WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional school-medical dental

  1. Dental Radiographs Ordered by Dental Professionals: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Even in resource limited settings dental caries is still the regular indication for taking dental radiographs, and periapical views are the most frequent type of radiograph ordered. Maxillary central incisors and mandibular molars were types of teeth commonly x-rayed mainly due to the aesthetic importance of the ...

  2. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-...

  3. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-point likert scale. The survey response rate was 73.71%. Two-thirds of respondents believed biostatistics to be a difficult subject and at the same time half of them did not consider it to be more difficult than other subjects in dentistry. Females were less competent than males in applying biostatistical skills which was found to be statistically significant. Results suggested that dentists with research or academics as an adjunct to their clinical practice had better command over the subject. The current study shows that there is lack of command over the subject of biostatistics among dental professionals although they were aware of its importance in dentistry. There is a need of changing the training pattern of biostatistics for dental professionals which would make them confident enough to apply biostatistics in their clinical practice.

  4. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Dental Professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Teledentistry, attitude, knowledge, practice, dental professionals. Background. Oral health disparities are a global issue with most dental specialists located in urban areas. Limited number of dental professionals in rural area leaves people without access to quality dental care in those areas (Berndt, Leone, &.

  5. Drivers of professional mobility in the Northern Territory: dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D J; Garnett, S T; Barnes, T; Stevens, M

    2007-01-01

    Attracting and retaining an efficient allied health workforce is a challenge faced by communities in Australia and overseas. High rates of staff turnover in the professional workforce diverts resources away from core business and results in the loss of valuable skills and knowledge. Understanding what attracts professionals to a particular place, and why they leave, is important for developing effective strategies to manage turnover and maximise workforce productivity. The Northern Territory (NT) faces particular workforce challenges, in part because of its geographic location and unusual demography. Do these factors require the development of a tailored approach to recruitment and retention? This article reports on a study undertaken to examine the motivations for coming to, staying in and leaving the NT for dental professionals, and the implications of results on workforce management practices. In 2006, dentists, dental specialists, dental therapists and dental hygienists who were working or had worked in the NT, Australia, in the recent past were surveyed to collect demographic and workforce data and to establish the relative importance of social and work-related factors influencing their migration decisions. Multivariate logistic regression models were generated to describe the demographic characteristics of dental professionals who stayed in the NT for more than 5 years and to analyse why dental professionals left. The analyses, based on a 42% response rate, explained 60-80% of the variation in responses. Generally dental professionals who had stayed for more than 5 years were older, had invested in the purchase of homes and were more involved in social and cultural activities. Those who moved to the NT as a result of financial incentives or who had strong expectations that working in the NT would be an exciting, novel experience tended to stay for no more than 5 years, often leaving because they found the work environment too stressful. In contrast, those who

  6. Human trafficking and the dental professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Michael G

    2012-05-01

    "Human trafficking" is a term for a modern form of slavery. It is a criminal human rights violation and a significant health issue. Dental professionals can assist in recognizing victims of trafficking. The author conducted a PubMed search of the English-language literature through May 2011, which yielded no articles meeting the search criteria "dentistry" and "human trafficking prostitution." Given these results, the author reviewed articles published in medical journals, reports from both governmental and nongovernmental agencies and lay literature. The author examines the present state of human trafficking and provides information--including specific questions to ask--to help dentists identify victims. In addition, the author suggests means of notifying authorities and assisting trafficking victims. He also examines the health care needs of these patients. Human trafficking is a global problem, with thousands of victims in the United States, including many women and children. Dentists have a responsibility to act for the benefit of others, which includes detecting signs of abuse and neglect. Dental professionals are on the front lines with respect to encountering and identifying potential victims who seek dental treatment. Dentists can combat human trafficking by becoming informed and by maintaining vigilance in their practices.

  7. Exploring Current and Future Roles of Non-Dental Professionals: Implications for Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Hannah L; Farrell, Christine; Gwozdek, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The health care system is undergoing transformation in which oral health is not only valued as an aspect of overall health, but health care delivery systems are aligning to better deliver total patient care. As a result of this transformation, education for many non-dental professionals incorporates oral health content to prepare them to practice in comprehensive delivery models. While some non-dental professionals already incorporate oral health care in their service, many opportunities exist for expansion of oral health care delivery by other non-dental professionals, including radiologic technicians, nursing staff, and human services professionals. As non-dental professionals take on expanded roles in oral health care, the dental hygiene workforce must be prepared to practice in settings with new types of professionals. Dental hygiene curricula should prioritize interprofessional education to best prepare these students for practice in evolved delivery models. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  8. Hand hygiene amongst dental professionals in a tertiary dental clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate hand washing attitude and practices among Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in a Nigerian Tertiary Dental Clinic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in University of Benin Teaching Hospital was conducted between February ...

  9. Saudi dental hygienists' opinions regarding establishing a professional association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joufi, A I; Wilder, R S; Curran, A E; Brame, J L

    2018-02-28

    To assess the opinions of dental hygienists in Saudi Arabia regarding the establishment of a professional association including the role it should have to meet their professional needs. A cross-sectional electronic survey using Qualtrics was utilized. IRB exemption was obtained prior to distribution. Although there are 298 licensed Saudi dental hygienists in Saudi Arabia, email addresses were only available for 101 respondents: those obtained previously by direct contact for the purpose of initiation of a professional association and those referred by the direct contacts. Subjects were emailed a link to the survey. Seventy-seven subjects responded fully to the survey yielding a response rate of 70.3%. Most 91.5% (n = 65) of the respondents favoured the establishment of a Saudi dental hygiene professional association. Eighty-eight per cent (n = 59) responded that such an association would promote development of the profession in the country at least somewhat and 86.6% (n = 58) agreed that their professional needs could be met by its establishment. Interestingly, half of those who did not support the creation of the professional association believed it would promote development of the profession and meet professional needs. A representative sample of dental hygienists in Saudi Arabia support the establishment of a professional association and feel that it would advocate and promote the dental hygiene profession in the country and meet their professional needs. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cultivating professional responsibility in a dental hygiene curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M

    2013-08-01

    To prepare dental hygienists for future roles in the health care system, dental hygiene education must prepare graduates with skills, ethics, and values that align with professional responsibility. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of curricular changes designed to develop professional identity and responsibility over the entire span of the dental hygiene curriculum. Twenty-four dental hygiene students at the University of Minnesota were surveyed about their attitudes toward access to dental care, society's and health professionals' responsibility to care for the underserved, and their personal efficacy to provide care for the underserved. Surveys were conducted at three time points in the curriculum. The Attitudes Toward Health Care instrument adapted by Holtzman for dental use was used to survey the students. The findings indicate that this institution's curricular changes were effective in cultivating professional responsibility among these students. Their attitude scores increased across the six-semester curriculum, and students in their last semester of the program believed that all individuals have a right to dental care and that society has an obligation to provide dental care. These students' sense of obligation to care for the needy became stronger and their perceptions of their own ability to impact the community and act as an agent of change also increased.

  11. Awareness of Consumer Protection Act among dental health professionals in dental schools of Ghaziabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta; Dhingra, Chandan; Anand, Richa

    2013-12-01

    The study aimed to assess the awareness of the Consumer Protection Act among dental health professionals in dental schools of Ghaziabad, India. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out on dental health professionals in dental schools of Ghaziabad, India. A total of 348 dental health professionals (170 males and 178 females) were surveyed, out of which 116 were MDS faculty, 45 were BDS faculty and 187 were pursuing post graduation. The questionnaire comprised of 24 questions about the awareness of consumer protection act. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, student's t test and ANOVA. A total of 84.8% (n=295) reported to be aware of consumer protection act. Amongst them, MDS faculty showed more awareness as compared to BDS faculty and those pursuing post-graduation. Considering the present scenario, MDS faculty dental professionals have more awareness of consumer protection act compared to other dental professionals. So, we must upgrade our knowledge on consumer protection act at all levels of our profession and change our attitude by inculcating a practice to spread the message of consumer protection act for delivering quality dental care.

  12. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  13. Dental Environmental Noise Evaluation and Health Risk Model Construction to Dental Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kuen Wai; Wong, Hai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2017-09-19

    Occupational noise is unavoidably produced from dental equipment, building facilities, and human voices in the dental environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise exposure on the dental professionals' health condition. The psychoacoustics approach noise exposure assessment followed by the health risk assessment was carried on at the paediatric dentistry clinic and the dental laboratory in the Prince Philip Dental Hospital of Hong Kong. The A-weighted equivalent sound level, total loudness, and sharpness values were statistically significantly higher for the noise at the laboratory than that at the clinic. The degree of perceived influences and sharpness of noise were found to have the impacts on the dental professionals' working performance and health. Moreover, the risk of having a bad hearing state would a have 26% and 31% higher chance for a unit increment of the short-term and long-term impact scores, respectively. The dental professionals with the service length more than 10 years and the daily working hours of more than eight showed the highest risk to their hearing state. The worse the hearing state was, the worse the health state was found for the dental professionals. Also, the risk of dissatisfaction would be increased by 4.41 and 1.22 times for those who worked at the laboratory and a unit increment of the long-term impact score. The constructed health risk mode with the scientific and statistical evidence is hence important for the future noise management of environmental improvement.

  14. Physical activity, sedentary lifestyle, and obesity among Indian dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi

    2012-05-01

    Regular physical activity is well recognized as an important lifestyle behavior for the development and maintenance of individual and population health and well-being. This study was conducted to evaluate physical activity, sedentary lifestyle, and obesity among Indian dental health professionals. Global Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess physical activity among 324 dental health care professionals. Metabolic equivalents (MET) were used to express the intensity of physical activities. Obesity was recorded corresponding to Body Mass Index. Individuals were considered in high risk group to develop obesity if energy expenditure was sedentary lifestyle of dental health care professionals is a major threat to the present and future health of the professionals by which the entire community could be prone to an epidemic of chronic disease.

  15. Occupational violence against dental professionals in southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Ezeja, E B; Ehikhamenor, E E

    2011-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of workplace violence in Oral healthcare centres against Nigerian dental professionals. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 175 randomly selected dental professionals working in Oral healthcare centres of University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria was conducted. The survey response rate was 78.9%. The respondents were dentists (58.0%), dental nurses (18.1%), dental technologists (12.3%), dental therapists (8.0%) and dental record officers (3.6%). The prevalence of violence in Nigerian Oral healthcare centres was 31.9%. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of violence against dentist and dental auxiliaries. Violence was often associated with long waiting time (27.3%), cancellation of appointment (13.6%), outcome of patient's treatment (11.4%), alcohol intoxication (9.1%), psychiatric patient (6.8%,) patient's bill (4.5%) and others (27.3%). Non-physical violence in form of loud shouting (50.0%) threat (22.7%), sexual harassment (6.8%) and swearing (2.3%) constituted the majority while physical violence in form of bullying and hitting constituted the remaining 18.2%. The main perpetrators of the violence were patients (54.5%) and patient's relatives/friends (18.2%). The expressed impact of violence among the respondents include fear (18.2%), impaired job performance (15.9%), psychological problems (13.6%) and off duty (9.1%). No impact was declared by 43.2% of respondents. The prevalence of workplace violence in Oral healthcare centres against dental professionals in Southern Nigeria was significant and had a substantial effect on dental professionals' well-being thus necessitating urgent attention.

  16. Percutaneous injuries among dental professionals in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Syed M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous exposure incidents facilitate transmission of bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. This study was conducted to identify the circumstances and equipment related to percutaneous injuries among dental professionals. Methods We used workers' compensation claims submitted to the Department of Labor and Industries State Fund during a 7-year period (1995 through 2001 in Washington State for this study. We used the statement submitted by the injured worker on the workers' compensation claim form to determine the circumstances surrounding the injury including the type of activity and device involved. Results Of a total of 4,695 accepted State Fund percutaneous injury claims by health care workers (HCWs, 924 (20% were submitted by dental professionals. Out of 924 percutaneous injuries reported by dental professionals 894 (97% were among dental health care workers in non-hospital settings, including dentists (66, 7%, dental hygienists (61, 18% and dental assistants (667, 75%. The majority of those reporting were females (638, 71%. Most (781, 87% of the injuries involved syringes, dental instruments (77, 9%, and suture needles (23%. A large proportion (90% of injuries occurred in offices and clinics of dentists, while remainder occurred in offices of clinics and of doctors of medicine (9%, and a few in specialty outpatient facilities (1%. Of the 894 dental health care workers with percutaneous injuries, there was evidence of HBV in 6 persons, HCV in 30 persons, HIV in 3 persons and both HBV and HVC (n = 2 exposure. Conclusion Out of hospital percutaneous injuries are a substantial risk to dental health professionals in Washington State. Improved work practices and safer devices are needed to address this risk.

  17. The servant leader: a higher calling for dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certosimo, Fred

    2009-09-01

    The dental profession is guided by normative principles that provide guidance to our leaders and practicing dentists in addressing the needs of patients and the profession, yet there is room for incorporating new ideas that help dental professionals meet their professional obligations. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the concept of "servant leadership," especially in contrast with "self-serving leaders," and to suggest that servant leadership is consistent with the high ethical and professional ideals of the dental profession. The servant leader is the antithesis of the self-serving leader, who incessantly seeks more power and acquisition of material possessions. The servant leader's highest priority is the people (patients/students/customers) he or she serves. The concept of the servant-leader can take us away from self-serving, top-down leadership and encourage us to think harder about how to respect, value, and motivate people and ultimately provide better service to our patients.

  18. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Dayani, Rozita; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS) chart for scoring (1–10). After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test. Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc. Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments. PMID:27928236

  19. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Dayani, Rozita; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth. A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS) chart for scoring (1-10). After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test. No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc. Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments.

  20. Colour discrimination of dental professionals and colour deficient laypersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak-Guberina, Renata; Celebic, Asja; Powers, John M; Paravina, Rade D

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare results of non-dental (conventional) and dental colour discrimination tests (customized, shade guide test), to evaluate influence of profession, gender and age of colour normal dentists and laboratory technicians on colour discrimination results and to evaluate results of colour deficient laypersons. A total of 36 colour normal dental professionals, all volunteers were divided into two groups consisting of 18 participants each: dentists (DDS) and laboratory technicians (CDT). In addition, a group 15 colour deficient males also volunteered (CDP). Colour discrimination was examined using Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test and total error scores (TES) were calculated. Participants performed a dentistry related colour discrimination test by matching 26 pairs of shade tabs. Shade guide scores (3DS) were calculated. These tests were performed under the controlled conditions of a viewing booth. Mean values and standard deviations were determined. ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) were used for result analysis. TES and 3DS were correlated for colour normal observers, r = 0.47 (p gender and age were recorded. TES of 159 (83) and 3DS of 6.7 (2.7) were recorded for colour deficient laypersons. Based on TES, 33% of colour deficient laypersons had average discrimination, whilst 67% had low discrimination. Within the limitation of this study, it was concluded that results of non-dental and dental colour discrimination tests were correlated, and that profession (DDS/CDT), gender and age gender did not influence colour discrimination of colour normal participants. Although colour and appearance of dental restorations are of paramount importance for the aesthetic outcome, colour vision of dental professionals is not routinely tested. This paper validates and recommends the usage of dental shade guides for a simple, affordable and understandable testing of colour vision, either as a sole test or

  1. Change Management in Dental Education: A Professional Learning Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatta, Anthony M

    2018-06-01

    Professional learning communities (PLCs) are defined as "a group of people sharing and critically interrogating their practice in an ongoing, reflective, collaborative, inclusive, learning-oriented, growth-promoting way." PLCs have been found to be an effective change management strategy in business and education when confronted by rapid change. The American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education new national program-ADEA CCI 2.0-includes the development of a PLC. By employing an "engage and learn" model PLC centered on continuous quality improvement and systems thinking, dental faculty can identify internal and external barriers to change that could lead to innovative solutions to complex issues. This article argues that a PLC is a viable change management strategy to counteract the effect of multiple external forces impacting dental education and thus to develop future-ready faculty.

  2. Professional burnout and work stress among Israeli dental assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Nir; Meyerson, Joseph; Birenzweig, Yonatan; Eli, Ilana

    2018-05-16

    Professional burnout and work-related stress are known problems that have been the subject of in-depth examination among dentists. Nevertheless, these issues have not been widely studied among dental assistants. The aims of this study were threefold: to confirm the structure of a Work Stress Inventory (WSI) for Dental Assistants which was originally developed for Jordanian dental assistants (factor analysis); to evaluate work stress and burnout among Israeli dental assistants and to discover the factors predicting Israeli assistants' burnout (regression analyses). The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the WSI were distributed by mail and in person. Varimax factor analysis revealed that the items which contribute to different aspects of work stress are similar among both Jordanian and Israeli populations. Among the 299 Israeli dental assistants who completed the questionnaires, the most stressful work-related factors were income, workload, and work hazards. Eighteen percent of the participants exhibited a high to very high level of burnout. Participants exhibited a moderate level of emotional exhaustion (EE), low level of depersonalization (DP), and high level of personal accomplishment (PA). Most WSI factors were found to correlate positively with EE and DP. Linear stepwise regression analyses revealed that the best predictor of EE was the dentist‒assistant relationship, followed by workload, patient type, and salary. The best predictor of DP was patient suffering followed by dentist‒assistant relationship, years of professional experience, and work hazards. Professional stress and burnout among dental assistants are important factors that can possibly affect the wellbeing of both dental personnel and their patients. Further studies are necessary to better understand these factors in addition to the effects of personal relationships on burnout among dentists and their assistants.

  3. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2018-01-01

    and vegetables, nuts, seeds, and wholegrain starch-rich foods; (iv) discourage the consumption of foods high in saturated fat and salt; and (v) discourage the consumption of all drinks containing free sugars. The dental health professional has an opportunity to support patients to reduce their intake of free...

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practices of dental professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, attitude and practices of dental professionals in Rwanda towards the ... towards teledentistry, it will not be easy to implement teledentistry innovations. ... Also only 13 (12.6%) and eight (7.8%) were sharing digital x-ray and digital ...

  5. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Saffarpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth.Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS chart for scoring (1-10. After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test.Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc.Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments.Keywords: Smiling; Perception; Esthetics, Dental

  6. The changing tobacco landscape: What dental professionals need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Elizabeth T; Chaffee, Benjamin W; Gansky, Stuart A; Walsh, Margaret M

    2016-07-01

    Tobacco products in the United States and the patterns of tobacco use are changing. Although cigarette smoking prevalence has declined, dental professionals are likely to encounter substantial numbers of patients who have tried and are continuing to use new and alternative tobacco products, including cigars, water pipes (hookahs), and electronic cigarettes, as well as conventional and new smokeless tobacco products. The authors reviewed conventional and new tobacco products in the United States, their adverse oral and systemic health effects, and their prevalence of use. Tobacco products other than cigarettes account for a substantial portion of tobacco use. For this reason, tobacco-use prevention and cessation counseling provided by dental health care professionals must address all tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, water pipes, and electronic cigarettes, as well as conventional and new smokeless tobacco products. Cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use are associated with immediate and long-term adverse health effects, including nicotine addiction, oral and systemic disease, and death. Novel products may attract new tobacco users, potentially leading to addiction that results in enduring tobacco product use and associated adverse health effects. This critical review of conventional, new, and emerging tobacco products presents information that dental professionals can use in providing tobacco-related counseling to patients who use or who are at risk for using tobacco products. It is essential that dental professionals are knowledgeable about tobacco products and are able to answer patients' questions and provide them with evidence-based tobacco-related counseling. This information may prevent patients from initiating use or help reduce or cease use to avoid immediate and long-term adverse health effects, including nicotine addiction, oral and systemic disease, and death. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  7. Professional and personal enhancement: a pragmatic approach in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deivanayagam, Kandaswamy; K, Anbarasi

    2016-06-01

    Students of health education are often offended by the transitions and challenges they face while encountering diverse people, ideas and academic workloads. They may be offended because of reasons not only related to their societal background but also to their basic competence in managing transitions. In the Asian scenario, students enter the first year of professional education in their late teen age along with the definition of self which was created by their parents. There are different issues that arise in this age group that may positively shape or negatively affect the personalities of students. They need to achieve a sense of balance between personal and professional traits on their own. Several students are often unable to cultivate the expected required qualities, which leads to an abject state of mind and hinder their progress. We identified the most common personal and professional hurdles in the lives of dental students and we provided experiential solutions to overcome the hurdles by using a sociable approach through an integrated, continuing education program. Designing and implementing a cohesive, amalgamated and inspiring personal and professional enhancement action program for dental students. Feedback from students reflected that the needs and expectations of students vary with academic phase. In addition students expressed that this program series inculcated some positive skills, and overall, they are satisfied with the utility of the program. Personal and professional enhancement of students in accordance with individual needs as well as with expected requirements needs a committed administrative action plan. Our results in this context are encouraging and can be considered for application in dental institutions.

  8. Exposures of dental professionals to elemental mercury and methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Chou, Hwai-Nan; Gruninger, Stephen E; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure, a worldwide public health concern, predominantly takes two forms--methylmercury from fish consumption and elemental Hg from dental amalgam restorations. We recruited 630 dental professionals from an American Dental Association meeting to assess Hg body burden and primary sources of exposure in a dually exposed population. Participants described occupational practices and fish consumption patterns via questionnaire. Hg levels in biomarkers of elemental Hg (urine) and methylmercury (hair and blood) were measured with a Direct Mercury Analyzer-80 and were higher than the general US population. Geometric means (95% CI) were 1.28 (1.19-1.37) μg/l in urine, 0.60 (0.54-0.67) μg/g in hair and 3.67 (3.38-3.98) μg/l in blood. In multivariable linear regression, personal amalgams predicted urine Hg levels along with total years in dentistry, amalgams handled, working hours and sex. Fish consumption patterns predicted hair and blood Hg levels, which were higher among Asians compared with Caucasians. Five species contributed the majority of the estimated Hg intake from fish--swordfish, fresh tuna, white canned tuna, whitefish and king mackerel. When studying populations with occupational exposure to Hg, it is important to assess environmental exposures to both elemental Hg and methylmercury as these constitute a large proportion of total exposure.

  9. Dentistry - a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Clarke, Wendy; Eaton, Kenneth A; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2007-11-16

    New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs) in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career.Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'.Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future'. Longterm goals covered the spectrum of opportunities within

  10. Shade selection performed by novice dental professionals and colorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetti, E; Matela, A-M; Haag, P; Kononen, M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test inter-observer variability in shade selection for porcelain restorations, using three different shade guides: Vita Lumin Vacuum, Vita 3D-Master and Procera. Nineteen young dental professionals acted as observers. The results were also compared with those of a digital colorimeter (Shade Eye Ex; Shofu, Japan). Regarding repeatability, no significant differences were found between the three shade guides, although repeatability was relatively low (33-43%). Agreement with the colorimetric results was also low (8-34%). In conclusion, shade selection shows moderate to great inter-observer variation. In teaching and standardizing the shade selection procedure, a digital colorimeter may be a useful educational tool.

  11. Social media use, attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of online professionalism amongst dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Philip; Johnson, Ilona Gail

    2016-01-01

    Use of social media has increased amongst health professionals. This has benefits for patient care but also introduces risks for confidentiality and professional fitness to practise. This study aimed to examine dental student attitudes towards professional behaviour on social media. The secondary aim was to establish the extent and nature of social media use and exposure to potentially unprofessional behaviours.\\ud \\ud A cross-sectional study was carried out in one dental school. Data were co...

  12. Mind the gap! A comparison of oral health knowledge between dental, healthcare professionals and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W; Filipponi, T; Roberts-Burt, V

    2014-02-01

    The importance of consistent, accurate and unambiguous messages are well documented in oral health promotion literature. Whether the reality of delivering messages in the field fulfils these principle is questionable. This paper explores the perceptions of dental professionals, healthcare professionals and lay community members with regard to key oral health messages in order to highlight any inconsistencies and knowledge gaps between and within groups for disease risk factors. A questionnaire was administered to individuals who belonged to three groups: dental professionals, healthcare professionals and lay community members. The questionnaire established knowledge regarding risk factors for caries, periodontal disease and erosion. Thirty-five (57.4%) of the dental group answered the whole questionnaire correctly, with 22 (27.8%) and 9 (5.1%) of the healthcare and lay community group answering the whole questionnaire correctly, respectively. The question of fluoride levels in children's toothpaste was the main reason for incorrect answers in the dental group. The results of this survey demonstrate a knowledge gradient from dental professionals through to healthcare professionals and then to lay members of the community. The knowledge base observed in the dental group is reflected in the other two groups as would be expected albeit with a significant gap between each group. As expected the dental professionals are generally well informed, but not as well informed as could be expected.

  13. The professional role of the dental hygienist as viewed by accreditation commissioners and consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanable, E D

    1977-12-01

    Members of the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational Programs and of its associated Committee D (Committee on Dental Hygiene) were asked a series of questions designed to elicit their positions on (1) the occupational status of dental hygiene in society at large and in the social prestige hierarchy of the dental profession, (2) reference groups for dental hygienists, (3) ethical norms for the hygienist role, (4) revivalism movements within dental hygiene, and (5) images of the "ideal dental hygienist." Results indicate that commissioners and consultants see dental hygienists as (1) ranking 7.1 on a ten-point scale of professional status in the community-at-large, (2) somewhat lower than dentists but higher than other auxiliaries in the social hierarchy of the dental profession, (3) socially referenced to dentists rather than hygienists, (4) primarily oral health educators with strong clinical skills, (5) better educated and more skilled now than they have ever been before, (6) bound to essentially the same ethics as dentists, except for self-regulation, and (7) much too aggressive at the national level for their own good. The ideal dental hygienist was seen as a behavioral change specialist with (1) clinical skills, (2) an attitude of service to patients (3) a willingness to work with dentists to increase the scope of dental hygiene duties in the preventive and periodontal areas, and (4) a willingness to leave the decisions regarding the profession of dental hygiene to dentists.

  14. Awareness of medico-legal issues among medical and dental college health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Senthilkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The changing doctor-patient relationship and commercialization of modem medical practice has affected the practice of medicine. The fundamental values of medicine insist that the doctors should be aware about the various medico-legal issues which help in proper recording of medical management details. Aim: To evaluate the knowledge on Medico-legal Issues among Medical and Dental College Health Professionals of Meenakshi University (MAHER, Tamilnadu. Materials & Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among health professionals of Meenakshi University (MAHER, Tamilnadu. A total o f320 health professionals (163 medical and 157 dental participated in the study. A structured, closed ended, self-administered questionnaire was used for collection of data. Chi-square test was used to compare the awareness of medico-legal issues between medical and dental health professionals. Results: Among the 320 health professionals, 87.4% of medical and 76.1% of dental professionals were aware about the informed consent, 18.8% of medical and 5.7% of dental professionals had awareness about COPRA and only 14.3% of medical and 7.6% of dental professionals had awareness regarding the Medico-legal programs/courses. Conclusions: The results illustrated that the participants had little awareness on medico-legal issues. Hence there is an urgent need to update the understanding of these issues to be on a legally safer side.

  15. Loss of idealism or realistic optimism? A cross-sectional analysis of dental hygiene students' and registered dental hygienists' professional identity perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champine, J M; Inglehart, M R; Furgeson, D; Halaris, J F; Fitzgerald, M; Danciu, T E; Kinney, J S

    2018-02-01

    The dental hygiene profession in the U.S. is in the process of establishing a direct access model of care and contributing to the creation of the profession of a dental therapist. The objectives were to analyse the professional role perceptions of dental hygiene students and registered dental hygienists in these times of change. Specifically, it was explored whether dental hygiene students' current professional identities differ (i) from their expected future identities, and (ii) from dental hygienists' current and (iii) past identities. Survey data were collected from 215 dental hygiene students concerning their present and future role perceptions, and from 352 registered dental hygienists concerning their present and past professional identity perceptions. Students' future professional identity perceptions were even more positive than their very positive current perceptions of their professional role components. Students' current perceptions of professional pride, professional ambition, work ethic and patient relations were more positive than dental hygienists' current perceptions of these professional role components. A comparison of students' current perceptions with dental hygienists' current and retrospective descriptions showed that students were more positive than dental hygienists in each case. The fact that dental hygienists had less positive role perceptions than dental hygiene students might lead to the conclusion that a loss of idealism occurs over the course of a professional lifespan. However, dental hygienists actually improved their role perceptions over time and students' future descriptions were more positive than their current descriptions, supporting the interpretation that realistic optimism dominates professional role perceptions in these times of change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Improving teamwork between students from two professional programmes in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Karlsson, M; Franklin, I; Lindh, L; Wretlind, K

    2012-02-01

    holistic view on patients and dental work, thereby preparing both groups of students for their professional life. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Impact of Curriculum on Understanding of Professional Practice: A Longitudinal Study of Students Commencing Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules A.; Dall'Alba, Gloria; Livingstone, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines changes in understanding of dental practice among a cohort of students in the early years of a dentistry programme. In their first two professional years, we identified five distinct understandings of dental practice that we have ordered from least to most comprehensive: "relieving pain or generally caring for…

  18. Dental Environmental Noise Evaluation and Health Risk Model Construction to Dental Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Kuen Wai; Wong, Hai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2017-01-01

    Occupational noise is unavoidably produced from dental equipment, building facilities, and human voices in the dental environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of occupational noise exposure on the dental professionals’ health condition. The psychoacoustics approach noise exposure assessment followed by the health risk assessment was carried on at the paediatric dentistry clinic and the dental laboratory in the Prince Philip Dental Hospital of Hong Kong. The A-weigh...

  19. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhic, Edin; Plancak, Darije; Lajnert, Vlatka; Muhic, Asja

    2016-09-01

    Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  20. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Lajnert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. Materials and methods: A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS. Results: An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Conclusions: Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  1. Comparison of dental education and professional development between mainland China and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Y; Zhang, Z Y; Jiang, X Q; Guo, L

    2010-05-01

    Different educational and professional developments within the dental field create different sets of missions, norms, and practices regarding dental diseases and their appropriate treatment. This review has addressed differences in dental education and professional development between mainland China and North America. Many factors influence the choice of model and it is very difficult to predict which model will become predominant. However, there is growing sentiment that the independent faculty model in North America is logical and superior to the model, which 'integrates' dental and medical education in mainland China. Many North America dental schools place a high priority on preclinical and clinical training in the curriculum in order to expose students to patient oral health needs and systemic dental problems much earlier than in mainland China. North America dental schools promote and embrace students self-learning skills by the use of PBL, CRL, and TRAD education methodologies and new e-based technologies and approaches whereby students learn rather than are taught. In mainland China, the traditional lecture-based format is still employed in the majority of dental schools; however, strategies to enhance students self-learning skills is increasingly utilised in most well-known Chinese dental schools. The Chinese dental education model, which treats dentistry as a sub-specialty of medicine, has brought about fundamental differences, with the dentist functioning essentially as a stomatologist. For example, China has built up a large oral and maxillofacial surgery society, and craniofacial surgery is performed to a much broader extent by Chinese dentists than by most North American counterparts. In North America, dentists engage in full-time work, attend continuing training/education programmes, belong to an association, gain legal status, and construct a code of ethics emphasising the quality of care delivered to the public. Currently, continuing dental

  2. Teaching and assessment of professional attitudes in UK dental schools - commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J; Ellis, J; Abbas, C; Germain, P

    2010-08-01

    The General Dental Council expects professionalism to be embedded and assessed through-out the undergraduate dental programme. Curricula need therefore to accommodate these recommendations. A stroll poll of UK dental schools provided a basis for understanding the current methods of teaching and assessing professionalism. All respondent schools recognised the importance of professionalism and reported that this was taught and assessed within their curriculum. For most the methods involved were largely traditional, relying on lectures and seminars taught throughout the course. The most common form of assessment was by grading and providing formative feedback after a clinical encounter. Whilst clinical skills and knowledge can perhaps be readily taught and assessed using traditional methods, those involved in education are challenged to identify and implement effective methods of not only teaching, but also assessing professionalism. A variety of standalone methods need to be developed that assess professionalism and this will, in turn, allow the effectiveness of teaching methods to be assessed.

  3. [Professionalization of Legal Dental Experts in Germany: Results of Studies on Structured Focus Groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, H U; Walther, W; Dick, M

    2018-04-01

    Legal expert opinions are a crucial instrument of professional self-control in medicine. To give impulses for further development, focus groups were initiated to reflect upon the perspective of legal dental experts. 5 focus group discussions on the topic "Professionalization of legal dental experts" were conducted. A total of 32 experienced legal dental experts participated in the discussions. The results were evaluated by qualitative content analysis. A catalogue of 68 ideas was generated for improvement and divided into 15 categories. Among these were periodic quality circles, interprofessional exchange, supervision of novices and periodic feedback for legal dental experts and dentists. Self-reflection can be included as an instrument for quality improvement of legal dental expert opinions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Oral health in pregnancy: educational needs of dental professionals and office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Littell, Christopher T; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn

    2012-01-01

    Dental care during pregnancy is important for pregnant women and their children. Comprehensive guidelines for the provision of dental services for pregnant patients were published in 2006, but there is relatively little information about their use in actual practice. The aim of this study was to examine differences in knowledge and attitudes regarding dental care in pregnancy among dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and nonclinical office staff. A secondary aim was to identify sources of influence on attitudes and knowledge regarding the guidelines. A survey was used to collect information from 766 employees of a Dental Care Organization based in Oregon; responses from 546 were included in the analyses reported here. Statistically significant differences in knowledge were found among the professional-role groups. Dentists and hygienists consistently answered more items correctly than did other respondents. Within all professional-role groups, knowledge gaps existed and were most pronounced regarding provision of routine and emergency services. Positive perceptions of providing dental care during pregnancy were associated with higher knowledge scores (z = 4.16, P education and continuing education for all dental office personnel are needed to promote the diffusion of current evidence-based guidelines for dental care during pregnancy. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  5. Dental Sealants: Knowledge, Value, Opinion, and Practice among Dental Professionals of Bathinda City, India

    OpenAIRE

    Asawa, Kailash; Gupta, Vivek V.; Tak, Mridula; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Bapat, Salil; Mishra, Prashant; Roy, Santanu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to assess the knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding use of dental sealants among private dental practitioners in Bathinda City, Punjab, India. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all private dental practitioners in Bathinda City, Punjab. A self-administered structured questionnaire consisting of 28 items was used to assess their knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding dental sealants. One-way analysi...

  6. Reasons for tooth mortality as perceived by dental professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that among the patients attending dental clinics and hospitals in Udaipur city, dental caries and periodontal disease was found to be the two major causes of tooth mortality. This is probably the first study to report on the trends in tooth loss in general practice in Udaipur ...

  7. Changes in the professional domain of Dutch dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; van Offenbeek, M. A. G.; Slot, D. E.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study's purpose was to compare the scope of practice of Dutch dental hygienists educated through a two- or three-year curriculum ('old curriculum dental hygienists' [OCDHs]) with that of hygienists educated through a new extended four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree

  8. Dental health professional recommendation and consumer habits in denture cleansing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, Alyson S; Varghese, Roshan; Bosma, MaryLynn; Kitson, Nicola; Bradshaw, David J

    2016-02-01

    Regular cleaning of dentures is essential to the oral and general health of denture wearers. Only limited systematic data are available on the recommendations that dental health care professionals (DHCPs) make to patients for denture cleaning. Data on denture wearers' cleaning regimens are also lacking. The purpose of this study was to provide data on recommendations that DHCPs make to patients for denture cleaning and on the cleaning regimens of denture wearers. DHCPs (n=613), including dentists and hygienists, were surveyed in developed (Japan, USA, Italy) and developing (Brazil, India) countries. A questionnaire assessing a range of denture cleaning recommendations was used. The questions addressed products, frequency, how to use remedies, the suggested dilution and duration of cleansing treatment, the location of dentures while cleaning, and the reasoning behind the recommendation of particular products or modes of treatment. Denture cleansing methods and the routine of denture wearers in developed and developing countries were also surveyed with a questionnaire (n=2862) and a 1-week diary (n=1462). An average of more than 2 treatments was recommended by DHCPs. Specialist denture cleanser tablets, "regular" toothpaste, mouthwash, soap and water, denture paste, foam or liquid denture cleanser, and dishwashing detergents were most commonly recommended; other product recommendations included baking soda, vinegar, salt water, and bleach. More than 10% of DHCPs made no primary recommendation on cleaning. Denture tablets were more commonly recommended in developed countries, whereas toothpaste was the most common recommendation in developing countries. Denture wearers used products and methods similar to those recommended by DHCPs. Toothpaste, water, and mouthwash were used more frequently than denture tablets. More than 75% of denture wearers reported using denture cleanser tablets for more than 5 minutes, whereas soap and toothpaste were typically used for less

  9. Assessment of dentally related functional competency for older adults with cognitive impairment--a survey for special-care dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Clark, Jennifer J J

    2013-01-01

    This survey was to study whether and how dental professional assess dental-related function in older adults with cognitive impairment (OACI). An invitation was sent to 525 special-care dental professionals, followed by a reminder in 2 weeks. Thirteen percent of the targeted participants completed the survey. Among them, 88% completed a hospital dentistry, geriatric dentistry, or other postgraduate training program. Nearly 70% of the respondents considered somewhat to very difficult to assess dentally related function; 45% did not ever or did not regularly assess dental-related function for OACI. Dental-related functional assessments were often based on a subjective, unstructured approach. Only 6% of the respondents routinely used standard instruments to assess the patients' function. These results indicate that an objective functional assessment based on a standardized instrument has not been routinely incorporated into dental care for OACI, raising concerns for quality of care in this vulnerable population. ©2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High and specialty-related musculoskeletal disorders afflict dental professionals even since early training years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianru YI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine how early musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs develop in dental professionals and to explore the potential differences among distinct dental specialties. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 271 dental postgraduates majoring in five dental specialties were recruited, i.e., orthodontics, prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics and alveolar surgery. 254 age-matched non-dental postgraduates served as the control. The standardized Nordic questionnaire on MSDs and a self-report questionnaire regarding correlative factors (only for dental postgraduates were answered through emails. Reliability of responses was assessed applying test-retest method. RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient of participants' answers ranged from 0.89 to 0.96. Dental postgraduates had significantly higher prevalence of MSDs than the control group, especially at neck, upper back and lower back. In all dental specialties included, high prevalence of MSDs was reported at neck (47.5%-69.8%, shoulders (50.8%-65.1%, lower back (27.1%-51.2% and upper back (25.6%-46.5%, with lower prevalence at elbows (5.1%-18.6%, hips (3.4%-16.3% and ankles (5.1%-11.6%. Periodontics students reported the worst MSDs in most body regions except wrists and knees, which were more prevalent for prosthodontic and alveolar surgery students, respectively. Furthermore, year of clinical work, clinical hours per week and desk hours per week were found as risk factors for MSDs, whereas physical exercise and rest between patients as protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: High and specialty-related MSDs afflict dental professionals even since very early stage of careers. Prevention aimed at the specialty-related characteristics and the risk/protective factors revealed in this study should be introduced to dental personnel as early as possible.

  11. Dental Infection and Pregnancy: the Lack of Treatment by the Dental Professional Evolving to a Complex Maxillofacial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rodrigo Dos Santos; Gomes-Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Silva; Bonardi, João Paulo; Silva, Jonathan Ribeiro da; Latini, Gustavo Lima; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Infections of the maxillofacial complex caused by caries disease are common in dental practice. The professionals have to have technical knowledge to treat it at the onset of the condition and avoid the spread to deep anatomical spaces of face and neck, which can implicate in a risk of patients' life.In Brazil, current dental professionals usually denied oral surgical treatments in patients with some clinical conditions, not because of fear to resolve it but for lack of knowledge to treat it. An example of these conditionals is pregnancy. It is well known that during the pregnancy period, the patient can be treated in the correct period of gestation. Early diagnosis is crucial for effective therapy in serious infections. The treatment has to be crucial during pregnancy because of the potentially fatal situation that the disease can create to the pregnant woman and the fetus.The aim of this article is to demonstrate a case of dental caries in a pregnant patient, which was evaluated by other professionals and had the treatment denied, evolving to a serious maxillofacial infection.

  12. Understanding the motivation: a qualitative study of dental students' choice of professional career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J; Clarke, W; Wilson, N

    2008-05-01

    Given the changing nature of the dental workforce, and the need to retain the services of future members, it is important to understand why current dental students perceive that they were motivated to study dentistry. Qualitative research provides the opportunity to explore the underlying issues in addition to informing subsequent quantitative research. The objectives of this research were to investigate final-year dental students' motivation for studying dentistry and how they perceive this has been modified during their undergraduate degree programme. Purposive sampling of a representative group of 35 final-year dental students at King's College London Dental Institute to participate in audio-taped focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed using Framework Methodology. The findings suggest a strong emphasis on having a career, providing 'professional status', 'financial benefits', 'job security, flexibility and independence' and 'good quality of life'. Students reported being attracted by features of the job, supported to a greater or lesser extent by personal experience, family and friends. It appears however that students' initial motivation is being tempered by their experiences during their undergraduate degree programme, in particular, the 'responsibilities of an intensive professional education', their 'mounting student debt' and the perception of 'feeling undervalued'. This perception related to dentistry in general and National Health Service dentistry in particular, being undervalued, by government, patients, the public and members of the dental profession. Students' vision of a 'contained professional career' within health care, providing status and financial benefits, appears to have influenced their choice of dentistry. Pressures relating to student life and policy changes are perceived as impacting on key components of professional life, particularly status in the social and economic order. The implications for educators, professional leaders and

  13. Education of tobacco use prevention and cessation for dental professionals--a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joan M; Ramseier, Christoph A; Mattheos, Nikos; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta; Compton, Sharon; Al-Hazmi, Nadia; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Suvan, Jean; Antohé, Magda E; Forna, Doriana; Radley, Nicki

    2010-02-01

    The use of tobacco continues to be a substantial risk factor in the development and progression of oral cancer, periodontitis, implant failure and poor wound healing. Dental and dental hygiene education providers have made great advances towards the incorporation of tobacco education into their curricula in recent years. Unfortunately, however, both medical and dental education research has consistently reported schools providing only basic knowledge-based curricula that rarely incorporate more effective, behaviourally-based components affecting long-term change. The limited training of oral healthcare students, at least in part, is reflected in practising dental professionals continuing to report offering incomplete tobacco interventions. In order to prepare the next generation of oral healthcare providers, this paper proposes a paradigm shift in how tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) may be incorporated into existing curricula. It is suggested that schools should carefully consider: to what level of competency should TUPAC be trained in dental and dental hygiene schools; the importance of establishing rapport through good communication skills; the core knowledge level for TUPAC; suggested instructional and assessment strategies; the importance of continuing professional education for the enhancement of TUPAC.

  14. Attitude of Indian dental professionals toward scientific publications: A questionnaire based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pradhuman; Sachdeva, Suresh K; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Khosa, Rameen; Basavraju, Suman; Dutta, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Due to competitiveness and academic benefits, most dental professionals feel an urgent need to increase their publications. Hence, we explored the attitude of students and faculty members toward scientific publications through a questionnaire. A questionnaire consisting of 13 questions was sent by e-mails and posting the printed copies to dental postgraduate (PG) students (second and third year) and faculty members (n = 500 each). The returned completed questionnaires were analyzed. About 37% of dental PG faculty and 35.6% PG students responded to the questionnaire, with overall response of 72.6%. Among the PG faculty, professors (P) had more scientific publications, followed by senior lecturers (SL) and readers (R). The publications as first or corresponding author were less among both faculty and PG students while co-authorship was more among PG students compared to faculty members. Awareness about the term "plagiarism" was overall high and relatively highest among R, followed by SL, P and PG students. The percentage of publications in fee charging journals was more among PG students than faculty members and self-funding for publication was observed in 86.4% of PG students and 94-100% among faculty members. About 72.6% of dental professionals were involved in publishing of their research work and the number of publications increased steadily with an increase in their academic experience. All the dental professionals concurred publications as the criteria for academic excellence.

  15. [Professional strategy and institutional isomorphism: the dental health insurance industry in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Cristine; Costa, Nilson do Rosário

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes the organizational model of the dental health industry. The main organizational leaders in this industry are the professional cooperatives and group dental insurance companies. The theoretical basis of the article is the organizational theory developed by Di Maggio and Powell. The dental health industry consists of a great number of small and very dynamic companies, however an expressive part of clients and profit are concentrated in a few large companies. The results show that the industry has expanded the number of clients after the creation of the National Health Insurance Agency. The regulation regime has forced institutional changes in the firms with regard to the market entry, permanence or exit patterns. There was no evidence that the regulatory rules have interfered with the development and financial conditions of the industry. The average profitability of the sector, especially among the group dental insurance companies, is extremely high.

  16. Prevalence of dental trauma and use of mouthguards in professional handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Lana; Milardović Ortolan, Slađana; Žarković, Davor; Viskić, Joško; Jokić, Dražen; Mehulić, Ketij

    2017-06-01

    Published data about orofacial injuries and mouthguard use by professional handball players are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of orofacial trauma and mouthguard use in professional handball players. Data were collected from 100 professional handball players through a questionnaire, which contained 17 questions about age, experience in playing handball, playing position, orofacial trauma experience during the past 12 months, type of injury and mouthguard use. Almost half (49%) of the interviewed players experienced head and/or facial trauma during the past year. The most common injuries were soft tissue lacerations (39.6%). Dental injuries occurred in 22% of the participants, with socket bleeding being the most frequent injury (14%). Of the affected teeth, 76.9% were upper incisors. Mouthguards had a statistically significant protective role regarding tooth fractures and tooth avulsion (P=.043). Players who wore a mouthguard had a 5.55 times less chance of suffering dental injuries. Almost 76% of dental injuries resulted in complications afterward. Sixty-seven percentage of the players knew that mouthguards could prevent injuries, but only 28% used them regularly. Of the players who wore a mouthguard regularly, 76.9% were advised to do so by their dentists. The incidence of head and orofacial injuries among professional handball players is high. Mouthguards prevented severe dental injuries such as tooth fracture and avulsion, but their use was still limited. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Knowledge and attitude of dental professionals of north India toward plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Guram, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is stealing of some others work or idea without proper citation. It is one of the biggest challenges faced by the scholarly world and by far a grim form of delinquency in academics. The study was designed to explore the knowledge and attitudes of dental professionals toward plagiarism. A questionnaire having 14 questions was sent either via e-mails or by sending printed copies to 5000 dental professionals, while maintaining anonymity of all the participants. Most of the dental professionals know about plagiarism, and they believe that plagiarism cannot be avoided successfully. Pressure to publish was a major reason along with several others, which accounts for more and more indulgence in plagiarism. At the same time lack of facilities in private institutions and lack of funding for research work were the major factors as well, which hinder in creating research environment and hence promotes plagiarism and false studies to publish it. Plagiarism is present in dental professionals and that significant reduction can only be brought by awareness, objective check methods and stringent punishment. Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct must be recognized and must not be tolerated.

  18. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Professionals of North India Toward Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Guram, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plagiarism is stealing of some others work or idea without proper citation. It is one of the biggest challenges faced by the scholarly world and by far a grim form of delinquency in academics. Aim: The study was designed to explore the knowledge and attitudes of dental professionals toward plagiarism. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire having 14 questions was sent either via e-mails or by sending printed copies to 5000 dental professionals, while maintaining anonymity of all the participants. Result: Most of the dental professionals know about plagiarism, and they believe that plagiarism cannot be avoided successfully. Pressure to publish was a major reason along with several others, which accounts for more and more indulgence in plagiarism. At the same time lack of facilities in private institutions and lack of funding for research work were the major factors as well, which hinder in creating research environment and hence promotes plagiarism and false studies to publish it. Conclusion: Plagiarism is present in dental professionals and that significant reduction can only be brought by awareness, objective check methods and stringent punishment. Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct must be recognized and must not be tolerated. PMID:24678470

  19. Factors That Advance and Restrict Programme Change and Professional Development in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; Roberts, Kellie W.; Zafar, Mueen A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a professional development initiative using organisational change research studies to frame the inquiry. Two faculty groups and two student groups participated in a total of four focus group interviews to ascertain their perceptions of a new model of pre-clinical dental education. Using a…

  20. Survey on the occurrence of dental trauma and preventive strategies among Brazilian professional soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Britto Correa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to verify the occurrence of dental injuries in professional Brazilian soccer players, the level of knowledge of the teams' medical departments about mouthguards, and the conducts adopted in cases of dental trauma during the match. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Closed questionnaires were sent to the physicians in charge of the medical departments of the 40 teams enrolled in the first and second divisions of the Brazilian professional soccer league in 2007. The data obtained were subjected to descriptive analysis to determine absolute and relative frequencies of answers for each one of the questions. RESULTS: Physicians from 38 (95% of the 40 teams in the first and second divisions answered the questionnaires and 71.1% reported the occurrence of some type of dental injury during soccer practice, dental fractures (74.1% and avulsions (59.3% being the most prevalent ones. Regarding emergency conducts, approximately 50% answered that a successful replantation could be obtained in periods from 6 to 24 h after injury, and 27.8% were not able to answer this question. Regarding mouthguard use, 48.6% of the physicians did not know about mouthguards, and only 21.6% usually recommended their use by the soccer players. Among the physicians who do not recommend the use of mouthguards, 50% justified that it was not necessary. Almost 50% of the medical departments do not have a dentist as part of the health professional staff. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to conclude that dental injuries are common during professional soccer practice and that there is a lack of information in the medical departments related to the emergency conducts and prevention of dental trauma.

  1. Efficacy and acceptance of professional dental cleaning among nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Anna Greta; Kottmann, Hannah Elisa; Hamacher, Stefanie; Derman, Sonja Henny Maria; Noack, Michael Johannes

    2018-05-13

    To determine the impact of general and oral health status of nursing home residents in Germany on efficacy and acceptance of professional dental cleaning performed by a dental nurse. Participants (N = 41; mean age 83 ± 8 years) living in a nursing home were included. Personal and general health, oral health, oral hygiene habits, and needs were investigated. Individual acceptance regarding professional dental cleaning via different devices (scaler, interdental brushes, ultrasonic cleaning) was assessed, as was the efficacy of this method using after-cleaning indices. Oral health among nursing home residents was impaired and independent from dementia status. Most residents (33/41) performed oral hygiene procedures independently and showed better index values than those in need of external help. Residents requiring help with oral hygiene showed increased risk profiles (higher age, more often immobile, demented, more xerostomia). The dental cleaning procedure required a mean time of 37 ± 11 min, was widely accepted (36/41), and achieved clean results (plaque index 0.1 ± 0.5, oral hygiene index 0.2 ± 1.6, Volpe-Manhold index 0.4 ± 1.6); food residues were reduced to 0 independent from cognitive status. Regarding the cleaning methods, scalers were accepted best without difference between demented and non-demented residents. Professional dental cleaning in nursing homes is an accepted and efficacious oral hygiene procedure among nursing home residents. Professional dental cleaning is an efficacious and accepted method as a first step in line with strategies to improve oral health and should be considered in nursing home residents.

  2. Understanding the role of the qualified professional: a comparison of medical and dental students' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, H; Ryan, C A; O'Sullivan, E

    2006-10-01

    The Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada developed a competency framework to assist future specialists in responding to challenges as health care providers. The CANMEDs project described 7 essential roles of Specialist Physicians include Health Advocate, Manager, Scholar, Medical Expert, Professional, Communicator and Collaborator (HMSEPC(2)). The object of the current study was to investigate whether medical students and dental students in Ireland recognised these responsibilities as essential to a qualified doctor/dentist. Ninety-eight medical and forty-six dental students (year 1 and year 4) were asked to mind map the responsibilities of qualified doctors/dentists. The comments on the mind map were applied to one of the 7 CANMED roles. There were 484 comments from 128 students. Students had the greatest number of responses referring to the Medical and Dental Expert (257, 30.4%) and Professional (227, 26.9%) roles. This was followed by Communicator (130, 15.4%), Scholar (107, 12.7%) and Health Advocate (82, 9.7%) roles. There were relatively few responses relating to Manager (12, 1.4%) and Collaborator (i.e. teamwork) roles (30, 3.6%). There were no differences in responses between Dental Students and Medical Students and between 1 st year and 4th year students. Similarly there were no differences between the responses of Irish students (n =95; 68%) and International students (n =45; 32%) Students are aware of their responsibilities as Medical or Dental experts (diagnostic and therapeutic skills) for ethical and effective patient care (professional role). They are somewhat aware of the Communicator (therapeutic relationships and effective listening), Scholar (personal continuing education strategies) and Health Advocate (contribute to improved community health) roles. In general they have little concept of the importance of Management skills (utilising resources effectively), and of Collaboration (teamwork and consulting effectively with other

  3. Professional satisfaction among dental practitioners in Ghaziabad city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venisha Pandita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional satisfaction is an important determinant of health worker motivation, retention and performance and are critical improving the functioning of health systems in low-and middle income countries. Objective: To measure professional satisfaction among registered clinical dentists in Ghaziabad city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 107 dentists practicing in clinics. A questionnaire measuring dimensions of professional satisfaction was distributed manually to the participating dentists. All items were written in 5 point Likert format with a score ranging from 5 (strongly satisfied to 1 (strongly dissatisfied. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 19.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA and Student′s t-test measuring the difference of means between the subgroups for each dimension was performed. Results: Analysis showed significant differences (P < 0.05 in levels of satisfaction for various dimensions of professional satisfaction by gender, educational qualification and work status type. There were differences in professional satisfaction between male and female dentists-related to the personal time dimension. Results also showed that postgraduates were more satisfied than graduates. It was reported that full time dentists expressed dissatisfaction in the time spent with their family and leading to troubles in their personal relationships. Conclusion: Overall, dentists have a high level of professional satisfaction and the level of satisfaction is influenced by various socio demographic and psycho-behavioral factors.

  4. Building professional competence in dental hygiene students through a community-based practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, M N; Compton, S M

    2017-11-01

    As Canadians age, there is an increased need for oral health professionals specializing in services for this unique population. Dental hygiene students require exposure to this population to develop professional competencies. This study investigated the dimensions of professional competence that were developed through a practicum for dental hygiene students in long-term care settings while working with older adults. Nine dental hygiene students were recruited across two cohorts. All students completed reflective journals describing their practicum experiences. Five students also participated in an audio-recorded focus group and completed a pre-focus group questionnaire. Additionally, the practicum course coordinator completed an audio-recorded interview. Transcripts and journals were coded using a constant comparative approach and themes were identified. Students described developing client-focused skills, such as effective verbal and non-verbal communication with older adults with dementia. Context-based learning was also a large part of the competency development for the practicum students. Understanding the care environment within which these residents lived helped students to understand and empathize why oral health may not be prioritized. Students also developed an understanding of the work of other health professionals in the settings and improved their abilities to communicate with other healthcare providers. However, students recognized that the utility of those interprofessional skills in private practice may be limited. Dental hygiene students developed personal and ethical competencies during practicum that are highly transferrable across professional settings. Exposure of students to older adult populations in long-term care may increase the likelihood of dental hygienists working in this area. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A survey: how periodontists and other dental professionals view the scope of periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Peter K; Hall, Joshua; Finkelman, Matthew; Park, Angel; Levi, Paul A

    2014-07-01

    How do periodontists think of themselves when they define their practices? How do other dental professionals view the scope of the specialty of periodontology? A strong component of periodontal residency programs is extracting teeth and preserving or building bony ridges for the eventual placement of implants. Has the discipline of periodontology moved away from retaining and treating the natural dentition? By the use of a rank-order survey, the practice of periodontology was defined by periodontists and other dental professionals. In a pilot study, respondents were asked to list the answers to the question, "What is a periodontist?" The results were consolidated into eight statements. The eight statements were placed into an anonymous rank-order survey, and more than 1,200 responses were returned. The responses primarily came from periodontists, hygienists, general practitioners, dental students, and dental hygiene students. "Periodontists surgically treat advanced gum and bone infection problems" was considered the most important statement in all of the cohorts. The least important statement considered by all was, "Periodontists are educators promoting health." Non-periodontist dentists (NPDs) ranked the statement, "Periodontists perform dental implants and related procedures" less importantly (P periodontal therapy done by periodontists increases their therapeutic success for their patients.

  6. Summary of: Mind the gap! A comparison of oral health knowledge between dental, healthcare professionals and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R S

    2014-02-01

    The importance of consistent, accurate and unambiguous messages are well documented in oral health promotion literature. Whether the reality of delivering messages in the field fulfils these principle is questionable. This paper explores the perceptions of dental professionals, healthcare professionals and lay community members with regard to key oral health messages in order to highlight any inconsistencies and knowledge gaps between and within groups for disease risk factors. A questionnaire was administered to individuals who belonged to three groups: dental professionals, healthcare professionals and lay community members. The questionnaire established knowledge regarding risk factors for caries, periodontal disease and erosion. Thirty-five (57.4%) of the dental group answered the whole questionnaire correctly, with 22 (27.8%) and 9 (5.1%) of the healthcare and lay community group answering the whole questionnaire correctly, respectively. The question of fluoride levels in children's toothpaste was the main reason for incorrect answers in the dental group. The results of this survey demonstrate a knowledge gradient from dental professionals through to healthcare professionals and then to lay members of the community. The knowledge base observed in the dental group is reflected in the other two groups as would be expected albeit with a significant gap between each group. As expected the dental professionals are generally well informed, but not as well informed as could be expected.

  7. Factors associated with older adults' need for oral hygiene management by dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shiho; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ohara, Yuki; Edahiro, Ayako; Sato, Emiko; Suga, Takeo; Hirano, Hirohiko

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the need for oral hygiene management by dental professionals among older adults requiring long-term care, and to collect basic data for building a dental treatment framework on a regional level. Although healthcare providers are aware of the importance of oral care for older adults requiring long-term care, reports claim that the provision of oral care is insufficient, and a framework is being built for the provision of oral hygiene management by dental professionals. A survey on lifestyle and oral health was carried out on 372 older adults requiring long-term care in one town in Japan. Binomial logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess factors affecting the need for oral hygiene management. A total of 66.1% of participants required oral hygiene management. The Barthel Index, Clinical Dementia Rating, oral hygiene status and other factors differed significantly with the presence or absence of oral hygiene management need. In addition to variables related to oral hygiene status (dental plaque and tongue coating), factors that significantly affected oral hygiene management need included the Clinical Dementia Rating (odds ratio 2.63, 95% confidence interval 1.08-6.41). The results of the present study suggest that the need for oral hygiene management by dental professionals increases as dementia advances. However, current systems that provide regional dental care are structured based on the level of care need and the degree of independence. A dementia perspective needs to be added to these systems. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 956-962. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. The role of the student professional association in mentoring dental hygiene students for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgeson, Danielle; George, Mary; Nesbit, Samuel; Peterson, Charlotte; Peterson, Diane; Wilder, Rebecca S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the Student American Dental Hygienists' Association (SADHA) in mentoring/developing dental hygiene students for the future. This project also assessed attitudes and practices of SADHA advisors towards the utilization of SADHA as a mechanism for mentoring dental hygiene students' professional development to meet the oral health needs of the public, and the goals of the ADHA. These goals include promotion of education beyond the baccalaureate level to develop qualified faculty, encouraging dental hygiene research, and promoting leadership. The study also evaluated if geographic region and academic setting impacted the utilization of SADHA. After IRB exemption, a pilot-tested questionnaire was administered using Survey Monkey, an online survey website, to 277 individual contacts at Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) accredited dental hygiene programs. A response rate of 68% was achieved with 186 individual responses. Eighty percent of respondents indicated offering no mentoring opportunities outside of the curriculum, while incongruously, 58.3% felt they actively mentor through SADHA. When asked what the main focus of SADHA should be, SADHA advisors ranked community service/philanthropy as number one. SADHA chapters at institutions that offer a Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene (BSDH) degree completion program offer more mentoring opportunities (p= or conversion rate than other regions (p=.018). SADHA advisors do not agree on how SADHA should be utilized. The majority of SADHA chapters are not offering mentoring opportunities outside of the traditional curriculum for leadership and career development. What is clear is that both students and advisors desire more interaction with the local ADHA components and constituents. In order to address these issues, efforts should be made to provide networking support among SADHA advisors and increase faculty perception of the importance of the professional

  9. Dentistry – a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Methods Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. Results A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career. Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'. Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future

  10. Understanding continuous professional development participation and choice of mid-career general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T; Wassif, H S

    2017-02-01

    Participating in continuing professional development (CPD) activities is a requirement for dental practitioners to keep their skills and knowledge up to date. Understanding the ways dental practitioners engage with professional development and the impact on practice is not fully known (Eaton et al. 2011, http://www.gdc-uk.org/Aboutus/policy/Documents/Impact%20Of%20CPD%20In%20Dentistry.pdf). The aim of this study was to gain insights into the ways that dentists reflect on their professional development and what may be influencing their choices. Empirical qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviewing of five mid-career dentists. Using grounded theory, the data were analysed for themes about CPD choice and participation. Three themes were identified as influences to dentists' choices of CPD with pragmatic considerations of how new learning could benefit their patients and their practices. Dental practitioners were influenced by the requirements of external regulatory bodies which they did not consider to necessarily improve practice. Dentists working in primary care in the UK are undertaking CPD which is influenced by the pragmatic requirements of running a small business and to meet regulatory requirements. In this sample, dentists are not critically reflecting on their education needs when choosing their CPD activity. Protected learning time and organisational feedback and support are recommended as a way to promote more meaningful reflection on learning and to improve professional development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The emerging dental workforce: why dentistry? A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their professional career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nairn HF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental graduates are joining a profession experiencing changes in systems of care, funding and skill mix. Research into the motivation and expectations of the emerging workforce is vital to inform professional and policy decisions. The objective of this research was to investigate final year dental students' perceived motivation for their choice of career in relation to sex, ethnicity and mode of entry. Methods Self-administered questionnaire survey of all final year dental students at King's College London. Data were entered into SPSS; statistical analysis included Chi Squared tests for linear association, multiple regression, factor analysis and logistic regression. Results A response of 90% (n = 126 was achieved. The majority were aged 23 years (59%, female (58% and Asian (70%. One in 10 were mature students. Eighty per cent identified 11 or more 'important' or 'very important' influences, the most common of which were related to features of the job: 'regular working hours' (91%, 'degree leading to recognised job' (90% and 'job security' (90%. There were significant differences in important influences by sex (males > females: 'able to run own business'; females > males: 'a desire to work with people', ethnic group (Asians > white: 'wish to provide public service', 'influence of friends', 'desire to work in healthcare', having 'tried an alternative career/course' and 'work experience' and mode of entry (mature > early entry: 'a desire to work with people'. Multivariate analysis suggested 61% of the variation in influences is explained by five factors: the 'professional job' (31%, 'healthcare-people' (11%, 'academic-scientific' (8%, 'careers-advising' (6%, and 'family/friends' (6%. The single major influence on choice of career was a 'desire to work with people'; Indian students were twice as likely to report this as white or other ethnic groups. Conclusion Final year dental students report a wide range of important

  12. Creating research and development awareness among dental care professionals by use of strategic communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morténius, Helena; Twetman, Svante

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of contemporary research advances, only a limited fraction is implemented into dental practice. One possible way to facilitate this process is to stimulate the research and development (R&D) awareness and interest with aid of strategic communication. METHODS......: The aim of the study was to analyse the role of a strategic communication in R&D awareness and interest among dental care professionals (DCP) over a 12-year period. A second aim was to compare the findings with those from primary care professionals (PCP). The project had a prospective design...... and the intervention was conducted through established oral, written and digital channels. The outcome was captured by two validated questionnaires submitted after 7 and 12 years, respectively. An additional Questionnaire file shows the details [see Additional file 1]. The material consisted of 599 health care...

  13. Knowledge and awareness of the Consumer Protection Act among dental professionals in India: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurminder; Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Singh, Simarpreet; Talwar, Puneet Singh; Munjal, Vaibhav

    2014-07-01

    The medical profession has been included in the Consumer Protection Act (CPA), to protect the interests of the patients in case of any unethical treatment rendered by the doctor. The present systematic review was conducted to assess the knowledge and awareness of CPA among dental professionals in India. A systematic review of relevant cross-sectional observational studies was conducted regarding the level of knowledge and awareness of CPA among dental professionals in India. Five studies out of 44 were finally included in the present review, after conducting both an electronic and manual search of scientific databases. The potential biases were reported and appropriate data was extracted by the concerned investigators. More than 90% of the study subjects in one of the studies were aware of the CPA, as compared to other studies. In two studies, when queried about the correct time period during which a patient can sue a doctor, very few subjects (18 and 23.2%) answered correctly. Almost 90% of the subjects were taking some form of consent in one of the studies. Private practitioners had more awareness as compared to academicians and combined practitioners. The results of the present review showed that a majority of the subjects were aware of the existence of CPA, but knowledge about the basic rules and regulations was lacking in a few studies. Therefore, dental professionals need to keep themselves updated on the various rules and latest amendments to save themselves from any litigation.

  14. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Graduate Students' and Faculty Perspectives on Dental Hygienists' Professional Role and the Potential Contribution of a Peer Teaching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Martha J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    The changing role of dental hygienists deserves dental and dental hygiene educators' attention. The first aim of this survey study was to assess University of Michigan dental, dental hygiene, and graduate students' and faculty members' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles; their attitudes and behaviors related to clinical interactions between dental and dental hygiene students; and perceived benefits of engaging dental hygiene students as peer teachers for dental students. The second aim was to assess whether one group of dental students' experiences with dental hygiene student peer teaching affected their perceptions of the dental hygiene profession. Survey respondents were 57 dental hygiene students in all three years of the program (response rate 60% to 100%); 476 dental students in all four years (response rate 56% to 100%); 28 dental and dental hygiene graduate students (response rate 28%); and 67 dental and dental hygiene faculty members (response rate 56%). Compared to the other groups, dental students reported the lowest average number of services dental hygienists can provide (p≤0.001) and the lowest average number of patient groups for which dental hygienists can provide periodontal care (ppeer teaching (ppeer teaching. After experiencing dental hygiene student peer teaching, the dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles, attitudes about clinical interactions with dental hygienists, and perceived benefits of dental hygiene student peer teachers improved and were more positive than the responses of their peers with no peer teaching experiences. These results suggest that dental hygiene student peer teaching may improve dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles and attitudes about intraprofessional care.

  15. Oral health-related complications of breast cancer treatment: assessing dental hygienists' knowledge and professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists' knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the state of Michigan (n=962). The survey assessed the respondents' knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After 2 mailings, the response rate was 37% (n=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge concerning the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the potential oral side effects is up to date. Results indicate a need for more education about the oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment.

  16. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2017-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:26338905

  17. STUDY OF INDICATORS OF AMYLOLYTIC ACTIVITY OF MOUTH FLUID OF DENTAL HEALTHCARE WORKERS UNDER VARIOUS CONDITIONS OF PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Melnikova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Amylolytic activity indicators of oral liquid of dentists in different conditions of professional activity at outpatient dental care and lectures have been studied. We observed an increase in amylolytic activity of oral liquid of dentists men and women after outpatient dental care, that indicates the activation of the sympathetic-adrenal system in response to the professional stress. We also identified the gender-specific response to the α-amylase load in professional dentists: male amylolytic activity of oral fluid was higher than female. In the group of male and female dentist cadets we registered the decrease of amylolytic activity of oral fluid. The correlation analysis revealed a negative relationship between the level of α-amylase and rigidity in a group of male dentists. We suggested that male dentists reduced their adaptation to the psychosocial conditions under job stress. Keywords: dentist, professional activity, professional stress, outpatient dental care, lectures, amylolytic activity of oral fluid.

  18. Second and third year oral health and dental student perceptions of future professional work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A S; Anderson, V R; Foster Page, L A

    2013-11-01

    To explore and compare the ways dental and oral health students characterise their future professional work (FPW) at the end of their second and third professional years. Questionnaires were given to a cohort group of 48 dental students and 31 oral health students at the end of their second and third professional years at the University of Otago. Students' characterisations of their FPW were identified using an inductive approach, and the emphasis on each characterisation was confirmed using a 'weighted' table. Dental student response rates were 92% (in 2010) and 85% (in 2011); and oral health student response rates were 100% (in 2011) and 97% (in 2011). Students characterised their FPW in ten broad ways: in reference to treatment-related concerns, patient-related concerns, oral health promotion, oral health education, disease prevention and monitoring, communication, teamwork, maintaining an ideal clinical environment, maintaining a sense of self and improving quality of life. In both years, dental students emphasised treatment-related concerns as central to their FPW and dealing with patient-related concerns as a primary source of difficulty. Oral health students emphasised oral health promotion, oral health education, disease prevention and monitoring and restorative tasks as central to their FPW and dealing with patient-related concerns as a primary source of difficulty. Students' broad perceptions of their FPW changed little as they progressed through their programmes; however, their responses suggested the need for greater attention within their programmes to patient management and teamwork. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Awareness of biomedical waste management among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in Amritsar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ramandeep S; Manchanda, Adesh; Singh, Simarpreet; Verma, Nitin; Padda, Sarfaraz

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine awareness of biomedical waste (BMW) management policies and practices among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in a dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar, India, to inform the development of future policies for effective implementation of BMW rules. The study involved 160 staff members at the Amritsar hospital/clinics (80 dentists and 80 auxiliary staff) to whom a questionnaire was distributed regarding policies, practices and awareness relating to BMW. The questionnaire was first piloted. Completed questionnaires were returned anonymously. The resulting data were statistically tested using the chi-square test for differences between the dentists and auxiliary staff. In respect of BMW management policies, there was a highly significant difference in the responses of the dentists, whose answers suggested far greater knowledge than that of the auxiliaries (Pmanagement practices, the dentists were significantly more aware (Pwaste collection in the hospital and the disposal of various items into different colour-coded bags. As for employee education/awareness, there was a significant difference (Pmanagement among dental auxiliary staff in the dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar and a lack of awareness of some aspects among dentists who work in the hospital/clinics. The results provide the hospital authorities with data upon which they can develop a strategy for improving BMW management.

  20. Faculty professional development in emergent pedagogies for instructional innovation in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Bender, D; Nadershahi, N

    2017-05-01

    Innovative pedagogies have significantly impacted health professions' education, dental education included. In this context, faculty, defined in this study as instructor in higher education, has been increasingly required to hone their instructional skills. The purpose of this exploratory study was to share the design, implementation and preliminary outcomes of two programmes to enhance dental faculty's instructional skills, the Teaching and Learning Seminar Series and the Course Director Orientation. Data sources included faculty and student surveys developed and administered by the researchers; data extracted from the learning management system; reports from the learning analytics tool; and classroom observations. Participants' satisfaction, self-reported learning, instructional behavioural change, and impact on student learning behaviours and institutional practice were assessed borrowing from Kirkpatrick's 4-level model of evaluation of professional development effectiveness. Initial findings showed that faculty in both programmes reported positive learning experiences. Participants reported that the programmes motivated them to improve instructional practice and improved their knowledge of instructional innovation. Some faculty reported implementation of new instructional strategies and tools, which helped create an active and interactive learning environment that was welcomed by their students. The study contributes to literature and best practice in health sciences faculty development in pedagogy and may guide other dental schools in designing professional development programmes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Analysis of the ethical aspects of professional confidentiality in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Garbin, Artênio José Isper; Saliba, Nemre Adas; de Lima, Daniela Coelho; de Macedo, Ana Paula Ayala

    2008-01-01

    From the point of view of deontological ethics, privacy is a moral right that patients are entitled to and it is bound to professional confidentiality. Otherwise, the information given by patients to health professionals would not be reliable and a trustable relationship could not be established. The aim of the present study was to assess, by means of questionnaires with open and closed questions, the awareness and attitudes of 100 dentists working in the city of Andradina, São Paulo State, Brazil, with respect to professional confidentiality in dental practice. Most dentists (91.43%) reported to have instructed their assistants on professional confidentiality. However, 44.29% of the interviewees showed to act contradictorily as reported talking about the clinical cases of their patients to their friends or spouses. The great majority of professionals (98.57%) believed that it is important to have classes on Ethics and Bioethics during graduation and, when asked about their knowledge of the penalties imposed for breach of professional confidentiality, only 48.57% of them declared to be aware of it. Only 28.57% of the interviewees affirmed to have exclusive access to the files; 67.14% reported that that files were also accessed by their secretary; 1.43% answered that their spouses also had access, and 2.86% did not answer. From the results of the present survey, it could be observed that, although dentists affirmed to be aware of professional confidentiality, their attitudes did not adhere to ethical and legal requirements. This stand of health professionals has contributed to violate professional ethics and the law itself, bringing problems both to the professional and to the patient.

  2. Analysis of the ethical aspects of professional confidentiality in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view of deontological ethics, privacy is a moral right that patients are entitled to and it is bound to professional confidentiality. Otherwise, the information given by patients to health professionals would not be reliable and a trustable relationship could not be established. The aim of the present study was to assess, by means of questionnaires with open and closed questions, the awareness and attitudes of 100 dentists working in the city of Andradina, São Paulo State, Brazil, with respect to professional confidentiality in dental practice. Most dentists (91.43% reported to have instructed their assistants on professional confidentiality. However, 44.29% of the interviewees showed to act contradictorily as reported talking about the clinical cases of their patients to their friends or spouses. The great majority of professionals (98.57% believed that it is important to have classes on Ethics and Bioethics during graduation and, when asked about their knowledge of the penalties imposed for breach of professional confidentiality, only 48.57% of them declared to be aware of it. Only 28.57% of the interviewees affirmed to have exclusive access to the files; 67.14% reported that that files were also accessed by their secretary; 1.43% answered that their spouses also had access, and 2.86% did not answer. From the results of the present survey, it could be observed that, although dentists affirmed to be aware of professional confidentiality, their attitudes did not adhere to ethical and legal requirements. This stand of health professionals has contributed to violate professional ethics and the law itself, bringing problems both to the professional and to the patient.

  3. Perceived learned skills and professional development of graduates from a master in dental public health programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, S; Delgado-Angulo, E K; Bernabé, E

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the impact of a training programme is important for quality assurance and further development. It also can helps with accountability and marketing purposes. This study evaluated the impact of King's College London (KCL) Master of Science programme in Dental Public Health in terms of graduates' perceived learned skills and professional development. An online questionnaire was sent to individuals who completed successfully the KCL Master of Science programme in Dental Public Health and had a valid email address. Participants provided information on demographic characteristics, perceived learned skills (intellectual, practical and generic) and professional development (type of organisation, position in the organisation and functions performed at work before and after the programme). Learned skills' scores were compared by demographic factors in multiple linear regression models, and the distribution of responses on career development was compared using nonparametric tests for paired groups. Although all scores on learned skills were on the favourable side of the Likert scale, graduates reported higher scores for practical skills, followed by intellectual and generic skills. No differences in scores were found by sex, age, nationality or time since graduation. In terms of career development, there were significantly higher proportions of graduates working in higher education institutions and taking leadership/managerial roles in organisations as well as greater number and variety of functions at work after than before the programme. This online survey shows that the programme has had a positive impact on graduates in terms of perceived learned skills and professional development. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Dental Education Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of professional dental prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet on the cariogenic microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LANZA Célia Regina Moreira

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of professional dental prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet on salivary counting of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in 32 children ranging from 7 to 10 years of age, has been assessed. Whole stimulated saliva was collected before the prophylaxis, immediately after it and 30 days later, and the number of CFU/ml in the saliva was detected through the Caritest system. A statistically significant immediate decrease on salivary levels of both microorganisms was observed, 50% for mutans streptococci and 27% for lactobacilli. For mutans streptococci this decrease continued through the 30 days period; the same did not occur with lactobacilli, that returned to their baseline values.

  5. The value of inter-professional education: a comparative study of dental technology students' perceptions across four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J; Henderson, A J; Sun, J; Haugen, H; Myhrer, T; Maryan, C; Ivanow, K N; Cameron, A; Johnson, N W

    2015-04-24

    The ability to function as an effective member of a dental care team is a highly desirable--frequently mandated--attribute of dental technology (DT) graduates. Currently, there is little rigorous examination of how the learning of team-working skills might best be structured in a DT curriculum. This research compares DT curricula, and students' attitudes and perceptions regarding collaboration in practice, from four countries. Students (n=376) were invited to complete an education profile questionnaire, and the standardised measure--the shared learning scale. There were 196 (52%) responses. Students given opportunities to engage with others had better perceptions of inter-professional learning (IPL). Most believed that team-work and collaborative skills were best acquired by learning together with other dental care professionals, preferably sharing cases for real patients. Curricula should maximise opportunities for dental technology students to experience authentic IPL. Collaboration and team-work needs to be embedded through the whole undergraduate programme.

  6. Insights into Ergonomics Among Dental Professionals of a Dental Institute and Private Practitioners in Hubli–Dharwad Twin Cities, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivardhan Kalghatgi

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Participants had considerable awareness and behavior toward ergonomics in dental practice. The high attitude score indicates stronger acceptance of ergonomics principles and guidelines during routine dental procedures. The current study highlights the situation of ergonomics in dental practice in the form of knowledge, attitude, and practices.

  7. Work experiences, professional development and career prospects of New Zealand dental house surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jenny J; Antoun, Joseph S

    2010-12-01

    New dental graduates compete for house surgeon positions every year, despite little being known about the work experience gained from such posts. The main objectives of this study were to identify the nature of house surgeons' work experiences, their continued professional development (CPD) opportunities and the impact of hospital experience on their future career pathways. A questionnaire was mailed to all 31 New Zealand dental house surgeons (response rate 100%). The majority of house surgeons (77.4%) found hospital work enjoyable, with nearly all (93.5%) perceiving themselves as better clinicians from their experience. Oral surgery, restorative dentistry, special needs dentistry and removable prosthodontics were the most commonly practised areas. The average weekly number of working hours was 42.3 hours for a normal week and 61.8 hours for an on-call week. Stress levels during on-call work were significantly higher than during day-to-day hospital work (p career, with nearly 13% wishing to return to a New Zealand hospital in the future. A dental house surgeon position remains an attractive choice and offers an enjoyable experience for young graduates. Hospitals provide ample CPD opportunities and appear to play an influential role in a house surgeon's career pathway.

  8. Gender differences in dental students' professional expectations and attitudes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Graça Kfouri, M; Moysés, S T; Gabardo, M C L; Moysés, S J

    2017-09-22

    Introduction With the significant increase of women in dentistry, the profile of the dental professional has been altered.Aim To investigate the discourses of future dental surgeons, of both genders, from public and private universities of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, to detect whether gender profile differences can influence training and intended future practice.Methods The problem is approached using a qualitative design, with the strategy of collective interviews in focus groups followed by a discourse analysis.Results Women choose dentistry mainly because they like working with people and want to have formal employment in the future. Male discourses show a desire for professional status, worthy business prospects, and the flexibility of being self-employed. The analysis of the university education process revealed that men desire learning that is more technical, besides knowledge on business management, whereas women still complain of current prejudices in the personal relationships that exist with teaching staff and colleagues.Conclusion The teaching process, based on the technique-driven biomedical model, has not reached an ideal standard for the female gender in terms of training, which would be a model based on empathy and good relationships with human beings.

  9. Methylmercury and elemental mercury differentially associate with blood pressure among dental professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Wang, Yi; Gillespie, Brenda; Werner, Robert; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2013-01-01

    Methylmercury-associated effects on the cardiovascular system have been documented though discrepancies exist, and most studied populations experience elevated methylmercury exposures. No paper has investigated the impact of low-level elemental (inorganic) mercury exposure on cardiovascular risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to increase understanding of the association between mercury exposure (methylmercury and elemental mercury) and blood pressure measures in a cohort of dental professionals that experience background exposures to both mercury forms. Dental professionals were recruited during the 2010 Michigan Dental Association Annual Convention. Mercury levels in hair and urine samples were analyzed as biomarkers of methylmercury and elemental mercury exposure, respectively. Blood pressure (systolic, diastolic) was measured using an automated device. Distribution of mercury in hair (mean, range: 0.45, 0.02–5.18 μg/g) and urine (0.94, 0.03–5.54 μg/L) correspond well with the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Linear regression models revealed significant associations between diastolic blood pressure (adjusted for blood pressure medication use) and hair mercury (n = 262, p = 0.02). Urine mercury results opposed hair mercury in many ways. Notably, elemental mercury exposure was associated with a significant systolic blood pressure decrease (n = 262, p = 0.04) that was driven by the male population. Associations between blood pressure and two forms of mercury were found at exposure levels relevant to the general population, and associations varied according to type of mercury exposure and gender. PMID:22494934

  10. Internet resources for dentistry: government and medical sites for the dental professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, G F

    2000-02-15

    As society transitions deeper into the Information Age, Information Technology has become a critical tool that supports all facets of the global economy. The Internet, via the World-Wide Web (WWW), has become a major component of business operations for corporate and educational organizational entities. An estimated 10,000 or more health-related websites are providing information for both consumers and healthcare professionals. In addition to private and state-supported institutions being present on the Internet, the federal government has moved rapidly toward disseminating information electronically, with significant utilization of the WWW as the technological vehicle. All branches of the US Government and federal-related agencies are now represented on the Internet in an effort to deliver content to their end users, primarily the public. The intent of this article is to complement the previous publication, "Internet Resources for Dentistry: Utilization of the Internet to Support Professional Growth, Decision Making, and Patient Care," by presenting dental healthcare professionals with information on additional governmental and medical "Internet" sites. In addition, healthcare professionals must arm themselves with more than just access itself, but also the ability to critically judge the quality of information retrieved from the WWW.

  11. Promoting professional behaviour in undergraduate medical, dental and veterinary curricula in the Netherlands: evaluation of a joint effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luijk, S.J.; Gorter, R.C.; van Mook, W.N.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: From 2002 onwards, a nationwide working group of representatives from all medical (8), dental (3) and veterinary medicine (1) schools collaborated in order to develop and implement recommendations for teaching and assessing professional behaviour. Aim: The aim of this article is to

  12. Accreditation of professionals for radiological protection in medical and dental radiology at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teogenes A. da; Pereira, Elton G.; Alonso, Thessa C.; Guedes, Elton C.; Goncalves, Elaine C.; Nogueira, Maria Angela A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of the CDTN/CNEN as far as the radiological protection services in the medical and dental radiology has changed a lot due to the new Regulatory Directives. The CDTN/CNEN was recognized as the regional reference center for providing not only radiological survey services, but to coordinate an accreditation procedure for professional persons to be accepted by the State Regulatory Authorities to work at Minas Gerais. All the new activities were formalized in a Cooperation Agreement between the CDTN/CNEN and the Regulatory Authority. This paper describes the accreditation procedure for candidates, the adopted requirements, the intercomparison results among measuring instruments and the main achievements during the first year of the Agreement. (author)

  13. Essential professional duties for the sub-Saharan medical/dental graduate: An Association of Medical Schools of Africa initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapade-Olaopa, E O; Sewankambo, N; Iputo, J E; Rugarabamu, P; Amlak, A H; Mipando, M; Monekosso G L

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND - Globally, human resources for health are being optimized to address the increasing health burden and concomitant increased demands on health professionals. These demands are even more exacting in Sub-SaharanAfrica considering the shortage of health care workers, especially physicians. The noteworthy efforts at deploying task-shifting to address this situation not-withstanding, the situation also signals the need to re-define the objectives of medical instruction to ensure effective and contemporary medical practice in a mostly physician-led health workforce across the sub-continent. In this regard, medical and dental graduates must be educated to perform certain minimum essential professional duties competently. Essential Professional Duties are locally relevant professional activities of international standard that represent identifiable outcomes against which the effectiveness of physicians in a specific community can be measured to ensure social accountability. PROCEDURE AND PRODUCT - The Association of Medical Schools of Africa has developed the 'Essential Professional Duties for sub-Saharan medical and dental graduates' to ensure these physicians provide safe and effective contemporary medical/dental practice on the sub-continent. The duties have been grouped into those required for basic patient care, basic administrative skills, basic emergency care, communication, inter-professional relationships, self-directed learning and social responsibilities. Their relevance and suitability have been evaluated prior to their adoption by the Association. CONCLUSION; These Essential Physician Duties have been developed to serve as targets for health professionals training instruments and thus give direction to health system strategies. It is hoped that they will be adopted by medical and dental schools across sub-,. Saharan Africa.

  14. Glutathione enzyme and selenoprotein polymorphisms associate with mercury biomarker levels in Michigan dental professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Wang, Yi [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gillespie, Brenda [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Werner, Robert [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, 325 E. Eisenhower Parkway Suite 100, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 (United States); Franzblau, Alfred [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Basu, Niladri, E-mail: niladri@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Mercury is a potent toxicant of concern to both the general public and occupationally exposed workers (e.g., dentists). Recent studies suggest that several genes mediating the toxicokinetics of mercury are polymorphic in humans and may influence inter-individual variability in mercury accumulation. This work hypothesizes that polymorphisms in key glutathione synthesizing enzyme, glutathione s-transferase, and selenoprotein genes underlie inter-individual differences in mercury body burden as assessed by analytical mercury measurement in urine and hair, biomarkers of elemental mercury and methylmercury, respectively. Urine and hair samples were collected from a population of dental professionals (n = 515), and total mercury content was measured. Average urine (1.06 {+-} 1.24 ug/L) and hair mercury levels (0.49 {+-} 0.63 ug/g) were similar to national U.S. population averages. Taqman assays were used to genotype DNA from buccal swab samples at 15 polymorphic sites in genes implicated in mercury metabolism. Linear regression modeling assessed the ability of polymorphisms to modify the relationship between mercury biomarker levels and exposure sources (e.g., amalgams, fish consumption). Five polymorphisms were significantly associated with urine mercury levels (GSTT1 deletion), hair mercury levels (GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, GSS 5 Prime ), or both (SEPP1 3 Prime UTR). Overall, this study suggests that polymorphisms in selenoproteins and glutathione-related genes may influence elimination of mercury in the urine and hair or mercury retention following exposures to elemental mercury (via dental amalgams) and methylmercury (via fish consumption). -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the influence of 15 polymorphisms on urine and hair Hg levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Urine and hair Hg levels in dental professionals were similar to the US population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTT1 and SEPP1 polymorphisms associated with urine Hg levels. Black

  15. Glutathione enzyme and selenoprotein polymorphisms associate with mercury biomarker levels in Michigan dental professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Wang, Yi; Gillespie, Brenda; Werner, Robert; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is a potent toxicant of concern to both the general public and occupationally exposed workers (e.g., dentists). Recent studies suggest that several genes mediating the toxicokinetics of mercury are polymorphic in humans and may influence inter-individual variability in mercury accumulation. This work hypothesizes that polymorphisms in key glutathione synthesizing enzyme, glutathione s-transferase, and selenoprotein genes underlie inter-individual differences in mercury body burden as assessed by analytical mercury measurement in urine and hair, biomarkers of elemental mercury and methylmercury, respectively. Urine and hair samples were collected from a population of dental professionals (n = 515), and total mercury content was measured. Average urine (1.06 ± 1.24 ug/L) and hair mercury levels (0.49 ± 0.63 ug/g) were similar to national U.S. population averages. Taqman assays were used to genotype DNA from buccal swab samples at 15 polymorphic sites in genes implicated in mercury metabolism. Linear regression modeling assessed the ability of polymorphisms to modify the relationship between mercury biomarker levels and exposure sources (e.g., amalgams, fish consumption). Five polymorphisms were significantly associated with urine mercury levels (GSTT1 deletion), hair mercury levels (GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, GSS 5′), or both (SEPP1 3′UTR). Overall, this study suggests that polymorphisms in selenoproteins and glutathione-related genes may influence elimination of mercury in the urine and hair or mercury retention following exposures to elemental mercury (via dental amalgams) and methylmercury (via fish consumption). -- Highlights: ► We explore the influence of 15 polymorphisms on urine and hair Hg levels. ► Urine and hair Hg levels in dental professionals were similar to the US population. ► GSTT1 and SEPP1 polymorphisms associated with urine Hg levels. ► Accumulation of Hg in hair following exposure from fish was modified by genotype. ► GSTP1, GSS

  16. HIV transmission in the dental setting and the HIV-infected oral health care professional: workshop 1C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flint, S R

    2011-04-01

    This workshop addressed two important issues: first, the global evidence of HIV transmission from health care provider to patient and from patient to health care provider in the general health care environment and the dental practice setting; second, in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, whether oral health care professionals living with HIV pose a risk of transmission to their patients and whether standard infection control is adequate to protect both the patient and the oral health care professional in dental practice. The workshop culminated in a general discussion and the formulation of a consensus statement from the participating delegates, representing more than 30 countries, on the criteria under which an HIV-infected oral health care professional might practice dentistry without putting patients at risk. This consensus statement, the Beijing Declaration, was agreed nem con.

  17. Interventions for enhancing the distribution of dental professionals: a concise systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Ralf; van den Berg, Neeltje; Schwendicke, Falk

    2017-10-01

    A spatially unequal distribution of dentists or dental care professionals (D/DCPs), such as therapists or hygienists, could reduce the quality of health services and increase health inequities. This review describes the interventions available to enhance this spatial distribution and systematically assesses their effectiveness. Electronic databases (Cochrane CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, CINAHL) were searched and cross-referencing was performed using a standardised searching algorithm. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies and interrupted time series were included. Studies investigating a minimum of one of four interventions (educational, financial, regulatory and supportive) were included. The primary outcome was the spatial distribution of D/DCPs. Secondary outcomes were access, quality of services and equity or adverse effects. This review was registered (CRD42015026265). Of 4,885 articles identified, the full text of 201 was assessed and three (all investigating national policy interventions originally not aiming to change the distribution of D/DCPs) were included. In one Japanese study spanning 1980 to 2000, the unequal spatial distribution of dentists decreased alongside a general increase in the number of dentists. It remained unclear if these findings were associated. In a second Japanese study, an increase in the number of dentists was found in combination with a postgraduate training programme implemented in 2006, and this occurred alongside an increasingly unequal distribution of dentists, again without proof of cause and consequence. A third study from Taiwan found the introduction of a national universal-coverage health insurance to equalise the distribution of dentists, with statistical association between this equalisation and the introduction of the insurance. The effectiveness of interventions to enhance the spatial distribution of D/DCPs remains unclear. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Stem cells in dentistry: A study regarding awareness of stem cells among dental professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Parita K Chitroda; Girish Katti; Nikhat M Attar; Syed Shahbaz; G Sreenivasarao; Ambika Patil

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dental stem cell, a type of adult stem cell, exhibits multipotent differentiation capacity and is drawing worldwide attention because of its numerous applications. The advances in applications of dental stem cells seem to be unsurpassed in the near future, for which specialized skills and knowledge in this arena are of prime significance. Hence, there is a need to acquire more knowledge about dental stem cells to obtain maximum benefits from it in the coming years. Dental stem cel...

  19. Knowledge of the management of paediatric dental traumas by non-dental professionals in emergency rooms in South Araucanía, Temuco, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jaime; Bustos, Luís; Herrera, Samira; Sepulveda, Jaqueline

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge and attitudes regarding first aid for dental trauma in children (TDI) by non-dental professionals and paramedical technicians of hospital emergency rooms in the South Araucanía Health Service, Chile, which was attained through application of a survey. Samples were collected from people with occupations in the respective emergency rooms. The participants were 82 people that were interviewed using a questionnaire regarding management of dental trauma. Paramedic technicians, general and specialist doctors, and nurses were included in this survey. The appraisal covered diverse aspects: birth date, age, sex, years of experience in the emergency room, and questions regarding specific dental trauma topics, which focused on crown fractures, luxation injuries in permanent dentition, avulsion in primary and permanent teeth, and the respective emergency treatments. Of the participants, 78.1% reported to have been presented with a TDI patient. The majority (90.2%) had not received formal training on TDI. These results revealed a wide distribution of responses. The overall dental trauma knowledge among the participants was relatively poor. For crown fractures management 54.9% indicated that they would ask the affected child about the crown remnants. In regard to transport and storage medium of avulsed permanent teeth, only 9.8% of the participants answered correctly and 43.9% of respondents stated that they would not replant an avulsed permanent tooth, since that procedure is considered the responsibility of a dentist. The majority of the respondents were not knowledgeable regarding TDI or the management and benefits of timely care, particularly in cases of avulsed permanent teeth. Therefore, formal education and training on the topic is suggested during undergraduate studies.

  20. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Associated With Job Contentment in Dental Professionals: Indian Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Background High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional ther...

  1. Creating research and development awareness among dental care professionals by use of strategic communication: a 12-year intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena; Twetman, Svante

    2017-12-29

    Despite the availability of contemporary research advances, only a limited fraction is implemented into dental practice. One possible way to facilitate this process is to stimulate the research and development (R&D) awareness and interest with aid of strategic communication. The aim of the study was to analyse the role of a strategic communication in R&D awareness and interest among dental care professionals (DCP) over a 12-year period. A second aim was to compare the findings with those from primary care professionals (PCP). The project had a prospective design and the intervention was conducted through established oral, written and digital channels. The outcome was captured by two validated questionnaires submitted after 7 and 12 years, respectively. An additional Questionnaire file shows the details [see Additional file 1]. The material consisted of 599 health care professionals (205 DCP; 394 PCP) that responded to the first questionnaire and 526 individuals (195 DCP; 331 PCP) who responded to the second. All were employed by the primary care organization of Region Halland located in southwest of Sweden. The majority were women (≥ 85%) and the mean age at the first questionnaire was 49 years (SD 8.5). Longitudinal analyses were applied to those individuals that responded to both surveys after 7 and 12 years (n = 248). Comparisons between DCP's and PCP's were processed with Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests. Strategic communication contributed to increase the R&D awareness and interest among the dental personnel. The created interest was reported stronger among the DCP when compared with PCP at both surveys (p Strategic communication can be employed as a scientific tool that may contribute to the creation of a long-term R&D awareness and interest among dental care professionals.

  2. Professional dental and oral surgery liability in Italy: a comparative analysis of the insurance products offered to health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Paternoster, Mariano; Nugnes, Mariarosaria; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Graziano, Vincenzo; Niola, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In Italy there has been an increase in claims for damages for alleged medical malpractice. A study was therefore conducted that aimed at assessing the content of the coverage of insurance policy contracts offered to oral health professionals by the insurance market. The sample analysed composed of 11 insurance policy contracts for professional dental liability offered from 2010 to 2015 by leading insurance companies operating in the Italian market. The insurance products analysed are structured on the "claims made" clause. No policy contract examined covers the damage due to the failure to acquire consent for dental treatment and, in most cases, damage due to unsatisfactory outcomes of treatment of an aesthetic nature and the failure to respect regulatory obligations on privacy. On entering into a professional liability insurance policy contract, the dentist should pay particular attention to the period covered by the guarantee, the risks both covered and excluded, as well as the extent of the limit of liability and any possible fixed/percentage excess. When choosing a professional liability contract, a dentist should examine the risks in relation to the professional activity carried out before signing.

  3. Rural placement experiences in dental education and the impact on professional intentions and employment outcomes-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G; Wright, F C; Foster, K; Blinkhorn, A

    2017-11-23

    The availability of clinical dental services in rural locations is a major concern for many countries as dental care professionals gravitate to work in metropolitan areas. This systematic review examines the literature on Rural Placement Programs within dentistry and their impact on workforce intentions and employment outcomes. The review provides a detailed analysis of the methodological characteristics of the literature, considers the quality of the evidence and compares the outcomes within an international context. The systematic review identified published literature between 2005 and 2016 from databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed, NursingOVID and Cochrane. The PRISMA protocol was adopted for the development of the study, and the Health Gains Notation Framework was implemented to assess the quality of the selected research papers. Eleven studies considering Rural Clinical Placement Programs met the inclusion criteria. The studies were from Australia, South Africa, United States, Thailand and India. The evidence in this review indicates that well-designed, financially supported programmes that provide a perceived valuable clinical experience, good supervision and professional support in a rural environment can lead to dental students stating increased intentions to working in a rural location. However, there was a lack of evidence and research into whether these rural intentions result in positive action to take up employment in a rural location. The evidence suggests that well-prepared rural clinical placements, which have experienced clinical supervisors, good professional student support from the dental school, provide a valuable clinical experience and are sufficiently funded, can increase intentions to work in a rural location upon graduation. However, there is a lack of evidence in dentistry into whether intentions translate into practitioners taking clinical positions in a rural location. Future research should be planned, which will undertake

  4. Systematic review of the effectiveness of continuing dental professional development on learning, behavior, or patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmstone, Victoria R; Elley, Karen M; Skrybant, Magdalena T; Fry-Smith, Anne; Bayliss, Sue; Torgerson, Carole J

    2013-03-01

    This study is based on a systematic review of studies using a randomized controlled trial or quasi-experimental design in order to synthesize existing evidence evaluating the effectiveness of continuing professional development (CPD) interventions in dentistry on learning gains, behavior change, or patient outcomes. The authors searched a range of electronic databases from 1986 to the present and screened all potentially relevant studies for inclusion, using pre-established inclusion/exclusion criteria. Following data extraction and quality appraisal of all included studies, a narrative synthesis of the studies was undertaken. Ten studies (in fourteen articles) were included. All were evaluation studies of CPD interventions targeted exclusively at dentists. The ten included studies evaluated a range of interventions: courses/workshops, written information, CAL, audit/self-reflection, face-to-face support, and black box combinations of these interventions. Two high- and moderately high-quality studies evaluated CAL CPD for dentists and found equivocal impact of CAL for dentists. A black box combination of interventions was rigorously evaluated and showed moderate impact on patient care. This finding suggests that multimethod and multiphased CPD has potential for the greatest impact. There is a need for more high-quality randomized controlled trials evaluating CPD interventions in dentistry. It is important that future evaluations of CPD interventions clarify the nature of the interventions such that they are explicit and replicable and that appropriate outcomes are selected (health of patients and change in practice or behavior as well as knowledge and understanding) in order to move the evidence base of effective practice forward in this area of dental education.

  5. Dental Hygiene Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Their Professional Role in Regard to Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christine M.

    Dental hygiene students' perceptions of themselves and the "typical dental hygienist" were assessed in relation to feminist attitudes at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dempewolff's (1972) 56-item Feminism II Scale was administered to all first-year, second-year, and…

  6. Education of tobacco use prevention and cessation for dental professionals - a paradigm shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, J.M.; Ramseier, C.A.; Mattheos, N.; Schoonheim-Klein, M.; Compton, S.; Al-Hazmi, N.; Polychronopoulou, A.; Suvan, J.; Forna, D.; Radley, N.

    2010-01-01

    The use of tobacco continues to be a substantial risk factor in the development and progression of oral cancer, periodontitis, implant failure and poor wound healing. Dental and dental hygiene education providers have made great advances towards the incorporation of tobacco education into their

  7. A Dental Hygiene Professional Practice Index (DHPPI) and access to oral health status and service use in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Paul; Langelier, Margaret H; Continelli, Tracey A; Battrell, Ann

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize a larger study that developed a statistical index that defines the professional practice environment of dental hygienists (DHs) in the United States, and to determine the extent to which the index scores are related to the number of DHs and dentists, the utilization of dental services, and selected oral health outcomes across the 50 states. A Dental Hygiene Professional Practice Index (DHPPI) defines the professional status, supervision requirements, tasks permitted, and reimbursement options for DHs in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia, as of December 31, 2001. Spearman rank order correlations between the DHPPI and numbers of oral health professionals, utilization of oral health services, and oral health outcomes in the 50 states are also presented. The analyses revealed that: There are significant differences in the legal practice environments (as reflected in the DHPPI) across the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Between 1990 and 2001, the number of DHs per capita increased by 46% in the United States, while the number of dentists per 100,000 population increased by only 10%. The DHPPI was not significantly correlated with the number of DHs or dentists in the 50 states in 2001. The DHPPI was significantly positively correlated with the salaries of DHs in 2001. The DHPPI was also significantly and positively correlated with a number of indicators of utilization of oral health services and oral health outcomes. Both access to oral health services and oral health outcomes are positively correlated with the DHPPI. This suggests that states with low DHPPI scores would be logical candidates for revised DH practice statutes and regulations to accomplish these objectives.

  8. Behavior analysis in consumer affairs: encouraging dental professionals to provide consumers with shielding from unnecessary X-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, B.F.; Neistat, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    An unobtrusive observation system was developed to determine the extent to which dental professionals in two communities provided lead shielding to patients during X-ray exams. A lengthy baseline revealed low and irregular provision of shielding among half of these professionals. Subsequently, a program was undertaken by a consumer's group in which these professionals were requested to provide shielding and were given confidential feedback regarding its use during the baseline period. The provision of shielding dramatically increased at all offices and was maintained throughout a follow-up period extending to more than 9 months after the program's implementation. Little or no generalized effect was observed in the occurrence of three collateral behaviors that were also assessed throughout the study

  9. Prenatal dental care: evaluation of professional knowledge of obstetricians and dentists in the cities of Londrina/PR and Bauru/SP, Brazil, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régia Luzia Zanata

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the current knowledge and recommendations of obstetricians and dentists as to the dental care to pregnant patients in the cities of Londrina/PR and Bauru/SP, Brazil. Questionnaires were distributed to professionals of both cities, arguing on the following issues: oral health during pregnancy; contact between prenatal care and dental care providers; prenatal fluoride supplementation; selection of therapeutic agents for local anesthesia, pain control and treatment of infection; and dental procedures that can be performed during each trimester. Data were analyzed by frequency of responses and statistical analyses were carried out using X² (type of workplace/service and t test (time since graduation, significant if p<0.05. Seventy-nine obstetricians and 37 dentists responded the questionnaires. Most physicians referred the patient to dental care only when a source of dental problem was mentioned, limiting the adoption of a preventive approach. Forty-three percent of dentists and 34% of obstetricians did not know the potential contribution of periodontal infection as a risk factor for preterm low birth-weight babies. There was divergence from scientific literature as to the recommendation of local anesthetics (dentists and obstetricians, prenatal fluoride supplementation (obstetricians and dental radiographs (dentists. The findings of this survey with dentists and obstetricians showed that dental management during pregnancy still presents some deviations from scientific literature recommendations, indicating the need to update these health care professionals in order to establish guidelines for prenatal dental care.

  10. A review of strategies to stimulate dental professionals to integrate smoking cessation interventions into primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosseel, J.P.; Jacobs, J.E.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarise evidence regarding the effectiveness of various implementation strategies to stimulate the delivery of smoking cessation advice and support during daily dental care. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Search of online medical and psychological databases, correspondence with authors and

  11. Oral health needs in individuals with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13: Implications for dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Deborah; Martinez, Alyssa; Campbell, Emily All

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine oral health needs and dental care in individuals with trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 (full, mosaic, partial and other, mixed types). Primary feeding method was also examined. Data was collected from a parent-completed, mixed method survey (TRIS Survey). Mean age in months was 120.2 (range 38 to 394 months) and 133 (range 36 to 405 months), respectively, for trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 individuals. Results indicated the majority of individuals received routine dental care from their family dentist. Approximately 80% in both groups needed some form of specialized dental care. Close to 25% and 30% of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 individuals, respectively, required hospital admission for specialized dental care. Responses indicated the presence of excessive plaque and tooth decay across the groups with a higher incidence for individuals with trisomy 13. Although not the primary form of intake, over half of the individuals received oral feedings. Implications for dental care and management are provided along with the need for additional research to confirm or disconfirm this study's findings. © 2015 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Safeguarding children in dentistry: 1. Child protection training, experience and practice of dental professionals with an interest in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J C; Elcock, C; Sidebotham, P D; Welbury, R R

    2009-04-25

    Following several highly publicised inquiries into the deaths of children from abuse and neglect, there has been much recent interest in the role and responsibility of all health professionals to protect children at risk of maltreatment. The findings of a postal questionnaire, sent in March 2005 to 789 dentists and dental care professionals with an interest in paediatric dentistry working in varied settings in the UK, are presented in a two-part report and discussed in the context of current multi-agency good practice in safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children. This first part explores reported child protection training, experience and practice. There was a significant gap between recognising signs of abuse and responding effectively: 67% of respondents had suspected abuse or neglect of a child patient at some time in their career but only 29% had ever made a child protection referral. The dental profession is alerted to the need to ensure necessary appropriate action to safeguard children is always taken when child abuse or neglect are suspected.

  13. Enhancing professionalism using ethics education as part of a dental licensure board's disciplinary action. Part 2. Evidence of the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebeau, Muriel J

    2009-01-01

    Pretest scores were analyzed for 41 professionals referred for ethics assessment by a dental licensing board. Two were exempt from instruction based on pretest performance on five well-validated measures; 38 completed an individualized course designed to remediate deficiencies in ethical abilities. Statistically significant change (effect sizes ranging from .55 to 5.0) was observed for ethical sensitivity (DEST scores), moral reasoning (DIT scores), and role concept (essays and PROI scores). Analysis of the relationships between ability deficiencies and disciplinary actions supports the explanatory power of Rest's Four Component Model of Morality. Of particular interest is the way the model helped referred professionals deconstruct summary judgments about character and see them as capacities that can be further developed. The performance-based assessments, especially the DEST, were particularly useful in identifying shortcomings in ethical implementation. Referred practitioners highly valued the emphasis on ethical implementation, suggesting the importance of addressing what to do and say in ethically challenging cases. Finally, the required self-assessments of learning confirm the value of the process for professional renewal (i.e., a renewed commitment to professional ideals) and of enhanced abilities not only to reason about moral problems, but to implement actions.

  14. Position paper by Canadian dental sleep medicine professionals on the role of different health care professionals in managing obstructive sleep apnea and snoring with oral appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Luc; Almeida, Fernanda; Arcache, Jean-Patrick; Ashton-McGregor, Catherine; Coté, David; Driver, Helen S; Ferguson, Kathleen A; Lavigne, Gilles J; Martin, Philippe; Masse, Jean-François; Morisson, Florence; Pancer, Jeffrey; Samuels, Charles Harry; Schachter, Maurice; Sériès, Frédéric; Sullivan, Glendon Edward

    2012-01-01

    The present Canadian position paper contains recommendations for the management by dentists of sleep-disordered breathing in adults with the use of oral appliances (OAs) as a treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The recommendations are based on literature reviews and expert panel consensus. OAs offer an effective, first-line treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer an OA to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for severe OSA patients who cannot tolerate CPAP, are inappropriate candidates for CPAP or who have failed CPAP treatment attempts. The purpose of the present position paper is to guide interdisciplinary teamwork (sleep physicians and sleep dentists) and to clarify the role of each professional in the management of OA therapy. The diagnosis of OSA should always be made by a physician, and OAs should be fitted by a qualified dentist who is trained and experienced in dental sleep medicine. Follow-up assessment by the referring physician and polysomnography or sleep studies are required to verify treatment efficacy. The present article emphasizes the need for a team approach to OA therapy and provides treatment guidelines for dentists trained in dental sleep medicine. Many of the dentists and sleep physicians who contributed to the preparation of the present article are members of the Canadian Sleep Society and the authors reached a consensus based on the current literature.

  15. Assessment of occupational exposure of dental professionals to mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil - 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34ispec.13428

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Gasparetto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the occupational exposure of dental professionals to metallic mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in the city of Maringá, Brazil, samples of blood and urine were collected from 149 dental professionals (group exposed, and 51 healthy adults similar for age and gender of the exposed group (control group in September and October, 2008. Urinary mercury was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, urea and creatinine in blood and urine by UV/VIS spectrophotometry and analysis of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the urine by reactive bands. The program ‘Statistic’ version 7.1 and the software R version 2.6.2 were used for the statistical calculations. Urinary mercury was 2.08 ± 2.11 µg g-1 creatinine in workers exposed to mercury and 0.36 ± 0.62 µg g-1 creatinine in the control group (p -1 creatinine; 11% of these professionals (n = 16 had mercury levels above the reference value (5.0 µg g-1 creatinine, whereas the maximum value found was 13 µg g-1 creatinine. The dental professionals of public primary health care in the city of Maringa was exposed to metallic mercury at levels 5.8 times higher than the non-exposed subjects.  

  16. The ethics of social media in dental practice: ethical tools and professional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Bruce; Curley, Arthur

    2013-07-01

    This article considers several important trends in dental practice that result from innovations in digital and social media. It provides ethical tools for analysis, Illuminates areas of ethical concern in the current practice environment and offers recommendations for future practice. A summary in the form of a checklist is posted at the end of this essay for dentists considering the use of social media in their practice.

  17. Oral health education for schoolchildren: a qualitative study of dental care professionals' view of knowledge and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, E; Ringberg, K; Gabre, P

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and interpret dental professionals' view of knowledge, learning, health promotion and their expectations of and attitudes to the response from schoolchildren. A qualitative study design was used with discourse method. Nine dental hygienists and dental nurses, who have practised oral health education among schoolchildren, described their work in tape-recorded, semi-structured interviews. The discourse method stresses the variation and distinctions in the statements, and to understand the content of the text, its contextual dependence must be taken into account. The preventive discourse could be found in all interviews, but it was concentrated on disease prevention and less on maintaining health. The biomedical view of knowledge dominated. Children's and parent's own responsibility for healthy habits was stressed, but no reflection of ethical considerations associated with influencing people's life-style was found. The text revealed discrepancy between the informants, and even within the same individual, showing ambivalence towards oral health education. Some individuals suggested lessons guided by communication with the children, while others wanted to maintain methods based on information about oral diseases to a greater extent. Different perspectives were found. The expression 'oral health promotion' was frequently used and supported by all the interviewed informants, but the statements did not reveal the informant's definition of the concept. Several educators focused on signs of diseases and less on the individual's view of their own health. In the future, oral health education programme needs to focus on quality of life, behavioural variables and indicators of empowerment rather than just disease outcomes.

  18. Use of complementary and alternative medicine for work related musculoskeletal disorders associated with job contentment in dental professionals: Indian outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Kumar Rajendra; Karim, Bushra; Kanwar, Alpana; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Ankit; Saini, Priya; Arya, Satya; Sachdeva, Neha

    2014-04-01

    High prevalence rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD) among dentists have been reported. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies can be helpful in managing and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine if dental professionals are using CAM for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Who have greater job satisfaction: dentist who uses Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or conventional therapy (CT) as a treatment modality for WRMSD. Dentists who registered in Uttar Pradesh state, India under Indian Dental Council, Uttar Pradesh branch (n=1134) were surveyed. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 53% (n=601) was obtained, revealing that 82% (n=487) of the respondents suffered from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or conventional therapy was reported among 80% (n=390) of the dentists with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health compared to conventional therapy users (PComplementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to facilitate musculoskeletal health that will enable longer and healthier careers, increase productivity, provide safer workplace and prevent musculoskeletal disorders.

  19. Health professional's perceptions of and potential barriers to smoking cessation care: a survey study at a dental school hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiishi Takemi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is currently accepted as a well-established risk factor for many oral diseases such as oral cancer and periodontal disease. Provision of smoking cessation care to patients with oral problems is a responsibility of health care professionals, particularly dentists and dental hygienists. This study examined the smoking-related perceptions and practices of dental school hospital-based health professionals in Japan. Findings A cross-sectional study design was used. The sample was formed from dentists, dental hygienists, physicians and nurses of a dental school hospital in Tokyo, Japan (n = 93, 72%. Participants were asked to complete an 11-item questionnaire assessing demographic variables and smoking history, provision of smoking cessation advice or care, attitudes about smoking cessation, and perceived barrier(s to smoking cessation care. Eighteen percent of participants reported being current smokers and 15% reported being ex-smokers, with higher smoking rates reported by dentists compared with other health professionals (p = 0.0199. While recognizing the importance of asking patients about their smoking status, actual provision of smoking cessation advice or care by participants was relatively insufficient. Interventions such as 'assess willingness to make a quit attempt' and 'assist in quit attempt' were implemented for less than one-quarter of their patients who smoke. Non-smokers were more likely to acknowledge the need for increased provision in smoking cessation care by oral health professionals. 'Lack of knowledge and training' was identified as a central barrier to smoking cessation care, followed by 'few patients willing to quit'. Conclusions A need for further promotion of smoking cessation activities by the health professionals was identified. The findings also suggest that dentists and dental hygienists, while perceiving a role in smoking care, do require training in the provision of smoking cessation care

  20. Is advertising by dental professionals having a negative impact on consumers?: the perspectives of Indian consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dable, Rajani A; Musani, Smita I; Wasnik, Pradnya B; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L; Pawar, Babita R

    2014-01-01

    Advertising by dentists is a controversial issue. Many feel that advertising is necessary for creating dental awareness, whereas, many others feel that it should be banned to keep intact the ethical aspect of the profession, which aims at serving the community. This study explores consumers' ideas about advertising. A total of 562 respondents from various parts of India participated in this study. The response rate was 46.83%. The data were analyzed by applying the chi-square test of association and the Z test of difference between two proportions at 5% and 1% level of significance (i.e., p<.05 and p<.01).

  1. Assessment of professional competency and need of smoking cessation counseling for dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani A. Dable

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the smoking prevalence among dental students and to assess the need for promoting tobacco education and intervention by exploring their knowledge about smoking related risk factors. The study also examined the attitudes and practices of the students toward tobacco consumption, and their responsibilities toward the community. Methods: In total, 53 male students participated in the study (21 juniors and 32 seniors. The training program was divided into three modules, and the questionnaire was administered before and after the counseling sessions, which provided the comparative data on the students’ views about smoking cessation. Results: The most commonly practiced mode of tobacco consumption was found to be cigarette smoking (90.6 %, while a few consumed Gutkha (9.4%. All the junior students (100% reported to have been benefitted by the counseling program, while 68.8% of the students from the senior group reported the same. Bivariate statistical analysis was conducted using the Pearson’s chi-square test for testing the difference across the age groups. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Conclusion: Curbing tobacco influence on dental students in their initial days can ensure a smoke-free life for them, as well as prevents them from feeling embarrassed or experiencing a lack of confidence while seeing their patients. Thus, tobacco education and intervention programs can motivate the students and increase their potential to be credible advisors regarding smoking cessation.

  2. Radiation risk assessment in professionals working in dental radiology area using buccal micronucleus cytome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatullah, Syed; Dawasaz, Ali Azhar; Luqman, Master; Assiry, Ali A; Almeshari, Ahmed A; Togoo, Rafi Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of micronuclei (MN) in buccal mucosal cells of professionals working in radiology area to determine the risk of stochastic effects of radiation. All the professionals and students working in King Khalid University - College of Dentistry radiology area were included in the Risk Group (RG = 27). The Control Group (CG = 27) comprised of healthy individual matching the gender and age of the RG. Buccal mucosal scraping from all the 54 subjects of RG and CG were stained with Papanicolaou stain and observed under oil immersion lens (×100) for the presence of micronuclei (MN) in the exfoliated epithelial cells. There was no significant difference between the incidence of MN in RG and CG (p = >0.05) using t-test. Routine radiation protection protocol does minimize the risk of radiation induced cytotoxicity, however, screening of professionals should be carried out at regular intervals.

  3. Dental Erosion and Dentinal Sensitivity amongst Professional Wine Tasters in South East Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Professional wine tasters face a hidden occupational hazard due to the high acid content in wine. This study evaluates the self-perceived dentinal sensitivity and erosive effects of wine on the professional wine tasters of the Granite Belt and the Scenic Rim regions of South East Queensland, Australia. Methods. Seventy wineries were contacted and participants were surveyed about their professional wine tasting experience and oral health. Participants were also required to rate their tooth sensitivity prior to being examined for erosion using a modified Smith & Knight tooth wear index. The data were analysed using Mann Whitney U test and Spearman’s correlation test. Results. The results showed that most participants (25 males, 22–66 yrs, brushed twice a day; however, the majority did not floss daily and had limited knowledge of the erosive effect of wine. There was a direct correlation between years of wine tasting, age of participants, and the erosion index. Correlation was not observed between the participant’s sensitivity index and erosion index. Conclusion. The lack of significant experience of dentinal hypersensitivity amongst professional wine tasters should not prevent oral health practitioners from providing necessary counselling and undertaking preventive measures, as tooth wear can have serious long-term effect on oral health of an individual.

  4. Engaging dental professionals in NHS leadership - the challenges, the opportunities and the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, J

    2014-09-01

    Leadership training in dentistry and the wider NHS is often overlooked or seen as an unnecessary distraction from front line duties. Dentists themselves are often reluctant to adopt formal leadership learning due to the way work is structured and rewarded. So, what is it like for a dentist to undertake leadership training and how can the gap be bridged between the need for highly trained leaders in dentistry and the reticence of front line professionals to take time away from practice?

  5. Continuing professional development of dentists through distant learning: An Indira Gandhi National Open University-Dental Council of India experiment a report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Kuba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To keep themselves updated with all the advancements in the field of dentistry, dentists should involve themselves in some kind of professional development. Distance learning is the most appropriate way to serve the growing demand due to technological advancements. Indira Gandhi National Open University in collaboration with Dental Council of India (DCI developed and launched two continuing professional development programs in Endodontics (postgraduate certificate in endodontics and postgraduate certificate in oral implantology and has trained over 400 and 280 BDS dentists respectively till date. The program package consists of self-instructional material, assignments, videos and practical training. The training is conducted in premiere dental colleges and institutions recognized by DCI. The certificate is awarded after a term end examination, both in theory and practical. The pass percentages of the theory courses ranged from around 63% to 98%, and 90% of the candidates cleared the practical exam.

  6. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  7. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  8. How a modified approach to dental coding can benefit personal and professional development with improved clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the remarkable achievements in dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. This has made the concept of Evidenced Based Dentistry more applicable to modern dental practice. Despite merit in the concept whereby clinical decisions are guided by scientific evidence, there are problems with establishing a scientific base. This is no more challenging than in modern dentistry where the gap between rapidly developing products/procedures and its evidence base are widening. Furthermore, the burden of oral disease continues to remain high at the population level. These problems have prompted new approaches to enhancing research. The aim of this paper is to outline how a modified approach to dental coding may benefit clinical and population level research. Using publically assessable data obtained from the Australian Chronic Disease Dental Scheme and item codes contained within the Australian Schedule of Dental Services and Glossary, a suggested approach to dental informatics is illustrated. A selection of item codes have been selected and expanded with the addition of suffixes. These suffixes provided circumstantial information that will assist in assessing clinical outcomes such as success rates and prognosis. The use of item codes in administering the CDDS yielded a large database of item codes. These codes are amenable to dental informatics which has been shown to enhance research at both the clinical and population level. This is a cost effective method to supplement existing research methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Knowledge, value, opinion and practice about usage of pit and fissure sealant among dental professionals in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappan, N; Dhamodhar, M Dinesh; Nithin, M G; Kumar, E Senthil

    2015-12-01

    A study was aimed to assess the knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding the use of dental sealants among private dental practitioners in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. A self-administrated questionnaire were distributed to 192 private dental practitioners in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India by using simple random sampling. A convenience sampling technique was employed. The questionnaire consisted of 28 items, which included information about knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding dental sealants. The questionnaire was obtained from the study by San Martin et al. 2013 and Kailash Asawa et al. 2014. Frequency distribution was tabulated. For frequency distribution strongly, strongly agree, and agree were combined as "agree" and strongly disagree and disagree were combined as "disagree." There were no changes in "neutral." Among the 196 study subjects 56.2% were males and 43.8% were females with their clinical experience of 52.1% for 15 years. The mean scores for knowledge, value, opinion, and practice were 41.8 ± 3.7, 18.7 ± 2.8, 18.1 ± 1.4, and 12.9 ± 2.3, respectively. The results suggest that dental practitioners had satisfactory knowledge about pit and fissure sealant and had neutral attitudes about sealants being effective. Dental practitioners adequately used the pit and fissure sealants but they did not follow the standardized procedures and specific guidelines.

  10. Atendimento odontológico ao portador do HIV: medo, preconceito e ética profissional Dental care for HIV-positive individuals: fear, prejudice, and professional ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto César Discacciati

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Descrever os aspectos éticos envolvidos no atendimento odontológico a pacientes HIV soropositivos ou com aids. Métodos. Revisão da literatura mediante consulta a livros texto e busca nos bancos de dados Medline e Lilacs, com ênfase nos trabalhos conduzidos na Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Foram abordados aspectos como representação social da aids e risco de infecção pelo HIV durante atendimentos, recusa de atendimento, encaminhamento a outro profissional sem motivo justificável, cobrança de honorários diferenciados, imposição de horários especiais e manutenção do sigilo sobre o status sorológico do paciente. Resultados. Ainda existe preconceito e desconhecimento sobre o risco de infecção por HIV e aids, tanto por parte dos cirurgiões dentistas quanto por parte de outros pacientes. Conclusões. É preciso dar início a um projeto de educação nos próprios consultórios e nas universidades que formam novos profissionais, assim como reforçar o papel dos Conselhos Regionais e Federal de Odontologia no esclarecimento sobre a postura ética dos cirurgiões-dentistas diante da infecção por HIV e aids.Objective. To describe the ethical aspects involved in the dental care provided to patients who are HIV-positive or who have AIDS. Methods. Literature review (textbooks and MEDLINE and LILACS databases, with an emphasis on the work developed at the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. We examined the social representation of AIDS, the risk of HIV infection during office visits, the refusal to provide care, referral to other professionals without justification, special charges and office visit hours for HIV-positive patients, and the confidentiality of the serological status of the patient. Results. There is still prejudice and ignorance about the risk of HIV and AIDS infection, on the part of dental surgeons and of patients. Conclusions. An educational

  11. Atenção odontológica à gestante: papel dos profissionais de saúde Dental treatment of pregnant women: the role of healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Aparecida Britto Codato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de pesquisa qualitativa realizada com gestantes usuárias do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS e de serviços privados que objetivou identificar a percepção dessas mulheres sobre o papel dos profissionais de saúde em relação à atenção odontológica durante a gravidez, cujos dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas gravadas, semiestruturadas por roteiro de questões e analisados por meio de análise de conteúdo temática. Concluiu que alguns profissionais de saúde alimentam e proferem mitos e medos sobre atenção odontológica e saúde bucal relacionados ao período gestacional. Evidenciou-se a necessidade de investimentos em educação sobre odontologia e gravidez, tanto em nível de graduação como de pósgraduação, porque tais conhecimentos podem contribuir com a revisão de conceitos e, por conseguinte, nas condutas manifestas ante essa parcela da população.The scope of this article involved qualitative research conducted together with pregnant women attended by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS and private services, seeking to identify the perception of these women on the role of health professionals in relation to dental care during pregnancy. The data were collected through recorded, semi-structured interviews based on a questionnaire and analyzed by assessment of thematic content. It was noted that some health professionals propagate and reinforce misconceptions and fears about dental care and oral health during pregnancy. The need for investment in education on dental care during pregnancy, both at undergraduate and graduate level, was clearly revealed, since knowledge on the subject can contribute to a review of concepts, and consequently the manifest behavior vis-à-vis this segment of the population.

  12. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  13. Radiation protection practices and related continuing professional education in dental radiography: A survey of practitioners in the North-east of England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Ceri; Grange, Stuart; Trevor, Margaret M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the level of implementation of recommendations from the National Radiological Protection Board, relating to best radiation protection practice in dental radiography within general dental practices in the North-east of England. To survey the opinion of practitioners on the availability of related post-graduate courses in the region. Methods: A postal survey in the form of a self-reported questionnaire was mailed to all practices in the North-east of England in November 2000. The questionnaire, consisting of closed and open-ended questions, was to be completed where possible by the resident radiation protection supervisor. Results: Two hundred and sixteen practices responded to the questionnaire, a response rate of 53%. The survey revealed variation in the standards of application of best radiation protection practice. Some 23% of practitioners had not attended any post-graduate courses on radiation protection since qualifying. Post-graduate education provision on radiation protection in the region was considered insufficient by 51% of respondents. Conclusions: It is concluded that a significant proportion of practices were not making full use of opportunities to reduce dose to their patients. In addition, a small number of practices had untrained staff acting as the Radiation Protection Supervisor. A significant proportion of practitioners had not been updated in radiation protection practices within a 5-year period, and this may account for the failure to implement best radiographic practice. Over half felt that there was insufficient availability of post-graduate courses in radiation protection. The regional provision of continuing professional education in this field may need development

  14. An Overview of Dental Radiology. NCHCT Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manny, Edward F.; And Others

    This overview of dental radiology contains sections on demographics, equipment, dental radiology quality assurance, efficacy, dental radiology education curricula, professional organizations' guidelines for training and use, and state activities. In section 1 dental personnel, population of dental personnel, employment and earning prospects,…

  15. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  16. Effect of professional dental prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet on the cariogenic microbiota Efeito da profilaxia profissional com jato de bicarbonato de sódio sobre a microbiota cariogênica

    OpenAIRE

    Célia Regina Moreira LANZA; José Eduardo de Oliveira LIMA; Sergio Aparecido TORRES; Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira MACHADO

    2000-01-01

    The effect of professional dental prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate jet on salivary counting of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in 32 children ranging from 7 to 10 years of age, has been assessed. Whole stimulated saliva was collected before the prophylaxis, immediately after it and 30 days later, and the number of CFU/ml in the saliva was detected through the Caritest system. A statistically significant immediate decrease on salivary levels of both microorganisms was observed, 50% for...

  17. Internet resources for dentistry: computer, Internet, reference, and sites for enhancing personal productivity of the dental professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, G F

    2000-08-15

    At the onset of the new millennium the Internet has become the new standard means of distributing information. In the last two to three years there has been an explosion of e-commerce with hundreds of new web sites being created every minute. For most corporate entities, a web site is as essential as the phone book listing used to be. Twenty years ago technologist directed how computer-based systems were utilized. Now it is the end users of personal computers that have gained expertise and drive the functionality of software applications. The computer, initially invented for mathematical functions, has transitioned from this role to an integrated communications device that provides the portal to the digital world. The Web needs to be used by healthcare professionals, not only for professional activities, but also for instant access to information and services "just when they need it." This will facilitate the longitudinal use of information as society continues to gain better information access skills. With the demand for current "just in time" information and the standards established by Internet protocols, reference sources of information may be maintained in dynamic fashion. News services have been available through the Internet for several years, but now reference materials such as online journals and digital textbooks have become available and have the potential to change the traditional publishing industry. The pace of change should make us consider Will Rogers' advice, "It isn't good enough to be moving in the right direction. If you are not moving fast enough, you can still get run over!" The intent of this article is to complement previous articles on Internet Resources published in this journal, by presenting information about web sites that present information on computer and Internet technologies, reference materials, news information, and information that lets us improve personal productivity. Neither the author, nor the Journal endorses any of the

  18. Trabalho e formação profissional do atendente de consultório dentário e do técnico em higiene dental Work and professional qualifications of dentist office attendants and of dental hygiene technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Boen Garcia Liñan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a formação de egressos dos cursos de atendente de consultório dentário (ACD e de técnico em higiene dental (THD, procurando compreender a importância dos cursos técnicos na melhoria do desempenho profissional, da renda individual e familiar, assim como a sua importância para uma melhor inserção no mercado de trabalho. Mostra que, apesar das deficiências assinaladas pelos egressos, a escola os qualificou adequadamente para o desempenho de suas funções. No entanto, as dificuldades por eles encontradas em termos de representação coletiva, a falta de prestígio social e a baixa credibilidade e respeito profissional que lhes consagram os cirurgiões-dentistas permanecem como problemas a serem enfrentados. A falta de legitimidade profissional que ainda os caracteriza faz com que os auxiliares da odontologia fiquem à mercê das oscilações do mercado de trabalho e das políticas de saúde. O artigo sustenta que a regulamentação dessas categorias de trabalhadores pode significar proteção técnica e ética, evitando a formação de monopólios profissionais e assegurando normas de eqüidade e justiça sociais para os profissionais da saúde bucal.This article analyzes the qualifications of dental office attendant (DOA and dental hygiene technician (DHT graduates, seeking to understand the importance technical courses have not only in improving their professional performance, individual and family incomes, but also their impact on these professionals' better placement in the work market. It shows that, despite the deficiencies these graduates mention, their schooling qualified them appropriately to perform their duties. However, the difficulties these professionals face in terms of collective representation, the lack of social prestige, and the low levels of professional credibility and respect they get from dentists remain hurdles to be faced. The lack of professional legitimacy that characterizes their work

  19. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  20. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu, Nigeria ... HIV-infected individuals is also known to be achieved through the provision of ... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals ..... Table 7: Willingness to care versus training needs on care.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of early clinical exposure on professional attitude of dental students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aghili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Learning dentistry could have many tension and anxieties like encountering to a strange clinical environment. Early clinical exposure (ECE is supposed to control these stresses. ECE program is an increasingly widespread component of educational curriculum. This study aims to determine the effect of early clinical exposure on the attitude of dental students’ towards dental education and profession. Methods: An analytic study was performed on all 72 dental students studying basic science at Faculty of Dentistry of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences consisted of a short term course of introduction to clinical environment in academic year of 2011-2012. Every 12 students attended in an one day ECE course from 8 AM to 1 PM. Students ' attitude towards dental profession and education were assessed by a questionnaire included 25 items before and after the course .For data analysis descriptive paired-t-test was used. Results: All students completed the questionnaires. Students' attitude towards dental education and profession was evaluated. Mean score of students' attitude before and after exposure to clinical environment were 94.6 and 100.5 respectively .Significant differences were found in the students' attitude before and after the course (P=0.001 Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, we found a positive effect of early clinical exposure on attitudes of first and second year dental students. Demographic variations had an effect on the students' attitude .Therefore we suggest that early clinical exposure should be added to educational curriculum of dental students.

  2. Advancing education in dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battrell, Ann; Lynch, Ann; Steinbach, Pam; Bessner, Sue; Snyder, Josh; Majeski, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The changing health care environment and societal imperatives indicate the need for transformative change within the dental hygiene profession to serve the emerging needs of the public. The American Dental Hygienists' Association is leading the way toward meaningful change. The American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) has as its vision the integration of dental hygienists into the health care delivery system as essential primary care providers to expand access to oral health care. This article provides data on current dental hygiene education programs and those in development. Also included is a discussion regarding how the dental hygiene profession can better serve the health and wellness needs of society by transforming the way graduates are prepared for the future. ADHA's dental hygiene survey center data, policies and a futuristic analysis plus a review of the professional literature describe the current state of dental hygiene education and the profession. A discussion of societal, health care and educational trends that creates the imperative for transformation of the dental hygiene profession is provided. Ultimately, the purpose of advancing education in dental hygiene is to achieve better oral and overall health for more people. The profession's responsibility to the public includes evaluating its own ability to provide care and taking the steps necessary to ensure its maximum effectiveness. ADHA is leading this process for dental hygienists in diverse ways. It is imperative that the dental hygiene profession understands and embraces the changing health care environment. Through open dialog and the sharing of evidence the professional path will be determined along with forward movement for the benefit of society and the dental hygiene profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dental education in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J M

    2003-01-01

    For a long time there has been a need to establish a dental school in Kuwait, due to the fact that the majority of dentists working in Kuwait are expatriates from various countries. An Amiri decree in 1996 made it possible, and the first dental students were admitted to the Kuwait University Faculty of Dentistry in 1998. The mission of the Faculty of Dentistry is 'to promote oral health in Kuwait through education, research and cooperation with other professional health care institutions as well as the community at large'. A 6.5-year dental curriculum was completed after 2 years of committee work and was accepted by the University Council in 2001. This curriculum incorporates current trends in medical and dental education, such as the evidence-based and community-based approaches, problem-solving methodology for outcome-based learning, and competency achieved through comprehensive patient care. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of a single annual professional intervention for the prevention of childhood dental caries in a remote rural Indigenous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Kroon, Jeroen; Tut, Ohnmar; Kularatna, Sanjeewa; Jamieson, Lisa M; Wallace, Valda; Boase, Robyn; Fernando, Surani; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Scuffham, Paul A; Johnson, Newell W

    2015-08-29

    The aim of the study is to reduce the high prevalence of tooth decay in children in a remote, rural Indigenous community in Australia, by application of a single annual dental preventive intervention. The study seeks to (1) assess the effectiveness of an annual oral health preventive intervention in slowing the incidence of dental caries in children in this community, (2) identify the mediating role of known risk factors for dental caries and (3) assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the intervention. The intervention is novel in that most dental preventive interventions require regular re-application, which is not possible in resource constrained communities. While tooth decay is preventable, self-care and healthy habits are lacking in these communities, placing more emphasis on health services to deliver an effective dental preventive intervention. Importantly, the study will assess cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness for broader implementation across similar communities in Australia and internationally. There is an urgent need to reduce the burden of dental decay in these communities, by implementing effective, cost-effective, feasible and sustainable dental prevention programs. Expected outcomes of this study include improved oral and general health of children within the community; an understanding of the costs associated with the intervention provided, and its comparison with the costs of allowing new lesions to develop, with associated treatment costs. Findings should be generalisable to similar communities around the world. The research is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), registration number ACTRN12615000693527; date of registration: 3rd July 2015.

  5. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  6. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Status Among Dental Surgeons in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    consensus about vaccination rates among dental professionals in the literature as dental surgeons ..... Research Category of the Hatton poster competition in the 3rd. African Middle East ... Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1987;15:125-7. 6.

  7. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  8. The Role and Education of Dental Care Professionals in Identifying Domestic Violence: Report of an Audience Participation Exercise and Round Table Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Susan J.; Quinn, Barry; Reynolds, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is a major public problem affecting 30% of women over 16. Three quarters of victims have violence to the head and neck, and therefore the role of the dentist is paramount in DV identification. Only one-third of dental schools in the UK include DV in their curricula and there is a need to introduce effective education for the…

  9. CONCURRENT CONTACT SENSITIZATION TO METALS IN DENTAL EXPOSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Sensitization to metals is a significant problem for both dental patients treated with dental materials and for dental professionals in occupational exposures. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of concurrent contact sensitization to relevant for dental practice metals among students of dental medicine, students from dental technician school, dental professionals and patients. Material and Methods: A total of 128 participants were included in the study. All of them were patch-tested with nickel, cobalt, copper, potassium dichromate, palladium, aluminium, gold and tin. The results were subject to statistical analysis (p < 0.05. Results: For the whole studied population, potassium dichromate exhibited concomitant reactivity most often; copper and tin also often manifested co-reactivity. For the groups, exposed in dental practice, potassium dichromate and tin were outlined as the most often co-reacting metal allergens, but statistical significance concerning the co-sensitization to copper and the other metals was established only for aluminium. An increased incidence and OR for concomitant sensitization to cobalt and nickel was established in the group of dental students; to copper and nickel - in the control group; to palladium and nickel - in the group of dental professionals, the group of students of dental medicine and in the control group; to potassium dichromate and cobalt - in the group of dental students; to copper and palladium - in the control group of dental patients; to potassium dichromate and copper - in the group of dental professionals; to copper and aluminum - in the groups of students from dental technician school and of dental professionals; to copper and gold - in the groups of dental professionals and in the group of dental patients; to potassium dichromate and aluminum - in the group of dental professionals; to potassium dichromate and gold - in the group of dental professionals, and to

  10. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  11. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  12. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  13. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  14. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  15. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The relevance of behavioural sciences in dental practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    2000-01-01

    includes compliance with certain oral hygiene regimens or specific dental visiting patterns. The outcome of the treatment depends on both the dental professional's knowledge and skills and the patient's skills, objectives and expectations. Furthermore, dental professionals and patients should be satisfied......The aim of this paper is to illustrate how knowledge from behavioural sciences is necessary and relevant in creating a successful dental practice, benefitting patients and dental professionals. There are many ways to create a successful dental practice, the products of which are the various...... treatments performed by dentists or dental hygienists for their patients. Advanced technologies and methods are constantly improving these treatments and thus the technical and managerial aspects of dentistry. However, the success of dental practice is not only dependent on the technique applied...

  17. Estratégia profissional e mimetismo empresarial: os planos de saúde odontológicos no Brasil Professional strategy and institutional isomorphism: the dental health insurance industry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Vieira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa o modelo organizacional das empresas de planos de saúde odontológicos das modalidades de cooperativas de profissionais e a odontologia de grupo para compreender a dinâmica da oferta de serviços odontológicos no país. Adotou-se como referência a formulação institucionalista de Di Maggio e Powell. O mercado de planos de saúde odontológico é pulverizado, com o predomínio de empresas de pequeno porte, e apresenta um grande dinamismo, que favorece as empresas de pequeno, médio e alto porte. As modalidades analisadas concentram a maior proporção de beneficiários e receitas. A análise geral do desempenho do setor revela impressionante dinamismo na captação de clientes, mesmo após a criação da ANS. O regime de regulação tem imposto um novo padrão institucional à entrada, permanência e saída das empresas no mercado, que não afeta o desempenho setorial. Os dados analisados evidenciam que o setor de planos de saúde odontológicos é altamente rentável, apresentando uma grande capacidade na geração de receitas que explica o crescimento e a permanência destas modalidades no mercado. Os padrões de rentabilidade média, principalmente das empresas de odontologia de grupo, são extremamente elevados, ficando muito acima de qualquer atividade empresarial do Brasil.This article analyzes the organizational model of the dental health industry. The main organizational leaders in this industry are the professional cooperatives and group dental insurance companies. The theoretical basis of the article is the organizational theory developed by Di Maggio and Powell. The dental health industry consists of a great number of small and very dynamic companies, however an expressive part of clients and profit are concentrated in a few large companies. The results show that the industry has expanded the number of clients after the creation of the National Health Insurance Agency. The regulation regime has forced

  18. Radiation protection in the dental profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holyoak, B.; Overend, J.K.; Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey, conducted by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), on the standard of radiation protection in the dental profession in the United Kingdom is described. The results are compared with UK advisory standards. The preliminary survey results were reported in the professional press and each participating dental practitioner received comments and advice concerning the basic requirements for radiation protection. The method of survey has been broadened to form the basis of inspection of dental radiography by the HSE. (H.K.)

  19. Taxonomy for competency-based dental curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Neira, Roberto J; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this article is to propose a classification of dental competencies. Interest in dental competencies has grown consistently during the last three decades. However, the dental education literature suggests that the term "competency" is understood and used differently by dental schools around the world. The taxonomic classification of dental competencies we propose follows a systematic approach starting at the highest level of complexity, i.e., the professional profile the teaching institution envisions for its graduates, and following in a decreasing degree of complexity to competency function, task, step, movement, and moment. This taxonomy has proved to be useful for more than thirty years in the Dental School of the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia. Graduates of this school are successful practitioners, teachers, and researchers in Peru and other countries. The classification proposed here should clarify terms, facilitate curriculum design and learning assessment, stimulate further discussion on the matter, and facilitate communication among the dental education establishment.

  20. [Dental curriculum and team treatment concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgersdijk, R.C.W.; Kersten, H.

    2001-01-01

    The changing oral situation in the Netherlands, the upgrading of the dental hygienist training and the introduction of the bachelor and master degree in the Dutch higher education system asks for a new dental professional: the oral physician. To prepare the oral physician for his role as leader of a

  1. Perceptions of undergraduate dental students at Makerere College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The creating, maintenance and storage of patients' medical records is an important competence for the professional training of a dental student. Objective. Owing to the unsatisfactory state of dental records at the students' clinic, the objective of this study was to obtain information from undergraduate dental ...

  2. Placement, support, and retention of health professionals: national, cross-sectional findings from medical and dental community service officers in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M; Onah, Michael; Kornik, Saul; Peacocke, Julia; Reid, Stephen

    2014-02-26

    In South Africa, community service following medical training serves as a mechanism for equitable distribution of health professionals and their professional development. Community service officers are required to contribute a year towards serving in a public health facility while receiving supervision and remuneration. Although the South African community service programme has been in effect since 1998, little is known about how placement and practical support occur, or how community service may impact future retention of health professionals. National, cross-sectional data were collected from community service officers who served during 2009 using a structured self-report questionnaire. A Supervision Satisfaction Scale (SSS) was created by summing scores of five questions rated on a three-point Likert scale (orientation, clinical advising, ongoing mentorship, accessibility of clinic leadership, and handling of community service officers' concerns). Research endpoints were guided by community service programmatic goals and analysed as dichotomous outcomes. Bivariate and multivariate logistical regressions were conducted using Stata 12. The sample population comprised 685 doctors and dentists (response rate 44%). Rural placement was more likely among unmarried, male, and black practitioners. Rates of self-reported professional development were high (470 out of 539 responses; 87%). Participants with higher scores on the SSS were more likely to report professional development. Although few participants planned to continue work in rural, underserved communities (n = 171 out of 657 responses, 25%), those serving in a rural facility during the community service year had higher intentions of continuing rural work. Those reporting professional development during the community service year were twice as likely to report intentions to remain in rural, underserved communities. Despite challenges in equitable distribution of practitioners, participant satisfaction with the

  3. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Advanced Dental Students' Use, Knowledge, and Beliefs Regarding Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearston, Jenni A; Shah, Krina; Cheng, Eric; Moosvi, Rizvan; Park, Su Hyun; Patel, Naiya; Spielman, Andrew I; Weitzman, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    Using cigarettes and alternative tobacco products (ATPs) is associated with negative oral health outcomes, and dental health professionals are poised to help patients quit. The aim of this study was to determine dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students' use, knowledge, and beliefs about cigarettes and ATPs, including perceptions about their education in tobacco dependence treatment and counseling experience. All 1,783 students enrolled in the dental, dental hygiene, and postdoctoral dental programs at the New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate in the survey in 2016. A total of 708 students at least partially completed the survey, for a response rate of 39.7%. In the results, 146 of the students (20.1%) reported ever using cigarettes, while 253 (35.7%) reported ever using any ATP. Regarding tobacco use intervention, the students reported they had not received enough training on ATPs, were neutral about cigarettes, and were somewhat confident and not so confident counseling a cigarette smoker or ATP user, respectively. By their fourth year, 77.8% of the dental students reported they had counseled someone to stop smoking cigarettes, but only 40.7% had counseled someone to stop using ATPs. Overall, all groups of students reported feeling more confident and had received more education on interventions for cigarettes than for ATPs (ptobacco and did not perceive they had received enough training on intervening with patients on use of cigarettes and ATPs. These findings call for a revised tobacco education curriculum for dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students, focused on building knowledge and confidence for promoting tobacco dependence treatment.

  4. Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Vincent N

    2005-01-01

    The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences.

  5. An audit of dental prescriptions between clinics and dental laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C A

    2011-08-12

    To discover the quality of written instructions from dentists to dental technicians and the nature of non-compliant prescriptions. An audit of laboratory prescription compliance was conducted within an NHS Trust Dental Teaching Hospital to determine the level of communication between dentists and dental technicians. One hundred and fifty prescriptions were audited from dental undergraduates and qualified dentists throughout the different departments. A total of two-thirds of prescriptions were considered non-compliant and failed to meet relevant ethical and legal guidelines. This problem was seen throughout all departments and at all professional levels. A breakdown in communication between dentists and technicians through the use of prescriptions is evident even within a close working environment.

  6. Perception of Nepalese dental hygiene and dentistry students towards the dental hygienists profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knevel, Rjm; Gussy, M G; Farmer, J; Karimi, L

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates student and stakeholder perceptions of the role of the dental hygienist in Nepal. The impact of these perceptions on the professionalization of dental hygienists is described whilst exploring the consequences for oral health workforce planning. Dentistry and dental hygiene students from one dental college in Nepal were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire; 171 students returned the questionnaire containing a mix of forced response and open-ended items. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS ® 22. These data were complemented with qualitative information from survey open questions and from semi-structured interviews with key informants from several relevant organizations. Qualitative data were manually analysed and coded. Data were triangulated to contextualize quantitative data. A high level of positive regard for the role of the dental hygienist in Nepal was evident amongst dentistry and dental hygiene students in this college. Both groups believe that the dental hygienist can play a major role in raising oral health awareness in Nepal. The scope of practice of the dental hygienist was unclear with issues surrounding the scope of practice and reports of illegal practice by dental hygienists. Significant differences (P dental hygiene and dentistry students in relation to their opinion regarding independent practice and the need of supervision by a dentist. Supervision of the dental hygienist by dentists and issues surrounding the scope of practice are polarizing the relationship between dentists, dental hygienists and the relevant professional organizations. This could hinder cooperation between these oral health professionals and might lead to underutilization of the dental hygienist. To improve the understanding about the roles of each oral health professional, establishing functional relationships and intraprofessional education involving dentistry and dental hygiene students needs to be introduced. This will benefit the

  7. Dental Hygienists Licensed in Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia. Health Manpower Project.

    Beginning with a statement on the profession of dental hygiene and the two types of professional preparation available in the field, the pilot study then presents a two-part summary of its findings and an explanation of the methodology employed. Part I of the main portion of the report concerns employment characteristics (status, age, residence,…

  8. Enhancing professionalism using ethics education as part of a dental licensure board's disciplinary action. Part 1. An evidence-based process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebeau, Muriel J

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a process and procedures for interacting with individuals who have violated the rules of professional conduct and includes descriptions of each of the assessment measures used to conduct a baseline assessment of four ethical capacities that are necessary conditions for reflective, ethical practice. The process and assessment methods are theoretically grounded in Rest's Four Component Model of Morality--a model that asserts that moral failing can result in a deficiency in any one of four abilities or capacities that are necessary for ethical behavior. Following descriptions of five well-validated assessment strategies, a synopsis of an educational intervention is presented.

  9. Dental students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-08-01

    In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental students, amongst other non-qualified individuals, to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental students have part-time employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental students their opinion about the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental students at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA) in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by e-mail. Within 1 month, two reminders were sent. The response was 44% (427 students). Of the responding students, 71% had paid employment in addition to their study. Twenty-five per cent of all students worked in a dental practice, usually 8 h a week. Study year and age were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were providing chair side assistance, giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning. The self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was positively related to study year and working in a dental practice. Hardly any information about the requirements of the IHCP Act with regard to delegation of tasks was provided by the employer. Many Dutch dental students work in a dental practice, taking over a variety of tasks. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was relatively high, many dental students expressed the need for more detailed information about the legal aspects of their tasks.

  10. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  11. Sexual Advances by Patients in Dental Practice: Implications for the Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Gary T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Oregon dentists (n=248) and dental hygienists (n=235) investigated frequency of patient-initiated sexual advances and methods of dealing with them. Up to 44 percent experienced 1 or more patient verbal advances, and 23 percent experienced physical advances during a 5-year period. Inclusion of related issues in professional curricula is…

  12. Smartphones and dental trauma: the current availability of apps for managing traumatic dental injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Serpil; Singh, Parmjit

    2016-02-01

    There is a general consensus regarding the lack of awareness regarding the emergency management of traumatic dental injuries amongst laypersons and dental professionals. This article aims to provide an overview of the apps available for traumatic dental injuries using smartphones. These apps may serve as a gateway for raising awareness of traumatic dental injuries. Three smartphone devices were used to access their respective app stores (Nokia Lumia 635 with Windows Phone OS 8.1; iPhone 5 with iOS 8.1; Samsung Galaxy Ace II with Android OS v2.3.6 Gingerbread). Nine phrases were searched: broken tooth/teeth; chipped tooth/teeth; dental emergency; dental injury; dental trauma; fractured tooth/teeth; knocked-out tooth/teeth; tooth/teeth injury; and tooth/teeth trauma. Seven apps for the Android and one app for the Apple operating system were relevant. The only Apple iOS app retrieved (Dental Trauma) was also found for the Android OS (Dental Trauma First Aid) and had the endorsement of the International Association of Dental Traumatology. AcciDent was the only app dedicated to traumatic dental injuries targeted solely towards dental professionals. Five other apps (Chipped Tooth Solution, Dental Crown Repair, Fixing Cracked Tooth, Repairing the Front Tooth and Solution to Broken Tooth) appeared to come from the same source (KBES). No traumatic dental injury apps were found for the Windows Phone OS. There are apps available for both patients and dentists that range in quality and on the whole lack real-life photographs. Future apps should continue to provide good quality, evidence-based and validated material. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  14. Knowledge and attitude towards preventive dental care among dental faculties in Bangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Preventive approach in dental practice has been cited as a reason for the decline in oral diseases and as a predominant part of the service-mix of dental practices in the future. Dental faculty′s knowledge and attitude toward prevention are important, since they have exceptionally important direct and indirect roles in shaping student′s preventive orientation and also potentially influencing their patient′s ability to take care of their teeth. Thus, this study was conducted to assess knowledge and attitudes toward preventive dental care among dental faculties and their relation to demographic and professional characteristics. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among dental faculties in Bangalore city. Of 17 dental colleges, 4 were selected by simple random sampling. A total of 218 dental faculties was individually asked to complete a pretested questionnaire. The questionnaire requested information on dental faculty′s demographic and professional characteristics and their knowledge and attitudes toward preventive dental care. Descriptive, Chi-square tests, and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: The highest knowledge was seen among dental faculties regarding prevention of malocclusion (3.51 ± 1.02 followed by oral cancer (2.95 ± 1.09 and periodontal diseases (2.86 ± 1.02. The least knowledge was seen for the prevention of caries (2.63 ± 1.35. The most positive attitudes regarding preventive dentistry was characterized as being essential (6.34 ± 1.05, useful (6.32 ± 1.07 and valuable (6.27 ± 1.00. Statistically significant differences were found in relation to knowledge and attitudes for all demographic and professional characteristics except for gender and Department of Teaching. Conclusion: Dental faculty seems to have differing levels of knowledge regarding oral diseases with positive attitudes seen regarding preventive dentistry. Continuing education activities and

  15. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human t...

  16. Dental caries in Victorian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M; Hopcraft, M; Morgan, M

    2014-09-01

    The poor oral health of nursing home residents is the cause of substantial morbidity and has major implications relating to health care policy. The aim of this study was to measure dental caries experience in Australians living in nursing homes, and investigate associations with resident characteristics. Clinical dental examinations were conducted on 243 residents from 19 nursing homes in Melbourne. Resident characteristics were obtained from nursing home records and interviews with residents, family and nursing home staff. Two dental examiners assessed coronal and root dental caries using standard ICDAS-II criteria. Residents were elderly, medically compromised and functionally impaired. Most required assistance with oral hygiene and professional dental care was rarely utilized. Residents had high rates of coronal and root caries, with a mean 2.8 teeth with untreated coronal caries and 5.0 root surfaces with untreated root caries. Functional impairment and irregular professional dental care were associated with higher rates of untreated tooth decay. There were no significant associations with medical conditions or the number of medications taken. Nursing home residents have high levels of untreated coronal and root caries, particularly those with high needs due to functional impairment but poor access to professional services. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Dental hygiene students' part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorterman, J H G; Dikkes, B T; Brand, H S

    2010-05-01

    Many students have paid employment while studying. In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental hygiene students to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental hygiene students have part-time job employment in dental practice and which professional tasks they carry out. We also asked the dental hygiene students their opinion of the IHCP Act. All the enrolled dental hygiene students (n = 341) at a School of Health in the Netherlands received a questionnaire by email. The response was 52% (176 students). Of the responding students, 75% had paid employment in addition to their study. A proportion of the students (35%) worked in a dental practice. The median number of hours worked per week was eight. Study year, age and prior education were positively related to working part-time in dental practice. Activities frequently performed were giving oral hygiene instruction, fluoride applications, scaling and root planning, providing chair side assistance and giving local anaesthesia. Although the self-reported knowledge about the IHCP Act was high, almost half of the students expressed the need for more detailed legal information. Many dental hygiene students work in a dental practice, taking over a number of tasks usually performed by the dentist. More information in the dental hygiene curriculum about the requirements of the IHCP Act seems desirable.

  18. Predictors of dental avoidance among Australian adults with different levels of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Ketting, Manon

    2015-09-01

    It has been proposed that avoidance of dental visits might be the main determinant of poor oral health outcomes in people with high dental anxiety (HDA). This study aimed to determine the predictors of dental avoidance among people with HDA and also whether these predictors differed from those found in people with lower dental anxiety (LDA). Study participants (n = 596; response rate = 41.1%) comprised a random cross-sectional sample of the Australian adult population who completed a mailed self-complete questionnaire containing items relating to the use and accessibility of dental services, trust in dental professionals, dental anxiety, dental experiences, self-perceived oral health, vulnerability-related perceptions of visiting the dentist, and psychological health. Multiple imputation was used to replace missing values and statistically significant variables in bivariate analyses were entered into a multivariable logistic generalized linear model. More than two-thirds of participants with HDA were currently avoiding or delaying a dental visit. Among people with HDA, dental avoidance was independently and significantly predicted by difficulty paying a $300 dental bill, having no or only little trust in the last-visited dentist, perceived treatment need and dental anxiety. Among people with LDA, only perceived treatment need and dental anxiety predicted avoidance. In addition to their high anxiety, a number of additional barriers to dental visiting were found for people with HDA. These barriers, especially cost and communication issues with dentists, need to be addressed to assist people with HDA obtain necessary, regular dental care. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Dental students' motivation and the context of learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bettina Tjagvad; Netterstrom, Ingeborg; Kayser, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study shows dental students' motives for choosing the dental education and how the motives influence their motivation at the first semester of study. Further the study demonstrates the relevance of the context of learning. This issue is of importance when planning a curriculum...... for the dental education. The material consists of interviews with eight dental students. The results show that dental students were focused on their future professional role, its practical dimensions and their future working conditions. Their motivation for choosing the dental education was found to influence...... their motivation for studying and their experience of the relevance of the first semester. The dental students who had co-education with the medical students at the first year of study missed a dental context and courses with clinically relevant contents. In conclusion, our data signify the importance...

  20. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  1. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  2. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  3. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  4. Body mass index and dental caries in children aged 5 to 8 years attending a dental paediatric referral practice in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong-Lenters, M.; van Dommelen, P.; Schuller, A.A.; Verrips, E.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and dental caries are widely-recognised problems that affect general health. The prevention of both dental caries and obesity have proven very difficult: children and their parents may need professional support to achieve behaviour change. To find out whether both dental caries

  5. Body mass index and dental caries in children aged 5 to 8 years attending a dental paediatric referral practice in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong-Lenters, Maddelon; van Dommelen, Paula; Schuller, Annemarie A; Verrips, Erik H W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and dental caries are widely-recognised problems that affect general health. The prevention of both dental caries and obesity have proven very difficult: children and their parents may need professional support to achieve behaviour change. To find out whether both dental caries

  6. Ergonomics in dental pratice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Quaresemin de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of ergonomics is critical so that you can get a suitable working environment for professional, it is safe, healthy and comfortable. The objective was to identify whether the dental students followed the principles of ergonomics during clinical visits, evaluating, through photographs, compliance with ergonomic principles applied in dental practice, and finally identify the most affected sites by RSI / WMSDs of students enrolled in the dental clinic of the Faculdade IMED. Snapshots were made and only considered the position of the student operator, the same taken by the researcher using the mobile device. For each clinical procedure were taken two photographs in hidden angles to the student operator so that it did not change its ergonomic position to be observed. After obtaining the photos, they were evaluated and classified in scores from 0 to 3 according to the adequacy of the work placement, and then inserted into Excel and later in a database (SPSS 15.0. The following work is a cross-sectional, observational study, they were conducted in dental clinics IMED college. Among the 66 respondents, 14 were male and 52 female. It was found that 57 (86,3% reported feeling pain somewhere in the body, being the most affected sites neck (36.4%, and consecutively lower back (30.3% and higher than the back (27.3%. The results of the 63 procedures performed by the photographic shots were classified as “inadequate” in 49 procedures, “partially adequate” in 12 and “impossible to evaluate” in 2 procedures. The research results have shown a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and do not follow the ergonomic principles, emphasizing the need for more attention to ergonomics of the students.

  7. The Allied Dental Professions: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L

    2017-09-01

    This executive summary for Section 5 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project addresses the current and future educational systems for dental assisting, dental hygiene, dental therapy, and dental laboratory technology. Nineteen experts prepared six background articles on the educational changes necessary for future roles and practices. The key issues addressed relate to delivery system changes, educational curricula, scopes of practice, regulatory measures, and the public's oral health. The major finding is that substantial reforms will be needed to adequately prepare allied oral health professionals for the changes anticipated in 2040. A reconsideration of current accreditation guidelines, more flexibility with scopes of practice, and an adherence to rigorous academic programs are essential elements for the future of these professions.

  8. New leaders in dentistry: dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Leadership opportunities for dental students have opened dramatically in recent decades because of the humanistic approach to education that shares responsibility for learning between students and faculty and that values mutual respect. Technology has also had an effect because it creates instant access and global communities. This new student leadership is most apparent in the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), which recently developed a White Paper on ethics, assisted in the establishment of Student Professionalism and Ethics Clubs at schools, and is developing a policy on unsupervised dental care. Students are also demonstrating leadership in research; in dual degrees that enhance teaching and policy; and in community service and outreach.

  9. English education for healthcare professionals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moross, Janelle; Seki, Naoko; Morio, Ikuko

    2017-11-01

    In a global environment, education for healthcare professionals should include cultivating human resources who have the necessary skills to work in an international arena. This article will review the current status of English education for dental healthcare professionals in Japan. After conducting a literature search using the keywords: English education, Japan, and dental, only a few studies were found that investigated and proposed suggestions for dental professional English education. Even so, these were still in the early stages with outcomes yet to be fully evaluated. Even though English is thought indispensable for global professionals, and that increasing chances for communication skills is necessary, little attention has been addressed to English education for dental professionals or the implementation of such education in the Japanese undergraduate dental curricula. With the current reality of field expansion in dentistry, the need for not only improved English communication skills for Japanese dentists, but also the acquisition of essential expertise, psychomotor, teambuilding, critical thinking, and creative thinking skills in English as well as Japanese, is a definite probability. In order to reach this level of knowledge, further efforts and research would be necessary for the advancement and development of dental professional English education in Japan.

  10. State-sponsored dental terrorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, M

    2017-11-24

    Has the state's manipulation of the NHS dental contract systems deliberately, or accidentally, had corrupting effects on the behaviours of some members of the dental profession? If the answer is 'possibly' or 'probably', then obvious questions that follow include, 'was this done deliberately' and if so, 'why'? Could this have been done for largely altruistic reasons, or was it done to achieve government control for minimum cost? Might this have been undertaken for political, financial or ideological reasons - regardless of any adverse longer term consequences for some patients or for some dental professionals? Might it have been done to take greater control of the dental profession on the grounds that all professions are a conspiracy against the laity, as the mildly paranoid George Bernard Shaw once alleged? Is it possible that some of this manipulation might have been done to help to disempower yet another profession, allegedly to 'modernise it', but perhaps to enslave it for its own reasons? Was this just another example of some statist politicians wanting to interfere in all aspects of UK society, regardless of their lack of specific understanding, or any proven expertise, in many areas? Could the state's manipulation of contracts and processes be regarded as an abuse of power by a virtual monopoly, which has been used to control a largely altruistic profession by imposing corrupting NHS dental contract systems with the most recent one involving 'units of dental activity' (UDAs)? Perhaps it was really about some politicians wanting ever more power, control or money - their usual drivers - with the dental and medical professions accidentally becoming casualties?

  11. Radiological protection in quality control in dental radiology; Proteccion radiologica y control de calidad en radiologia dentaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Salaberry, Mirtha [Direccion National de Tecnologia Nuclear, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    1994-06-01

    Many regulations were given in this article about ionizing radiation biological effects in the dental area. With the purpose to find a good dentistry professional reception it presents procedures for the use of X-ray dental equipment.

  12. Dental considerations in cardiovascular patients: A practical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhry, Swantika; Jaiswal, Ritika; Sachdeva, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease trends, complications, and associated therapeutics impact the dental health and treatment. Such patients require special consideration with regard to when and which dental treatment is appropriate and what precautions are required. Alertness to potential oral adverse drug reactions enables referral of patient's to his physician or cardiologist. Cardiovascular drugs are also known to have mild to potentially fatal drug interactions. Dental professionals may be the first ...

  13. Emerging new modalities in dental radiology and radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Dental radiology is emerging day by day with technological innovations and new dental radiological equipments. These sophisticated new emerging technological raise a concern about the radiation emitted by these equipments. This becomes more relevant in the context that there is frequent diagnostic radiographic exposure of head and neck region due to recurrent dental problems. The presentation deals with radiation exposure to the patients and professionals from these equipments. (author)

  14. Is liberal independent dental practice in danger? Assessing forms of dental practice in the European Regional Organization (ERO) zone of the FDI World Dental Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Seeberger, Gerhard Konrad; Callaway, Angelika; Briseño-Marroquín, Benjamín; Rusca, Philippe; Frank, Michael; Otterbach, Ernst-Jürgen

    2018-02-26

    A trend towards increasingly new forms of dental practice has been observed in the FDI World Dental Federation. Elementary foundations such as the free dentist and therapy choice, and independent, free, self-responsible professional practice may be undermined. The current study is aimed at analyzing the general training framework, organization, and professional types of dental practice in the European Regional Organization (ERO) zone and at critically discussing selected aspects of changes in the dental profession. A questionnaire was developed by the ERO Working-Group "Liberal Dental Practice." Information about dental schools, professional organizations, dental practice regulations, and ambulatory healthcare centers was analyzed. Self-employed dental practice is the most common type of practice (51.7%). Dentists are allowed to work independently immediately after graduation (72.7%). Approximately one-third are organized as compulsory members in chambers/corporations. The density of dentists has a mean of 1,570 inhabitants per dentist. In most countries, there are no special rules for founding dental ambulatory healthcare centers. In a total of 353 universities of the ERO countries surveyed, 16,619 dentists per year were trained, with a trend toward a higher percentage of female students (63%). Despite modern forms of dental practice, the charter of the individual liberal dental profession (CED et al, 2013) should be respected and taken into account on the basis of ethical principles. The commercialization of the dental profession can be neutralized only by establishing and following well-defined ethical principles; oral healthcare quality can thus be ensured without the influence of third parties.

  15. Creation of a scholars program in dental leadership (SPDL) for dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Green, Thomas G; Polverini, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    There is a great need for leaders in the dental profession. As technological advances make our world smaller and our lives faster and more complex, we as a profession face challenges and opportunities that are evolving. Many of the changes in the scope and mode of practice will require new and different approaches. Meeting these challenges will require changes in how we as dental professionals do business; interact with our patients, other stakeholders, and health care providers; and educate our future colleagues. The purposeful incorporation of leadership education into dental and dental hygiene curricula represents an important departure from existing paradigms-but will help prepare our students to address these challenges. This article provides an overview of the development of a Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Our aim for the program is to create a learning environment that fosters leadership development, so that students are prepared and motivated to assume leadership positions in the profession and their communities.

  16. Clareamento Dental

    OpenAIRE

    Sossai, Najara; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Verdinelli, Ellen Carla; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Bassegio, Wagner; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR

    2011-01-01

    O clareamento dental já é utilizado há bastante tempo na Odontologia e atualmente é um dos tratamentos odontológicos mais solicitados para obtenção de um sorriso mais estético. Classificado em clareamento caseiro e/ou de consultório, ambas as técnicas são motivo de polêmica quanto aos seus benefícios, riscos, limitações e efeito clareador, bem como sobre qual é a melhor técnica existente para a promoção de um clareamento dental eficaz e seguro. Neste contexto, o presente estudo tem por objeti...

  17. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  18. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  19. Changes in Generic and Degree Completion Dental Hygiene Student Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sandra; Rubinstein, Linda

    1989-01-01

    A study compared the characteristics of dental hygiene students in two programs (bachelor's degree and two-year professional dental hygiene training) in 1978 and 1987 to assess changes over time. Results are presented and the implications for enrollment management are discussed. (MSE)

  20. Critical Thinking Skills of United States Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notgarnie, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of decision-making in dental hygienists' practice requires critical thinking skills. Interest in raising educational standards for entry into the dental hygiene profession is a response to the demand for enhanced professional skills, including critical thinking skills. No studies found in the course of literature review compared…

  1. 32 CFR 199.13 - TRICARE Dental Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... necessary for the residents to be professionally qualified to provide dental care for dependent children..., and licensed by an appropriate authority. (10) Dentist. Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) or Doctor... active duty, Selected Reserve or Individual Ready Reserve member. (2) Child. To be eligible, the child...

  2. Risk Judgment by General Dental practitioners: Rational but Uninformed

    OpenAIRE

    Ellervall, Eva; Brehmer, Berndt; Knutsson, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Decisions by dentists to administer antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infectious complications in patients involves professional risk assessment. While recommendations for rational use have been published, several studies have shown that dentists have low adherence to these recommendations. Objective: To examine general dental practitioners’ (GDPs’) assessments of the risk of complications if not administering antibiotic prophylaxis in connection with dental procedures in patients...

  3. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  4. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  5. Tanzania Dental Journal Vol. 15 No. 1, May 2008 25

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    of organizations allowing them to pool resources, avoid duplication and minimize impact. It encourages ... The results of the International. Collaborative .... health professionals in the Clinical, Dental,. Diagnostics ..... Research. Rockville, MD ...

  6. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  7. Competition and dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhdar, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiography must comply with the same regulations with which conventional radiography complies. Radiation doses to individual patients are low but, because of the large number of patients X-rayed, the collective dose to the population is not negligible. Care in siting and regular maintenance of the equipment will reduce doses to both staff and patients. To produce X-ray films with a good image quality using a low radiation dose requires attention to film processing; this is often a neglected area. (Author)

  9. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  10. The business of dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Widyanti Sriyono

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization including General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS and Asia Fair Trade Agreement (AFTA are a new free trade system. In globalization era, there will be an intense and free competition in looking for jobs throughout the world. This new system will affect the health services system in which health services tend to follow an industrial model. Meaning that dentistry or dental health services tend to be part of a business system, and this system has caused controversy among the community and the profession itself. The results of the discussion revealed that professional and business of dentistry is compatible and complementary. The tendency of increasing number of legal form of practice (group and a professional corporation and the worldwide advertisement of these practices supported the premise that delivering dental practice tends to follow the industrial model. Dentists should not only more focus on achieving financial success in running the business of practice but profession should have the most concern for the people who seek their services. Delivering quality of dental care depends on the high skill of the dentist and on the satisfactory income for the survival of the practice in the long run, and this make the practice will be viewed by the public and profession as being appropriate and of high quality. Facing the globalization, besides possessing high clinical skill, dentists must have a firm understanding of management concepts and apply them in their practice. In conclusion: The profession and the business of dentistry are compatible and complementary. The delivery of the dental services tends to follow the industrial model, which is a current reality. Dentist should concern more on the delivering high quality of dental services, not only focus on the business of the practice, although the satisfactory income is important for the survival growth of the practice in the long run. It is suggested for dentists to follow as

  11. Role of dental expert in forensic odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K.; Kumar, Sachil; Rathore, Shiuli; Pandey, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Forensic dentistry has become an integral part of forensic science over the past 100 years that utilizes dental or oro-facial findings to serve the judicial system. This has been due to the dedication of people like Gustafson's, Keiser-Nielson, and Suzuki for this field. They established the essential role which forensic dentistry plays mainly in the identification of human remains. The tooth has been used as weapons and under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize mal practice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identity of unknown individuals. This paper will try to summarize the various roles of dental experts in forensic medicine. PMID:25298709

  12. Disparities in children's oral health and access to dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, W E; Wehr, E; Crall, J J

    Dental caries can be prevented by a combination of community, professional, and individual measures including water fluoridation, professionally applied topical fluorides and dental sealants, and use of fluoride toothpastes. Yet, tooth decay is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Dental care is the most prevalent unmet health need in US children with wide disparities existing in oral health and access to care. Only 1 in 5 children covered by Medicaid received preventive oral care for which they are eligible. Children from low income and minority families have poorer oral health outcomes, fewer dental visits, and fewer protective sealants. Water fluoridation is the most effective measure in preventing caries, but only 62% of water supplies are fluoridated, and lack of fluoridation may disproportionately affect poor and minority children. Childhood oral disease has significant medical and financial consequences that may not be appreciated because of the separation of medicine and dentistry. The infectious nature of dental caries, its early onset, and the potential of early interventions require an emphasis on preventive oral care in primary pediatric care to complement existing dental services. However, many pediatricians lack critical knowledge to promote oral health. We recommend financial incentives for prioritizing Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment dental services; managed care accountability; integration of medical and dental professional training, clinical care, and research; and national leadership. JAMA. 2000;284:2625-2631.

  13. Social media and professionalism: does the profession need to re-think the parameters of professionalism within social media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Acl

    2017-03-01

    Social media is no longer a new concept, with social media platforms dominating how many communicate. It would be unrealistic to expect that dentistry would not become involved in the use of social media for professional reasons, as well as professionals using social media platforms privately. Despite it being acceptable for dental professionals to have social media presence, those dental professionals have a framework of professional, ethical and legal obligations to which they must conform when using social media. This article seeks to discuss how unintentionally professionalism may be breached by dental professionals not making a distinction between social media and other facets of professional life. There is need for a discussion about how as a profession, dentistry may perceive the effects of professional interaction with social media on the profession's wider relationship with society and whether current regulatory advice goes far enough to protecting the interests of patients. It is important for the use of social media by dental professionals to fit within the established social contract between the profession and society and failure to observe the terms of this will cause damage to the patient-professional relationship. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Estimating Demand for and Supply of Pediatric Preventive Dental Care for Children and Identifying Dental Care Shortage Areas, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Gentili, Monica; Griffin, Paul M; Griffin, Susan O; Harati, Pravara; Johnson, Ben; Serban, Nicoleta; Tomar, Scott

    Demand for dental care is expected to outpace supply through 2025. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of pediatric dental care shortages in Georgia and to develop a general method for estimation that can be applied to other states. We estimated supply and demand for pediatric preventive dental care for the 159 counties in Georgia in 2015. We compared pediatric preventive dental care shortage areas (where demand exceeded twice the supply) designated by our methods with dental health professional shortage areas designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. We estimated caries risk from a multivariate analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and national census data. We estimated county-level demand based on the time needed to perform preventive dental care services and the proportion of time that dentists spend on pediatric preventive dental care services from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pediatric preventive dental care supply exceeded demand in Georgia in 75 counties: the average annual county-level pediatric preventive dental care demand was 16 866 hours, and the supply was 32 969 hours. We identified 41 counties as pediatric dental care shortage areas, 14 of which had not been designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. Age- and service-specific information on dental care shortage areas could result in more efficient provider staffing and geographic targeting.

  15. Dental anxiety among adult patients and its correlation with self-assessed dental status and treatment needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, S.; Bilal, S.; Dawani, N.; Rizvi, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dental anxiety levels and to assess its correlation with self-assessed dental status and treatment needs of patients. Methods: The study was conducted at the Out Patient Department of Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Karachi. Using non-probability quota sampling, the study included the first 32 patients between 18 and 35 years of age, visiting the facility. Over a period of one month (22 working days) 704 patients comprised the study population. They were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to self-assess their dental anxiety levels, oral health status and treatment needs. The data was analysed using SPSS 17.0 with descriptive frequencies and chi-square test. Results: Of the total participants, 650 (92.32%) patients provided consent. Average dental anxiety scale score was 12.46, representing high anxiety score. There were 174 (26.8%) smokers; only 234 (36%) had visited a dentist less than a year ago; 385 (59.2%) considered their dental health to be satisfactory; 306 (47.1%) thought of their treatment needs to be little'; 222 (34.2%) brushed their teeth twice daily. Dental anxiety was statistically significant with treatment needs and dental status. Relation of tooth-brushing with last dental visit and treatment needs was also found to be significant. Conclusion: A high level of dental anxiety was observed among the study population. The dental professionals should seek ways to help dentally anxious individuals. (author)

  16. Cost as a barrier to accessing dental care: findings from a Canadian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brandy; Cooney, Peter; Lawrence, Herenia; Ravaghi, Vahid; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Canadians who report cost barriers to dental care. An analysis of data collected from the 2007/09 Canadian Health Measures Survey was undertaken from a sample of 5,586 Canadian participants aged 6-79. Cost barriers to dental care were operationalized through two questions: "In the past 12 months, have you avoided going to a dental professional because of the cost of dental care?" and "In the past 12 months, have you avoided having all the dental treatment that was recommended because of the cost?" Logistic regressions were conducted to identify relationships between covariates and positive responses to these questions. Approximately 17.3 percent of respondents had avoided a dental professional because of cost within the previous year, and 16.5 percent had declined recommended dental treatment because of cost. Adjusted estimates demonstrate that respondents with lower incomes and without dental insurance were over four times more likely to avoid a dental professional because of cost and approximately two and a half times more likely to decline recommended dental treatment because of cost. Nearly one out of five Canadians surveyed reported cost barriers to dental care. This study provides valuable baseline information for future studies to assess whether financial barriers to dental care are getting better or worse for Canadians. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  17. Occupational hazards to dental staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Ayatollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis; percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  18. Dental Practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by blood and blood products essentially occur through the use ... occupational risks and questions on the attitudes of the ... No response. 6 ... Figure 3: Dental professionals have a lower risk of being infected with .... Greeff M, Phetlhu R. The meaning and effect of HIV/AIDS .... For the purpose of printing, always retain a good.

  19. A discourse on dental hygiene education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z; Sunell, S; Boschma, G; Imai, P; Craig, B J

    2011-11-01

    Over the past decade, the discourse on dental hygiene education has gained momentum in Canada. This review provides insights into the evolution of dental hygiene education in Canada, briefly exploring the history and professional influences for diploma and baccalaureate education within the profession. The profession in Canada has yet to implement a national standardized entry-to-practice educational model, but the recent development of national educational competencies may prove to be a promising beginning. The review also discusses efforts to advance dental hygiene education in recent years, while exploring the political and professional pressures and challenges that remain. Further discourse on education and outcomes-related research can be effective in positively influencing governmental, professional and public opinions of higher entry-level education for dental hygiene which may ultimately result in regulatory change and improved client outcomes. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Sultanate of Oman: building a dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2015-06-22

    A medium- and long-term perspective is required in human resource development to ensure that future needs and demands for oral healthcare are met by the most appropriate health professionals. This paper presents a case study of the Sultanate of Oman, one of the Gulf States with a current population of 3.8 million, which has initiated dental training through the creation of a dental college. The objectives of this paper are first to describe trends in the dental workforce in Oman from 1990 to date and compare the dental workforce with its medical counterparts in Oman and with other countries, and second, to consider future dental workforce in the Sultanate. Data were collected from published sources, including the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Manpower (MoM), and Ministry of National Economy (MoNE)-Sultanate of Oman; the World Health Organization (WHO); World Bank; and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Dentist-to-population ratios were compared nationally, regionally and globally for medicine and dentistry. Dental graduate outputs were mapped onto the local supply. Future trends were examined using population growth predictions, exploring the expected impact in relation to global, regional and European workforce densities. Population growth in Oman is increasing at a rate of over 2% per year. Oman has historically been dependent upon an expatriate dental workforce with only 24% of the dentist workforce Omani in 2010 (n = 160). Subsequent to Oman Dental College (ODC) starting to qualify dental (BDS) graduates in 2012, there is an increase in the annual growth of the dentist workforce. On the assumption that all future dental graduates from ODC have an opportunity to practise in Oman, ODC graduates will boost the annual Omani dentist growth rate starting at 28% per annum from 2012 onwards, building capacity towards global (n = 1711) and regional levels (Gulf State: n = 2167) in the medium term. The output of dental graduates from Oman Dental College is

  1. Pressures on the dental care system in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotman, S; Goldman, H

    1982-07-01

    A number of significant pressures are creating tensions in the dental profession and the dental care delivery system. These pressures may be categorized in five major areas: 1) regulation and deregulation pressures involve changes in the state dental practice acts, court decisions concerning antitrust and advertising, and the inclusion of consumers on State professional regulatory boards; 2) cost of services includes factors involving the out-of-pocket cost of dental care and the growth of dental insurance; 3) dentist-related factors include the increased number of dentists and the indebtedness of dental graduates; 4) the pressures of changes in the American populations include the decline in population growth and the increase in proportion of elderly people; 5) changes in the distribution of dental care are based on new epidemiologic data concerning dental caries and progress in the prevention of periodontal disease. Many of these pressures are inducing competition in the dental care system. It is clear that the dental care system is in the process of change as it responds to these complex pressures.

  2. A marketing strategy for the dental public health profession: what is it? Why is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Rusinowitz, L

    1988-01-01

    A personnel management problem exists within dental public health that interferes with its mission of improving the nation's oral health. A major cause of this problem may be that many administrators who write position descriptions and hire professional staff are unaware of differences between clinical and public health dental practitioners. A marketing plan has been developed to address this lack of awareness about proper use of dental public health professionals. Its main goal is to establish more appropriate personnel and employment practices within dental public health. The expected outcomes of this plan could assist both recipients of dental public health services and members of the profession. The purpose of this article is to introduce the marketing strategy to dental public health professionals.

  3. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practices among health professionals in King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Oral health knowledge among the health professionals working in KFMC, Riyadh was lower than what would be expected of these groups, which had higher literacy levels in health care, but they showed a positive attitude toward professional dental care.

  4. What's in a name? Nominative determinism in the UK dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, J

    2016-12-16

    Background Nominative determinism describes the theory that people are more likely to pursue careers that are connected to their names. Compelling research has been carried out across the medical professions that provides strong evidence for this phenomenon, but as yet its applicability to the UK dental workforce remains unknown.Aim The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of dentally-related surnames in the UK dental workforce (dentists and dental care professionals) and compare this to the UK population.Results Dentistry may provide a surprising counter-example to prevailing theories of nominative determinism, as UK dentists are significantly less likely than the UK general population to have dentally-related surnames. This new phenomenon of 'nominative antideterminism' was not observed in the dental care professional (DCP) cohort, for whom the prevalence of dentally-related surnames was similar to that in the wider UK population.

  5. The dead center of the dental curriculum: changing attitudes of dental students during dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Christopher J; Townsend, Grant C

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in dental students' perceptions of professionalism, knowledge, and emotion over the period of dissection in a human anatomy course. Whether human dissection needs to be a part of the modern dental curriculum is often called into question, particularly with the plethora of electronic and other aids available to support the learning of anatomy. The influence of the dissection process on development of professional attitudes and emotional maturity has been studied in medical students, but how dental students react to this part of their education is less well known. To investigate this question, a survey was administered before and after the dissection course to two sequential year groups of dental students. It was found that these students had high levels of understanding of professional values before commencing dissection and continued to value the role of teamwork in aiding their learning over the survey period. The majority of students coped well with the assimilation of knowledge and developed coping mechanisms to handle the emotional aspects of dissection. The students remained excited by and interested in dissection, and the majority valued it as the most positive aspect of their anatomy course. The students increasingly valued the use of prosected specimens as an aid to learning. This study confirmed that significant changes occur in dental students' attitudes during the period of dissection, which we believe contribute to the development of more empathetic and caring practitioners.

  6. Ethnicity and perception of dental shade esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Muhammad Omar; Naseem, Mustafa; Elcock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether or not people from different ethnic backgrounds have different attitudes towards dental esthetics and chose different dental appearances in terms of tooth shade, and to determine whether the dental professional's choice and the individual's own choice have any relationship with what the individual ideally perceives as esthetically pleasing. For this cross-sectional analytical study, 120 volunteer students from the University of Sheffield (excepting dental students) from various ethnic backgrounds, of different ages, of both genders, and with varying degree/educational levels were recruited from the campus. The volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire containing 9 adapted attitudinal statements regarding positive or negative dental esthetic perceptions in terms of tooth shade, with responses on a 5-point Likert scale from "Entirely agree" to "Entirely disagree". Scores for all attitudinal statements were summed up to give an attitudinal score. The participants' ideal, perceived, and actual (self-assessed and investigatorassessed) tooth shade was also determined using a shade guide and a facial mirror. No association between ethnicity and attitudinal score was found. However, statistically significant associations were found between the participants' degree/educational level (P=0.004, 95% Confidence Interval (CI)=-4.18 to -0.82) and their ideal tooth shade value (P=0.038, 95% CI=-3.53 to -0.11). There were strong correlations between self-assessed and professionally assessed tooth shade value in all ethnic groups, with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho) being ρ>0.6. Regarding ideally desired and perceived tooth shade value, weak correlations were found in all ethnic groups (Spearman's rho being ρethnicity and attitude towards dental esthetics with regard to tooth shade, both ethnicity and dental esthetics are very diverse terms with multiple dimensions, each of which needs further investigation with regard to their mutual

  7. An assessment of professionalism on students' Facebook profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, K N; Byrne, H; Nason, G J; O'Connell, B

    2018-02-01

    With the advent of social media, healthcare professionals not only need to be conscious of professionalism in their face-to-face interactions but also in the electronic environment. The aim of this study was to assess the level of online professionalism on Facebook profiles available for public viewing of students from a dental school. A search was performed via a new Facebook account of all students in the University Dental School (dental hygiene, dental nursing, dental science and dental technology). Profiles were categorised as 'private' or 'public'. Demographic details and photographs/comments of unprofessional behaviour were recorded for each individual Facebook profile. Each profile was subsequently scored with regard to professionalism based on a previously published score. There are a total of 287 students in the dental school. Of these, 62% (n = 177) had a Facebook account. Three per cent (n = 6) had a public account (fully accessible) whilst 97% (n = 171) had a private account (limited access); 36% (n = 63) of students mentioned the dental school/hospital on their profile; 34% (n = 60) had questionable content on their profile whilst 3% (n = 6) had definite violations of professionalism on their profile; and 25% (n = 44) had unprofessional photographs on their profile. Of those with unprofessional content, 52% (n = 23) of these had a documented affiliation with the dental school also visible on their profile. There was a concerning level of unprofessional content visible on students' Facebook profiles. Students need to be fully aware of their professional responsibility in the setting of social media. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Dental Education Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Internal dental school environmental factors promoting faculty survival and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-04-01

    A career in dental academics offers ample rewards and challenges. To promote successful careers in dental education, prospective and new dental faculty should possess a realistic view of the dental school work environment, akin to the informed consent so valuable to patients and doctors. Self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses provides helpful information in matching faculty applicants with appropriate dental schools. Essential prehiring information also includes a written job description detailing duties and responsibilities, professional development opportunities, and job performance evaluation protocol. Prehiring awareness of what constitutes excellence in job performance will aid new faculty in allotting time to productive venues. New faculty should not rely solely on professional expertise to advance careers. Research and regular peer-reviewed publications are necessary elements in academic career success, along with the ability to secure governmental, private foundation, and corporate grant support. Tactful self-promotion and self-definition to the dental school community are faculty responsibilities, along with substantial peer collaboration. The recruitment period is a singular opportunity to secure job benefits and privileges. It is also the time to gain knowledge of institutional culture and assess administrative and faculty willingness to collaborate on teaching, research, professional development, and attainment of change. Powerful people within dental schools and parent institutions may influence faculty careers and should be identified and carefully treated. The time may come to leave one's position for employment at a different dental school or to step down from full-time academics. Nonetheless, the world of dental and health professional education in 2005 is rapidly expanding and offers unlimited opportunities to dedicated, talented, and informed educators.

  9. Dental and General Trauma in Team Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Mateja; Kühl, Sebastian; Šlaj, Martina; Connert, Thomas; Filippi, Andreas

    Handball has developed into a much faster and high-impact sport over the past few years because of rule changes. Fast sports with close body contact are especially prone to orofacial trauma. Handball belongs to a category of sports with medium risk for dental trauma. Even so, there is only little literature on this subject. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the type of injuries, especially the occurrence of orofacial trauma, habits of wearing mouthguards, as well as degree of familiarity with the tooth rescue box. For this purpose, 77.1% (n=542/703) of all top athletes and coaches from the two highest Swiss leagues (National League A and National League B), namely 507 professional players and 35 coaches, were personally interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. 19.7% (n=100/507) of the players experienced dental trauma in their handball careers, with 40.8% (n=51/125) crown fractures being the most frequent by far. In spite of the relatively high risk of lip or dental trauma, only 5.7% (n=29/507) of the players wear mouthguards. The results of this study show that dental trauma is common among Swiss handball players. In spite of the high risk of dental trauma, the mouthguard as prevention is not adequately known, and correct procedure following dental trauma is rarely known at all.

  10. Risk of Fungal Infection to Dental Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Lopes Damasceno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi can cause various diseases, and some pathogenic fungi have been detected in the water of dental equipment. This environment offers suitable conditions for fungal biofilms to emerge, which can facilitate mycological contamination. This study verified whether the water employed in the dental units of two dental clinics at the University of Franca was contaminated with fungi. This study also evaluated the ability of the detected fungi to form biofilms. The high-revving engine contained the largest average amount of fungi, 14.93 ± 18.18 CFU/mL. The main fungal species verified in this equipment belonged to the genera Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., Candida spp., and Rhodotorula spp. Among the isolated filamentous fungi, only one fungus of the genus Fusarium spp. did not form biofilms. As for yeasts, all the Candida spp. isolates grew as biofilm, but none of the Rhodotorula spp. isolates demonstrated this ability. Given that professionals and patients are often exposed to water and aerosols generated by the dental procedure, the several fungal species detected herein represent a potential risk especially to immunocompromised patients undergoing dental treatment. Therefore, frequent microbiological monitoring of the water employed in dental equipment is crucial to reduce the presence of contaminants.

  11. A Review of Mercury Exposure and Health of Dental Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Nagpal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerable effort has been made to address the issue of occupational health and environmental exposure to mercury. This review reports on the current literature of mercury exposure and health impacts on dental personnel. Citations were searched using four comprehensive electronic databases for articles published between 2002 and 2015. All original articles that evaluated an association between the use of dental amalgam and occupational mercury exposure in dental personnel were included. Fifteen publications from nine different countries met the selection criteria. The design and quality of the studies showed significant variation, particularly in the choice of biomarkers as an indicator of mercury exposure. In several countries, dental personnel had higher mercury levels in biological fluids and tissues than in control groups; some work practices increased mercury exposure but the exposure levels remained below recommended guidelines. Dental personnel reported more health conditions, often involving the central nervous system, than the control groups. Clinical symptoms reported by dental professionals may be associated with low-level, long-term exposure to occupational mercury, but may also be due to the effects of aging, occupational overuse, and stress. It is important that dental personnel, researchers, and educators continue to encourage and monitor good work practices by dental professionals.

  12. Training in the field of dental CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantone, M.C.; Biazzi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Since some years the Cone Beam CT or CT volumetric Technique 'cone beam' (CBCT examination), developed with clinical applications in fields such as Interventional Radiology, surgery, intraoperative radiotherapy, breast imaging and dental. All the professional figures involved with CBCT must have received adequate training to practice the theoretical radiological application considered and have relevant expertise in the field of radiation protection. This can be especially critical in the area of dental and maxillofacial CBCT, where the dentist has not received adequate training in radiological field. It also required continuous training, in particular when new equipment are adopted and CBCT.

  13. Program Design Considerations for Leadership Training for Dental and Dental Hygiene Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.; Nelson, Bonnie A.; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C.; Thompson, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Since leadership is an essential part of the oral health professions, oral health educators can play an essential role in establishing a culture of leadership and in mentoring students to prepare them for future leadership roles within the profession. However, leadership training for oral health professionals is a relatively new concept and is frequently not found within dental and dental hygiene curricula. The purpose of this article is to propose several models for leadership training that are specific to the oral health professions. The authors hope that providing an overview of leadership programs in academic dental institutions will encourage all U.S. and Canadian dental schools to begin developing a culture that promotes leadership development. PMID:22319084

  14. Variation, certainty, evidence, and change in dental education: employing evidence-based dentistry in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, V C; Richards, D; Niederman, R

    2001-05-01

    Variation in health care, and more particularly in dental care, was recently chronicled in a Readers Digest investigative report. The conclusions of this report are consistent with sound scientific studies conducted in various areas of health care, including dental care, which demonstrate substantial variation in the care provided to patients. This variation in care parallels the certainty with which clinicians and faculty members often articulate strongly held, but very different opinions. Using a case-based dental scenario, we present systematic evidence-based methods for accessing dental health care information, evaluating this information for validity and importance, and using this information to make informed curricular and clinical decisions. We also discuss barriers inhibiting these systematic approaches to evidence-based clinical decision making and methods for effectively promoting behavior change in health care professionals.

  15. 'Vacation for your teeth' - dental tourists in Hungary from the perspective of Hungarian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, E; Szocska, G

    2013-10-01

    Hungary has become a popular destination for foreign patients in the last two decades, particularly in dental care. Since 2008, increasing prices in Western Europe coupled with Hungary's accessibility and availability of dental treatment, has meant the country has become a leader in 'dental tourism'. As the quality of care in Hungary is high and prices are more affordable than in Western Europe, and due to the freedom of movement of people, services and goods within the EU, patient flow into Hungary has increased progressively. The aim of this article is to provide comprehensive empirical evidence from the perspective of a recipient country in dental tourism. A questionnaire survey was conducted among Hungarian dentists (n = 273). Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with representatives of dental professional bodies (n = 10). Both research methods aimed to elicit dentists' views on the presence of dental tourism - particularly the push and pull factors (for example, source countries, competitors, information sources, patient motivation). The findings show that there are several reasons why Hungary could maintain a leading position in dental tourism. First, the cost/benefit ratio is outstanding. The affordable price and value for money were already recognised in the early 1990s and were appreciated even before Hungary joined the EU. Secondly, the high quality of Hungary's dental profession: a) dental professionals in Hungary are well-qualified dental practitioners who have received high level dental training; b) dental professional standards are up-to-date and often supervised; c) in Hungary dental technology, the quality of materials and equipment used in dental practices is of European level quality. The rate of complications in dental care is around 5%, similar to other European countries. Finally, previous treatment experiences are positive and patient satisfaction levels are high. More and more patients seek care in Hungary, and more and more

  16. Anatomical sciences: A foundation for a solid learning experience in dental technology and dental prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Mahmoud M; Thompson, C Mark; Massadiq, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    Basic science courses are extremely important as a foundation for scaffolding knowledge and then applying it in future courses, clinical situations as well as in a professional career. Anatomical sciences, which include tooth morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and head and neck anatomy form a core part of the preclinical courses in dental technology programs. In this article, the importance and relevance of anatomical sciences to dental personnel with no direct contact with patients (dental technicians) and limited discipline related contact with patients (dental prosthetists) is highlighted. Some light is shed on the role of anatomical sciences in the pedagogical framework and its significance in the educational process and interprofessional learning of dental technicians and prosthetists using oral biology as an example in the dental curriculum. To conclude, anatomical sciences allow dental technicians and prosthetists to a gain a better insight of how tissues function, leading to a better understanding of diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning and referrals if needed. Patient communication and satisfaction also increases as a result of this deep understanding of oral tissues. Anatomical sciences bridge the gap between basic science, preclinical, and clinical courses, which leads to a holistic approach in patient management. Finally, treatment outcomes are positively affected due to the appreciation of the macro and micro structure of oral tissues. Anat Sci Educ 10: 395-404. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  17. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  18. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  19. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CE providers and find CE courses. Commission on Dental Accreditation Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations Learn about the examinations used in licensing ...

  20. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  1. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Autumn Giving: ‘Fall’ into the Future of Dental Hygiene Support the Institute for Oral Health! Give ... best for your patients! Learn More Sidebar Menu Dental Hygiene Programs Continuing Education Career Center Annual Conference ...

  2. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  3. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  4. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  5. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  6. California Dental Hygiene Educators' Perceptions of an Application of the ADHA Advanced Dental Hygiene Practitioner (ADHP) Model in Medical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren; Walsh, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    To assess California dental hygiene educators' perceptions of an application of the American Dental Hygienists' Association's (ADHA) advanced dental hygiene practitioner model (ADHP) in medical settings where the advanced dental hygiene practitioner collaborates in medical settings with other health professionals to meet clients' oral health needs. In 2014, 30 directors of California dental hygiene programs were contacted to participate in and distribute an online survey to their faculty. In order to capture non-respondents, 2 follow-up e-mails were sent. Descriptive analysis and cross-tabulations were analyzed using the online survey software program, Qualtrics™. The educator response rate was 18% (70/387). Nearly 90% of respondents supported the proposed application of the ADHA ADHP model and believed it would increase access to care and reduce oral health disparities. They also agreed with most of the proposed services, target populations and workplace settings. Slightly over half believed a master's degree was the appropriate educational level needed. Among California dental hygiene educators responding to this survey, there was strong support for the proposed application of the ADHA model in medical settings. More research is needed among a larger sample of dental hygiene educators and clinicians, as well as among other health professionals such as physicians, nurses and dentists. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  7. Towards building the oral health care workforce: who are the new dental therapists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M; Lopez, Naty

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, Minnesota Governor Pawlenty signed into law a bill approving the creation of a new dental team member: the dental therapist. The intent of this legislation was to address oral health disparities by creating a dental professional who would expand access to dental care in Minnesota. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of the first class of dental therapy students at the University of Minnesota and to ascertain the values and motivations that led them to choose a career in dental therapy. Four surveys were used to create the composite profile of the ten students in this first dental therapy class: 1) the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, 2) the Learning Type Measure, 3) the Attitudes Toward Healthcare Survey, and 4) a values and motivation survey that included demographic data. The results of the surveys revealed interacting influences of the students' background, personal self-concept, and environment leading to a career decision to pursue dental therapy.

  8. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  9. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to

  10. Marketing Dental Services | Tuominen | Tanzania Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Marketing Dental Services. R Tuominen. Abstract. No Abstract.

  11. Qualitative description of dental hygiene practices within oral health and dental care perspectives of Mexican-American adults and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; Aguirre-Zero, Odette; Westerhold, Chi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify dental hygiene themes voiced by adults and teenagers of Mexican origin [or Mexican Americans (MAs)] and place these themes within the larger landscape of oral health and dental care perceptions. Interviews with urban-based MAs were analyzed to identify barriers, beliefs, and behaviors influencing engagement in dental hygiene practices. Adult (n = 16, ages 33-52) and teenage (n = 17, ages 14-19) MAs reported themes pertaining to structural factors (financial and economic-related barriers, the dual challenges of reduced access to care vis-à-vis successfully navigating the dental care system, and the effects of reduced social support derived from migration) and to individual factors (different agendas between MAs and health systems for dental care utilization and indications for oral self-care, including limited dental hygiene instruction from professionals and larger impacts from school-based and mass media). Also, prior experiences with dental hygiene, prevention, and associated themes were characterized by a range of attitudes from fatalistic to highly determined agency. Good family upbringing was instrumental for appropriate dental hygiene, anteceding good oral health; and outlining a loose structure of factors affecting oral health such as diet, having "weak" teeth, or personal habits. Themes from adults and teenagers in the Midwest United States were generally similar to other groups of MA parents and younger children. Dental hygiene was not salient relative to other oral health and dental care matters. Several opportunities for improvement of knowledge and enhancing motivation for dental hygiene practices were identified, both within and outside professional resources. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  12. Implementation of an Outcome-Based Longitudinal Pharmacology Teaching in Undergraduate Dental Curriculum at KSAU-HS Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmalik M. Alkatheri

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/objectives: The aim of this study is to present a modification of the structure of the pharmacology educational experience for dental students as a result of the early introduction of a pharmacology course into the pre-professional curriculum. Methods: Three courses of professional dental pharmacology were modified before and/or after delivery by developing general course learning outcomes, lecture-by-lecture learning outcomes and theme mapping to align topics taught within these courses and with those taught in the pre-professional dental program. Results: Final proposals for three professional dental pharmacology courses, which are distributed over three professional years, were prepared based on teaching experience and theme mapping. Topics were added, deleted, transferred from one course to another to afford courses that are fully aligned, relatively comprehensive, longitudinal, with focus on topics relevant to the dental practice without redundancy. In addition, the design of these courses took into consideration the level of coverage of the pre-professional dental pharmacology course. Conclusions: This longitudinal inclusion of pharmacology courses form the second pre-professional year to the third professional year is expected to improve dental students’ pharmacology education experience. Although the last of these courses is a pharmacotherapeutic course, more courses with clinically oriented therapeutic approach are recommended. Keywords: Pharmacology course design, Dental students, Curriculum development, Curriculum mapping

  13. Dental students' motivation and the context of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Bettina Tjagvad; Netterstrom, Ingeborg; Kayser, Lars

    2009-02-01

    This qualitative study shows dental students' motives for choosing the dental education and how the motives influence their motivation at the first semester of study. Further the study demonstrates the relevance of the context of learning. This issue is of importance when planning a curriculum for the dental education. The material consists of interviews with eight dental students. The results show that dental students were focused on their future professional role, its practical dimensions and their future working conditions. Their motivation for choosing the dental education was found to influence their motivation for studying and their experience of the relevance of the first semester. The dental students who had co-education with the medical students at the first year of study missed a dental context and courses with clinically relevant contents. In conclusion, our data signify the importance of the context of learning. It is recommended that a future curriculum for the dental school should be designed in a way where basic science subjects are taught with both theoretically as well as practically oriented subjects and in a context which is meaningful for the students.

  14. Dental management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dağ, Canan; Bezgin, Tuğba; Özalp, Nurhan

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of rare, genetic skin disorders characterized by fragility and blistering to minimal trauma. All oral surfaces may be involved, including the tongue, buccal mucosa, palate, floor of the mouth and gingiva. Common oral findings of the disease include microstomia, intraoral ulcerations and bullae formation, ankyloglossia, tongue atrophy, elimination of buccal and vestibular sulci, lingual depapillation and atrophy of the palatal folds. In these case reports; systemic findings, oral manifestations and preventive measures are described for 3 patients with EB, all of whom required extensive oral management. Early dental management and preventive care to minimize caries development and improve oral health is very important for patients with EB. Pediatric dentists play an especially important role in early intervention. In describing the dental management of three EB cases, this article stresses the importance of an aggressive dental preventive programme with strict oral hygiene instructions for patients and parents along with frequent professional cleaning and fluoride therapy.

  15. Assessment of occupational exposure of dental professionals to mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil = Avaliação da exposição ocupacional de profissionais de odontologia ao mercúrio em unidades básicas de saúde de Maringá, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Minervino de Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the occupational exposure of dental professionals to metallic mercury in dental offices of a public primary health care in the city of Maringá, Brazil, samples of blood and urine were collected from 149 dental professionals (group exposed, and 51 healthy adults similar for age and gender of the exposed group (control group in September and October, 2008. Urinary mercury was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, urea and creatinine in blood and urine by UV/VIS spectrophotometry and analysis of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the urine by reactive bands. The program ‘Statistic��� version 7.1 and the software R version 2.6.2 were used for the statistical calculations. Urinary mercury was 2.08  2.11 µg g-1 creatinine in workers exposed to mercury and 0.36  0.62 µg g-1 creatinine in the control group (p Para avaliar a exposição ocupacional dos profissionais de odontologia ao mercúrio metálico nas Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS de Maringá, Brasil, foram coletadas amostras de sangue e urina de 149 profissionais de odontologia (grupo exposto e de 51 adultos saudáveis similares em relação à idade e ao gênero do grupo exposto (grupo controle, no período de setembro e outubro de 2008. Foi determinado o mercúrio urinário por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica, a uréia e creatinina no sangue por espectrofotometria UV/VIS, e análise dos aspectos físicos, químicos e microbiológicos da urina por fitas reativas. Para a análise estatística foi utilizado o programa Statistic versão 7.1 e o R versão 2.6.2. O mercúrio urinário foi 2,08 ± 2,11 µg g-1 de creatinina nos profissionais expostos ao mercúrio e 0,36 ± 0,62 µg g-1 de creatinina no grupo controle (p < 0,05. Os níveis de mercúrio urinário detectados estavam abaixo do Índice Biológico Máximo Permitido estabelecido no Brasil (35 µg g-1 de creatinina, 11% destes profissionais (n=16

  16. PROVIDING DENTAL CARE FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana MURARU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorders, it is realistic to assume that dental professionals are likely to treat individuals with this diagnosis. Understanding the complexities of this disorder and its behavioral manifestations is indispensable for dentists. The present article presents several characteristics of autism spectrum disorder that impact dental interventions, along with medical and behavioral alternatives to better manage the dental problems of children with autism spectrum disorder. A multidisciplinary approach and family support are important for planning a dental intervention for these patients in order to avoid anxiety. Knowledge on autism, the dentist-patient relationship and the individual preparation for dental interventions is useful for constructing a controllable medical experience

  17. Dental ergonomics: Basic steps to enhance work efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim Shaik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the dental profession and the postures assumed by the dental surgeons during their professional work has a huge impact on the dental surgeon′s body and carries with it a high risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. To perform efficiently and effectively, they shall always like to attain a position that allows them to achieve optimum access, visibility, comfort, and control at all times. Good ergonomic design of the workplace is a basic requirement for facilitating the balanced musculoskeletal health that will enable longer, healthier career, enhance productivity, and minimize MSDs among dental surgeons. While treating the patients, they are concerned about patients′ comfort and pay little attention to their own health till they begin to experience discomfort in their body. With a little attention and creativity, dental surgeons can improve their comfort on the job during the course of their career.

  18. Online directed journaling in dental hygiene clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwozdek, Anne E; Klausner, Christine P; Kerschbaum, Wendy E

    2009-01-01

    Reflecting upon and sharing of clinical experiences in dental hygiene education is a strategy used to support the application of didactic material to patient care. The promotion of interactive, clinically focused discussions creates opportunities for students to foster critical thinking and socialization skills in dental hygiene practice. Twenty-eight dental hygiene students in their first semester of patient care utilized online directed journaling via blogging software, as a reflection and sharing strategy. Journal entries found critical thinking and socialization themes including connection of didactic material to clinical experience, student-patient interaction, student-student collaboration, and a vision of the professional role of the dental hygienist. A 7 item evaluation instrument provided data that the online journaling strategy was perceived as effective and valuable by the students. Online directed journaling is a strategy that has the potential to enhance critical thinking and socialization skills in dental hygiene clinical education.

  19. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  20. Dental education in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Sato, Manuel; Rodiguez, Lyly; Sato, Doris; Bird, William F

    2008-09-01

    This paper provides information about Peru's dental history and dental school system, including the curriculum and dental licensure. With the increase in the number of dental schools in Peru, the number of dentists is also increasing. Until 1965, Peru had only three dental schools; currently, there are 14. Four of these dental schools are public, and ten are private. A five- or six-year dental program leads to the B.D.S. degree. After successful completion of a thesis defense or competency examination, the D.D.S. degree is awarded. The D.D.S. is mandatory for practicing dentistry in Peru. Currently, there are approximately 14,000 active dentists, with a dentist-patient ratio of approximately 1:2,000.

  1. Workforce re-entry for Japanese unemployed dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Y; Miura, H

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the profile of unemployed dental hygienists who could be enticed to re-enter the workforce and the factors that could facilitate their re-entry into the dental field in Japan. The questionnaire was mailed with a postage-paid return envelope to a sample of 3095 licensed dental hygienists. A 50.4% response rate (S = 1477) was observed. The rate of working dental hygienists was 60.3% (n = 891), and of unemployed dental hygienists was 39.7% (n = 586). Of the latter, 31.9% (n = 187) stated intentions of returning to the workplace. The unemployed dental hygienists seeking employment were more often married and had more children, compared with working dental hygienists currently. This group also had significantly fewer total service years. Moreover, only 11.96% of them belonged to the Japan Dental Hygienists' Association, and 41.3% of those attended training workshops. According to their response, they perceived their top three major barriers to re-entry as 'lack sufficient dental hygiene skill', 'child rearing' and 'poor working atmosphere'. 'Flexibility in the work schedule' and 'location' were the most important factors for re-entry from their perspective. There were not many dental hygienists hoping to return to the dental field. The findings suggested that strategies to encourage non-practicing dental hygienists to re-entry should be emphasized in the areas of a flexible working atmosphere, easy access to information on how to return to practice and guidance on how to maintain professionalism during inactivity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hazardous radiological waste-dental and environmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Dental radiology is concerned with maxillo-facial radiological diagnostic procedure. It is meant for patient welfare and to generate diagnostically useful information, which can be utilized for patient welfare. If injudiciously used, it can become a source of harmful effluents and solid waste, which may pose risk to health and environment. Professionals of dental radiology should be aware about their responsibility to dispose such waste in the rightful manner to fulfil their medical pledge and ethics of doing no harm. (author)

  3. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  4. Towards a specific approach to education in dental ethics: a proposal for organising the topics of biomedical ethics for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkey, Sefik; Guven, Tolga; Sert, Gurkan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding dental ethics as a field separate from its much better known counterpart, medical ethics, is a relatively new, but necessary approach in bioethics. This need is particularly felt in dental education and establishing a curriculum specifically for dental ethics is a challenging task. Although certain topics such as informed consent and patient rights can be considered to be of equal importance in both fields, a number of ethical issues in dental practice are only remotely-if at all-relevant for medical practice. Therefore, any sound approach to education in dental ethics has to recognise the unique aspects of dental practice in order to meet the needs of dental students and prepare them for the ethical challenges they may face during their professional practice. With this goal in mind, this paper examines the approach of the authors to dental ethics education and proposes a system to organise the topics of biomedical ethics for dental education. While the authors' perspective is based on their experience in Turkey, the proposed system of classification is not a rigid one; it is open to interpretation in other contexts with different social, cultural and professional expectations. Therefore, the paper also aims to inspire discussion on the development of an ideal dental ethics curriculum at an international level.

  5. The Doctoral Degree in Dental Hygiene: Creating New Oral Healthcare Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur

    2016-06-01

    Doctoral dental hygiene education would prepare scholars and leaders to improve population health through changes in oral health policy and delivery. Discussions about doctoral education in dental hygiene have centered on the need to create a cadre of dental hygiene researchers and scholars who will expand the body of knowledge for the profession. It has been proposed that scholars are needed to lead the development of theory and disseminate knowledge unique to the discipline of dental hygiene. Transformation to doctoral education is not a new trend as many other health care disciplines have already implemented curricular models, establishing the doctoral degree for entry level into practice. The Institute of Medicine has called for the exploration of new models for care delivery. Dental hygienists need to be prepared with leadership skills enabling them to participate and lead interprofessional teams and develop policies designed to improve the delivery of oral health care services to enhance population health. Current educational models do not adequately prepare dental hygienists to serve in this capacity. The purpose of this article is to present 2 models of doctoral education for dental hygiene that will illustrate how dental hygienists can be better prepared as scholars and leaders for the profession. These proposed models of doctoral education in dental hygiene present a paradigm shift in dental hygiene education. As with other disciplines that have evolved, both academically and professionally, dental hygiene will be positioned to achieve the hallmark of professional status with this terminal degree. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  7. Advantages of the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Initiative and Its Role in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, Frederick A.; Grill, Ashley C.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.; Vena, Don; Keenan, Analia V.; Naftolin, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a novel venue in which providers can increase their knowledge base and improve delivery of care through participation in clinical studies. This article describes some aspects of our experience with a National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-supported PBRN and discusses the role it can play in dental education. PBRNs create a structured pathway for providers to advance their professional development by participating in the process of collecting data through clinical research. This process allows practitioners to contribute to the goals of evidence-based dentistry by helping to provide a foundation of evidence on which to base clinical decisions as opposed to relying on anecdotal evidence. PBRNs strengthen the professional knowledge base by applying the principles of good clinical practice, creating a resource for future dental faculty, training practitioners on best practices, and increasing the responsibility, accountability, and scope of care. PBRNs can be the future pivotal instruments of change in dental education, the use of electronic health record systems, diagnostic codes, and the role of comparative effectiveness research, which can create an unprecedented opportunity for the dental profession to advance and be integrated into the health care system. PMID:21828299

  8. Integrated Medical-Dental Delivery Systems: Models in a Changing Environment and Their Implications for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith A; Snyder, John J; Gesko, David S; Helgeson, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Models and systems of the dental care delivery system are changing. Solo practice is no longer the only alternative for graduating dentists. Over half of recent graduates are employees, and more than ever before, dentists are practicing in groups. This trend is expected to increase over the next 25 years. This article examines various models of dental care delivery, explains why it is important to practice in integrated medical-dental teams, and defines person-centered care, contrasting it with patient-centered care. Systems of care in which teams are currently practicing integrated oral health care delivery are described, along with speculation on the future of person-centered care and the team approach. Critical steps in the education of dental and other health care professionals and the development of clinical models of care in moving forward are considered. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  9. STIGMA AROUND HIV IN DENTAL CARE: PATIENTS' EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario A; Phillips, J Craig; Kerston, R Paul; Moniri, Nardin R

    2016-02-01

    Tooth decay and other oral diseases can be highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Even though dental professionals are trained to provide equal and non-judgemental services to all, intentional or unintentional biases may exist with regard to PLWHA. We conducted qualitative descriptive research using individual interviews to explore the experiences of PLWHA accessing dental care services in Vancouver, Canada. We interviewed 25 PLWHA, aged 23-67 years; 21 were men and 60% reported fair or poor oral health. Thematic analysis showed evidence of both self-stigma and public stigma with the following themes: fear, self-stigma and dental care; overcoming past offences during encounters with dental care professionals; resilience and reconciliation to achieve quality care for all; and current encounters with dental care providers. Stigma attached to PLWHA is detrimental to oral care. The social awareness of dental professionals must be enhanced, so that they can provide the highest quality care to this vulnerable population.

  10. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-03-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency situations, basic life support is most important. However, emergencies in young children mostly involve breathing. Therefore, physicians who treat pediatric dental patients should learn PALS. It is necessary for the physician to regularly renew training every two years to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations. In order to manage emergency situations in the pediatric dental clinic, respiratory support is most important. Therefore, mastering professional PALS, which includes respiratory care and core cases, particularly upper airway obstruction and respiratory depression caused by a respiratory control problem, would be highly desirable for a physician who treats pediatric dental patients. Regular training and renewal training every two years is absolutely necessary to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations.

  11. Workplace health in dental care - a salutogenic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmark, U; Wagman, P; Wåhlin, C; Rolander, B

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to explore self-reported psychosocial health and work environments among different dental occupations and workplaces from a salutogenic perspective. A further purpose was to analyse possible associations between three salutogenic measurements: The Sense of Coherence questionnaire (SOC), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS). Employees in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county council (n = 486) were invited to respond to a self-reported web survey including demographics, work-related factors, the SOC, the SHIS and the WEMS. This study showed positive associations between employee characteristics and self-reported overall psychosocial health as well as experienced work environment. Autonomy was reported more among men than women (P better health (SOC, SHIS) and experienced more autonomy, better management and more positive to reorganization than other dental professions. Dental hygienists and nurses experienced less time pressure than dentists (P ≤ 0.007). Better health and positive work experiences were also seen in smaller clinics (P ≤ 0.29). Dental professionals reported a high degree of overall psychosocial health as well as a positive work experience. Some variations could be seen between employee characteristics such as gender, years in dental care, professionals, managing position and workplace size. Identify resources and processes at each workplace are important and should be included in the employee's/employers dialogue. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Dental Hygiene Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dental Students' Knowledge of Resources for LGBT Persons: Findings from Three Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoying; Mugayar, Leda; Perez, Edna; Nagasawa, Pamela R; Brown, David G; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2017-01-01

    Recently, there has been increased attention to including cultural diversity in the education of health professionals, including concern for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) inclusion and visibility. Studies regarding cultural exposure and acceptance of LGBT populations have been concentrated in medicine, with findings showing that medical providers often graduate having missed the preparation required to care for LGBT persons. A visible, comprehensive, culturally competent environment in dental schools would help ensure that all oral health professionals and students are aware of services available to address the particular needs of LGBT students. The aims of this survey-based study conducted in 2015-16 were to determine dental students' perceptions regarding LGBT students' needs and to assess dental students' knowledge of resources for LGBT persons at three U.S. dental schools, one each in the Midwest, West, and South. Of the 849 students invited to participate, 364 completed the survey (338 dental, 26 dental hygiene), for an overall response rate of 43%. The response rate at individual schools ranged from 30% to 55%. The results showed perceptions of insufficient LGBT information, resources, and support at these institutions, especially at the Western school. There were significant differences among the three schools, with students at the Western school more than the other two schools perceiving that their institution was less aware of whether it met the academic, social support, and spiritual needs of LGBT students. There were no significant differences between LGBT and non-LGBT students' perceptions. The authors urge dental school administrators to explore the degree to which their programs teach respectful and caring behavior towards LGBT students and, by extension, LGBT patient populations.

  13. Use of social media by dental educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, M R; Loewen, J M; Romito, L M

    2013-11-01

    Social networking applications have become an established means of communication; applications that did not exist ten years ago are now used daily. Social media can be used for a myriad of reasons including instructional tools to supplement learning. This project was designed to assess the usage of social media applications by dental school faculty members and identify the types of accounts they prefer. Four hundred forty-three full-time dental and dental hygiene faculty members from five U.S. dental schools were invited to complete a twelve-item online survey regarding their social media usage. The response rate was 50 percent (n=221). Of the respondents, nearly half were dentists, and 62 percent were ≥51 years of age. Facebook was the most popular social network, reportedly used by 111 respondents. The most often reported frequency of use was weekly (20.4 percent, n=221); users indicated utilizing a network primarily for personal rather than professional purposes. However, 37 percent of the respondents reported not using any social media. The most frequently cited barriers to the use of social media were time (48 percent) and privacy concerns (48 percent). Although few would dispute the influence social media has on today's students, the suitability and appropriateness of social media technology and its integration into dental curricula require further evaluation.

  14. [Stop smoking advice for patients who smoke: feasible in the dental practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Maassen, I.T.H.M.; Jacobs, J.E.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Allard, R.H.; Schattenberg, G.T.B.M.R.; Hilberink, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    Smoking may cause periodontal diseases and raises the chance of getting oral cancer. The Dutch Guideline for the Treatment of Tobacco Addiction recommends that dental professionals explicitly advise all patients who smoke to stop smoking. In 12 dental practices a study was made of how the guidelines could be implemented. The strategy consisted of a patient protocol for minimal, one-time cessation advice or for more intensive supervision, a patient leaflet, centralized training for the dental ...

  15. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    .... FDA-2008-N-0163] (formerly Docket No. 2001N-0067) RIN 0910-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam... the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II...

  16. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  17. Evaluating a dental practice for purchase or associateship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diecidue, Robert J

    2008-07-01

    Private dental practice can be achieved through either outright ownership or an associateship in conjunction with senior dentists; the decision depends on personal and professional objectives and goals. Once a decision is made, the time and effort required to identify an appropriate practice, negotiate the terms of purchase or associateship, and transition to the new practice can be daunting. This article reviews the process and provides an overview of the general steps involved in the evaluation of a dental practice for purchase or associateship. With appropriate knowledge and preparation, due diligence, and ethical and sensitive behavior, transitioning to private practice can be successful and lead to professional and personal fulfillment.

  18. The 'simple' general dental anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental anaesthesia should not be underestimated. Eddie Oosthuizen .... dental surgeon has limited training in airway management. ... primary teeth to hours for extensive dental conservation .... options after the extraction of permanent teeth ...

  19. Summary of : piloting a local dental network across Hampshire and Isle of Wight Primary Care Trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Dr Michael

    2014-09-01

    To pilot a local dental network (LDN) within the Hampshire and Isle of Wight region. An LDN Coordinating Group was set up, which was chaired by the local consultant in dental public health and included representatives from dental commissioning and performance management teams, dental practice advisory team, finance, Oxford and Wessex Dental Deanery and the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Local Dental Committee. The LDN successfully led the organisation of a leadership training course for local dentists, and produced recommendations for local oral surgery and orthodontics care pathways. Key to the success was the collaboration achieved between the commissioners, local postgraduate dental deanery and local dental committee. There were challenges associated with involving non-salaried dental practitioners without a source of funding, and with communicating with the wider dental community. The new Wessex LDN needs to be adequately resourced and integrated into the local commissioning structure, as well as the wider health system, to function effectively. Most importantly, the LDN needs local dental professionals to embrace the opportunities for leadership and use their skills to inform and influence local dental commissioning for the benefit of the local population.

  20. Piloting a local dental network across Hampshire and Isle of Wight Primary Care Trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J H; Easterby-Smith, V; Percival, K R

    2014-09-01

    To pilot a local dental network (LDN) within the Hampshire and Isle of Wight region. An LDN Coordinating Group was set up, which was chaired by the local consultant in dental public health and included representatives from dental commissioning and performance management teams, dental practice advisory team, finance, Oxford and Wessex Dental Deanery and the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Local Dental Committee. The LDN successfully led the organisation of a leadership training course for local dentists, and produced recommendations for local oral surgery and orthodontics care pathways. Key to the success was the collaboration achieved between the commissioners, local postgraduate dental deanery and local dental committee. There were challenges associated with involving non-salaried dental practitioners without a source of funding, and with communicating with the wider dental community. The new Wessex LDN needs to be adequately resourced and integrated into the local commissioning structure, as well as the wider health system, to function effectively. Most importantly, the LDN needs local dental professionals to embrace the opportunities for leadership and use their skills to inform and influence local dental commissioning for the benefit of the local population.

  1. Assessing the current state of dental informatics in saudi arabia: the new frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nasser, Lubna; Al-Ehaideb, Ali; Househ, Mowafa

    2014-01-01

    Dental informatics is an emerging field that has the potential to transform the dental profession. This study aims to summarize the current applications of dental informatics in Saudi Arabia and to identify the challenges facing expansion of dental informatics in the Saudi context. Search for published articles and specialized forum entries was conducted, as well as interviews with dental professionals familiar with the topic. Results indicated that digital radiography/analysis and administrative management of dental practice are the commonest applications used. Applications in Saudi dental education included: web-based learning systems, computer-based assessments and virtual technology for clinical skills' teaching. Patients' education software, electronic dental/oral health records and the potential of dental research output from electronic databases are yet to be achieved in Saudi Arabia. Challenges facing Saudi dental informatics include: lack of IT infrastructure/support, social acceptability and financial cost. Several initiatives are taken towards the research in dental informatics. Still, more investments are needed to fully achieve the potential of various application of informatics in dental education, practice and research.

  2. Teaching and Teacher Education for Health Professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musumali

    development. In its four years of existence the programme has recruited 14 postgraduate students from different health professionals including doctors, nurses, clinical officers, biomedical scientists, dental therapists/ technicians, laboratory scientists/technicians and pharmacists. Table 1: Enrollment and Graduation Trends ...

  3. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction : A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P.; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  5. Dental Health Behavior in the Prevention of Pulmonary TB at Health Centre in Several Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indirawati Tjahja Notohartojo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary TB is an infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by bacteria. Dental health professionals such as dentists and dental nurses are in charge of health personnel to prevent, treat, cure, teeth the mouth, so as not to arise or aggravate toothache. In doing their job as dental health workers is expected to use gloves or masks, and always wash their hands to avoid the transmission of pulmonary TB disease. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted involving 78 dental health professionals in 50 primary health centers that were chosen in six districts in three provinces of Banten, South Kalimantan and Gorontalo. Data were obtained by interviews and processed using SPSSResults: More than 90% dental health workers in work wore masks gloves and washed their hands after work. There was a signifi cant relationship between exercise with dental health professionals with a p value of 0.007, which means a signifi cant. Conclusion: In performing their duties, dental health workers have already used personal protective equipment such asmasks, gloves, and washed their hands and did enough exercise. Recommendation: need to increase knowledge about pulmonary TB in dental health professionals.

  6. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  7. Dental radiology for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation

  8. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  9. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  10. What Should Oral Health Professionals Know in 2040: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Jane A

    2017-08-01

    The "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project assesses current status and trends to prepare for the future. Section 3 of the project asks what knowledge and skills should dental and advanced dental education learners have to provide dental care in 2040 and how should educators be preparing them. This executive summary of five background articles in this section focuses on predoctoral education, advanced dental education, the provision of medical services within dental practice, the incorporation of oral health services into primary care and medical practice, and interprofessional education and practice. The changing environment and external forces are presented along with their implications for advancing dental education. These forces include changes in population characteristics (e.g., demographics, disease prevalence, health disparities, consumerism), treatment needs and modalities, care delivery, science and technology, educational methods, and medical and dental integration. Future oral health professionals (OHPs) will care for more diverse patient populations, older patients with complex medical and dental needs, and relatively dentally healthy younger cohorts who require fewer complex restorative and prosthodontic treatments. Increasing integration of medical and oral health education and patient care will require OHPs to have more medical knowledge and to practice in intra- and interprofessional teams. OHPs increasingly will be providing patient-centered care as employees in large group practices, health care settings, and safety net clinics with expanded types of OHPs and improved materials and technology. Educators need to implement innovative curricula and educational methods to prepare for and adapt to the disruptive changes that lie ahead.

  11. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  12. Perceived stress in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Radojkova-Nikolovska, Vera; Markovska-Simoska, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a normal physiological response to events that make us feel threatened, or upset our balance in some way. In medicine, it is known that stress, as an emotional state, can be a trigger for many psychosomatic disorders. Work stress and burnout are considered to be serious professional risks in dentistry. The dentist should be aware of these stressors and attempt to manage them in order to avoid becoming occupationally dissatisfied. On the other hand, the other common characteristic of modern life is a growing burden of different chronic diseases. Periodontal disease is one of the two most important oral diseases contributing to the global burden of chronic disease. The aim of this study was to assess the perceived stress in patients with periodontal pathologies, and to compare it with the stress in doctors-dentists and students of dentistry as future professionals. Our study confirmed the presence of significant stress in all three groups of examinees (patients, doctors, and students). Surprisingly, the obtained PSQ scores are similar in the examined groups. In addition, no differences between perceived stress in males and females have been found. There is a minimal positive correlation between age and obtained scores. However, stress must be evaluated as a risk factor both for professionals or for chronic dental patients and some response measures must be undertaken.

  13. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  14. Tanzania Dental Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Committee of Tanzania Dental. Association would like to Thank. [fUfNJfNJU[[j)~ for its magnanimity towards meeting the cost of this Journal ... ceps is token out of the dental kit and the tooth is removed out of its socket. The tooth is dropped into the waste bucket. The fareceps is placed in the water basin. The socket site is ...

  15. Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... needs of dental practitioners in Nigeria, Africa and international community interested in the dental practice in the developing world. The NDJ is published biannually and accepts reports of original research, review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques related to dentistry and allied subjects ...

  16. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...

  17. Dental Education Required for the Changing Health Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita; González-Cabezas, Carlos; de Peralta, Tracy; Johnsen, David C

    2017-08-01

    To be able to meet the demands for care in 2040, dental graduates will need to address challenges resulting from the rapidly changing health care environment with knowledge and sets of skills to build on current standards and adapt to the future. The purposes of this article are to 1) analyze key challenges likely to evolve considerably between now and 2040 that will impact dental education and practice and 2) propose several sets of skills and educational outcomes necessary to address these challenges. The challenges discussed include changes in prevalence of oral diseases, dental practice patterns, materials and technologies, integrated medical-dental care, role of electronic health records, cultural competence, integrated curricula, interprofessional education, specialty-general balance, and web/cloud-based collaborations. To meet these challenges, the dental graduate will need skills such as core knowledge in basic and clinical dentistry, technical proficiency, critical thinking skills for lifelong learning, ethical and professional values, ability to manage a practice, social responsibility, and ability to function in a collegial intra- and interprofessional setting. Beyond the skills of the individual dentist will be the need for leadership in academia and the practice community. Academic and professional leaders will need to engage key constituencies to develop strategic directions and agendas with all parties pointed toward high standards for individual patients and the public at large. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  18. Microbiological changes associated with dental prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, J Max; Palys, Michael D; Carpino, Elizabeth; Regan, Elizabeth O; Sweeney, Michael; Socransky, Sigmund S

    2004-11-01

    Despite the common application of dental prophylaxis as part of patient therapy, there is little reported that describes the microbiological impact of this treatment. The authors gave 20 healthy college-aged subjects three dental prophylaxes with a fluoride-containing prophylaxis paste during a two-week period and instructed them in oral hygiene. They evaluated the microbiological composition of dental plaque samples collected before and after treatment using DNA probe analysis. They analyzed 40 representative bacterial species in seven bacterial complexes by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization assay techniques. After three dental prophylaxes, the patients' mean Gingival Index score decreased from 0.82 to 0.77, the mean Plaque Index score decreased from 0.72 to zero, and the total number of bacteria per tooth decreased to approximately one-third of the original number. The authors computed two different measures of bacterial presence. The reduction in bacterial numbers was statistically significant and occurred in many species. Bacterial proportion (DNA percentage or percentage of the bacteria per tooth) did not change significantly. Greater reductions in bacterial count occurred in species that showed high numbers before treatment. The total bacterial count decreased by approximately 72 percent of its original level before prophylaxis was initiated. Professional dental prophylaxis did not target any particular bacteria or bacterial groups but removed bacteria nonspecifically and in proportion to their initial numbers. Repeated dental prophylaxes effect a reduction in bacterial amount that is commensurate with the initial amount, but they do does not alter composition. This suggests that mild gingivitis may be a bacterially nonspecific effect of plaque accumulation and emphasizes the need for regular plaque removal to maintain optimal gingival health.

  19. Patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, patient satisfaction with dental services has received only minor attention. Objective: To assess patients' satisfaction with public dental health services in Dar es Salaam. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Five public dental clinics randomly selected from a list of all the nine public dental ...

  20. Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence among 12 and 15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. Aim: The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries ...

  1. Awareness of dental implants among dental patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness of dental implant in Nigerian patients and their willingness to choose dental implant as a tooth replacement option. A survey was conducted among patients presenting for dental treatment in 3 teaching hospitals and private dental clinics in 3 urban cities of ...

  2. Professional assessment of facial profile attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Jen; Chew, Ming Tak; Wong, Hwee Bee

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the assessments of Chinese facial profile attractiveness by orthodontists and oral surgeons. The sample comprised 31 dental professionals (20 orthodontists, 11 oral surgeons) in an Asian community. Facial profile photographs and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 2 Chinese adults (1 man, 1 woman) with normal profiles, Class I incisor relationships, and Class I skeletal patterns were digitized. The digital images were modified by altering cephalometric skeletal and dental hard tissue Chinese normative values in increments of 2 standard deviations in the anteroposterior plane to obtain 7 facial profiles for each sex. The images were bimaxillary protrusion, protrusive mandible, retrusive mandible, normal profile (Class I incisor with Class I skeletal pattern), retrusive maxilla, protrusive maxilla, and bimaxillary retrusion. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine professional differences in assessment. Multiple regression analysis was performed with age, professional status, sex, and number of years in practice as independent variables. A strong correlation was found in the profile assessment between orthodontists and oral surgeons. Normal and bimaxillary retrusive Chinese male and female profiles were judged to be highly attractive by orthodontists and oral surgeons. Chinese male and female profiles with protrusive mandibles were judged the least attractive. There was a difference in professional opinion about the most attractive male profile (P profile and oral surgeons preferring a fuller normal Chinese profile. Sex of dental professionals and number of years in clinical practice were found to affect profile rankings.

  3. Measuring the attitudes of dental students towards social accountability following dental education - Qualitative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivian; Foster Page, Lyndie; McMillan, John; Lyons, Karl; Gibson, Barry

    2016-06-01

    The term social accountability has gained increased interest in medical education, but is relatively unexplored in dentistry. The aim of this study is to explore dental students' attitudes towards social accountability. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups with University of Otago final year (5th year) Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) students was carried out. A questionnaire designed to measure medical students' attitudes towards social responsibility was used as a guide. Following data collection, framework analysis was used to analyze each of the three focus groups, and repeating themes were noted. Analysis of the focus groups discovered recurring themes, such that participants believed that dentists should be accountable to society in a professional context and that they are responsible for patients who present at their clinic but that there is no professional obligation to help reduce oral health inequalities by working with populations facing inequalities. There was strong agreement that there needs to be change to the dental health care system from a structural and political level to address oral health inequalities, rather than individual dentists assuming greater responsibility. Our findings show that dental education may not be accountable to society in the sense that it is not producing graduates who believe that they have an obligation to address the priority oral health concerns of society.

  4. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Dental Hygienist's and Therapist's Guide to the Management of Tooth Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyanayagam, Yana

    2016-08-01

    Dental care professionals can support patients to prevent and manage tooth erosion. The role of the dentist is to restore the structure and function of teeth damaged by acid erosion, while the role of the dental hygienist therapist is to work alongside the dentist to help manage and reduce the risk of tooth erosion. This article will highlight how the dental hygienist or therapist can identify tooth erosion. It will describe the features of tooth erosion and outline the causes. This article will discuss preventative care options for patients who are at risk of tooth erosion, including specific oral hygiene instructions, fluoride advice and use of other dental products.

  6. Dental Acrylics - Potential Agent for a Myriad of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivangi Gajwani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An allergic reaction also known as a hypersensitivity reaction is caused by the immune system in response to a foreign substance (or allergen. Allergenic chemicals can be found in many products used in the dental operatory. With repeated exposure, these chemicals can cause allergic reactions in dental professionals, resulting in local as well as systemic manifestations. According to various studies done, it became evident that the prevalence of acrylic allergy most commonly in the form of allergic contact dermatitis is affecting the dental personnel to a much greater degree than is believed. Awareness of this disease complex in the form of any new symptoms and potential exposure is paramount for dental personals.

  7. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental... materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other... Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix...

  8. [Training and use of dental manpower resources in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosillo, G G; López Cámara, V; Alvarez Manilla, J M; García Cantú, M; Silva Olivares, H

    1978-01-01

    The introductory section describes the general situation of dental care in Mexico, analyzes the prevailing service model (including the kind of work done by the dental professional and the technology he employs), and briefly reviews the evolution of dentistry in the country. There follows an account of a series of new approaches to service and manpower training in experimental implementation since 1972 in the stomatology curriculum at the Xochimilco campus of the Metropolitan Autonomous University, at the National School of Professional Studies at Zaragoza, in the School of Dentistry of Nuevo León Autonomous University, Monterrey, and in the Dental Services at Ciudad Netzahualcóyotl. In each case, the background, characteristics, and objectives of the programs, and their evolution and prospects are described.

  9. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbaraini Alexandra

    2012-06-01

    them aware of existing preventive options, educated them about how to maintain a healthy mouth and teeth, and supported and reassured them frequently during visits. Conclusions Patients valued having a supportive and caring dentist and a dedicated dental team. The experience of having a dedicated, supportive and caring dentist helped patients to take control of their own oral health. These dentists and dental teams produced profound changes in not just the oral health care routines of patients, but in the way patients thought about their own oral health and the role of dental professionals.

  10. [An illustrated guide to dental screening: a school survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Annabelle; Sayada, Mélanie; Azogui-Levy, Sylvie

    2017-12-05

    Marked social inequalities in oral health are observed right from early childhood. A mandatory complete health check-up, including dental screening, is organized at school for 6-year-old children. School healthcare professionals are not well trained in dental health. The aim of this study was to assess the relevance of an illustrated guide as a simple and rapid dental screening training tool in order to ensure effective, standardized and reproducible screening. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the context of the dental examination performed as part of the health check-up. Two examiners (Doctor E1 and Nurse E2) were trained in dental screening by means of the illustrated guide. This reference guide, comprising pictures and legends, presents the main oral pathology observed in children. 109 consent forms for oral screening were delivered, and 102 children agreed to participate (93.57%). The sensitivity of detection of tooth decay by examiners E1 and E2 was 81.48% with a specificity of 96%. No correlation was observed between the child's age (+/- 6 years) and correct detection rates. The illustrated guide is an appropriate and rapid tool for dental screening that can improve the quality of dental check-up and increase the number of children detected.

  11. Detecting the manipulation of digital clinical records in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Flores-García, V.; Labajo-González, E.; Santiago-Sáez, A.; Perea-Pérez, B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Radiography provides many advantages in the diagnosis and management of dental conditions. However, dental X-ray images may be subject to manipulation with malicious intent using easily accessible computer software. Methods: In this study, we sought to evaluate a dentist's ability to identify a manipulated dental X-ray images, when compared with the original, using a variant of the methodology described by Visser and Kruger. Sixty-six dentists were invited to participate and evaluate 20 intraoral dental X-ray images, 10 originals and 10 modified, manipulated using Adobe Photoshop to simulate fillings, root canal treatments, etc. Results: Participating dentists were correct in identifying the manipulated image in 56% of cases, 6% higher than by chance and 10% more than in the study by Visser and Kruger. Conclusion: Malicious changes to dental X-ray images may go unnoticed even by experienced dentists. Professionals must be aware of the legal consequences of such changes. A system of detection/validation should be created for radiographic images. - Highlights: • Fraudulent manipulation of dental X-ray images creates a problem of legal security. • Dentists were able to identify manipulated images on 56% of all occasions. • 6% more than the probability of a person with no dental training. • 10% more than in the study by Visser and Kruger.

  12. Perceptions of uncivil student behavior in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Students and faculty members in the health professions classroom are expected to exhibit professional behaviors that are conducive to maintaining a positive learning environment, but there is little published research concerning incivility in the area of dental education. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in perceptions of incivility between dental faculty and students, between students in different courses of study, and between students in different years of dental study. The study utilized an anonymous electronic survey of all dental faculty and administrators and all dental, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology students at a single institution. The survey instrument contained questions concerning perceived uncivil behavior in the classroom and clinical settings. Response rates were 54% for faculty and administrators and ranged from 60% to 97% for students in various years and programs. The results were analyzed based on gender, course of study, year of study, and ethnicity. Significant differences were found regarding perceptions of civil behaviour between faculty and students, male and female students, the year of study, and the course of study. These differences point to the need for further research as well as administrative leadership and faculty development to define guidelines in this area in order to ensure a positive learning environment.

  13. Pricing and competition in the private dental market in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, E; Väisänen, A; Mikkola, H

    2011-06-01

    To investigate how the prices were set in private dental care, which factors determined prices and whether the recent National Dental Care Reform had increased competition in the dental care market in Finland. A questionnaire to all full time private dentists (n = 1,121) in the ten largest cities. Characteristics of the practice, prices charged, price setting, perceived competition and expectations for the practices were requested. The response rate was 59.6%. Correlation analysis (Pearson's) was used to study relationships between the prices of different treatment items. Linear regression analysis was used to study determinants of the price of a one surface filling. Most dentists' fee schedules were based on the price of a one surface filling and updated annually. Changes in practice costs calculated by the dentists' professional association and information on average prices charged on dental treatments in the country influenced pricing. High price levels were associated with specialisation, working in a group practice, working close to many other practices or in a town with a dental school. Less than half of the respondents had faced competition in dental services and price competition was insignificant. Price setting followed traditional patterns and private markets in dental services were not found to be very competitive.

  14. Controlled Use of X-Ray in Dental Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesbia Rosa Tirado-Amado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: To contribute in an informative and critical way to the promotion of controlled use of X-ray during dental consulting and dental care. Introduction: The practice of dentistry as a health care service requires the use of complementary tools for proper diagnosis, treatment and follow-up in patients with different clinical conditions. For that reason, the use of x-ray by dentists is common and very useful, but it involves radiation exposure to the patient and the dental professional or dental student. Although, often people do not pay attention to this exposition in regard to biological effects, because they are considered too low to generate significant biological effects. Conclusion: It is necessary to consider the risk of accumulative doses for constant exposure in dentist and dental students. Moreover, in patients, because a synergism with other radiations can occur, they can be exposed because of the attention in other areas of health. For these reasons, it is necessary to promote awareness and knowledge on basic aspects of the controlled use of X-ray in the dental care, being also aware of the need to strengthen the knowledge of the basics aspects that lead to decreased risk of biological effects from its proper use in the dental care.

  15. Job satisfaction among dental assistants in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretto, Nelson Rubens Mendes; Caldas, Arnaldo de França; Coelho Junior, Luiz Gutenberg Toledo de Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expressed levels of job satisfaction of dental assistants working in Brazil and whether there are relationships among professional formation standards, workplace relations and job satisfaction. An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out with a calculated sample of 443 dental assistants. A questionnaire was developed for this purpose and its validity was verified in a pilot study. The questionnaire provided data for socioeconomic and demographic categorization and identified the variables that could be correlated to professional satisfaction. Job satisfaction was stratified into satisfaction and no satisfaction. All participants signed an informed consent form. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 13.0. Pearson's chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed. Among the 443 participants, 94.6% were women, 72.7% were aged between 21 and 40 years and 65.0% were single. Over half had 37 or more months of job experience and had completed their course at a public institution. The majority earned between US$141.00 and US$190.00 per month. Job satisfaction was mentioned by 81.5% of the dental personnel. It was found that most subjects were satisfied with their job, and that the level satisfaction is influenced negatively by salary, workplace, workload and dentist's personality.

  16. Interacting institutional logics in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebecca; Holt, Robin

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the organisational field of general dental practice and how agents change or maintain the institution of values associated with the everyday work of health care provision. Our dataset comprise archival literature and policy documents, interview data from field level actors, as well as service delivery level interview data and secondary data gathered (2011-12) from 16 English dental practices. Our analysis provides a typology of institutional logics (prevailing systems of value) experienced in the field of dental practice. Confirming current literature, we find two logics dominate how care is assessed: business-like health care and medical professionalism. We advance the literature by finding the business-like health care logic further distinguished by values of commercialism on the one hand and those of accountability and procedural diligence on the other. The logic of professionalism we also find is further distinguished into a commitment to clinical expertise and independence in delivering patient care on the one hand, and concerns for the autonomy and sustainability of a business enterprise on the other. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Just-in-time training of dental responders in a simulated pandemic immunization response exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Michael D; Hirst, Jeremy L; Vesper, Benjamin J; DeTella, George E; Tsagalis, Mila P; Roberg, Mary J; Peters, David E; Wallace, Jimmy D; James, James J

    2014-06-01

    The reauthorization of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act in 2013 incorporated the dental profession and dental professionals into the federal legislation governing public health response to pandemics and all-hazard situations. Work is now necessary to expand the processes needed to incorporate and train oral health care professionals into pandemic and all-hazard response events. A just-in-time (JIT) training exercise and immunization drill using an ex vivo porcine model system was conducted to demonstrate the rapidity to which dental professionals can respond to a pandemic influenza scenario. Medical history documentation, vaccination procedures, and patient throughput and error rates of 15 dental responders were evaluated by trained nursing staff and emergency response personnel. The average throughput (22.33/hr) and medical error rates (7 of 335; 2.08%) of the dental responders were similar to those found in analogous influenza mass vaccination clinics previously conducted using certified public health nurses. The dental responder immunization drill validated the capacity and capability of dental professionals to function as a valuable immunization resource. The ex vivo porcine model system used for JIT training can serve as a simple and inexpensive training tool to update pandemic responders' immunization techniques and procedures supporting inoculation protocols.

  18. An evaluation of the sociodemographic determinants of dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-22

    Sep 22, 2014 ... showed that the best predictors for dental anxiety were sex (P00.008) ... in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 1 ... professionals (doctors, lawyers, engineers), university .... Psychological studies indicate that women have a lower ... supportive role of family that helps patients cope with.

  19. Pattern of prescription of antibiotics among dental practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics by clinicians leads to antibiotic resistance, and is a serious global health concern. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic prescription practices of dental practitioners and their adherence to professional guidelines while treating oral health problems among children.

  20. Scholarship and Dental Education: New Perspectives for Clinical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E.

    1984-01-01

    Career advancement in academic dentistry appears to demand success in teaching, scholarship, and service, but foremost in research or scholarship. As a result, many dental faculty believe they are forced to choose between providing excellent professional preparation for their students or ensuring their academic careers. (MLW)

  1. External marketing. How it can build a dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, S

    1988-01-01

    This article gives a general introduction to external marketing as it befits the image of the dental professional. Research and various media opportunities are discussed, highlighting their advantages and pointing out the pros and cons of each. The latest trends in advertising philosophy are intertwined with concrete advice regarding cost effectiveness. This article is helpful to solo as well as group practitioners.

  2. Dental Anomalies: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jahanimoghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anomalies are usual congenital malformation that can happen either as isolated findings or as a part of a syndrome. Developmental anomalies influencing the morphology exists in both deciduous and permanent dentition and shows different forms such as gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens evaginatus (DE, enamel pearls, taurodontism or peg-shaped laterals. All These anomalies have clinical significance concerning aesthetics, malocclusion and more necessary preparing of the development of dental decays and oral diseases. Through a search in PubMed, Google, Scopus and Medline, a total of eighty original research papers during 1928-2016 were found with the keywords such as dental anomaly, syndrome, tooth and hypodontia. One hundred review titles were identified, eighty reviews were retrieved that were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. In this review, dental anomalies including gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens invaginatus, DE, taurodontism, enamel pearls, fluorosis, peg-shaped laterals, dentinal dysplasia, regional odontodysplasia and hypodontia are discussed. Diagnosing dental abnormality needs a thorough evaluation of the patient, involving a medical, dental, familial and clinical history. Clinical examination and radiographic evaluation and in some of the cases, specific laboratory tests are also needed. Developmental dental anomalies require careful examination and treatment planning. Where one anomaly is present, clinicians should suspect that other anomalies may also be present. Moreover, careful clinical and radiographical examination is required. Furthermore, more complex cases need multidisciplinary planning and treatment.

  3. The Top 10 ethical challenges in dental practice in indian scenario: Dentist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanishree M Kemparaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This exploratory qualitative research is an attempt to assess the health care ethical challenges in dental practice in an Indian scenario. Methodology: Qualitative indepth interview was conducted on 20 dental professionals to assess the ethical challenges prevailing in dental practice in Indian scenario. After obtaining the responses the verbatims were categorized into categories and finally 36 themes emerged. Later from two group of 6 panellists each after conducting focus group discussion the themes of ethical issues occurring in dental practice were ranked based on order of significance impact on the practice, patient and society using Delphi method. Result: The top ten ethical challenges listed by the panellists are inadequate sterilization and waste management in dental clinics, poor knowledge and attitude towards ethics among our dental practitioners, in competence among dental professional, increase in cost of oral health service, poor informed consent process, requirement of consensus about the treatment procedures among dentists, Conflict in Advertising, clustering of dental clinics in urban areas, disagreement with treatment modalities among dentist and patient, poor medical record maintenance among our dental practitioners. Conclusion: The study attempts to bring the prevailing ethical challenges in oral health care practice in Indian scenario.

  4. Professionalism: challenges for dentistry in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozar, D T

    2012-11-30

    While countries varies significantly in the financing of dental care, they are much more alike in the delivery of dentistry. Dental care is principally provided in dental offices and clinics that are independent business entities whose business leaders are most often the dentists themselves. However society expects from dentists a level of professionalism (i.e. habitually acting ethically, both in terms of competence and conduct) in contrast to the methods and motivations of the marketplace. This is why the single most important challenge of dental professional ethics continues to be giving proper priority to patients' well being and building ethically correct decision-making relationships with patients while, at the same time, trying to maintain a successful business operation. If we look into dentistry's future, the centrality of this aspect of professional ethics is not likely to change, although the ways in which dentists might violate this trust will probably multiple as funding mechanisms become increasingly complex. It is important that dentists reflect with fresh eyes on their ethical commitments. One challenge is the increased availability of oral health information to the public and the fact that so many people are uncritical of the accuracy of information in the media and on the web. A second is the increase in the amount of health care advertising in many societies. A third is the growth of aesthetic dentistry that differs from standard oral health care in important and ethically significant ways. The fourth is insurance that frequently complicates the explanation of a patient's treatment alternatives and often brings a third party into the treatment decision relationship. The ethical challenges of each of these factors will be considered and ultimately tying it to the central theme of dental professionalism.

  5. Professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAndrew-Benavidas, E.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation outlines the functions of the North American Young Generation in Nuclear. Activities of the organization include professional development, recruiting, retention, public outreach, leadership, networking, workforce issues, mentoring and communications

  6. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  7. Dental biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body......-fermenting bacteria causing demineralization of teeth, dental caries, which may further lead to inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and periapical region, i.e., pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. In supra- and subgingival biofilms, predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic proteolytic bacteria will colonize...

  8. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  9. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  10. The 21st-Century Dental Curriculum: A Framework for Understanding Current Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Denise K; Tedesco, Lisa A

    2017-08-01

    This article provides an overview of the emergence of professional education and academic dentistry, in particular into the comprehensive research university. The development of academic dentistry as a vital member of the academic health center at the research university and beyond is described. Summaries are provided of major studies and innovations in dental education models and curricula, ranging from the Gies report in 1926 to the 1995 Institute of Medicine study Dental Education at the Crossroads , the U.S. surgeon general's report on oral health in 2000, the Macy study report in 2008, and the American Dental Education Association Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) series of articles published from 2005 to 2009. The article also tracks changes in number and institutional affiliation of U.S. dental schools. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  11. Alfred Owre: revisiting the thought of a distinguished, though controversial, early twentieth-century dental educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2013-08-01

    Many in dental education are unfamiliar with the professional life and thought of Dr. Alfred Owre, a distinguished though controversial dental educator in the early twentieth century. Owre served as dean of dentistry at both the University of Minnesota, 1905-27, and Columbia University, 1927-33. He was also a member of the Carnegie Foundation's commission that developed the report Dental Education in the United States and Canada, written by Dr. William J. Gies. Owre was a controversial leader due to his creative and original ideas that challenged dental education and the profession. His assessment and critique of the problems of dental education in his era can readily be applied to contemporary dental education and the profession, just as his vision for transformative change resonates with ideas that continue to be advocated by some individuals today. This article also documents his tumultuous relationship with Gies.

  12. An assessment of faculty and dental student decision-making in ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Catalanotto, Frank A; Garvan, Cynthia Wilson; Hudson-Vassell, Charisse

    2014-01-01

    This study reports and compares dental student and dental faculty scores to national norms for the Defining Issues Test 2, a measure of ethical decision-making competency. The findings showed that dental students and faculty tend to make decisions that promote self-interest, paralleling the ethical orientation of business professionals. Differences associated with gender, language, and norms from previous studies were observed. The findings underscore the importance of raising dental faculty and student awareness of their own ethical decision-making approaches. More importantly, the findings highlight the need to ensure that dental faculty have both the knowledge and skills to train dental students about the central role that ethical decision-making must play in patient care.

  13. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  14. [To finish with fear of dental care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, J B; Bracconi, M; Herve, C; Pirnay, P

    2015-06-01

    The patient facing the dentist knows fear, anxiety. The symbolism of the mouth and teeth from childhood is an entirely specific nature of the human body. The terrifying image of dental treatment and dentist that has long been stigmatized through painting, literature, theater and cinema can change today. Many therapeutic options to the management of anxiety in dental phobia; anesthesia, conscious sedation, combined with a soothing cabinet, a caring dentist, targeted use of medications or milder alternative methods; homeopathy, herbal medicine, acupuncture, psychotherapy, places the patient's interests at the center of the caregiving relationship. But this treatment panel is also offered him the difficulty of the choice. This exercise without systematization, according to the patient with competence and kindness. Some patients may be sent or processed in collaboration with other health professionals.

  15. Dental CBCT equipment and performance issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, K.; Jacobs, R.; Schulze, R.

    2013-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), also known as digital volumetric tomography was developed in the late 1990s and is now increasingly available in clinical practice. It can provide high resolution cross-sectional images of teeth and the maxillofacial region with applications in all branches of dentistry. As a new imaging modality, there were no established suspension levels at a European level. A literature review, encompassing scientific, professional publications and existing national guidelines was performed in an attempt to develop a set of suspension levels for dental CBCT, using additional expert opinion from the members of the European Academy of dento-maxillo-facial radiology. A limited set of suspension levels has been devised for aspects of the X-ray tube and generator, dosimetry, field-of-view, alignment and image quality. These should be kept under review in the light of growing experience of testing equipment in practice. (authors)

  16. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  17. Advances in dental imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E

    2001-04-01

    The number of dental radiographs taken in the UK has steadily increased over the past 20 years--recently estimating around 18 million taken in the general dental services alone, and dental radiographs now account for nearly 25% of all medical radiographic exposures. Radiographs remain our most useful diagnostic aid. Their strength is in demonstrating hard tissue pathology, which makes radiographs particularly effective in the maxillofacial region. Although well accepted in this capacity, there remain a number of limitations and drawbacks to conventional radiographs which recent developments have begun to overcome. There have been improvements in the scope and capabilities of dental imaging equipment. There has also been a continuing effort to reduce radiation-induced harm by limiting our exposure to it. This has been possible both through the introduction of new methods and protocols for reducing individual radiation exposures and by the creation of guidelines for selecting radiographs more effectively and thereby reducing the total number of radiographs taken.

  18. Glossary of Dental Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more... Coffee and Doughnuts: A Disastrous Combo for Teeth? The sugars in doughnuts have been identified as ... More print this article enlarge text Glossary of Dental Terms Oral Health Defined Amalgam silver/mercury alloy ...

  19. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Proper care of your child's teeth and gums includes brushing and rinsing daily. It ...

  20. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks associated with tobacco, substance abuse and oral piercings. Why it's done Regular dental exams help protect ... sugary beverages Smoking Chewing tobacco Eating disorders Oral piercings Not wearing a mouthguard during contact sports The ...

  1. Nigerian Dental Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS The Nigerian Dental ... review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques ... figures and illustrations, including one copy stored in a 3.5” floppy should be sent to ...

  2. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  3. Panoramic dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.H.; Kircher, D.R.; Hart, F.W.; Ciavattoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for improving the handling rate of patients in panoramic dental radiography when tube head-camera assembly of a low silhouette panoramic dental X-ray machine is rotated for a scan in one direction only. This is effected by fast return of the tube head-camera assembly with its simultaneous elevation, thus facilitating the radiographed patient's exit from the machine and the entrance of another patient. Fast speed is about twice the scanning speed. (author)

  4. Professional autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, A E

    1998-02-01

    Professional autonomy may represent the first step to implementing measures that will allow CRNAs to attain a level of independent practice consistent with their clinical and educational training. Autonomy is regarded as an essential ingredient of professionalism and confers independent function at the individual practitioner level. The principle of autonomy refers to the individual's capacity to make independent decisions based on the assumption that he or she possesses the cognitive, psychological, and emotional faculties to make rational decisions. Nursing practice meets the first two criteria of professionalism--competence and dedication to an important social good. The third criterion of professionalism, autonomy, has been a focal point for controversy since the late nineteenth century, in which obedience to supervisors and physicians remained a central focus of nursing ethics teaching until the advent of feminism in the 1970s. This article presents a thorough analysis of these concepts with some thoughts on how understanding the fundamental precepts and further research may not only help maintain the current level of CRNA professional autonomy but serve to guide us to become more autonomous in the future.

  5. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  6. Saliva and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  7. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  8. Public attitude towards dentists and dental services in Bangalore city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashree Savanur Ravindranath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding public attitude towards dentists and dental services helps both dental service providers and planners. Hence, this study was conducted to assess public attitude toward dentists and dental services in Bangalore city, India. Methods: Two thousand residents of Bangalore city were selected through multistage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire containing statements pertaining to public attitude toward dentists and dental services in Bangalore city was administered to the subjects. Five point Likert scale was used to measure the attitude. Results: About 67.8% of the study subjects had visited a dentist in their lifetime. Negative attitudes were observed regarding waiting time, cleanliness of instruments and dentist advising patients to give up unhealthy practices such as smoking, drinking and pan chewing. Positive attitude was found regarding availability of dental services near place of residence or work, modern equipments being used for treatment and the nobleness of the dental professionals. About 67% of study subjects felt that dental services are expensive. Only 65% agree that regular check-ups prevent dental diseases and 33% of the study subjects agree that dental treatment can be delayed if there are other expenses. Conclusions: Subjects generally had positive attitude toward dentists and dental services. Certain factors like waiting time and cleanliness elicited negative response.

  9. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Research AADSM Highlights Members More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of dental practice that focuses on ... SomnoMed Silver Sponsors Copyright © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  10. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  11. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  12. [Dental erosion and young adults: what do they know and how would they like to receive information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verploegen, V J N; Schuller, A A

    2017-09-01

    Dental erosion occurs often among adolescents and young adults in the Netherlands. This problem requires attention because its consequences are irreversible. In this study (part of the 'Dental Research and Practice in the North Netherlands' project) a questionnaire was distributed to 331 young adults (age 20 to 25) from 25 dental practices. The goal of the study was to find out how much young adults know about dental erosion and how they wish to receive dental information. The results show that much is still unknown about dental erosion among young adults and that the extent of knowledge depended of the level of education and on information on dental erosion that had already been received. Participants preferred to receive information in a conversation with an oral healthcare professional, with the support of printed matter.

  13. An overview of dental radiology in cities of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, F.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Belinato, W.

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, the National Ordinance No. 453/1998 of the Ministry of Health regulates the operation of medical and odontological diagnostic radiology services. However, the inspection of periapical dental X-ray equipment is not carried out by some Sanitary Surveillances. This study intended to determine the suitability to the ordinance of the dental offices of Sobral-CE, Northeast of Brazil, and to compare the results with literature data for other cities of Brazil, giving a view of dental radiology of this country. It was performed tests of radiation field and image quality, and it was applied questionnaires to the professionals of Sobral-CE. For the image quality test, it was used a dental phantom and the processing of the films was performed in the clinics and at the laboratory (standard). The questionnaire assessed physical parameters that interfere on the radiation protection and on the quality of images. The results show that the ordinance is not being properly followed and that it is necessary to inspect the periapical X-ray equipments. Moreover, in general, it is observed that dental professionals should have better training on ionizing radiation and on radiation protection. (authors)

  14. Sexual harassment in Dentistry: prevalence in dental school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sexual harassment is unlawful in all work and educational environments in most nations of the world. The goals of this study were to describe the sexual harassment prevalence and to evaluate the experiences and attitudes of undergraduate students in one dental school in Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An 18-item questionnaire was administered to 254 dental students with a completion rate of 82% (208. Students were requested to respond to questions about their background and academic level in dental school, their personal experiences with sexual harassment and their observation of someone else being sexually harassed. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of the students reported being sexually harassed by a patient, by a relative of a patient or by a professor. Male students had 3 times higher probability of being sexually harassed than female student [OR=2.910 (1.113-7.611]. Additionally, 25.4% of the students reported witnessing sexual harassment at the school environment. The majority of students did not feel professionally prepared to respond to unwanted sexual behaviors. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that sexual harassment can occur in a dental school setting. There is a need for ongoing sexual harassment education programs for students and university staff. Increased knowledge of sexual harassment during graduation can better prepare dental professionals to respond to sexual harassment during their practice.

  15. Sexual harassment in dentistry: prevalence in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Zina, Lívia Guimarães; Garbin, Artênio José Insper; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba

    2010-01-01

    Sexual harassment is unlawful in all work and educational environments in most nations of the world. The goals of this study were to describe the sexual harassment prevalence and to evaluate the experiences and attitudes of undergraduate students in one dental school in Brazil. An 18-item questionnaire was administered to 254 dental students with a completion rate of 82% (208). Students were requested to respond to questions about their background and academic level in dental school, their personal experiences with sexual harassment and their observation of someone else being sexually harassed. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed. Fifteen percent of the students reported being sexually harassed by a patient, by a relative of a patient or by a professor. Male students had 3 times higher probability of being sexually harassed than female student [OR=2.910 (1.113-7.611)]. Additionally, 25.4% of the students reported witnessing sexual harassment at the school environment. The majority of students did not feel professionally prepared to respond to unwanted sexual behaviors. These findings demonstrate that sexual harassment can occur in a dental school setting. There is a need for ongoing sexual harassment education programs for students and university staff. Increased knowledge of sexual harassment during graduation can better prepare dental professionals to respond to sexual harassment during their practice.

  16. Steps to the Future. Dental Hygiene Education and Practice Workshop II Proceedings (Louisville, Kentucky, April 25-27, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Dental Hygienists' Association, Chicago, IL.

    The proceedings of the second in a series of workshops on dental hygiene education and practice are presented. The opening remarks are by Cheryl Westphal. Papers categorized as "Considerations for the Professionalization of Dental Hygiene" are as follows: "Socio-Economic Viewpoint" (Gary Gaumer); "Political Science Viewpoint" (Lelia Helms);…

  17. Dental school finances: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, W H

    1986-05-01

    Total expenditures and revenues of 58 US dental school were derived from reports of the ADA Division of Educational Measurements. These financial data were studied by type of dental school (public, state-related private, and private) and by expenditure/revenue categories. Dental schools showed little diversity in expenditures: most were directed toward instruction; few were directed toward research or continuing education. Several distinctive patterns among the three types of dental schools in revenues were observed. Two configurations emerged: public and state-related private dental schools receive more than 75% of their revenues from government and tuition, and private dental schools, more than 50%.

  18. Information Technology Practices Amongst Dental Undergraduate Students at a Private Dental Institution in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In dental and medical education, information and communication technology (ICT has been playing an important role and its use is rapidly increasing. In developing countries, however, information technology is still only available to a minority of health professionals. The present study aimed to assess the level of computer use among dental undergraduate students pursuing their career at a private dental institution in India.Materials and Methods: The study population comprised dental undergraduate students from first to fourth year pursuing their career in a private dental institution of India. Informationtechnology practices were assessed using a questionnaire that consisted of 14 questions.Results: In total, 247 students with an overall response rate of 66% participated in the study. Only 58.3% of the study population mentioned that they had access to computers.Students from preclinical years reported to be competent in IT skills more frequently than the clinical year students (chi square test, P=0.007. Compared to women, men used computers more regularly both for academic activities (P=0.082 and personal use (P=0.006.Similarly, students of clinical years used computers more than preclinical students for both purposes (academic activities, P=0.045; personal use, P=0.124.Conclusion: The present study revealed that computer literacy of Indian dental undergraduate students was comparable with students of other countries whereas accessibility of IT sources was poor. Expansion of computer-assisted learning which requires careful strategic planning, resource sharing, staff incentives, active promotion of multidisciplinary working, and effective quality control should be implemented.

  19. Enhancing communication in dental clinics with linguistically different patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    The United States is becoming substantially more diverse in its citizenry, with numerous racial and ethnic cultural groups and immigrants living and working in this country. In addition, there has been an increase in the number of languages other than English spoken in homes, as well as an increase in the number of individuals with limited English-speaking abilities. Given the emerging racial, ethnic, and cultural trends in U.S. society, it is important that dental students as future practitioners have knowledge of interpreter services, working with professionally trained interpreters, and the legal responsibilities and requirements of interpretation. The purposes of this study were to 1) describe the role of interpreters in dental health care settings; 2) identify challenges they face; and 3) propose approaches and strategies to improve communication between dental students as future practitioners and non-English-speaking patients. Data were collected through a series of individual in-depth, face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured open-question format and email communications with three key informants who were purposefully selected to participate in this study based on their comprehensive knowledge and experience as interpreters. The qualitative analysis revealed themes or stories related to the following areas of this study: 1) the role of professional interpreters in dental and other health care settings; 2) challenges faced by interpreters and providers working with patients with limited English-speaking ability; and 3) strategies and approaches used to improve communication and address challenges. By understanding the unique interpreting needs of non- or limited English-speaking patients, dental students have an opportunity to broaden their cultural competency skills. Dental schools have an obligation to ensure that students, faculty, and staff know and understand the legal rights of patients and health care providers to communicate effectively when

  20. Environmental and perceived stress in Australian dental undergraduates: Preliminary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Astill

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dental students have reported a high prevalence of psychological stress and the causes are associated with the challenging dental environmental and demographic factors. This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation on dental students’ stress status, using a sample of first-to-third-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery students in an Australian university. Special interests included causes of dental environmental stress and access to help services. Methods. A sample of 145 students was surveyed with a modified Dental Environmental Survey and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale in 2014. The participants’ demographic information was also collected. Results. The response rate was 95.4%. Second-year (P = 0.042, third-year (P < 0.001 and employed students (P = 0.027 were more likely to report stress resulting from transition to clinical learning. Third-year students were more often stressed about communicating and approaching staff (P = 0.023 as well as different opinions between staff (P < 0.001 and reduced holidays (P < 0.001. Students that were younger than 21 years of age (P = 0.001, that were first years (P < 0.001, and that were not in a relationship (P = 0.010 more often found difficulty of course work stressful. Students who were not in a relationship more often considered learning manual dexterity a source of stress (P = 0.034. Students previously seeking professional help were more likely to be stressed (P = 0.010. Conclusion. Causes of dental environment stress varied among years of study and demographic backgrounds. Professional support to stressed students should be enhanced. Further investigation is indicated.

  1. Patient Satisfaction in Military Dental Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-07

    the variance in regards to overall satisfaction. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dentistry, Patient Satisfaction, Military, Consumer Satisfaction, Dental... patient satisfaction in military dental treatment facilities. Dental health is extremely important for the military as dental assets are not always... customer satisfaction is an important component of military dental care. Quarterly patient satisfaction reports are generated for each dental treatment

  2. Role of dental physician in Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Rangare Lakshman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a variable, autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue whose cardinal features affect the cardiovascular system, eyes, and skeleton. The patient′s prognosis depends on the severity of cardiovascular complications and is mainly determined by progressive dilation of the aorta. If signs of MFS are recognized, it is important to refer to the correct health care professional for further testing to prevent associated complications. Hereby, we report a case of MFS who was unaware about the cardiac manifestations, thereby emphasizing the importance in identifying this potentially life-threatening condition in dental practice.

  3. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  4. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...

  5. Dental hygiene habits and oral health status of seafarers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Sibilio, Fabio; Amenta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study has assessed the dental hygiene habits and problems of seafarers and their attitudes/ perceptions regarding oral hygiene using a dental hygiene/habits questionnaire. A research questionnaire on oral hygiene habits was prepared along with a summary of all the questions and sent to ships via e-mail by Centro Internazionale Radio Medico (CIRM) networks. CIRM, is the Italian Telemedical Maritime Assistance Service (TMAS), and represents the Centre with the largest number of seafarers assisted on board ships worldwide. CIRM proposed the questionnaire to all ships (n = 1,198) asking for medical advice from 1 July 2014 till 31 October 2014. Two dental professionals were involved in the development and analysis of the questionnaire. Seafarers are at risk of several dental health problems due to their oral hygiene and dietary habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, poor oral hygiene knowledge and motivation. Dietary habits during voyages were also questionable and seafarers consume food rich in fermentable carbohydrates, which is a major risk factor for dental caries. Seafarers need better oral hygiene education and care to enable them to manage their oral health in a better way. Life at the sea, under challenging circumstances is not without stress, that is why it is important that seafarers are given complete information about correct oral hygiene protocols and dental hygiene and the advantages for their health of keeping a healthy mouth.

  6. Awareness of Undergraduate Dental and Medical Students Towards Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ashish; Marla, Vinay; Shrestha, Sushmita; Agrawal, Diksha

    2017-12-01

    Oral cancer is a common malignancy in Nepal and many other South East Asian countries, which is predisposed by a variety of potentially malignant oral diseases. Considering the importance of knowledge of health professionals and their role in early diagnosis and reduction of cancer statistics, this study aims to evaluate the awareness of undergraduate dental and medical students towards oral cancer. The study involved undergraduate dental and medical students of BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Nepal. A self-administered questionnaire adapted from Carter to Ogden was distributed. One hundred forty-three dental and 311 medical students responded to the questionnaire. Significantly more dental (80.4 %) than medical students (36.0 %) were found to routinely examine the oral mucosa. Tobacco smoking and chewing were the most commonly recognized risk factors by both medical and dental students. Most of the students found ulcer as the common change associated with oral cancer. Only 30 out of the total students felt very well informed about oral cancer. This study has demonstrated a lack of awareness in some aspects of oral cancer among medical and dental students which highlights the need to frame new teaching methodologies. Similar studies from other health institutions would provide an insight regarding the same and could be a base for formulating a uniform curriculum in the implementation of knowledge regarding oral cancer.

  7. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, A.; Dowling, A.; Renehan, J.; Clarke, D.; Malone, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Dept. of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James's Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future. (authors)

  8. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, A

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97\\/43\\/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James\\'s Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  9. The effect of xylitol on dental caries and oral flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak PA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prathibha Anand Nayak,1 Ullal Anand Nayak,2 Vishal Khandelwal3 1Department of Periodontics, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India; 2Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, NIMS Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India; 3Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Index Dental College and Hospital, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India Abstract: Dental caries, the most chronic disease affecting mankind, has been in the limelight with regard to its prevention and treatment. Professional clinical management of caries has been very successful in cases of different severities of disease manifestations. However, tertiary management of this disease has been gaining attention, with numerous methods and agents emerging on a daily basis. Higher intake of nutritive sweeteners can result in higher energy intake and lower diet quality and thereby predispose an individual to conditions like obesity, cardiovascular disorders, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Non-nutritive sweeteners have gained popularity as they are sweeter and are required in substantially lesser quantities. Xylitol, a five-carbon sugar polyol, has been found to be promising in reducing dental caries disease and also reversing the process of early caries. This paper throws light on the role and effects of various forms of xylitol on dental caries and oral hygiene status of an individual. Keywords: xylitol, caries preventive effect, oral flora 

  10. Orofacial piercings: perceptions of dental practitioners and piercing parlours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Barbara L; Groves, Gemma; Dransfield, Kathryn

    2005-07-01

    To identify the advice given by piercing parlours prior to orofacial piercing and to determine how many dental practitioners see complications from orofacial piercings. Administered questionnaire to 19 piercing parlours and postal questionnaire to 400 dental practitioners in south-east Wales. Ninety-nine per cent of 227 dental practitioners in south-east Wales had treated patients with orofacial piercings, over three-quarters had seen a patient for a complication caused by the piercing, and over half (N=120) had treated a patient for a complication of piercing. Tongue (N=225) and lip (N=209) piercings were most frequently seen and the most commonly occurring complication was fractured or cracked teeth (N=176). Almost all practitioners wanted more information on orofacial piercing and its sequelae. All 19 piercing parlours in south-east Wales warned clients about pain following piercing and 18 mentioned swelling; only four discussed possible damage to teeth and none discussed the risk of airway obstruction. Despite the concerns of dental and medical professionals orofacial piercing remains popular and the complications it causes are frequently seen by dental practitioners. There is a need for literature to assist both dental practitioners and piercers in advising and safeguarding patients.

  11. Orofacial injuries reported by professional and non-professional basketball players in zagreb and zagreb county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Davor; Lešić, Nikolina; Šostar, Zvonimir

    2014-12-01

    Injuries are common during sport activities, a part of which is also injuries to the stomatognathic system. According to the data from literature orofacial injuries are frequent, but relatively minor. World Dental Federation has listed basketball as a medium-risk sport in sustaining orofacial injuries. The purpose of this investigation was to determine incidence, type and severity of orofacial injuries during basketball and frequents of mouthguard use. The sample consisted of 195 athletes who actively participate in basketball, 60 amateurs/non-professional and 135 professionals. A total of 2 265 injuries to the stomatognathic system were documented in this research; 200 (8.8%) of those injuries refer to the non-professionals and 2 065 (91.2%) to the professionals. The most common injuries are lacerations and contusions of soft tissue (a total of 2 208 or 97.5%), followed by dental injuries (a total of 57 or 2.5%). Out of all recorded laceration injuries 59.8% lacerations of soft tissue occurred during practice (12.6% amateurs and 87.4% professionals), while 40.2% of them occurred during games (2.5% amateurs and 97.5% professionals). Of a total of 57 dental injuries recorded during an athletes career, in 78.9% it were the professionals who suffered an injury, and in 21.1% of them the amateurs. Out of a total of 195 basketball players only 1% (2 players - one professional and one amateur) frequently used mouthguard during practice and games, while 93.3% of them never tried to wear a mouthguard. Such low percentage of mouthguard use in basketball players reflects poor awareness and education of athletes and coaches, as well as insufficient role of dentists in education. Orofacial injuries during basketball are not severe (80% lacerations), and therefore do not stimulate the use of a protecting devices even their use will totally diminish this type of injuries.

  12. Competence, competency-based education, and undergraduate dental education: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuenjitwongsa, S; Oliver, R G; Bullock, A D

    2018-02-01

    The aim of undergraduate dental education is to provide competent dentists to serve societal needs and improve population oral healthcare. Competency-based education has influenced the development of dental education for decades but this term is problematic. This article explores components of competency-based undergraduate health professional education in order to help the dental profession have a better understanding of the context and purposes of undergraduate dental education. This is a discussion paper based on a wide reading of the literature on the education of health professionals with a specific focus on competency-based undergraduate education. Competence comprises an integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes indicating a capability to perform professional tasks safely and ethically. The process of becoming a competent practitioner is complex. Four characteristics of competency-based education are: curriculum components and content shaped by societal needs; focused on student-centred learning; learning achievement; and limited attention to time-based training and numerical targets. Alongside a competency-based approach, undergraduate dental education can be influenced by institutional features and external factors but these receive little consideration in the literature. Understanding competence, competency-based education, and institutional and external factors will help to improve educational quality, define roles and professional development for the dental educator, and inform further research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ramadan fasting and dental treatment considerations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeesta, Khaleelahmed Bhavikatti; Prabhuji, M Lv; Shruthi, J R

    2015-01-01

    During the sacred month of Ramadan, Muslims abstain from the consumption of food from dawn until dusk. Extended fasting hours produce changes in the body's metabolism during this period. A majority of the population who fast also restrict themselves from undergoing dental treatments due to a fear of breaking the fast. Even among health professionals, a certain amount of uncertainty prevails about the implications of treating a patient who is fasting. To help clinicians carry out safe and effective treatment without hampering a patient's religious beliefs, the present article focuses on the effect of Ramadan fasting on the body's metabolism and the ramifications for treatment aspects, including medications and dental procedures.

  14. Immediate placement of dental implants in the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkar Haraswarupa Puttaraju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case describes extraction of teeth in the mandibular arch, i.e., 41 42 43 44 45 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 (grade two mobility, followed by immediate placement of four dental implants (3i biomet, two in the 45 55 region and two dental implants in 12 21 region. A prefabricated provisional mandibular denture was immediately placed. The purpose of immediate placement was to aid the patient resume his professional duties the next day itself along with esthetic and functional comfort, psychological well-being and most importantly preserving the remaining tissue in a healthy condition.

  15. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  16. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons for delayed reporting for oral care were negligence (53.5%); poor dental services or visited but not treated (19.4%); financial reasons (14.8%); and dental fear (12.3%). Seventy seven percent of respondents who had toothache due to advanced dental caries were aware that the aching tooth was decayed, of which, ...

  17. Diagnostic methods for dental caries used by private dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the preference profiles of various types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in Ankara for detecting dental caries. Methods: Private dental practitioners, in five districts of Ankara, were provided with questionnaires comprising demographic ...

  18. Dental Education in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Dental education in the Netherlands is reviewed in terms of dental practice, overall development, structure and functioning of a typical school of dentistry, admissions, student finances, curriculum, certification, postgraduate education, and education for related professions. (MSE)

  19. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  20. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  1. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  2. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Health THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Kim, diagnosed in 1986 People with a chronic disease may neglect their general health and wellness, research shows. Dental care is no exception. A tendency to focus ...

  3. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... a sticky substance that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where ...

  4. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide provides the dentist and dental support personnel with basic information on the safe use of x-rays in dental radiography. Included in this CODE are specific recommendations for eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff

  5. Career motivations, perceptions of the future of dentistry and preferred dental specialties among saudi dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawany, Hassan S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the career motivations, perceptions of the future of dentistry and preferred postgraduate specialties of Saudi dental students. A pretested, self-administered, 16-item questionnaire was distributed to first- through fifth-year dental students at King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the level of significance was set at 5%. Of the 530 potential participants, 329 students (198 male and 131 female respondents) completed the questionnaire. High professional status (71.4%), a secure career (67.8%), a high income (78.1%), flexible working hours (54.4%), a wide range of career options after graduation (59.3%), opportunities for self-employment (69.3%) and good job opportunities abroad (65.3%) were endorsed to a great/considerable extent by the respondents. "It takes time to establish a practice" (62.3%), "Postgraduate education is a necessity" (72.4%) and "The increasing number of dental institutions is a threat to the profession" (59.3%) were endorsed to a great or considerable extent by the respondents. The most popular specialty among the male students was oral maxillofacial surgery (20.1%) and among female students was operative dentistry (23.4%). The career motivations of this group of dental students seemed to relate to socioeconomic aspects of dentistry and perceptions of the future of dentistry seemed to relate to the need for postgraduate education.

  6. Career Motivations, Perceptions of the Future of Dentistry and Preferred Dental Specialties Among Saudi Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawany, Hassan S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the career motivations, perceptions of the future of dentistry and preferred postgraduate specialties of Saudi dental students. Methods: A pretested, self-administered, 16-item questionnaire was distributed to first- through fifth-year dental students at King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Of the 530 potential participants, 329 students (198 male and 131 female respondents) completed the questionnaire. High professional status (71.4%), a secure career (67.8%), a high income (78.1%), flexible working hours (54.4%), a wide range of career options after graduation (59.3%), opportunities for self-employment (69.3%) and good job opportunities abroad (65.3%) were endorsed to a great/considerable extent by the respondents. “It takes time to establish a practice” (62.3%), “Postgraduate education is a necessity” (72.4%) and “The increasing number of dental institutions is a threat to the profession” (59.3%) were endorsed to a great or considerable extent by the respondents. The most popular specialty among the male students was oral maxillofacial surgery (20.1%) and among female students was operative dentistry (23.4%). Conclusion: The career motivations of this group of dental students seemed to relate to socioeconomic aspects of dentistry and perceptions of the future of dentistry seemed to relate to the need for postgraduate education. PMID:25246989

  7. Visualisation of dental images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Azuhar Ripin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Mohd Isa; Suriany Sarmid

    2005-01-01

    Since the invention and the discovery of x-rays, physicians, surgeons and life scientists have been using images to diagnose and subsequently treat diseases. X-ray is also widely used in many imaging techniques to better understand basics anatomy, physiology and biology as well as testing and analytical work in physical science. In dentistry, x-ray technique has been employed to get a panoramic view of the whole teeth of a particular patient. A panoramic dental radiograph is very useful in dentistry for diagnostic purpose, denture preparation, as well as for orthodontic. Image visualisation is an important aspect especially for the dentists to analyse and proceed with a particulate dental treatment. In this project panoramic dental image obtained by using a standard phantom is visualised by using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software. A panoramic dental x-ray machine, Cranex3, is used to get a panoramic radiograph, which is subsequently digitized, by using Vidar digitizer (Sierra Plus). The 2D digitized image is enhance and apply other visualising techniques such as surface rendering and volume rendering technique using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software as a first step in 3D visualisation. In this paper, visualising of panoramic dental radiograph by using IDL is discussed in brief. (Author)

  8. The estimation of patients' views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice by general dental practitioners: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truin Gert-Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the changes in dental healthcare, such as the increasing assertiveness of patients, the introduction of new dental professionals, and regulated competition, it becomes more important that general dental practitioners (GDPs take patients' views into account. The aim of the study was to compare patients' views on organizational aspects of general dental practices with those of GDPs and with GDPs' estimation of patients' views. Methods In a survey study, patients and GDPs provided their views on organizational aspects of a general dental practice. In a second, separate survey, GDPs were invited to estimate patients' views on 22 organizational aspects of a general dental practice. Results For 4 of the 22 aspects, patients and GDPs had the same views, and GDPs estimated patients' views reasonably well: 'Dutch-speaking GDP', 'guarantee on treatment', 'treatment by the same GDP', and 'reminder of routine oral examination'. For 2 aspects ('quality assessment' and 'accessibility for disabled patients' patients and GDPs had the same standards, although the GDPs underestimated the patients' standards. Patients had higher standards than GDPs for 7 aspects and lower standards than GDPs for 8 aspects. Conclusion On most aspects GDPs and patient have different views, except for social desirable aspects. Given the increasing assertiveness of patients, it is startling the GDP's estimated only half of the patients' views correctly. The findings of the study can assist GDPs in adapting their organizational services to better meet the preferences of their patients and to improve the communication towards patients.

  9. Dental Hygiene Students' Self-Assessment of Ergonomics Utilizing Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partido, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    Due to postural demands, dental professionals are at high risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Dental clinicians' lack of ergonomic awareness may impede the clinical application of recommendations to improve their posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback involving photography and self-assessment would improve dental hygiene students' ergonomic scores and accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. The study involved a randomized control design and used a convenience sample of all 32 junior-year dental hygiene students enrolled in the autumn 2016 term in The Ohio State University baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Sixteen students were randomly assigned to each of two groups (control and training). At weeks one and four, all participants were photographed and completed ergonomic self-evaluations using the Modified-Dental Operator Posture Assessment Instrument (M-DOPAI). During weeks two and three, participants in the training group were photographed again and used those photographs to complete ergonomic self-assessments. All participants' pre-training and post-training photographs were given ergonomic scores by three raters. Students' self-assessments in the control group and faculty evaluations of the training group showed significant improvement in scores over time (F(1,60)=4.25, p<0.05). In addition, the accuracy of self-assessment significantly improved for students in the training group (F(1,30)=8.29, p<0.01). In this study, dental hygiene students' self-assessments using photographs resulted in improvements in their ergonomic scores and increased accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. Any improvement in ergonomic score or awareness can help reduce the risks for WMSDs, especially among dental clinicians.

  10. Dental caries: Strategies to control this preventable disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Rugg-Gunn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide a brief commentary review of strategies to control dental caries. Dental decay is one of man’s most prevalent diseases. In many counties, severity increased in parallel with importation of sugar, reaching its zenith about 1950s and 1960s. Since then, severity has declined in many countries, due to the wide use of fluoride especially in toothpaste, but dental caries remains a disease of medical, social and economic importance. Within the EU in 2011, the cost of dental treatment was estimated to be €79 billion. The pathogenesis is well understood: bacteria in dental plaque (biofilm metabolise dietary sugars to acids which then dissolve dental enamel and dentine. Possible approaches to control caries development, therefore, involve: removal of plaque, reducing the acidogenic potential of plaque, reduction in sugar consumption, increasing the tooth’s resistance to acid attack, and coating the tooth surface to form a barrier between plaque and enamel. At the present time, only three approaches are of practical importance: sugar control, fluoride, and fissure sealing. The evidence that dietary sugars are the main cause of dental caries is extensive, and comes from six types of study. Without sugar, caries would be negligible. Fluoride acts in several ways to aid caries prevention. Ways of delivering fluoride can be classed as: ‘automatic’, ‘home care’ and ‘professional care’: the most important of these are discussed in detail in four articles in this issue of the Acta Medica Academica. Conclusion. Dental caries is preventable – individuals, communities and countries need strategies to achieve this.

  11. Does dental caries affect dental development in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Elezi, Besiana; Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-01-01

    Although a link between dietary changes, caries, and dental development has been observed, the literature provides little insight about this relationship. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between dental caries and dental development in a clinical sample of Albanian children and adolescents. In total, 118 children and adolescents, born between 1995 and 2004 and aged 6–15 years, were included. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Filled Teeth (dft) index and dental caries in the permanent dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Dental development during the permanent dentition was determined using the Demirjian method. Linear and ordinal regression models were applied to analyze the associations of dental caries with dental age and developmental stages of each left mandibular tooth. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition, estimated as a median dft of 2.0 (90% range, 0.0–9.1), was significantly associated with lower dental age (β = -0.21; 90% CI: -0.29, -0.12) and with delayed development of the canine, both premolars, and the second molar. Untreated dental caries (dt) was associated with lower dental age (β = -0.19; 90% CI: -0.28, -0.10). Dental caries in the permanent dentition, estimated as a median DMFT of 1.0 (90% range, 0.0–8.0), was not significantly associated with dental age (β = 0.05; 90% CI: -0.04, 0.14). However, the DMFT was associated with the advanced stages of development of both premolars and the second molar. The untreated dental caries in the deciduous dentition delays the development of permanent teeth. PMID:29659350

  12. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  13. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  14. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... qualify for VHA dental treatment, including any claim for treatment of periodontal disease or calculus... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes...

  15. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  16. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of...

  17. Educating professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    relates to actual development work, where a social worker education program is restructured and developed, with the aim of creating optimal transfer. The social worker must 'be able to co-operate, organize, coordinate, implement, evaluate and develop social efforts’ in accordance with the curriculum. How...... does that look in practice? Based on interviews with newly-educated social workers, I have analyzed which competences the social worker (hereafter ‘he’) uses in practice, how these competences are developed, and how the student learns to apply the competences acquired in the educational program.......The purpose of the professional bachelor’s degree is to qualify the students to act competently in a subsequent job situation. Anecdotal experience and research have shown that limited transfer between what is learned during the coursework and the subsequent professional practice. This article...

  18. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  19. Risks from dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Tamara Goularte

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the risks and consequences of exposure to dental X-ray. The methodology used was the survey of bibliographic literature on this matter. First, we tried to understand the operation and characteristics of dental X-rays. Afterwards, we tried to know about the risks that this procedure offers to workers and patients. And concluded with the consequences of such exposure. The results showed that dental x-rays only offer risks in prolonged exposure, can affect the worker or patient to pathologies such as cancer or a life-time decreased due to the stochastic effect. Therefore, radiological protection standards must be respected and practised. (author)

  20. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  2. EATING DISORDERS: DENTAL IMPLICATIONS – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Rode

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity, anorexia and bulimia are typical civilisation diseases or diseases of unhealthy living. They affect mainly white women in their childhood and adolescence. Occurrence of these diseases is getting higher also in Slovenia. Changes inside the oral cavity of a bulimic patient may be detected during a routine clinical examination. This places dental professionals in a position to be among the first to detect bulimia which is usually characterized by episodes of purging behaviors such as self-induced vomiting. Such vomiting brings stomach acids in contact with the mouth and teeth, causing erosion of tooth enamel which often leads to severely decayed teeth.Methods. This study presents a case of successful treatment of oral symptoms and dental rehabilitation in female patient with bulimia.Conclusions. Dental rehabilitation for bulimic patients is more than just a substituting of their bad and lost teeth. It is actually the first step toward their regained self-respect. Therefore it is important for the dentist to be familiar with the clinical symptoms of these diseases that can be revealed in oral cavity to efficiently contribute to a patient rehabilitation.

  3. YouTube, dentistry, and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically assess the informational value, intention, source, and bias of videos related to dentistry available on the video-sharing Internet platform YouTube. YouTube (www.youtube.com) was searched for videos related to dentistry, using the system-generated sorts "by relevance" and "most viewed" and two categories (All and Education). Each of the first thirty results was rated by two assessors filling out a questionnaire for each (total: 120). The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Cohen's kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient tau, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and a nonparametric three-way ANOVA, including an analysis of the interaction between the sorting and category effect, with an α-level of 5 percent. The scan produced 279,000 results in the category All and 5,050 in the category Education. The analysis revealed a wide variety of information about dentistry available on YouTube. The purpose of these videos includes entertainment, advertising, and education. The videos classified under Education have a higher degree of usefulness and informational value for laypersons, dental students, and dental professionals than those found in a broader search category. YouTube and similar social media websites offer new educational possibilities that are currently both underdeveloped and underestimated in terms of their potential value. Dentists and dental educators should also recognize the importance of these websites in shaping public opinion about their profession.

  4. The assessment of infection control in dental practices in the municipality of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Kimiko Matsuda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the infection control measures actually implemented by dental surgeons during dental practice, as patients and professionals are exposed to high biological risk in dental care environments. METHOD: 614 questionnaires (90.69% were answered by professionals registered in updating or in post-graduate courses in the Municipality of São Paulo. RESULTS: Out of surveyed professionals 30.62% admitted that surface protection barriers were not used, whereas 34.17% were using non ideal or outdated pre-disinfection practices. The autoclave was used by 69.38% of participants, although 33.80% were not monitoring control of the sterilization cycles. Chemical and biological indicators were not used simultaneously by 83.21% of respondents and were not employed on a daily or weekly basis by at least 81.75%. Dubious methods of sterilization were cited by 44.77%. Occupational accidents caused by cutting and piercing objects were reported by 47.88%; however, the biologic risk was underestimated by 74.15% of the professionals who suffered the accidents. Irritant solutions were used as an antiseptic agent by 18.55%. CONCLUSIONS: Infection control measures reported by dental surgeons during their practices are deficient. It is necessary to educate, raise awareness of professionals, and promote constant updating courses on procedures which aim at improving safety of dental care.

  5. Pediatric obesity-related curricular content and training in dental schools and dental hygiene programs: systematic review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Bhaskar, Vaishnavi; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2017-06-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to determine: a) What dental schools and dental hygiene programs are doing to promote knowledge and skills related to addressing childhood obesity and to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and b) What else these schools and programs could do to better equip future oral health professionals to address childhood obesity and reduce consumption of SSBs. The authors searched PubMed, Scopus, Education Full Text (EBSCOHost), and ERIC (EBSCOHost) to identify peer-reviewed publications reporting on obesity or dietetic-related curricula in dental and dental hygiene education within the last 20 years. Three studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Outcomes of the identified studies were abstracted and summarized independently by two investigators. The first study describes a 2009 survey of pediatric dentistry residents. Approximately, half had received formal training yet they lacked essential knowledge or skills for managing children who were obese. The second study describes nutrition-related coursework offered in the second year of a predoctoral dental school curriculum in Saudi Arabia, and the third study reports on the development of an "oral health rotation" dietetic internship in a pediatric dentistry clinic, in the context of interprofessional education (IPE). Evidence of dental schools' and dental hygiene programs' efforts to address obesity and SSB consumption in children in their curricula is scant, while Commission on Dental Accreditation standards make sporadic mentions of diet and nutrition. Opportunities exist to leverage existing resources and innovative, experiential approaches, including IPE, to formally, and effectively address this important issue in predoctoral oral health education. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Rubberloid Van R Dental Prod. Surgident Lactona Corp. Alginates Coe Alginate Coe Labs o Jeltrate L.D. Caulk Kerr Alginate Kerr/Sybron Alginate S.S. White Co...Surgident- Alginate Lactona Corp. Unijel II Unitek Corp. O Combination Agar/a ig inate Colloid 80 U.S. Shiza Corp. Dentloid Denterials, Ltd...66061 (215) 277-3800 (913) 782-2200 Shofu Dental Corp. Lactona Corp. (subsidary of 4025 Bohannon Dr. Warner-Lambert Co.) Menlo Park, CA 94025 . Academy

  7. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  8. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Tanja-Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b uses a Virtual Reality (VR representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions. Participants (n = 69 took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control. In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  9. Child Care Providers' Knowledge About Dental Injury First Aid in Preschool-age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Kristine L; Rainchuso, Lori; Boyd, Linda D; Giblin, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess child care providers' level of knowledge of first aid management and attitudes towards dental injuries among preschool-age children within Fairfield County, Connecticut and Boston, Massachusetts. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study used a web-based, validated questionnaire adapted from several studies with permission from authors. A panel of 5 dental experts determined the relevance of the questions and overall content (I-CVI range 0.8-1; S-CVI = 0.95). The 28 question survey included demographics, level of knowledge, attitudes about traumatic dental injuries, emergency management, and 2 case study questions on management of luxation and tooth fracture. Survey data was coded and analyzed for associations and trends using STATA® statistics/data analysis software v. 11.2. Results: A total of 100 child care providers completed the online questionnaire. Eighty-four percent self-reported little to no knowledge about dental injury management. Sixty percent of child care providers agreed that they are responsible for managing dental injuries. Approximately two-thirds of child care providers reported not feeling adequately informed about dental injuries, with 77% expressing interest in receiving more information. Conclusions: The majority of child care providers' do not have the knowledge to perform adequate first aid following a dental injury. Professional development on first aid for dental injuries is recommended among this workforce population. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  10. Improving Dental Experiences by Using Virtual Reality Distraction: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; P. White, Mathew; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people’s previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events. PMID:24621518

  11. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practices of Indian dental surgeons towards tobacco control: advances towards prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Rekha, Dorothy P; Patil, Basanagouda K; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek; Isaac, Mohan K

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the knowledge, attitude and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Bangalore, Karnataka, concerning use of tobacco in their patients. A self-administered questionnaire was administered to all dental surgeons prior to a sensitization program on nicotine dependence. The dental surgeons who responded (n=100) reported a need for increasing sensitization on the issue of tobacco especially among health professionals. Only 33% knew that nicotine is the most addictive drug and knowledge was poor about pharmacological as well as non pharmacological methods of treatment of nicotine dependence. Only 52% asked all their patients about tobacco use. However, almost all dental surgeons agreed that there should be a ban on public use of tobacco. The results of this study call for sensitizing health professionals on a larger scale on the issue of tobacco use and its treatment.

  13. Perceived Dentist and Dental Hygienist Task Distribution After Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Team Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  14. Perceived dentist and dental hygienist task distribution after dental and dental hygiene students' team intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J; Krijnen, Wim P; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  15. [Pharyngeal bacteria and professional oral health care in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yoneyama, T; Ota, M; Hashimoto, K; Miyake, Y

    1997-02-01

    In 15 elderly residents of an old-age home, we measured the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci in the pharynx over 5 months. Seven residents received professional oral health care from dentists and dental hygienists and eight practiced oral care by themselves or together with a helper. During the 5 months, the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci decreased (p professional care. In contrast, the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci neither did not change or increased in those who did not receive professional care. These findings show that professional oral health care by dentists and dental hygienists can decrease the total number of bacteria and the numbers of streptococci and staphylococci in the pharynx of elderly people, which might prevent aspiration pneumonia.

  16. Dental considerations in cardiovascular patients: A practical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swantika Chaudhry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease trends, complications, and associated therapeutics impact the dental health and treatment. Such patients require special consideration with regard to when and which dental treatment is appropriate and what precautions are required. Alertness to potential oral adverse drug reactions enables referral of patient's to his physician or cardiologist. Cardiovascular drugs are also known to have mild to potentially fatal drug interactions. Dental professionals may be the first line of defense in the detection and referral of a patient suspected of having cardiovascular disease, an uncontrolled disease status, or oral adverse drug reactions, and they have a key role to play in oral and systemic disease prevention and treatment, in partnership with the patient and his physician.

  17. Exposure control practices for administering nitrous oxide: A survey of dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2017-06-01

    Engineering, administrative, and work practice controls have been recommended for many years to minimize exposure to nitrous oxide during dental procedures. To better understand the extent to which these exposure controls are used, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants. The anonymous, modular, web-based survey was completed by 284 dental professionals in private practice who administered nitrous oxide to adult and/or pediatric patients in the seven days prior to the survey. Use of primary engineering controls (i.e., nasal scavenging mask and/or local exhaust ventilation (LEV) near the patient's mouth) was nearly universal, reported by 93% and 96% of respondents who administered to adult (A) and pediatric (P) patients, respectively. However, adherence to other recommended precautionary practices were lacking to varying degrees, and were essentially no different among those administering nitrous oxide to adult or pediatric patients. Examples of work practices which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: not checking nitrous oxide equipment for leaks (41% A; 48% P); starting nitrous oxide gas flow before delivery mask or airway mask was applied to patient (13% A; 12% P); and not turning off nitrous oxide gas flow before turning off oxygen flow to the patient (8% A; 7% P). Absence of standard procedures to minimize worker exposure to nitrous oxide (13% of all respondents) and not being trained on safe handling and administration of nitrous oxide (3%) were examples of breaches of administrative controls which may also increase exposure risk. Successful management of nitrous oxide emissions should include properly fitted nasal scavenging masks, supplemental LEV (when nitrous oxide levels cannot be adequately controlled using nasal masks alone), adequate general ventilation, regular

  18. [Dental care for foreigners in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Péter; Oesterle, August

    2008-10-01

    High quality elective dental care for foreign patients was not exceptional in Hungary before the collapse of the old regime in 1989. Nevertheless, it became business as usual only in the new era thanks to the open state borders and the international competitive market environment. Unfortunately, no scientific study concerning this phenomenon has been conducted so far, however its professional and economic significance has been indicated by day-to-day experience. Additionally, the term "dental tourism" also used in international scientific papers became a commonplace in Hungary with unfavourable connotations. The present survey was the first to study this phenomenon by scientific standards in the most involved areas, namely in the capital city Budapest and in three counties in the Western Hungarian Region. Data collecting was performed by a self-reported questionnaire sent via conventional mail to all members of the Dental Section of the Hungarian Medical Chamber practicing in those indicated regions. Respond rates were 20.65% in Budapest and 25.34% in Western Hungary. The sample obtained this way, clearly indicated dimensions of cross-border patient migration and its economic significance as well. In Western Hungary 80.81% of foreign patients came from the neighbouring Austria and two out of ten practices realized 40 to 100% of their income out of this business. In Budapest foreign patients' nationality was more diversified. The largest group arrived from the United Kingdom (9.93%). Nevertheless the economic impact of dental tourism in Budapest is not relevant and outbalanced by a considerable domestic demand on the local private market.

  19. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  20. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  1. Do Dental X-Rays Induce Genotoxicity and Cytotoxicity in Oral Mucosa Cells? A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2017-10-01

    Dental X-rays are widely used in clinical practice, since the technique is an important approach for diagnosing diseases in dental and periodontal tissues. However, it is widely known that radiation is capable of causing damage to cellular systems, such as genotoxicity or cytotoxicity. Thus, the aim of this review was to present a critical analysis regarding the studies published on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by dental X-rays in oral mucosa cells. Such studies have revealed that some oral cell types are more sensitive than others following exposure to dental X-rays. Certainly, this review will contribute to a better understanding of this matter as well as to highlighting perspectives for further studies. Ultimately, such data will promote better safety for both patients and dental professionals. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Dental PACS development in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is an image information technology system for the transmission and storage of medical images. In Korea the first full PACS was installed at Samsung Medical Center in 1994, but, the rate of distribution was very slow. The government's approval for the medical insurance reimbursement for full PACS examinations in November 1999 became the turning point. Thereafter the number of hospitals with full PACS has steeply increased. In September of this year, PACS was installed at 906 medical institutes, including most of university hospitals and general hospitals. The first full dental PACS was installed at Wonkwang University Dental Hospital in 2002. Now ten out of eleven university dental hospitals implemented full dental PACS. The current status and technological factors of dental PACS in Korean university dental hospitals and the future perspectives of dental PACS are described.

  3. [Current status of disinfection and sterilization for dental handpieces in the hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao-hong; Sun, Zheng; Su, Jing

    2004-11-01

    To understand current status of the uses of dental handpieces, methods of disinfection and sterilization and their effectiveness in dental-care hospitals and out-patient departments of stomatology in general hospitals. Ten dental-care hospitals and departments of stomatology in general hospitals at varied levels were randomly sampled during 2000 to 2001 to investigate the uses of dental handpieces and means of their disinfection and sterilization. One used dental handpiece from each hospital or department of stomatology in general hospital selected was detected for possible contamination of bacteria by aerobic bacterial count and Coliform bacterial examinations and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) on it, based on "The Technical Standards for Disinfection" set by the Ministry of Health of China, and the effectiveness of its disinfection and sterilization was evaluated as well. Anti-suction handpieces were used only in 5.9% of the hospitals or departments, 94.1% of them without anti-suction devices. Cleansing disinfection was applied for used dental handpieces in 62.9% of the dental-care hospitals and the departments of stomatology, with an effective rate of 26.17%, immersing disinfection in 10.0%, with an effective rate of 55.88%, and autoclave in 27.1%, with an effective rate of 80.43%. Used dental handpieces in the hospitals and departments of stomatology in general hospitals were all contaminated by bacteria and HBsAg could be detected in 1.67% of them. Dental handpieces without anti-suction should be replaced soon by those with it or comprehensive dental unit with anti-suction device should be used. Used dental handpieces must be sterilized effectively before next use. Awareness on prevention from cross-infection should be improved for dental-care professional staff and operation of sterilization should be standardized.

  4. Examining the implications of dental treatment costs for low-income families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Patrick; McNally, Mary E

    2010-01-01

    Dental disease is concentrated among those with low socioeconomic status. Dental care is not publicly funded, and many Canadians must therefore make difficult financial choices when accessing dental care. Families who live in poverty have difficulty meeting even their most basic household needs, so dental treatment may not be affordable. The objective of this study was to understand how the cost of dental treatment affects the monthly budgets of families with low incomes. A chart review was conducted for a sample of 213 new patients examined at the Dalhousie University dental clinic over a 1-year period. Costs for proposed treatment plans were averaged. The patients" ability to pay for proposed treatment was examined in the context of various income scenarios. Two hundred and one patients were included in the final analysis. Dental treatment costs per patient averaged approximately $1600 for the year, with 42% of the planned treatment completed within the first year. The estimated monthly cost of completed treatment was $55. When the cost of a healthy diet was included in the monthly budget, it was determined that families in Nova Scotia with parents working for minimum wage and those receiving income assistance would experience a 100% shortfall for dental expenses. Low-income families in Nova Scotia were unable to afford both a nutritious diet and dental care. This is disturbing, given the links between a healthy diet and both overall health and dental health. An understanding of the significance of income shortfalls for those with low incomes, especially as they affect even basic nutritional needs, will help dental professionals to appreciate the seriousness of this issue and the difficulties that many Canadians face when trying to access basic dental care.

  5. Dental fear and anxiety in children and adolescents: qualitative study using YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Hamzah, S H; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; McGrath, Colman; King, Nigel M

    2013-02-22

    Dental fear and anxiety (DFA) refers to the fear of and anxiety towards going to the dentist. It exists in a considerable proportion of children and adolescents and is a major dilemma in pediatric dental practice. As an Internet social medium with increasing popularity, the video-sharing website YouTube offers a useful data source for understanding health behaviors and perceptions of the public. Using YouTube as a platform, this qualitative study aimed to examine the manifestations, impacts, and origins of DFA in children and adolescents from the public's perspective. To retrieve relevant information, we searched YouTube using the keywords "dental fear", "dental anxiety", and "dental phobia". Videos in English expressing a layperson's views or experience on children's or adolescent's DFA were selected for this study. A video was excluded if it had poor audiovisual quality, was irrelevant, was pure advertisement or entertainment, or contained only the views of professionals. After the screen, we transcribed 27 videos involving 32 children and adolescents, which were reviewed by a panel of 3 investigators, including a layperson with no formal dental training. Inductive thematic analysis was applied for coding and interpreting the data. The videos revealed multiple manifestations and impacts of DFA, including immediate physical reactions (eg, crying, screaming, and shivering), psychological responses (eg, worry, upset, panic, helplessness, insecurity, resentment, and hatred), and uncooperativeness in dental treatment. Testimonials from children, adolescents, and their parents suggested diverse origins of DFA, namely personal experience (eg, irregular dental visits and influence of parents or peers), dentists and dental auxiliaries (eg, bad manner, lack of clinical skills, and improper work ethic), dental settings (eg, dental chair and sounds), and dental procedures (eg, injections, pain, discomfort, and aesthetic concerns). This qualitative study suggests that DFA in

  6. Effect of Fluoride Mouthrinse and Toothpaste on Number of Streptococcal Colony Forming Units of Dental Plaque

    OpenAIRE

    SE Jabbarifar; SA Tabibian; F Poursina

    2005-01-01

    Background: Frequent topical fluoride therapy through toothpaste, mouthrinse, professional gels and solutions causes decrease in incidence, pause and repair of dental caries in the enamel. These mechanisms are done through penetration of fluoride ions (F-) and their replacement with hydroxyl ions (OH-) of hydroxyappatite of enamel, interfere with microbial metabolism of dental plaque and bacteriostatic effect on some cariogenic bacterial strains such as streptococci. The aim of this study was...

  7. Knowledge and Perceptions Regarding Nicotine Replacement Therapy among Dental Students in Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Alshahrani, Obaid Abdullah; Jhugroo, Chitra; Tashery, Hamed Mohammed; Mathews, Jacob; Chavan, Khechari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organized dentistry has recognized the role of oral health professionals in discouraging tobacco use. Unexplored level of knowledge regarding the benefits and prescription of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) have aroused interest among us which initiated us to assess the knowledge and perception of dental students toward NRT among various dental colleges in Karnataka, South India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was done among 16 selected colleges in Karnataka. It ...

  8. Dental Student Academic Integrity in U.S. Dental Schools: Current Status and Recommendations for Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bruce S; Knight, G William; Graham, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cheating incidents in 2006-07 led U.S. dental schools to heighten their efforts to enhance the environment of academic integrity in their institutions. The aims of this study were to document the measures being used by U.S. dental schools to discourage student cheating, determine the current incidence of reported cheating, and make recommendations for enhancing a culture of integrity in dental education. In late 2014-early 2015, an online survey was distributed to academic deans of all 61 accredited U.S. dental schools that had four classes of dental students enrolled; 50 (82%) responded. Among measures used, 98% of respondents reported having policy statements regarding student academic integrity, 92% had an Honor Code, 96% provided student orientation to integrity policies, and most used proctoring of final exams (91%) and tests (93%). Regarding disciplinary processes, 27% reported their faculty members only rarely reported suspected cheating (though required in 76% of the schools), and 40% disseminated anonymous results of disciplinary hearings. A smaller number of schools (n=36) responded to the question about student cheating than to other questions; those results suggested that reported cheating had increased almost threefold since 1998. The authors recommend that schools add cheating case scenarios to professional ethics curricula; disseminate outcomes of cheating enforcement actions; have students sign a statement attesting to compliance with academic integrity policies at every testing activity; add curricular content on correct writing techniques to avoid plagiarism; require faculty to distribute retired test items; acquire examination-authoring software programs to enable faculty to generate new multiple-choice items and different versions of the same multiple-choice tests; avoid take-home exams when assessing independent student knowledge; and utilize student assessment methods directly relevant to clinical practice.

  9. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  10. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  12. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  13. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more impressions made of your mouth and remaining teeth. These impressions are used to make the crown — your realistic-looking artificial tooth. The crown can't be placed until your jawbone is strong ... and your dental specialist can choose artificial teeth that are either ...

  14. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  15. Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resource Center Burmese (myanma bhasa) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - myanma bhasa (Burmese) PDF Orange County North ... California Dental Association Karen (S’gaw Karen) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - S’gaw Karen (Karen) ...

  16. Professional C++

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Master complex C++ programming with this helpful, in-depth resource From game programming to major commercial software applications, C++ is the language of choice. It is also one of the most difficult programming languages to master. While most competing books are geared toward beginners, Professional C++, Third Edition, shows experienced developers how to master the latest release of C++, explaining little known features with detailed code examples users can plug into their own codes. More advanced language features and programming techniques are presented in this newest edition of the book,

  17. Professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  18. Dental student perceptions of oral and maxillofacial surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Krystian F; Ziccardi, Vincent B; Aziz, Shahid R; Sue-Jiang, Shuying

    2013-05-01

    The specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) encompasses the diagnosis and surgical management of a variety of pathologic, functional, and esthetic conditions of the oral and maxillofacial region. Despite the specialty's prominent role in the field of dentistry, a lack of complete understanding still remains among dental and medical health professionals as to the exact scope and expertise of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The present study aimed to analyze a population of dental students' perceptions of OMS as a specialty with respect to treatment rendered, referral patterns, and a general opinion of the specialty as a whole. A survey consisting of 10 multiple-choice questions was compiled and distributed to dental students through an on-line polling service (SurveyMonkey). A total of 5 dental student classes at a single dental school were polled using school-based electronic mail, including the graduating seniors. All answers were kept confidential, and no individual students were identified. The students were not able to retake the survey once completed. The final tallies of the survey results were compiled and submitted for statistical analysis. Statistically significant associations between the year of dental education and student perceptions of OMS were determined. As dental students progress through their undergraduate studies, their perceptions change with regard to the referral of dental implants. Periodontists were found to have statistically significantly greater rates of referral than oral and maxillofacial surgeons from dental students in the fourth year and recent graduates compared with younger dental students from the first, second, and third years for placement of dental implants. Statistically insignificant in terms of a changing dental student perception was the finding that third molar removal was within the domain of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, as well as the management of cleft lip and palate deformities and mandibular

  19. The state of infant oral healthcare knowledge and awareness: Disparity among parents and healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaprakash P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Provision of infant oral health (IOH care is a challenging issue in the rural areas of our country due to lack of pedodontists and other dental workforces. To overcome these barriers it is essential to call the medical and other healthcare professionals to provide IOH care in joint collaboration with dental professionals. However, it is unclear to what extent these medical professionals are really aware of preventive strategies and to what extent they impart them. Thus, the present study was designed to begin from the grass-root levels, that is, assessing the baseline knowledge and awareness regarding IOH care among students (dental/medical and parents (urban/rural. Variation of opinions with inconsistencies were obtained from both medical and/dental students and as well as from both the parental groups. This study calls for further research to evaluate the role of various factors involved in IOH care and to effectively educate all healthcare providers in this area.

  20. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  1. Exploring Dental Providers' Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR.

  2. Radiographic Assessment of Dental Maturation in Children With Dental Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Aida Carolina; Pozo, Rodrigo Del; de Cedres, Lucila Blanco

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in humans, frequently associated with disorders in dental development and maturation. The purpose of this study is to determine radiographic variations in dental maturation in a group of Venezuelan children with dental agenesis. 1,188 panoramic radiographs, from healthy patients ages 5 to 12 years old were studied for agenesis of permanent teeth. Dental maturation was assessed by relative eruption and dental age according to Nolla, comparing children affected with dental agenesis to a stratified control group selected from the same population, excluding children with premature loss of primary teeth in the left quadrants and unclear radiographs. Descriptive analysis, and differences between means and medians (Student t test, Kruskall-Wallis p=0.05) were performed. Medians for Nolla stages were similar between groups, with delay in tooth formation in the agenesis group for second molars (p<0.05) and maxillary lateral incisors and second premolars. Dental age was significantly underestimated for both groups, -0.89 (±0.78) for the control group and -1.20 (±0.95) for the study group. Tooth eruption was similar between groups. Dental age was significantly delayed in Venezuelan children with dental agenesis, with variable significance for tooth formation of studied teeth.

  3. [Men who have sex with men and human immunodeficiency virus testing in dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Jesús Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Álvarez, Mario Moisés

    To explore the attitudes of men who have sex with men (MSM) towards the implementation of rapid HIV-1/2 testing in the dental practice, and to evaluate MSM's perceptions of stigma and discrimination related to sexual orientation by dental care professionals. Cross-sectional study using a self-administered, anonymous, structured analytical questionnaire answered by 185 MSM in Mexico. The survey included sociodemographic variables, MSM's perceptions towards public and private dental providers, and dental services, as well as their perception towards rapid HIV-1/2 testing in the dental practice. In addition, the perception of stigma and discrimination associated with their sexual orientation was explored by designing a psychometric Likert-type scale. The statistical analysis included factor analysis and non-hierarchical cluster analysis. 86.5% of the respondents expressed their willingness to take a rapid HIV-1/2 screening test during their dental visit. Nevertheless, 91.9% of them considered it important that dental professionals must be well-trained before administering any rapid HIV-1/2 tests. Factor analysis revealed two factors: experiences of sexual orientation stigma and discrimination in dental settings, and feelings of concern about the attitude of the dentist and dental staff towards their sexual orientation. Based on these factors and cluster analysis, three user profiles were identified: users who have not experienced stigma and discrimination (90.3%); users who have not experienced stigma and discrimination, but feel a slight concern (8.1%), and users who have experienced some form of discrimination and feel concern (1.6%). The dental practice may represent a potential location for rapid HIV-1/2 testing contributing to early HIV infection diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Methods used by accredited dental specialty programs to advertise faculty positions: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Armbruster, Paul C; Gallo, John R

    2011-01-01

    The various reasons for the current and projected shortages of dental faculty members in the United States have received much attention. Dental school deans have reported that the top three factors impacting their ability to fill faculty positions are meeting the requirements of the position, lack of response to position announcement, and salary/budget limitations. An electronic survey sent to program directors of specialty programs at all accredited U.S. dental schools inquired about the number of vacant positions, advertised vacant positions, reasons for not advertising, selection of advertising medium, results of advertising, and assistance from professional dental organizations. A total of seventy-three permanently funded full-time faculty positions were reported vacant, with 89.0 percent of these positions having been advertised in nationally recognized professional journals and newsletters. Networking or word-of-mouth was reported as the most successful method for advertising. The majority of those responding reported that professional dental organizations did not help with filling vacant faculty positions, but that they would utilize the American Dental Association's website or their specialty organization's website to post faculty positions if they were easy to use and update.

  5. Technology is a critical game changer to the practice of dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C

    2014-06-01

    Dental hygienists will need to embrace 21st century technology to adapt to workplace settings. To stay relevant in the workforce, dental hygienists need mastery of new skills and technologies. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the vast array of technological advances impacting dental practice and the consequent implications for oral health care providers. New technologies have provided unparalleled opportunities for degree and career advancement for dental hygienists. Advances in science and technology are providing patients with better quality and more convenient oral health care. Dental hygienists need technological skills that enable them to fully utilize technology as a strategy for consultation with dentists and other health care professionals and for other purposes. Continuing education and life-long learning factor into preparing dental hygienists for 21st century technologies. With technological advances, less adaptive professionals could potentially see a decrease in demand for their services. Possessing a high level of knowledge of dentistry and dental hygiene does not ensure a position in the workforce. Knowledge of technologies and associated skills are required for quality patient care and career and personal growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. New Zealand dental technicians and continuing education: findings from a qualitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne R; Pang, Lilian C Y; Aarts, John M

    2012-06-01

    Under the 2003 Health Practitioners Competence Assurance (HPCA) Act, New Zealand registered dental technicians are subject to mandatory Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements. Internationally, little published literature has examined dental technicians' perspectives of CPD and CPD needs, and there is no published literature relating to the New Zealand context. Available research highlights the importance of CPD for maintaining high professional standards, ensuring patient safety, allowing dental technicians to keep abreast of current research and technological advances, fostering peer networks, and promoting job satisfaction. In 2009, an online open-ended questionnaire was developed to examine New Zealand dental and clinical dental technicians' perspectives of CPD and their perceived CPD needs. In total, 45 New Zealand registered dental technicians responded. Questionnaire responses provided rich qualitative insights into dental technicians' wide-ranging perceptions of CPD, factors that make CPD involvement more or less difficult and more or less desirable, and ways in which CPD access and relevance might be improved. This paper discusses the survey findings in the light of the existing literature on CPD and in relation to the unique New Zealand regulatory environment. It highlights the factors which respondents identified as shaping their CPD decisions, barriers to CPD engagement, perceived CPD needs, suggestions as to how the current CPD system could be improved, and areas for future research.

  7. A Study of Visible Tattoos in Entry-Level Dental Hygiene Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search, Kathryn R; Tolle, Susan L; McCombs, Gayle B; Arndt, Aaron

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to survey entry-level dental hygiene program directors in the United States (U.S.) to assess their perceptions of dental hygienists with visible tattoos as well as to determine current policies related to dress codes in U.S. dental hygiene programs. Methods: Data was collected with an online survey emailed to 340 dental hygiene program directors yielding a 43% (n=141) response rate. Participants indicated their opinions of visible tattoos on the basis of professionalism and school policy satisfaction. Results: Eighty percent of respondents reported their program as having dress code policies on visible tattoos, with the majority (97%) requiring visible tattoos to be covered. Results revealed both students (M=5.57, phygiene faculty should discuss the impact of visible tattoos on future employment opportunities, and that the community would view the school as less professional if students had visible tattoos (pPersonal tolerance toward tattoos (phygiene program dress code included policy on visible tattoos. Conclusion: Study results showed that visible tattoos were not perceived favorably and that personal perceptions of dental hygiene program directors may have influenced school dress code polices regarding visible tattoos. These findings provide evidence based information for dental hygienists, students, faculty, administrators and hiring managers for formulating policies relating to body art. Copyright © 2018 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  8. Assessment of digital literacy and use of smart phones among Central Indian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Mehrotra, Divya; Kamthan, Shivam; Sabir, Husain; Katiyar, Pratibha; Sai Prasad, S V

    2018-01-01

    Education has largely been digitalized. More so, for professional education, keeping updated in this fast paced world has become a necessary requisite and dentistry has not been left untouched. This cross sectional questionnaire based study aimed to assess the digital literacy and smartphone usage amongst the 260 Central Indian dental students including their perspicacity about smartphone/internet usage for learning purposes. The students' attitude for implementation of digital technology in study programs/education system was also evaluated. The questionnaire was distributed among total 260 dental students from different dental institutes of Central India. The data was collected and analyzed using SPSS software. Out of 260 students, 250 were internet users, out of which 56% had internet access all time. 94.23% students owned a smartphone. 46.53% (114/245) students had some app related to the dentistry in their smartphone device. The commonest site for surfing related to knowledge seeking was google scholar (72%) followed by Pubmed and others. Nearly 80% dental students believed that social media helps them in their professional course studies. Post graduate students showed statistitically significant difference from undergraduates and interns in terms of knowledge of keywords, dental apps and reading research journals. 89.23% students were keen for implementation of e-learning in their curriculum. This study reflects willingness of dental students to adopt digital revolution in dental education which in turn may present an opportunity for educators and policy makers to modify educational methods and thereby advance student's current learning approaches.

  9. Expanding services in a shrinking economy: desktop document delivery in a dental school library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushrowski, Barbara A

    2011-07-01

    How can library staff develop and promote a document delivery service and then expand the service to a wide audience? The setting is the library at the Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD), Indianapolis. A faculty survey and a citation analysis were conducted to determine potential use of the service. Volume of interlibrary loan transactions and staff and equipment capacity were also studied. IUSD Library staff created a desktop delivery service (DDSXpress) for faculty and then expanded the service to practicing dental professionals and graduate students. The number of faculty using DDSXpress remains consistent. The number of practicing dental professionals using the service is low. Graduate students have been quick to adopt the service. Through careful analysis of capacity and need for the service, staff successfully expanded document delivery service without incurring additional costs. Use of DDSXpress is continually monitored, and opportunities to market the service to practicing dental professionals are being investigated.

  10. Oral piercings and their dental implications: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrinder; Tuli, Avantika

    2012-05-01

    Oral piercing has become common in young adults in recent years. Adolescents are characterized by a compulsive tendency to distinguish themselves from the rest; differences in clothes, hairstyle, or "decorative" details are used to this effect, based on highly-diverse criteria. Dental health-care professionals need to be aware of the procedures and risks involved with oral piercings and the social and psychological reasons that lead people to engage in this practice, regardless of the risks. The present article addresses oral mutilation practices, specifically from the oral health perspective, as it is of concern to dental professionals due to the health risks and oral complications associated with such practices. The various oral ornaments, piercing sites, and their implications, orally, as well as systemically, have been discussed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a... dental cavity or a broken tooth. (b) Classification. Class I. ...

  13. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Home › Medicaid › Benefits › Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Related Resources Learn How to Report the ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  14. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  15. Significance of Dental Records in Personal Identification in Forensic Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagish Kumar L Shanbhag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology is a branch that connects dentistry and the legal profession. One of the members in the forensic investigation team is a dentist. Dentists play an important and significant role in various aspects of the identification of persons in various forensic circumstances. However, several dentists and legal professionals are quite ignorant of this fascinating aspect of forensic odontology. A need was felt to fill this gap. The dental record is a legal document possessed by the dentist and it contains subjective and objective information about the patient. A PubMed search and Google search were done for articles highlighting the importance of dental records in forensic sciences using the key words "forensic odontology, forensic dentistry, forensic dentists, identification, dental records, and dental chart". A total of 42 articles relevant to the title of the article were found and reviewed. The present article highlights the role of dentists in forensic sciences, their possible contributions to forensics, and the various aspects of forensic dentistry, thus bridging the gap of knowledge between the legal and the dental fraternities.

  16. A survey of dental residents' expectations for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguno, Christine; Murray, Peter E; Howard, Cameron; Madras, Jonathan; Mangan, Stephen; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to survey a group of dental residents regarding their expectations for using regenerative endodontic procedures as part of future dental treatments. After institutional review board approval, the opinions of 32 dentists who were having postgraduate residency training to become specialists in a dental school were surveyed. The survey had 40 questions about professional status, ethical beliefs, judgment, and clinical practice. It was found that 83.9% of dentists had no continuing education or training in stem cells or regenerative endodontic procedures. Results showed that 96.8% of dentists are willing to receive training to be able to provide regenerative endodontic procedures for their patients. Of the total group, 49.1% of dentists already use membranes, scaffolds, or bioactive materials to provide dental treatment. It was determined that 47.3% of dentists agree that the costs of regenerative procedures should be comparable with current treatments. It was also found that 55.1% of dentists were unsure whether regenerative procedures would be successful. Dentists are supportive of using regenerative endodontic procedures in their dental practice, and they are willing to undergo extra training and to buy new technology to provide new procedures. Nevertheless, dentists also need more evidence for the effectiveness and safety of regenerative treatments before they will be recommended for most patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Detecting the manipulation of digital clinical records in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Flores-García, V; Labajo-González, E; Santiago-Sáez, A; Perea-Pérez, B

    2017-11-01

    Radiography provides many advantages in the diagnosis and management of dental conditions. However, dental X-ray images may be subject to manipulation with malicious intent using easily accessible computer software. In this study, we sought to evaluate a dentist's ability to identify a manipulated dental X-ray images, when compared with the original, using a variant of the methodology described by Visser and Kruger. Sixty-six dentists were invited to participate and evaluate 20 intraoral dental X-ray images, 10 originals and 10 modified, manipulated using Adobe Photoshop to simulate fillings, root canal treatments, etc. Participating dentists were correct in identifying the manipulated image in 56% of cases, 6% higher than by chance and 10% more than in the study by Visser and Kruger. Malicious changes to dental X-ray images may go unnoticed even by experienced dentists. Professionals must be aware of the legal consequences of such changes. A system of detection/validation should be created for radiographic images. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A survey of US dental practices' use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy; Henry, Jon C

    2012-03-01

    Social media is becoming the way for businesses, including health care professionals, to communicate with consumers. The study examines the use of social media by dental practices in the US. An electronic survey was sent to 22,682 dentists in the United States. The survey consisted of questions related to the use of social media in the dental practice. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and comparisons were made using a Fisher's exact test. A total of 573 responses were received. Social media was used in 52% of dental practices, the most common being Facebook. The use of social media was most commonly for marketing purposes (91%). Dentists younger than 45 years old were more likely to use social media in their practice than dentists 45 years or older (p > 0.001). Dental practices actively use social media for marketing and communication. Many dentists are unsure how to measure the success of social media in their practice. Additional research is needed to measure the success of social media in a dental practice. Social media is a common way practices market and interact with their patients. There are some difficulties in determining what appropriate content for social media is and how to evaluate the success.

  19. Nationwide survey on barriers for dental research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundendu Arya Bishen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Research in the dental field is progressing at mightier speed worldwide, but an unfortunately representation of India at this platform is negligible. The present study was undertaken to unearth the barriers for dental research among dental professionals in Indian scenario. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted on 1514 participant′s (Master of Dental Surgery and Bachelor of Dental Surgery staff and postgraduates in 40 dental colleges of India selected by multistage random sampling. The response rate was 75.7%. The survey was undertaken from July 2013 to December 2013. The survey instrument was 24-item, investigator developed, self-structured, close-ended, and self-administered questionnaire grouped into four categories that are, institutional/departmental support related barriers, financial/training support related barriers, time-related barriers, and general barriers. Results: Among all respondents 47.23% informed that they are administrative and educational work rather than research work as (P < 0.001. Overall 57.53% of study participants reported lack of administrative and technical support for research work as (P < 0.001. Overall 64.9% reported meager college funding was the barrier (P < 0.001. Overall 61.5% respondents reported lack of time to do research work due to clinical and teaching responsibilities (P < 0.001 was the barrier for research. Largely 80.25% agreed that, the lack of documentation and record maintenance are an obvious barrier for research (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Present study unearths certain barriers for research in an Indian scenario, which includes administrative overburden, lack of funds, and lack of documentation of the dental data. Governing authorities of dentistry in India have to make major interventions to make research non-intensive environment to research-friendly environment.

  20. General dental practitioners' views on early childhood caries and timing of the first dental visit in Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Alaa S; Schroth, Robert J; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I

    2015-03-01

    This survey evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Selangor regarding early childhood caries (ECC) prevention and the recommended timing of a child's first dental visit. A questionnaire was mailed to 521 licensed GDPs. Descriptive statistics were used, and bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed. The response rate was 52.6%. Although 89.8% mentioned counseling parents and caregivers, only 44.2% were familiar with anticipatory guidance. Whereas 98.2% agreed that early examinations are important to prevent ECC, only 51.8% were aware of the recommendation for a first visit by 12 months of age. GDPs who recommended early dental visits were significantly more likely to be recent graduates, more familiar with professional guidelines, and less likely to be deterred by a child's crying or behavior. In conclusion, GDPs in Selangor are aware about the importance of early dental visits in ECC prevention. However, a considerable number of them are still not aware of the recommendation that children must first visit the dentist by 12 months of age. Furthermore, some of their current practices in ECC management and prevention do not match professional recommendations. © 2013 APJPH.

  1. Professional socialisation: an influence on professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional ...

  2. Political or dental power in private and public service provision: a study of municipal expenditures for child dental care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L. B.; Bech, M.; Lauridsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Both professionals and politicians may affect expenditures for highly professional services provided in the public and private sector. We investigated Danish publicly financed child dental care with a special focus on the influence of politicians and dentists on the expenditure level. By studying...... from 1996 to 2001 for 226 Danish municipalities, thus allowing for the control for heterogeneity between municipalities and for intra-municipal correlations across time. The results point to differences in expenditures between municipalities with privately and publicly produced dental care. Furthermore...... spatial patterns in expenditure levels across municipalities, we are able to test the influences of these two main actors and the networks through which learning is achieved. Four hypotheses on the existence of different spatial spillover effects are tested. The empirical analysis is based on annual data...

  3. Willingness of Saudi dental professionals to treat Hepatitis B virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-04

    May 4, 2014 ... questions related to age, sex, vaccination against HBV, screening for HBV antibody .... Ethical Committee, King Saud University (Registration .... Bednarsh HS, Klein B. Legal issues for healthcare workers with bloodborne.

  4. Meditation - A Powerful Stress Buster in Dental Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Saxena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meditation is an umbrella term that encompasses a family of practices. In state of meditation there is total relaxation of body & mind. Control of breathing & doing nothing are the basic steps. The practice of meditation creates a balanced, rhythmic & naturally flowing pulsation of life through every part of the body. It transfers the struggling- stressful & exhausted life into a peaceful one. That life is full of health, creativity, love & compassion. Such type of greatest adventure only ′human mind′ can undertake. For meditation, there is no need to escape from the life. It is a simple technique that does not require sophisticated or complicated amenities.

  5. Differences in utilization of dental procedures by children enrolled in Wisconsin Medicaid and Delta Dental insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Pradeep; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko; Eichmiller, Fredrick; Okunseri, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have directly compared dental procedures provided in public and private insurance plans for enrollees living in dental health professional shortage areas (DHPSAs). We examined the rates for the different types of dental procedures received by 0-18-year-old children living in DHPSAs and non-DHPSAs who were enrolled in Medicaid and those enrolled under Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDW) for years 2002 to 2008. Medicaid and DDW dental claims data for 2002 to 2008 was analyzed. Enrollees were divided into DDW-DHPSA and non-DHPSA and Medicaid-DHPSA and non-DHPSA groups. Descriptive and multivariable analyses using over-dispersed Poisson regression were performed to examine the effect of living in DHPSAs and insurance type in relation to the number of procedures received. Approximately 49 and 65 percent of children living in non-DHPSAs that were enrolled in Medicaid and DDW received at least one preventive dental procedure annually, respectively. Children in DDW non-DHPSA group had 1.79 times as many preventive, 0.27 times fewer complex restorative and 0.51 times fewer endodontic procedures respectively, compared to those in Medicaid non-DHPSA group. Children enrolled in DDW-DHPSA group had 1.53 times as many preventive and 0.25 times fewer complex restorative procedures, compared to children in Medicaid-DHPSA group. DDW enrollees had significantly higher utilization rates for preventive procedures than children in Medicaid. There were significant differences across Medicaid and DDW between non-DHPSA and DHPSA for most dental procedures received by enrollees. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Knowledge of dental ethics and jurisprudence among dental practitioners in Chennai, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kesavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethics is a science of ideal human character and behavior in situations where the distinction should be made between what is right and wrong. Dental jurisprudence is a set of legal regulations set forth by each state's legislature describing the legal limitations and regulations related to the practice of dentistry. Objectives: (1 To assess the dental practitioners' awareness about dentists (Code of Ethics regulation and jurisprudence. (2 To assess the awareness of dentists regarding Consumer Protection Act (COPRA and its implications in dentistry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted. A pilot study was conducted to validate the questionnaire and to get the required sample size which was 346. A specially designed questionnaire consisting of 24 close-ended questions divided into two sections was used. The resulting data were coded, and statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 17.0. Results: The results showed that about 65% of the dentists were aware that the Dentist Act was given in the year 1948 and 76% knew that the dentists (Code of Ethics regulation was given by the Dental Council of India. Only 33% knew that it is not unethical for a dental surgeon to supply or sell drugs related to dentistry in his clinic. Only 31% responded correctly that it is not necessary to obtain informed consent for clinical examination and routine radiography. Nearly, half of the respondents (43% were not aware of professional indemnity insurance. Conclusion: The study concludes that majority of the dental practitioners are aware of dental ethics but their knowledge on jurisprudence and COPRA needs to be enriched. Although recommendations can be made to the dental profession to alter their behavior, real improvement is unlikely without changes in legislation and social policy.

  7. The differences in healthcare utilization for dental caries based on the implementation of water fluoridation in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung-Soo; Han, Kyu-Tae; Park, Sohee; Moon, Ki Tae; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-11-08

    There were some debates about the water fluoridation program in South Korea, even if the program had generally substantial effectiveness. Because the out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care were higher in South Korea than in other countries, an efficient solution was needed. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the implementation of water fluoridation and the utilization of dental care. We used the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort. In this study, data finally included 472,250 patients who were newly diagnosed with dental caries during 2003-2013. We performed survival analysis using cox proportional hazard model, negative binomial-regression, and regression analyses using generalized estimating equation models. There were 48.49 % outpatient dental care visit during study period. Individuals with water fluoridation had a lower risk of dental care visits (HR = 0.949, 95 % CI = 0.928-0.971). Among the individuals who experienced a dental care visit, those with water fluoridation program had a lower number of dental care visits (β = -0.029), and the period of water fluoridation had an inverse association with the dental care expenditures. The implementation of water fluoridation programs and these periods are associated with reducing the utilization of dental health care. Considering these positive impacts, healthcare professionals must consider preventive strategies for activating water fluoridation programs, such as changes in public perception and relations, for the effective management of dental care in South Korea.

  8. Curriculum evaluation of ethical reasoning and professional responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Carole R; Bowen, Denise M; Paarmann, Carlene S

    2003-01-01

    This exploratory study evaluated curricular content and evaluation mechanisms related to ethics and professionalism in the baccalaureate dental hygiene program at Idaho State University. Competency-based education requires enhanced student preparation in ethical reasoning, critical thinking, and decision-making. Graduates must integrate concepts, beliefs, principles, and values to fulfill ethical and professional responsibilities. Methods included 1) development of five supporting competencies defining ethics and professionalism to provide a framework for curricular evaluation; 2) assessment of all course content and evaluation methods for each supporting competency; 3) evaluation of students' clinical performance based on professional judgment grades; and 4) survey of junior (n=30) and senior (n=27) students' attitudes about dental hygiene practice related to ethics and professionalism. Results revealed that most courses include content and evaluation related to at least one supporting competency; however, authentic evaluation is weak. Clinical instructors rarely relate evaluations to ethical principles or values. Surveys showed significant differences between junior and senior students' attitudes about ethics and professionalism in six of thirty-four areas (the six were laws and regulations; communication and interpersonal skills; problem solving; professional activities/programs; integrity; and safe work environment). This article shares one approach for evaluating curricular content and evaluation methods designed to develop student competence in ethical reasoning and professionalism. Based upon the study's findings, recommendations are made for curricular enhancement via authentic evaluation and faculty training.

  9. Dental management of a pediatric patient with Burkitt lymphoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, M Y; Pandey, R K; Kumar, Archana; Radhakrishnan, Aparna

    2012-06-01

    Recent advancements in the field of cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy have led to higher rates of survival for children with malignant tumors. More than 75% of pediatric patients diagnosed with malignancies survive more than 5 years. These advancements have resulted in additional responsibilities for dental professionals to diagnose, evaluate, prevent, stabilize, and manage the oral and dental problems that can compromise the quality of life of these children. This case report highlights the importance of professional and self-administered oral prophylactic measures and patient compliance in the successful oral rehabilitation of a pediatric patient with Burkitt lymphoma. © 2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Identifying and preparing the next generation of part-time clinical teachers from dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Hellyer, P; Meakin, N; Jones, K A

    2015-10-09

    Part-time general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental care professionals (DCPs) working in practice are being increasingly utilised to deliver undergraduate clinical dental education to both dental and hygiene/therapy students. As such, there is a need for appropriate recruitment processes and ongoing staff development in the different and complex role of the clinical teacher. Recently a group of experienced dental practitioners, making a journey from GDP to part-time clinical teacher, identified common themes, experiences, challenges and realisations. These were: 'what is clinical dental education?'; 'me as a clinical teacher'; and 'specific teaching issues'. The themes highlighted the complexity of dental education and the different environment of the teaching clinic from general practice. Some of the themes identified could be a starting point for the induction process to facilitate an easier transition from experienced GDP to clinical teacher. With the current demands from both students and patients alike, the 'three way dynamic of patient, student and teacher' needs to be supported if dental schools are to attract and develop the highest quality clinical teachers. It is of critical importance to give an exceptional experience to students in their clinical education as well as to patients in terms of excellent and appropriate treatment. The challenge for deans and directors of education is to find the resources to properly fund teacher recruitment, induction and the development of part-time GDPs in order to produce the expert teachers of tomorrow.

  11. Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Hajar S; Gao, Xiaoli; Yung Yiu, Cynthia K; McGrath, Colman; King, Nigel M

    2014-01-01

    Internet social media offers a rich source for soliciting the public's views on health issues. This qualitative research, using You-Tube as a platform, aimed to explore the public's perspectives on management of dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in pediatric patients. Using three keywords ("dental fear," "dental phobia," and "dental anxiety"), YouTube videos were searched. Twenty-seven videos related to DFA in children and adolescents were reviewed by three investigators, including a nondental layperson. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted for interpreting the data. Several strategies were considered useful for controlling DFA in pediatric patients, including: verbal and nonverbal communication to establish closeness and effective guidance (explanation, permission-seeking, reassurance, and negotiation); desensitization to dental settings and procedures; tell-show-do; positive reinforcement; distraction by imagination and thoughtful designs of clinic; and parental presence and support. Some self-coping strategies adopted by patients alleviated their DFA, such as self-reasoning and trust-building through long-term connection. Dentists' clinical competence, favorable treatment outcomes, and state-of-the-art devices and technologies (dental lasers, intraoral camera, and adapted anaesthesia method) contributed to reducing DFA. Authentic testimonials in YouTube videos endorsed and interpreted a variety of strategies adoptable by patients, parents, and dental professionals for managing children's and adolescents' dental fears and anxieties.

  12. Are advertisements in dental journals supported by an appropriate evidence-base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnutt, Ivor G; Hardy, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Dental professionals are constantly exposed to advertisements in the dental literature. These promote products, either for use in the operatory or to recommend to patients. In an era of evidence-based practice, what references are provided to support claims made by the advertisers? This study aimed to determine if advertisements in four major dental journals, whose target audience is general dental practitioners, were supported by an appropriate evidence-base, readily accessible to readers. The 2010 printed volumes of the Australian Dental Journal, British Dental Journal, Dental Update and the Journal of the American Dental Association were hand searched to identify advertisements which made a claim of clinical benefit or superiority to competing products. Advertisements were categorized according to type of product being promoted and the availability, nature and number of any supporting references was recorded. Repeated advertisements were analyzed only once. A total of 390 advertisements were identified and 369 made a claim of benefit or superiority. When the 222 duplicates of the same advertisement were removed, 147 unique advertisements remained. Of these: 54 (37%) were advertisements related to dental devices for in-surgery use; 44 (30%) for dental materials, and 27 (18%) for dentifrices/medicaments. 113 (76.9%) advertisements offered no evidential support for claims made. Of the 34 advertisements that provided evidential support, only 20 provided a complete reference that could readily be sourced by an interested reader: 15 articles in refereed journals; 5 data on file; 3 in-house studies and combinations thereof. Four references were not accessible due to incomplete referencing. Two advertisements provided evidence that was not relevant to the product being advertised. The majority of advertisements in the dental literature do not provide an adequate evidence-base, readily available to readers, to support the claims being made. If evidence-based practice is

  13. Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too ... What if my mouth is sore after my dental work? A sore mouth is common after dental ...

  14. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health & Hygiene for Young Children Page Content Article ... and lead to future dental problems. Teaching Good Dental Habits The best way to protect your child's ...

  15. Milestones of dental history

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Mahant; S Vineet Agrawal; Sonali Kapoor; Isha Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Since ages, human beings suffer from the dental problems. With the journey as time elapsed the person treating the teeth changed (i.e., from barbers and monks to present dentists), equipment changed (i.e., from bow drills to airotor and laser handpieces), materials changed (i.e., from ground mastic alum/honey to tooth colored composite and ceramics). There has been drastic change in treatment planning from extraction to the conservation of teeth and from manual restoration to computerized res...

  16. Ethical checklist for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchuse, D J; Rinchuse, D J; Deluzio, C

    1995-01-01

    A checklist for verification of unethical business practices, originally formulated by Drs. Blanchard and Peale, is adapted to dental practice. A scenario is used as a model to demonstrate the applicability of this instrument to dental practice. The instrument asks three questions in regards to an ethical dilemma: 1) Is it legal? 2) Is it fair? 3) How does it make you feel? The paper concludes the giving of gifts to general dentists by dental specialists for the referral of patients is unethical.

  17. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, ...

  19. Professional stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Job stress is a line, for the person at work hired adverse physiological, psychological and behavioral reactions to situations in which job requirements are not in accordance with its capabilities, abilities and needs. Sources of stress at work are numerous. Personal factors: personality types have been most studied so far, environmental changes and demographic characteristics as well. Interpersonal stress inducing factors act and influence to the occurrence of many psychosomatic diseases. Psychosocial climate and relationships which are prevented or encouraged such as: cooperation and competition, trust and suspicion certainly affect to the appearance of professional stress. The way of leadership is very important. Organizational factors are the type of work, work time, noncompliance of the job, the introduction of new ethnologies, the conflict of personal roles, fear of job loss, bad physical conditions of working environment. The consequences of stress at work are numerous: at the cognitive level, the emotional level, the production plan, the health, plan reduces the immune system that cause a variety of psychosomatic illnesses and accidents at work.

  20. Portrait professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Tim

    2011-12-01

    Most medical photographers, unless working as dedicated ophthalmic photographers or retinal screeners, will shoot portraits or publicity pictures. Many will spend a proportion of their time producing brochure shots for patient information material or their Trust's Annual Report. High-quality images of staff at work are often required by the strategic planning departments of Trusts to support bids for business from service commissioners. This "non-clinical" work is in reality commercial work - the jobs that high street portrait and general practice photographers would undertake in different settings. Medical photographers use many of the same tools as their commercial cousins. They use the same DSLR cameras and lenses. They use Adobe Photoshop to manipulate images. However, one software tool extensively used by portrait and social photographers, but possibly unfamiliar to many medical photographers, is Portrait Professional. Currently in its 10th version, it is produced by Anthropics Technology ( http://www.anthropics.com ), a London-based company specialising in image manipulation software.

  1. Parents' online discussions about children's dental caries: A critical content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Avery; Weijs, Cynthia A; Haines-Saah, Rebecca J; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-09-14

    Through an analysis of postings to an online parenting forum, we aimed to explore the many ways in which parents orient to (i.e., take up, challenge, re-articulate) information about child dental health in the context of their online interactions. Our analysis is anchored in Nettleton's theoretical work on dental authority and power, which we apply in a digital context. We examined discussion threads from the public online forums on BabyCenter Canada. We identified relevant threads using the site search function and keywords related to dental health, with a focus on dental caries (tooth decay), related care behaviours (e.g., toothbrushing), and the controversial issue of fluoride. Following descriptive content coding, we applied a critical lens to unpack themes related to expert knowledge, gender and parenting online cultures. We analyzed 479 relevant threads. Our findings focus on two central themes: the tension between parents' views and those of dental health professionals; and, the gendered, cultural roles and expectations that position mothers as primarily responsible for the care of children's dental health. Though these themes are not new, our findings show that they persist in the digital context where social divisions (e.g., expert/non-expert) may be blurred. Our analysis of online discussions provides an opportunity to think critically about ways in which parents engage with public health, in digital contexts. Although some mothers express disconnect when communicating with dental professionals, they are very engaged and concerned with dental health issues for their children. A challenge for dental public health is to find ways to shift perspective towards recognizing that the target population is empowered and already engaged in discussions of research evidence and clinical encounters on their own terms, facilitated by an online context.

  2. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  3. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the ...

  4. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  5. Development and Testing of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Resource for Children's Dental Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, J; Rodd, H; Morgan, A; Williams, C; Gupta, E; Kirby, J; Creswell, C; Newton, T; Stevens, K; Baker, S; Prasad, S; Marshman, Z

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for dental anxiety; however, access to therapy is limited. The current study aimed to develop a self-help CBT resource for reducing dental anxiety in children, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a trial to evaluate the treatment efficacy and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention. A mixed methods design was employed. Within phase 1, a qualitative "person-based" approach informed the development of the self-help CBT resource. This also employed guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions. Within phase 2, children, aged between 9 and 16 y, who had elevated self-reported dental anxiety and were attending a community dental service or dental hospital, were invited to use the CBT resource. Children completed questionnaires, which assessed their dental anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) prior to and following their use of the resource. Recruitment and completion rates were recorded. Acceptability of the CBT resource was explored using interviews and focus groups with children, parents/carers and dental professionals. For this analysis, the authors adhered to the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool criteria. There were 24 families and 25 dental professionals participating in the development and qualitative evaluation of the CBT resource for children with dental anxiety. A total of 56 children agreed to trial the CBT resource (66% response rate) and 48 of these children completed the study (86% completion rate). There was a significant reduction in dental anxiety (mean score difference = 7.7, t = 7.9, df = 45, P < 0.001, Cohen's d ES = 1.2) and an increase in HRQoL following the use of the CBT resource (mean score difference = -0.03, t = 2.14, df = 46, P < 0.05, Cohen's d ES = 0.3). The self-help approach had high levels of acceptability to stakeholders. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the effectiveness and acceptability of the resource in

  6. Development and Testing of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Resource for Children’s Dental Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, J.; Rodd, H.; Morgan, A.; Williams, C.; Gupta, E.; Kirby, J.; Creswell, C.; Newton, T.; Stevens, K.; Baker, S.; Prasad, S.; Marshman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for dental anxiety; however, access to therapy is limited. The current study aimed to develop a self-help CBT resource for reducing dental anxiety in children, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a trial to evaluate the treatment efficacy and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention. A mixed methods design was employed. Within phase 1, a qualitative “person-based” approach informed the development of the self-help CBT resource. This also employed guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions. Within phase 2, children, aged between 9 and 16 y, who had elevated self-reported dental anxiety and were attending a community dental service or dental hospital, were invited to use the CBT resource. Children completed questionnaires, which assessed their dental anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) prior to and following their use of the resource. Recruitment and completion rates were recorded. Acceptability of the CBT resource was explored using interviews and focus groups with children, parents/carers and dental professionals. For this analysis, the authors adhered to the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool criteria. There were 24 families and 25 dental professionals participating in the development and qualitative evaluation of the CBT resource for children with dental anxiety. A total of 56 children agreed to trial the CBT resource (66% response rate) and 48 of these children completed the study (86% completion rate). There was a significant reduction in dental anxiety (mean score difference = 7.7, t = 7.9, df = 45, P < 0.001, Cohen’s d ES = 1.2) and an increase in HRQoL following the use of the CBT resource (mean score difference = -0.03, t = 2.14, df = 46, P < 0.05, Cohen’s d ES = 0.3). The self-help approach had high levels of acceptability to stakeholders. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the effectiveness and acceptability of the resource

  7. Is dosimetry still a necessity in current dental practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S S; Rakesh, N; Clint, Joseph Ben; Sharma, Shivani; Chauhan, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Today, dentists have a wide range of imaging modalities to choose from, the film based techniques, digital techniques, and the recent introduction of 3D volumetric or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The inherent design features of the new generation dental x-ray equipment has significantly improved over the years with no evidence of substandard x-ray units in operation. In dental facilities radiological workload is comparatively low, newer radiation equipments and accessories follow safety guidelines and employ better radiation protection measures for the patient and the operator. Dentists’ knowledge and expertise in radiation protection measures is good, enabling them to carry out riskfree radiation procedures in their practice. Therefore, the present study is aimed at assessing the need for dosimeters in current dental scenario.‘Is there currently a significant risk from dental radiography to merit the use of personal dosimetery in dental practice.’Dental health professionals (Oral radiologists) and radiographic assistants of fourteen dental colleges in Karnataka state participated in this questionnaire study. The questionnaire consisted of the following questions—the make, type, year of manufacture of radiographic machines used in their setup, number of radiographs made per day in the institution, type of receptors used, number of personnel at risk for radiation exposure, radiation protection measures used, regular monitoring by personal dosimeters, equivalent dosage readings for the past 12 months and whether the reading of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for any personnel had exceeded the recommended exposure value in the last 3 years.Dosimetry records of the radiology staff in the last three years shows doses no more than 1.50 mSv per year. The various institutions’ dose (person mSv) was in the range of 3.70 mSv–3.90 mSv.Personal monitoring for Dentists can be omitted in the dental colleges since the estimated dose of oral radiologists

  8. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    faculty.• Provide resident and faculty training in cultural and linguistic competency.• Develop and conduct a collaborative inter professional education project with a Pediatric Medicine department, a nursing school, and other health professions' education programs.• Provide faculty and residents with financial support to pursue a master's degree in public health; and • Provide support and assistance for dental practitioners desiring to explore a transition into the educational environment.

  9. Exploring Dental Providers’ Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N.; Ye, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. Objective The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. Methods A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Results Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). Conclusions On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR. PMID:27437058

  10. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  11. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  12. Dental technician of the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, W.; Wismeijer, D.; Hanssen, S.; Tahmaseb, A.

    2015-01-01

    The new technologies in the field of dental science have not only changed the way in which dentists run their practice but have also dramatically changed the procedures carried out in dental laboratories. Mechanical engineering, incorporated CMM, laser milling, 3D printing and 3D design in a

  13. New dental applications with LEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, A.; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  14. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... Oral diseases qualify as a major public health concern owing to their high prevalence and incidence in all regions of the world (1). Dental caries and gingivitis are the two most common dental diseases affecting children worldwide. These two diseases are, to a large extent, the result of the presence of ...

  15. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  16. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  18. Comparison of internet addiction, pattern and psychopathology between medical and dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedam, Sachin Ratan; Shivji, Imran Ali; Goyal, Arvind; Modi, Lipsy; Ghosh, Santanu

    2016-08-01

    There has been an enormous use of internet among health professionals in the last decade. It has made significant changes in the health care system. Besides its several benefits, the excessive undisciplined use has led to the emergence of concept of internet addiction. The objectives of our study were to estimate prevalence of internet addiction among medical and dental students; to determine association of internet use pattern and psychopathology between medical and dental internet addicted (IA) students. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 597 students from medical and dental colleges. They completed semi-structured data, internet addiction test and mental health inventory questionnaires as per instructions provided. Students were divided into medical internet addicts and dental internet addicts for comparison. The prevalence of severe internet addiction was more among dental students (2.3%) than that among medical students (1.2%). There was significant difference between the students of medical and dental faculties, who fall under the category of addiction on the basis of-gender, computer ownership and purpose of internet use (Pinternet use pattern and psychopathology among the two groups of internet addict from health professionals. So, further studies need to be conducted among different groups of internet addicts to evaluate different parameters. Specific measures should be taken to prevent internet addiction and its complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Barriers to dental attendance in older patients

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D

    2017-04-01

    Health professionals in Ireland are increasingly concerned about the quality of oral health in older patients. The aim of this study is to identify the obstacles that face this age-group when accessing dental care, so that we are in a better position to address them. A questionnaire was completed by 105 patients attending a geriatric outpatient clinic. Over 50 percent of respondents had not attended a dentist in over 36 months, for the reasons that \\'I have no problem or need for treatment’ (62%) and ‘I have no teeth, and therefore I have no need to go’ (54%). While it is common to assume that no teeth means no need to see a dentist, research shows that regular dental visits are vital for ensuring the early screening of oral cancer and other mucosal pathologies, and the optimisation of existing rosthesis\\/restorations. The chief recommendation of this paper is thus to provide better education and access to older people on the importance of visiting the dentist.

  20. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.