WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional school-medical dental

  1. Developing professionalism: dental students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, Abid; Ahmad, Amina

    2014-12-01

    To explore the undergraduate dental students' insight of their professionalism development through Focus Group Discussions (FGD). Constructivist approach using qualitative phenomenological design. Fatima Memorial Hospital, College of Dentistry, Lahore, from April to June 2011. Four FGDs of 1st year (8 students), 2nd year (6 students), 3rd year (6 students) and 4th year (6 students) enrolled in Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) program were conducted to explore how they have developed various elements of professionalism namely altruism, accountability, excellence, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for all; and how professionalism can be further developed in them. The FGDs were audio taped, transcribed and analyzed through thematic analysis. Triangulation of themes and trends were done through content analysis by relating to their respective frequency of quotes. Data verification was done through audit by second author. Role models and social responsibility were the main reasons in the students' professionalism development thus far with personal virtues and reasons; religion; and punishment and reward contributing to a lesser degree. Training contributed least but was deemed most in furthering professionalism. Excessive workload (quota) and uncongenial educational environment were considered detrimental to the cause. Formal planning and implementation of professionalism curriculum; selection of students with appropriate attributes; control of hidden curriculum, including effective role models, good educational and working environments will foster professionalism among dental students maximally.

  2. Fad diets: facts for dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie

    2008-01-01

    The author examined fad diet practices associated with oral health status and the role of the dental practitioner in addressing relevant issues. The author reviewed the literature regarding overweight and obesity in the United States to interpret issues that might arise in reviewing fad diet practices among dental patients. The author provides suggestions for assisting patients in choosing dietary and lifestyle behaviors that are based on current public health evidence in support of achieving and maintaining a healthy body weight. Dental professionals are well-positioned to guide patients toward dietary choices that support dental health and the attainment of a healthy weight associated with a decreased risk of developing chronic diseases.

  3. Preparing for the dental team: investigating the views of dental and dental care professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, Susan; Marley, John; Stevenson, Mike; Milner, Sharon

    2008-02-01

    There is growing evidence to support the contention that interprofessional education (IPE) at both pre and post-qualification levels will improve professionals' abilities to work more effectively in a team and to communicate more effectively with colleagues and patients. This body of evidence, however, is primarily concerned with nursing, medical and associated professionals and students, and there are few studies that include dental students and particularly where learning occurs with the dental care professions (DCP). The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of dental and DCP students to IPE and to highlight some of the barriers to developing programmes for these students. It was also intended to examine the students' awareness of dental and DCP roles and responsibilities. Two questionnaires, the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and a dental roles and responsibilities questionnaire, were distributed to all 5 years of dental students (n = 189) based at Queen's University Belfast (QUB), both years of the dental hygiene students (n = 8) also based at QUB, as well as to final year dental nursing students based at Belfast Institute of Further and Higher Education (BIFHE) (n = 64). The results indicated that dental and DCP students had a positive attitude to IPE as a means to improve teamwork and communication skills but there are potential obstacles as demonstrated by the differing perceptions of each of the three groups about the roles of the other. Some aspects of practice, involving personal care and advice to patients, were regarded by all groups as a shared role but the dental hygiene students regarded themselves as having a shared role in several tasks identified by dental and dental nurse students as the sole role of the dentist. Dental hygiene students in this study did not see their role as primarily to support the dentist but more as a partner in care. Professional identity and its development are issues that must be

  4. Human trafficking and the dental professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Michael G

    2012-05-01

    "Human trafficking" is a term for a modern form of slavery. It is a criminal human rights violation and a significant health issue. Dental professionals can assist in recognizing victims of trafficking. The author conducted a PubMed search of the English-language literature through May 2011, which yielded no articles meeting the search criteria "dentistry" and "human trafficking prostitution." Given these results, the author reviewed articles published in medical journals, reports from both governmental and nongovernmental agencies and lay literature. The author examines the present state of human trafficking and provides information--including specific questions to ask--to help dentists identify victims. In addition, the author suggests means of notifying authorities and assisting trafficking victims. He also examines the health care needs of these patients. Human trafficking is a global problem, with thousands of victims in the United States, including many women and children. Dentists have a responsibility to act for the benefit of others, which includes detecting signs of abuse and neglect. Dental professionals are on the front lines with respect to encountering and identifying potential victims who seek dental treatment. Dentists can combat human trafficking by becoming informed and by maintaining vigilance in their practices.

  5. Exploring Current and Future Roles of Non-Dental Professionals: Implications for Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Hannah L; Farrell, Christine; Gwozdek, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The health care system is undergoing transformation in which oral health is not only valued as an aspect of overall health, but health care delivery systems are aligning to better deliver total patient care. As a result of this transformation, education for many non-dental professionals incorporates oral health content to prepare them to practice in comprehensive delivery models. While some non-dental professionals already incorporate oral health care in their service, many opportunities exist for expansion of oral health care delivery by other non-dental professionals, including radiologic technicians, nursing staff, and human services professionals. As non-dental professionals take on expanded roles in oral health care, the dental hygiene workforce must be prepared to practice in settings with new types of professionals. Dental hygiene curricula should prioritize interprofessional education to best prepare these students for practice in evolved delivery models. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  6. Attitudes towards infection control among dental health care professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Rimkuvienė, Jūratė

    2011-01-01

    The oral flora is one of the most ecologically diverse microbial populiations known to man. It has been proved that any dental intervention: dental preparation, professional oral hygiene, extraction of teeth, regular prophylactic examination of patient‘s mouth is related with a possible spread of infection. Therefore, one of the most important tasks for the dental care professionals is to prevent the spread of infection and create safe environment for a patient, the dentist himself and other ...

  7. Hand hygiene amongst dental professionals in a tertiary dental clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate hand washing attitude and practices among Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in a Nigerian Tertiary Dental Clinic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in University of Benin Teaching Hospital was conducted between February ...

  8. Exposures of Dental Professionals to Elemental Mercury and Methylmercury

    OpenAIRE

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Chou, Hwai-Nan; Gruninger, Stephen E.; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure, a worldwide public health concern, predominantly takes two forms – methylmercury from fish consumption and elemental Hg from dental amalgam restorations. We recruited 630 dental professionals from an American Dental Association meeting to assess Hg body burden and primary sources of exposure in a dually-exposed population. Participants described occupational practices and fish consumption patterns via questionnaire. Mercury levels in biomarkers of elemental Hg (urine) a...

  9. Does Smoking Hamper Oral Self-Care Among Dental Professionals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Smoking may impact oral self-care (OSC.  This study aimed to analyze the role of smoking in OSC among Iranian dental health professionals.Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional data were collected at two annual dental meetings and seven randomly selected dental schools in Iran. A total of 1,459 respond- ents composed of 967 general dental practitioners (GDPs, 229 dental educators (DE, and 263 senior dental students (DS anonymously completed a self-administered ques- tionnaire inquiring about smoking status and OSC.Results: Thirty percent of the men and 12% of women reported smoking with no dif-ference according to their professional status. Women reported better OSC than did men, but only 26% of the women and 17% of the men followed the three most important recommendations for OSC. Smoking was associated with infrequent tooth brushing and flossing, irregular use of fluoride containing toothpaste, consumption of sugary snacks, and weak adherence to the recommended OSC guidelines.Conclusion: Dental health education should place more emphasis on smoking counsel-ing and cessation among dental health professionals.

  10. Innovation and the Professionalization Process: An Analysis of Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Larry A.; Branch, Roger G.

    One of the results of almost 2 decades of research and theoretical development in the area of professional socialization has been the focusing of interest on the evaluation of interpersonal influences upon students in professional schools. Based on data from the first 2 years of a 6-year longitudinal study of students at a new dental school, this…

  11. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  12. Dental Environmental Noise Evaluation and Health Risk Model Construction to Dental Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kuen Wai; Wong, Hai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2017-09-19

    Occupational noise is unavoidably produced from dental equipment, building facilities, and human voices in the dental environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise exposure on the dental professionals' health condition. The psychoacoustics approach noise exposure assessment followed by the health risk assessment was carried on at the paediatric dentistry clinic and the dental laboratory in the Prince Philip Dental Hospital of Hong Kong. The A-weighted equivalent sound level, total loudness, and sharpness values were statistically significantly higher for the noise at the laboratory than that at the clinic. The degree of perceived influences and sharpness of noise were found to have the impacts on the dental professionals' working performance and health. Moreover, the risk of having a bad hearing state would a have 26% and 31% higher chance for a unit increment of the short-term and long-term impact scores, respectively. The dental professionals with the service length more than 10 years and the daily working hours of more than eight showed the highest risk to their hearing state. The worse the hearing state was, the worse the health state was found for the dental professionals. Also, the risk of dissatisfaction would be increased by 4.41 and 1.22 times for those who worked at the laboratory and a unit increment of the long-term impact score. The constructed health risk mode with the scientific and statistical evidence is hence important for the future noise management of environmental improvement.

  13. Occupational violence against dental professionals in southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Ezeja, E B; Ehikhamenor, E E

    2011-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of workplace violence in Oral healthcare centres against Nigerian dental professionals. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 175 randomly selected dental professionals working in Oral healthcare centres of University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria was conducted. The survey response rate was 78.9%. The respondents were dentists (58.0%), dental nurses (18.1%), dental technologists (12.3%), dental therapists (8.0%) and dental record officers (3.6%). The prevalence of violence in Nigerian Oral healthcare centres was 31.9%. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of violence against dentist and dental auxiliaries. Violence was often associated with long waiting time (27.3%), cancellation of appointment (13.6%), outcome of patient's treatment (11.4%), alcohol intoxication (9.1%), psychiatric patient (6.8%,) patient's bill (4.5%) and others (27.3%). Non-physical violence in form of loud shouting (50.0%) threat (22.7%), sexual harassment (6.8%) and swearing (2.3%) constituted the majority while physical violence in form of bullying and hitting constituted the remaining 18.2%. The main perpetrators of the violence were patients (54.5%) and patient's relatives/friends (18.2%). The expressed impact of violence among the respondents include fear (18.2%), impaired job performance (15.9%), psychological problems (13.6%) and off duty (9.1%). No impact was declared by 43.2% of respondents. The prevalence of workplace violence in Oral healthcare centres against dental professionals in Southern Nigeria was significant and had a substantial effect on dental professionals' well-being thus necessitating urgent attention.

  14. Protocol for diagnostic test accuracy study: the efficacy of screening for common dental diseases by Dental Care Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard; Walsh, Tanya; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen; Tickle, Martin; Ashley, James; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background The bulk of service delivery in dentistry is delivered by general dental practitioners, when a large proportion of patients who attend regularly are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. This represents a substantial and unnecessary cost, given that it is possible to delegate a range of tasks to dental care professionals, who are a less expensive resource. Screening for the common dental diseases by dental care professionals has the potential to release general dental practiti...

  15. Assessing professionalism within dental education; the need for a definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra-Shaw, S; Robinson, P G; Roberts, T

    2012-02-01

    Professionalism is a broad competency needed by dentists to act effectively and efficiently and is seen as a central part of both undergraduate and postgraduate curricula. Assessment is vital in education to assess progress and direct future learning. It is also an essential part of good professional regulation, which depends upon high quality assessment to maintain credibility. Educators must produce clear expectations that students can strive for. Thus dental educators are required to understand precisely what is meant by "professionalism" in relation to dentistry in order to both teach and assess it. The aim of this paper is to explain the importance of professionalism, explore its features and its assessment as described in the literature. The paper concludes that without a validated definition of this construct, assessment of professionalism within dental education will be compromised. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    The burden of oral disease is high in populations across the world. This is because of high consumption of free sugars. The WHO Guideline on Sugars Intake for Adults and Children recommended limiting free sugars to no more than 5% energy intake to protect oral health throughout the life-course. The objectives of this paper are to consider the implications of the Guideline for dental health practice and to advocate use of the common risk factor approach when providing dietary advice. As part of a broad range of actions needed to reduce free sugars intake, improved education for dental health professionals and supporting patients to eat less free sugars are key actions for the dental profession. All dental health professionals should have the skills and confidence to provide their patients with healthier eating advice, including how to limit free sugars intake. It is therefore important that dental health professionals receive adequate education in diet and nutrition, and there is a need for dental educational regulating bodies to define the content of the dental curriculum with respect to nutrition. All patients, or their parents or carers, should receive dietary advice to reduce free sugars within the context of a healthy diet for the prevention of all NCDs. Dietary advice should: (i) focus on reducing the amount of free sugars consumed; (ii) be tailored according to the patient's body mass status (eg underweight, overweight, normal weight); (iii) encourage the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, and wholegrain starch-rich foods; (iv) discourage the consumption of foods high in saturated fat and salt; and (v) discourage the consumption of all drinks containing free sugars. The dental health professional has an opportunity to support patients to reduce their intake of free sugars-such advice and support will have positive impacts beyond the mouth. © 2017 The World Health Organization.

  17. The servant leader: a higher calling for dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certosimo, Fred

    2009-09-01

    The dental profession is guided by normative principles that provide guidance to our leaders and practicing dentists in addressing the needs of patients and the profession, yet there is room for incorporating new ideas that help dental professionals meet their professional obligations. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the concept of "servant leadership," especially in contrast with "self-serving leaders," and to suggest that servant leadership is consistent with the high ethical and professional ideals of the dental profession. The servant leader is the antithesis of the self-serving leader, who incessantly seeks more power and acquisition of material possessions. The servant leader's highest priority is the people (patients/students/customers) he or she serves. The concept of the servant-leader can take us away from self-serving, top-down leadership and encourage us to think harder about how to respect, value, and motivate people and ultimately provide better service to our patients.

  18. Colour discrimination of dental professionals and colour deficient laypersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak-Guberina, Renata; Celebic, Asja; Powers, John M; Paravina, Rade D

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare results of non-dental (conventional) and dental colour discrimination tests (customized, shade guide test), to evaluate influence of profession, gender and age of colour normal dentists and laboratory technicians on colour discrimination results and to evaluate results of colour deficient laypersons. A total of 36 colour normal dental professionals, all volunteers were divided into two groups consisting of 18 participants each: dentists (DDS) and laboratory technicians (CDT). In addition, a group 15 colour deficient males also volunteered (CDP). Colour discrimination was examined using Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test and total error scores (TES) were calculated. Participants performed a dentistry related colour discrimination test by matching 26 pairs of shade tabs. Shade guide scores (3DS) were calculated. These tests were performed under the controlled conditions of a viewing booth. Mean values and standard deviations were determined. ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) were used for result analysis. TES and 3DS were correlated for colour normal observers, r = 0.47 (p colour deficient laypersons. Based on TES, 33% of colour deficient laypersons had average discrimination, whilst 67% had low discrimination. Within the limitation of this study, it was concluded that results of non-dental and dental colour discrimination tests were correlated, and that profession (DDS/CDT), gender and age gender did not influence colour discrimination of colour normal participants. Although colour and appearance of dental restorations are of paramount importance for the aesthetic outcome, colour vision of dental professionals is not routinely tested. This paper validates and recommends the usage of dental shade guides for a simple, affordable and understandable testing of colour vision, either as a sole test or complementing conventional (professional) tests. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Personality as a predictor of professional behavior in dental school: comparisons with dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, T C; Catano, V M; Cunningham, D P

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of personality measures to predict the success of dental students (N = 87) in clinical and academic courses and to compare their personality profiles to those of dental practitioners (N = 130). A second purpose of the study was to develop a new criterion measure, the Student Professionalism Scale, based on competencies previously identified as necessary for professional success. The Canadian Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) predicted first-year, preclinical academic success; the DAT Reading Comprehension component predicted third-year clinical performance; and Perceptual Ability, the ability to deal with two- and three-dimensional objects, predicted student professionalism. Results from the personality measure indicated that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism, and to a lesser extent Agreeableness, were significant predictors of both first-year academic performance and professional behavior. In comparing the personality profiles of dental students to dental practitioners, students who were more similar to the dentists did better in their first year of coursework. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of the dental admissions process.

  20. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Dental Professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the data. One way ANOVA and Chi-square tests were performed to assess whether the knowledge and attitude varies according to socio-demographic characteristics or to each other and to .... Disagree N (%). I think teledentistry can violate the patient's privacy. .... In Rwanda there is a big number of dental professionals.

  1. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage... designated as primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as... seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care, podiatric...

  2. Evaluation of an assessment system for professionalism amongst dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra-Shaw, S; Roberts, T; Robinson, P G

    2017-11-01

    Dental professionalism is an essential requirement to practice dentistry that covers both abilities and personal qualities. Therefore, a programme of assessment that promotes personal and professional development throughout the undergraduate dental education course is needed. This study aimed to develop and validate a system to assess dental students' professionalism based on a previously developed conceptual framework. Using the framework, an assessment programme was designed to encourage students to reflect on and explain their observed behaviours with appropriate feedback. The programme was panel-tested and then administered to a cohort of senior dental students. Internal reliability criterion validity and construct validity were evaluated quantitatively, whilst the usefulness of the programme was evaluated qualitatively. Mean of student, staff and agreed grades was similar, and there were no floor or ceiling effects. All item-total correlations were >0.6 and Cronbach's alpha = 0.95 indicating acceptable internal reliability. All items correlated significantly with global ratings indicating good criterion validity. All hypothesized correlations were significant, and grades were not related to age or gender. Qualitative data produced three themes: assessment process, educational value and suggestions for improvement. The assessment programme has good internal reliability and validity and suggests that basing an assessment system around the explicit theoretical model is a valuable educational tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2018-01-01

    health professionals receive adequate education in diet and nutrition, and there is a need for dental educational regulating bodies to define the content of the dental curriculum with respect to nutrition. All patients, or their parents or carers, should receive dietary advice to reduce free sugars...... within the context of a healthy diet for the prevention of all NCDs. Dietary advice should: (i) focus on reducing the amount of free sugars consumed; (ii) be tailored according to the patient's body mass status (eg underweight, overweight, normal weight); (iii) encourage the consumption of fresh fruits...

  4. Protocol for diagnostic test accuracy study: the efficacy of screening for common dental diseases by dental care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, Richard; Walsh, Tanya; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen; Tickle, Martin; Ashley, James; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2013-09-21

    The bulk of service delivery in dentistry is delivered by general dental practitioners, when a large proportion of patients who attend regularly are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. This represents a substantial and unnecessary cost, given that it is possible to delegate a range of tasks to dental care professionals, who are a less expensive resource. Screening for the common dental diseases by dental care professionals has the potential to release general dental practitioner's time and increase the capacity to care for those who don't currently access services. The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic test accuracy of dental care professionals when screening for dental caries and periodontal disease in asymptomatic adults aged eighteen years of age. Ten dental practices across the North-West of England will take part in a diagnostic test accuracy study with 200 consecutive patients in each practice. The dental care professionals will act as the index test and the general dental practitioner will act as the reference test. Consenting asymptomatic patients will enter the study and see either the dental care professionals or general dental practitioner first to remove order effects. Both sets of clinicians will make an assessment of dental caries and periodontal disease and enter their decisions on a record sheet for each participant. The primary outcome measure is the diagnostic test accuracy of the dental care professionals and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values will be reported. A number of clinical factors will be assessed for confounding. The results of this study will determine whether dental care professionals can screen for the two most prevalent oral diseases. This will inform the literature and is apposite given the recent policy change in the United Kingdom towards direct access.

  5. Professional storytelling in clinical dental anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class, consisting of 12 questions that students had to answer on a Likert scale of 1-5. An overall satisfaction score was obtained and we used a linear mixed model to compare differences in satisfaction between the two groups, with "group" as the fixed effect. We also conducted an exploratory factor analysis of the responses to investigate whether there were distinct constructs within the data. Overall satisfaction is high, with students "with stories" having higher satisfaction than those "without stories." The former group consistently gives higher satisfaction scores, regardless of which question is being asked. Factor analysis provides evidence that storytelling nurtures reflective learning, while students work on their clinical anatomy problems.

  6. Professional and personal enhancement: a pragmatic approach in dental education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandaswamy Deivanayagam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Students of health education are often offended by the transitions and challenges they face while encountering diverse people, ideas and academic workloads. They may be offended because of reasons not only related to their societal background but also to their basic competence in managing transitions. In the Asian scenario, students enter the first year of professional education in their late teen age along with the definition of self which was created by their parents. There are different issues that arise in this age group that may positively shape or negatively affect the personalities of students. They need to achieve a sense of balance between personal and professional traits on their own. Several students are often unable to cultivate the expected required qualities, which leads to an abject state of mind and hinder their progress. We identified the most common personal and professional hurdles in the lives of dental students and we provided experiential solutions to overcome the hurdles by using a sociable approach through an integrated, continuing education program. Methods: Designing and implementing a cohesive, amalgamated and inspiring personal and professional enhancement action program for dental students. Results: Feedback from students reflected that the needs and expectations of students vary with academic phase. In addition students expressed that this program series inculcated some positive skills, and overall, they are satisfied with the utility of the program. Conclusion: Personal and professional enhancement of students in accordance with individual needs as well as with expected requirements needs a committed administrative action plan. Our results in this context are encouraging and can be considered for application in dental institutions.

  7. Dental hygienists' perceptions of professionalism are multidimensional and context-dependent: a qualitative study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Yukiko; Imafuku, Rintaro; Takemoto, Toshinobu; Waki, Tadayuki; Obayashi, Taiji; Ogawa, Tetsuji

    2017-12-29

    Due to the declining birth rate and aging of Japanese society, the roles and responsibilities of dental hygienists are continuously expanding. Medical professionalism needs to be pursued continuously throughout one's career in order to improve dental care and treatment. Although conceptualising professionalism is essential to the education of health professionals, professionalism in the field of dental hygiene has not been defined or adequately examined in Japan. The purposes of this study are to investigate dental hygienists' perceptions of the constituent elements of professionalism and the factors affecting their perceptions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 dental hygienists in Japan. Drawing on the conceptualisation of professionalism in medicine described by Van de Camp et al., the transcribed data were thematically analysed. The dental hygienists in this study perceived 70 constituent elements that were categorised into eight core competencies related to professionalism. These competencies were further classified into three main themes: intrapersonal, interpersonal, and public professionalism. There were three sociohistorical factors that affected their perceptions of the constituent elements, namely academic background (university or technical school), the contexts of any previously provided dental care (university hospital or dental clinic), and their social interactions with their colleagues during their engagement in dental practice (dental team or interprofessional team). Moreover, according to their sociohistorical backgrounds, the dental hygienists saw themselves variously as scholars (university graduates), facilitators (university hospital), skillful artisans (dental clinic), or collaborators (interprofessional team). Dental hygienists' perceptions of professionalism are multidimensional and context-dependent, so culture- and professional-specific elements need to be included in educational curricula and continuing professional

  8. Stem cells in dentistry: A study regarding awareness of stem cells among dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitroda, Parita K; Katti, Girish; Attar, Nikhat M; Shahbaz, Syed; Sreenivasarao, G; Patil, Ambika

    2017-01-01

    Dental stem cell, a type of adult stem cell, exhibits multipotent differentiation capacity and is drawing worldwide attention because of its numerous applications. The advances in applications of dental stem cells seem to be unsurpassed in the near future, for which specialized skills and knowledge in this arena are of prime significance. Hence, there is a need to acquire more knowledge about dental stem cells to obtain maximum benefits from it in the coming years. Dental stem cells in India are still at the budding stage, and there seems to be limited awareness regarding dental stem cells. This study aimed to assess the awareness of stem cells among the dental professionals. The present study was a questionnaire-based study of dental professionals (MDS, BDS, postgraduates, and interns) of three different institutions. Results showed that 95.2% of dental professionals are aware of the terminology dental stem cells and 53.9% of them are aware of various applications of dental stem cells. Chi-square test showed a significant correlation between the sources of information, source of dental stem cells, and clinical applications in relation to the academic qualification of the dental professionals. This study revealed a good level of awareness among the dental professionals, and it also showed the need to spread more knowledge about the advances in applications, storage, banking, and guidelines related to dental stem cells.

  9. Electronic textbooks as a professional resource after dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael L; Strother, Elizabeth A; Brunet, Darlene P; Gallo, John R

    2012-05-01

    In two previous studies of dental students' attitudes about the VitalSource Bookshelf, a digital library of dental textbooks, students expressed negative opinions about owning and reading electronic textbooks. With the assumption that dentists would find the digital textbooks useful for patient care, the authors surveyed recent graduates to determine if their attitude toward the VitalSource Bookshelf had changed. A brief survey was sent to 119 alumni from the classes of 2009 and 2010 of one U.S. dental school. Forty-seven (39.5 percent) completed the questionnaire. Eighteen respondents (48.3 percent) reported using the e-textbooks often or sometimes. The twenty-nine dentists who said they have not used the collection since graduation reported preferring print books or other online sources or having technical problems when downloading the books to a new computer. Only five respondents selected the VitalSource Bookshelf as a preferred source of professional information. Most of the respondents reported preferring to consult colleagues (37.8 percent), the Internet (20 percent), or hardcopy books (17.8 percent) for information. When asked in an open-ended question to state their opinion of the Bookshelf, nineteen (42.2 percent) responded positively, but almost one-third of these only liked the search feature. Six respondents reported that they never use the program. Twenty-two said they have had technical problems with the Bookshelf, including fifteen who have not been able to install it on a new computer. Many of them said they have not followed up with either the dental school or VitalSource support services to overcome this problem. Our study suggests that dentists, similar to dental students, dislike reading electronic textbooks, even with the advantage of searching a topic across more than sixty dental titles.

  10. Oral hygiene practices and habits among dental professionals in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives : The present study was carried out to assess the oral hygiene practices and habits among practicing general dentists. Materials and Methods : The study was carried out in four dental schools with the help of a self administered questionnaire. The questionnaire covered dentists′ oral self care, smoking habits, professional reading and oral health concepts. A total of 700 dentists responded, of which 457 were males. Recommended oral self care (ROSC included tooth brushing one per day, eating sugary snacks daily or rarely and regularly using fluoride tooth paste. Results : The data obtained was then subjected to statistical analyses and evaluated using chi-square tests and logistic regressions.It was found that 55.9% of all respondents brushed twice a day, 59.4% consumed sugar containing snacks less than once daily and 55.1% of them used fluoride containing paste regularly while brushing. 81.1% of the 700 dentists never used tobacco products. In all, 19.6% 0f the practicing general dentists followed recommended oral self care. Conclusion : From the present study, it can be concluded that only 19.6% of south Indian dentists follow recommended oral self care and hence awareness programs and continuous dental education programs among dentists is essential to improve the present scenario and to increase the number of dental professionals following ROSC.

  11. Exposures of dental professionals to elemental mercury and methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Chou, Hwai-Nan; Gruninger, Stephen E; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure, a worldwide public health concern, predominantly takes two forms--methylmercury from fish consumption and elemental Hg from dental amalgam restorations. We recruited 630 dental professionals from an American Dental Association meeting to assess Hg body burden and primary sources of exposure in a dually exposed population. Participants described occupational practices and fish consumption patterns via questionnaire. Hg levels in biomarkers of elemental Hg (urine) and methylmercury (hair and blood) were measured with a Direct Mercury Analyzer-80 and were higher than the general US population. Geometric means (95% CI) were 1.28 (1.19-1.37) μg/l in urine, 0.60 (0.54-0.67) μg/g in hair and 3.67 (3.38-3.98) μg/l in blood. In multivariable linear regression, personal amalgams predicted urine Hg levels along with total years in dentistry, amalgams handled, working hours and sex. Fish consumption patterns predicted hair and blood Hg levels, which were higher among Asians compared with Caucasians. Five species contributed the majority of the estimated Hg intake from fish--swordfish, fresh tuna, white canned tuna, whitefish and king mackerel. When studying populations with occupational exposure to Hg, it is important to assess environmental exposures to both elemental Hg and methylmercury as these constitute a large proportion of total exposure.

  12. 77 FR 38838 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care... primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 1.... Criteria then were defined for each of seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental...

  13. Social media use, attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of online professionalism amongst dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Philip; Johnson, Ilona Gail

    2016-01-01

    Use of social media has increased amongst health professionals. This has benefits for patient care but also introduces risks for confidentiality and professional fitness to practise. This study aimed to examine dental student attitudes towards professional behaviour on social media. The secondary aim was to establish the extent and nature of social media use and exposure to potentially unprofessional behaviours.\\ud \\ud A cross-sectional study was carried out in one dental school. Data were co...

  14. Dental students' motivations and perceptions of dental professional career in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Amit; Mehta, Sonia; Gupta, Deepak; Sheikh, Soheyl; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Singh, Ravinder; Singla, Isha

    2012-11-01

    Students' motivations in choosing a career in the health professions are of great interest for educators and admission committees, particularly in the field of dentistry. This study conducted in four private dental institutions in India was designed to investigate dental students' motivations in their choice of dentistry as a career and their perceptions regarding dentistry in India. A total of 400 questionnaires were distributed, and 369 students responded in a combination of selected responses to the questions, for a response rate of 92.3 percent. In the results, 53.7 percent of the students reported pursuing dentistry because it offers stable work (pstudents pursued dentistry because they can determine their own hours of work and 36.6 percent said they liked to be their own boss. Among these students, 64.5 percent said they were content to be joining dentistry as a professional course, but 35.5 percent were discontented (pchoice followed by orthodontics. Only 11.7 percent reported wanting to pursue dentistry for research purposes. Overall, this study found that financial and professional factors were the chief criteria for students' pursuing dentistry in India; however, the strongest influence in the choice of dentistry was the students' parents or family.

  15. Child maltreatment - prevalence and characteristics of mandatory reports from dental professionals to the social services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Therese; Cocozza, Madeleine; Annerbäck, Eva-Maria; Dahllöf, Göran

    2017-01-01

    Dental professionals are required to report suspicions of child maltreatment to the social services. As yet, no studies assess the prevalence of these mandated reports from dental care services or their content. This study investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mandated reports from dental professionals to the social services. Furthermore, it analyses associations between dental professionals reporting suspicions of maltreatment with such reports from other sources. The study collected dental mandatory reports from within one municipality of Sweden during 2008-2014. The material consisted of a total of 147 reports by dental professionals regarding 111 children. The total prevalence of reports from dental care services to the social services was 1.5 per 1000 children with a significant increase between 2008 and 2011 (P social services. Reports to the social services from dental care services on suspicions of child maltreatment concern parental deficiencies (failure to attend appointments) and neglect (dental neglect). Mandated reports from dental care services often co-occur with other mandated reports. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Relationship between professional dental care in childhood and coronary heart disease in adulthood in a single urban dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shameer; Burke, Timothy; Weiss, Michael; Trapp, Taylor; Neri, Lori; Matsumura, Martin E

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and dental diseases, particularly periodontitis (PD). The present study was designed to assess the relationship between childhood dental care and adult CHD in a single community dental clinic. Consecutive patients (n = 223) at a single urban U.S. dental clinic were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the details of their childhood and present dental care as well as CHD and PD diagnoses. A significantly greater proportion of patients who reported a lack of prophylactic dental care in childhood also reported a present diagnosis of CHD (54.2% vs 23.6%, P history, age and sex, the relationship between dental care in childhood and reduced CHD remained significant (OR = 0.318, 95% CI = 0.159-0.635, P = 0.001). This association cannot be explained wholly by a mechanism involving the development of PD in patients with poor childhood dental care, as PD was not significantly associated with CHD in the multivariate model (OR = 1.646, 95% CI = 0.836-3.239, P = 0.149). In our single dental clinic assessment, adequate childhood professional dental prophylactic care was associated with reduced CHD in adulthood, an association independent of traditional risk factors. Further studies are required to better define the magnitude of this association.

  17. Awareness of medico-legal issues among medical and dental college health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Senthilkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modem medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. The fundamental values of medicine insist that the doctors should be aware about the various medico-legal issues which help in proper recording of medical management details. Aim: To evaluate the knowledge on Medico-legal Issues among Medical and Dental College Health Professionals of Meenakshi University (MAHER, Tamilnadu. Materials & Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among health professionals of Meenakshi University (MAHER, Tamilnadu. A total o f320 health professionals (163 medical and 157 dental participated in the study. A structured, closed ended, self-administered questionnaire was used for collection of data. Chi-square test was used to compare the awareness of medico-legal issues between medical and dental health professionals. Results: Among the 320 health professionals, 87.4% of medical and 76.1% of dental professionals were aware about the informed consent, 18.8% of medical and 5.7% of dental professionals had awareness about COPRA and only 14.3% of medical and 7.6% of dental professionals had awareness regarding the Medico-legal programs/courses. Conclusions: The results illustrated that the participants had little awareness on medico-legal issues. Hence there is an urgent need to update the understanding of these issues to be on a legally safer side.

  18. Professional ethics and cynicism amongst Dutch dental students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, W.G.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Welie, J.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some 40 years ago, Morris and Sherlock concluded that dental students are very cynical about their future profession, and indeed become more cynical as they progress through dental school. Later studies continued to report cynicism among dental students, but some studies did not confirm

  19. Loss of idealism or realistic optimism? A cross-sectional analysis of dental hygiene students' and registered dental hygienists' professional identity perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champine, J M; Inglehart, M R; Furgeson, D; Halaris, J F; Fitzgerald, M; Danciu, T E; Kinney, J S

    2018-02-01

    The dental hygiene profession in the U.S. is in the process of establishing a direct access model of care and contributing to the creation of the profession of a dental therapist. The objectives were to analyse the professional role perceptions of dental hygiene students and registered dental hygienists in these times of change. Specifically, it was explored whether dental hygiene students' current professional identities differ (i) from their expected future identities, and (ii) from dental hygienists' current and (iii) past identities. Survey data were collected from 215 dental hygiene students concerning their present and future role perceptions, and from 352 registered dental hygienists concerning their present and past professional identity perceptions. Students' future professional identity perceptions were even more positive than their very positive current perceptions of their professional role components. Students' current perceptions of professional pride, professional ambition, work ethic and patient relations were more positive than dental hygienists' current perceptions of these professional role components. A comparison of students' current perceptions with dental hygienists' current and retrospective descriptions showed that students were more positive than dental hygienists in each case. The fact that dental hygienists had less positive role perceptions than dental hygiene students might lead to the conclusion that a loss of idealism occurs over the course of a professional lifespan. However, dental hygienists actually improved their role perceptions over time and students' future descriptions were more positive than their current descriptions, supporting the interpretation that realistic optimism dominates professional role perceptions in these times of change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhic, Edin; Plancak, Darije; Lajnert, Vlatka; Muhic, Asja

    2016-09-01

    Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  1. Comparison of dental education and professional development between mainland China and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Y; Zhang, Z Y; Jiang, X Q; Guo, L

    2010-05-01

    Different educational and professional developments within the dental field create different sets of missions, norms, and practices regarding dental diseases and their appropriate treatment. This review has addressed differences in dental education and professional development between mainland China and North America. Many factors influence the choice of model and it is very difficult to predict which model will become predominant. However, there is growing sentiment that the independent faculty model in North America is logical and superior to the model, which 'integrates' dental and medical education in mainland China. Many North America dental schools place a high priority on preclinical and clinical training in the curriculum in order to expose students to patient oral health needs and systemic dental problems much earlier than in mainland China. North America dental schools promote and embrace students self-learning skills by the use of PBL, CRL, and TRAD education methodologies and new e-based technologies and approaches whereby students learn rather than are taught. In mainland China, the traditional lecture-based format is still employed in the majority of dental schools; however, strategies to enhance students self-learning skills is increasingly utilised in most well-known Chinese dental schools. The Chinese dental education model, which treats dentistry as a sub-specialty of medicine, has brought about fundamental differences, with the dentist functioning essentially as a stomatologist. For example, China has built up a large oral and maxillofacial surgery society, and craniofacial surgery is performed to a much broader extent by Chinese dentists than by most North American counterparts. In North America, dentists engage in full-time work, attend continuing training/education programmes, belong to an association, gain legal status, and construct a code of ethics emphasising the quality of care delivered to the public. Currently, continuing dental

  2. WHAT ARE CANADIAN DENTAL PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS TAUGHT ABOUT INFANT, TODDLER AND PRENATAL ORAL HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Robert J; Quiñonez, Rocio B; Yaffe, Aaron B; Bertone, Mary F; Hardwick, Felicity K; Harrison, Rosamund L

    2015-01-01

    Establishing dental homes for children at an early age is an important step toward instilling good oral health practices and changing trajectories of oral health. The purpose of this study was to determine how accredited dental and dental hygiene programs in Canada prepare students in the areas of infant, toddler and prenatal oral health. An electronic questionnaire was sent to associate deans (academic), program directors or curriculum directors of accredited dental (n = 10) and dental hygiene (n = 39) programs. Participants were asked about infant, toddler and prenatal oral health curricula taught at their institution. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were used to assess the results. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Representatives of 10 dental (100%) and 25 dental hygiene (64.1%) programs responded. All dental and 56% of dental hygiene programs recommend a first visit by 12 months. Infant and toddler oral health was noted as a component of most schools' curriculum. Barriers to teaching about or providing clinical experiences in infant and toddler oral health include lack of time, patients, program resources and finances. Most dental (70%) and dental hygiene (82.6%) programs include prenatal oral health as a component of their curriculum, yet only 40% of responding dental and 70% of dental hygiene programs reported having designated time in their curriculum for it. Barriers preventing programs from teaching or providing clinical experiences regarding prenatal oral health include lack of time and patients. Many, but not all dental professional programs are teaching their students about the recommended age for a first dental visit. Better adherence to national guidelines will require programs to address current barriers impeding learning about this important topic and to provide creative opportunities for students regarding prenatal and infant and toddler oral health.

  3. Orientation of Dental Professionals in India towards Integrative Medicine: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan, Balasubramanian; Gayathri, Haritheertham; Garhnayak, Mirna; Naik, Eslavath Seena

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing demand on our health care system, including Dentistry, to shift from a bio-medical approach to Integrative model of care. The attitudes of health professionals towards Integrative Medicine (IM) are an important factor that influences this transition. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the orientation of the dental professionals in India towards the principles and practice of Integrative Medicine. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 286 dental faculty and postgraduate students from three dental schools in India. The participants voluntarily and anonymously completed the "Integrative Medicine-30' questionnaire, a 30 item self-report instrument that measures the health care provider's orientation towards Integrative Medicine in five subscales. Data analysis included summary statistics and intergroup comparisons by gender and professional status with independent samples Mann-Whitney U test. The overall orientation of the dental professionals towards IM was almost neutral. While the use of learning resources on Complementary and Alternative Medicine was lower, they showed a more positive orientation towards patient-centred care. Compared to postgraduate students of Dentistry, the dental faculty were more oriented towards IM (median score of 82 vs. 79.5, porientation (82 vs. 78, porientation of dental professionals in India towards the principles and practice of IM.

  4. [A preliminary study on shade matching ability of dental professionals with different background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guang-yu; Shan, Jun-ling; Kuang, Hai; Xu, Sheng; Luo, Li

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the difference of shade matching ability of dental professionals with different educational background using toothguide training box (TTB), and provide information for medical esthetics course in dental school. Sixty subjects including 20 dental students, 20 prosthodontics technical students and 20 prosthodontics technicians without color blindness were enrolled in this study. Each participant was asked to match 15 standard shade tabs which have been randomly chosen from Vita 3D-Master shade guide. SPSS 17.0 software package was used for data analysis. The scores of dental students, prosthodontics technical students and dental prosthodontics technicians were 834.04±51.66, 859.40±53.31and 888.36±48.54, respectively. There was no significant difference in the sum number of accurate shade matching compared between dental students and prosthodontics technical students (P>0.05), but there was significant difference between dental prosthodontics technicians, prosthodontics technical students (P<0.05), and dental students (P<0.01). The score of shade matching is significantly different among dental professionals with different background using TTB.

  5. Changes in the professional domain of Dutch dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; van Offenbeek, M.A.; Slot, D.E.; van der Schans, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  This study’s purpose was to compare the scope of practice of Dutch dental hygienists educated through a two- or three-year curriculum (‘old curriculum dental hygienists’ [OCDHs]) with that of hygienists educated through a new extended four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor’s degree

  6. Changes in the professional domain of Dutch dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; van Offenbeek, M. A. G.; Slot, D. E.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study's purpose was to compare the scope of practice of Dutch dental hygienists educated through a two- or three-year curriculum ('old curriculum dental hygienists' [OCDHs]) with that of hygienists educated through a new extended four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree

  7. Reasons for tooth mortality as perceived by dental professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that among the patients attending dental clinics and hospitals in Udaipur city, dental caries and periodontal disease was found to be the two major causes of tooth mortality. This is probably the first study to report on the trends in tooth loss in general practice in Udaipur ...

  8. Oral health in pregnancy: educational needs of dental professionals and office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Littell, Christopher T; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn

    2012-01-01

    Dental care during pregnancy is important for pregnant women and their children. Comprehensive guidelines for the provision of dental services for pregnant patients were published in 2006, but there is relatively little information about their use in actual practice. The aim of this study was to examine differences in knowledge and attitudes regarding dental care in pregnancy among dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and nonclinical office staff. A secondary aim was to identify sources of influence on attitudes and knowledge regarding the guidelines. A survey was used to collect information from 766 employees of a Dental Care Organization based in Oregon; responses from 546 were included in the analyses reported here. Statistically significant differences in knowledge were found among the professional-role groups. Dentists and hygienists consistently answered more items correctly than did other respondents. Within all professional-role groups, knowledge gaps existed and were most pronounced regarding provision of routine and emergency services. Positive perceptions of providing dental care during pregnancy were associated with higher knowledge scores (z = 4.16, P office personnel are needed to promote the diffusion of current evidence-based guidelines for dental care during pregnancy. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  9. Dental health professional recommendation and consumer habits in denture cleansing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, Alyson S; Varghese, Roshan; Bosma, MaryLynn; Kitson, Nicola; Bradshaw, David J

    2016-02-01

    Regular cleaning of dentures is essential to the oral and general health of denture wearers. Only limited systematic data are available on the recommendations that dental health care professionals (DHCPs) make to patients for denture cleaning. Data on denture wearers' cleaning regimens are also lacking. The purpose of this study was to provide data on recommendations that DHCPs make to patients for denture cleaning and on the cleaning regimens of denture wearers. DHCPs (n=613), including dentists and hygienists, were surveyed in developed (Japan, USA, Italy) and developing (Brazil, India) countries. A questionnaire assessing a range of denture cleaning recommendations was used. The questions addressed products, frequency, how to use remedies, the suggested dilution and duration of cleansing treatment, the location of dentures while cleaning, and the reasoning behind the recommendation of particular products or modes of treatment. Denture cleansing methods and the routine of denture wearers in developed and developing countries were also surveyed with a questionnaire (n=2862) and a 1-week diary (n=1462). An average of more than 2 treatments was recommended by DHCPs. Specialist denture cleanser tablets, "regular" toothpaste, mouthwash, soap and water, denture paste, foam or liquid denture cleanser, and dishwashing detergents were most commonly recommended; other product recommendations included baking soda, vinegar, salt water, and bleach. More than 10% of DHCPs made no primary recommendation on cleaning. Denture tablets were more commonly recommended in developed countries, whereas toothpaste was the most common recommendation in developing countries. Denture wearers used products and methods similar to those recommended by DHCPs. Toothpaste, water, and mouthwash were used more frequently than denture tablets. More than 75% of denture wearers reported using denture cleanser tablets for more than 5 minutes, whereas soap and toothpaste were typically used for less

  10. Insights into Ergonomics Among Dental Professionals of a Dental Institute and Private Practitioners in Hubli–Dharwad Twin Cities, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalghatgi, Shrivardhan; Prasad, Kakarla Veera Venkata; Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Deolia, Shravani; Chhabra, Chaya

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of ergonomics among dental professionals of Hubli–Dharwad twin cities, India. Methods Investigator-developed, self-administered, closed-ended questionnaire assessing knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding ergonomics during dental practice was filled in by undergraduates, house surgeons, postgraduates, and faculty members of dental institutions and private practitioners from Hubli–Dharwad twin cities. Results Data were collected from a total of 250 participants, 50 belonging to each academic group. Overall mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 52%, 75%, and 55%, respectively. Significant correlation was found for age with attitude (χ2 = 10.734, p = 0.030) and behavior (χ2 = 12.984, p = 0.011). Marital status was significantly associated with all the three domains; knowledge (χ2 = 29.369, p = 0.000), attitude (χ2 = 29.023, p = 0.000), and practices (χ2 = 13.648, p = 0.009). Conclusion Participants had considerable awareness and behavior toward ergonomics in dental practice. The high attitude score indicates stronger acceptance of ergonomics principles and guidelines during routine dental procedures. The current study highlights the situation of ergonomics in dental practice in the form of knowledge, attitude, and practices. PMID:25516809

  11. Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Hygiene of Dental Professionals and Laypersons - A Survey Performed in Lower Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöfler, Gerhild; Friedl, Katrin; Fresmann, Sylvia; Mausberg, Rainer F; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    The aim of this survey-based cross-sectional study was to analyse the oral health behaviour of dental professionals and persons without professional dental knowledge (layperson group) regarding the use and selection of tools for their personal dental hygiene. A total of 356 persons participated in the survey (dental professional group: 160; layperson group: 196). Information regarding dental hygiene habits, such as toothbrush use, toothbrushing habits, and the use of additional dental hygiene tools was determined using a standardised questionnaire. Data were analysed using the chi-squared and Wilcoxon tests, with significance set at p < 0.05. 93% of the dental professional group and 89% of layperson group used manual toothbrushes (p = 0.03). Power toothbrushes were used by 57% of those surveyed in the dental professional group and 37% of those in the layperson group (p < 0.01). In the dental professional group, the duration of toothbrushing was significantly longer and it was performed more often compared to layperson group (p < 0.001). The use of dental floss and interdental brushes in the layperson group (dental floss 38%, interdental brush 5%) was considerably lower than in the dental professional group (dental floss 84%, interdental brush 11%; p < 0.001). The results of the survey on oral health behaviour revealed significant differences between the groups. The acceptance of additional tools for personal dental hygiene was low, such as dental floss and interdental brushes. Given the great importance of these tools for biofilm control, they should be emphasised in motivational measures and instructions regarding oral care performed at home.

  12. Knowledge and Awareness of Teledentistry among Dental Professionals - A Cross Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boringi, Mamatha; Waghray, Shefali; Lavanya, Reddy; Babu, Dara Balaji Gandhi; Badam, Raj Kumar; Harsha, Niharika; Garlapati, Komali; Chavva, Sunanda

    2015-08-01

    The use of technology in the form of smart phones and other electronic media in day to day life has become an integral part of life today. Technology today is seeing a paradigm shift towards better inter-professional communications which can help doctors, patients and the masses as a whole. Putting these technological advancements to good use evolves as a major milestone in medicine/ dentistry in the form of telemedicine/teledentistry. The present study was aimed at knowing the knowledge and awareness of teledentistry among dental professionals of a dental college in India. The study was conducted in a dental college in India and was circulated among dental professionals. A questionnaire was prepared to assess the knowledge and awareness of teledentistry and was circulated among dental professionals in a dental college. The data thus collected was statistically analysed and results obtained. The data collected was statistically analysed using SPSS software. A total of 406 persons responded to the questionnaire. In the present study it was found that the knowledge and awareness about teledentistry was very low among post graduates (7.23%) and interns (9.38%) when compared to I & II BDS while most of them agreed that teledentistry is a practice of dentistry through various media options with limited application in dentistry without a legal issue. In the present study, it was apparent that most of the respondents were lacking adequate knowledge and awareness on teledentistry. Hence, there is an immense need to create awareness among dental professionals on teledentistry as the future lies in technological advancement. Tele dentistry can mark the beginning of a new era in dentistry. This can be achieved by conducting CDE programs and awareness campaigns/programs which helps in various levels.

  13. [Dental care for HIV-positive individuals: fear, prejudice, and professional ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discacciati, J A; Vilaça, E L

    2001-04-01

    To describe the ethical aspects involved in the dental care provided to patients who are HIV-positive or who have AIDS. Literature review (textbooks and MEDLINE and LILACS databases), with an emphasis on the work developed at the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. We examined the social representation of AIDS, the risk of HIV infection during office visits, the refusal to provide care, referral to other professionals without justification, special charges and office visit hours for HIV-positive patients, and the confidentiality of the serological status of the patient. There is still prejudice and ignorance about the risk of HIV and AIDS infection, on the part of dental surgeons and of patients. An educational project should be undertaken at dental offices and at universities that train new professionals. In addition, the role of national and regional professional associations in providing information concerning ethical aspects involved in the care of HIV/AIDS patients should be reinforced.

  14. High and specialty-related musculoskeletal disorders afflict dental professionals even since early training years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianru YI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine how early musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs develop in dental professionals and to explore the potential differences among distinct dental specialties. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 271 dental postgraduates majoring in five dental specialties were recruited, i.e., orthodontics, prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics and alveolar surgery. 254 age-matched non-dental postgraduates served as the control. The standardized Nordic questionnaire on MSDs and a self-report questionnaire regarding correlative factors (only for dental postgraduates were answered through emails. Reliability of responses was assessed applying test-retest method. RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient of participants' answers ranged from 0.89 to 0.96. Dental postgraduates had significantly higher prevalence of MSDs than the control group, especially at neck, upper back and lower back. In all dental specialties included, high prevalence of MSDs was reported at neck (47.5%-69.8%, shoulders (50.8%-65.1%, lower back (27.1%-51.2% and upper back (25.6%-46.5%, with lower prevalence at elbows (5.1%-18.6%, hips (3.4%-16.3% and ankles (5.1%-11.6%. Periodontics students reported the worst MSDs in most body regions except wrists and knees, which were more prevalent for prosthodontic and alveolar surgery students, respectively. Furthermore, year of clinical work, clinical hours per week and desk hours per week were found as risk factors for MSDs, whereas physical exercise and rest between patients as protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: High and specialty-related MSDs afflict dental professionals even since very early stage of careers. Prevention aimed at the specialty-related characteristics and the risk/protective factors revealed in this study should be introduced to dental personnel as early as possible.

  15. Assessment of Dentally-related Functional Competency for Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment – A Survey for Special-care Dental Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Clark, Jennifer JJ

    2013-01-01

    This survey was to study whether and how dental professional assess dental-related function in older adults with cognitive impairment (OACI). An invitation was sent to 525 special-care dental professionals, followed by a reminder in 2 weeks. Thirteen percent of the targeted participants completed the survey. Among them, 88% completed a hospital dentistry, geriatric dentistry or other post-graduate training program. Nearly 70% of the respondents considered somewhat to very difficult to assess dentally-related function; 45% did not ever or did not regularly assess dental-related function for OACI. Dental-related functional assessments were often based on a subjective, unstructured approach. Only 6% of the respondents routinely used standard instruments to assess the patients' function. These results indicate that an objective functional assessment based on a standardized instrument has not been routinely incorporated into dental care for OACI, raising concerns for quality of care in this vulnerable population. PMID:23451924

  16. Dental Sealants: Knowledge, Value, Opinion, and Practice among Dental Professionals of Bathinda City, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asawa, Kailash; Gupta, Vivek V.; Tak, Mridula; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Bapat, Salil; Mishra, Prashant; Roy, Santanu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to assess the knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding use of dental sealants among private dental practitioners in Bathinda City, Punjab, India. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all private dental practitioners in Bathinda City, Punjab. A self-administered structured questionnaire consisting of 28 items was used to assess their knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding dental sealants. One-way analysis of variance, independent sample t-test, and multivariate regression analysis were utilized for statistical analysis. Confidence level and level of significance were set at 95% and 5%, respectively. Results. The mean scores for knowledge, value, opinion, and practice were 41.8 ± 3.7, 18.7 ± 2.8, 18.1 ± 1.4, and 12.9 ± 2.3, respectively. Analysis revealed that qualification was statistically significant among all dependent variables (P ≤ 0.05); work experience was significantly associated with both knowledge and opinion means scores (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion. The results suggest that dental practitioners had sufficient knowledge about dental sealants. They also acknowledge the importance of use of dental sealants. Practice of dental sealants in clinics was found adequate but they were not following the specific guidelines and standardized procedures. PMID:24818028

  17. Willingness of Saudi dental professionals to treat Hepatitis B virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 10.2% of the Saudi dentists were willing to treat HB infected patients. The other dentists (89.8%) were unwilling to provide dental care for HB infected patients. Although 94.5% of the surveyed dentists were vaccinated against HBV, the main reason behind the refusal to treat HB infected patients (92.3%) was the risk of ...

  18. Continuing professional development of dental practitioners in Prato, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, Michele; Mauro, Saverio

    2008-05-01

    The three objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate the frequency of access to instruments of continuing education by dental practitioners belonging to the Order of Dental Practitioners of the Province of Prato, Italy; 2) to ascertain their understanding and use of evidence-based medicine; and 3) to identify their preferences for obtaining continuing education in dental therapy. Of the 177 members of this order, 123 (69 percent) responded to a telephone interview. The typical dentist of Prato reads articles in Italian journals once a week, consults colleagues once a week, reads books once a month, accesses the Internet every three months, goes to congresses or courses every six months, and does not read articles published in international journals. Forty-one percent of those interviewed did not know the meaning of the term "evidence-based medicine." Practical training was considered the most important form of update in therapy and reaches statistical significance (pInternet (which received the lowest score). The conclusions were that dentists of Prato obtain continuing education episodically and in a passive way. They do not understand the concept of evidence-based medicine and often employ it superficially.

  19. Atypical pattern of (meth)acrylate allergic contact dermatitis in dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Hunasehally, R Y; Hughes, T M; Stone, N M

    2012-09-01

    (Meth)acrylates in dental bonding agents are a common source of allergic contact dermatitis in dental professionals. The distribution of the contact dermatitis is commonly on finger tips, but is determined by individual habits as demonstrated by the two case reports in this article. Despite the site of contact dermatitis, the bonding agents are often not suspected as a source of contact allergy due to misconception regarding the protective effect of natural rubber latex gloves. With these case reports, we endeavour to emphasize the inadequacy of the latex gloves in protecting against the (meth)acrylate induced contact allergy and also list the measures a dental professional needs to incorporate in order to minimise the risks of sensitisation to (meth)acrylates.

  20. Prevalence of dental trauma and use of mouthguards in professional handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lana; Milardović Ortolan, Slađana; Žarković, Davor; Viskić, Joško; Jokić, Dražen; Mehulić, Ketij

    2017-06-01

    Published data about orofacial injuries and mouthguard use by professional handball players are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of orofacial trauma and mouthguard use in professional handball players. Data were collected from 100 professional handball players through a questionnaire, which contained 17 questions about age, experience in playing handball, playing position, orofacial trauma experience during the past 12 months, type of injury and mouthguard use. Almost half (49%) of the interviewed players experienced head and/or facial trauma during the past year. The most common injuries were soft tissue lacerations (39.6%). Dental injuries occurred in 22% of the participants, with socket bleeding being the most frequent injury (14%). Of the affected teeth, 76.9% were upper incisors. Mouthguards had a statistically significant protective role regarding tooth fractures and tooth avulsion (P=.043). Players who wore a mouthguard had a 5.55 times less chance of suffering dental injuries. Almost 76% of dental injuries resulted in complications afterward. Sixty-seven percentage of the players knew that mouthguards could prevent injuries, but only 28% used them regularly. Of the players who wore a mouthguard regularly, 76.9% were advised to do so by their dentists. The incidence of head and orofacial injuries among professional handball players is high. Mouthguards prevented severe dental injuries such as tooth fracture and avulsion, but their use was still limited. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Knowledge and attitude of dental professionals of north India toward plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Guram, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is stealing of some others work or idea without proper citation. It is one of the biggest challenges faced by the scholarly world and by far a grim form of delinquency in academics. The study was designed to explore the knowledge and attitudes of dental professionals toward plagiarism. A questionnaire having 14 questions was sent either via e-mails or by sending printed copies to 5000 dental professionals, while maintaining anonymity of all the participants. Most of the dental professionals know about plagiarism, and they believe that plagiarism cannot be avoided successfully. Pressure to publish was a major reason along with several others, which accounts for more and more indulgence in plagiarism. At the same time lack of facilities in private institutions and lack of funding for research work were the major factors as well, which hinder in creating research environment and hence promotes plagiarism and false studies to publish it. Plagiarism is present in dental professionals and that significant reduction can only be brought by awareness, objective check methods and stringent punishment. Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct must be recognized and must not be tolerated.

  2. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Professionals of North India Toward Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Guram, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plagiarism is stealing of some others work or idea without proper citation. It is one of the biggest challenges faced by the scholarly world and by far a grim form of delinquency in academics. Aim: The study was designed to explore the knowledge and attitudes of dental professionals toward plagiarism. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire having 14 questions was sent either via e-mails or by sending printed copies to 5000 dental professionals, while maintaining anonymity of all the participants. Result: Most of the dental professionals know about plagiarism, and they believe that plagiarism cannot be avoided successfully. Pressure to publish was a major reason along with several others, which accounts for more and more indulgence in plagiarism. At the same time lack of facilities in private institutions and lack of funding for research work were the major factors as well, which hinder in creating research environment and hence promotes plagiarism and false studies to publish it. Conclusion: Plagiarism is present in dental professionals and that significant reduction can only be brought by awareness, objective check methods and stringent punishment. Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct must be recognized and must not be tolerated. PMID:24678470

  3. [Work-related musculoskeletal diseases in dental professionals. 1. Prevalence and risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, F; Vercelli, S; Ferriero, G; D'Angelo, F; Migliario, M; Franchignoni, M

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a sharp rise in the incidence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD). All occupations are involved; in dental professionals (dentists, dental hygienists and dental auxiliaries) this problem occurs in 54-93% of subjects, with higher risk in elderly subjects and women. Spine, shoulder, elbow and hand are mostly involved. Prevention of WMSD is becoming crucial and requires the identification and modification of risk factors. Individual characteristics of the worker--such as gender, age, stature, physical condition, strength, etc.--may contribute to the occurrence of these musculoskeletal disorders. Moreover, the specific occupation and work organisation may be the source of ergonomic hazards. Awkward postures, prolonged repetitive movements, intense work schedules or fast work pace represent important risk factors for WMSD. Sometimes the dentist's workstation is not suited to the specific professional characteristics and an ergonomic improvement is needed. Finally, factors connected with professional equipment (such as vibrations, or sharp and hard surfaces causing pressure points) may also contribute to generating WMSD in dental professionals.

  4. Professional satisfaction among dental practitioners in Ghaziabad city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venisha Pandita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional satisfaction is an important determinant of health worker motivation, retention and performance and are critical improving the functioning of health systems in low-and middle income countries. Objective: To measure professional satisfaction among registered clinical dentists in Ghaziabad city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 107 dentists practicing in clinics. A questionnaire measuring dimensions of professional satisfaction was distributed manually to the participating dentists. All items were written in 5 point Likert format with a score ranging from 5 (strongly satisfied to 1 (strongly dissatisfied. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 19.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA and Student′s t-test measuring the difference of means between the subgroups for each dimension was performed. Results: Analysis showed significant differences (P < 0.05 in levels of satisfaction for various dimensions of professional satisfaction by gender, educational qualification and work status type. There were differences in professional satisfaction between male and female dentists-related to the personal time dimension. Results also showed that postgraduates were more satisfied than graduates. It was reported that full time dentists expressed dissatisfaction in the time spent with their family and leading to troubles in their personal relationships. Conclusion: Overall, dentists have a high level of professional satisfaction and the level of satisfaction is influenced by various socio demographic and psycho-behavioral factors.

  5. Self-Reported Obstacles to Regular Dental Care among Information Technology Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, L Swetha; Doshi, Dolar; Reddy, B Srikanth; Kulkarni, Suhas; Reddy, M Padma; Satyanarayana, D; Baldava, Pavan

    2016-10-01

    Good oral health is important for an individual as well as social well-being. Occupational stress and work exhaustion in Information Technology (IT) professionals may influence the oral health and oral health related quality of life. To assess and compare self-reported obstacles for regular dental care and dental visits among IT professionals based on age, gender, dental insurance and working days per week. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,017 IT professionals to assess the self-reported obstacles to regular oral health care in Hyderabad city, Telangana, India. The Dental Rejection of Innovation Scale (DRI-S) was employed in this study. Comparison between means of DRI-S based on variables was done using t-test and ANOVA. The association between variables and DRI-S was determined using Chi-square test. A total of 1017 participants comprising of 574 (56%) males and 443 (44%) females participated in the study. As age increased, a significant increase in mean DRI-S scores was seen for total and individual domains except for the "Situational" domain wherein higher mean score (9.42±2.5; p=0.0006) was observed among 30-39 years age group. Even though females reported higher mean scores for total and individual domains when compared to males, nevertheless significant difference was seen only for total (p=0.03) and "Lack of Knowledge" (p=0.001) domain. Self-reported obstacles to regular dental care was more with increasing age, increased number of working days per week, irregular dental visits and absence of dental insurance facility.

  6. Does dental hygienist professional education meet the needs of working life? Educators' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiaho, T-L; Kaakinen, P; Virtanen, J I

    2017-08-14

    The aim of this study was to describe the compatibility of dental hygienist education with working life from the perspective of their educators. We conducted a qualitative study among principal educators of dental hygienists in Finland in 2012-2013. The participants were leading educators of dental hygienists (n = 13) from the four Finnish education units. We used semi-structured interviews based on previous Nordic studies to collect the data and analysed them using inductive content analysis. According to the educators, dental hygienists' skills at work are neither fully nor effectively utilized, even though their education meets the needs of working life quite well. The educators felt that hygienists' professional competence would prove more useful in health promotion and orthodontic measures and that the division of labour should be clearer. Clarifying this distinction in periodontal therapy could be improved. Fully utilizing dental hygienists' competence in clinical work would benefit from further development. The content of dental hygienists' clinical work should be reassessed so as to utilize their skills more fully. The compatibility of dental hygienist education corresponds largely to the needs of future working life. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dentistry – a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Methods Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. Results A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career. Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'. Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future

  8. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Raman

    2013-07-16

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health.

  9. Understanding continuous professional development participation and choice of mid-career general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T; Wassif, H S

    2017-02-01

    Participating in continuing professional development (CPD) activities is a requirement for dental practitioners to keep their skills and knowledge up to date. Understanding the ways dental practitioners engage with professional development and the impact on practice is not fully known (Eaton et al. 2011, http://www.gdc-uk.org/Aboutus/policy/Documents/Impact%20Of%20CPD%20In%20Dentistry.pdf). The aim of this study was to gain insights into the ways that dentists reflect on their professional development and what may be influencing their choices. Empirical qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviewing of five mid-career dentists. Using grounded theory, the data were analysed for themes about CPD choice and participation. Three themes were identified as influences to dentists' choices of CPD with pragmatic considerations of how new learning could benefit their patients and their practices. Dental practitioners were influenced by the requirements of external regulatory bodies which they did not consider to necessarily improve practice. Dentists working in primary care in the UK are undertaking CPD which is influenced by the pragmatic requirements of running a small business and to meet regulatory requirements. In this sample, dentists are not critically reflecting on their education needs when choosing their CPD activity. Protected learning time and organisational feedback and support are recommended as a way to promote more meaningful reflection on learning and to improve professional development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The emerging dental workforce: why dentistry? A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their professional career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Patel, Resmi; Donaldson, Nora; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2007-06-15

    Dental graduates are joining a profession experiencing changes in systems of care, funding and skill mix. Research into the motivation and expectations of the emerging workforce is vital to inform professional and policy decisions. The objective of this research was to investigate final year dental students' perceived motivation for their choice of career in relation to sex, ethnicity and mode of entry. Self-administered questionnaire survey of all final year dental students at King's College London. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included Chi Squared tests for linear association, multiple regression, factor analysis and logistic regression. A response of 90% (n = 126) was achieved. The majority were aged 23 years (59%), female (58%) and Asian (70%). One in 10 were mature students. Eighty per cent identified 11 or more 'important' or 'very important' influences, the most common of which were related to features of the job: 'regular working hours' (91%), 'degree leading to recognised job' (90%) and 'job security' (90%). There were significant differences in important influences by sex (males > females: 'able to run own business'; females > males: 'a desire to work with people'), ethnic group (Asians > white: 'wish to provide public service', 'influence of friends', 'desire to work in healthcare', having 'tried an alternative career/course' and 'work experience') and mode of entry (mature > early entry: 'a desire to work with people'). Multivariate analysis suggested 61% of the variation in influences is explained by five factors: the 'professional job' (31%), 'healthcare-people' (11%), 'academic-scientific' (8%), 'careers-advising' (6%), and 'family/friends' (6%). The single major influence on choice of career was a 'desire to work with people'; Indian students were twice as likely to report this as white or other ethnic groups. Final year dental students report a wide range of important influences on their choice of dentistry, with variation by

  11. The emerging dental workforce: why dentistry? A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their professional career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nairn HF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental graduates are joining a profession experiencing changes in systems of care, funding and skill mix. Research into the motivation and expectations of the emerging workforce is vital to inform professional and policy decisions. The objective of this research was to investigate final year dental students' perceived motivation for their choice of career in relation to sex, ethnicity and mode of entry. Methods Self-administered questionnaire survey of all final year dental students at King's College London. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included Chi Squared tests for linear association, multiple regression, factor analysis and logistic regression. Results A response of 90% (n = 126 was achieved. The majority were aged 23 years (59%, female (58% and Asian (70%. One in 10 were mature students. Eighty per cent identified 11 or more 'important' or 'very important' influences, the most common of which were related to features of the job: 'regular working hours' (91%, 'degree leading to recognised job' (90% and 'job security' (90%. There were significant differences in important influences by sex (males > females: 'able to run own business'; females > males: 'a desire to work with people', ethnic group (Asians > white: 'wish to provide public service', 'influence of friends', 'desire to work in healthcare', having 'tried an alternative career/course' and 'work experience' and mode of entry (mature > early entry: 'a desire to work with people'. Multivariate analysis suggested 61% of the variation in influences is explained by five factors: the 'professional job' (31%, 'healthcare-people' (11%, 'academic-scientific' (8%, 'careers-advising' (6%, and 'family/friends' (6%. The single major influence on choice of career was a 'desire to work with people'; Indian students were twice as likely to report this as white or other ethnic groups. Conclusion Final year dental students report a wide range of important

  12. Perceptions of dental professionals and laypeople to altered dental esthetics in cases with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Marco; Olimpo, Alessia; Fastuca, Rosamaria; Caprioglio, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    The smile perception of patients is not strictly related to standardized protocols and technical implications which certainly affect clinicians' decisions. The absence of maxillary lateral incisors could affect smile esthetics either with treatment or not. The aim of the present study was to investigate if different perceptions on altered smiles due to missing maxillary lateral incisors, with or without treatment, exist among different groups of people (laypersons, adult orthodontic patients, general dentists, and orthodontists). An ideal smile model was selected and altered simulating different malocclusions and treatment options. Twelve simulations were submitted to four categories of respondents: laypeople, adult orthodontic patients, general dentists and orthodontists. They were asked to express smile perception for each simulation by ranking and rating simulations using a 0 to 100 visual analog scale. Analysis of variance was used to determine if there were statistically significant differences in values assigned among the four categories of respondents for each simulation. Significant differences in smile perceptions were found between professionals (dentists and orthodontists) and laypeople. Presence of dental tipping and marked diastema in the arch were disharmonious aspects less tolerated in a smile by all categories of evaluators. Simulations associated with space closure orthodontic treatment were ranked as the most attractive smile and significantly ranked higher by dental professionals than patients and laypeople. Treatment, absence of diastema, and symmetry were the most accepted characteristics by all categories of respondents. Ideal orthodontic treatment options might be overestimated by clinicians when compared to laypeople's smile perception.

  13. A survey: how periodontists and other dental professionals view the scope of periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Peter K; Hall, Joshua; Finkelman, Matthew; Park, Angel; Levi, Paul A

    2014-07-01

    How do periodontists think of themselves when they define their practices? How do other dental professionals view the scope of the specialty of periodontology? A strong component of periodontal residency programs is extracting teeth and preserving or building bony ridges for the eventual placement of implants. Has the discipline of periodontology moved away from retaining and treating the natural dentition? By the use of a rank-order survey, the practice of periodontology was defined by periodontists and other dental professionals. In a pilot study, respondents were asked to list the answers to the question, "What is a periodontist?" The results were consolidated into eight statements. The eight statements were placed into an anonymous rank-order survey, and more than 1,200 responses were returned. The responses primarily came from periodontists, hygienists, general practitioners, dental students, and dental hygiene students. "Periodontists surgically treat advanced gum and bone infection problems" was considered the most important statement in all of the cohorts. The least important statement considered by all was, "Periodontists are educators promoting health." Non-periodontist dentists (NPDs) ranked the statement, "Periodontists perform dental implants and related procedures" less importantly (P <0.001) than the periodontists. The non-periodontist cohort (NPC), which includes NPDs and dental hygienists, ranked the statement, "Periodontists' treatments help general dentists and other specialists increase successful therapeutic outcomes" as second most important. The results of this survey indicate that periodontists ranked the placement of implants and their related procedures higher than the NPC. NPDs appear to value periodontists in treating the natural dentition for their patients. The NPC appreciates that periodontal therapy done by periodontists increases their therapeutic success for their patients.

  14. Knowledge of different medical and dental professional groups in Switzerland about halitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Barbara; Oppliger, Nathalie; Filippi, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Although halitosis is a widespread condition, it is still seen as too personal or embarrassing to talk about. The cause of real halitosis can be intraoral or extraoral. In order to determine the level of knowledge of health care providers in Switzerland, a survey was conducted over a period of three years in which 150 family physicians, 150 ear, nose and throat specialists, 154 dentists and 151 dental hygienists were personally interviewed. The survey shows that only 46.7% of the dentists and only 47.0% of the dental hygienists are consulted by patients for their halitosis, whereas 58.0% of the family physicians and 50.7% of the ENT specialists reported treating 1-10 patients for halitosis per year, while 46.7% of the ENT doctors even reported treating 11-100 patients for halitosis per year. 81.5% of all interviewed doctors and dental hygienists were of the opinion that halitosis mainly originates intraorally. 76.0% of the dentists and 72.8% of the dental hygienists as well as 33.3% of the family physicians recommend periodontitis therapy as halitosis treatment. This proves that a large percentage of medical professionals thinks that marginal periodontitis is the most common cause of halitosis. This study also shows that patients seek first consultations with dentists and dental hygienists less often than with family physicians and ENT specialists, despite the fact that the cause of halitosis is primarily intraoral.

  15. STUDY OF INDICATORS OF AMYLOLYTIC ACTIVITY OF MOUTH FLUID OF DENTAL HEALTHCARE WORKERS UNDER VARIOUS CONDITIONS OF PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

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    S. V. Melnikova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Amylolytic activity indicators of oral liquid of dentists in different conditions of professional activity at outpatient dental care and lectures have been studied. We observed an increase in amylolytic activity of oral liquid of dentists men and women after outpatient dental care, that indicates the activation of the sympathetic-adrenal system in response to the professional stress. We also identified the gender-specific response to the α-amylase load in professional dentists: male amylolytic activity of oral fluid was higher than female. In the group of male and female dentist cadets we registered the decrease of amylolytic activity of oral fluid. The correlation analysis revealed a negative relationship between the level of α-amylase and rigidity in a group of male dentists. We suggested that male dentists reduced their adaptation to the psychosocial conditions under job stress. Keywords: dentist, professional activity, professional stress, outpatient dental care, lectures, amylolytic activity of oral fluid.

  16. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2017-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:26338905

  17. Second and third year oral health and dental student perceptions of future professional work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A S; Anderson, V R; Foster Page, L A

    2013-11-01

    To explore and compare the ways dental and oral health students characterise their future professional work (FPW) at the end of their second and third professional years. Questionnaires were given to a cohort group of 48 dental students and 31 oral health students at the end of their second and third professional years at the University of Otago. Students' characterisations of their FPW were identified using an inductive approach, and the emphasis on each characterisation was confirmed using a 'weighted' table. Dental student response rates were 92% (in 2010) and 85% (in 2011); and oral health student response rates were 100% (in 2011) and 97% (in 2011). Students characterised their FPW in ten broad ways: in reference to treatment-related concerns, patient-related concerns, oral health promotion, oral health education, disease prevention and monitoring, communication, teamwork, maintaining an ideal clinical environment, maintaining a sense of self and improving quality of life. In both years, dental students emphasised treatment-related concerns as central to their FPW and dealing with patient-related concerns as a primary source of difficulty. Oral health students emphasised oral health promotion, oral health education, disease prevention and monitoring and restorative tasks as central to their FPW and dealing with patient-related concerns as a primary source of difficulty. Students' broad perceptions of their FPW changed little as they progressed through their programmes; however, their responses suggested the need for greater attention within their programmes to patient management and teamwork. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Analysis of the ethical aspects of professional confidentiality in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view of deontological ethics, privacy is a moral right that patients are entitled to and it is bound to professional confidentiality. Otherwise, the information given by patients to health professionals would not be reliable and a trustable relationship could not be established. The aim of the present study was to assess, by means of questionnaires with open and closed questions, the awareness and attitudes of 100 dentists working in the city of Andradina, São Paulo State, Brazil, with respect to professional confidentiality in dental practice. Most dentists (91.43% reported to have instructed their assistants on professional confidentiality. However, 44.29% of the interviewees showed to act contradictorily as reported talking about the clinical cases of their patients to their friends or spouses. The great majority of professionals (98.57% believed that it is important to have classes on Ethics and Bioethics during graduation and, when asked about their knowledge of the penalties imposed for breach of professional confidentiality, only 48.57% of them declared to be aware of it. Only 28.57% of the interviewees affirmed to have exclusive access to the files; 67.14% reported that that files were also accessed by their secretary; 1.43% answered that their spouses also had access, and 2.86% did not answer. From the results of the present survey, it could be observed that, although dentists affirmed to be aware of professional confidentiality, their attitudes did not adhere to ethical and legal requirements. This stand of health professionals has contributed to violate professional ethics and the law itself, bringing problems both to the professional and to the patient.

  19. The role of non-dental health professionals in providing access to dental care for low-income and minority patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Leonard A

    2009-07-01

    The disadvantaged suffer disproportionately from dental problems. These persons are more likely to have untreated oral health problems and associated pain, and also are more likely to forego dental treatment even when in pain. There has been increased emphasis on the potential role of physicians in alleviating oral health disparities, especially among children. In addition, many adults lacking access to traditional dental services seek care and consultation from hospital emergency departments, physicians, and pharmacists. The delivery of oral health care services by non-dental health professionals may assume increasing importance as the population continues to age and becomes more diverse. This is because, in general, the elderly and ethnic and racial minorities face significant economic barriers to accessing private dental services.

  20. Faculty professional development in emergent pedagogies for instructional innovation in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Bender, D; Nadershahi, N

    2017-05-01

    Innovative pedagogies have significantly impacted health professions' education, dental education included. In this context, faculty, defined in this study as instructor in higher education, has been increasingly required to hone their instructional skills. The purpose of this exploratory study was to share the design, implementation and preliminary outcomes of two programmes to enhance dental faculty's instructional skills, the Teaching and Learning Seminar Series and the Course Director Orientation. Data sources included faculty and student surveys developed and administered by the researchers; data extracted from the learning management system; reports from the learning analytics tool; and classroom observations. Participants' satisfaction, self-reported learning, instructional behavioural change, and impact on student learning behaviours and institutional practice were assessed borrowing from Kirkpatrick's 4-level model of evaluation of professional development effectiveness. Initial findings showed that faculty in both programmes reported positive learning experiences. Participants reported that the programmes motivated them to improve instructional practice and improved their knowledge of instructional innovation. Some faculty reported implementation of new instructional strategies and tools, which helped create an active and interactive learning environment that was welcomed by their students. The study contributes to literature and best practice in health sciences faculty development in pedagogy and may guide other dental schools in designing professional development programmes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Awareness of biomedical waste management among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in Amritsar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ramandeep S; Manchanda, Adesh; Singh, Simarpreet; Verma, Nitin; Padda, Sarfaraz

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine awareness of biomedical waste (BMW) management policies and practices among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in a dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar, India, to inform the development of future policies for effective implementation of BMW rules. The study involved 160 staff members at the Amritsar hospital/clinics (80 dentists and 80 auxiliary staff) to whom a questionnaire was distributed regarding policies, practices and awareness relating to BMW. The questionnaire was first piloted. Completed questionnaires were returned anonymously. The resulting data were statistically tested using the chi-square test for differences between the dentists and auxiliary staff. In respect of BMW management policies, there was a highly significant difference in the responses of the dentists, whose answers suggested far greater knowledge than that of the auxiliaries (Pmanagement practices, the dentists were significantly more aware (Pwaste collection in the hospital and the disposal of various items into different colour-coded bags. As for employee education/awareness, there was a significant difference (Pmanagement among dental auxiliary staff in the dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar and a lack of awareness of some aspects among dentists who work in the hospital/clinics. The results provide the hospital authorities with data upon which they can develop a strategy for improving BMW management.

  2. Hepatitis B awareness and attitudes among dental professionals in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita D Shitoot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and awareness with regards to hepatitis B in dental health care professionals, and to estimate the efforts made by them to prevent the transmission of hepatitis among patients. This study also evaluated the immunization status of hepatitis B among dentists. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted among dental professionals in Central India. A Predesigned questionnaire was given to assess the general awareness, attitude, and behavior toward hepatitis B infection and vaccination along with questions to evaluate their own immunization status. Results: A total of 424 dentists responded to the questionnaire. Among them, 24.05% had not received even a single dose of Hepatitis B vaccine while 50.48% had not completed the required course of vaccination. Most common reason cited by dentists for non-immunization was that they had not thought about it (66.03%. Ninety-six percent of the participants were aware of the Hepatitis-B vaccination programme. Conclusion: Despite the availability of an effective vaccine in the market, dentists continue to remain non-vaccinated. It is the lack of awareness and carelessness on the part of dentists coupled with the negligence of the risk that has led them being incompletely vaccinated. There is a need to ensure that every doctor is vaccinated against Hepatitis B before he/she enters professional practice.

  3. The undergraduate degree project--preparing dental students for professional work and postgraduate studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, C

    2014-11-01

    The undergraduate degree project is a requisite part of higher education in Sweden, designed to prepare students for professional work and postgraduate studies. This article examines the extent to which the degree project in Swedish dental education helps students achieve these purposes. The focus was on the students' choice of topics and research methods as well as their ability to reflect on the implications of their results for dental practice. Degree projects from three of the four Swedish dental schools were analysed using content analysis. The students' topics concerned clinical dentistry, biomedicine, educational issues and public oral health. Quantitative research methods were used more often than qualitative ones. Some of the degree projects were based on literature reviews. Students demonstrated shortcomings in their reflections on the implications of their results for dental practice. The level of reflection was particularly low in one of the schools; this may be because the students in this school were not expected to reflect on the results. The degree project gives the students an opportunity to develop their knowledge on a topic relevant to dentistry, to be trained in conducting research and to reflect on scientific knowledge in relation to dentistry. However, this study shows the need of assessment criteria that urge the students to reflect on the link between science and clinical work and motivate them to learn to reflect so they become critical thinkers. It is also suggested that dental students should learn more about qualitative research methods. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The value of inter-professional education: a comparative study of dental technology students' perceptions across four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J; Henderson, A J; Sun, J; Haugen, H; Myhrer, T; Maryan, C; Ivanow, K N; Cameron, A; Johnson, N W

    2015-04-24

    The ability to function as an effective member of a dental care team is a highly desirable--frequently mandated--attribute of dental technology (DT) graduates. Currently, there is little rigorous examination of how the learning of team-working skills might best be structured in a DT curriculum. This research compares DT curricula, and students' attitudes and perceptions regarding collaboration in practice, from four countries. Students (n=376) were invited to complete an education profile questionnaire, and the standardised measure--the shared learning scale. There were 196 (52%) responses. Students given opportunities to engage with others had better perceptions of inter-professional learning (IPL). Most believed that team-work and collaborative skills were best acquired by learning together with other dental care professionals, preferably sharing cases for real patients. Curricula should maximise opportunities for dental technology students to experience authentic IPL. Collaboration and team-work needs to be embedded through the whole undergraduate programme.

  5. Work experiences, professional development and career prospects of New Zealand dental house surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jenny J; Antoun, Joseph S

    2010-12-01

    New dental graduates compete for house surgeon positions every year, despite little being known about the work experience gained from such posts. The main objectives of this study were to identify the nature of house surgeons' work experiences, their continued professional development (CPD) opportunities and the impact of hospital experience on their future career pathways. A questionnaire was mailed to all 31 New Zealand dental house surgeons (response rate 100%). The majority of house surgeons (77.4%) found hospital work enjoyable, with nearly all (93.5%) perceiving themselves as better clinicians from their experience. Oral surgery, restorative dentistry, special needs dentistry and removable prosthodontics were the most commonly practised areas. The average weekly number of working hours was 42.3 hours for a normal week and 61.8 hours for an on-call week. Stress levels during on-call work were significantly higher than during day-to-day hospital work (p common form of CPD available at hospitals (74.2%), followed by hands-on clinical training (61.3%). More than half of the house surgeons (58.1%) planned to pursue a specialist career, with nearly 13% wishing to return to a New Zealand hospital in the future. A dental house surgeon position remains an attractive choice and offers an enjoyable experience for young graduates. Hospitals provide ample CPD opportunities and appear to play an influential role in a house surgeon's career pathway.

  6. Impact of Dental Neglect Scale on Oral Health Status Among Different Professionals in Indore City-A Cross- Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Pubali; Dasar, Pralhad; Nagarajappa, Sandesh; Mishra, Prashant; Kumar, Sandeep; Balsaraf, Swati; Lalani, Afsheen; Chauhan, Astha

    2015-10-01

    Young educated Indian generation are very much health conscious. They take adequate nutritious balanced diet and practice physical exercise regularly to keep themselves active and healthy. Oral health is a part of general health care system. If oral health is neglected it may affect our general health and as a result it affects our quality of life too. To assess dental negligence and oral health status by using Dental Neglect scale questionnaire among different professionals of Indore city. The study consisted of a convenient sample of 400 students of aged 18-25 years from 4 different professional colleges of Sri Aurobindo Group of Institutes of the same campus. A pretested validated questionnaire was used for assessing dental neglect and home dental care practices. Oral health examination was conducted to assess dental caries and oral hygiene status by using DMFT and OHIS respectively. Data was analysed using SPSS Software (version 20). For OHI(S), majority of the respondents (57.7%) showed fair oral hygiene for DNS score 15. The Dental Neglect Scale (DNS) score was found statistically significant with OHIS and caries experience at 95% Confidence Interval. There was no statistically significant difference between DNS score and frequency of Decayed, Missing and Filled teeth DMFT. The Dental Neglect Scale appears to be a sound method for objectifying dental neglect. It has many of the features of a satisfying health index. However, further validation with other age groups, cultures, place and a larger population is required in order to justify the utility of Dental Neglect Scale in different situations.

  7. The learning environment in professional doctorate and postgraduate dental education: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, J; Thomson, W M

    2017-11-01

    Currently, there is a lack of studies focusing on professional doctoral students' and graduates' perceptions of their learning environment, in particular, using a qualitative approach to elicit in-depth information. This article aims to contribute to the existing body of knowledge by systematically exploring, critically analysing and getting a deeper understanding of professional doctorate dental students' and graduates' insights into effective and ineffective clinical and physical learning environment characteristics. The study included a total of 20 participants. Participants included 16 final-year Doctor of Clinical Dentistry (DClinDent) students and four dental specialists (graduates of the DClinDent programme). Semi-structured, individual interviews were used. Participants were asked to reflect upon and describe in detail their effective and ineffective learning environment experiences. The critical incident technique was used to guide the data collection. Data were analysed using a general inductive qualitative approach. Learning environment characteristics which participants associated with effective learning included the following: sufficient opportunities for comprehensive treatment planning; introduction to a number of patient treatment philosophies; a sufficient number of complex cases; clinically oriented research and assignment topics; a focus on clinical training in the programme generally; a research topic of a realistic depth and breadth, suitable for their 'specialist training' degree; and a well-resourced and updated physical infrastructure. On the other hand, most participants indicated that the absence of an adequate number of clinical cases, an overemphasis on research (as opposed to clinical practice) in the DClinDent programme and an 'outdated' physical infrastructure in the dental school clinics could hamper effective clinical learning. These findings contribute to the meaningful advancement of the literature on learning environment

  8. Assessment of professional behaviour : a comparison of self-assessment by first year dental students and assessment by staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra-Shaw, S.; Kropmans, TJB; Tams, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A study was set up to assess usefulness and acceptability of a method of assessing professional behaviour of undergraduate dental students. Setting: The first year preclinical course at the Department of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene, University of Groningen, the Netherlands. Materials and

  9. Promoting professional behaviour in undergraduate medical, dental and veterinary curricula in the Netherlands: evaluation of a joint effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luijk, S.J.; Gorter, R.C.; van Mook, W.N.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: From 2002 onwards, a nationwide working group of representatives from all medical (8), dental (3) and veterinary medicine (1) schools collaborated in order to develop and implement recommendations for teaching and assessing professional behaviour. Aim: The aim of this article is to

  10. HIV transmission in the dental setting and the HIV-infected oral health care professional: workshop 1C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flint, S R

    2011-04-01

    This workshop addressed two important issues: first, the global evidence of HIV transmission from health care provider to patient and from patient to health care provider in the general health care environment and the dental practice setting; second, in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, whether oral health care professionals living with HIV pose a risk of transmission to their patients and whether standard infection control is adequate to protect both the patient and the oral health care professional in dental practice. The workshop culminated in a general discussion and the formulation of a consensus statement from the participating delegates, representing more than 30 countries, on the criteria under which an HIV-infected oral health care professional might practice dentistry without putting patients at risk. This consensus statement, the Beijing Declaration, was agreed nem con.

  11. Evaluation of the dental curriculum at the University of Basel. Does the Master of Dental Medicine adequately prepare for the professional practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Yoon-Büchel, Nadja; Bühler, Julia; Dettwiler, Christian A; Weiger, Roland

    The present study reports the results of a structured survey of graduates intending to evaluate the education at the Dental School of the University of Basel in the years from 2006 to 2014. In addition, dentists and practice owners supervising graduates from Basel in daily clinical routine or hiring them as assistant dentists were questioned. The aims of the current survey were (1) to analyze own subjective experiences, (2) to assess potential differences between the cohorts prior to and after the implementation of the Bologna reform, (3) to compare the rating regarding theoretical knowledge and practical skills, and (4) to disclose potential for improvement. It was found that according to both their own assessment and the rating of the practice owners, graduates possess the basic dental expertise. The alumni rated their theoretical knowledge higher than their clinical practical skills and indicated a potential for intensification in the fields of dental surgery and implantology. When comparing the cohorts who had completed their studies according to the old (until 2010) and new study regulations, there were only minor differences; the own skills related to patient information about treatments were better rated by alumni who had been trained according to the new study regulations. The curriculum leading to the Master of Dental Medicine at the University of Basel fundamentally prepares graduates for the professional activity, but the additional acquisition of clinical experience in daily practice is indispensable.

  12. Continuing professional development amongst dental practitioners in the United Kingdom: how far are we from lifelong learning targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Dave; Newton, Tim

    2002-02-01

    This study was conducted to identify the extent to which qualified dental practitioners in the UK currently undertake three distinct activities of Continuing Professional Development (CPD): reading professional journals; attending courses; and undertaking retraining courses. Also, to determine the impact of gender, age, length of time since qualification, current working hours and career breaks upon the extent to which dental practitioners engage in CPD. Data were analysed from a questionnaire survey of a systematic sample of one in 10 dentists taken from the Dentists Register of the UK General Dental Council. The response rate was 66.6%. Only dentists practising at the time of the survey were included in the analysis (N = 1550). A high proportion of the sample reported regularly undertaking activities related to CPD. Approximately 87% read professional journals at least once per month; just over half had attended five or more days at professional meetings and courses in the last year. Only a small proportion of dentists (12%) had undertaken a retraining course in the past three years. Those dentists who had been qualified for between 21 and 30 years, those who had gained additional qualifications after qualifying as a dentist, and those who had taken a career break at some point in their life were more likely to read professional journals. Attendance at postgraduate dental courses was related to being male, not having taken a career break, possessing an additional qualification, longer working hours, and not being a General Dental Practitioners (GDP). Attendance at a retraining course was less likely for those who had taken a career break, those who had attended fewer courses in the last year and for those who worked 30--40 h per week. A large proportion of dental practitioners are currently undertaking sufficient CPD to meet the UK requirements of recertification. Greater attention should be directed towards identifying the barriers to CPD among female dentists

  13. Modelling workforce skill-mix: how can dental professionals meet the needs and demands of older people in England?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J E; Kleinman, E R; Harper, P R

    2010-02-13

    -mix' resulted in the lowest volume of clinical staff equivalents (dentists: 8,668) providing care for older people, whereas maximum skill-mix involved more staff (clinical staff = 10,337, of whom 2,623 were dentists, 4,180 hygienist/therapists and 3,534 clinical dental technicians) if all care is provided at the relevant level of competence. The model suggests that with widening skill-mix, dental care professionals can play a major role in building dental care capacity for older people in future. The implications for health policy, professional bodies and dental teamworking are discussed.

  14. Effect of professional cleaning and dental brushing with or without fluoridated dentifrice on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta, Sara Nader; Lima, José Eduardo de Oliveira; Vono, Bernardo Gonzales; Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio da; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Pin, Maria Ligia Gerdullo

    2005-09-01

    An in situ evaluation of the potential rehardening effect of fluoridated and non-fluoridated toothpastes with or without air polishing was conducted. Ten volunteers, using acrylic palatal appliances containing two bovine enamel blocks with artificial carious lesions, took part in this study. Four times a day, after the main meals and at night, the volunteers, in a habitual way, brushed their natural teeth with the dentifrice indicated to the experimental design and after that the appliances were put again into the mouth. They were divided into 4 different groups: G1 - control - non-fluoridated dentifrice; G2 - fluoridated dentifrice; G3 - non-fluoridated dentifrice, but having a previous prophylaxis using air polishing; G4 - fluoridated dentifrice and previous air polishing. The effects of treatments on enamel rehardening were evaluated in the blocks that were assessed by surface microhardness, and the percentage of surface microhardness change (%reh) was calculated in relation to the baseline values. The results showed that %reh was higher in the groups with fluoridated dentifrice, and professional prophylaxis did not have an additional effect in the groups of fluoridated dentifrices (p<0.05). The data suggested that, in the absence of fluoride, removal of dental plaque helped to increase the process of enamel rehardening.

  15. Creating research and development awareness among dental care professionals by use of strategic communication: a 12-year intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena; Twetman, Svante

    2017-12-29

    Despite the availability of contemporary research advances, only a limited fraction is implemented into dental practice. One possible way to facilitate this process is to stimulate the research and development (R&D) awareness and interest with aid of strategic communication. The aim of the study was to analyse the role of a strategic communication in R&D awareness and interest among dental care professionals (DCP) over a 12-year period. A second aim was to compare the findings with those from primary care professionals (PCP). The project had a prospective design and the intervention was conducted through established oral, written and digital channels. The outcome was captured by two validated questionnaires submitted after 7 and 12 years, respectively. An additional Questionnaire file shows the details [see Additional file 1]. The material consisted of 599 health care professionals (205 DCP; 394 PCP) that responded to the first questionnaire and 526 individuals (195 DCP; 331 PCP) who responded to the second. All were employed by the primary care organization of Region Halland located in southwest of Sweden. The majority were women (≥ 85%) and the mean age at the first questionnaire was 49 years (SD 8.5). Longitudinal analyses were applied to those individuals that responded to both surveys after 7 and 12 years (n = 248). Comparisons between DCP's and PCP's were processed with Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests. Strategic communication contributed to increase the R&D awareness and interest among the dental personnel. The created interest was reported stronger among the DCP when compared with PCP at both surveys (p communication facilitated R&D interest in both groups. The most powerful channels were the written "Research bulletin" and peer inspiration. Strategic communication can be employed as a scientific tool that may contribute to the creation of a long-term R&D awareness and interest among dental care professionals.

  16. Behavior analysis in consumer affairs: encouraging dental professionals to provide consumers with shielding from unnecessary X-ray exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, B F; Neistat, M D

    1983-01-01

    An unobtrusive observation system was developed to determine the extent to which dental professionals in two communities provided lead shielding to patients during X-ray exams. A lengthy baseline revealed low and irregular provision of shielding among half of these professionals. Subsequently, a program was undertaken by a consumer's group in which these professionals were requested to provide shielding and were given confidential feedback regarding its use during the baseline period. The provision of shielding dramatically increased at all offices and was maintained throughout a follow-up period extending to more than 9 months after the program's implementation. Little or no generalized effect was observed in the occurrence of three collateral behaviors that were also assessed throughout the study. PMID:6833165

  17. Attitudes and trends of primary care dentists to continuing professional development: a report from the Scottish dental practitioners survey 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggate, M; Russell, E

    2002-10-26

    To describe the current and intended continuing professional development activity of dentists in general and community practice. A cross-sectional survey by postal questionnaire. A semi-structured questionnaire was sent to all general practice and community dentists identified from the dental practices division as being in practice in Scotland. The issues addressed included personal demographics, current working patterns and job satisfaction, training and professional development and finally career and working intentions. Of the 1,917 questionnaires sent to general dental practitioners (GDPs), 1,357 were returned useable (70% response rate); 212 of the 283 questionnaires to community dental practitioners (CDPs) were returned giving a 75% response rate. Of the responders, 89% of GDPs (1,188) and 95% of CDPs (178) reported participating in some form of CPD in the preceding year. One sixth of GDPs (211) and one third of CDPs (62) had a further qualification. Short courses such as Section 63 were very popular with over 90% of GDPs, but more than half the respondents did not think that further qualifications would enhance their career prospects. The most commonly identified barriers to further qualifications were heavy clinical commitments (78%), with 73% citing the substantial cost with no additional benefit. Over a third of GDPs under the age of 30 indicated they intended to sit a postgraduate qualification, but this fell to 12% for those aged over 30. The number of dentists identified on a career break was low (18). Two years before implementation of the General Dental Council's mandatory revalidation scheme, over 90% of Scottish primary care dentists reported active participation in continuing professional development. Future initiatives must be sufficiently sophisticated to fulfil the educational needs of different age groups, and to focus on part-time and career break dentists as well as full-time practitioners. It is important to establish career pathways in

  18. Education of tobacco use prevention and cessation for dental professionals - a paradigm shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, J.M.; Ramseier, C.A.; Mattheos, N.; Schoonheim-Klein, M.; Compton, S.; Al-Hazmi, N.; Polychronopoulou, A.; Suvan, J.; Forna, D.; Radley, N.

    2010-01-01

    The use of tobacco continues to be a substantial risk factor in the development and progression of oral cancer, periodontitis, implant failure and poor wound healing. Dental and dental hygiene education providers have made great advances towards the incorporation of tobacco education into their

  19. Dental visits and professional fluoride applications for children 72 to 108 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasha, Abed A; Levy, Steven M; Warren, John J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report patterns of dental visits and fluoride applications longitudinally during ages 7 to 9. A cohort recruited at birth was followed in the Iowa Fluoride Study, with pretested questionnaires-sent to participants at 3- to 6-month intervals--concerning children having a dental (or dental hygiene) appointment or a fluoride application during the period. The percentages with dental visits were stable during these years (92%-93%), however, the percentages reporting fluoride applications increased from 68% (seventh year) to 74% (ninth year). Among children with complete data for 72 to 108 months of age, 99% visited the dentist and 84% received fluoride applications. Dental visits were significantly more frequent with a higher socioeconomic status, and fluoride applications were significantly more frequent in children with primary dentition caries experience. The prevalence of visits and fluoride applications during these years are stable, with most children having at least 1 visit per year.

  20. Use of restorative procedures by allied dental health professionals in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Jennifer J; Stoltenberg, Jill L

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, the Minnesota legislature revised the Dental Practice Act to include restorative procedures in the scope of practice for registered dental assistants (RDAs) and registered dental hygienists (RDHs). The authors examined these practitioners' characteristics and made comparisons on the basis of their use of restorative function (RF) training and their practices' locations. They also examined practice type, models of implementation and perceived outcomes. The authors mailed a survey to all RF-certified RDAs and RDHs in Minnesota (N = 387). They used descriptive statistics to summarize the data and t tests and Fisher exact tests (P restorative procedures varied greatly by practitioner type. The perceptions of those who performed RFs indicated they had a positive effect on dental practice. The addition of RF-certified personnel to the dental team has the potential to increase the number of patients seen in practice and the job satisfaction of team members.

  1. Ethical dilemmas among dental professionals in Davangere city- a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanka, S G; Singla, Hitashi; Lawrence, Denzy; Veeresh, D J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the ethical problems faced by dental practitioners, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, College of Dental Sciences and private dental clinics in the city of Davangere. A questionnaire with close-ended questions on eight scenarios was administered to the 135 study participants. In the case of scenario 1, 81.4% of the participants said that the doctor had violated the principle of truthfulness. As for scenario 2, less than 50% of the participants replied that the doctor had breached ethical principles. In case scenario 3, 93% felt that the doctor should have taken the physician's opinion before extracting a tooth. Most dental practitioners faced ethical dilemmas because of the lack of awareness, and there is a need to introduce certain programmes to promote knowledge of ethics.

  2. Prevalence of Colour Vision Anomalies Amongst Dental Professionals and its Effect on Shade Matching of Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Anuj Paul; Wangoo, Anuj; Singh, Sukhman; Mehar, Damanpreet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The success of a restoration is dependent on accurate shade matching of teeth leading to studies evaluating the factors affecting the perception of shades. Colour vision anomalies including colour blindness have been found to exist in the population and it has been thought to be a potential factor affecting the colour perception ability. Aim The present study was done to evaluate the prevalence of colour vision anomalies and its effect on matching of shades of teeth. Materials and Methods A total of 147 dental professionals were randomly selected for the study and were first tested for visual acuity using the Snellen’s Eye Chart so as to carry on the study with only those operators who had a vision of 6/6. Then, the Ishihara’s colour charts were used to test the operators for colour vision handicap. In the last stage of the study, test for accuracy of shade selection was done using the Vitapan Classical shade guide. The shade guide tabs were covered to avoid bias. Percentage was used to calculate the prevalence of colour vision handicap and its effect on matching of shades of teeth as compared to normal vision, which was evaluated using Chi square test. Results Nineteen operators had colour vision anomalies out of hundred operators and only two operators presented with colour blindness. Colour vision anomaly was more prevalent than colour blindness and it was also found that it was more prevalent in males than females. The difference between the accuracy of shade matching between the operators with normal vision and colour vision defect and operators with normal vision and colour blindness was statistically not significant. Conclusion Colour blindness and colour vision handicap are rare conditions, with the latter being more common in the population. According to our study, it was concluded that no statistically significant difference existed amongst the operators with normal vision and colour vision anomaly or operators with normal vision

  3. A review of strategies to stimulate dental professionals to integrate smoking cessation interventions into primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosseel, J.P.; Jacobs, J.E.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarise evidence regarding the effectiveness of various implementation strategies to stimulate the delivery of smoking cessation advice and support during daily dental care. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Search of online medical and psychological databases, correspondence with authors and

  4. 78 FR 38718 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care... geographic areas, population groups, and facilities designated as primary medical care, mental health, and... (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care, podiatric, pharmacy, and veterinary care). The...

  5. Promoting professional behaviour in undergraduate medical, dental and veterinary curricula in the Netherlands: evaluation of a joint effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijk, Scheltus J; Gorter, Ronald C; van Mook, Walther N K A

    2010-01-01

    From 2002 onwards, a nationwide working group of representatives from all medical (8), dental (3) and veterinary medicine (1) schools collaborated in order to develop and implement recommendations for teaching and assessing professional behaviour. The aim of this article is to describe the outcomes of this process, including hurdles encountered and challenges to be met. By a qualitative survey, information was requested on teaching professional behaviour, assessment, instruments used, consequences of unprofessional behaviour and faculty training. All schools have adopted at least parts of the 2002 recommendations. Differences exist mainly in the organisational structure of teaching and assessment as well as in the assessment instruments used. In all schools a longitudinal assessment of professional behaviour was accomplished. All schools involved have made progress since 2002 with regard to teaching and assessment of professional behaviour, resulting in a shift from an instrumental to a cultural change for some schools. A stimulating factor was society's call to focus on patient safety and therefore on assessment of unprofessional behaviour. Hurdles yet to be taken are the involvement of students in the assessment process, teacher confidence in personal assessment capacities, remediation programmes and logistic and administrative support.

  6. Position Paper by Canadian Dental Sleep Medicine Professionals Regarding the Role of Different Health Care Professionals in Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Gauthier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present Canadian position paper contains recommendations for the management by dentists of sleep-disordered breathing in adults with the use of oral appliances (OAs as a treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. The recommendations are based on literature reviews and expert panel consensus. OAs offer an effective, first-line treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer an OA to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy, or for severe OSA patients who cannot tolerate CPAP, are inappropriate candidates for CPAP or who have failed CPAP treatment attempts. The purpose of the present position paper is to guide interdisciplinary teamwork (sleep physicians and sleep dentists and to clarify the role of each professional in the management of OA therapy. The diagnosis of OSA should always be made by a physician, and OAs should be fitted by a qualified dentist who is trained and experienced in dental sleep medicine. Follow-up assessment by the referring physician and polysomnography or sleep studies are required to verify treatment efficacy. The present article emphasizes the need for a team approach to OA therapy and provides treatment guidelines for dentists trained in dental sleep medicine. Many of the dentists and sleep physicians who contributed to the preparation of the present article are members of the Canadian Sleep Society and the authors reached a consensus based on the current literature.

  7. Position paper by Canadian dental sleep medicine professionals on the role of different health care professionals in managing obstructive sleep apnea and snoring with oral appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Luc; Almeida, Fernanda; Arcache, Jean-Patrick; Ashton-McGregor, Catherine; Coté, David; Driver, Helen S; Ferguson, Kathleen A; Lavigne, Gilles J; Martin, Philippe; Masse, Jean-François; Morisson, Florence; Pancer, Jeffrey; Samuels, Charles Harry; Schachter, Maurice; Sériès, Frédéric; Sullivan, Glendon Edward

    2012-01-01

    The present Canadian position paper contains recommendations for the management by dentists of sleep-disordered breathing in adults with the use of oral appliances (OAs) as a treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The recommendations are based on literature reviews and expert panel consensus. OAs offer an effective, first-line treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer an OA to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for severe OSA patients who cannot tolerate CPAP, are inappropriate candidates for CPAP or who have failed CPAP treatment attempts. The purpose of the present position paper is to guide interdisciplinary teamwork (sleep physicians and sleep dentists) and to clarify the role of each professional in the management of OA therapy. The diagnosis of OSA should always be made by a physician, and OAs should be fitted by a qualified dentist who is trained and experienced in dental sleep medicine. Follow-up assessment by the referring physician and polysomnography or sleep studies are required to verify treatment efficacy. The present article emphasizes the need for a team approach to OA therapy and provides treatment guidelines for dentists trained in dental sleep medicine. Many of the dentists and sleep physicians who contributed to the preparation of the present article are members of the Canadian Sleep Society and the authors reached a consensus based on the current literature.

  8. Assessment of occupational exposure of dental professionals to mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil - 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34ispec.13428

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Gasparetto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the occupational exposure of dental professionals to metallic mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in the city of Maringá, Brazil, samples of blood and urine were collected from 149 dental professionals (group exposed, and 51 healthy adults similar for age and gender of the exposed group (control group in September and October, 2008. Urinary mercury was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, urea and creatinine in blood and urine by UV/VIS spectrophotometry and analysis of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the urine by reactive bands. The program ‘Statistic’ version 7.1 and the software R version 2.6.2 were used for the statistical calculations. Urinary mercury was 2.08 ± 2.11 µg g-1 creatinine in workers exposed to mercury and 0.36 ± 0.62 µg g-1 creatinine in the control group (p -1 creatinine; 11% of these professionals (n = 16 had mercury levels above the reference value (5.0 µg g-1 creatinine, whereas the maximum value found was 13 µg g-1 creatinine. The dental professionals of public primary health care in the city of Maringa was exposed to metallic mercury at levels 5.8 times higher than the non-exposed subjects.  

  9. Creating research and development awareness among dental care professionals by use of strategic communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morténius, Helena; Twetman, Svante

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of contemporary research advances, only a limited fraction is implemented into dental practice. One possible way to facilitate this process is to stimulate the research and development (R&D) awareness and interest with aid of strategic communication. METHODS...... questionnaire was 49 years (SD 8.5). Longitudinal analyses were applied to those individuals that responded to both surveys after 7 and 12 years (n = 248). Comparisons between DCP's and PCP's were processed with Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests. RESULTS: Strategic communication contributed to increase the R......&D awareness and interest among the dental personnel. The created interest was reported stronger among the DCP when compared with PCP at both surveys (p 

  10. Patients appearing to dental professionals with orofacial pain arising from intracranial tumors: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzam, Alan A; Habibian, Mina

    2012-12-01

    A small proportion of patients with orofacial pain appearing to dentists and dental specialists will have intracranial tumors as the underlying cause. These patients may undergo unnecessary dental interventions before the correct diagnosis is made. A search of the literature using the PubMed database was performed to identify case reports of this occurrence. Cases were analyzed for common characteristics or presenting features that may aid dentists in identifying patients with intracranial tumors. Twenty-eight cases were identified. Features consistent with the diagnoses of trigeminal neuralgia, persistent idiopathic facial pain, and temporomandibular disorders were the most common presentations. Fifty-nine percent of patients presented with sensory or motor function loss at their initial diagnosis. Patients who present with symptoms that extend beyond the typical presentation of these entities are at highest risk for intracranial tumors and should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Training of dental professionals in Motivational Interviewing can heighten interdental cleaning self-efficacy in periodontal patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Peter Woelber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The success of periodontal therapy depends on the adherence of patients to professional recommendations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a workshop in Motivational Interviewing (MI on non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by dental students. Material and Methods: In the experimental group patients with periodontitis were treated by students trained in MI, while in the control group patients were treated by students who had not been trained in MI. Clinical oral parameters were assessed by a blinded periodontist in addition to the evaluation of psychological questionnaires given before and after the non-surgical periodontal treatment (six months. Conversations between patients and students were recorded and rated with the Motivational Treatment Integrity Code (MITI-d by a blinded psychologist.Results: There were 73 patients in the MI group and 99 patients in the control group. The MI group showed significantly higher scores in the MITI-d analysis. Regression analysis showed that there were no significant differences between groups with regard to plaque level, gingival bleeding, pocket depth reduction or bleeding upon probing. However, patients in the MI-group showed significantly higher interdental cleaning self-efficacy than patients in the control group (MI= 19.57+/-4.7; control= 17.38+/-6.01; p=0.016. Conclusions: Teaching MI to dental students resulted in a significant improvement in the self-efficacy of interdental cleaning in patients compared to a control group of non-trained students, but no improvement in other aspects of non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study also showed that an eight-hour workshop with supervision significantly improved the MI-compliant conversations of dental students without requiring more conversation time.

  12. Oral health education for schoolchildren: a qualitative study of dental care professionals' view of knowledge and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, E; Ringberg, K; Gabre, P

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and interpret dental professionals' view of knowledge, learning, health promotion and their expectations of and attitudes to the response from schoolchildren. A qualitative study design was used with discourse method. Nine dental hygienists and dental nurses, who have practised oral health education among schoolchildren, described their work in tape-recorded, semi-structured interviews. The discourse method stresses the variation and distinctions in the statements, and to understand the content of the text, its contextual dependence must be taken into account. The preventive discourse could be found in all interviews, but it was concentrated on disease prevention and less on maintaining health. The biomedical view of knowledge dominated. Children's and parent's own responsibility for healthy habits was stressed, but no reflection of ethical considerations associated with influencing people's life-style was found. The text revealed discrepancy between the informants, and even within the same individual, showing ambivalence towards oral health education. Some individuals suggested lessons guided by communication with the children, while others wanted to maintain methods based on information about oral diseases to a greater extent. Different perspectives were found. The expression 'oral health promotion' was frequently used and supported by all the interviewed informants, but the statements did not reveal the informant's definition of the concept. Several educators focused on signs of diseases and less on the individual's view of their own health. In the future, oral health education programme needs to focus on quality of life, behavioural variables and indicators of empowerment rather than just disease outcomes.

  13. The Effects of High-Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Dental Professionals with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Rim Suh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs have a significant issue for dental professionals. This study investigated the effects of high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS on work-related pain, fatigue, and the active range of motion in dental professionals. Among recruited 47 dental professionals with WMSDs, 24 subjects received high-frequency TENS (the TENS group, while 23 subjects received placebo stimulation (the placebo group. TENS was applied to the muscle trigger points of the levator scapulae and upper trapezius, while placebo-TENS was administered without electrical stimulation during 60 min. Pain and fatigue at rest and during movement were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS, pain pressure threshold (PPT, and active range of motion (AROM of horizontal head rotation at six time points: prelabor, postlabor, post-TENS, and at 1 h, 3 h, and 1 day after TENS application. Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task. The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05 as compared to the placebo group. A single session high-frequency TENS may immediately reduce symptoms related to WMSDs in dental professionals.

  14. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work related musculoskeletal disorders associated with job contentment in dental professionals: Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-04-01

    High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD. Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (Palternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders.

  15. Dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  16. Is advertising by dental professionals having a negative impact on consumers?: the perspectives of Indian consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dable, Rajani A; Musani, Smita I; Wasnik, Pradnya B; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L; Pawar, Babita R

    2014-01-01

    Advertising by dentists is a controversial issue. Many feel that advertising is necessary for creating dental awareness, whereas, many others feel that it should be banned to keep intact the ethical aspect of the profession, which aims at serving the community. This study explores consumers' ideas about advertising. A total of 562 respondents from various parts of India participated in this study. The response rate was 46.83%. The data were analyzed by applying the chi-square test of association and the Z test of difference between two proportions at 5% and 1% level of significance (i.e., p<.05 and p<.01).

  17. Assessment of professional competency and need of smoking cessation counseling for dental students

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    Rajani A. Dable

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the smoking prevalence among dental students and to assess the need for promoting tobacco education and intervention by exploring their knowledge about smoking related risk factors. The study also examined the attitudes and practices of the students toward tobacco consumption, and their responsibilities toward the community. Methods: In total, 53 male students participated in the study (21 juniors and 32 seniors. The training program was divided into three modules, and the questionnaire was administered before and after the counseling sessions, which provided the comparative data on the students’ views about smoking cessation. Results: The most commonly practiced mode of tobacco consumption was found to be cigarette smoking (90.6 %, while a few consumed Gutkha (9.4%. All the junior students (100% reported to have been benefitted by the counseling program, while 68.8% of the students from the senior group reported the same. Bivariate statistical analysis was conducted using the Pearson’s chi-square test for testing the difference across the age groups. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Conclusion: Curbing tobacco influence on dental students in their initial days can ensure a smoke-free life for them, as well as prevents them from feeling embarrassed or experiencing a lack of confidence while seeing their patients. Thus, tobacco education and intervention programs can motivate the students and increase their potential to be credible advisors regarding smoking cessation.

  18. Engaging dental professionals in NHS leadership - the challenges, the opportunities and the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, J

    2014-09-01

    Leadership training in dentistry and the wider NHS is often overlooked or seen as an unnecessary distraction from front line duties. Dentists themselves are often reluctant to adopt formal leadership learning due to the way work is structured and rewarded. So, what is it like for a dentist to undertake leadership training and how can the gap be bridged between the need for highly trained leaders in dentistry and the reticence of front line professionals to take time away from practice?

  19. Perceptions of Jordanian laypersons and dental professionals to altered smile aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Al-Shamsi, Nada O; Al-Khateeb, Susan

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to rate the attractiveness of different smile variables, to compare the perception of Jordanian laypeople, general practitioners, and orthodontists to altered smile aesthetics, and to identify the threshold where different variables begin to impair smile aesthetics. A smiling photograph of a female dental student was selected and digitally manipulated to create changes in buccal corridor space (BCS), the amount of gingival display, and the midline diastema. These altered images were rated by three groups of Jordanians: 200 laypeople (100 females and 100 males), 200 general practitioners (100 females and 100 males), and 160 orthodontists (40 females and 120 males). Smile aesthetics scores were calculated and comparisons between groups were performed using the univariate general linear model. The results showed that profession and gender affected BCS and midline diastema attractiveness ratings (P<0.001). Wide BCSs, a gingival display of more than 2 mm, and the presence of a midline diastema of any size were rated as unattractive by all groups.

  20. Summary of: Modelling workforce skill-mix: how can dental professionals meet the needs and demands of older people in England?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, H

    2010-02-13

    healthcare system with 'no skill-mix' resulted in the lowest volume of clinical staff equivalents (dentists: 8,668) providing care for older people, whereas maximum skill-mix involved more staff (clinical staff = 10,337, of whom 2,623 were dentists, 4,180 hygienist/therapists and 3,534 clinical dental technicians) if all care is provided at the relevant level of competence.Conclusion The model suggests that with widening skill-mix, dental care professionals can play a major role in building dental care capacity for older people in future. The implications for health policy, professional bodies and dental teamworking are discussed.

  1. Continuing professional development of dentists through distant learning: An Indira Gandhi National Open University-Dental Council of India experiment a report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Kuba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To keep themselves updated with all the advancements in the field of dentistry, dentists should involve themselves in some kind of professional development. Distance learning is the most appropriate way to serve the growing demand due to technological advancements. Indira Gandhi National Open University in collaboration with Dental Council of India (DCI developed and launched two continuing professional development programs in Endodontics (postgraduate certificate in endodontics and postgraduate certificate in oral implantology and has trained over 400 and 280 BDS dentists respectively till date. The program package consists of self-instructional material, assignments, videos and practical training. The training is conducted in premiere dental colleges and institutions recognized by DCI. The certificate is awarded after a term end examination, both in theory and practical. The pass percentages of the theory courses ranged from around 63% to 98%, and 90% of the candidates cleared the practical exam.

  2. Working conditions and personal characteristics: Predicting burnout among dental professionals in Mysore, India: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Harilal Chainani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentistry is a profession demanding physical and mental efforts. Increased workload, stress, poorer mental health, and reduced job satisfaction, these factors might combine, to increase the level of "burnout" among dental practitioners. Aim: To assess the burnout level among the dentist practising in Mysore city and to investigate the association between personal characteristics, working conditions and burnout. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the month of August-September 2011. A predesigned and pretested questionnaire of 22 items called Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human service Survey was distributed among the dentists to assess the burnout levels. The response was obtained using a Likert scale ranging from 0 to 6. Statistical analysis was carried out using Microsoft Excel and SPSS version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. The data were subjected to mean, standard deviation, and contingency coefficient test at 5% level of significance. Results: Emotional exhaustion was found to be high in 31 (22.1%, moderate in 16 (11.4%, and low in 93 (66.4% of the dentists. High level of personal accomplishment was found in 63 (45.0%, moderate in 45 (32.1%, and low in 32 (22.9% dentists. Depersonalization was found to be low in 63 (45.0%, moderate in 45 (32.1%, and high in 32 (22.9% participants. Conclusion: Of the 140 participants, 16 (11.4% were found to be at a high risk. 118 (84.3% in moderate risk and 6 (4.3% in low risk of burnout.

  3. Basic life support revisited – New American Heart Association, 2015, guidelines: An update for dental professionals

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    Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed Bijle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available American Heart Association (AHA - a professional organization dealing with appropriate cardiac care in an effort to reduce disability and deaths caused by cardiovascular disease and stroke, portrays the necessity of continuous evaluated evidence-based medicine. Thus, AHA formally introduces every 5 years their guidelines for the Emergency Cardiovascular Care on the basis of a thorough evidence search to make provision of the best possible treatment for patients with cardiac emergencies. Since, new 2015 AHA guidelines are established very recently, awareness of our fellow dentists with its major changes at least with respect to basic life support (BLS seems important. Hence, this communication is scripted to throw light on the significant changes in 2015 AHA guidelines has brought in BLS protocols.

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practice towards droplet and airborne isolation precautions amongs dental health care professionals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Manish; Sawla, Leena; Mathur, Anmol; Nihlani, Tarun; Ayair, Uttara; Prabu, Duraiswamy; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain comprehensive information about the knowledge, attitude and practices in regard to droplet and airborne infection related precautions among faculty member and the undergraduate students in Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. A cross sectional survey was conducted among 311 dental faculty and the undergraduate students under clinical training in Udaipur, Rajasthan. A self-assessment questionnaire composed of queries on three levels, namely knowledge, attitude and practices with respect to airborne and droplet isolation precautions was used. The data was collected and analyzed by using SPSS software. Frequency distribution scores of knowledge, attitude and practice in relation to droplet and airborne isolation precautions were revealed that even the students under training along with the faculty member were quite aware of the precautions and the principles of airborne and droplet isolation. Mean score for knowledge was 9.17±2.07; Mean scores for attitude and practice were 48.65±7.47 and 6.88±3.51 respectively. There were no significant difference in all groups regarding knowledge, attitude and practice. In addition, a positive linear correlation was found between two items of survey including knowledge- attitude, knowledge- practice and attitude- practice (Pknowledge and attitude but the practice levels for the same were low. The study confirms from the findings that the infection control measures among the health care professionals are fairly good and an educational program on isolation precautions can further enhance these levels and thereby, reducing the risk of infection transmission risks.

  5. Systematic review of parameters and methods for the professional assessment of aesthetics in dental implant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benic, Goran I; Wolleb, Karin; Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review was to evaluate the scientific literature regarding the professional assessment of aesthetics in implant dentistry. An electronic search of Medline database and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed, and complemented by a manual search. Clinical or validation studies (Part 1) and randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) (Part 2) reporting parameters and methods for the assessment of aesthetics were included. The information regarding the assessment of aesthetics was extracted. The methodological quality of RCTs was evaluated by means of the Cochrane Collaboration's Tool for assessing risk of bias. The search yielded 149 and 32 publications in Part 1 and Part 2, respectively. A great diversity with regard to parameters, methods and measurement units used for the assessment of aesthetics was found among the included studies. With respect to time points of assessment there were significant differences between the RCTs. Only two RCTs fulfilled all the criteria of the The Cochrane Collaboration's Tool for assessing risk of bias. Due to the differences of the study designs, parameters and methods used for the assessment of aesthetics, comparisons between studies should be interpreted with caution. Only a limited number of RCTs offer sound evidence on aesthetic outcomes in implant dentistry. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Dental students interacting with dental nurses: an investigation of the role of gender and ethnicity in inter-professional communication and working styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, R; McWilliams, C; Gorter, R; Williams, S

    2007-01-27

    To examine the influence of dental students' gender and ethnicity on their perceptions of dental nurses' duties and upon their communication and working styles when interacting with dental nurses (DNs). A survey of clinical dental students attending Queen's University Belfast and University of Leeds. Students were invited to complete the 34 item Communication and Working Styles Questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed the students' perceptions of the duties of a DN and the students' communication and working styles. Factor analysis revealed two communication and working styles which were friendly and difficult styles, respectively. Two hundred and forty-eight students participated giving a response rate of 88%: 58% were female and 30% of students from Leeds were from various ethnic minority groups. The students' perceptions as to the duties of a DN were affected by university attended and ethnicity. The majority of students used friendly communication styles. The type of style used was determined by university attended, gender and ethnicity. Male students had higher mean scores for friendly working styles whereas students from minority ethnic groups had higher mean scores for gender-related communication style. Female students and students from minority ethnic groups had higher mean scores for items relating to teamwork. This survey illustrates the different communication and working styles used by male and female and dental students from different ethnic backgrounds when interacting and working with DNs.

  7. Professional competencies and work-related support in relation to periodontal therapy and work satisfaction: A questionnaire study among Swedish Dental Hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, A; Alian, A Y; Wennström, J L; Abrahamsson, K H

    2017-11-16

    To analyse dental hygienists' (DHs) views on professional competencies and behavioural interventions in the treatment of periodontitis patients, perceived work-related support and work satisfaction. A Web-based questionnaire was distributed to all DHs employed at the public dental service in the county of Västra Götaland, Sweden. 302 (83%) responded to the questionnaire; 291 of these DHs stated that they on regular basis treated periodontitis patients and thus constituted the sample for analyses. Based on initial correlation and bivariate analyses of the questionnaire data, multiple logistic regression models were formulated to estimate perceived competencies to treat patients with periodontitis and work satisfaction. The multiple analyses revealed that DHs who worked with specific methods for behavioural intervention, like motivational interviewing, were more likely to rate themselves as "definitely possessing the competencies required to treat patients with periodontitis" (OR 4.0). Likewise, this group of DHs did not consider it more difficult to charge their patients the financial costs for such a behavioural intervention than for scaling therapy (OR 3.1). The perception that one's professional competencies were utilized well in daily practice was associated with high work satisfaction (OR 4.1). More years in the profession (OR 1.03) and a good support by colleagues (OR 1.9) had also a positive impact on work satisfaction. Dental hygienists' considered that competencies in the treatment of periodontitis patients were related to the practice of behavioural interventions as part of therapy. A stimulating and supportive work environment, with opportunities for professional development, is important for work satisfaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. How a modified approach to dental coding can benefit personal and professional development with improved clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the remarkable achievements in dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. This has made the concept of Evidenced Based Dentistry more applicable to modern dental practice. Despite merit in the concept whereby clinical decisions are guided by scientific evidence, there are problems with establishing a scientific base. This is no more challenging than in modern dentistry where the gap between rapidly developing products/procedures and its evidence base are widening. Furthermore, the burden of oral disease continues to remain high at the population level. These problems have prompted new approaches to enhancing research. The aim of this paper is to outline how a modified approach to dental coding may benefit clinical and population level research. Using publically assessable data obtained from the Australian Chronic Disease Dental Scheme and item codes contained within the Australian Schedule of Dental Services and Glossary, a suggested approach to dental informatics is illustrated. A selection of item codes have been selected and expanded with the addition of suffixes. These suffixes provided circumstantial information that will assist in assessing clinical outcomes such as success rates and prognosis. The use of item codes in administering the CDDS yielded a large database of item codes. These codes are amenable to dental informatics which has been shown to enhance research at both the clinical and population level. This is a cost effective method to supplement existing research methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  10. The hypertensive dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, B C; Glick, M

    1997-08-01

    The dental team plays an integral role in safeguarding the general health of patients. Dental health care workers should be able to recognize risk factors associated with hypertension and counsel patients in an effort to reduce those that are present. In addition, dental professionals should recognize how these risk factors and associated hypertension affect the provision of dental care. This article reviews recent findings and therapies for hypertension, evaluates historically accepted but unsupported anecdotal information on the dental management of hypertensive patients and proposes guidelines for the dental management of these patients.

  11. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  12. Dental fear among medical and dental undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, H; Razak, I A

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). "Heart beats faster" and "muscle being tensed" were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. "Drill" and "anesthetic needle" were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  13. Atendimento odontológico ao portador do HIV: medo, preconceito e ética profissional Dental care for HIV-positive individuals: fear, prejudice, and professional ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto César Discacciati

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Descrever os aspectos éticos envolvidos no atendimento odontológico a pacientes HIV soropositivos ou com aids. Métodos. Revisão da literatura mediante consulta a livros texto e busca nos bancos de dados Medline e Lilacs, com ênfase nos trabalhos conduzidos na Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Foram abordados aspectos como representação social da aids e risco de infecção pelo HIV durante atendimentos, recusa de atendimento, encaminhamento a outro profissional sem motivo justificável, cobrança de honorários diferenciados, imposição de horários especiais e manutenção do sigilo sobre o status sorológico do paciente. Resultados. Ainda existe preconceito e desconhecimento sobre o risco de infecção por HIV e aids, tanto por parte dos cirurgiões dentistas quanto por parte de outros pacientes. Conclusões. É preciso dar início a um projeto de educação nos próprios consultórios e nas universidades que formam novos profissionais, assim como reforçar o papel dos Conselhos Regionais e Federal de Odontologia no esclarecimento sobre a postura ética dos cirurgiões-dentistas diante da infecção por HIV e aids.Objective. To describe the ethical aspects involved in the dental care provided to patients who are HIV-positive or who have AIDS. Methods. Literature review (textbooks and MEDLINE and LILACS databases, with an emphasis on the work developed at the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. We examined the social representation of AIDS, the risk of HIV infection during office visits, the refusal to provide care, referral to other professionals without justification, special charges and office visit hours for HIV-positive patients, and the confidentiality of the serological status of the patient. Results. There is still prejudice and ignorance about the risk of HIV and AIDS infection, on the part of dental surgeons and of patients. Conclusions. An educational

  14. Atenção odontológica à gestante: papel dos profissionais de saúde Dental treatment of pregnant women: the role of healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Aparecida Britto Codato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de pesquisa qualitativa realizada com gestantes usuárias do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS e de serviços privados que objetivou identificar a percepção dessas mulheres sobre o papel dos profissionais de saúde em relação à atenção odontológica durante a gravidez, cujos dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas gravadas, semiestruturadas por roteiro de questões e analisados por meio de análise de conteúdo temática. Concluiu que alguns profissionais de saúde alimentam e proferem mitos e medos sobre atenção odontológica e saúde bucal relacionados ao período gestacional. Evidenciou-se a necessidade de investimentos em educação sobre odontologia e gravidez, tanto em nível de graduação como de pósgraduação, porque tais conhecimentos podem contribuir com a revisão de conceitos e, por conseguinte, nas condutas manifestas ante essa parcela da população.The scope of this article involved qualitative research conducted together with pregnant women attended by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS and private services, seeking to identify the perception of these women on the role of health professionals in relation to dental care during pregnancy. The data were collected through recorded, semi-structured interviews based on a questionnaire and analyzed by assessment of thematic content. It was noted that some health professionals propagate and reinforce misconceptions and fears about dental care and oral health during pregnancy. The need for investment in education on dental care during pregnancy, both at undergraduate and graduate level, was clearly revealed, since knowledge on the subject can contribute to a review of concepts, and consequently the manifest behavior vis-à-vis this segment of the population.

  15. Status of occupational hazards and their prevention among dental professionals in Chandigarh, India: A comprehensive questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Frequency tables were prepared and coefficient of correlation was computed to check correlation between different variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The most common occupational hazard reported was injury from "sharps" (77%, out of which needle prick injury was the most frequent. Of the other occupational problems job related stress (43.3%, musculoskeletal problems (39.8%, and allergies (23.8% from things used in dental clinics were most common. A reasonably high percentage of dentists were immunized against hepatitis-B virus (88.4% and were following proper infection control measures and hospital waste disposal methods. Very few dentists were following the correct method of disposal of excess amalgam (11% and measurement of radiation exposure (27.5% within their clinic. Most of them (90.2% were satisfied with their current working hours and job. Conclusion: Prevalence of occupational hazards among the studied group was high and certain preventive measures were not being followed properly. Therefore, there is a need to improve the knowledge of dentists regarding these hazards and their prevention.

  16. Internet resources for dentistry: computer, Internet, reference, and sites for enhancing personal productivity of the dental professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, G F

    2000-08-15

    At the onset of the new millennium the Internet has become the new standard means of distributing information. In the last two to three years there has been an explosion of e-commerce with hundreds of new web sites being created every minute. For most corporate entities, a web site is as essential as the phone book listing used to be. Twenty years ago technologist directed how computer-based systems were utilized. Now it is the end users of personal computers that have gained expertise and drive the functionality of software applications. The computer, initially invented for mathematical functions, has transitioned from this role to an integrated communications device that provides the portal to the digital world. The Web needs to be used by healthcare professionals, not only for professional activities, but also for instant access to information and services "just when they need it." This will facilitate the longitudinal use of information as society continues to gain better information access skills. With the demand for current "just in time" information and the standards established by Internet protocols, reference sources of information may be maintained in dynamic fashion. News services have been available through the Internet for several years, but now reference materials such as online journals and digital textbooks have become available and have the potential to change the traditional publishing industry. The pace of change should make us consider Will Rogers' advice, "It isn't good enough to be moving in the right direction. If you are not moving fast enough, you can still get run over!" The intent of this article is to complement previous articles on Internet Resources published in this journal, by presenting information about web sites that present information on computer and Internet technologies, reference materials, news information, and information that lets us improve personal productivity. Neither the author, nor the Journal endorses any of the

  17. The future dental workforce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  18. Dental biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    species at a site will build up and may eventually cause development of disease. Depending on local ecological factors, the composition of the dental biofilm may vary considerably. With access to excess carbohydrates, the dental biofilm will be dominated by mainly gram-positive carbohydrate...... and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body...... by bacteremia and cause systemic disease. Basically, prevention and treatment of dental biofilm infections are achieved by regular personal and professional removal of the dental biofilm....

  19. An Overview of Dental Radiology. NCHCT Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manny, Edward F.; And Others

    This overview of dental radiology contains sections on demographics, equipment, dental radiology quality assurance, efficacy, dental radiology education curricula, professional organizations' guidelines for training and use, and state activities. In section 1 dental personnel, population of dental personnel, employment and earning prospects,…

  20. Expanding a professional dental care system: experiences of Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion during Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Frank L; Smith, Gregory M; Cobb, James W; Patterson, Craig G; Smith, Mark A; Pollard, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09, Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion managed an extensive dental care system stretching throughout the Iraq theater of operations. We illustrate several of the unique challenges faced by Task Force 261's headquarters and its dental and area support companies, and describe the remedies emplaced by the Task Force. Personnel structure, the evacuation chain, supply and facility management, dental civil-military operations, detainee care, information technology applications, and public health initiatives are discussed in detail.

  1. Trabalho e formação profissional do atendente de consultório dentário e do técnico em higiene dental Work and professional qualifications of dentist office attendants and of dental hygiene technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Boen Garcia Liñan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a formação de egressos dos cursos de atendente de consultório dentário (ACD e de técnico em higiene dental (THD, procurando compreender a importância dos cursos técnicos na melhoria do desempenho profissional, da renda individual e familiar, assim como a sua importância para uma melhor inserção no mercado de trabalho. Mostra que, apesar das deficiências assinaladas pelos egressos, a escola os qualificou adequadamente para o desempenho de suas funções. No entanto, as dificuldades por eles encontradas em termos de representação coletiva, a falta de prestígio social e a baixa credibilidade e respeito profissional que lhes consagram os cirurgiões-dentistas permanecem como problemas a serem enfrentados. A falta de legitimidade profissional que ainda os caracteriza faz com que os auxiliares da odontologia fiquem à mercê das oscilações do mercado de trabalho e das políticas de saúde. O artigo sustenta que a regulamentação dessas categorias de trabalhadores pode significar proteção técnica e ética, evitando a formação de monopólios profissionais e assegurando normas de eqüidade e justiça sociais para os profissionais da saúde bucal.This article analyzes the qualifications of dental office attendant (DOA and dental hygiene technician (DHT graduates, seeking to understand the importance technical courses have not only in improving their professional performance, individual and family incomes, but also their impact on these professionals' better placement in the work market. It shows that, despite the deficiencies these graduates mention, their schooling qualified them appropriately to perform their duties. However, the difficulties these professionals face in terms of collective representation, the lack of social prestige, and the low levels of professional credibility and respect they get from dentists remain hurdles to be faced. The lack of professional legitimacy that characterizes their work

  2. The dangers of schooling : The introduction of school medical inspection in the Netherlands (c.1900)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nelleke; de Beer, Fedor

    2009-01-01

    In this article the authors address the question of why school medical inspection in the Netherlands developed not only considerably slower than the British service but did so also on a more modest scale in terms of the impact on children's lives. In the Netherlands school doctors were not allowed

  3. Smoking and dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in ...

  4. Dental education: a leadership challenge for dental educators and practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    By all outward signs, the dental profession is prospering. However, signs of a looming crisis in dental education threaten the future effectiveness of the profession. Transforming dental education through the application of principles espoused by the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (CCI) is essential for securing the future of the profession. To meet the future oral health needs of the public, dental schools must retain their research mission and prepare students for evidence-based practice. To accomplish this, both the curricular content and the environment and approach to dental education must change. Besides the knowledge and abilities needed to care for a more diverse and aging population, future practitioners must possess tools needed to thrive in the world of small business and have the ethical foundation to conduct themselves as responsible professionals. Ensuring the future of the profession is a leadership challenge to be shared by both dental educators and practitioners.

  5. Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of a single annual professional intervention for the prevention of childhood dental caries in a remote rural Indigenous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Kroon, Jeroen; Tut, Ohnmar; Kularatna, Sanjeewa; Jamieson, Lisa M; Wallace, Valda; Boase, Robyn; Fernando, Surani; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Scuffham, Paul A; Johnson, Newell W

    2015-08-29

    The aim of the study is to reduce the high prevalence of tooth decay in children in a remote, rural Indigenous community in Australia, by application of a single annual dental preventive intervention. The study seeks to (1) assess the effectiveness of an annual oral health preventive intervention in slowing the incidence of dental caries in children in this community, (2) identify the mediating role of known risk factors for dental caries and (3) assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the intervention. The intervention is novel in that most dental preventive interventions require regular re-application, which is not possible in resource constrained communities. While tooth decay is preventable, self-care and healthy habits are lacking in these communities, placing more emphasis on health services to deliver an effective dental preventive intervention. Importantly, the study will assess cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness for broader implementation across similar communities in Australia and internationally. There is an urgent need to reduce the burden of dental decay in these communities, by implementing effective, cost-effective, feasible and sustainable dental prevention programs. Expected outcomes of this study include improved oral and general health of children within the community; an understanding of the costs associated with the intervention provided, and its comparison with the costs of allowing new lesions to develop, with associated treatment costs. Findings should be generalisable to similar communities around the world. The research is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), registration number ACTRN12615000693527; date of registration: 3rd July 2015.

  6. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  7. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  8. Assessment of Sharp Injuries among Cameroonian Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To assess the prevalence of sharp injury among Cameroonian dental professionals. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study of 41 dental professionals recruited from 4 out of 10 provinces in Cameroon was conducted in the second half of 2009. A self-administered questionnaire was used to capture ...

  9. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Background Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to...

  10. METHACRYLATE AND ACRYLATE ALLERGY IN DENTAL STUDENTS.

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Lyapina; Assya Krasteva; Maria Dencheva; Mariana Tzekova; Angelina Kisselova-Yaneva

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of acrylic monomers is used in dentistry, and when dental personnel, patients or students of dental medicine become sensitized, it is of great importance to identify the dental ;acrylic preparations to which the sensitized individual can be exposed. Numerous studies confirm high incidence of sensitization to (meth) acrylates in dentatal professionals, as well as in patients undergoing dental treatment and exposed to resin-based materials. Quite a few studies are available aiming t...

  11. The Role and Education of Dental Care Professionals in Identifying Domestic Violence: Report of an Audience Participation Exercise and Round Table Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Susan J.; Quinn, Barry; Reynolds, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is a major public problem affecting 30% of women over 16. Three quarters of victims have violence to the head and neck, and therefore the role of the dentist is paramount in DV identification. Only one-third of dental schools in the UK include DV in their curricula and there is a need to introduce effective education for the…

  12. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  13. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Advanced Dental Students' Use, Knowledge, and Beliefs Regarding Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearston, Jenni A; Shah, Krina; Cheng, Eric; Moosvi, Rizvan; Park, Su Hyun; Patel, Naiya; Spielman, Andrew I; Weitzman, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    Using cigarettes and alternative tobacco products (ATPs) is associated with negative oral health outcomes, and dental health professionals are poised to help patients quit. The aim of this study was to determine dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students' use, knowledge, and beliefs about cigarettes and ATPs, including perceptions about their education in tobacco dependence treatment and counseling experience. All 1,783 students enrolled in the dental, dental hygiene, and postdoctoral dental programs at the New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate in the survey in 2016. A total of 708 students at least partially completed the survey, for a response rate of 39.7%. In the results, 146 of the students (20.1%) reported ever using cigarettes, while 253 (35.7%) reported ever using any ATP. Regarding tobacco use intervention, the students reported they had not received enough training on ATPs, were neutral about cigarettes, and were somewhat confident and not so confident counseling a cigarette smoker or ATP user, respectively. By their fourth year, 77.8% of the dental students reported they had counseled someone to stop smoking cigarettes, but only 40.7% had counseled someone to stop using ATPs. Overall, all groups of students reported feeling more confident and had received more education on interventions for cigarettes than for ATPs (pcigarettes and ATPs. These findings call for a revised tobacco education curriculum for dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students, focused on building knowledge and confidence for promoting tobacco dependence treatment.

  14. 75 FR 7218 - Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional Services at Non-Departmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Benefits; 64.010, Veterans Nursing Home Care; and 64.011, Veterans Dental Care. Congressional Review Act... schools, Medical devices, Medical research, Mental health programs, Nursing home care, Philippines... contract with non-VA facilities for care in accordance with the provisions of this section. When demand is...

  15. Are dental students ready for supercomplex dental practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeatter, D; Peck, C

    2018-02-01

    Contemporary dental practice requires practitioners who are able to draw upon varying interconnected knowledge and skills, in order to make judgments and take action when faced with multiple, often contradictory, ways of interpreting a situation. However, the curricula that prepare students for dental practice are traditionally based on the theoretical knowledge and technical skills to be gained by students. This is despite evidence in the dental literature of a collective desire for graduates to have more range and depth in their repertoire. Examination of contemporary dental practice through the lens of supercomplexity (Higher Education, 40, 409 and 2000) provides contextual understanding and a platform to explore the types of learning and curriculum approaches that can best prepare students for professional practice. From the insights offered by examples from other professional fields, we, as dental educators, can begin to conceptualise learning dentistry as much more than competency frameworks or descriptions of what students need to know and be able to do. Rather, to equip graduates for contemporary dental practice, the dental curriculum needs to become a vehicle for students to develop personally and professionally as well as teaching the theoretical and technical aspects of dentistry. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Da autonomia da boca: práticas curriculares e identidade profissional na emergência do ensino brasileiro da odontologia On the autonomy of the mouth: curricular practices, professional identity, and the emergence of dental teaching in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Maria Warmling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Analisa como ocorreu a separação entre o ensino da medicina e o da odontologia no Brasil. Privilegia a institucionalização das políticas de ensino da odontologia no país como vertente produtora de identidade profissional. Políticas de ensino e práticas profissionais são inter-relacionadas para mostrar como suas relações e sentidos mudam historicamente. Propõe que a autonomia do ensino da odontologia emergiu da necessidade de conformação do sistema de regulação das práticas de cura no Brasil e seu processo de instituição desenvolveu-se sob inspiração das políticas positivistas acerca do ensino livre. Práticas curriculares foram produzindo a subjetividade do cirurgião-dentista moderno e também da clínica por ele desempenhada.The article analyzes how the separation of the teaching of medicine and of dentistry occurred in Brazil. It highlights the role that the institutionalization of dental teaching policies played in shaping a professional identity. Relations are drawn between teaching policies and professional practices to show how their relationships and meanings have changed historically. It is argued that the teaching of dentistry became autonomous because of the need to comply with the formation of a system to regulate healing practices in Brazil and that the process of its institutionalization transpired under the inspiration of positivist policies about free teaching. Curricular practices produced the subjectivity of the modern dental surgeon and his clinical practices.

  17. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  18. Social media and dentistry: some reflections on e-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, P; Waylen, A

    2015-04-24

    The proliferation of digital technology is impacting on the training and development of healthcare professionals. Research on the online behaviour of medical and pharmacy students indicates that social media poses a number of risks to the professional practice of healthcare professionals. General Dental Council guidelines on the use of social media also suggest that it has the potential to expose dental professionals to a variety of breaches of professional conduct. This paper explores the various ways social media can help, as well as hinder, the practice of dental professionalism. However, the lack of primary research on the social media behaviour of dental students and qualified dental practitioners alike acts as a barrier to increasing social media awareness within dentistry. The paper concludes by calling for more research-led discussion on the role social media plays in shaping our understanding of dental professionalism in the twenty-first century.

  19. Community Dental Health Coordinators: Cultural "Connectors" for Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Jane

    2017-01-01

    The American Dental Association's Community Dental Health Coordinator program was designed to teach community health worker skills to dental auxiliaries. Case management, a valued skill utilized by medical providers, is largely unknown in the dental profession. When case management is incorporated into a dental professional's practice, prevention becomes amplified, leading to decreased costs and increased access. ©2017 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  20. Continuing professional development--global perspectives: synopsis of a workshop held during the International Association of Dental Research meeting in Gothenburg, Sweden, 2003. Part 2: regulatory and accreditation systems and evidence for improving the performance of the dental team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, H.A.; Eaton, K.A.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Toh, C.G.; Grayden, S.K.; Senakola, E.; Rohlin, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two that report on continuing professional development (CPD). Details of the informants and the methodologies used were reported in the first paper. This paper reports the data and information presented on the topics of regulatory and accreditation systems for

  1. Estratégia profissional e mimetismo empresarial: os planos de saúde odontológicos no Brasil Professional strategy and institutional isomorphism: the dental health insurance industry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Vieira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa o modelo organizacional das empresas de planos de saúde odontológicos das modalidades de cooperativas de profissionais e a odontologia de grupo para compreender a dinâmica da oferta de serviços odontológicos no país. Adotou-se como referência a formulação institucionalista de Di Maggio e Powell. O mercado de planos de saúde odontológico é pulverizado, com o predomínio de empresas de pequeno porte, e apresenta um grande dinamismo, que favorece as empresas de pequeno, médio e alto porte. As modalidades analisadas concentram a maior proporção de beneficiários e receitas. A análise geral do desempenho do setor revela impressionante dinamismo na captação de clientes, mesmo após a criação da ANS. O regime de regulação tem imposto um novo padrão institucional à entrada, permanência e saída das empresas no mercado, que não afeta o desempenho setorial. Os dados analisados evidenciam que o setor de planos de saúde odontológicos é altamente rentável, apresentando uma grande capacidade na geração de receitas que explica o crescimento e a permanência destas modalidades no mercado. Os padrões de rentabilidade média, principalmente das empresas de odontologia de grupo, são extremamente elevados, ficando muito acima de qualquer atividade empresarial do Brasil.This article analyzes the organizational model of the dental health industry. The main organizational leaders in this industry are the professional cooperatives and group dental insurance companies. The theoretical basis of the article is the organizational theory developed by Di Maggio and Powell. The dental health industry consists of a great number of small and very dynamic companies, however an expressive part of clients and profit are concentrated in a few large companies. The results show that the industry has expanded the number of clients after the creation of the National Health Insurance Agency. The regulation regime has forced

  2. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for dental assistants. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of dental assistants with ...

  3. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  4. The relevance of behavioural sciences in dental practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    2000-01-01

    or the technical skills of dental professionals, but also on patients, their attitudes and behaviour and the interaction between dental professionals and patients. It is well known that the success of dental treatments (for example, periodontal, orthodontic or implants) depends on the patient's behaviour, which......The aim of this paper is to illustrate how knowledge from behavioural sciences is necessary and relevant in creating a successful dental practice, benefitting patients and dental professionals. There are many ways to create a successful dental practice, the products of which are the various...... treatments performed by dentists or dental hygienists for their patients. Advanced technologies and methods are constantly improving these treatments and thus the technical and managerial aspects of dentistry. However, the success of dental practice is not only dependent on the technique applied...

  5. Dental anxiety--how would you manage it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnad, Maya P Rao

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is well documented within dental literature, and is a condition with which dentists and dental care professionals alike will be familiar. Its consequences may extend beyond dental implications alone, but can also have the potential to affect a patient's quality of life. It is important that as a dental profession we are aware of the methods which can be used to manage various forms of dental anxiety, and to refer to specialist services as appropriate. This paper focusses on detailing both the evidence-based behavioural and pharmacological strategies that may be employed for both dentally anxious adults and children.

  6. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Strategies for combating dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare, Lyndsay C; Dundes, Lauren

    2004-11-01

    Dental anxiety and subsequent avoidance of dental care and deterioration of oral health pose a significant problem for the dental profession. In an attempt to elucidate preferences of anxious dental patients, we gathered survey data from 121 persons at a small, private liberal arts college in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Half of the respondents experienced dental anxiety, and most of these (66 percent) attributed anxiety to fear of anticipated pain. The majority of anxious patients preferred a dentist to be friendly (93 percent), talkative (82 percent), and to have an office with adorned walls (89 percent) and a slightly cool temperature (63 percent). Patients who identified themselves as anxious also indicated that music in the background (89 percent) and magazines and books in the dental office (75 percent) were helpful. Anxious patients were more likely than non-anxious patients to prefer a male dentist (77 percent versus 52 percent). This finding was especially marked among anxious male respondents, 93 percent of whom preferred a male dentist compared to 73 percent of anxious female respondents. These survey data may assist dental professionals in understanding and combating patients' dental anxiety, in order to increase the frequency of dental visits and to prompt a corresponding restoration or maintenance of oral health.

  8. Is there an association between the presence of dental fluorosis and dental trauma amongst school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lorenna Fonseca Braga de; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Mendes, Rafael Inácio Pompeu; Oliveira, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes; Oliveira, Carolina de Castro; Lima, Carolina Veloso; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether there is an association with the different levels of dental fluorosis and the presence of dental trauma amongst school children. A transversal study was conducted amongst school children from the age of 12. Dental examinations were conducted by 24 well trained and fully qualified dental surgeons. Data was collected from 36 randomly selected public schools amongst 89 schools in a municipality. The criteria used to diagnose dental fluorosis was based on the Dean's fluorosis Index and for diagnosing dental trauma we looked for clinical signs of crown fractures and dental avulsions. Multiple descriptive analysis, which was bivariate, was carried out. Amongst the 2,755 school children that took part in the study 1,089 (39.6%) were diagnosed with dental fluorosis and 106 (3.8%) had one tooth or more with dental trauma. We noted a high prevalence of dental fluorosis, independent of the level of severity, amongst individuals with one tooth or more who had dental trauma. This association was even more evident where there were severely high levels of fluorosis. We also noted that the presence of fluorosis was greater amongst those that actively paid more attention to discoloration on their teeth and who received treatment from a dental professional at their schools. Nevertheless dental fluorosis was associated with the presence of dental trauma, independent of its severity.

  9. [Dental curriculum and team treatment concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgersdijk, R.C.W.; Kersten, H.

    2001-01-01

    The changing oral situation in the Netherlands, the upgrading of the dental hygienist training and the introduction of the bachelor and master degree in the Dutch higher education system asks for a new dental professional: the oral physician. To prepare the oral physician for his role as leader of a

  10. Perceptions of undergraduate dental students at Makerere College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The creating, maintenance and storage of patients' medical records is an important competence for the professional training of a dental student. Objective. Owing to the unsatisfactory state of dental records at the students' clinic, the objective of this study was to obtain information from undergraduate dental ...

  11. Dental biofilm infections - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-04-01

    Teeth are colonized by oral bacteria from saliva containing more than 700 different bacterial species. If removed regularly, the dental biofilm mainly comprises oral streptococci and is regarded as resident microflora. But if left undisturbed, a complex biofilm containing up to 100 bacterial species at a site will build up and may eventually cause development of disease. Depending on local ecological factors, the composition of the dental biofilm may vary considerably. With access to excess carbohydrates, the dental biofilm will be dominated by mainly gram-positive carbohydrate-fermenting bacteria causing demineralization of teeth, dental caries, which may further lead to inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and periapical region, i.e., pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. In supra- and subgingival biofilms, predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic proteolytic bacteria will colonize and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body by bacteremia and cause systemic disease. Basically, prevention and treatment of dental biofilm infections are achieved by regular personal and professional removal of the dental biofilm. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gnathological postural treatment in a professional basketball player: a case report and an overview of the role of dental occlusion on performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Alberto; Beraldi, Alessandro; Nota, Alessandro; Danelon, Furio; Ballanti, Fabiana; Longoni, Salvatore

    2012-04-01

    During competitions and training many professional athletes use to wear occlusal splints to improve their sports performance. However, notwithstanding some studies concluded that achieving a balanced cranial-occlusal system could bring to an improvement of sports performances, the results are still contrasting. Probably the gnathological postural treatment of athletes has greater influence on performance when the individual suffers of Temporomandibular Joint Disfunction (TMJ) or physio-postural pathologies owing to the consequent alteration of the "tonic-postural system". This clinical case details a gnathological postural approach to a professional basketball player suffering from muscular problems related to the stomatognathic apparatus and a low back pain unresolved with the only physiotherapy, which limited her performance. Force platform and T-Scan III appliances were used in order to check the postural and occlusal condition of the athlete and as an aid to clinical parameters in achieving a correct splint balance. After the treatment involving inserting an occlusal splint and physiotherapy sessions, the patient no longer complained of low back pain problems and the symptoms associated with the stomatognathic apparatus improved considerably. In particular, after the tests carried out on an isokinetic machine, a force increase related to the quadriceps muscles was detected when the patient was wearing the occlusal splint. All athletes must however be analysed individually and carefully with clinical and instrumental analyses in order to consider the possible real effectiveness of an occlusal splint for improving postural structure and sports performance.

  13. Cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosomatic problems in dental settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Sakano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Akira; Abiko, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been applied for various problems, including psychiatric diseases such as depression and anxiety, and for physical symptoms such as pain. It has also been applied for dental problems. Although the effect of CBTs on temporomandibular disorders and dental anxiety are well documented, its effectiveness on other types of oral symptoms remain unclear. Little information comparing the different types of CBTs in the dental setting is currently available. Because dental professionals are often expected to conduct CBTs in the dental setting, it is important to develop proper training programs for dental professionals. In this review article, we demonstrate and discuss the application of CBTs for psychosomatic problems, including temporomandibular disorders, dental anxiety, burning mouth syndrome, and other oral complaints in dental settings.

  14. An analysis of present dental professions in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordell, Sven; Unell, Lennart; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Dentistry in Sweden is predicted to have a shortage of dentists in the future and the division of labour within dentistry will be a more debated question. In order to forecast the effects of such a shortage the professional status of the involved groups must be made clearer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the emergence and present professional status of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The study was conducted on the basis of theories on professions, and their roles in organizations was analysed. The results were applied on the historical emergence, establishment and consolidation of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The results show that a large sector of salaried dentists has not diminished the professional status of the Swedish dentists. Professional ambitions such as many clinical subspecialties and a strong element of research have not been restrained by the public health ambitions in the Public Dental Health Service (PDHS). Presently, other dental professions are dental hygienists, dental technicians and dental nurses. Of these the only other licensed group, the dental hygienists, are an emerging profession. They have an uphill struggle to obtain a full professional status, mainly because their knowledge domains are neither specific nor exclusive to their group. Development of a common core curriculum on a clearly academic level would enhance their professional status. Dental technicians and nurses are lacking fundamental traits as professions. There appears to be little need for additional groups of clinical professions besides dentists and dental hygienists in Swedish dentistry. In conclusion,this analysis provided better understanding of the present status of the Swedish dental professions, to prepare for future restructuring of the dental care system. Further work will be needed to understand the impact of professional traits on the management of groups of professionals.

  15. Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Vincent N

    2005-01-01

    The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences.

  16. [Prosthetic rehabilitation: needs in Senegalese dental offices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodj, E B; Diouf, M; Faye, D; Ndiaye, A; Seck, M T; Ndiaye, C; Diallo, P D

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of dental prosthetic needs will develop strategies for prevention and treatment through a package of individual, community and professional policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate prosthetic needs in Senegalese dental offices. The survey was conducted among people aged 15 years and more attending Senegalese dental clinics. The mean number of missing teeth was 4.4. Only 55.3% of the sample expressed the need for dentures and 81.8% had a diagnosed need for prosthesis. A statistically significant difference was noticed between the needs diagnosed and the expressed needs (p dental offices.

  17. Health Instruction Packages: Dental Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gary E.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct non-professional dental personnel in selected job-related skills. The first module, by Gary E. Hayes, describes how to locate the hinge axis point of the jaw, place and secure a bitefork, and perform a facebow transfer. The second module,…

  18. Central regional profile of dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D M

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to identify personal, familial, academic, and employment characteristics of dental hygiene students from the central region of the United States to develop a comprehensive student profile for research and recruitment purposes. In fall 1990, 25 dental hygiene program directors in ten states in the central region of the United States and 475 students enrolled in these programs were mailed surveys to develop program and student profiles. Data were analyzed using measures of central tendency and frequency. Directors and students from 24 of 25 dental hygiene programs responded. Data are reported from these 24 directors and 422 of 464 (91%) of the students enrolled in the programs. Dental hygiene students in the central region of the United States are similar in personal, parental, and academic backgrounds to the general population of college students nationally. Unlike the general college population, the regional dental hygiene population tends to be singularly female. Students chose to major in dental hygiene for economic and personal reasons. The availability of employment opportunities, the flexibility to work full- or part-time, and the prospects of making a better income and becoming a professional influenced their decision. Students identified dentists, dental hygienists, and relatives as being influential in their becoming interested in the dental hygiene profession. Previous dental office employment experience also influenced many students in their career choice. The study findings provide information for dental hygiene educators and others interested in student characteristics and factors that influence the selection of dental hygiene as a career.

  19. Competencias profesionales de los pasantes de enfermería, medicina y odontología en servicio social en México Professional competencies of nursing, medical, and dental interns performing social service in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Domingo Vázquez Martínez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar hasta dónde los pasantes de enfermería, medicina y odontología que están realizando su servicio social en México poseen las competencias profesionales requeridas para ejercer la profesión. MÉTODOS: Se revisaron los resultados de los exámenes generales para el egreso de la licenciatura, aplicados por el Centro Nacional para la Evaluación de la Educación Superior a los egresados de las carreras de enfermería, medicina y odontología entre 2006 y 2008. RESULTADOS: De 39 824 egresados examinados de las tres carreras en el periodo considerado, 12 845 no contaban con las competencias profesionales mínimas. En enfermería, del total de examinandos en los tres años, 3 765 (30,2% mostraron desempeño no suficiente; en medicina, 6 704 (32,7%, y en odontología, 2 376 (34,1%. A pesar de esto, todos ellos ejercían, o habían ejercido, como profesionistas, con el respaldo de la normatividad correspondiente y formando parte del personal de salud de las instituciones de salud (aproximadamente 11% de la fuerza de trabajo en esas profesiones, en la Secretaría de Salud. CONCLUSIONES: Los pasantes son la base de la atención de salud de la población rural, pero aproximadamente una tercera parte de ellos no tienen las competencias profesionales mínimas. Es imperativo que demuestren sus competencias profesionales antes de iniciar el servicio social, y que cuenten con una supervisión académica y profesional estrecha durante el término de la pasantía.OBJECTIVE: Determine the degree to which nursing, medical, and dental interns performing social service in Mexico have the professional competencies required to practice the profession. METHODS: The results of the general examinations for completion of the undergraduate degree, administered between 2006 and 2008 to students in the nursing, medical, and dentistry programs by the National Center for Higher Education Assessment, were reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 39 824 graduates in the

  20. Dental hygienists in Hong Kong: present and future status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, D S; Schwarz, E; Tong, A C; Wong, M C

    1996-01-01

    This study assessed the current employment status of dental hygienists practicing in Hong Kong, investigated factors affecting their employment, evaluated the satisfaction of local dental hygienists and their employers, and explored the career prospects of dental hygienists in Hong Kong. All registered dental hygienists (n = 64), all dentists who employed dental hygienists (n = 25), and a systematic sample of dentists who did not employ dental hygienists (n = 278) were surveyed in June 1994 concerning employment situation, salaries, job satisfaction, and opinions on future prospects for dental hygienists. Response rates were 86% for dental hygienists (n = 55), 88% for employers (n = 22), and 63% for dentists at large (n = 175). Among the dental hygienists, 87% still were employed as dental hygienists, and both the dental hygienists and their employers agreed that the employment situation was satisfactory; however, several dental hygienists were considered to be working below their level of qualification. Major reasons for dentists not to employ a dental hygienist were having only one operatory and having an inadequate number of patients. In general, employers expressed satisfaction with the performance of the dental hygienists. Major reasons for employing a dental hygienist were that a dental hygienist would add professional and economical benefit to their clinic. Few dentists would support expanded duties for dental hygienists. In Hong Kong, dental hygienists and their employers comprise a small group with limited impact on oral healthcare services. Dental hygienists' perceptions of their future roles and ambitions are higher than those of their employers. To further the development of dental services in Hong Kong and meet documented oral healthcare needs in the population, greater utilization of dental hygienists should be promoted.

  1. Masculine and Feminine Personality Attributes of Dental Students and Their Attitudes toward Women's Roles in Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebeau, Muriel J.; Loupe, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Egalitarian attitudes and the personality traits of instrumentality (masculinity) and expressiveness (feminity) were examined for male and female dental students. A comparison of dental students with academic psychologists suggests that successful professionals have similar personality traits. (Author/MLW)

  2. Dental students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-08-01

    In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental students, amongst other non-qualified individuals, to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental students have part-time employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental students their opinion about the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental students at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by e-mail. Within 1 month, two reminders were sent. The response was 44% (427 students). Of the responding students, 71% had paid employment in addition to their study. Twenty-five per cent of all students worked in a dental practice, usually 8 h a week. Study year and age were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were providing chair side assistance, giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning. The self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was positively related to study year and working in a dental practice. Hardly any information about the requirements of the IHCP Act with regard to delegation of tasks was provided by the employer. Many Dutch dental students work in a dental practice, taking over a variety of tasks. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was relatively high, many dental students expressed the need for more detailed information about the legal aspects of their tasks.

  3. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined......, the result is, that more than 100 trauma scenario exist when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios have a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnose and treatment it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  4. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  5. The development of an exemplar e-module for the continuing professional development of European dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kossioni, A.E.; Kavadella, A.; Tzoutzas, I.; Bakas, A.; Tsiklakis, K.; Bailey, S.; Bullock, A.; Cowpe, J.; Barnes, E.; Thomas, H.; Thomas, R.; Karaharju-Suvanto, T.; Suomalainen, K.; Kersten, H.; Povel, E.; Giles, M.; Walmsley, D.; Soboleva, U.; Liepa, A.; Akota, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To present the development of an exemplar e-module for dental continuing professional development (CPD) provided by dental schools and other dental educational providers. Materials and methods The exemplar e-module covered the topic of ‘Sterilisation and cross-infection control in the dental

  6. Smartphones and dental trauma: the current availability of apps for managing traumatic dental injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Serpil; Singh, Parmjit

    2016-02-01

    There is a general consensus regarding the lack of awareness regarding the emergency management of traumatic dental injuries amongst laypersons and dental professionals. This article aims to provide an overview of the apps available for traumatic dental injuries using smartphones. These apps may serve as a gateway for raising awareness of traumatic dental injuries. Three smartphone devices were used to access their respective app stores (Nokia Lumia 635 with Windows Phone OS 8.1; iPhone 5 with iOS 8.1; Samsung Galaxy Ace II with Android OS v2.3.6 Gingerbread). Nine phrases were searched: broken tooth/teeth; chipped tooth/teeth; dental emergency; dental injury; dental trauma; fractured tooth/teeth; knocked-out tooth/teeth; tooth/teeth injury; and tooth/teeth trauma. Seven apps for the Android and one app for the Apple operating system were relevant. The only Apple iOS app retrieved (Dental Trauma) was also found for the Android OS (Dental Trauma First Aid) and had the endorsement of the International Association of Dental Traumatology. AcciDent was the only app dedicated to traumatic dental injuries targeted solely towards dental professionals. Five other apps (Chipped Tooth Solution, Dental Crown Repair, Fixing Cracked Tooth, Repairing the Front Tooth and Solution to Broken Tooth) appeared to come from the same source (KBES). No traumatic dental injury apps were found for the Windows Phone OS. There are apps available for both patients and dentists that range in quality and on the whole lack real-life photographs. Future apps should continue to provide good quality, evidence-based and validated material. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An argument for dental hygiene to develop as a discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobban, S J; Edgington, E M; Compton, S M

    2007-02-01

    The practice of dental hygiene was developed to provide oral health education and preventive oral health care, originally for children. It has grown to provide oral health services valued by a broad spectrum of society, but has not attained the desired respect and status accorded to other professional groups. Professional disciplines link actions of practitioners with the science that is the foundation of practice. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether dental hygiene practice could benefit from pursuit of development as a discipline. Literature on professionalization and disciplines, related to dental hygiene in general and the North American context specifically, was retrieved from databases and grey sources, such as organizational reports. Dental hygiene's current characteristics relative to a discipline were examined. Dental hygiene has developed some characteristics of a discipline, such as identifying a metaparadigm that includes concepts of the client, the environment, health/oral health and dental hygiene actions, with a perspective that includes a focus on disease prevention and oral health promotion. However, research production by dental hygienists has been limited, and often not situated within theoretical or conceptual frameworks. Dental hygiene draws its knowledge for practice from a variety of sources. Dental hygiene could strengthen its value to society by prioritizing development of highly skilled researchers to study interventions leading to improved oral outcomes, and transferring that knowledge to practitioners, strengthening links between practice and science. Intentional pursuit of knowledge for practice would lead to dental hygiene's eventual emergence as a professional discipline.

  8. English education for healthcare professionals in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Moross

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a global environment, education for healthcare professionals should include cultivating human resources who have the necessary skills to work in an international arena. This article will review the current status of English education for dental healthcare professionals in Japan. After conducting a literature search using the keywords: English education, Japan, and dental, only a few studies were found that investigated and proposed suggestions for dental professional English education. Even so, these were still in the early stages with outcomes yet to be fully evaluated. Even though English is thought indispensable for global professionals, and that increasing chances for communication skills is necessary, little attention has been addressed to English education for dental professionals or the implementation of such education in the Japanese undergraduate dental curricula. With the current reality of field expansion in dentistry, the need for not only improved English communication skills for Japanese dentists, but also the acquisition of essential expertise, psychomotor, teambuilding, critical thinking, and creative thinking skills in English as well as Japanese, is a definite probability. In order to reach this level of knowledge, further efforts and research would be necessary for the advancement and development of dental professional English education in Japan.

  9. English education for healthcare professionals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moross, Janelle; Seki, Naoko; Morio, Ikuko

    2017-11-01

    In a global environment, education for healthcare professionals should include cultivating human resources who have the necessary skills to work in an international arena. This article will review the current status of English education for dental healthcare professionals in Japan. After conducting a literature search using the keywords: English education, Japan, and dental, only a few studies were found that investigated and proposed suggestions for dental professional English education. Even so, these were still in the early stages with outcomes yet to be fully evaluated. Even though English is thought indispensable for global professionals, and that increasing chances for communication skills is necessary, little attention has been addressed to English education for dental professionals or the implementation of such education in the Japanese undergraduate dental curricula. With the current reality of field expansion in dentistry, the need for not only improved English communication skills for Japanese dentists, but also the acquisition of essential expertise, psychomotor, teambuilding, critical thinking, and creative thinking skills in English as well as Japanese, is a definite probability. In order to reach this level of knowledge, further efforts and research would be necessary for the advancement and development of dental professional English education in Japan.

  10. A cluster randomised controlled trial in primary dental care based intervention to improve professional performance on routine oral examinations and the management of asymptomatic impacted third molars: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grol Richard PTM

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine oral examination (ROE refers to periodic monitoring of the general and oral health status of patients. In most developed Western countries a decreasing prevalence of oral diseases underpins the need for a more individualised approach in assigning individualised recall intervals for regular attendees instead of systematic fixed intervals. From a quality-of-care perspective, the effectiveness of the widespread prophylactic removal of mandibular impacted asymptomatic third molars (MIM in adolescents and adults is also questionable. Data on the effectiveness of appropriate interventions to tackle such problems, and for promoting continuing professional development in oral health care are rare. Methods/design This study is a cluster randomised controlled trial with groups of GDPs as the unit of randomisation. The aim is to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of small group quality improvement on professional decision-making of general dental practitioners (GDPs in daily practice. Six peer groups ('IQual-groups' shall be randomised either to the intervention arm I or arm II. Groups of GDPs allocated to either of these arms act as each other's control group. An IQual peer group consists of eight to ten GDPs who meet in monthly structured sessions scheduled for discussion on practice-related topics. GDPs in both trial arms receive recently developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPG on ROE or MIM. The implementation strategy consists of one interactive IQual group meeting of two to three hours. In addition, both groups of GDPs receive feedback on personal and group characteristics, and are invited to make use of web-based patient risk vignettes for further individual training on risk assessment policy. Reminders (flow charts will be sent by mail several weeks after the meeting. The main outcome measure for the ROE intervention arm is the use and appropriateness of individualised risk assessment in

  11. Effect of professional dental prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet on the cariogenic microbiota Efeito da profilaxia profissional com jato de bicarbonato de sódio sobre a microbiota cariogênica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Moreira LANZA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of professional dental prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet on salivary counting of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in 32 children ranging from 7 to 10 years of age, has been assessed. Whole stimulated saliva was collected before the prophylaxis, immediately after it and 30 days later, and the number of CFU/ml in the saliva was detected through the Caritest system. A statistically significant immediate decrease on salivary levels of both microorganisms was observed, 50% for mutans streptococci and 27% for lactobacilli. For mutans streptococci this decrease continued through the 30 days period; the same did not occur with lactobacilli, that returned to their baseline values.Avaliou-se o efeito da profilaxia dentária profissional com o jato de bicarbonato de sódio na contagem salivar de estreptococos do grupo mutans e de lactobacilos em 32 crianças entre 7-10 anos. Coletou-se saliva total estimulada antes e 60 minutos após o procedimento, e decorridos 30 dias, sendo o número de UFC/mL saliva detectado através do sistema Caritest. Constatou-se uma redução imediata, estatisticamente significativa, nos níveis salivares de ambos os microrganismos, sendo de 50% para estreptococos do grupo mutans e de 27% para lactobacilos. Para os estreptococos do grupo mutans, esta redução persistiu pelo período de 30 dias, o mesmo não ocorrendo para os lactobacilos, que retornaram aos seus valores iniciais.

  12. Registered Dental Hygienists as Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Janet; Shugars, Daniel A.

    1985-01-01

    Surveys conducted to (1) investigate why dental hygienists choose to become dentists, (2) evaluate their success in dental school, (3) assess the experience of those who had entered dental school, and (4) gauge the level of interest among dental hygienists in applying to dental school are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  13. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23858419 . Tinanoff N. Dental caries. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St ... Kapner, DDS, general and aesthetic dentistry, Norwalk Medical Center, Norwalk, CT. Review provided ...

  14. Dental Hygienists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There are areas in the United States, typically rural areas, where patients need dental care but have ... workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. ...

  15. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a few quick steps. There is no drilling or scraping of the molars. Your dentist will: ... harden. This takes about 10 to 30 seconds. Cost and Insurance Coverage Ask your dental office about ...

  16. [The transformation of the dental services market and the battle over a monopoly in 19th century dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiana Leite

    2006-01-01

    The article analyzes the process by which dentistry acquired the status of a profession. The setting is the mid-nineteenth-century United States, where the West's first professional dental organizations were founded, and the focus is on some aspects of the development of a dental market and on the professional disputes among practitioners of the dental trade, who wanted a monopoly within this field of knowledge. Certain outside factors played a major role in the emergence of the profession, including changes in patterns of sugar consumption (which spread dental caries disease throughout society) as well as the expansion of the dental service market. The subsequent proliferation of distinct groups of dental practitioners--both qualified and unqualified to practice dentistry--and their competition for a place in the dental market reflect the battle waged to establish jurisdiction in this field and the emergence of dentistry as a 'modern profession'.

  17. Dental caries in Victorian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M; Hopcraft, M; Morgan, M

    2014-09-01

    The poor oral health of nursing home residents is the cause of substantial morbidity and has major implications relating to health care policy. The aim of this study was to measure dental caries experience in Australians living in nursing homes, and investigate associations with resident characteristics. Clinical dental examinations were conducted on 243 residents from 19 nursing homes in Melbourne. Resident characteristics were obtained from nursing home records and interviews with residents, family and nursing home staff. Two dental examiners assessed coronal and root dental caries using standard ICDAS-II criteria. Residents were elderly, medically compromised and functionally impaired. Most required assistance with oral hygiene and professional dental care was rarely utilized. Residents had high rates of coronal and root caries, with a mean 2.8 teeth with untreated coronal caries and 5.0 root surfaces with untreated root caries. Functional impairment and irregular professional dental care were associated with higher rates of untreated tooth decay. There were no significant associations with medical conditions or the number of medications taken. Nursing home residents have high levels of untreated coronal and root caries, particularly those with high needs due to functional impairment but poor access to professional services. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Dental hygiene students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-05-01

    Many students have paid employment while studying. In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental hygiene students to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental hygiene students have part-time job employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental hygiene students their opinion of the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental hygiene students (n = 341) at a School of Health in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by email. The response was 52% (176 students). Of the responding students, 75% had paid employment in addition to their study. A proportion of the students (35%) worked in a dental practice. The median number of hours worked per week was eight. Study year, age and prior education were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning, providing chair side assistance and giving local anaesthesia. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was high, almost half of the students expressed the need for more detailed legal information. Many dental hygiene students work in a dental practice, taking over a number of tasks usually performed by the dentist. More information in the dental hygiene curriculum about the requirements of the IHCP Act seems desirable.

  19. Predictors of dental avoidance among Australian adults with different levels of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Ketting, Manon

    2015-09-01

    It has been proposed that avoidance of dental visits might be the main determinant of poor oral health outcomes in people with high dental anxiety (HDA). This study aimed to determine the predictors of dental avoidance among people with HDA and also whether these predictors differed from those found in people with lower dental anxiety (LDA). Study participants (n = 596; response rate = 41.1%) comprised a random cross-sectional sample of the Australian adult population who completed a mailed self-complete questionnaire containing items relating to the use and accessibility of dental services, trust in dental professionals, dental anxiety, dental experiences, self-perceived oral health, vulnerability-related perceptions of visiting the dentist, and psychological health. Multiple imputation was used to replace missing values and statistically significant variables in bivariate analyses were entered into a multivariable logistic generalized linear model. More than two-thirds of participants with HDA were currently avoiding or delaying a dental visit. Among people with HDA, dental avoidance was independently and significantly predicted by difficulty paying a $300 dental bill, having no or only little trust in the last-visited dentist, perceived treatment need and dental anxiety. Among people with LDA, only perceived treatment need and dental anxiety predicted avoidance. In addition to their high anxiety, a number of additional barriers to dental visiting were found for people with HDA. These barriers, especially cost and communication issues with dentists, need to be addressed to assist people with HDA obtain necessary, regular dental care. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Analysis of the extent and efficiency of the partnership and collaboration between the dental faculties and National Dental Associations within the FDI-ERO zone: a dental faculties' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin; Mersel, Alex; Margvelashvili, Vladimer; Melo, Paulo; Jerolimov, Vjekoslav

    2013-10-01

    As National Dental Associations and dental faculties can be considered as the two major institutions representing national organised dentistry, their further extended collaboration is crucial in responding to the many global oral health matters and issues. The main aim of the present study is to analyse the nature and extent of the partnership between the dental faculties and NDAs. A questionnaire was developed focusing on the relationship between National Dental Associations and the dental faculties within the World Dental Federation-European Regional Organisation zone regarding their major professional activities such as dental education, workforce issues, improvement of national oral health, science and knowledge transfer. The questionnaire was sent to 173 dental faculties within the countries in the European Regional Organisation zone. Response rate was 62/173 (35.8%). Major activities of dental faculties were listed as implementation of new technologies into practice (72%), followed by improvement of national oral health (65%), while the least involved activity was dental workforce issues (42%). The dental faculties perceived their relationship with the National Dental Associations as quite satisfactory in the field of continuing education and science and knowledge transfer. However, their relationship was suggested to need significant improvement when dealing with undergraduate dental education curriculum, dental workforce issues and negotiations with the authorities regarding professional matters/issues. Despite the fact that there are differences between the perceived competences and responsibilities of the two bodies, the presence of so many potential areas of collaboration, the increasing expectations from the individual dentists/dental profession and the new challenges of the dental profession give this relationship significant importance. Communication, regular contacts, more joint activities and improved collaboration is needed between dental faculties

  1. METHACRYLATE AND ACRYLATE ALLERGY IN DENTAL STUDENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of acrylic monomers is used in dentistry, and when dental personnel, patients or students of dental medicine become sensitized, it is of great importance to identify the dental ;acrylic preparations to which the sensitized individual can be exposed. Numerous studies confirm high incidence of sensitization to (meth acrylates in dentatal professionals, as well as in patients undergoing dental treatment and exposed to resin-based materials. Quite a few studies are available aiming to evaluate the incidence of sensitization in students of dental medicineThe purpose of the study is to evaluate the incidence of contact sensitization to some (meth acrylates in students of dental medicine at the time of their education, in dental professionals (dentists, nurses and attendants and in patients, the manifestation of co-reactivity.A total of 139 participants were included in the study, divided into four groups: occupationally exposed to (methacrylates and acrylic monomers dental professionals, 3-4 year-of-education students of dental medicine, 6th year–of-education students of dental medicine and patients with suspected or established sensitization to acrylates, without occupational exposure. All of them were patch-tested with methyl methacrylate (MMA, triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TREGDMA, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy phenyl]propane (bis-GMA, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA, and tetrahidrofurfuril metacrylate. The overall sensitization rates to methacrylates in the studied population are comparative high – from 25.9% for MMA to 31.7% for TREGDMA. Significantly higher incidence of sensitization in the group of 3-4 course students compared to the one in the group of dental professionals for MMA and TREGDMA was observed. Highest was the incidence of sensitization to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, BIS-GMA, 2-HEMA and tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate in the group of patients, with

  2. Dental students' motivation and the context of learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bettina Tjagvad; Netterstrom, Ingeborg; Kayser, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study shows dental students' motives for choosing the dental education and how the motives influence their motivation at the first semester of study. Further the study demonstrates the relevance of the context of learning. This issue is of importance when planning a curriculum...... for the dental education. The material consists of interviews with eight dental students. The results show that dental students were focused on their future professional role, its practical dimensions and their future working conditions. Their motivation for choosing the dental education was found to influence...... their motivation for studying and their experience of the relevance of the first semester. The dental students who had co-education with the medical students at the first year of study missed a dental context and courses with clinically relevant contents. In conclusion, our data signify the importance...

  3. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  4. Dental treatment planning and management for the mouth cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vinod K

    2010-06-01

    The need to deliver cancer treatment promptly often requires modification of ideal dental treatment plans. Treatment planning and preventive care is crucial and needs to be done before radiotherapy in order to avoid complications such as osteoradionecrosis. Rapid delivery of this dental care can only be achieved if oral care is given adequate priority in the patient care pathway. Few cancer centres have the resources to provide comprehensive dental care and thus, in most circumstances, this care has to be provided by the patient's dentist and dental care professional, with advice from the local dental oncology specialist team. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dental demographics and metrics of oral diseases in the ageing Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcraft, M S

    2015-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges currently facing the dental profession in Australia is the provision of quality and timely dental care to the elderly. Adults aged 65+ years are an exponentially growing section of the community with rapidly changing dental needs, thanks in part to improvements in oral health over the past 60 years that have resulted in a dramatically decreased rate of edentulism and subsequently an increased number of teeth present. This is a challenge not only for the public dental services, but also public health policy makers, private dental practitioners, professional organizations and dental education providers. It is an issue that crosses a range of dental care providers, not only dentists but also dental prosthetists and dental hygienists, whose role in the provision of dental services has been slowly growing in Australia. Furthermore, with evidence of links between oral and systemic health, this issue has significant impacts for the broader health system. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  7. Body mass index and dental caries in children aged 5 to 8 years attending a dental paediatric referral practice in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong-Lenters, M. de; Dommelen, P. van; Schuller, A.A.; Verrips, E.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and dental caries are widely-recognised problems that affect general health. The prevention of both dental caries and obesity have proven very difficult: children and their parents may need professional support to achieve behaviour change. To find out whether both dental caries

  8. David Farrar Mitchell: dental researcher & educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2008-01-01

    David Farrar Mitchell, DDS, PhD (1918-1975), was a pioneer in aviation dentistry and a leader in dental education, service and research. In the mid-1940's, he was the first dental officer assigned to the School of Aviation Medicine (SAM) in San Antonio, Texas, a unique, Army Air Corps organization for research and teaching. From 1942-1946, as a trained dental researcher and oral pathologist, he published works on dental problems afflicting military aviators, especially those associated with high altitude flying. His work greatly influenced ongoing dental treatment of military flyers. He served as faculty chairman of two dental schools: The University of Minnesota (1948-1955) and Indiana University (1955-1975). Of his 33 graduate students in oral pathology/medicine, 28 became department chairs at dental schools throughout the world. He was president of the American Academy of Oral Pathology (1962) and of the American Association for Dental Research (1975). From 1969 to 1975, he was editor of the prestigious Journal of Dental Research. During his professional career, Dr. Mitchell published 120 scientific articles on diverse topics relating to oral diagnosis and oral medicine.

  9. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  10. Occupational violence against dental professionals in southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-physical violence in form of loud shouting (50.0%) threat (22.7%), sexual harassment (6.8%) and swearing (2.3%) constituted the majority while physical violence in form of bullying and hitting constituted the remaining 18.2%. The main perpetrators of the violence were patients (54.5%) and patient's relatives/friends ...

  11. Sultanate of Oman: building a dental workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wilson, Nairn HF

    2015-01-01

    Background A medium- and long-term perspective is required in human resource development to ensure that future needs and demands for oral healthcare are met by the most appropriate health professionals. This paper presents a case study of the Sultanate of Oman, one of the Gulf States with a current population of 3.8 million, which has initiated dental training through the creation of a dental college. Objectives The objectives of this paper are first to describe trends in the dental workforce...

  12. Social media and professionalism: does the profession need to re-think the parameters of professionalism within social media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Acl

    2017-03-01

    Social media is no longer a new concept, with social media platforms dominating how many communicate. It would be unrealistic to expect that dentistry would not become involved in the use of social media for professional reasons, as well as professionals using social media platforms privately. Despite it being acceptable for dental professionals to have social media presence, those dental professionals have a framework of professional, ethical and legal obligations to which they must conform when using social media. This article seeks to discuss how unintentionally professionalism may be breached by dental professionals not making a distinction between social media and other facets of professional life. There is need for a discussion about how as a profession, dentistry may perceive the effects of professional interaction with social media on the profession's wider relationship with society and whether current regulatory advice goes far enough to protecting the interests of patients. It is important for the use of social media by dental professionals to fit within the established social contract between the profession and society and failure to observe the terms of this will cause damage to the patient-professional relationship. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Dental exarticulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-23

    Jun 23, 2014 ... RKDF Dental College and Research, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. Address for ... Proper positioning was checked using an intraoral periapical radiograph ... soft diet and use of chlorhexidine mouthwash to maintain oral hygiene. .... teachers and students about the role of storing avulsed teeth in a wet ...

  14. Identifying Noncognitive Skills That Contribute to Dental Students' Success: Dental Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Pendergast, Laura; Tellez, Marisol; Waldron, Elizabeth; Ismail, Amid

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify noncognitive factors that dental faculty members perceived to contribute to dental students' success and to assess dental faculty members' ratings of the relative importance of these factors to academic performance, clinical performance, and overall success. Out of 184 eligible faculty members at one U.S. dental school, 43 respondents (23.3%) completed a survey in 2015-16. The survey asked respondents to rank the importance of seven noncognitive factors to academic performance, clinical performance, and overall success. Descriptive analysis was conducted to determine the ratings on importance of each noncognitive factor. Two additional open-ended questions asked faculty members to 1) think of dental students who performed very well and list the noncognitive factors they believed contributed to those students' success and 2) identify the two most important of those factors that contributed to success. Qualitative analysis was conducted to identify themes in the open-ended responses. The respondents rated professionalism and preparedness highest in importance for overall success. Preparedness was rated highest in importance for academic performance, and communication was highest in importance for clinical performance. Six themes were identified in the open-ended responses: communication/interpersonal skills, approach to learning, personal characteristics, professionalism, diverse experiences, and technical abilities. On both open-ended items, the most frequently cited noncognitive skill was communication/interpersonal skills followed by approach to learning. In this study, dental faculty members perceived communication, preparedness, and professionalism as important skills contributing to dental students' success.

  15. Technological updates in dental photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagam, Josh; Kleiman, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Digital photography is a constantly evolving medium that can be used in dentistry for a number of applications including documentation and patient education. In the past 5 years, it has become standard professional practice for photographers to shoot in raw format, organize and edit in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, and archive files using portable hard drives and off-site storage. Concurrently, cameras have increased resolution, improved antidust technology, and added versatile flash accessories for macro imaging. Adopting professional photographic practices and taking advantage of technological developments in a dental practice can be an invaluable tool in education and documentation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses Show Clinical Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-26

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 16 MAR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prosthesis ...Show Clinical Success presented at/published to Texas Dental Journal in accordance with MDWI 41- 108, has been approved and assigned local file #17147...resin-bonded lixed dental prostheses show clinical success 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? 0 YES [gj NO FUNDING SOURCE: 8. DO YOU NEED FUNDING

  17. Attitudes towards shared learning of trainee dental technicians and undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeson, Michael G; Walker-Gleaves, Caroline; Ellis, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The challenges of health care are increasingly complex and subject to frequent change. Meeting these demands requires that health professionals work in partnership with each other and the patient. One way of contributing to this is for students to learn together. However, effective teamwork requires an education system that helps to foster understanding among all those entering the health workforce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes towards shared learning of undergraduate dental students and trainee dental technicians in a university dental school/hospital in the United Kingdom. Twenty-five trainee dental technicians and 75 undergraduate dental students took part in the study over five academic years. Data were collected using structured questionnaires. A 100% response rate was achieved from the questionnaires. The results indicated the majority of students recognized the benefits of shared learning and viewed the acquisition of teamworking skills as useful for their future working lives, beneficial to the care of their patients, and likely to enhance professional working relationships. The study also found a positive association of being valued as an individual in the dental team by all student groups. Future dental curricula should provide opportunities to develop effective communication between these two groups and encourage teamworking opportunities. These opportunities need to be systematically developed in the dental curriculum to achieve the desired goals.

  18. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Dentists are often the first health care professionals to diagnose ... quality and quantity of saliva.9 However, if enamel ... Early recognition of dental erosion is important .... measured in freshly collected saliva using an indicator.

  19. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... planning, and care are provided by an experienced, multidisciplinary team composed of representatives from a variety of dental, ... repair or correct damaged, malformed, or missing teeth. Multidisciplinary Team – a group of professionals who work together to ...

  20. Critical Thinking Skills of United States Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notgarnie, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of decision-making in dental hygienists' practice requires critical thinking skills. Interest in raising educational standards for entry into the dental hygiene profession is a response to the demand for enhanced professional skills, including critical thinking skills. No studies found in the course of literature review compared…

  1. Prevention of Dental Caries: Knowledge, Practice and Opinion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dental caries is the most prevalent oral disease in children and this is preventable. Paediatricians are the first professionals whom children visit and are in good position to begin the process of prevention of dental caries if they recognize and encourage good preventive habits. Objective: To determine the ...

  2. FDI 2006: an eye-opening dental experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Sashi; Alam, Riaz; Fernandez, Stanley

    2007-02-24

    Although it may seem a daunting prospect, attending a large international dental conference can be an extremely rewarding experience from both a professional and a personal perspective. Here, three dentists recall their experiences at the 2006 FDI Annual World Dental Congress in Shenzhen, China.

  3. Use and Application of Structural Models in Dental Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Rosario H. Yap; McDonald, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Latent abilities of dental students were analyzed as causes and professional achievements as effects, with preadmission performances as indicators of latent abilities. The results demonstrate that structural analysis focuses on the direct impact of the quality of dental school education. (Author/MLW)

  4. Dentinal sensitivity, self-reported gingivo-dental conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental appearance satisfaction was expressed by 77.0% of the participants while 8.2% use or believe that they will use artificial teeth with ageing. Dentinal sensitivity was significantly associated with texture of toothbrush, receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing, dental appearance satisfaction and food packing.

  5. Nigerian Dental Students' Assessment of their Clinical Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical learning in medical and dental education provides students with knowledge, skills and proper etiquette for their professional life. Students' assessment of clinical education is therefore important to help to promote excellence in medical and dental education in Nigeria. A cross-sectional study using a ...

  6. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  7. Dental research in the Indian Armed Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Army Dental (AD Corps is an essential entity under the Indian Army, rendering comprehensive dental care to the combatants and dependents of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. It has a pan-Indian presence, with deployments in all terrains, deep seas, and air spaces in addition to overseas establishments. It delivers high-end clinical services through different levels: Primary dental units, secondary and tertiary dental centers. In addition, it runs some of the finest training schools for dental and paradental professionals. It maintains high standards in clinical practice in all disciplines of dentistry. All these has been made possible largely because of the consistent research pursuits; the corps accomplishes to addresses the clinical requirements and emerging challenges. Research in the AD Corps is done in three modes: (i Armed Forces Medical Research Committee Projects (AFMRC done every year by the Indian Army, (ii Interdisciplinary research among medical and dental specialities, and (iii Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO. Through these, it has embarked on advanced, cutting-edge research for new technologies, protocols, and products in the dental sciences. This paper takes stock of current trends in the AD Corps in these domains and highlights its thrust areas toward quality dental treatment.

  8. Social support and dental utilization among children of Latina immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahouraii, Helen; Wasserman, Melanie; Bender, Deborah E; Rozier, R Gary

    2008-05-01

    Latino children use fewer professional dental services and experience more dental decay than non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black children. This study tested the association between four types of social support (information, influence, material aid, emotional aid) and dental use among children of Latina immigrants in North Carolina. Latina mothers age 15-44 years (N=174) were sampled from four counties using a multistage church-based sampling design. Each mother reported dental care use for her oldest child younger than 11 years of age. Instrumental aid (information) alone was not associated with dental care use, but receiving any of the other types of social support was associated with dental care use at the bivariate level (pdental-related social support could help Latina immigrant mothers overcome barriers to dental care for their children.

  9. A brief comparison of curricula at dental schools in China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hantang; Yang, Jingyi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Wu; Wang, Ping

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the dental curricula at dental schools in China and Japan. A survey was conducted in representative dental schools in China and Japan. It was found that, in China and Japan where dental schools recruit students directly from high schools, more attention is paid to introduction of early professional education. Most dental schools in Japan arrange dental subjects for their students from the first through the fourth years, while in China, only a few dental schools take this path although many of them are currently making changes. It was also discovered that, in both countries, an increasing number of dental schools assign a specific dental subject to the same period with its relevant bioscience or biomedical counterparts, which makes it possible for them to enhance each other reciprocally in a positive way for students and consequently help dental students master the related topics.

  10. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwitz, Robert H; Ismail, Amid I; Pitts, Nigel B

    2007-01-06

    Dental caries, otherwise known as tooth decay, is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of people worldwide; individuals are susceptible to this disease throughout their lifetime. Dental caries forms through a complex interaction over time between acid-producing bacteria and fermentable carbohydrate, and many host factors including teeth and saliva. The disease develops in both the crowns and roots of teeth, and it can arise in early childhood as an aggressive tooth decay that affects the primary teeth of infants and toddlers. Risk for caries includes physical, biological, environmental, behavioural, and lifestyle-related factors such as high numbers of cariogenic bacteria, inadequate salivary flow, insufficient fluoride exposure, poor oral hygiene, inappropriate methods of feeding infants, and poverty. The approach to primary prevention should be based on common risk factors. Secondary prevention and treatment should focus on management of the caries process over time for individual patients, with a minimally invasive, tissue-preserving approach.

  11. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  12. Perception of studying dental law and ethics among postgraduate dental students in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassif, H S

    2015-08-14

    Law and ethics is an integral part of medical and dental professional practice. The subject is touched upon in the undergraduate curriculum. Historically, dentists interested in postgraduate study in this subject have accessed courses on medical law and ethics. While there are areas of shared interest (for example, consent, confidentiality) there are differences in emphasis and content (for example, end of life care, organ transplants, etc) which are not relevant to dentistry. A new postgraduate certificate (PgCert) course was approved by the University of Bedfordshire designed specifically for dental practitioners, making it the only university accredited course in the UK that is specific to dental staff. Students' perception of the subject of dental law and ethics at a postgraduate level was not known. The first PgCert student cohort was assessed at the start and the end of the course using two questionnaires. Sixteen students, all qualified dental practitioners working in the UK, took part. The perception toward the subject of dental law and ethics was in-line with the current guideline and regulations governing the dental profession. Perception of dental law was clearer at the end of the course compared to the beginning while dental ethics remained a challenging subject.

  13. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  14. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practices among health professionals in King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Oral health knowledge among the health professionals working in KFMC, Riyadh was lower than what would be expected of these groups, which had higher literacy levels in health care, but they showed a positive attitude toward professional dental care.

  15. Service evaluation of a nurse-led dental anxiety management service for adult patients

    OpenAIRE

    Porritt, Jenny; Jones, K; Marshman, Z

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate patients' and professionals' experiences of a nurse-led dental anxiety management service (NDAMS).\\ud \\ud Design Service evaluation.\\ud \\ud Setting The NDAMS operates as part of the Sheffield Salaried Primary Dental Care Service.\\ud \\ud Subjects and methods Questionnaire survey of anxious patients and qualitative interviews with patients and professionals.\\ud \\ud Interventions Dental nurses delivered low-level psychological interventions as part of an integrated care pathwa...

  16. Dental ergonomics to combat musculoskeletal disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arpit; Ankola, Anil V; Hebbal, Mamata

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are significant workplace problems affecting occupational health, productivity and the careers of dental professionals. The prevalence of MSDs is on the rise for all types of dental workers. In spite of different patterns of work culture, there are parallel levels of symptoms in dentists across nations. Risk factors for MSDs are multifactorial. Symptoms appear very early in careers, with higher prevalence of MSDs even during educational training. Ergonomics improvements, health promotion and organizational interventions are necessary to reduce the risk. An interdisciplinary approach with progressive efforts should be taken to address MSDs in dental professionals.

  17. Internet information on child oral health and the first dental visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, C K; Slack-Smith, L M

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the available online information regarding a child's first dental visit (CFDV) and compares this with internationally recognized guidelines for the timing of CFDV. Online information regarding CFDV was searched using the Google search engine under the Australian domain for four selected search terms and limited to the first 50 results. The websites of selected professional dental associations were also investigated for recommended CFDV timing. Guidelines recommended the CFDV from when the first tooth erupts or by the age of one year. Information on timing for CFDV was available on the internet and consistent with recognized guidelines for almost half of the 157 sites examined. Information on CFDV was consistent with guidelines when mentioned in professional dental association and public (government and corporate) sites. Misinformation regarding CFDV was primarily associated with dental forums and sites owned by dental professionals. The three most popular topics of additional information included oral hygiene instruction, procedures for age-one CFDV and preparing the child for the CFDV. Internet information regarding a child's first dental visit was generally informative but not always in agreement with the recommendations of professional dental associations. Misinformation regarding CFDV was primarily associated with dental forums and dental professional owned sites. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  18. An assessment of professionalism on students' Facebook profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, K N; Byrne, H; Nason, G J; O'Connell, B

    2018-02-01

    With the advent of social media, healthcare professionals not only need to be conscious of professionalism in their face-to-face interactions but also in the electronic environment. The aim of this study was to assess the level of online professionalism on Facebook profiles available for public viewing of students from a dental school. A search was performed via a new Facebook account of all students in the University Dental School (dental hygiene, dental nursing, dental science and dental technology). Profiles were categorised as 'private' or 'public'. Demographic details and photographs/comments of unprofessional behaviour were recorded for each individual Facebook profile. Each profile was subsequently scored with regard to professionalism based on a previously published score. There are a total of 287 students in the dental school. Of these, 62% (n = 177) had a Facebook account. Three per cent (n = 6) had a public account (fully accessible) whilst 97% (n = 171) had a private account (limited access); 36% (n = 63) of students mentioned the dental school/hospital on their profile; 34% (n = 60) had questionable content on their profile whilst 3% (n = 6) had definite violations of professionalism on their profile; and 25% (n = 44) had unprofessional photographs on their profile. Of those with unprofessional content, 52% (n = 23) of these had a documented affiliation with the dental school also visible on their profile. There was a concerning level of unprofessional content visible on students' Facebook profiles. Students need to be fully aware of their professional responsibility in the setting of social media. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Dental Education Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dental care approach in patients with osteopetrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detailleur, V; Vansteenkiste, G; Renard, M; Verdonck, A

    2016-12-01

    To describe dental and dentofacial characteristics observed in patients diagnosed with osteopetrosis and to advise a dental care approach in these patients. Four patients were clinically diagnosed with osteopetrosis, characterised by increased bone density, bone marrow failure, blindness and deafness due to compression of cranial nerves. All patients were dentally screened at different ages (2.5-31 years) and three of them were treated with a haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at the age of 6 months, 1 and 3.1 years. All patients showed similar dental characteristics but varying severity and extent. Dental pits, abnormalities in form, agenesis and enamel deformations are seen. The eruption of the permanent dentition occurs at a slow rate, primary teeth can persist, have no successor, and aberrant form of the primary/permanent teeth can delay eruption. Uneven surfaces and atypical dental crowns combined with visual impairment make brushing of the teeth and plaque removal more difficult to manage. Dental problems such as delay in tooth eruption, crown anomalies and agenesis are seen in the patients diagnosed with osteopetrosis, although the severity and extensiveness of the symptoms differ and possibly depend on the age of the patient at HSCT. Treatment management: Frequent dental follow-up examinations are necessary for guiding the eruption and professional dental cleanings. Aid in the eruption can be helpful. In the case of surgical interventions, an antibiotic prophylaxis is advised. A fluoride treatment can be added to prevent caries. The role of HSCT in dental findings needs further research.

  20. The business of dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Widyanti Sriyono

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization including General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS and Asia Fair Trade Agreement (AFTA are a new free trade system. In globalization era, there will be an intense and free competition in looking for jobs throughout the world. This new system will affect the health services system in which health services tend to follow an industrial model. Meaning that dentistry or dental health services tend to be part of a business system, and this system has caused controversy among the community and the profession itself. The results of the discussion revealed that professional and business of dentistry is compatible and complementary. The tendency of increasing number of legal form of practice (group and a professional corporation and the worldwide advertisement of these practices supported the premise that delivering dental practice tends to follow the industrial model. Dentists should not only more focus on achieving financial success in running the business of practice but profession should have the most concern for the people who seek their services. Delivering quality of dental care depends on the high skill of the dentist and on the satisfactory income for the survival of the practice in the long run, and this make the practice will be viewed by the public and profession as being appropriate and of high quality. Facing the globalization, besides possessing high clinical skill, dentists must have a firm understanding of management concepts and apply them in their practice. In conclusion: The profession and the business of dentistry are compatible and complementary. The delivery of the dental services tends to follow the industrial model, which is a current reality. Dentist should concern more on the delivering high quality of dental services, not only focus on the business of the practice, although the satisfactory income is important for the survival growth of the practice in the long run. It is suggested for dentists to follow as

  1. Disparities in children's oral health and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, W E; Wehr, E; Crall, J J

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, professional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride toothpastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral health and access to care. Only 1 in 5 children covered by Medicaid received preventive oral care for which they are eligible. Children from low income and minority families have poorer oral health outcomes, fewer dental visits, and fewer protective sealants. Water fluoridation is the most effective measure in preventing caries, but only 62% of water supplies are fluoridated, and lack of fluoridation may disproportionately affect poor and minority children. Childhood oral disease has significant medical and financial consequences that may not be appreciated because of the separation of medicine and dentistry. The infectious nature of dental caries, its early onset, and the potential of early interventions require an emphasis on preventive oral care in primary pediatric care to complement existing dental services. However, many pediatricians lack critical knowledge to promote oral health. We recommend financial incentives for prioritizing Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment dental services; managed care accountability; integration of medical and dental professional training, clinical care, and research; and national leadership. JAMA. 2000;284:2625-2631.

  2. Role of dental expert in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K; Kumar, Sachil; Rathore, Shiuli; Pandey, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Forensic dentistry has become an integral part of forensic science over the past 100 years that utilizes dental or oro-facial findings to serve the judicial system. This has been due to the dedication of people like Gustafson's, Keiser-Nielson, and Suzuki for this field. They established the essential role which forensic dentistry plays mainly in the identification of human remains. The tooth has been used as weapons and under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize mal practice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identity of unknown individuals. This paper will try to summarize the various roles of dental experts in forensic medicine.

  3. Role of dental expert in forensic odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K.; Kumar, Sachil; Rathore, Shiuli; Pandey, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Forensic dentistry has become an integral part of forensic science over the past 100 years that utilizes dental or oro-facial findings to serve the judicial system. This has been due to the dedication of people like Gustafson's, Keiser-Nielson, and Suzuki for this field. They established the essential role which forensic dentistry plays mainly in the identification of human remains. The tooth has been used as weapons and under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize mal practice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identity of unknown individuals. This paper will try to summarize the various roles of dental experts in forensic medicine. PMID:25298709

  4. Evolution of clinical reasoning in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Shiva; Macentee, Michael I

    2011-03-01

    The approach to care in dentistry has evolved over the past couple of decades from a narrow focus on oral disease to addressing the psychosocial determinants of oral health. Subsequently, there have been many attempts to reform dental curricula through alternative models of education, such as competency-based and community-based educational models and problem-based learning. These efforts aim to improve the abilities of dental students in problem-solving, critical thinking, professionalism, and social and cultural competence to help them cope with the complexity of dealing with oral health-related issues and the constantly changing evidence underlying the practice of dentistry. However, it is not yet clear how well these educational initiatives meet their objectives or how they influence the reasoning skills of dental students. There is now a need to develop a conceptual framework for clinical reasoning in dentistry grounded on empirical evidence to direct the future evolution of dental education.

  5. Occupational hazards to dental staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Ayatollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis; percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  6. Occupational hazards to dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Fatemah; Ardekani, Ali Mellat; Bahrololoomi, Rezvan; Ayatollahi, Jahangir; Ayatollahi, Ali; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2012-01-01

    Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis); percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  7. A scoping review of qualitative research in peer-reviewed dental publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussy, M; Dickson-Swift, V; Adams, J

    2013-08-01

    Qualitative research designs are being used increasingly in dental research. This paper describes the extent and range of dental research in which qualitative methods have been employed as well as the techniques of data collection and analysis preferred by dental researchers. A scoping review was conducted to locate studies published in dental journals, which reported the use of qualitative methods. Data concerning the focus of the research and the reported qualitative techniques were extracted. Studies included in the review totalled 197. The majority of qualitative research captured in this scoping study focussed on three main areas: dental education, professional dental and dental educators' activities and experiences and the patient/public perceptions. Interviews and focus group discussions were the most commonly selected techniques for data collection. The majority of the studies included in the scoping review had a focus on education of dental professionals the activities of dental professionals or the reported perceptions of or experiences with dental services by patients or members of the public. Little research was located, which explored peoples' personal experience of dental conditions. Research reported in dental publications has a heavy bias towards the use of focus groups and interview data collection techniques. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Reaching the Texas dental goals of healthy people 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Bill

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has promoted Healthy People 2010, which is a set of national health objectives for the nation to achieve over the first decade of the new century (1). Texas has not yet met its target of 50 percent of 8-year-old children with dental sealants having been placed on their 6-year molars, which is one of the Healthy People 2010 goals. An assessment of the dental needs of children in Tarrant County, Texas, was initiated by the JPS Health Network (named after John Peter Smith). The JPS Health Network established the Healthy Smiles program to address the dental needs of the students in this county because a school based dental sealant program would be effective in reducing dental decay. Approved Title One elementary schools in Tarrant County were scheduled for dental screenings, education, and fluoride and dental sealant applications. Students were given visual dental screenings and classified as to future dental needs. First grade students received fluoride varnish and second and third grade students received fluoride and dental sealants. For the 2010-2011 school year: A total of 28,322 students were seen by dental professionals from the JPS Health Network; 8,348 dental sealants were placed; and 11,825 fluoride applications were given by dental staff. The JPS Health Network Healthy Smiles Program proved to be an effective way to deliver oral preventive care and dental education to a large number of low-income students. Dental caries prevention programs such as Healthy Smiles could help Texas reach its goals for improved oral health for the children of Texas.

  9. In new territory: consent and the extended duties dental nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsden, Jacqui

    2015-02-01

    With the introduction of direct access to treatment from dental care professionals (DCPs) in 2013, dental nurses are being trained to support the wider dental team in a number of additional skills. The name for this expanded team role is Extended Duties Dental Nurse (EDDN). These new duties take the EDDN into new territories, one of which includes the issue of consent. This article explains the background to direct access and the extra responsibilities for EDDNs in terms of consent and indemnity. It explores the new knowledge required to gain valid consent and presents a scenario for consideration. The article concludes that it is important for EDDNs to develop their professional approach, taking early advice from the referring dentist and/or professional indemnity adviser if faced with an unfamiliar scenario.

  10. From Public Mental Health to Community Oral Health: The Impact of Dental Anxiety and Fear on Dental Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Antonio; Carrillo-Díaz, María; Armfield, Jason M.; Romero, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Dental fear is a widely experienced problem. Through a “vicious cycle dynamic,” fear of dental treatment, lower use of dental services, and oral health diseases reinforce each other. Research on the antecedents of dental anxiety could help to break this cycle, providing useful knowledge to design effective community programs aimed at preventing dental fear and its oral health-related consequences. In this regard, frameworks that analyze the interplay between cognitive and psychosocial determinants of fear, such as the Cognitive Vulnerability Model, are promising. The onset of dental fear often occurs in childhood, so focusing on the child population could greatly contribute to understanding dental fear mechanisms and prevent this problem extending into adulthood. Not only can public mental health contribute to population health, but also community dentistry programs can help to prevent dental fear. Regular dental visits seem to act in a prophylactic way, with dental professionals playing an important role in the regulation of the patients’ anxiety-related responses. Both public mental health and community dentistry could therefore benefit from a multidisciplinary approach to dental fear and oral health. PMID:24616889

  11. Dental anxiety among adult patients and its correlation with self-assessed dental status and treatment needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Shahbano; Bilal, Sobia; Dawani, Narendar; Rizvi, Kulsoom

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the dental anxiety levels and to assess its correlation with self-assessed dental status and treatment needs of patients. The study was conducted at the Out Patient Department of Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Karachi. Using non-probability quota sampling, the study included the first 32 patients between 18 and 35 years of age, visiting the facility. Over a period of one month (22 working days) 704 patients comprised the study population. They were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to self-assess their dental anxiety levels, oral health status and treatment needs. The data was analysed using SPSS 17.0 with descriptive frequencies and chi-square test. Of the total participants, 650 (92.32%) patients provided consent. Average dental anxiety scale score was 12.46, representing high anxiety score. There were 174 (26.8%) smokers; only 234 (36%) had visited a dentist less than a year ago; 385 (59.2%) considered their dental health to be satisfactory; 306 (47.1%) thought of their treatment needs to be 'little'; 222 (34.2%) brushed their teeth twice daily. Dental anxiety was statistically significant with treatment needs and dental status. Relation of tooth-brushing with last dental visit and treatment needs was also found to be significant. A high level of dental anxiety was observed among the study population. The dental professionals should seek ways to help dentally anxious individuals.

  12. From public mental health to community oral health: the impact of dental anxiety and fear on dental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Antonio; Carrillo-Díaz, María; Armfield, Jason M; Romero, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Dental fear is a widely experienced problem. Through a "vicious cycle dynamic," fear of dental treatment, lower use of dental services, and oral health diseases reinforce each other. Research on the antecedents of dental anxiety could help to break this cycle, providing useful knowledge to design effective community programs aimed at preventing dental fear and its oral health-related consequences. In this regard, frameworks that analyze the interplay between cognitive and psychosocial determinants of fear, such as the Cognitive Vulnerability Model, are promising. The onset of dental fear often occurs in childhood, so focusing on the child population could greatly contribute to understanding dental fear mechanisms and prevent this problem extending into adulthood. Not only can public mental health contribute to population health, but also community dentistry programs can help to prevent dental fear. Regular dental visits seem to act in a prophylactic way, with dental professionals playing an important role in the regulation of the patients' anxiety-related responses. Both public mental health and community dentistry could therefore benefit from a multidisciplinary approach to dental fear and oral health.

  13. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  14. Tobacco use prevention and cessation in dental and dental hygiene undergraduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Christoph A; Christen, Arden; McGowan, Joan; McCartan, Bernard; Minenna, Luigi; Ohrn, Kerstin; Walter, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    Oral health care professionals are aware of their responsibility to advise patients to stop using tobacco. However, they do not feel sufficiently prepared to help their patients to quit, and consequently are not confident in providing these preventive measures. This fact reflects the lack of emphasis on tobacco cessation in both dental and dental hygiene undergraduate education. It may therefore be assumed that improvement of dental and dental hygiene education in tobacco use cessation counselling may result in increased self-confidence and frequency of its provision. The importance of making space in the curriculum for tobacco use prevention and cessation has to be emphasised. Dental schools and dental hygiene programmes have to be reminded of the key role the dental profession has in tobacco control. Next to the public health aspect of tobacco control, such involvement may be both an ethical and a legal responsibility. The implementation of effective tobacco use prevention and cessation in a dental educational setting requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the school's entire teaching personnel and external experts. In general, a knowledge base attained through lecture, Problem-Based Learning (PBL), or E-Learning, and clinical skills attained through clinical instructions and practices is required. It is suggested that curriculum content should include (1) the biological effects of tobacco use, (2) the history of tobacco culture and psychosocial aspects of tobacco use, (3) prevention and treatment of tobacco use and dependence, and (4) development of clinical skills for tobacco use prevention and cessation.

  15. Dental education in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  16. Dental education in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jorge A; Pulido, Jairo H Ternera; Castro Núñez, Jaime A; Bird, William F; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty.

  17. Threshold concepts in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, I M; Cabot, L B; Kobus, M; Woolford, M

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents a conceptual framework to inform dental education. Drawing from a vast body of research into student learning, the simple model presented here has an explanatory value in describing what is currently observed to happen and a predictive value in guiding future teaching practices. We introduce to dental education the application of threshold concepts that have a transformative role in offering a new vision of the curriculum that helps to move away from the medieval transmission model of higher education towards a dual processing model that better reflects the way in which professionals operate within the discipline. Threshold concepts give a role for the student voice in offering a novice perspective which is paradoxically something that is out of reach of the subject expert. Finally, the application of threshold concepts highlights some of the weaknesses in the competency-based training model of clinical teaching. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Dental insurance, attitudes to dental care, and dental visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, Dana N; Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John

    2013-01-01

    Dental insurance status is strongly associated with service use. In models of dental visiting, insurance is typically included as an enabling factor. However, in Australia, people self-select into health insurance (privately purchased) and levels of cover for dental services are modest. Rather than enabling access, insurance status may be a "marker" for unmeasured predisposing attitudes. This study aims to explore associations between dental insurance status and visiting while adjusting for dental care attitudes. Participants (South Australians aged 45-54 years) of a 2-year prospective cohort study (2005-2007) investigating dental service use were surveyed on their attitudes to dental care and insurance status. Six attitudinal factors were assessed using a 23-item Likert scale. Bivariate associations between insurance, attitudes, visiting, and other known covariates (age, sex, and household income) were explored. A series of regression models assessed whether prevalence ratios of visiting were attenuated after controlling for attitudinal factors. Response rate was 85.0 percent. Analysis was limited to dentate adults with known dental insurance status (n=529). The majority had dental insurance (75.2%) and made regular visits (63.7%). Insurance status, visiting, and attitudinal factors were significantly associated. Controlling for covariates, insured adults, compared with the uninsured, were 57 percent more likely to make regular visits. After adjusting for attitudinal factors, the significant association between insurance and visiting persisted. Dental care attitudes did not confound the association between dental insurance and visiting, indicating that dental insurance status was not a "marker" for predisposing attitudes. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. Perceptions of professionalism in dentistry - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra-Shaw, S; Roberts, T E; Robinson, P G

    2013-11-08

    Professionalism is an essential competence for dental professionals. Dental educators require both a clear definition and an understanding of the scope of professionalism in order to teach and assess it. The aim of this study was to identify concepts of professionalism in dentistry and the themes within this construct. Semi-structured interviews with participants purposively sampled to ensure representation of relevant viewpoints. Qualitative framework analysis was used to induct themes. Four themes arose from the data: (i) professionalism as a second order competence, (ii) the expression of professionalism as dependent on context, (iii) reflection as a necessary component and (iv) professionalism encompasses both tacit and overt personal aspects. These results were then incorporated into a conceptual model of dental professionalism. Analysis of the interview data reveals that participants conceptualise professionalism as the manner in which one reflects on and reconciles different aspects of professional practice, which demonstrates acceptance of professional responsibility and accountability. It is manifested in the manner in which work is carried out. The definition and model conceptualise the construct of professionalism within dentistry that can be used to derive an educational and assessment system.

  20. Sultanate of Oman: building a dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2015-06-22

    A medium- and long-term perspective is required in human resource development to ensure that future needs and demands for oral healthcare are met by the most appropriate health professionals. This paper presents a case study of the Sultanate of Oman, one of the Gulf States with a current population of 3.8 million, which has initiated dental training through the creation of a dental college. The objectives of this paper are first to describe trends in the dental workforce in Oman from 1990 to date and compare the dental workforce with its medical counterparts in Oman and with other countries, and second, to consider future dental workforce in the Sultanate. Data were collected from published sources, including the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Manpower (MoM), and Ministry of National Economy (MoNE)-Sultanate of Oman; the World Health Organization (WHO); World Bank; and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Dentist-to-population ratios were compared nationally, regionally and globally for medicine and dentistry. Dental graduate outputs were mapped onto the local supply. Future trends were examined using population growth predictions, exploring the expected impact in relation to global, regional and European workforce densities. Population growth in Oman is increasing at a rate of over 2% per year. Oman has historically been dependent upon an expatriate dental workforce with only 24% of the dentist workforce Omani in 2010 (n = 160). Subsequent to Oman Dental College (ODC) starting to qualify dental (BDS) graduates in 2012, there is an increase in the annual growth of the dentist workforce. On the assumption that all future dental graduates from ODC have an opportunity to practise in Oman, ODC graduates will boost the annual Omani dentist growth rate starting at 28% per annum from 2012 onwards, building capacity towards global (n = 1711) and regional levels (Gulf State: n = 2167) in the medium term. The output of dental graduates from Oman Dental College is

  1. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  2. What's in a name? Nominative determinism in the UK dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, J

    2016-12-16

    Background Nominative determinism describes the theory that people are more likely to pursue careers that are connected to their names. Compelling research has been carried out across the medical professions that provides strong evidence for this phenomenon, but as yet its applicability to the UK dental workforce remains unknown.Aim The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of dentally-related surnames in the UK dental workforce (dentists and dental care professionals) and compare this to the UK population.Results Dentistry may provide a surprising counter-example to prevailing theories of nominative determinism, as UK dentists are significantly less likely than the UK general population to have dentally-related surnames. This new phenomenon of 'nominative antideterminism' was not observed in the dental care professional (DCP) cohort, for whom the prevalence of dentally-related surnames was similar to that in the wider UK population.

  3. A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1985-01-01

    Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)

  4. Prevalence of Systemic Diseases in Patients with Dental Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Khoshniat Nikoo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of diabetes and other risk factors in patients with dental infections.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients who preferred in maxillofacial word of shariaty hospital with acute dental infections in 9 months. A self-administered questionnaire was administered during a dental appointment in order to gather demographic information and recorded past history of systemic disease, OPG radiography, gingival examination, and the result of lab tests such as CBC , FBS, PT, Bilirubin , Creat, T3, T4, TSH, HIVAb and HBSAg.Results: 28% of the subjects and diabetes, 28% Anemia, 4% Hepatitis and 4% suffered from thyroid deficiency.28% were smokers and 18% declared using alcohol. 6% of this population was addicted to narcotic substances.There was a significant correlation between age, education, diabetes and dental infections (P<0.05. DMFT forpeople with dental infections without any systemic disease were 8, for diabetic patients, smokers and alcohol users were respectively 17.16, 17 and 14.Conclusion: Diabetes found highly prevalent in patients with dental infection and high DMFT.It indicates a need to establish a comprehensive oral health promotion program based on whole examination and blood glucose control in diabetic patients who have acute dental infection by collaboration between dental and general health care professionals. Moreover, it is recommended that all patients should be educated in dental and oral health forprevention of dental infections.

  5. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  6. Internal dental school environmental factors promoting faculty survival and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-04-01

    A career in dental academics offers ample rewards and challenges. To promote successful careers in dental education, prospective and new dental faculty should possess a realistic view of the dental school work environment, akin to the informed consent so valuable to patients and doctors. Self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses provides helpful information in matching faculty applicants with appropriate dental schools. Essential prehiring information also includes a written job description detailing duties and responsibilities, professional development opportunities, and job performance evaluation protocol. Prehiring awareness of what constitutes excellence in job performance will aid new faculty in allotting time to productive venues. New faculty should not rely solely on professional expertise to advance careers. Research and regular peer-reviewed publications are necessary elements in academic career success, along with the ability to secure governmental, private foundation, and corporate grant support. Tactful self-promotion and self-definition to the dental school community are faculty responsibilities, along with substantial peer collaboration. The recruitment period is a singular opportunity to secure job benefits and privileges. It is also the time to gain knowledge of institutional culture and assess administrative and faculty willingness to collaborate on teaching, research, professional development, and attainment of change. Powerful people within dental schools and parent institutions may influence faculty careers and should be identified and carefully treated. The time may come to leave one's position for employment at a different dental school or to step down from full-time academics. Nonetheless, the world of dental and health professional education in 2005 is rapidly expanding and offers unlimited opportunities to dedicated, talented, and informed educators.

  7. Awareness about biomedical waste management and knowledge of effective recycling of dental materials among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Pathak, Ruchi; Singh, Dhirendra K; Jalaluddin, Md; Kore, Shobha A; Kore, Abhijeet R

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical waste management has become a concern with increasing number of dental practitioners in India. Being health care professionals, dentists should be aware regarding safe disposal of biomedical waste and recycling of dental materials to minimize biohazards to the environment. The aim of the present study was to assess awareness regarding biomedical waste management as well as knowledge of effective recycling and reuse of dental materials among dental students. This cross-sectional study was conducted among dental students belonging from all dental colleges of Bhubaneswar, Odisha (India) from February 2016 to April 2016. A total of 500 students (208 males and 292 females) participated in the study, which was conducted in two phases. A questionnaire was distributed to assess the awareness of biomedical waste management and knowledge of effective recycling of dental materials, and collected data was examined on a 5-point unipolar scale in percentages to assess the relative awareness regarding these two different categorizes. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences was used to analyzed collected data. Forty-four percent of the dental students were not at all aware about the management of biomedical waste, 22% were moderately aware, 21% slightly aware, 7% very aware, and 5% fell in extremely aware category. Similarly, a higher percentage of participants (61%) were completely unaware regarding recycling and reusing of biomedical waste. There is lack of sufficient knowledge among dental students regarding management of biomedical waste and recycling or reusing of dental materials. Considering its impact on the environment, biomedical waste management requires immediate academic assessment to increase the awareness during training courses.

  8. Assessment of occupational exposure of dental professionals to mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil = Avaliação da exposição ocupacional de profissionais de odontologia ao mercúrio em unidades básicas de saúde de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Minervino de Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the occupational exposure of dental professionals to metallic mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in the city of Maringá, Brazil, samples of blood and urine were collected from 149 dental professionals (group exposed, and 51 healthy adults similar for age and gender of the exposed group (control group in September and October, 2008. Urinary mercury was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, urea and creatinine in blood and urine by UV/VIS spectrophotometry and analysis of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the urine by reactive bands. The program ‘Statistic��� version 7.1 and the software R version 2.6.2 were used for the statistical calculations. Urinary mercury was 2.08  2.11 µg g-1 creatinine in workers exposed to mercury and 0.36  0.62 µg g-1 creatinine in the control group (p Para avaliar a exposição ocupacional dos profissionais de odontologia ao mercúrio metálico nas Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS de Maringá, Brasil, foram coletadas amostras de sangue e urina de 149 profissionais de odontologia (grupo exposto e de 51 adultos saudáveis similares em relação à idade e ao gênero do grupo exposto (grupo controle, no período de setembro e outubro de 2008. Foi determinado o mercúrio urinário por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica, a uréia e creatinina no sangue por espectrofotometria UV/VIS, e análise dos aspectos físicos, químicos e microbiológicos da urina por fitas reativas. Para a análise estatística foi utilizado o programa Statistic versão 7.1 e o R versão 2.6.2. O mercúrio urinário foi 2,08 ± 2,11 µg g-1 de creatinina nos profissionais expostos ao mercúrio e 0,36 ± 0,62 µg g-1 de creatinina no grupo controle (p < 0,05. Os níveis de mercúrio urinário detectados estavam abaixo do Índice Biológico Máximo Permitido estabelecido no Brasil (35 µg g-1 de creatinina, 11% destes profissionais (n=16

  9. Dental and General Trauma in Team Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Mateja; Kühl, Sebastian; Šlaj, Martina; Connert, Thomas; Filippi, Andreas

    Handball has developed into a much faster and high-impact sport over the past few years because of rule changes. Fast sports with close body contact are especially prone to orofacial trauma. Handball belongs to a category of sports with medium risk for dental trauma. Even so, there is only little literature on this subject. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the type of injuries, especially the occurrence of orofacial trauma, habits of wearing mouthguards, as well as degree of familiarity with the tooth rescue box. For this purpose, 77.1% (n=542/703) of all top athletes and coaches from the two highest Swiss leagues (National League A and National League B), namely 507 professional players and 35 coaches, were personally interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. 19.7% (n=100/507) of the players experienced dental trauma in their handball careers, with 40.8% (n=51/125) crown fractures being the most frequent by far. In spite of the relatively high risk of lip or dental trauma, only 5.7% (n=29/507) of the players wear mouthguards. The results of this study show that dental trauma is common among Swiss handball players. In spite of the high risk of dental trauma, the mouthguard as prevention is not adequately known, and correct procedure following dental trauma is rarely known at all.

  10. Utilization of Preventive Dental Services Before and After Health Insurance Covered Dental Scaling in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young-Eun; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Nam-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Health insurance reduces the economic burden of diseases and enhances access to medical services. This study compared, among social classes, the utilization of preventive dental service before and after health insurance covered dental scaling. We analyzed time-series secondary data for 3  175  584 participants from 253 survey areas nationwide in the Community Health Survey (2009-2014) in Korea. The weighted proportion of participants who underwent dental scaling was defined as the scaling rate. Data regarding demographic and socioeconomic characteristics were collected. Scaling rates continuously increased over the 6-year period, particularly in 2014. College graduates had significantly higher scaling rates. Monthly income and scaling rate were positively related. Differences by education decreased over time. Differences by income were particularly high between 2012 and 2014. For women, the temporal rate was 2 times higher for professionals than for the unemployed. Despite increased dental scaling rates since the health coverage change in 2013, socioeconomic differences persist.

  11. Program Design Considerations for Leadership Training for Dental and Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.; Nelson, Bonnie A.; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C.; Thompson, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Since leadership is an essential part of the oral health professions, oral health educators can play an essential role in establishing a culture of leadership and in mentoring students to prepare them for future leadership roles within the profession. However, leadership training for oral health professionals is a relatively new concept and is frequently not found within dental and dental hygiene curricula. The purpose of this article is to propose several models for leadership training that are specific to the oral health professions. The authors hope that providing an overview of leadership programs in academic dental institutions will encourage all U.S. and Canadian dental schools to begin developing a culture that promotes leadership development. PMID:22319084

  12. New models of dental education and curricular change: their potential impact on dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Marsha A

    2012-01-01

    The collective body of work over the last seventy-five years in the Journal of Dental Education has chronicled the ongoing critical issues and trends in dental education. The evolution of the curriculum has run in fits and starts across the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. Today, there has been a resurgence in the introspective work of the profession to examine what is taught, how it is taught, in what sequence it is taught, and the context relating dental education to other health professions and the global reach of the educational and professional environment. In the context of contemporary times, individual as well as organizational leadership has refocused the educational environment from teaching to learning. This article discusses the types of curricular changes documented in the Journal of Dental Education.

  13. Faculty Approaches to Combating Professional Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidle, Enid A.

    1984-01-01

    The high activity and expectation levels of academic dentists provide both ideal conditions for producing burnout and good conditions for avoiding it. If dental faculty take advantage of opportunities for professional variety, sabbatical leaves, and refreshment of career and contacts, they can cope with or evade the results of pressure. (MSE)

  14. Dietitians' perceptions of the continuing professional development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation concepts guided the development of a conceptual framework and the design of provisional questionnaire items. Following revision of the ..... Pistorius G J. Report: Medical and Dental Professions Board – Continuing professional development. 2003. 25. Bulletin. CPD Pilot Project starts with medical technologists, ...

  15. Anatomical sciences: A foundation for a solid learning experience in dental technology and dental prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Mahmoud M; Thompson, C Mark; Massadiq, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    Basic science courses are extremely important as a foundation for scaffolding knowledge and then applying it in future courses, clinical situations as well as in a professional career. Anatomical sciences, which include tooth morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and head and neck anatomy form a core part of the preclinical courses in dental technology programs. In this article, the importance and relevance of anatomical sciences to dental personnel with no direct contact with patients (dental technicians) and limited discipline related contact with patients (dental prosthetists) is highlighted. Some light is shed on the role of anatomical sciences in the pedagogical framework and its significance in the educational process and interprofessional learning of dental technicians and prosthetists using oral biology as an example in the dental curriculum. To conclude, anatomical sciences allow dental technicians and prosthetists to a gain a better insight of how tissues function, leading to a better understanding of diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning and referrals if needed. Patient communication and satisfaction also increases as a result of this deep understanding of oral tissues. Anatomical sciences bridge the gap between basic science, preclinical, and clinical courses, which leads to a holistic approach in patient management. Finally, treatment outcomes are positively affected due to the appreciation of the macro and micro structure of oral tissues. Anat Sci Educ 10: 395-404. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  17. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... months to 1 year. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association recommend scheduling a ... age children and adolescents. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends scheduling regular dental checkups, with the most ...

  18. Dental education in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem.

  19. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  20. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Dental care - child URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the ...

  1. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  2. The quality of dental faculty work-life: report on the 2007 dental school faculty work environment survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haden, N Karl; Hendricson, William; Ranney, Richard R; Vargas, Adriana; Cardenas, Lina; Rose, William; Ross, Ridley; Funk, Edward

    2008-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of articles on the dental school work environment commissioned by the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. The report is based on the most extensive research to date on faculty satisfaction in the dental school environment. The purpose of the study was to assess faculty perceptions and recommendations related to work environment, sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, and professional development needs. More broadly, the study intends to provide insight into the "change readiness" of dental schools to move forward with curricular improvements and innovations. Findings are based on 1,748 responses from forty-nine U.S. dental schools obtained during the time frame of February to April 2007. The total number of respondents constituted 17 percent of all U.S. dental school faculty. The average response rate per school was thirty-six (21 percent). To elucidate the data in terms of issues related to the quality of faculty work-life based on demographics, the authors compared perceptions of various aspects of the work culture in academic dentistry among faculty with different academic ranks and academic degrees and by other variables such as age and gender, tenure versus non-tenure appointments, and full- versus part-time status. Quantitative and qualitative analyses show that the majority of faculty members described themselves as very satisfied to satisfied with their dental school overall and with their department as a place to work. Tenured associate professors expressed the greatest level of dissatisfaction. Opportunities for and support of professional development emerged as an area requiring substantially more attention from dental schools. The authors of the study suggest that dental school leaders use these findings to assess their individual dental school's work environment and to plan changes as needed.

  3. Qualitative description of dental hygiene practices within oral health and dental care perspectives of Mexican-American adults and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; Aguirre-Zero, Odette; Westerhold, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify dental hygiene themes voiced by adults and teenagers of Mexican origin [or Mexican Americans (MAs)] and place these themes within the larger landscape of oral health and dental care perceptions. Interviews with urban-based MAs were analyzed to identify barriers, beliefs, and behaviors influencing engagement in dental hygiene practices. Adult (n = 16, ages 33-52) and teenage (n = 17, ages 14-19) MAs reported themes pertaining to structural factors (financial and economic-related barriers, the dual challenges of reduced access to care vis-à-vis successfully navigating the dental care system, and the effects of reduced social support derived from migration) and to individual factors (different agendas between MAs and health systems for dental care utilization and indications for oral self-care, including limited dental hygiene instruction from professionals and larger impacts from school-based and mass media). Also, prior experiences with dental hygiene, prevention, and associated themes were characterized by a range of attitudes from fatalistic to highly determined agency. Good family upbringing was instrumental for appropriate dental hygiene, anteceding good oral health; and outlining a loose structure of factors affecting oral health such as diet, having "weak" teeth, or personal habits. Themes from adults and teenagers in the Midwest United States were generally similar to other groups of MA parents and younger children. Dental hygiene was not salient relative to other oral health and dental care matters. Several opportunities for improvement of knowledge and enhancing motivation for dental hygiene practices were identified, both within and outside professional resources. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Dental caries vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Shivakumar K; Vidya S; Chandu G

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from c...

  5. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  6. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to

  7. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  8. Temporomandibular disorders: what to teach in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, J F; Mosby, E L

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders continue to be a nemesis for health professionals and for patients who are afflicted. The medical/dental student must be taught to recognize this often complex disorder and be able to interact with the various disciplines within the medical/dental profession to provide the care needed. This article discusses problems and a possible approach for establishing continuity of format for classifying TM disorders so students can be taught to recognize them.

  9. Prevalence of percutaneous injuries and associated factors among dental surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Fabiana Vargas; Santana, Bianca Palma; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The practice of dentistry usually involves contact with secretions from the oral cavity through percutaneous injuries, which is a risk factor for the transmission of infections, especially hepatitis B, between the professional and patients. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of percutaneous injuries and associated factors among dental surgeons. Methods: A total of 187 dental surgeons from the city of Pelotas, Brazil, participated in this study. Data concerning the socio-demogr...

  10. Knowledge of halitosis among dentists and dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, Nathalie; Roth, Barbara; Filippi, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Bad breath is a widespread condition that has been increasingly discussed among professionals and in the mass media in the last few years. In nine of ten cases, halitosis originates intraorally; hence it has become an important topic of study in the education and training of dentists and dental hygienists. However, the de facto knowledge of professionals has never been examined until today. 750 dentists and dental hygienists from Switzerland, Germany, and France were personally interviewed. Their knowledge of halitosis was assessed using a specifically designed questionnaire. In general, considerable differences were ascertained between the German-speaking countries and France, dentists and dental hygienists, and women and men. 27.5% of the French participants believed that the underlying cause of halitosis has a non-oral nature, whereas only 8% of the Swiss and German participants believed so (p ⟨ 0.001). In contrast to dental hygienists, dentists more often considered gastrointestinal factors as a cause of halitosis (p ⟨ 0.001). Dental hygienists from Switzerland and Germany more frequently reported the use of tongue scrapers as a therapeutic method (97% and 97.3%) than did dentists of the same countries (87.3% and 89.3%). Among the French participants, only 52% mentioned the use of tongue scrapers to treat halitosis. 2.7% of French dental professionals had participated in a continuing education course about halitosis, which is much lower than the rate of attendance in Switzerland and Germany (46%). Additionally, interdisciplinary discrepancies were observed, as 65.3% of the dental hygienists frequented advanced training courses, which was twice as much as dentists. Therefore, there are clear differences between dentists in France and their colleagues from the German-speaking countries, but also between dental hygienists and dentists. Dental hygienists from Switzerland and Germany appear to be far ahead in terms of halitosis knowledge.

  11. Impact of Dental Health Education on "Specific Learning Needs" Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relwani, Aarti H; Kiran, Shital; Bhatt, Rohan; Patel, Megha

    2016-01-01

    This article compares and evaluates the effect of dental health education through schoolteachers and dental health professionals to "specific learning needs" children attending special school. A total of 71 "specific learning needs" children attending special school participated in the study. The baseline oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) for all the participants was recorded. The training of schoolteachers was done using audiovisual and verbal methods on dental health facts and how to provide instructions on oral hygiene measures for reinforcing to the students. The students were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 - No further dental health education by the schoolteachers or by the dental professionals was given to these students after the initial oral health education. Group 2 - In this group, the trained teachers taught students about the importance of oral health and demonstrated them brushing technique at intervals of 15 days, 1 month and 3 months. Group 3 - The dental professionals imparted dental health education and also demonstrated brushing techniques to these students at intervals of 15 days, 1 month and 3 months. Six months following the intervention a second examination was done to find out the OHI-S scores. Data analysis were done with Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test. Group 2 demonstrated significant decline in OHI-S scores after intervention and all the three groups showed a statistically significant difference between the baseline OHI-S score and the scores after 6 months. Schoolteachers can be utilized for reinforcing dental health education among "specific learning needs" children effectively. How to cite this article: Relwani AH, Kiran S, Bhatt R, Patel M. Impact of Dental Health Education on "Specific Learning Needs" Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):31-34.

  12. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  13. The history of dental hygiene in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nancy K

    2011-01-01

    This historical narrative highlights the origin and development of the dental hygiene profession in South Korea. The legacy of early American missionaries to Korea includes profound and long-lasting contributions in medicine, education and theology. Many of Korea's top universities today have their roots in the missionary schools of the late nineteenth century, including Yonsei University, home of the first dental hygiene program in Korea. From Yonsei in Seoul, the dental hygiene profession spread throughout the country, includingtheAmerican missionary-based program in Kwangju in 1977. Contributions included clinical and didactic education, as well as professional leadership and development. American dental missionaries developed the profession of dental hygiene in Korea, and provided guidance to Korean dentists and hygienists for its growth and expansion.

  14. PROVIDING DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana MURARU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorders, it is realistic to assume that dental professionals are likely to treat individuals with this diagnosis. Understanding the complexities of this disorder and its behavioral manifestations is indispensable for dentists. The present article presents several characteristics of autism spectrum disorder that impact dental interventions, along with medical and behavioral alternatives to better manage the dental problems of children with autism spectrum disorder. A multidisciplinary approach and family support are important for planning a dental intervention for these patients in order to avoid anxiety. Knowledge on autism, the dentist-patient relationship and the individual preparation for dental interventions is useful for constructing a controllable medical experience

  15. Current practice in dental oncology in the U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Stewart C; Turani, Duaa

    2010-10-01

    The clinical management of cancer patients, particularly where it affects the head and neck, may result in short- and long-term complications. Specialist management of the dental sequelae of cancer is often recognized nowadays by the term'Dental Oncology' Members of the dental team play a vital role in preventing and promptly managing such complications and all dental professionals should have a sound understanding and knowledge of the oral implications of cancer therapy and their management, and the contribution of this to the patient's quality of life. This article offers the dental team an overview of the impact of cancer therapy and strategies for preventing and managing the oral side-effects of cancer therapy prior to, during, and beyond cancer treatment.

  16. Dental ergonomics: Basic steps to enhance work efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim Shaik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the dental profession and the postures assumed by the dental surgeons during their professional work has a huge impact on the dental surgeon′s body and carries with it a high risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. To perform efficiently and effectively, they shall always like to attain a position that allows them to achieve optimum access, visibility, comfort, and control at all times. Good ergonomic design of the workplace is a basic requirement for facilitating the balanced musculoskeletal health that will enable longer, healthier career, enhance productivity, and minimize MSDs among dental surgeons. While treating the patients, they are concerned about patients′ comfort and pay little attention to their own health till they begin to experience discomfort in their body. With a little attention and creativity, dental surgeons can improve their comfort on the job during the course of their career.

  17. Towards a specific approach to education in dental ethics: a proposal for organising the topics of biomedical ethics for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkey, Sefik; Guven, Tolga; Sert, Gurkan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding dental ethics as a field separate from its much better known counterpart, medical ethics, is a relatively new, but necessary approach in bioethics. This need is particularly felt in dental education and establishing a curriculum specifically for dental ethics is a challenging task. Although certain topics such as informed consent and patient rights can be considered to be of equal importance in both fields, a number of ethical issues in dental practice are only remotely-if at all-relevant for medical practice. Therefore, any sound approach to education in dental ethics has to recognise the unique aspects of dental practice in order to meet the needs of dental students and prepare them for the ethical challenges they may face during their professional practice. With this goal in mind, this paper examines the approach of the authors to dental ethics education and proposes a system to organise the topics of biomedical ethics for dental education. While the authors' perspective is based on their experience in Turkey, the proposed system of classification is not a rigid one; it is open to interpretation in other contexts with different social, cultural and professional expectations. Therefore, the paper also aims to inspire discussion on the development of an ideal dental ethics curriculum at an international level.

  18. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  19. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  20. Dental health dispositions of pregnant women: A survey from a hospital clinic in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokmen Karasu, Ayse Filiz; Kutuk, Nukhet; Aydin, Serdar; Adanir, Ilknur; Ates, Seda; Bademler, Neslihan

    2017-08-01

    Dental hygienic habits should be maintained in pregnancy despite challenges. We aimed to study the dental attitudes and habits of pregnant women. The patients attending our hospital clinic were invited to fill out a structured questionnaire categorised into three major domains: (1) general oral hygiene status, (2) dental habits, and (3) dental attandence both during pregnancy and prior to pregnancy. Four hundred and seventy four women agreed to participate. Mean age of participants was 28 (18-43). While 184 (38%) women reported brushing twice a day, only 98 (20%) women claimed using floss and or mouth rinse. Fifty-nine (12.4%) women had a dental visit in their current pregnancy and 24 (5.1%) received professional treatment. Obstetric care givers should convey the importance of dental care to their patients. We suggest that dental health should be improved antenatally, and be assessed in detail by dental health care providers. Impact Statement Poor oral health conditions have shown to be associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, especially in low-income countries and regions. There is escalating evidence to support the lack of awareness among pregnant women about health consequences and long term risks associated with poor oral hygiene. Our results showed that dental hygienic practices of pregnant women are disconcerting in Turkey. The need for inter-professional collaboration among obstetric healthcare providers and dental specialistis is crucial for conveying to women the importance of dental care in pregnancy and beyond.

  1. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-03-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency situations, basic life support is most important. However, emergencies in young children mostly involve breathing. Therefore, physicians who treat pediatric dental patients should learn PALS. It is necessary for the physician to regularly renew training every two years to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations. In order to manage emergency situations in the pediatric dental clinic, respiratory support is most important. Therefore, mastering professional PALS, which includes respiratory care and core cases, particularly upper airway obstruction and respiratory depression caused by a respiratory control problem, would be highly desirable for a physician who treats pediatric dental patients. Regular training and renewal training every two years is absolutely necessary to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations.

  2. Workforce re-entry for Japanese unemployed dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Y; Miura, H

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the profile of unemployed dental hygienists who could be enticed to re-enter the workforce and the factors that could facilitate their re-entry into the dental field in Japan. The questionnaire was mailed with a postage-paid return envelope to a sample of 3095 licensed dental hygienists. A 50.4% response rate (S = 1477) was observed. The rate of working dental hygienists was 60.3% (n = 891), and of unemployed dental hygienists was 39.7% (n = 586). Of the latter, 31.9% (n = 187) stated intentions of returning to the workplace. The unemployed dental hygienists seeking employment were more often married and had more children, compared with working dental hygienists currently. This group also had significantly fewer total service years. Moreover, only 11.96% of them belonged to the Japan Dental Hygienists' Association, and 41.3% of those attended training workshops. According to their response, they perceived their top three major barriers to re-entry as 'lack sufficient dental hygiene skill', 'child rearing' and 'poor working atmosphere'. 'Flexibility in the work schedule' and 'location' were the most important factors for re-entry from their perspective. There were not many dental hygienists hoping to return to the dental field. The findings suggested that strategies to encourage non-practicing dental hygienists to re-entry should be emphasized in the areas of a flexible working atmosphere, easy access to information on how to return to practice and guidance on how to maintain professionalism during inactivity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Advantages of the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Initiative and Its Role in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, Frederick A.; Grill, Ashley C.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.; Vena, Don; Keenan, Analia V.; Naftolin, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a novel venue in which providers can increase their knowledge base and improve delivery of care through participation in clinical studies. This article describes some aspects of our experience with a National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-supported PBRN and discusses the role it can play in dental education. PBRNs create a structured pathway for providers to advance their professional development by participating in the process of collecting data through clinical research. This process allows practitioners to contribute to the goals of evidence-based dentistry by helping to provide a foundation of evidence on which to base clinical decisions as opposed to relying on anecdotal evidence. PBRNs strengthen the professional knowledge base by applying the principles of good clinical practice, creating a resource for future dental faculty, training practitioners on best practices, and increasing the responsibility, accountability, and scope of care. PBRNs can be the future pivotal instruments of change in dental education, the use of electronic health record systems, diagnostic codes, and the role of comparative effectiveness research, which can create an unprecedented opportunity for the dental profession to advance and be integrated into the health care system. PMID:21828299

  4. Integrated Medical-Dental Delivery Systems: Models in a Changing Environment and Their Implications for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith A; Snyder, John J; Gesko, David S; Helgeson, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Models and systems of the dental care delivery system are changing. Solo practice is no longer the only alternative for graduating dentists. Over half of recent graduates are employees, and more than ever before, dentists are practicing in groups. This trend is expected to increase over the next 25 years. This article examines various models of dental care delivery, explains why it is important to practice in integrated medical-dental teams, and defines person-centered care, contrasting it with patient-centered care. Systems of care in which teams are currently practicing integrated oral health care delivery are described, along with speculation on the future of person-centered care and the team approach. Critical steps in the education of dental and other health care professionals and the development of clinical models of care in moving forward are considered. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  5. Self-sufficiency in intern supply: the impact of expanded medical schools, medical places and rural clinical schools in Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Diann S; Zhang, Jianzhen; Wilkinson, David

    2009-08-01

    The doctor shortage in Australia generally, and the rural shortage in particular, has led to an increase in medical schools, medical places and rural training. If effective, these strategies will first impact on the intern workforce. We studied the source of interns in Queensland. Analysis of number, source and location of interns by Rural, Remote and Metropolitan Area (RRMA) classification (an index of remoteness) from university and health department records (2003-2008). Odds ratios compared the likelihood of intern supply from Queensland universities and rural clinical schools. Most interns in Queensland graduated from Queensland universities in 2007 (287 [72%]) and 2008 (344 [84%]). Proportions increased across all three RRMA groups from: 82% to 93% in RRMA1; 56% to 68% in RRMA2 and 67% to 79% in RRMA3. The University of Queensland (UQ) provides most interns in all RRMA locations including RRMA3, and this increased from 2007 (n = 33 [35%]) to 2008 (n = 57 [58%]). Interns from interstate decreased from 61 (15%) in 2007 to 40 (10%) in 2008. Interns from overseas fell from 53 (13%) in 2007 to 27 (7%) in 2008. Rural clinical schools compared with traditional urban-based schools were more likely to supply interns to RRMA3 than RRMA1 hospitals in 2007 (OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 4.6-16.7; P self-sufficiency in intern supply and will achieve this in the next few years. Rural clinical schools are playing an important role in producing interns for RRMA3 hospitals. Due to its large cohort, UQ remains the major provider across all RRMA groups.

  6. ADA dental product evaluation: case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M L

    1992-01-01

    The ADA Acceptance Programs entail a rigorous evaluation of products and offer clear benefits to manufacturers, dental professionals, and consumers alike. This paper outlines the implications of the ADA product-evaluation programs for each of these three constituencies and concludes that while there may be an occasional downside from the manufacturer's standpoint, their net effect is to provide assurances that products are safe, efficacious, and promoted properly.

  7. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine reasons for seeking dental care at late stages of oral diseases among dental patients attending the dental clinics at the School of Dentistry MUHAS. Materials and Methods: A total of 365 dental patients aged 15+ years who attended outpatient dental clinics of School of Dentistry MUHAS as first visit during ...

  8. Dental Students' Knowledge of Resources for LGBT Persons: Findings from Three Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoying; Mugayar, Leda; Perez, Edna; Nagasawa, Pamela R; Brown, David G; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2017-01-01

    Recently, there has been increased attention to including cultural diversity in the education of health professionals, including concern for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) inclusion and visibility. Studies regarding cultural exposure and acceptance of LGBT populations have been concentrated in medicine, with findings showing that medical providers often graduate having missed the preparation required to care for LGBT persons. A visible, comprehensive, culturally competent environment in dental schools would help ensure that all oral health professionals and students are aware of services available to address the particular needs of LGBT students. The aims of this survey-based study conducted in 2015-16 were to determine dental students' perceptions regarding LGBT students' needs and to assess dental students' knowledge of resources for LGBT persons at three U.S. dental schools, one each in the Midwest, West, and South. Of the 849 students invited to participate, 364 completed the survey (338 dental, 26 dental hygiene), for an overall response rate of 43%. The response rate at individual schools ranged from 30% to 55%. The results showed perceptions of insufficient LGBT information, resources, and support at these institutions, especially at the Western school. There were significant differences among the three schools, with students at the Western school more than the other two schools perceiving that their institution was less aware of whether it met the academic, social support, and spiritual needs of LGBT students. There were no significant differences between LGBT and non-LGBT students' perceptions. The authors urge dental school administrators to explore the degree to which their programs teach respectful and caring behavior towards LGBT students and, by extension, LGBT patient populations.

  9. Use of social media by dental educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, M R; Loewen, J M; Romito, L M

    2013-11-01

    Social networking applications have become an established means of communication; applications that did not exist ten years ago are now used daily. Social media can be used for a myriad of reasons including instructional tools to supplement learning. This project was designed to assess the usage of social media applications by dental school faculty members and identify the types of accounts they prefer. Four hundred forty-three full-time dental and dental hygiene faculty members from five U.S. dental schools were invited to complete a twelve-item online survey regarding their social media usage. The response rate was 50 percent (n=221). Of the respondents, nearly half were dentists, and 62 percent were ≥51 years of age. Facebook was the most popular social network, reportedly used by 111 respondents. The most often reported frequency of use was weekly (20.4 percent, n=221); users indicated utilizing a network primarily for personal rather than professional purposes. However, 37 percent of the respondents reported not using any social media. The most frequently cited barriers to the use of social media were time (48 percent) and privacy concerns (48 percent). Although few would dispute the influence social media has on today's students, the suitability and appropriateness of social media technology and its integration into dental curricula require further evaluation.

  10. Assessment of dental plaque by optoelectronic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Bortun, Cristina Maria; Levai, Mihaela-Codrina; Topala, Florin Ionel; Crǎciunescu, Emanuela Lidia; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of dental biofilm follows specific mechanisms of initial colonization on the surface, microcolony formation, development of organized three dimensional community structures, and detachment from the surface. The structure of the plaque biofilm might restrict the penetration of antimicrobial agents, while bacteria on a surface grow slowly and display a novel phenotype; the consequence of the latter is a reduced sensitivity to inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate with different optoelectronic methods the morphological characteristics of the dental biofilm. The study was performed on samples from 25 patients aged between 18 and 35 years. The methods used in this study were Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) working at 870 nm for in vivo evaluations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for validations. For each patient a sample of dental biofilm was obtained directly from the vestibular surface of the teeth's. SD-OCT produced C- and B-scans that were used to generate three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the sample. The results were compared with SEM evaluations. The biofilm network was dramatically destroyed after the professional dental cleaning. OCT noninvasive methods can act as a valuable tool for the 3D characterization of dental biofilms.

  11. Mercury exposure in the work place and human health: dental amalgam use in dentistry at dental teaching institutions and private dental clinics in selected cities of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Mahmood A; Nawaz, Sadaf; Ali, Saeed Waqar

    2016-03-01

    During the past two decades, mercury has come under increasing scrutiny with regard to its safety both in the general population and in occupationally exposed groups. It's a growing issue of global concern because of its adverse environmental and health impacts. Very few investigations on mercury amalgam use in the dentistry sector have been carried out in South Asia and there is little data reported on mercury contamination of indoor/outdoor air at dental sites. According to an earlier SDPI study, reported in 2013, alarmingly high mercury levels were observed in air (indoor as well as outdoor) at 11 of the 34 visited dental sites (17 dental teaching institutions, 7 general hospitals & 10 dental clinics) in five main cities of Pakistan. 88% of the sites indicated indoor mercury levels in air above the USA EPA reference level of 300 ng/m3. According to our study, carried out at 38 dental teaching institutions in 12 main cities (in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces) of Pakistan, respondents were of the opinion that the currently offered BDS curriculum does not effectively guide outgoing dental professionals and does not provide them adequate knowledge and training about mercury/mercury amalgam and other mercury related human health and mercury waste issues. 90% of respondents supported the review and revision of the present dental curriculum offered at dental teaching institutions in the country, at the earliest. A study has also been conducted to assess the status of mercury amalgam use in private dental clinics in Gilgit, Hunza, Peshawar, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. More than 90 private dental clinics were visited and dental professionals/private clinics in-charge were interviewed during June-July, 2015. The focus areas of the study were Hg amalgam toxicity, its waste management practices and safety measures practiced among the dental practitioners. In the light of the findings described and discussed in this brief report, to safeguard public health and

  12. Is There a Relationship Between Asthma and Dental Caries? A Critical Review of the Literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerardo Maupomé; Jay D. Shulman; Carlo Eduardo Medina-Solis; Oyebola Ladeinde

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a critical review of the literature to ascertain the strength of the scientific and professional evidence supporting an association between dental caries and the experience and severity of asthma...

  13. Advice for a young editor: an accidental career in dental journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, John P

    2005-01-01

    The editor of the Canadian Dental Association addresses issues such as balancing the interests of readers and the professional association, the value of mentors, building relationships with contributing authors and reviewers, and concerns over commercialism.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  15. A Model for Two-Year and Baccalaureate Clinical Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluch-Scranton, Joan; Gurenlian, JoAnn Rigolizzo

    1985-01-01

    Models for associate and bachelors degree programs training dental hygienists are proposed as a step in eliminating technical training for dental hygiene education and in delineating roles for the graduates of two- and four-year programs. They outline clinical and professional skills, practice settings, and supervision levels for each group. (MSE)

  16. Dental Health Behavior in the Prevention of Pulmonary TB at Health Centre in Several Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indirawati Tjahja Notohartojo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary TB is an infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by bacteria. Dental health professionals such as dentists and dental nurses are in charge of health personnel to prevent, treat, cure, teeth the mouth, so as not to arise or aggravate toothache. In doing their job as dental health workers is expected to use gloves or masks, and always wash their hands to avoid the transmission of pulmonary TB disease. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted involving 78 dental health professionals in 50 primary health centers that were chosen in six districts in three provinces of Banten, South Kalimantan and Gorontalo. Data were obtained by interviews and processed using SPSSResults: More than 90% dental health workers in work wore masks gloves and washed their hands after work. There was a signifi cant relationship between exercise with dental health professionals with a p value of 0.007, which means a signifi cant. Conclusion: In performing their duties, dental health workers have already used personal protective equipment such asmasks, gloves, and washed their hands and did enough exercise. Recommendation: need to increase knowledge about pulmonary TB in dental health professionals.

  17. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction : A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P.; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is

  18. Responsibility for Teaching Pain Control in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B.; Campbell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of 53 dental schools found most were not interested in developing a separate division or department of dental anesthesiology. Of those with a dentist anesthesiologist responsible for teaching pain control, all have or favor such a division. Less than one-third employ professionals limiting their practice to anesthesiology. (MSE)

  19. Dental caries vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, K M; Vidya, S K; Chandu, G N

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  20. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  1. Political or dental power in private and public service provision: a study of municipal expenditures for child dental care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L. B.; Bech, M.; Lauridsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Both professionals and politicians may affect expenditures for highly professional services provided in the public and private sector. We investigated Danish publicly financed child dental care with a special focus on the influence of politicians and dentists on the expenditure level. By studying...... from 1996 to 2001 for 226 Danish municipalities, thus allowing for the control for heterogeneity between municipalities and for intra-municipal correlations across time. The results point to differences in expenditures between municipalities with privately and publicly produced dental care. Furthermore...

  2. A political economic theory of the dental care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, J; Douglass, C W

    1982-01-01

    A theory of the dental care market is introduced which proposes that the vertically integrated (local/state/national) structure of the profession services as an organizational vehicle both for intra-professional debate and for developing provider-oriented dental care policy. We suggest that a special relationship exists between professionalism and professional regulation. Such regulation has functioned simultaneously to limit competition and to foster a prized consumption commodity for providers: professionalism and professional esteem. The organized pursuit of this commodity inherently dampens competition. Professionalism itself plays a crucial role in: 1) securing for organized dentistry a form of state regulation in which the providers themselves are the principal decision-makers; and 2) influencing provider and consumer market behavior in several significant respects, the net result being the formation of maintenance of a type of "leadership cartel" in the local market. Thus, a political-economic theory of the dental care market formally acknowledges professionalism as valued by established dentists and recent graduates as a central determining influence. Traditional models of pure competition and monopoly emerge as special, extreme cases of the general theory. Hypotheses are offered regarding consumer and provider behavior, market dynamics, and health policy and regulation. PMID:7091455

  3. Career retention in the dental hygiene workforce in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, G H; Gutmann, M E; DeWald, J P; Nunn, M E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence the retention and attrition of dental hygienists within the workforce in Texas. Respondents' perception of the role of employee benefits and practice of dental hygiene on career retention were explored. Demographic descriptors, including educational level, marital status, age, employment setting, and practice statuses, were also examined. A questionnaire modified from the American Dental Hygienists' Association Extension Study: Retention of Dental Hygienists in the Workforce Final Report, April 1992, was mailed to a systematic sample of licensed Texas dental hygienists in March 1999. Descriptive statistics were computed for dental hygienists currently in practice in Texas and those not in practice at the time of the survey. Differences in demographics, benefits, and attitudes between dental hygienists currently in practice in Texas and dental hygienists not in practice at the time of the survey were tested using independent t-tests for interval data and chi-squared tests for categorical data. All statistical analyses were conducted using the Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS v. 9, Chicago, Illinois). A response rate of 68.1% was obtained. Results revealed the primary reasons for remaining in the practice of dental hygiene were salary, family responsibility, professional collaboration, and variety of work. The primary reasons for leaving dental hygiene practice were family responsibility, boredom, salary, and lack of benefits. Secondary and tertiary reasons stated for staying in clinical practice revealed additional factors including benefits, participation in decision-making, and a safe environment. Dental hygienists in clinical practice were more likely to be employed by a dentist in a single practice and see more patients per day, have a certificate or associate's degree, be unmarried, have fewer children, and be younger than dental hygienists not in practice. The findings suggest

  4. [Perceived oral health and use of dental services during pregnancy: the MaterniDent study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Pastor-Harper, Diana; Constantin, Delia; Bedos, Christophe; Kaminski, Monique; Nabet, Cathy; Sixou, Michel; Rouillon, F

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the MaterniDent study was to determine the nature and frequency of dental problems experienced by pregnant women and their associated factors. The secondary objective was to determine the frequency of dental visits during pregnancy and to identify associated factors. The MaterniDent study was a multicenter cross-sectional study conducted among 904 postpartum women in three French maternity wards. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Measured variables included socio-demographic, health and behavioral characteristics. 57% of women reported having experienced at least one dental problem during pregnancy, while 20% had experienced dental pain during pregnancy. Multiparity, vomiting, soda consumption and increased sugar consumption during pregnancy were significantly associated with dental pain (pdental visit (p dental problem during pregnancy, although they did not necessarily consult a dentist to treat the problem. Given the impact of oral diseases for both mother and child, prevention and professional dental care during pregnancy should be promoted.

  5. Perception of dental illness among persons receiving public assistance in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedos, Christophe; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Levine, Alissa; Richard, Lucie; Boucheron, Laurence; Mereus, Witnisse

    2005-08-01

    We examined rationales for behaviors related to dental care among persons receiving public assistance in Montreal, Quebec. Fifty-seven persons receiving public assistance participated in 8 focus groups conducted in 2002. Sessions were recorded on audiotape and transcribed; analyses included debriefing sessions and coding and interpreting transcribed data. In the absence of dental pain and any visible cavity, persons receiving public assistance believed they were free of dental illness. However, they knew that dental pain signals a pathological process that progressively leads to tooth decay and, therefore, should be treated by a dentist. However, when in pain, despite recognizing that they needed professional treatment, they preferred to wait and suffer because of a fear of painful dental treatments and a reluctance to undertake certain procedures. Persons receiving public assistance have perceptions about dental health and illness that prevent them from receiving early treatment for tooth decay, which may lead to disagreements with dentists when planning dental treatments.

  6. Effect of dental plaque control on infection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chun-Ling; Jiang, Guang-Shui; Li, Chun-Hai; Li, Cui-Rong

    2012-10-01

    Data on the role of dental plaque in the transmission of Helicobactor pylori have varied. Furthermore, there has been few reports on the relationship between dental plaque control and H. pylori infection of gastric mucosa. The purpose of this study was to elucidate this potential relationship. The 13C urea breath test was conducted on 56 subjects who received dental plaque control and 51 subjects who did not. The prevalence of H. pylori in the gastric mucosa was 19.64% in patients who received dental plaque control, which was significantly lower than in those without dental plaque control (84.31%). Long-term professional dental plaque control was associated with less gastric reinfection by H. pylori, suggesting that dental plaque control may help to prevent H. pylori-induced gastric disease or reinfection.

  7. Need for an Ethical Framework for Testing for Systemic Diseases in Dental Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Marushka Leanne; Chattopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Testing for systemic diseases in dental clinics is a potentially attractive avenue for oral health professionals and may be viewed as an opportunity to increase professional reach, expand practice, and improve financial returns. However, several ethical questions arise that must be addressed before such activities are adopted. (1) What should be the level of training dentists must acquire to deal with challenges associated with testing? (2) How well are dental practices aware of and compliant...

  8. Curriculum survey on tobacco education in European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, C A; Aurich, P; Bottini, C; Warnakulasuriya, S; Davis, J M

    2012-10-01

    Dental professionals need adequate education in tobacco use prevention and cessation skills. The aim of this study was to identify the level of integration of tobacco education in undergraduate curricula of European dental schools. In 2009, a total of 197 European dental schools were identified through web-based searches. An e-mail survey, containing 20 questions, was sent to each head of school/director of education with up to five follow-up e-mails to non-responders. Dental schools from 21 European countries responded to the survey. The overall return rate was 68 out of 197 schools (35%). In 14 (21%) dental schools, the students were requested to be tobacco free, 14 (21%) asked their students to quit tobacco use and 21 (31%) offered students cessation assistance. All responding schools reported that patients were asked about their tobacco use; 59% by taking an oral history, 75% using a general medical history form and 10% using a specific tobacco use history form. A total of 34% of the schools referred smokers to an external counselling clinic, 13% referred to a telephone counselling, and dental students provided brief counselling in 11 schools (16%). Forty-five (67%) dental schools reported to have tobacco education implemented in their curriculum, of these 30 (67%) stated their tobacco curriculum was mandatory. Theoretical education on tobacco culture and its impact on oral health were implemented in 45 (66%) dental schools. However, only 18 (40%) schools have introduced practical skills training to their students. Dental schools assessed their students' theoretical knowledge (27%) and practical training (4%), respectively. Even though theoretical tobacco education appears to be acknowledged by many European dental schools, further practical training of undergraduate dental students in tobacco prevention and cessation skills should be encouraged.

  9. Appraisal of the dental school learning environment: the students' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzi, David; Davis, Elaine; Jasinevicius, Roma; Hendricson, William; Cintron, Laura; Isaacs, Marcia

    2005-10-01

    The majority of studies examining dental school curriculum have addressed organization, structure, and content issues from the perspectives of administrators, faculty, practitioners/alumni, and professional organizations. However, few studies have focused on students' opinions of dental school. The purpose of this study was to determine students' perceptions of the learning environment, intellectual climate, and teacher-student relationships in dental school. This report describes how the "dental version" of the Medical Student Learning Environment Survey (MSLES) was used to identify students' perceptions of their dental education. Freshman and junior dental students' perceptions were measured with the Dental Student Learning Environment Survey (DSLES), which evaluates learning environment, intellectual climate, and relationships among students and teachers in seven areas: flexibility, student-to-student interaction, emotional climate, supportiveness, meaningful experience, organization, and breadth of interest. The DSLES was mailed to twenty-three dental schools in North America with eighteen of the schools distributing the inventory. A total of 619 dental students responded. Results were differentiated between freshman and junior dental students. Both freshman and junior students provided the highest (most positive) ratings for the DSLES subscales of "breadth of interest" (interest in dentistry and outside interests are encouraged) and "meaningful learning experience" (significance of courses to dentistry). Freshman students provided the lowest (least positive) ratings for "emotional climate" (students' responses to the way their courses were conducted and stress levels), and junior students provided the least positive ratings for "faculty supportiveness" (extent of faculty support and encouragement provided to students). The DSLES identified students' perceptions of their educational experience and localized areas for improvement. By addressing these areas of

  10. Tomorrow's leaders, starting today: a pilot leadership development program for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoroff, Kristin Z; Schneider, Keith; Perry, Crystal

    2009-03-01

    Effective leadership is vitally important as the dental profession strives to meet current and future challenges. Leadership development programs have been created for mid-career dental professionals, but the relative lack of such programs for dental students may represent a missed opportunity to cultivate the dental leaders of tomorrow. A pilot leadership development program for dental students is described in this article. A voluntary leadership development program for dental students was offered in 2008 at the Case School of Dental Medicine with support from the Ohio Dental Association Foundation. The program aimed to increase students' leadership knowledge, improve their leadership skills, and provide inspiration through exposure to leaders who could serve as role models. At the conclusion of the program, students attended the Ohio Dental Association's Leadership Institute event. Forty-six students attended at least one program session. Thirty students attended all or all but one of the on-site sessions. Thirty-three participants responded to a post-program anonymous online survey. The majority of participants (81 percent) rated the program as very useful or useful and said they would participate in the program again (85 percent). Student attendance at the state dental association's leadership event increased appreciably from previous years. Student participation in the pilot program exceeded expectations. Leadership development programs for dental students are feasible and can benefit students and the dental community.

  11. Perceived stress in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Radojkova-Nikolovska, Vera; Markovska-Simoska, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a normal physiological response to events that make us feel threatened, or upset our balance in some way. In medicine, it is known that stress, as an emotional state, can be a trigger for many psychosomatic disorders. Work stress and burnout are considered to be serious professional risks in dentistry. The dentist should be aware of these stressors and attempt to manage them in order to avoid becoming occupationally dissatisfied. On the other hand, the other common characteristic of modern life is a growing burden of different chronic diseases. Periodontal disease is one of the two most important oral diseases contributing to the global burden of chronic disease. The aim of this study was to assess the perceived stress in patients with periodontal pathologies, and to compare it with the stress in doctors-dentists and students of dentistry as future professionals. Our study confirmed the presence of significant stress in all three groups of examinees (patients, doctors, and students). Surprisingly, the obtained PSQ scores are similar in the examined groups. In addition, no differences between perceived stress in males and females have been found. There is a minimal positive correlation between age and obtained scores. However, stress must be evaluated as a risk factor both for professionals or for chronic dental patients and some response measures must be undertaken.

  12. Automated Digital Dental Articulation

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, James J.; Chang, Yu-Bing; Gateno, Jaime; Xiong, Zixiang; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2010-01-01

    Articulating digital dental models is often inaccurate and very time-consuming. This paper presents an automated approach to efficiently articulate digital dental models to maximum intercuspation (MI). There are two steps in our method. The first step is to position the models to an initial position based on dental curves and a point matching algorithm. The second step is to finally position the models to the MI position based on our novel approach of using iterative surface-based minimum dis...

  13. Workplace health in dental care - a salutogenic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmark, U; Wagman, P; Wåhlin, C; Rolander, B

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to explore self-reported psychosocial health and work environments among different dental occupations and workplaces from a salutogenic perspective. A further purpose was to analyse possible associations between three salutogenic measurements: The Sense of Coherence questionnaire (SOC), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS). Employees in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county council (n = 486) were invited to respond to a self-reported web survey including demographics, work-related factors, the SOC, the SHIS and the WEMS. This study showed positive associations between employee characteristics and self-reported overall psychosocial health as well as experienced work environment. Autonomy was reported more among men than women (P < 0.000) and to a higher degree by dentists and dental hygienists than dental nurses (P < 0.000). Meaningfulness, happiness, job satisfaction, autonomy and positive to reorganization were reported by personnels aged less than 40 years (P ≤ 0.047). Clinical coordinators reported significant better health (SOC, SHIS) and experienced more autonomy, better management and more positive to reorganization than other dental professions. Dental hygienists and nurses experienced less time pressure than dentists (P ≤ 0.007). Better health and positive work experiences were also seen in smaller clinics (P ≤ 0.29). Dental professionals reported a high degree of overall psychosocial health as well as a positive work experience. Some variations could be seen between employee characteristics such as gender, years in dental care, professionals, managing position and workplace size. Identify resources and processes at each workplace are important and should be included in the employee's/employers dialogue. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  15. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  16. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  17. Immunization against dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshihiko; Oho, Takahiko; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Yoshio

    2002-05-15

    Dental caries is one of the most common infectious diseases. Of the oral bacteria, mutans streptococci, such as Streptococcus mutans and S. sobrinus, are considered to be causative agents of dental caries in humans. There have been numerous studies of the immunology of mutans streptococci. To control dental caries, dental caries vaccines have been produced using various cell-surface antigens of these organisms. Progress in recombinant DNA technology and peptide synthesis has been applied to the development of recombinant and synthetic peptide vaccines to control dental caries. Significant protective effects against dental caries have been shown in experimental animals, such as mice, rats and monkeys, which have been subcutaneously, orally, or intranasally immunized with these antigens. Only a few studies, however, have examined the efficacy of dental caries vaccines in humans. Recently, local passive immunization using murine monoclonal antibodies, transgenic plant antibodies, egg-yolk antibodies, and bovine milk antibodies to antigens of mutans streptococci have been used to control the colonization of the organisms and the induction of dental caries in human. Such immunization procedures may be a safer approach for controlling human dental caries than active immunization.

  18. Family dental health care service

    OpenAIRE

    Riana Wardani

    2008-01-01

    The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effecti...

  19. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professio......The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the...... professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...... ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships....

  20. Dental Education Required for the Changing Health Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita; González-Cabezas, Carlos; de Peralta, Tracy; Johnsen, David C

    2017-08-01

    To be able to meet the demands for care in 2040, dental graduates will need to address challenges resulting from the rapidly changing health care environment with knowledge and sets of skills to build on current standards and adapt to the future. The purposes of this article are to 1) analyze key challenges likely to evolve considerably between now and 2040 that will impact dental education and practice and 2) propose several sets of skills and educational outcomes necessary to address these challenges. The challenges discussed include changes in prevalence of oral diseases, dental practice patterns, materials and technologies, integrated medical-dental care, role of electronic health records, cultural competence, integrated curricula, interprofessional education, specialty-general balance, and web/cloud-based collaborations. To meet these challenges, the dental graduate will need skills such as core knowledge in basic and clinical dentistry, technical proficiency, critical thinking skills for lifelong learning, ethical and professional values, ability to manage a practice, social responsibility, and ability to function in a collegial intra- and interprofessional setting. Beyond the skills of the individual dentist will be the need for leadership in academia and the practice community. Academic and professional leaders will need to engage key constituencies to develop strategic directions and agendas with all parties pointed toward high standards for individual patients and the public at large. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  1. Professional ethics and professional etiquette in dentistry: are they compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbrun, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    In keeping with the theme of this colloquium, two aspects of ethics in dentistry are addressed: its evolution and its future. With respect to its evolution, two examples of changes in the design of clinical trials in dentistry are discussed. These concern the current requirement of informed consent from the subjects in the trial, now taken for granted, but not necessarily observed before 1964. The Vipeholm dental caries study is one example of pre-Helsinki Declaration experimentation. The second example, also drawn from caries research design, concerns the stricture on the use of placebo-controlled trials in the face of a proven drug. For example, the design of clinical trials of fluoride dentifrices has evolved since the mid 1970s. The use of a placebo-inactive control group is no longer acceptable as it would deprive its subjects of a proven caries-preventive agent and would expose its subjects to increased caries risk. While definitions of professional ethics in dentistry may vary, the ADA Code of Ethics includes five principles: patient autonomy ("self-governance"), non-maleficence ("do no harm"), beneficence ("do good"), justice ("fairness") and veracity ("truthfulness"). Professional etiquette refers to the way dentists relate to one another and is governed by the ADA Code of Professional Conduct which expresses specific types of conduct that are either required or prohibited. Sometimes, ethics and etiquette may conflict. The problem of financial issues that conflict with ethical ones is discussed along with the problem of commercialism in the practice of dentistry. Debts from dental school may adversely affect the professional behavior of young dentists, while general dentists might succumb to "goodies" provided by specialists. These often include continuing education courses, gifts, trips, and kickbacks. Specialists may fail to inform patients of improper or poor quality treatment by the referring general practitioner, fearing loss of referrals. Of course

  2. Routine oral examination: clinical vignettes, a promising tool for continuing professional development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, T.G.P.H.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Eeten-Kruiskamp, L. van; Mulder, J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop content for an educational system for dental professionals to be used for patient-tailored evidence-based decisions regarding routine oral examinations (ROEs) and to test the model as a tool in dental education. METHODS: Initially, an electronic database was developed

  3. Rights of dental patients in the EU - a legal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bossche, Anne-Marie; Ploscar, Paula

    2012-11-30

    This contribution presents the legal framework for intra-European mobility of dental patients. After presenting the EU competences in respect of healthcare and a brief look into the various routes of patient mobility, the article sets out the rules for access to dental care, treatment abroad and reimbursement through social security. In addition, we focus on the impact of European Union (EU) law upon national systems in respect of professional insurance, complaints procedures and information mechanisms. In conclusion, we reflect on the development in EU law of an independent set of rights to cross-border dental care and its consequences for financing and reimbursement of care, as well as for national practices in respect of professional liability and insurance.

  4. Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... needs of dental practitioners in Nigeria, Africa and international community interested in the dental practice in the developing world. The NDJ is published biannually and accepts reports of original research, review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques related to dentistry and allied subjects ...

  5. Perceptions of dental students in India about smoking cessation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasundaram, Prakash; Sequeira, Peter Simon; Jain, Jithesh

    2011-12-01

    Smoking kills 900,000 people every year in India. Many studies have shown that counseling from a health professional is an effective method of helping patients quit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of dental students in Karnataka, India, towards smoking cessation counseling. A questionnaire study was conducted among a convenience sample of 329 dental students comprised of III year and IV year students and interns in three dental colleges in Karnataka, India. Of the 329 students who completed the questionnaire, twenty-two (7 percent) were current smokers, and fifteen (5 percent) were ex-smokers. Although 94 percent responded they were giving antismoking advice to their patients, only 47 percent said they had been taught antismoking advice suitable for patients. While a majority (95 percent) planned to advise patients about tobacco use in their professional careers, significantly fewer (66 percent) indicated that such counseling would help patients to quit. This study of dental students and interns found that a majority intended to provide smoking cessation counseling in their professional career and agreed it is part of their professional role.

  6. Ethical dilemmas and financial burdens faced by clinical dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unprofessional behaviour, cheating or falsifying of information by undergraduate dental students is a serious problem, and may be a predictor of future professional board disciplinary actions against practitioners. In quota-driven curricula students have to complete a minimum number of procedures, many of which require ...

  7. Pattern of prescription of antibiotics among dental practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics by clinicians leads to antibiotic resistance, and is a serious global health concern. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic prescription practices of dental practitioners and their adherence to professional guidelines while treating oral health problems among children.

  8. Scholarship and Dental Education: New Perspectives for Clinical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E.

    1984-01-01

    Career advancement in academic dentistry appears to demand success in teaching, scholarship, and service, but foremost in research or scholarship. As a result, many dental faculty believe they are forced to choose between providing excellent professional preparation for their students or ensuring their academic careers. (MLW)

  9. Professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  10. Professional C++

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Master complex C++ programming with this helpful, in-depth resource From game programming to major commercial software applications, C++ is the language of choice. It is also one of the most difficult programming languages to master. While most competing books are geared toward beginners, Professional C++, Third Edition, shows experienced developers how to master the latest release of C++, explaining little known features with detailed code examples users can plug into their own codes. More advanced language features and programming techniques are presented in this newest edition of the book,

  11. Fissure sealants: Knowledge and practice of Yemeni dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Jamaei, Aisha Ahmed; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Al-Soneidar, Walid Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Alsalhani, Anas

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate Yemeni dental practitioners' knowledge and practices concerning fissure sealants. A modified questionnaire consisted of 25-items was distributed to 500 dentists working in Sana'a City. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square/Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analyses. The response rate was 74%. Most of the respondents were male (61.3%), general practitioners (84.2%), and had sealants, with the majority (88%) believed that there is strong scientific evidence about fissure sealants effectiveness and around 90% showed a good understanding of sealant placement instructions. On the other hand, respondents showed insufficient knowledge about sealants clinical practice. Although a high proportion of dental practitioners showed adequate knowledge about dental sealant, following guidelines and standardized procedures in clinical practice is lacking. These emphasize the need for regular continuing education courses for dental professional.

  12. Dental Acrylics - Potential Agent for a Myriad of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivangi Gajwani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An allergic reaction also known as a hypersensitivity reaction is caused by the immune system in response to a foreign substance (or allergen. Allergenic chemicals can be found in many products used in the dental operatory. With repeated exposure, these chemicals can cause allergic reactions in dental professionals, resulting in local as well as systemic manifestations. According to various studies done, it became evident that the prevalence of acrylic allergy most commonly in the form of allergic contact dermatitis is affecting the dental personnel to a much greater degree than is believed. Awareness of this disease complex in the form of any new symptoms and potential exposure is paramount for dental personals.

  13. A Care Pathway for Children Unable to Accept Dental Care Within the General Dental Services Involving the Use of Inhalation Sedation and General Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Allyson R; Ali, Halimah

    2015-05-01

    Dental treatment is the commonest reason for a child to be in hospital in the UK. This is a shocking statistic for a preventable disease. How can we reduce the high numbers of dental general anaesthetics? It is essential that dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) is fully justifiable, ensuring that the right patients receive the right treatment. Guidance for general dental practitioners on when to refer a child for a dental GA is discussed. Treatment planning for this dentally high-risk group of children requires a holistic approach. It is complex and requires an experienced and competent clinical team, including dental care professionals with additional postgraduate qualifications. Often, alternative treatments are successful and a GA can be avoided. An audit of 85 patients referred for GA with Oldham Community Dental Service demonstrated 35% of patients accepted treatment with local anaesthesia only, 25% required inhalation sedation and only 25% were actually referred on for GA. Treatment for this group of patients must include the availability and provision of appropriate alternative treatment modalities, with the right staff and facilities, including those for dental general anaesthetic sessions. Ongoing follow-up within the general dental services is essential for this group of patients.

  14. Patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, patient satisfaction with dental services has received only minor attention. Objective: To assess patients' satisfaction with public dental health services in Dar es Salaam. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Five public dental clinics randomly selected from a list of all the nine public dental ...

  15. Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence among 12 and 15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. Aim: The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries ...

  16. Awareness of dental implants among dental patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness of dental implant in Nigerian patients and their willingness to choose dental implant as a tooth replacement option. A survey was conducted among patients presenting for dental treatment in 3 teaching hospitals and private dental clinics in 3 urban cities of ...

  17. Nine years of DentEd--a global perspective on dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, P A; Eaton, K A; Paganelli, C; Shanley, D

    2008-08-23

    This paper describes the three successive and successful DentEd projects, funded by the European Union, that established a productive thematic network which identified common content within the dental curriculum. It then developed an agreed professional profile, with a defined set of competences and a modular curriculum for all new dental graduates based on the European Credit Transfer System and trends in learning and assessment. The three phases took nine years to complete. Phase one investigated all aspects of dental undergraduate education and included over 30 visits to different dental schools by teams of dental educators. Phase two built on this work and included further visits to dental schools. Phase three refined the competency framework that had been developed in phase two and culminated in a global dental conference which finalised position papers on all aspects of dental education. The work and recommendations of the ICT in dental education group are considered in detail in the paper. The projects provided the stimulus for a number of European and international collaborations, including the web-based International Federation of Dental Education and Associations (IFDEA) Knowledge Centre and the International Virtual Dental School (IVIDENT), both of which aim to make increasingly sophisticated ICT-based educational material available worldwide and to promote international understanding.

  18. What guides professional behavior of dentists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, John E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the question of what guides professional behavior in the hope that those who read it will reflect on how they conduct their relationships with patients, business associates, and employees. I propose that the ADA Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct are only a portion of what guides dentists' ethical behavior. The Principles and Code are founded on basic personal ethics and societal standards, and in the U.S. they are in turn the foundation for the state dental practice acts.

  19. Perceived stress and well-being among dental hygiene and dental therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M; Wilson, J C; Holmes, S; Radford, D R

    2017-01-27

    Aims To explore dental hygiene and dental therapy students' (DHDTS') perception of stress and well-being during their undergraduate education and establish base-line data for further studies of this group of dental professionals.Subjects and methods A questionnaire was distributed to Years 1, 2 and 3 DHDTS and final year outreach dental students (DS) (as a comparison group), at the University of Portsmouth Dental Academy (UPDA), during summer 2015. Data were collected on students' perception of levels of stress and well-being. Statistical analyses were undertaken using SPSS software. Mann-Whitney U tests with Bonferroni corrections were used and the level for a statistically significant difference was set at p academic work were perceived as stressful for both DHDTS and DS, with no significant difference between the groups. The majority of respondents reported levels of depression, anxiety, and stress to be within the normal range. All students reported high levels of positive well-being, with DHDTS scoring significantly higher than DS in the dimensions of personal growth, purpose in life, self-acceptance and positive relations with others (p stress within their undergraduate education, but also perceived themselves as positively-functioning individuals.

  20. Dental status in nursing home residents with domiciliary dental care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, P; Renvert, S; Sjogren, P; Zimmerman, M

    2017-12-01

    To describe the dental health status of elderly people in nursing homes receiving domiciliary dental care. Case note review. Nursing homes in 8 Swedish counties. Care dependent elderly people (≥65 years). Clinical data, including the number of remaining natural teeth, missing and decayed teeth (manifest dental caries) and root remnants, recorded by dentists according to standard practices. Medical and dental risk assessments were performed. Data were available for 20,664 patients. Most were women (69.1%), with a mean age of 87.1 years (SD 7.42, range 65-109). The mean age for men was 83.5 years (SD 8.12, range 65-105). Two or more medical conditions were present in most of the population. A total of 16,210 individuals had existing teeth of whom 10,974 (67.7%) had manifest caries. The mean number of teeth with caries was 5.0 (SD 5.93) corresponding to 22.8% of existing teeth. One in four individuals were considered to have a very high risk in at least one professional dental risk assessment category. Care dependent elderly in nursing homes have very poor oral health. There is a need to focus on the oral health-related quality of life for this group of frail elderly during their final period of life. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  1. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dental hygienist attitudes toward providing care for the underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Lynn A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate registered dental hygienists' attitude toward community service, sensitivity to patient needs, job satisfaction and their frequency to volunteer care for the underserved population. A 60 question survey instrument was developed and distributed to 306 participants. The survey instrument ad dressed the following variables: community service, sensitivity to patient needs, job satisfaction, social responsibility, spirituality and willingness to volunteer care. A total of 109 surveys were returned yielding a 33.9% response rate. SPSS version 19.0 was utilized for data analysis. Based on the factor analysis, the 6 original variables were reduced to 3 variables, which included attitude toward community service, job satisfaction and sensitivity to patient needs. For registered dental hygienists their level of education, membership in their professional association, attitude toward community service and sensitivity to patients were associated with their frequency of volunteering care for the underserved population. Additionally, a discriminant analysis indicated a strong prediction among registered dental hygienists attitude toward community service and job satisfaction to their frequency of volunteering care for the underserved population. This research study of the factors that influence registered dental hygienists' frequency of volunteering care indicates how important oral health care preparatory norms and dispositions are to the underserved population. Understanding what persuades registered dental hygienists to volunteer care provides valuable information to registered dental hygienists, as well as dental hygiene programs regarding volunteering care for the underserved population and the importance of attitudes toward community service, sensitivity to patient needs and job satisfaction.

  3. Controlled Use of X-Ray in Dental Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesbia Rosa Tirado-Amado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: To contribute in an informative and critical way to the promotion of controlled use of X-ray during dental consulting and dental care. Introduction: The practice of dentistry as a health care service requires the use of complementary tools for proper diagnosis, treatment and follow-up in patients with different clinical conditions. For that reason, the use of x-ray by dentists is common and very useful, but it involves radiation exposure to the patient and the dental professional or dental student. Although, often people do not pay attention to this exposition in regard to biological effects, because they are considered too low to generate significant biological effects. Conclusion: It is necessary to consider the risk of accumulative doses for constant exposure in dentist and dental students. Moreover, in patients, because a synergism with other radiations can occur, they can be exposed because of the attention in other areas of health. For these reasons, it is necessary to promote awareness and knowledge on basic aspects of the controlled use of X-ray in the dental care, being also aware of the need to strengthen the knowledge of the basics aspects that lead to decreased risk of biological effects from its proper use in the dental care.

  4. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbaraini Alexandra

    2012-06-01

    them aware of existing preventive options, educated them about how to maintain a healthy mouth and teeth, and supported and reassured them frequently during visits. Conclusions Patients valued having a supportive and caring dentist and a dedicated dental team. The experience of having a dedicated, supportive and caring dentist helped patients to take control of their own oral health. These dentists and dental teams produced profound changes in not just the oral health care routines of patients, but in the way patients thought about their own oral health and the role of dental professionals.

  5. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  6. Risk in the management of dental amalgam in dental medium and small entities in the department of Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo A. Ruiz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the applied research “Environmental Management of the Dental Amalgam in Antioquia, Colombia”, which was financed by the company New Stetic S. A. and the University of Antioquia. The research was carried out between 2005 and 2007 by the following groups: Biomedical Science and Technology, Precious Materials, and Pyrometallurgical and Materials Researches, and the Research and Development Division of the mentioned company. Objetive: to describe and characterize the activities about handling mercury, dental amalgam and its waste in 107 dental offices defined as medium and small, that is to say those with less than five dental chairs in the same workplace. Methodology: a poll was made in each institution filling a questionnaire about personal details of the interviewee, mercury and amalgam handling, occupational health, training, environmental conditions, and waste management. Each dental office was visited by a research engineer and an advanced engineering student who were trained in advance in order to collect the information. Results: a reflection aimed to establish integral actions and safe methodologies in the short term to promote a better quality service and a minimum risk for the people exposed to mercury and the ecosystem must be encouraged by dental and administrative staff, as well as by surveillance and control institutions and the educational institutions devoted to the formation of dental professionals.

  7. Examining Health Care Students' Attitudes toward E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettig, Jacob P; Noronha, Sandhya; Graneto, John; Obucina, Lillian; Christensen, Kelli J; Fjortoft, Nancy F

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To compare pharmacy, osteopathic medicine, dental medicine, and physician assistant (PA) students' perceptions of e-professionalism. Methods. A 20-item questionnaire was developed and administered to four cohorts of health care professions students early in their first professional year. The questionnaire contained 16 scenarios in which a hypothetical health care student or professional shared information or content electronically and students were asked to indicate how much they agreed that the scenario represented professional behavior. Results. Ninety-four percent of students completed the questionnaire. More female students were in the pharmacy and PA cohorts. There were statistical differences in students' perceptions of e-professionalism in five of 16 scenarios. Specific differences were most often between the osteopathic medicine students and the other cohorts. Conclusions. The health care professions students surveyed had similar perceptions of e-professionalism. Of the four cohorts, osteopathic medicine students appeared less conservative in their approach to e-professionalism than the other cohorts.

  8. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  9. Professional socialisation: an influence on professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional ...

  10. Measuring children's dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Gerry M; Freeman, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Medline and the Social Science Index Citation databases were searched. Studies had to have used measures of dental anxiety completed by children themselves (≤16 years), been published in English and reported primary data. Non-validated measures, those using proxy measures and non-dentally specific measures were excluded. Data were extracted independently using a standardised form. Validity and reliability of the questionnaires were assessed, and measures were evaluated against a theoretical framework of dental anxiety. A qualitative summary of the measures is presented. Sixty studies met the inclusion criteria. These covered seven 'trait' and two 'state' measures of dental anxiety used to assess children's dental anxiety over the past decade. The findings from this systematic review can be used to help guide dental academics, clinicians, psychologists and epidemiologists to choose the most appropriate measure of dental anxiety for their intended use. Future work should involve evaluating the content and developmental validity of existing measures with further consideration given to the use of theoretical frameworks to develop this field.

  11. The anatomy of a new dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, J; Kay, E J

    2008-06-14

    The goal of all dental schools is to develop competent, knowledgeable dentists who have excellent communication skills and a sense of social responsibility. This paper describes the theoretical reasoning behind the design of an innovative dental curriculum constructed from first principles in the UK. The recognised theories of psychologists, educationalists and sociologists of the twentieth century have informed our educational decisions. In practice, this translates to a blended learning environment with problem-based learning (PBL) case scenarios at its heart. The learning of clinical and communication skills, which begins in year 1, week 1, is absolutely integral to the case scenarios, as are ethics and professionalism. PBL is supported by a comprehensive e-learning platform, plenary lectures, workshops, clinical and life science teaching delivered by core academic staff and guest speakers who are the experts in our 'community of practice' in which the students are the novices. We believe that the whole is best described as 'enquiry-based learning'.

  12. Dental CBCT equipment and performance issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, K; Jacobs, R; Schulze, R

    2013-02-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), also known as digital volumetric tomography was developed in the late 1990s and is now increasingly available in clinical practice. It can provide high resolution cross-sectional images of teeth and the maxillofacial region with applications in all branches of dentistry. As a new imaging modality, there were no established suspension levels at a European level. A literature review, encompassing scientific, professional publications and existing national guidelines was performed in an attempt to develop a set of suspension levels for dental CBCT, using additional expert opinion from the members of the European Academy of dento-maxillo-facial radiology. A limited set of suspension levels has been devised for aspects of the X-ray tube and generator, dosimetry, field-of-view, alignment and image quality. These should be kept under review in the light of growing experience of testing equipment in practice.

  13. An assessment of faculty and dental student decision-making in ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Catalanotto, Frank A; Garvan, Cynthia Wilson; Hudson-Vassell, Charisse

    2014-01-01

    This study reports and compares dental student and dental faculty scores to national norms for the Defining Issues Test 2, a measure of ethical decision-making competency. The findings showed that dental students and faculty tend to make decisions that promote self-interest, paralleling the ethical orientation of business professionals. Differences associated with gender, language, and norms from previous studies were observed. The findings underscore the importance of raising dental faculty and student awareness of their own ethical decision-making approaches. More importantly, the findings highlight the need to ensure that dental faculty have both the knowledge and skills to train dental students about the central role that ethical decision-making must play in patient care.

  14. As práticas profissionais no campo público de atenção à saúde bucal: o caso de dois municípios da Bahia Professional practices in public dental healthcare: case study of two municipal districts, Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Cristina Lima Chaves

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo visou analisar os meios e processos de trabalho dos cirurgiões-dentistas inseridos na atenção básica em dois municípios da Bahia, buscando identificar em que medida fatores relacionados à gestão da atenção à saúde bucal, formação, inserção e perfil profissional influenciam as práticas desenvolvidas pelos mesmos. Foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas junto a nove cirurgiões-dentistas em ambos os municípios. Houve um padrão de organização do processo de trabalho mais próximo dos princípios estruturantes do sistema de saúde brasileiro no município C em relação ao município E. Essas diferenças parecem estar relacionadas a características da gestão, onde no município C observou-se uma articulação entre as atividades clínicas individuais, coletivas, preventivas e de planejamento. Apesar dessas diferenças, os profissionais mostraram similitudes quanto à dupla militância e as percepções sobre os campos públicos e privados da saúde. A hegemonia do setor privado parece estar influenciando a prática profissional dos cirurgiões-dentistas no serviço público.This paper examines the working facilities and processes of dentists in the primary healthcare systems of two towns in Bahia State, Brazil, striving to analyze the extent to which factors related to dental care, training, placement and professional profiles influence their practices. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine dentists in both towns, with work process organization patterns in Municipality C being closer to the structuring principles of Brazil's National Health System than in Municipality E. This seems to be related to management characteristics, with networking links among individual, collective, and preventive clinical activities and planning noted in Municipality C. Despite these differences, the practitioners presented similarities in terms of dual militancy and perceptions of the public and private healthcare

  15. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  16. Standing equine dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert A; Easley, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Dental surgeries refer to procedures that affect the dental tissues or their supporting structures. With the development of specific, efficacious, and conservative treatments, morbidity risks have been lowered and chances of benefiting the health of equids improved. Advances in quality of sedation, analgesia, and locoregional anesthesia allow a majority of dental surgeries to be performed in the standing patient. This update focuses on an orthograde endodontic technique, a minimally invasive buccotomy technique, with the potential to combine it with a transbuccal screw extraction technique, and revisits the AO pinless external fixator for fractures of the body of the mandible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  18. Dental service provision by oral health therapists, dental hygienists and dental therapists in Australia: implications for workforce modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Amarasena, N; Satur, J; Chrisopoulos, S; Brennan, D S

    2016-03-01

    Dental service provision rates are necessary for workforce planning. This study estimates patient and service rates for oral health therapists (OHTs), dental hygienists (DHs) and dental therapists (DTs). To identify important variables for workforce modelling, variations in rates by practice characteristics were assessed. A cross-sectional self-complete mailed questionnaire collected demographic and employment characteristics, and clinical activity on a self-selected typical day of practice. Private and public dental practices in Australia. Members of the two professional associations representing DHs, DTs and OHTs. For each practitioner type, means and adjusted rate ratios of patients per hour, services per visit and preventive services per visit were estimated. Comparisons by practice characteristics were assessed by negative binomial regression models. Response rate was 60.6% (n = 1,083), 90.9% were employed of which 86.3% were working in clinical practice and completed the service log. Mean services per patient visit provided by OHTs, DHs and DTs were 3.7, 3.5 and 3.3 and mean preventive services per patient were 2.1, 2.1 and 1.8 respectively. For all three groups, adjusting for explanatory variables, the rate of preventive services per patient varied significantly by practice type (general or specialist) and by the proportion of child patients treated. Services rates varied by age distribution of patients and type of practice. If these factors were anticipated to vary over-time, then workforce planning models should consider accounting for the potential impact on capacity to supply services by these dental workforce groups.

  19. A realistic approach to locating dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, E G; Shirley, W L; Waldrep, A C

    1984-12-01

    A realistic approach to locating a dental practice involves the consideration of factors affecting the demand for dental services in an area. This dictates examination of the demographic and economic determinants of demand. Many retail businesses have used this approach to making locational decisions, and dentistry should benefit from this same process. If the thesis is accepted that dentistry is a business as well as a profession, it follows that the dentist-business person must be permitted, indeed expected, to make a reasonable return in revenue on the investment of dollars in education, equipment, and other related expenses. This return on investment occurs only when there is adequate patient flow. An objective procedure to assess demand for dental services at a particular location has been described. With this method, students were expected to: Visit the community and, through interviews with other professionals and knowledgeable business persons, determine the extent of the probable dental service area. The service area is circumscribed on a census map. Use the census subdivision numbers on the map to secure data from the state data center that describes the area's population, in regard to age, race, gender, income, and education. Transfer the data to a spreadsheet designed to generate total visits, according to each of the demand determinants. Calculate the number of FTE practitioners needed to meet this potential demand, and compare this with the number of FTE dentists presently practicing in the community. Fourteen senior dental students, who have since graduated, have completed this procedure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Child Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a dentist or doctor suggests it. Provide healthy foods and limit sweet snacks and drinks Schedule regular dental check-ups Forming good habits at a young age can help your child have healthy teeth for life. NIH: National Institute ...

  1. [Corticosteroids in dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemelman, F J; Donckers, A M; Abraham-Inpijn, L

    1995-02-01

    In this article some pharmacologic aspects of corticosteroids and their main medical indications are reviewed. In addition, the use of corticosteroids in dentistry and their interference with dental treatment are discussed.

  2. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: English ( ... Problem About 7 million low-income children need sealants. What are sealants? Sealants are thin coatings painted ...

  3. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Journal of Dental Hygiene ADHA Update Author Guidelines Advertising Subscribe Resources ADHA Listserv About ADHA Leadership & Governance Board of Trustees Officers & Bios Bylaws & Ethics Leadership Development House of Delegates Organizational Structure Constituent ...

  4. Glossary of Dental Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mineralized and attack teeth, causing dental decay Porcelain veneers ultra-thin shells of ceramic material bonded to ... can also be used to heat bleaching agents Resin plastic material used in bonding, restorative, and replacement ...

  5. Dental Treatment Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5. Plasma Exchange (Plasmapheresis) • If the patient’s exchange protocol involves the use of anticoagulants (blood thinners), including ... should be used with caution to avoid respiratory depression. DENTAL TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS The MGFA mission is to ...

  6. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  7. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Improving Your Dental Health What to do Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush. ... the acids so they do not hurt your teeth. When you brush right after vomiting, it can cause the protective ...

  8. Sexual harassment in Dentistry: prevalence in dental school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sexual harassment is unlawful in all work and educational environments in most nations of the world. The goals of this study were to describe the sexual harassment prevalence and to evaluate the experiences and attitudes of undergraduate students in one dental school in Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An 18-item questionnaire was administered to 254 dental students with a completion rate of 82% (208. Students were requested to respond to questions about their background and academic level in dental school, their personal experiences with sexual harassment and their observation of someone else being sexually harassed. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of the students reported being sexually harassed by a patient, by a relative of a patient or by a professor. Male students had 3 times higher probability of being sexually harassed than female student [OR=2.910 (1.113-7.611]. Additionally, 25.4% of the students reported witnessing sexual harassment at the school environment. The majority of students did not feel professionally prepared to respond to unwanted sexual behaviors. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that sexual harassment can occur in a dental school setting. There is a need for ongoing sexual harassment education programs for students and university staff. Increased knowledge of sexual harassment during graduation can better prepare dental professionals to respond to sexual harassment during their practice.

  9. Sexual harassment in Dentistry: prevalence in dental school

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARBIN, Cléa Adas Saliba; ZINA, Lívia Guimarães; GARBIN, Artênio José Insper; MOIMAZ, Suzely Adas Saliba

    2010-01-01

    Objective Sexual harassment is unlawful in all work and educational environments in most nations of the world. The goals of this study were to describe the sexual harassment prevalence and to evaluate the experiences and attitudes of undergraduate students in one dental school in Brazil. Material and Methods An 18-item questionnaire was administered to 254 dental students with a completion rate of 82% (208). Students were requested to respond to questions about their background and academic level in dental school, their personal experiences with sexual harassment and their observation of someone else being sexually harassed. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed. Results Fifteen percent of the students reported being sexually harassed by a patient, by a relative of a patient or by a professor. Male students had 3 times higher probability of being sexually harassed than female student [OR=2.910 (1.113-7.611)]. Additionally, 25.4% of the students reported witnessing sexual harassment at the school environment. The majority of students did not feel professionally prepared to respond to unwanted sexual behaviors. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that sexual harassment can occur in a dental school setting. There is a need for ongoing sexual harassment education programs for students and university staff. Increased knowledge of sexual harassment during graduation can better prepare dental professionals to respond to sexual harassment during their practice. PMID:21085799

  10. Dental anxiety and fear among a young population with hearing impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUHANI, RALUCA DIANA; SUHANI, MIHAI FLAVIU; BADEA, MÎNDRA EUGENIA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Dental fear and anxiety is a major barrier for dental care provision. Identifying anxious patients can help dental professionals manage them appropriately. The study aimed at assessing dental fear and anxiety among a deaf population in Cluj-Napoca, Romania and their associated and contributing factors. Method In this cross sectional study 165 deaf participants were invited to complete a questionnaire comprising three sections. The first section contained questions about social and economical status, the second comprised a Romanian version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) while part three was the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). Data was introduced and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program, version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). Results Thirty four point nine percent (34.9%) of respondents were found to be insignificantly anxious, 59.7% were moderately or extremely anxious with 5.3% being identified with dental phobia based on the MDAS scores. Mean total score for dental anxiety on the MDAS scale was 13.7. Patients suffering from a prior negative experience were found to be more anxious (pDental fear and anxiety is widespread in the deaf communities. Higher percentages were observed among women and people with a previous traumatic dental experience. PMID:27004038

  11. Is there a need for a common framework of dental specialties in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M; Widström, E; Eaton, K A

    2008-08-01

    This paper aims to promote discussion about dental specialties and post-graduate dental education in the European Union (EU). Previously, dental educators have concentrated their efforts of seeking Pan-EU convergence in undergraduate dental education. However, the impact of the enlargement of the EU, the new European Commission (EC) Directive of professional training and the Bologna Process all impact on post-graduate (specialist) just as much as on undergraduate dental education. The provisions of the new EC directive mean that, unlike new medical specialties, new Pan-EU dental specialties cannot be created purely because they exist in two-fifths of EU Member States. At present, some EU Member States recognise eight or more dental specialties, whereas others recognise none. It is suggested that changing needs and demands of patients, which reflect a general improvement in oral health, increased wealth and an aging population will place increasing demands on dentistry to provide more complex care and treatment and that the current undergraduate curriculum cannot be expanded to provide suitable training to meet these needs and demands. There is thus a need to expand dental specialist training in all EU Member States, to agree common standards for specialist education and to officially recognise a wider range of Pan-EU dental specialties. The paper concludes that in order to achieve these goals, there is a need of a better collaboration between competent authorities, including governments, universities, dental associations and the various Pan-European Scientific Specialist Organizations.

  12. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-01-01

    Forensic odontology (dental forensics) can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be pra...

  13. Professional stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Job stress is a line, for the person at work hired adverse physiological, psychological and behavioral reactions to situations in which job requirements are not in accordance with its capabilities, abilities and needs. Sources of stress at work are numerous. Personal factors: personality types have been most studied so far, environmental changes and demographic characteristics as well. Interpersonal stress inducing factors act and influence to the occurrence of many psychosomatic diseases. Psychosocial climate and relationships which are prevented or encouraged such as: cooperation and competition, trust and suspicion certainly affect to the appearance of professional stress. The way of leadership is very important. Organizational factors are the type of work, work time, noncompliance of the job, the introduction of new ethnologies, the conflict of personal roles, fear of job loss, bad physical conditions of working environment. The consequences of stress at work are numerous: at the cognitive level, the emotional level, the production plan, the health, plan reduces the immune system that cause a variety of psychosomatic illnesses and accidents at work.

  14. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  15. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  16. Educational needs and employment status of Scottish dental technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M K; Ibbetson, R J

    2005-07-23

    To investigate the educational needs and employment status of dental technicians in Scotland. Two hundred and fifty dental technicians with postal addresses in Scotland. Structured questionnaire. An 83% response rate was achieved following three mailings. The majority of respondents were employed in commercial dental laboratories largely within the 'central belt' of Scotland, with 96% stating they were in full-time employment. Only 33% of these essential health-care workers were voluntarily registered with the Dental Technicians' Association, suggesting that a significant number had not felt it necessary or beneficial to do so. A lack of educational structure was identified, as was poor remuneration and an absence of opportunity for career progression. Although the prospect of continuing professional development was desirable, many respondents reported that they would be penalised financially for undertaking this and, in addition, may not be given the opportunity to pursue education because of lack of co-operation from their employer. Only 47% had attended an educational event within the preceding year, and of those who had not done this, a period of two-32 years had elapsed since any CPD involvement. Of the respondents, only 34% stated that any financial assistance had been available for educational purposes, with access to education being highlighted as problematic by 68%. A total of 64% of subjects felt they were out-of-date with professional education. This study highlights a number of real and potential problems in the field of education in dental technology. It is apparent that change within the structure of education and professional status, although largely welcomed, may be difficult to implement. The profession, as a whole, must realise that these changes in education and employment are not optional, and should be embraced as a positive step which will hopefully raise the profile and status of dental technicians throughout the UK.

  17. Enhancing communication in dental clinics with linguistically different patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    The United States is becoming substantially more diverse in its citizenry, with numerous racial and ethnic cultural groups and immigrants living and working in this country. In addition, there has been an increase in the number of languages other than English spoken in homes, as well as an increase in the number of individuals with limited English-speaking abilities. Given the emerging racial, ethnic, and cultural trends in U.S. society, it is important that dental students as future practitioners have knowledge of interpreter services, working with professionally trained interpreters, and the legal responsibilities and requirements of interpretation. The purposes of this study were to 1) describe the role of interpreters in dental health care settings; 2) identify challenges they face; and 3) propose approaches and strategies to improve communication between dental students as future practitioners and non-English-speaking patients. Data were collected through a series of individual in-depth, face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured open-question format and email communications with three key informants who were purposefully selected to participate in this study based on their comprehensive knowledge and experience as interpreters. The qualitative analysis revealed themes or stories related to the following areas of this study: 1) the role of professional interpreters in dental and other health care settings; 2) challenges faced by interpreters and providers working with patients with limited English-speaking ability; and 3) strategies and approaches used to improve communication and address challenges. By understanding the unique interpreting needs of non- or limited English-speaking patients, dental students have an opportunity to broaden their cultural competency skills. Dental schools have an obligation to ensure that students, faculty, and staff know and understand the legal rights of patients and health care providers to communicate effectively when

  18. Study motives and career choices of Iranian medical and dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Marzieh; Mahdian, Mina; Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Namdari, Mahshid

    2012-01-01

    To compare the study motives and career choices of senior undergraduate medical and dental students in Iran. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey study involving final year medical and dental students from 4 dental and medical schools was conducted in 2010. The questionnaire was designed in three sections (Demographic details, motivational items and career choice items) and after confirming the validity and reliability of the questions, it was distributed among the students. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included logistic regression and multiple linear regression. The response rate was 62% (n=219) for medical and 64% (n=300) for dental students. The factor analysis identified six motivational items: "Social and professional status", "Health care and people", "Others' recommendation", "personal interest and nature of occupation", "Occupational experience" and "Personal life". Medical students were more influenced by "Playing a role in community health" and "Personal interest". "Work independence" and "Social factors" however were two major influential factors among dental students. There were significant differences in important influences by age (Social and professional status, Others' recommendation), Parents' education (Social and professional status, Health care and people, Personal life) and marital status (single >married: Occupational experience, married > single: Personal life). Engaging in postgraduate studies was the first career preference among 90.9% and 89.8% of dental and medical students respectively. Medical and dental students report a wide range of motivational factors in studying medicine/dentistry and future career plans which is affected by age, parents' education and marital status.

  19. Information Technology Practices Amongst Dental Undergraduate Students at a Private Dental Institution in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In dental and medical education, information and communication technology (ICT has been playing an important role and its use is rapidly increasing. In developing countries, however, information technology is still only available to a minority of health professionals. The present study aimed to assess the level of computer use among dental undergraduate students pursuing their career at a private dental institution in India.Materials and Methods: The study population comprised dental undergraduate students from first to fourth year pursuing their career in a private dental institution of India. Informationtechnology practices were assessed using a questionnaire that consisted of 14 questions.Results: In total, 247 students with an overall response rate of 66% participated in the study. Only 58.3% of the study population mentioned that they had access to computers.Students from preclinical years reported to be competent in IT skills more frequently than the clinical year students (chi square test, P=0.007. Compared to women, men used computers more regularly both for academic activities (P=0.082 and personal use (P=0.006.Similarly, students of clinical years used computers more than preclinical students for both purposes (academic activities, P=0.045; personal use, P=0.124.Conclusion: The present study revealed that computer literacy of Indian dental undergraduate students was comparable with students of other countries whereas accessibility of IT sources was poor. Expansion of computer-assisted learning which requires careful strategic planning, resource sharing, staff incentives, active promotion of multidisciplinary working, and effective quality control should be implemented.

  20. Environmental and perceived stress in Australian dental undergraduates: Preliminary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Astill

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dental students have reported a high prevalence of psychological stress and the causes are associated with the challenging dental environmental and demographic factors. This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation on dental students’ stress status, using a sample of first-to-third-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in an Australian university. Special interests included causes of dental environmental stress and access to help services. Methods. A sample of 145 students was surveyed with a modified Dental Environmental Survey and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale in 2014. The participants’ demographic information was also collected. Results. The response rate was 95.4%. Second-year (P = 0.042, third-year (P < 0.001 and employed students (P = 0.027 were more likely to report stress resulting from transition to clinical learning. Third-year students were more often stressed about communicating and approaching staff (P = 0.023 as well as different opinions between staff (P < 0.001 and reduced holidays (P < 0.001. Students that were younger than 21 years of age (P = 0.001, that were first years (P < 0.001, and that were not in a relationship (P = 0.010 more often found difficulty of course work stressful. Students who were not in a relationship more often considered learning manual dexterity a source of stress (P = 0.034. Students previously seeking professional help were more likely to be stressed (P = 0.010. Conclusion. Causes of dental environment stress varied among years of study and demographic backgrounds. Professional support to stressed students should be enhanced. Further investigation is indicated.

  1. Graduate and Professional Education: An Incisive Look at Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyre, Glenn F.; Zhonga, Frida A.

    1975-01-01

    Factors influencing the graduate and professional education of women are reviewed and a successful University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Dentistry outreach program is described for recruiting women dental students through use of a slide-tape, special publications, and the involvement of school counselors. (JT)

  2. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  3. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  4. Seeing the unseen: diagnosing acromegaly in a dental setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mamta; Maitin, Nitin; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-09-03

    Acromegaly is a rare metabolic condition in adults caused due to over secretion of growth hormone mostly due to pituitary gland adenomas.Disproportionate skeletal, tissue and organ growth are characteristic of acromegaly but the changes may be so insidious that most of the times go unnoticed by the patient and family. Craniofacial soft tissue and skeletal changes including mandibular prognathism and disturbed occlusion are typical manifestations of the disease process. Dental professionals may be the first healthcare providers to be visited by these patients and thereby prove instrumental in early diagnosis. Here we report the diagnosis of a case of acromegaly in a dental setup.

  5. Ramadan fasting and dental treatment considerations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeesta, Khaleelahmed Bhavikatti; Prabhuji, M Lv; Shruthi, J R

    2015-01-01

    During the sacred month of Ramadan, Muslims abstain from the consumption of food from dawn until dusk. Extended fasting hours produce changes in the body's metabolism during this period. A majority of the population who fast also restrict themselves from undergoing dental treatments due to a fear of breaking the fast. Even among health professionals, a certain amount of uncertainty prevails about the implications of treating a patient who is fasting. To help clinicians carry out safe and effective treatment without hampering a patient's religious beliefs, the present article focuses on the effect of Ramadan fasting on the body's metabolism and the ramifications for treatment aspects, including medications and dental procedures.

  6. Salivary Lysozyme in Relation to Dental Caries among Thai Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsirivorakul, J; Petsongkram, B; Chaiyarit, P; Klaynongsruang, S; Pitiphat, W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze salivary lysozyme levels and activities in Thai preschoolers with different dental caries status. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected from 64 preschoolers, divided into a caries free group (n = 32) and a severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) group (n = 32). Both groups were similar regarding gender, age, dental caries status, salivary flow rate, and salivary protein concentrations. No differences were also in the caregivers' characteristics, oral health behaviors, and feeding habits. Only professional fluoride application was less frequently found in the S-ECC group (p caries free group (pcaries.

  7. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography. In...

  8. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, A; Dowling, A; Renehan, J; Clarke, D; Malone, J F

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James's Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  9. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, A

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97\\/43\\/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James\\'s Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  10. Service-learning in dental education: meeting needs and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Janet Grobe

    2009-04-01

    Community-based service-learning is increasingly common in dental education. By definition, service-learning combines educational goals with service to the community, and the community and school are equal partners. The three main goals of service-learning are improving learning, promoting civic engagement, and strengthening communities. There have been calls from many groups to reform dental education to better serve the public, and service-learning is one of the most often recommended methods to help meet this goal. One of the key attributes of service-learning is its potential to promote civic engagement and social responsibility during the student's education. The social responsibility of dentists and aspects of professionalism can be learned by students through participation in well-structured service-learning programs. Community-based service-learning programs can also address societal needs by improving the public's access to oral health care through partnerships among dental schools, oral health providers, and communities. This article describes service-learning programs at several dental schools to illustrate application of this educational strategy in predoctoral dental education. This article also describes challenges that confront schools desiring to implement and sustain service-learning programs, including academic quality, faculty development and training, interprofessionalism, making time in the curriculum, budget, faculty shortages and time, student credit, quality control, and remote sites away from the dental school.

  11. Public Health Dental Hygienists in Massachusetts: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainchuso, Lori; Salisbury, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore the attitudes and perceptions of public health dental hygienists on providing preventive care to underserved populations in Massachusetts. Methods: Non-probability purposive sampling was used for initial participant recruitment, and snowball sampling occurred thereafter. Data collection occurred through semi-structured interviews. Qualitative analysis was conducted using Pitney and Parker's eight-step CREATIVE process. Results: Data saturation occurred with 10 participants (n=10), one-third of the public health dental hygienists who are practicing in Massachusetts. The majority of practice settings included school-based programs (70%), while programs for children with special needs (10%) were the least common. Two major themes emerged from the data; (a) the opportunity to be an oral health change agent and (b) barriers to practice. Six subcategories emerged from the data and are reviewed within the context of their associated themes. Additionally, career satisfaction emerged as an unintended theme, and was reported as the driving force for the majority of participants. Conclusion: This study revealed a better understanding of the public health dental hygiene workforce model in Massachusetts. Public health dental hygienists in Massachusetts perceive themselves as change agents within the health care profession, and although barriers to practice are plentiful, these oral health care professionals are committed to improving access to dental care. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  12. Dental hygiene habits and oral health status of seafarers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Sibilio, Fabio; Amenta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study has assessed the dental hygiene habits and problems of seafarers and their attitudes/ perceptions regarding oral hygiene using a dental hygiene/habits questionnaire. A research questionnaire on oral hygiene habits was prepared along with a summary of all the questions and sent to ships via e-mail by Centro Internazionale Radio Medico (CIRM) networks. CIRM, is the Italian Telemedical Maritime Assistance Service (TMAS), and represents the Centre with the largest number of seafarers assisted on board ships worldwide. CIRM proposed the questionnaire to all ships (n = 1,198) asking for medical advice from 1 July 2014 till 31 October 2014. Two dental professionals were involved in the development and analysis of the questionnaire. Seafarers are at risk of several dental health problems due to their oral hygiene and dietary habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, poor oral hygiene knowledge and motivation. Dietary habits during voyages were also questionable and seafarers consume food rich in fermentable carbohydrates, which is a major risk factor for dental caries. Seafarers need better oral hygiene education and care to enable them to manage their oral health in a better way. Life at the sea, under challenging circumstances is not without stress, that is why it is important that seafarers are given complete information about correct oral hygiene protocols and dental hygiene and the advantages for their health of keeping a healthy mouth.

  13. The effect of xylitol on dental caries and oral flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak PA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prathibha Anand Nayak,1 Ullal Anand Nayak,2 Vishal Khandelwal3 1Department of Periodontics, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India; 2Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India; 3Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Index Dental College and Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India Abstract: Dental caries, the most chronic disease affecting mankind, has been in the limelight with regard to its prevention and treatment. Professional clinical management of caries has been very successful in cases of different severities of disease manifestations. However, tertiary management of this disease has been gaining attention, with numerous methods and agents emerging on a daily basis. Higher intake of nutritive sweeteners can result in higher energy intake and lower diet quality and thereby predispose an individual to conditions like obesity, cardiovascular disorders, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Non-nutritive sweeteners have gained popularity as they are sweeter and are required in substantially lesser quantities. Xylitol, a five-carbon sugar polyol, has been found to be promising in reducing dental caries disease and also reversing the process of early caries. This paper throws light on the role and effects of various forms of xylitol on dental caries and oral hygiene status of an individual. Keywords: xylitol, caries preventive effect, oral flora 

  14. Assessment of the perception of smile esthetics by laypersons, dental students and dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracel-Nogueira, Flávia; Pinho, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the esthetic perception of some components of the smile such as gingival exposure, level of the gingival margins, length of the crowns, maxillary midline and inter-incisor diastema by laypersons, dental students and dental professionals. Six hundred and thirty-four Portuguese people (292 laypersons, 241 dental students and 101 practitioners) assessed the esthetics of 13 altered pictures of the same smile arranged at random. The manipulated components (gingival exposure, level of the gingival margins, length of the crowns, maxillary midline and inter-incisor diastema) were altered using Adobe Photoshop® CS6 software. The classification of the pictures was done using the visual analogue scale (VAS), scored 1 to 10. The responses were then analyzed and processed with SPSS® version 21.0 using tests of average equality and correlation. The medium smile was the most appreciated smile, whereas the high smile and diastemas were considered to be the least esthetic. Among all the modified parameters, the midline shift was the least perceptible. The preference for asymmetry of the gingival margin at the maxillary lateral incisors (MLI) and the symmetry in the length of the crowns of the maxillary central incisors (MCI) reflected the importance given to MCI during smiling. Gender did not influence the scores given, except for gummy smiles, while younger people gave the highest scores. Regarding academic/professional training, there was an intra-group homogeneity of opinions as laypersons tended to give higher scores and professionals tended to give lower scores, but with no correlation between the variables. The fact that the laypersons had received orthodontic treatment, or not, had no influence on their perception. Laypersons, dental students and dental professionals had different perceptions of attractiveness when evaluating different modified features, except for diastemas, but with no significant differences between them. Gender

  15. Career Motivations, Perceptions of the Future of Dentistry and Preferred Dental Specialties Among Saudi Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawany, Hassan S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the career motivations, perceptions of the future of dentistry and preferred postgraduate specialties of Saudi dental students. Methods: A pretested, self-administered, 16-item questionnaire was distributed to first- through fifth-year dental students at King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Of the 530 potential participants, 329 students (198 male and 131 female respondents) completed the questionnaire. High professional status (71.4%), a secure career (67.8%), a high income (78.1%), flexible working hours (54.4%), a wide range of career options after graduation (59.3%), opportunities for self-employment (69.3%) and good job opportunities abroad (65.3%) were endorsed to a great/considerable extent by the respondents. “It takes time to establish a practice” (62.3%), “Postgraduate education is a necessity” (72.4%) and “The increasing number of dental institutions is a threat to the profession” (59.3%) were endorsed to a great or considerable extent by the respondents. The most popular specialty among the male students was oral maxillofacial surgery (20.1%) and among female students was operative dentistry (23.4%). Conclusion: The career motivations of this group of dental students seemed to relate to socioeconomic aspects of dentistry and perceptions of the future of dentistry seemed to relate to the need for postgraduate education. PMID:25246989

  16. Guidelines for the organisation of continuing professional development activities for the European dentist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suomalainen, K.; Karaharju-Suvanto, T.; Bailey, S.; Bullock, A.; Cowpe, J.; Barnes, E.; Thomas, H.; Thomas, R.; Kavadella, A.; Kossioni, A.; Kersten, H.; Povel, E.; Giles, M.; Walmsley, D.; Soboleva, U.; Liepa, A.; Akota, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Free movement of dental professionals across the European Union calls for more uniform continuing education in dentistry to ensure up-to-date, high-quality patient care and patient safety. This article provides guidelines for the management and delivery of high-quality continuing professional

  17. DENTAL HOT-COLD SENSITIVITY AND TRAUMATIC DENTAL INJURIES

    OpenAIRE

    Traebert, Jefferson; Luiz Gustavo Teixeira MARTINS; Traebert, Eliane Silva de Azevedo; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Although several studies have indicated negative impacts of traumatic dental injuries on children’s quality of life, virtually none of them have explored the possible association between them and the occurrence and dental hot-cold sensitivity. The aim of this study was to study the possible association of hot-cold dental sensitivity and history of traumatic dental injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving a representative sample of 11- to 14-year-old schoolchildre...

  18. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  19. Development and Testing of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Resource for Children’s Dental Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, J.; Rodd, H.; Morgan, A.; Williams, C.; Gupta, E.; Kirby, J.; Creswell, C.; Newton, T.; Stevens, K.; Baker, S.; Prasad, S.; Marshman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for dental anxiety; however, access to therapy is limited. The current study aimed to develop a self-help CBT resource for reducing dental anxiety in children, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a trial to evaluate the treatment efficacy and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention. A mixed methods design was employed. Within phase 1, a qualitative “person-based” approach informed the development of the self-help CBT resource. This also employed guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions. Within phase 2, children, aged between 9 and 16 y, who had elevated self-reported dental anxiety and were attending a community dental service or dental hospital, were invited to use the CBT resource. Children completed questionnaires, which assessed their dental anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) prior to and following their use of the resource. Recruitment and completion rates were recorded. Acceptability of the CBT resource was explored using interviews and focus groups with children, parents/carers and dental professionals. For this analysis, the authors adhered to the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool criteria. There were 24 families and 25 dental professionals participating in the development and qualitative evaluation of the CBT resource for children with dental anxiety. A total of 56 children agreed to trial the CBT resource (66% response rate) and 48 of these children completed the study (86% completion rate). There was a significant reduction in dental anxiety (mean score difference = 7.7, t = 7.9, df = 45, P design of a definitive trial to examine the treatment- and cost-effectiveness of the resource for reducing dental anxiety in children. PMID:28879243

  20. Development and Testing of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Resource for Children's Dental Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, J; Rodd, H; Morgan, A; Williams, C; Gupta, E; Kirby, J; Creswell, C; Newton, T; Stevens, K; Baker, S; Prasad, S; Marshman, Z

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for dental anxiety; however, access to therapy is limited. The current study aimed to develop a self-help CBT resource for reducing dental anxiety in children, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a trial to evaluate the treatment efficacy and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention. A mixed methods design was employed. Within phase 1, a qualitative "person-based" approach informed the development of the self-help CBT resource. This also employed guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions. Within phase 2, children, aged between 9 and 16 y, who had elevated self-reported dental anxiety and were attending a community dental service or dental hospital, were invited to use the CBT resource. Children completed questionnaires, which assessed their dental anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) prior to and following their use of the resource. Recruitment and completion rates were recorded. Acceptability of the CBT resource was explored using interviews and focus groups with children, parents/carers and dental professionals. For this analysis, the authors adhered to the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool criteria. There were 24 families and 25 dental professionals participating in the development and qualitative evaluation of the CBT resource for children with dental anxiety. A total of 56 children agreed to trial the CBT resource (66% response rate) and 48 of these children completed the study (86% completion rate). There was a significant reduction in dental anxiety (mean score difference = 7.7, t = 7.9, df = 45, P design of a definitive trial to examine the treatment- and cost-effectiveness of the resource for reducing dental anxiety in children.

  1. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education.

  2. Dental anxiety among patients visiting a University Dental Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Fearful individuals often avoid care despite extensive dental needs and anxious patients feel more pain and of longer duration than less anxious patients. This study was designed to determine the prevalence and factors associated with dental anxiety among patients visiting a University Dental Centre in Nigeria.

  3. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  4. Diagnostic methods for dental caries used by private dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the preference profiles of various types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in Ankara for detecting dental caries. Methods: Private dental practitioners, in five districts of Ankara, were provided with questionnaires comprising demographic ...

  5. Effect of professional cleaning and dental brushing with or without fluoridated dentifrice on enamel remineralization Efeito da profilaxia profissional e da escovação com dentifrício com ou sem flúor na remineralização do esmalte dental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nader Marta

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available An in situ evaluation of the potential rehardening effect of fluoridated and non-fluoridated toothpastes with or without air polishing was conducted. Ten volunteers, using acrylic palatal appliances containing two bovine enamel blocks with artificial carious lesions, took part in this study. Four times a day, after the main meals and at night, the volunteers, in a habitual way, brushed their natural teeth with the dentifrice indicated to the experimental design and after that the appliances were put again into the mouth. They were divided into 4 different groups: G1 - control - non-fluoridated dentifrice; G2 - fluoridated dentifrice; G3 - non-fluoridated dentifrice, but having a previous prophylaxis using air polishing; G4 - fluoridated dentifrice and previous air polishing. The effects of treatments on enamel rehardening were evaluated in the blocks that were assessed by surface microhardness, and the percentage of surface microhardness change (%reh was calculated in relation to the baseline values. The results showed that %reh was higher in the groups with fluoridated dentifrice, and professional prophylaxis did not have an additional effect in the groups of fluoridated dentifrices (pO objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, in situ, o potencial de remineralizaçaão do dentifrício fluoretado ou não, isoladamente ou associado à profilaxia profissional com jato de bicarbonato de sódio, em esmalte bovino com lesão superficial artificial de cárie. Utilizou-se 80 blocos de esmalte (4X4X2mm, nos quais foram realizadas medidas de microdureza superficial antes e após a desmineralização artificial e após o tratamento, com um penetrador, Knoop carga de 50/7s, para o cálculo do percentual de recuperação de dureza (%reh. Após as tomadas das 2 medidas de microdureza iniciais (antes e após a desmineralização, os blocos de esmalte foram incluídos em dispositivos intrabucais palatinos (2 blocos/aparelho. Dez jovens voluntários usaram estes

  6. Dental caries: Strategies to control this preventable disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Rugg-Gunn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide a brief commentary review of strategies to control dental caries. Dental decay is one of man’s most prevalent diseases. In many counties, severity increased in parallel with importation of sugar, reaching its zenith about 1950s and 1960s. Since then, severity has declined in many countries, due to the wide use of fluoride especially in toothpaste, but dental caries remains a disease of medical, social and economic importance. Within the EU in 2011, the cost of dental treatment was estimated to be €79 billion. The pathogenesis is well understood: bacteria in dental plaque (biofilm metabolise dietary sugars to acids which then dissolve dental enamel and dentine. Possible approaches to control caries development, therefore, involve: removal of plaque, reducing the acidogenic potential of plaque, reduction in sugar consumption, increasing the tooth’s resistance to acid attack, and coating the tooth surface to form a barrier between plaque and enamel. At the present time, only three approaches are of practical importance: sugar control, fluoride, and fissure sealing. The evidence that dietary sugars are the main cause of dental caries is extensive, and comes from six types of study. Without sugar, caries would be negligible. Fluoride acts in several ways to aid caries prevention. Ways of delivering fluoride can be classed as: ‘automatic’, ‘home care’ and ‘professional care’: the most important of these are discussed in detail in four articles in this issue of the Acta Medica Academica. Conclusion. Dental caries is preventable – individuals, communities and countries need strategies to achieve this.

  7. Dental Hygiene Students' Self-Assessment of Ergonomics Utilizing Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partido, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    Due to postural demands, dental professionals are at high risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Dental clinicians' lack of ergonomic awareness may impede the clinical application of recommendations to improve their posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback involving photography and self-assessment would improve dental hygiene students' ergonomic scores and accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. The study involved a randomized control design and used a convenience sample of all 32 junior-year dental hygiene students enrolled in the autumn 2016 term in The Ohio State University baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Sixteen students were randomly assigned to each of two groups (control and training). At weeks one and four, all participants were photographed and completed ergonomic self-evaluations using the Modified-Dental Operator Posture Assessment Instrument (M-DOPAI). During weeks two and three, participants in the training group were photographed again and used those photographs to complete ergonomic self-assessments. All participants' pre-training and post-training photographs were given ergonomic scores by three raters. Students' self-assessments in the control group and faculty evaluations of the training group showed significant improvement in scores over time (F(1,60)=4.25, p<0.05). In addition, the accuracy of self-assessment significantly improved for students in the training group (F(1,30)=8.29, p<0.01). In this study, dental hygiene students' self-assessments using photographs resulted in improvements in their ergonomic scores and increased accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. Any improvement in ergonomic score or awareness can help reduce the risks for WMSDs, especially among dental clinicians.

  8. Dental bacteremia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G J; Holzel, H S; Sury, M R; Simmons, N A; Gardner, P; Longhurst, P

    1997-01-01

    Bacteremia resulting from dental extraction is regarded as an important cause of bacterial endocarditis, and it is therefore recommended that patients undergoing tooth extraction be given prophylactic antibiotics. As dental procedures other than extractions may also cause bacteremias, we studied a variety of dental procedures routinely used in pediatric dentistry. Blood samples for cultures were obtained 30 s after each of 13 dental operative procedures in 735 anesthetized children aged 2-16 years. Four procedures used for conservative dentistry caused bacteremias significantly more often than the baseline value of 9.4%: polishing teeth 24.5%, intraligamental injection 96.6%, rubber dam placement 29.4%, and matrix band with wedge placement 32.1%. In comparison, toothbrushing alone caused a bacteremia on 38.5% of occasions. The organisms isolated were typical of odontogenic bacteremias in that 50% of the isolates were identified as varieties of viridans streptococci. These data show that a wider variety of dental procedures than was previously documented cause bacteremia.

  9. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  10. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  11. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  12. Factors that influence delivery of tobacco cessation support in general dental practice: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Rizwana; Csikar, Julia; Douglas, Gail; Muarry, Jenni

    2017-12-01

    To review the literature reporting factors that are associated with the delivery of lifestyle support in general dental practice. A systematic review of the quantitative observational studies describing activities to promote the general health of adults in primary care general dental practice. Behavior change included tobacco cessation, alcohol reduction, diet, weight management, and physical activity. Tooth brushing and oral hygiene behaviors were excluded as the focus of this review was on the common risk factors that affect general health as well as oral health. Six cross sectional studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies only reported activities to support tobacco cessation. As well as tobacco cessation one study also reported activities related to alcohol usage, physical activity, and Body Mass Index. Perceptions of time availability consistently correlated with activities and beliefs about tobacco cessation, alongside the smoking status of the dental professional. Dentists who perceive having more available time were more likely to discuss smoking with patients, prescribe smoking cessation treatments and direct patients toward (signpost to) lifestyle support services. Dental professionals who smoke were less likely to give smoking cessation advice and counselling than nonsmokers. Finally, the data showed that professional support may be relevant. Professionals who work in solo practices or those who felt a lack of support from the wider professional team (peer support) were more likely to report barriers to delivering lifestyle support. Organizational changes in dental practices to encourage more team working and professional time for lifestyle support may influence delivery. Dental professionals who are smokers may require training to develop their beliefs about the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. EATING DISORDERS: DENTAL IMPLICATIONS – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Rode

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity, anorexia and bulimia are typical civilisation diseases or diseases of unhealthy living. They affect mainly white women in their childhood and adolescence. Occurrence of these diseases is getting higher also in Slovenia. Changes inside the oral cavity of a bulimic patient may be detected during a routine clinical examination. This places dental professionals in a position to be among the first to detect bulimia which is usually characterized by episodes of purging behaviors such as self-induced vomiting. Such vomiting brings stomach acids in contact with the mouth and teeth, causing erosion of tooth enamel which often leads to severely decayed teeth.Methods. This study presents a case of successful treatment of oral symptoms and dental rehabilitation in female patient with bulimia.Conclusions. Dental rehabilitation for bulimic patients is more than just a substituting of their bad and lost teeth. It is actually the first step toward their regained self-respect. Therefore it is important for the dentist to be familiar with the clinical symptoms of these diseases that can be revealed in oral cavity to efficiently contribute to a patient rehabilitation.

  14. Attributions to dental and diabetes health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneckt, M C; Syrjälä, A M; Knuuttila, M L

    2000-03-01

    Previous studies have proposed common psychological factors between oral health behavior and diabetes self-care. The aim here was to describe and analyse more comprehensively the relationships between dental and diabetes health behavior on the basis of attribution theory. The likeness between subjects' own assessments, similarities of the causes given to success and failure, and the predictive power of own dental assessments concerning the metabolic balance of diabetes were studied. The research population was composed of 149 IDDM patients. Data were collected by means of a quantitative questionnaire, a clinical oral examination and from patient records. It was found that from the patients reporting success with avoiding gingivitis 82% also reported success with metabolic status and they also had lower mean HbA1c levels than patients assessing failure with gingivitis. There were some correlations between causes of failure: not bothering to clean approximal surfaces correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions, and laziness as the cause of caries correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions and with poor motivation for diabetes care. It can be concluded that there are some common determinants for both dental health behavior and diabetes self-care. This connection should be taken into account in health education by health care professionals.

  15. Perception of dental aesthetics in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, T; Santos, P; Moreira, J; Manzanares, M C; Ustrell, J M

    2009-09-01

    Assessing the perception of the aesthetic components of the oral health by paediatric patients at different stages of the child psychological development of Piaget. Twenty children aged between 21 months and 11 years, of both sexes, patients of a private clinic, were selected. The present study group consisted of patients treated for oral pathologies. A set of similar supplies was given to all children and they were asked to do a drawing, whose theme was "beautiful teeth and ugly teeth". The drawings were evaluated according to the classification of the cognitive development of Piaget. Children of all ages clearly represent their perception of what "beautiful teeth" and "ugly teeth" are. These representations provide the dental professional a clear vision of the child's feeling about dental aesthetics. The drawings are a useful source of information for assessing the aesthetic perception of paediatric patients. The knowledge of the children's aesthetic perception is relevant to paediatric dentists because children are conscious about their dental aesthetic appearance and that of the other children.

  16. YouTube, dentistry, and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically assess the informational value, intention, source, and bias of videos related to dentistry available on the video-sharing Internet platform YouTube. YouTube (www.youtube.com) was searched for videos related to dentistry, using the system-generated sorts "by relevance" and "most viewed" and two categories (All and Education). Each of the first thirty results was rated by two assessors filling out a questionnaire for each (total: 120). The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Cohen's kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient tau, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and a nonparametric three-way ANOVA, including an analysis of the interaction between the sorting and category effect, with an α-level of 5 percent. The scan produced 279,000 results in the category All and 5,050 in the category Education. The analysis revealed a wide variety of information about dentistry available on YouTube. The purpose of these videos includes entertainment, advertising, and education. The videos classified under Education have a higher degree of usefulness and informational value for laypersons, dental students, and dental professionals than those found in a broader search category. YouTube and similar social media websites offer new educational possibilities that are currently both underdeveloped and underestimated in terms of their potential value. Dentists and dental educators should also recognize the importance of these websites in shaping public opinion about their profession.

  17. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  18. ABCD of Safe Dental Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, K Sunil; Reddy B, V Thimma; Reddy, C Pujita; Lalita, Sree

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental practice is the integral component of the oral health. Though the dental practice is in close relation with that of the medical practice, it has its own distinctiveness in relation to safe practice. The safe dental practice should not only assure good oral and general health but also improve social interaction by enhancing physical appearance, esthetics, etc. For the safe dental practice, dentists must excel in patient care and standard of treatment. The interlocking missions ...

  19. Willingness of Saudi dental professionals to treat Hepatitis B virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-04

    May 4, 2014 ... Abstract. Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is considered the most important cross‑infection hazard in developing countries. ... questions related to age, sex, vaccination against HBV, screening for HBV antibody levels, willingness to treat hepatitis ... measures helped in the control of the disease and most.

  20. Pediatric obesity-related curricular content and training in dental schools and dental hygiene programs: systematic review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Bhaskar, Vaishnavi; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2017-06-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to determine: a) What dental schools and dental hygiene programs are doing to promote knowledge and skills related to addressing childhood obesity and to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and b) What else these schools and programs could do to better equip future oral health professionals to address childhood obesity and reduce consumption of SSBs. The authors searched PubMed, Scopus, Education Full Text (EBSCOHost), and ERIC (EBSCOHost) to identify peer-reviewed publications reporting on obesity or dietetic-related curricula in dental and dental hygiene education within the last 20 years. Three studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Outcomes of the identified studies were abstracted and summarized independently by two investigators. The first study describes a 2009 survey of pediatric dentistry residents. Approximately, half had received formal training yet they lacked essential knowledge or skills for managing children who were obese. The second study describes nutrition-related coursework offered in the second year of a predoctoral dental school curriculum in Saudi Arabia, and the third study reports on the development of an "oral health rotation" dietetic internship in a pediatric dentistry clinic, in the context of interprofessional education (IPE). Evidence of dental schools' and dental hygiene programs' efforts to address obesity and SSB consumption in children in their curricula is scant, while Commission on Dental Accreditation standards make sporadic mentions of diet and nutrition. Opportunities exist to leverage existing resources and innovative, experiential approaches, including IPE, to formally, and effectively address this important issue in predoctoral oral health education. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  1. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTrauma...

  2. Dental obturation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Elizabeth; Chudej, Lauren; Bilyeu, Brian; Brostow, Witold

    2006-10-01

    During the last decades, people have tried to develop a better material for use in dental obturation materials. This new material should meet the following requirements: durability, wear resistance, biocompatibility and chemical adhesion to dentin enamel. Wear resistance is very important and it is related with the service life of dental replacements. We have obtained aesthetically promising novel nano composites that can be used as dental replacements. The main objective of this work is to study the scratch and wear resistance of these nano composites. To meet this goal, scratch tests are performed using a micro scratch tester machine (CSEM), where a diamond indenter is used to make the scratch and the penetration of this indenter is measured with high resolution (7nm). We will be looking at the penetration depth (Rp) and the residual (or healing) depth (Rh) to calculate the percent recovery. These measurements represent the scratch resistance of the material.

  3. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  5. Child Care Providers' Knowledge About Dental Injury First Aid in Preschool-age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Kristine L; Rainchuso, Lori; Boyd, Linda D; Giblin, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess child care providers' level of knowledge of first aid management and attitudes towards dental injuries among preschool-age children within Fairfield County, Connecticut and Boston, Massachusetts.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study used a web-based, validated questionnaire adapted from several studies with permission from authors. A panel of 5 dental experts determined the relevance of the questions and overall content (I-CVI range 0.8-1; S-CVI = 0.95). The 28 question survey included demographics, level of knowledge, attitudes about traumatic dental injuries, emergency management, and 2 case study questions on management of luxation and tooth fracture. Survey data was coded and analyzed for associations and trends using STATA® statistics/data analysis software v. 11.2.Results: A total of 100 child care providers completed the online questionnaire. Eighty-four percent self-reported little to no knowledge about dental injury management. Sixty percent of child care providers agreed that they are responsible for managing dental injuries. Approximately two-thirds of child care providers reported not feeling adequately informed about dental injuries, with 77% expressing interest in receiving more information.Conclusions: The majority of child care providers' do not have the knowledge to perform adequate first aid following a dental injury. Professional development on first aid for dental injuries is recommended among this workforce population. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  6. Knowledge and attitude of Indian dentists regarding dental stem cells: A cross-sectional descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katge, Farhin; Shetty, Ashveeta J; Rusawat, Bhavesh; Vamsi, K C

    2017-01-01

    Dental stem cells derived from tooth structures are adult stem cells that have received attention of researchers over the past decade. Dental stem cells can be used to regenerate dental tissues as well as non dental organs. These dental stem cells are readily accessible as compared to other sources of stem cells and can be obtained and stored for future use through minimally invasive procedures. Research in this field is growing at a fast pace and it is essential that awareness regarding the same should be present amongst professionals. This study was carried out to assess the knowledge and attitude of Indian dentists regarding dental stem cells. A cross sectional descriptive, questionnaire based survey based on Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) was conducted and a total of 823 dentists from Maharashtra, India participated in the survey. The Pearson's Chi-Square Test and percentages of the total were used for statistical analysis. A total of 823 dentists completed the questionnaire survey; out of which 396 were male and 427 were female. Maximum respondents (53%) were dental graduates, followed by post graduates (45%) and PhD (1.7%). Data from the study revealed that there is good awareness regarding stem cells in general. However; the awareness, knowledge regarding sources, applications, uses and clinical research guidelines regarding dental stem cells is lacking amongst most dentists. Despite this lack of knowledge, dentists are keen on updating their knowledge regarding dental stem cells.

  7. Knowledge and attitude of Indian dentists regarding dental stem cells: A cross-sectional descriptive survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhin Katge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental stem cells derived from tooth structures are adult stem cells that have received attention of researchers over the past decade. Dental stem cells can be used to regenerate dental tissues as well as non dental organs. These dental stem cells are readily accessible as compared to other sources of stem cells and can be obtained and stored for future use through minimally invasive procedures. Research in this field is growing at a fast pace and it is essential that awareness regarding the same should be present amongst professionals. Aim: This study was carried out to assess the knowledge and attitude of Indian dentists regarding dental stem cells. Material and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive, questionnaire based survey based on Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP was conducted and a total of 823 dentists from Maharashtra, India participated in the survey. The Pearson's Chi-Square Test and percentages of the total were used for statistical analysis. Results and Conclusion: A total of 823 dentists completed the questionnaire survey; out of which 396 were male and 427 were female. Maximum respondents (53% were dental graduates, followed by post graduates (45% and PhD (1.7%. Data from the study revealed that there is good awareness regarding stem cells in general. However; the awareness, knowledge regarding sources, applications, uses and clinical research guidelines regarding dental stem cells is lacking amongst most dentists. Despite this lack of knowledge, dentists are keen on updating their knowledge regarding dental stem cells.

  8. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  9. Improving Dental Experiences by Using Virtual Reality Distraction: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; P. White, Mathew; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people’s previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events. PMID:24621518

  10. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Tanja-Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b uses a Virtual Reality (VR representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions. Participants (n = 69 took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control. In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  11. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  12. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  13. Clinical practice: dental trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerich, Katarzyna; Wyszkowski, Jacek

    2010-09-01

    Approximately 50% of children under the age of 15 are victims of various kinds of injuries in the orofacial region. Post-traumatic complications may occur, including crown discolouration, cervical root fracture, ankylosis, root resorption and tooth loss. The most severe complication after dental injury in primary dentition can affect the developing permanent tooth germ, and various consequences may be seen several years later when the permanent tooth erupts. In the permanent dentition, the most severe dental injury affects the surrounding alveolar bone structure and will lead to loss of the tooth. Current literature emphasises that awareness of appropriate triage procedures following dental trauma is unsatisfactory and that delay in treatment is the single most influential factor affecting prognosis. What should a paediatrician know, and more importantly, how should he/she advise parents and caretakers? In an emergency situation such as tooth avulsion, reimplantation within 30 min is the best treatment option at the site of the accident. If reimplantation of the tooth is impossible, milk, saline or even saliva are the preferred transport media. The prognosis for an avulsed tooth depends upon prompt care, which is a determinant factor for successful treatment of the traumatised tooth. In all other dental trauma cases, it is important to refer the child to a paediatric dentist, to follow up the healing process and reduce late post-traumatic complications. With timely interventions and appropriate treatment, the prognosis for healing following most dental injuries is good. In conclusion, it is important that paediatricians are able to inform parents and caretakers about all possible and long-lasting consequences of different dental injuries.

  14. Exposure control practices for administering nitrous oxide: A survey of dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2017-06-01

    Engineering, administrative, and work practice controls have been recommended for many years to minimize exposure to nitrous oxide during dental procedures. To better understand the extent to which these exposure controls are used, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants. The anonymous, modular, web-based survey was completed by 284 dental professionals in private practice who administered nitrous oxide to adult and/or pediatric patients in the seven days prior to the survey. Use of primary engineering controls (i.e., nasal scavenging mask and/or local exhaust ventilation (LEV) near the patient's mouth) was nearly universal, reported by 93% and 96% of respondents who administered to adult (A) and pediatric (P) patients, respectively. However, adherence to other recommended precautionary practices were lacking to varying degrees, and were essentially no different among those administering nitrous oxide to adult or pediatric patients. Examples of work practices which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: not checking nitrous oxide equipment for leaks (41% A; 48% P); starting nitrous oxide gas flow before delivery mask or airway mask was applied to patient (13% A; 12% P); and not turning off nitrous oxide gas flow before turning off oxygen flow to the patient (8% A; 7% P). Absence of standard procedures to minimize worker exposure to nitrous oxide (13% of all respondents) and not being trained on safe handling and administration of nitrous oxide (3%) were examples of breaches of administrative controls which may also increase exposure risk. Successful management of nitrous oxide emissions should include properly fitted nasal scavenging masks, supplemental LEV (when nitrous oxide levels cannot be adequately controlled using nasal masks alone), adequate general ventilation, regular

  15. Dental Informatics in India: Time to Embrace the Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Salma H.; Deolia, Shravani Govind; Chhabra, Chaya; Singh, Jagjeet; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Dental informatics is comparatively a juvenile and new field that has noteworthy potential for supporting clinical care, research, education and management. This field utilizes computer science, information sciences and the application of same to espouse dentistry. However, in the under-developed and developing countries almost most of the dentists are unacquainted about dental informatics, its goals, what it is capable of achieving and by what means they can get involved into it. Despite of emerging advances, certain conflicts also go along with it such as, professional under representation, security issues of the stored information due to universal access to computers high speed internet connections. Endnote software was used as resource material to collect literature which was carefully arranged in a synchronized way. Hence, the purpose of this review was to give an overall scenario of dental informatics, its applications, challenges and recommendations for further enhancement in this area. PMID:27135022

  16. International approaches to Indigenous dental care: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J; Hearn, L; Gibson, B; Slack-Smith, L M

    2014-12-01

    Indigenous populations around the world have significantly poorer oral health and inequalities in access to dental care largely attribute to the social determinants of health. Reviewing international literature offers an opportunity to better understand appropriate approaches for policy and practice in Australia. This article is a descriptive narrative review based on primary research literature discussing informative international approaches to Indigenous dental care. Approaches identified in the literature included integration of dentistry with primary health care and traditional practice, training and use of oral health professionals and approaches used at different stages of life, particularly in the management of early childhood caries. The international literature provides a range of approaches to Indigenous oral health. Tailored, culturally appropriate family and community based initiatives that address the multidisciplinary issues confronting Indigenous communities were most highly regarded. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale in Saudi adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bahammam, Maha A.; Hassan, Mona H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To test the reliability and validity of an Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and to correlate it with other demographic data. Methods: The original English version of the MDAS was translated into Arabic, and then translated back into English by experienced bilingual professionals. Four hundred and seventy-four patients referred to dental clinics for treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from November 2012 to June ...

  18. The relationship of primary care providers to dental practitioners in rural and remote Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2017-01-01

    Background Rural residents have poorer oral health and more limited access to dental services than their city counterparts. In rural communities, health care professionals often work in an extended capacity due to the needs of the community and health workforce shortages in these areas. Improved links and greater collaboration between resident rural primary care and dental practitioners could help improve oral health service provision such that interventions are both timely, effective and lea...

  19. Hypnosis for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety can be a hindrance to treatment. It is prevalent, so helping patients to overcome it should not be regarded as the province of a specialist. Hypnosis can be effective but is underused. A comparison of the conscious, alert state and hypnosis/nitrous oxide sedation is shown by electroencephalogram examples. The benefits and drawbacks of the use of hypnosis are discussed and suggestions of ways of learning and using hypnosis outlined. This paper is an overview of the common problem of dental anxiety and a pragmatic approach to overcoming it using hypnotherapy.

  20. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  1. Professional formation and deformation: repression of personal values and qualities in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabow, Michael W; Evans, Carrie N; Remen, Rachel N

    2013-01-01

    During medical training, students gain professional competence but may lose elements of personal humanity. Little is known about what personal qualities or values students themselves experience to be at risk or surrendered during medical school. Medical students participating in the Healer's Art elective in the United States and internationally during 2008--2009 were asked to reflect, identify, and draw a part of themselves that they were wary about revealing, not comfortable showing, or felt may be diminished in medical school and label this part with a word. Using a team-based qualitative approach, these words were categorized into common themes and the themes analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. Words from 673 students from 31 medical schools were analyzed. Most students were female (58.7%) and in their first year (86.3%). Eleven themes were identified: spirituality, emotional engagement, identity/self-expression, freedom/spontaneity, relationships, self-care, creativity, negative emotions, values, other, and joy/happiness. The most common individual words used were creativity, family, balance, freedom, love, peace, compassion, relationships, and reflection. There were only rare differences in distributions of themes across gender, year in school, school size, or school nationality. An international cadre of Healer's Art students identified core personal qualities and values that they may not reveal or feel may be diminished in medical school. Medical training involves not only professional formation but exposure to professional deformation as well. Educators must attend to both gains in professional competence and the personal qualities and values that are at risk in the course of professional development.

  2. The effects of gender disparities on dental hygiene education and practice in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciak-Donsberger, C

    2003-11-01

    In Europe, over 96.5% of dental hygienists are women. The objective of this report was to examine the impact of gender role stereotyping on the image of the dental hygiene profession and on disparities in educational attainment and work regulations within Europe. Data pertaining to regulated or non-regulated dental hygiene practice in 22 European countries were analysed according to possible gender impact on access to education and on the structure of the delivery of care. It was examined whether there is a correlation between national differences found in the dental hygiene profession and gender related disparities found in other work-related areas. Results show that the gender bias in the dental hygiene profession has an effect on equal access to education, and on equal occupational opportunities for dental hygienists within the European Union (EU) and beyond. In northern Europe, higher educational attainment in the field of dental hygiene, more extensive professional responsibilities and greater opportunities for self-employment in autonomous practice tend to correlate with greater equality in the work force. In eastern Europe, lower educational and professional opportunities in dental hygiene correlate with greater gender disparities found in other work-related areas. In some western European countries, the profession has not been implemented because of the political impact of organised dentistry, which expects financial loss from autonomous dental hygiene practice. In order to fulfil mandates of the EU, initiatives must be taken to remove the gender bias in the delivery of preventive care and to promote equal access to educational attainment and to professional development in the whole of Europe for those who choose to do so.

  3. Prevalence of Dental Anomalies in Permanent Dentition of Brazilian Individuals with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido; Topolski, Francielle; Perciliano de Faria, Lorraine; Occhiena, Carla Machado; Ferreira, Nancy dos Santos Pinto; Ferlin, Camila Ribeiro; Rogério de Mendonça, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of dental anomalies in the permanent dentition of individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) to increase the knowledge on the dental issues in this syndrome. Method: One hundred and five panoramic X-rays of patients with DS (61 males and 44 females), aged 7 to 42 years were used. The data were statistically analyzed using bivariate analyses test (p taurodontism (9.52%), supernumerary teeth (5.71%), macrodontia (2.85%) and root dilaceration (0.95%). There was no statistically significant difference between genders for any of the anomalies. Conclusion: A high prevalence of dental anomalies was observed in individuals with DS. The results of the present study reinforce the importance of good dental care, offering a greater basis for professionals who provide dental service to these patients. PMID:27733874

  4. Perceived Dentist and Dental Hygienist Task Distribution After Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Team Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  5. Contact allergy to (meth)acrylates in the dental series in southern Sweden: simultaneous positive patch test reaction patterns and possible screening allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Anthony T J; Isaksson, Marléne; Zimerson, Erik; Goh, Chee Leok; Bruze, Magnus

    2006-10-01

    Contact allergy to dental allergens is a well-studied subject, more so among dental professionals than dental patients. 1632 subjects had been patch tested to either the dental patient series or dental personnel series at the department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö, Sweden. Positive patch tests to (meth)acrylate allergens were seen in 2.3% (30/1322) of the dental patients and 5.8% (18/310) of the dental personnel. The most common allergen for both groups was 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA), followed by ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, and methyl methacrylate. 47 (29 dental patients and 18 dental personnel) out of these 48 had positive patch tests to 2-HEMA. All 30 subjects who had a positive reaction to EGDMA had a simultaneous positive reaction to 2-HEMA. One dental patient reacted only to 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA). From our data, screening for (meth)acrylate contact allergy with 2-HEMA alone would have picked up 96.7% (29/30) of our (meth)acrylate-allergic dental patients and 100% (18/18) of our (meth)acrylate-allergic dental personnel. The addition of bis-GMA in dental patients would increase the pick-up rate to 100%.

  6. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fikawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training consisted of materials on community dental health survey, principles of survey implementation, and field survey activity as an integral part of the training. Survey was conducted among third grade students of Madrasah Ibtidaiyah (MI in Tangerang city. Targeting and sampling part of the survey was implemented by city health office. There were 224 students, 182 parents, and 16 teachers who were successfully examined and/or interviewed. The survey showed that the participant’s knowledge was significantly (p<0.05 improved. The survey also showed that only 34% of the students had good oral hygiene score. There were 46.9% of students who suffered M1 caries and 47.3% had caries on their permanent teeth. Parents’ knowledge and attitude regarding child dental health was quite good and teachers had implemented students dental care effort. In conclusion, the survey-training model was proved to be useful to refresh the community dental health science while simultaneously obtained important data through survey. This model had never been conducted before and new breakthrough in the community dental health science refreshing activity targeted to local dental health personnel.

  7. Evaluating your professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Steven; Neve, Hilary; Leung, Yee

    2016-11-02

    What does being professional look like? Does it mean that you do the 'right' thing, even when no-one is looking? How do you evaluate your professionalism knowledge, values and behaviour? How do you identify and address underperformance in professionalism? How can you transfer your professionalism to different circumstances?

  8. Dental Student Academic Integrity in U.S. Dental Schools: Current Status and Recommendations for Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bruce S; Knight, G William; Graham, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cheating incidents in 2006-07 led U.S. dental schools to heighten their efforts to enhance the environment of academic integrity in their institutions. The aims of this study were to document the measures being used by U.S. dental schools to discourage student cheating, determine the current incidence of reported cheating, and make recommendations for enhancing a culture of integrity in dental education. In late 2014-early 2015, an online survey was distributed to academic deans of all 61 accredited U.S. dental schools that had four classes of dental students enrolled; 50 (82%) responded. Among measures used, 98% of respondents reported having policy statements regarding student academic integrity, 92% had an Honor Code, 96% provided student orientation to integrity policies, and most used proctoring of final exams (91%) and tests (93%). Regarding disciplinary processes, 27% reported their faculty members only rarely reported suspected cheating (though required in 76% of the schools), and 40% disseminated anonymous results of disciplinary hearings. A smaller number of schools (n=36) responded to the question about student cheating than to other questions; those results suggested that reported cheating had increased almost threefold since 1998. The authors recommend that schools add cheating case scenarios to professional ethics curricula; disseminate outcomes of cheating enforcement actions; have students sign a statement attesting to compliance with academic integrity policies at every testing activity; add curricular content on correct writing techniques to avoid plagiarism; require faculty to distribute retired test items; acquire examination-authoring software programs to enable faculty to generate new multiple-choice items and different versions of the same multiple-choice tests; avoid take-home exams when assessing independent student knowledge; and utilize student assessment methods directly relevant to clinical practice.

  9. Failure of non-vacuum steam sterilization processes for dental handpieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S; Smith, Andrew; Lappin, David; McDonagh, George; Kirk, Brian

    2017-09-10

    Dental handpieces are used in critical and semi-critical operative interventions. Although a number of dental professional bodies recommend that dental handpieces are sterilized between patient use there is a lack of clarity and understanding of the effectiveness of different steam sterilization processes. The internal mechanisms of dental handpieces contain narrow lumens (0·8-2·3mm) which can impede the removal of air and ingress of saturated steam required to achieve sterilization conditions. To identify the extent of sterilization failure in dental handpieces using a non-vacuum process. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations were conducted on commonly used UK benchtop steam sterilizers and three different types of dental handpieces. The sterilization process was monitored inside the lumens of dental handpieces using thermometric (TM) methods (dataloggers), chemical indicators (CI) and biological indicators (BI). All three methods of assessing achievement of sterility within dental handpieces that had been exposed to non-vacuum sterilization conditions demonstrated a significant number of failures (CI=8/3,024(fails/n tests); BI=15/3,024; TM=56/56) compared to vacuum sterilization conditions (CI=2/1,944; BI=0/1,944; TM=0/36). The dental handpiece most likely to fail sterilization in the non-vacuum process was the surgical handpiece. Non-vacuum sterilizers located in general dental practice had a higher rate of sterilization failure (CI=25/1,620; BI=32/1,620; TM=56/56) with no failures in vacuum process. Non-vacuum downward/gravity displacement, type-N steam sterilizers are an unreliable method for sterilization of dental handpieces in general dental practice. The handpiece most likely to fail sterilization is the type most frequently used for surgical interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Dental fear and anxiety in children and adolescents: qualitative study using YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Hamzah, S H; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; McGrath, Colman; King, Nigel M

    2013-02-22

    Dental fear and anxiety (DFA) refers to the fear of and anxiety towards going to the dentist. It exists in a considerable proportion of children and adolescents and is a major dilemma in pediatric dental practice. As an Internet social medium with increasing popularity, the video-sharing website YouTube offers a useful data source for understanding health behaviors and perceptions of the public. Using YouTube as a platform, this qualitative study aimed to examine the manifestations, impacts, and origins of DFA in children and adolescents from the public's perspective. To retrieve relevant information, we searched YouTube using the keywords "dental fear", "dental anxiety", and "dental phobia". Videos in English expressing a layperson's views or experience on children's or adolescent's DFA were selected for this study. A video was excluded if it had poor audiovisual quality, was irrelevant, was pure advertisement or entertainment, or contained only the views of professionals. After the screen, we transcribed 27 videos involving 32 children and adolescents, which were reviewed by a panel of 3 investigators, including a layperson with no formal dental training. Inductive thematic analysis was applied for coding and interpreting the data. The videos revealed multiple manifestations and impacts of DFA, including immediate physical reactions (eg, crying, screaming, and shivering), psychological responses (eg, worry, upset, panic, helplessness, insecurity, resentment, and hatred), and uncooperativeness in dental treatment. Testimonials from children, adolescents, and their parents suggested diverse origins of DFA, namely personal experience (eg, irregular dental visits and influence of parents or peers), dentists and dental auxiliaries (eg, bad manner, lack of clinical skills, and improper work ethic), dental settings (eg, dental chair and sounds), and dental procedures (eg, injections, pain, discomfort, and aesthetic concerns). This qualitative study suggests that DFA in

  11. Prevalence, intensity and impact of dental pain in 5-year-old preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Leite, Fabíola Rocha; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Bonanato, Karina; Paiva, Saul Martins; Vale, Míriam Pimenta; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of clinical oral health conditions, and the prevalence, intensity and the impact of dental pain on daily living among 5-year-old preschool children. A cross-sectional survey was carried out on a sample of 578 children attending preschools in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Data were collected by means of a pretested questionnaire given to the parents and a visual analogue scale of faces applied to the children. The children underwent dental examinations. According to the parents' reports, the lifetime prevalence of dental pain was 25.0% (95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 21.4 to 28.6), and dental pain caused crying in 16.8% (95% CI = 13.6 to 19.9) of the children; 10.7% (95% CI = 8.1 to 13.3) of children had dental pain in the 2 months prior to the dental examination. Among this group of children with dental pain, 59.3% experienced a negative impact as a result of pain. The following clinical conditions had mostly caused dental pain in the 2 months prior to the dental examination: root remnants, fistula and pulp caries. This recent pain resulted in a visit to the clinician in 13.6% of the children. Prevalence, intensity and the impact of dental pain in 5-year-old children were high in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Dental pain assessed in the present study was associated with avoidable pathological factors. However, only few children were treated professionally for the dental pain they were experiencing. Public policies should be developed and implemented to promote fair, comprehensive treatment for the population.

  12. Noise Exposure Assessment in a Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    Thitiworn Choosong; Wandee Kaimook; Ratchada Tantisarasart; Puwanai Sooksamear; Satith Chayaphum; Chanon Kongkamol; Wisarut Srisintorn; Pitchaya Phakthongsuk

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. Methods: A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the...

  13. LIPID PEROXIDATION AND JOB STRESS IN DENTAL HEALTHCARE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnikova S.V.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study devoted to the lipid peroxidation indices in dentists target group as a marker of psycho-emotional state. We revealed increase in the level of TBA-active products in female and male dentists during job stress. There was strong decrease in level of TBA-active products in control group of dentist that study during the lectures. Activation of lipid peroxidation in dentists during dentist examination can be considered as non-specific component of reactions towards the stressors of professional activities. We also revealed that the initial level of TBA-active products in female and male dentists before the outpatient dental reception was higher than that of dentists that study before lectures. This is indicates the mobilization of sympathetic nervous system before beginning of the working day. The contents of the level of TBA-active products in the oral fluid of female and male dentists after dental examination significantly increased, whereas these indices decreased in the group of dentists that study after the lectures. The increasing of TBA-active products in dentists after outpatient dental reception was by 42.5 % and 77 % higher compared with a group of dentists that study in the lecture classes. The results of correlation analysis suggest the influence of lipid peroxidation processes on the cardiovascular and blood system of dentists during job stress. Activation of lipid peroxidation in dentists during dental examination can be considered as non-specific component of the body's response to stressors influence in professional activities.

  14. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  15. Roles and competences for educators of undergraduate dental students: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuenjitwongsa, S; Bullock, A; Oliver, R G

    2016-11-19

    Dental educators are important people who contribute to the development of every aspect of dental education. In part due to the lack of understanding of their roles and competences, dental educator development has so far received little consideration. With the aim of enhancing the dental profession's contribution to the development of undergraduate dental education, this article explores common roles of educators of undergraduate dental students and the competences needed to be effective educators. This is a discussion paper based on a wide reading of the literature on the education of health professionals with a specific focus on roles and competences of educators. Roles of educators of undergraduate dental students typically encompass four areas: teaching, research, administration and providing healthcare. Educators may not be involved in every role; they normally perform the roles relevant to their work contexts. Competences for dental educators based on the four main roles comprise 12 domains: educational theories and principles; modes of education; learner issues; educational materials and instructional design; assessment and feedback; curriculum matters; evaluation; educational research; educational management; quality assurance; patient care and healthcare system and professionalism. Not all competences are required by all educators although educators need to be competent in the areas related to their roles and duties. Understanding the roles and competences for educators of undergraduate dental students can help individual educators to improve their personal effectiveness and institutions to tailor staff development programmes appropriate to the needs of their staff. Faculty development contributes to sustained enhancement of undergraduate dental education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Men who have sex with men and human immunodeficiency virus testing in dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Jesús Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Álvarez, Mario Moisés

    2017-06-21

    To explore the attitudes of men who have sex with men (MSM) towards the implementation of rapid HIV-1/2 testing in the dental practice, and to evaluate MSM's perceptions of stigma and discrimination related to sexual orientation by dental care professionals. Cross-sectional study using a self-administered, anonymous, structured analytical questionnaire answered by 185 MSM in Mexico. The survey included sociodemographic variables, MSM's perceptions towards public and private dental providers, and dental services, as well as their perception towards rapid HIV-1/2 testing in the dental practice. In addition, the perception of stigma and discrimination associated with their sexual orientation was explored by designing a psychometric Likert-type scale. The statistical analysis included factor analysis and non-hierarchical cluster analysis. 86.5% of the respondents expressed their willingness to take a rapid HIV-1/2 screening test during their dental visit. Nevertheless, 91.9% of them considered it important that dental professionals must be well-trained before administering any rapid HIV-1/2 tests. Factor analysis revealed two factors: experiences of sexual orientation stigma and discrimination in dental settings, and feelings of concern about the attitude of the dentist and dental staff towards their sexual orientation. Based on these factors and cluster analysis, three user profiles were identified: users who have not experienced stigma and discrimination (90.3%); users who have not experienced stigma and discrimination, but feel a slight concern (8.1%), and users who have experienced some form of discrimination and feel concern (1.6%). The dental practice may represent a potential location for rapid HIV-1/2 testing contributing to early HIV infection diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The Efficacy of Screening for Common Dental Diseases by Hygiene-Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, R.; Glenny, A.; Walsh, T.; Tickle, M.; Worthington, H.; Ashley, J.; Brocklehurst, P.

    2015-01-01

    Regularly attending adult patients are increasingly asymptomatic and not in need of treatment when attending for their routine dental examinations. As oral health improves further, using the general dental practitioner to undertake the “checkup” on regular “low-risk” patients represents a substantial and potentially unnecessary cost for state-funded systems. Given recent regulatory changes in the United Kingdom, it is now theoretically possible to delegate a range of tasks to hygiene-therapists. This has the potential to release the general dental practitioner’s time and increase the capacity to care. The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic test accuracy of hygiene-therapists when screening for dental caries and periodontal disease in regularly attending asymptomatic adults who attend for their checkup. A visual screen by hygiene-therapists acted as the index test, and the general dental practitioner acted as the reference standard. Consenting asymptomatic adult patients, who were regularly attending patients at 10 practices across the Northwest of England, entered the study. Both sets of clinicians made an assessment of dental caries and periodontal disease. The primary outcomes measured were the sensitivity and specificity values for dental caries and periodontal disease. In total, 1899 patients were screened. The summary point for sensitivity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.87) and 0.89 (0.86 to 0.92), respectively. The summary point for specificity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.87 (0.78 to 0.92) and 0.75 (0.66 to 0.82), respectively. The results suggest that hygiene-therapists could be used to screen for dental caries and periodontal disease. This has important ramifications for service design in public-funded health systems. PMID:25604256

  18. Management of children with autism spectrum disorder in the dental setting: concerns, behavioural approaches and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli, Konstantina; Reichart, Peter A; Bornstein, Michael M; Livas, Christos

    2013-11-01

    This article reviews the present literature on the issues encountered while coping with children with autistic spectrum disorder from the dental perspective. The autistic patient profile and external factors affecting the oral health status of this patient population are discussed upon the existing body of evidence. The MEDLINE database was searched using the terms 'Autistic Disorder', 'Behaviour Control/methods', 'Child', 'Dental care for disabled', 'Education', 'Oral Health', and 'Pediatric Dentistry' to locate related articles published up to January 2013. Most of the relevant studies indicate poor oral hygiene whereas they are inconclusive regarding the caries incidence in autistic individuals. Undergraduate dental education appears to determine the competence of dental professionals to treat developmentally disabled children and account partly for compromised access to dental care. Dental management of an autistic child requires in-depth understanding of the background of the autism and available behavioural guidance theories. The dental professional should be flexible to modify the treatment approach according to the individual patient needs.

  19. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  20. Dental student perceptions of oral and maxillofacial surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Krystian F; Ziccardi, Vincent B; Aziz, Shahid R; Sue-Jiang, Shuying

    2013-05-01

    The specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) encompasses the diagnosis and surgical management of a variety of pathologic, functional, and esthetic conditions of the oral and maxillofacial region. Despite the specialty's prominent role in the field of dentistry, a lack of complete understanding still remains among dental and medical health professionals as to the exact scope and expertise of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The present study aimed to analyze a population of dental students' perceptions of OMS as a specialty with respect to treatment rendered, referral patterns, and a general opinion of the specialty as a whole. A survey consisting of 10 multiple-choice questions was compiled and distributed to dental students through an on-line polling service (SurveyMonkey). A total of 5 dental student classes at a single dental school were polled using school-based electronic mail, including the graduating seniors. All answers were kept confidential, and no individual students were identified. The students were not able to retake the survey once completed. The final tallies of the survey results were compiled and submitted for statistical analysis. Statistically significant associations between the year of dental education and student perceptions of OMS were determined. As dental students progress through their undergraduate studies, their perceptions change with regard to the referral of dental implants. Periodontists were found to have statistically significantly greater rates of referral than oral and maxillofacial surgeons from dental students in the fourth year and recent graduates compared with younger dental students from the first, second, and third years for placement of dental implants. Statistically insignificant in terms of a changing dental student perception was the finding that third molar removal was within the domain of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, as well as the management of cleft lip and palate deformities and mandibular

  1. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Feng Lin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  2. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable sca...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  3. Pneumomediastinum after dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcelo Farfel

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Pneumomediastinum is a rare and life-threatening complication that may occur following dental procedures. We report a case of acute subcutaneous emphysema that extended through the superior mediastinum, after a root canal treatment and air syringe use. Awareness of such complication and prompt prophylactic antibiotic therapy are extremely important and can save lives.

  4. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... upper jaw protrude into one of your sinus cavities How you prepare Because dental implants require one or more surgical procedures, you ... can take several months, helps provide a solid base for your new artificial tooth ... teeth. Placing the abutment When osseointegration is complete, you ...

  5. Lasers in dental traumatology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olivi, G; Caprioglio, C; Genovese, M D

    2010-01-01

    ... connected to dental trauma, particularly in children. Furthermore, laser-assisted therapies drastically reduce the need for analgesics and anti- inflammatory medications compared with conventional procedures. Using laser equipment to obtain anaesthesia is another challenge, while the use of low power setting for desensitising tissue and to obtain anaesthesia is also an open field.

  6. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ADA Twitter ADA News Twitter ADA Facebook GKAS Facebook New Dentist Blog Press Room Contact News Releases Press Kits ADA Positions Advertise Media Kit Classifieds Digital Ads ADA News The Journal of the ADA Annual Meeting Advertising ADA CareerCenter ADA Marketplace Copyright © 2017 American Dental ...

  7. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016 Updated by: Michael Kapner, DDS, general and aesthetic dentistry, Norwalk Medical Center, Norwalk, CT. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Dental Health Read more Tooth Disorders Read more X- ...

  8. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  9. Dental Practice Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    The realization of the paper followed a review of specialty literature, through which the mainaspects of dental office management have been analyzed, rendering the management solutionsavailable to all of those interested from an economic, deontological point of view, as well asmethods of managing human resources in order to obtain the best feedback possible from patients.

  10. Final dental flourosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    sistêmica. In: Correia MSNP. Odontologia para a primeira infância. São Paulo: Santos 1998; pp. 291-314. 17. Dean, H.T. The investigation of physiological effects by epidemiological methods, In: Moulton. F.R, editor. Fluorine and dental health. Washington DC: American Association for the. Advancement of Science 1942; p.

  11. The diabetic dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T D

    1994-07-01

    DM is such a common disease in the United States that virtually every dentist encounters patients with known or undiagnosed diabetes. The dentist should be alert for both general and oral signs and symptoms suggestive of uncontrolled or poorly controlled DM, and laboratory or interoffice screening tests should be a part of dental practice. Under no circumstances, however, should the dentist attempt to diagnose the disease. Patients with suggestive symptoms or with abnormal blood glucose levels identified by screening tests should be referred to a physician for diagnosis and any treatment necessary. Uncontrolled DM may be associated with increased frequency and severity of oral infections, including periodontal disease and dental caries. In some diabetic patients, susceptibility to oral disease may continue despite establishment of effective metabolic control. Dental treatment can safely be performed on the controlled diabetic patient, but some adjustment of office protocol and of antihyperglycemic drug administration may occasionally be necessary. Finally, the dental treatment team must always be alert for signs and symptoms of developing diabetic emergencies and be prepared to provide treatment as necessary.

  12. Tanzania Dental Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ceps is token out of the dental kit and the tooth is removed out of its socket. The tooth is dropped into the waste bucket. The fareceps is placed in the water basin. The socket site is held with the thumb and farefinger and pressed. A gauze is applied onto the bleeding socket. Gauze soiled in blood is dropped in the bucket.

  13. Significance of Dental Records in Personal Identification in Forensic Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Vagish Kumar L Shanbhag

    2016-01-01

    Forensic odontology is a branch that connects dentistry and the legal profession. One of the members in the forensic investigation team is a dentist. Dentists play an important and significant role in various aspects of the identification of persons in various forensic circumstances. However, several dentists and legal professionals are quite ignorant of this fascinating aspect of forensic odontology. A need was felt to fill this gap. The dental record is a legal document possessed by the den...

  14. Seeing the unseen: diagnosing acromegaly in a dental setup

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Mamta; Maitin, Nitin; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare metabolic condition in adults caused due to over secretion of growth hormone mostly due to pituitary gland adenomas.Disproportionate skeletal, tissue and organ growth are characteristic of acromegaly but the changes may be so insidious that most of the times go unnoticed by the patient and family. Craniofacial soft tissue and skeletal changes including mandibular prognathism and disturbed occlusion are typical manifestations of the disease process. Dental professionals ma...

  15. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  16. Exploring Dental Providers' Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR.

  17. General dental practitioners' views on early childhood caries and timing of the first dental visit in Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Alaa S; Schroth, Robert J; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I

    2015-03-01

    This survey evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Selangor regarding early childhood caries (ECC) prevention and the recommended timing of a child's first dental visit. A questionnaire was mailed to 521 licensed GDPs. Descriptive statistics were used, and bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed. The response rate was 52.6%. Although 89.8% mentioned counseling parents and caregivers, only 44.2% were familiar with anticipatory guidance. Whereas 98.2% agreed that early examinations are important to prevent ECC, only 51.8% were aware of the recommendation for a first visit by 12 months of age. GDPs who recommended early dental visits were significantly more likely to be recent graduates, more familiar with professional guidelines, and less likely to be deterred by a child's crying or behavior. In conclusion, GDPs in Selangor are aware about the importance of early dental visits in ECC prevention. However, a considerable number of them are still not aware of the recommendation that children must first visit the dentist by 12 months of age. Furthermore, some of their current practices in ECC management and prevention do not match professional recommendations. © 2013 APJPH.

  18. Alternative scenarios: harnessing mid-level providers and evidence-based practice in primary dental care in England through operational research

    OpenAIRE

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L.; Radford, David R.; Harper, Paul R.; Gallagher, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In primary care dentistry, strategies to reconfigure the traditional boundaries of various dental professional groups by task sharing and role substitution have been encouraged in order to meet changing oral health needs. Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate the potential for skill mix use in primary dental care in England based on the undergraduate training experience in a primary care team training centre for dentists and mid-level dental providers. Methods: An opera...

  19. Influence of practice and personal characteristics on dental job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, A; Winter, P A

    1999-11-01

    Job satisfaction has been called a barometer of the dental profession. The Dentist Satisfaction Survey (DSS), an instrument that measures both specific facets related and overall job satisfaction of dentists, was administered to general dentists in Kentucky (N = 987). Independent variables included eleven job facets, plus practice characteristics and personal characteristics including student loan debt. Results of the stepwise multiple regression showed that 60 percent of the variance of the dependent variable, overall job satisfaction, was attributable to six job facets: respect, perception of income, delivery of care, stress, patient relations, and professional time. The most significant predictors of dental job satisfaction involved the intrinsic rewards of being a dentist and the delivery of dental health services. Less satisfying aspects of dentistry included business operations, including practice management and financial planning. Despite concern among educators about the potential influence of student loan debt, there was no significant correlation between student loan debt and overall job satisfaction. Findings from this study have implications for student recruitment, dental school curriculum design, and dental workforce planning.

  20. Significance of Dental Records in Personal Identification in Forensic Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagish Kumar L Shanbhag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology is a branch that connects dentistry and the legal profession. One of the members in the forensic investigation team is a dentist. Dentists play an important and significant role in various aspects of the identification of persons in various forensic circumstances. However, several dentists and legal professionals are quite ignorant of this fascinating aspect of forensic odontology. A need was felt to fill this gap. The dental record is a legal document possessed by the dentist and it contains subjective and objective information about the patient. A PubMed search and Google search were done for articles highlighting the importance of dental records in forensic sciences using the key words "forensic odontology, forensic dentistry, forensic dentists, identification, dental records, and dental chart". A total of 42 articles relevant to the title of the article were found and reviewed. The present article highlights the role of dentists in forensic sciences, their possible contributions to forensics, and the various aspects of forensic dentistry, thus bridging the gap of knowledge between the legal and the dental fraternities.