WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional school students

  1. Value Orientations and the Effects of Professional Schools on Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Patrick B.; Danisiewicz, Thomas J.

    The extent to which value orientations of professional students differ by occupational groups and by the socializing effects of professional schools on students was assessed. Approximately 1,150 students in nine major doctoral-granting universities participated. Based on work by Bengtson (1975), a humanism/materialism score was constructed for…

  2. Students with Anxiety: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. Heather; Robertson, Phyllis; Curtis, Russ; Frick, Melodie H.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most pervasive mental health concerns affecting students, yet a significant number of students with anxiety disorders remain underserved. If left untreated, anxiety can hinder students' personal/social, academic, and career development. The purpose of this article is to provide professional school counselors with helpful…

  3. The Civil Behavior of Students: A Survey of School Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Keely; Caldarella, Paul; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Young, K. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Many authors regard education as a way of increasing civility in society, and some have implemented interventions to improve civility in schools. However, very little empirical data exist on the extent and nature of students' civil behavior. The present study systematically gathered data from 251 school professionals regarding their perceptions of…

  4. Professional Identities of Vocational High School Students and Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Bilge Aslan; Altintas, Havva Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Vocational high schools are one of the controversial topics, and also the hardly touched fields in educational field. Students' profiles of vocational schools, their visions, and professional identity developments are not frequently reflected in the literature. Therefore, the main aim of the study is to research whether vocational high school…

  5. The influence of professional teachers on Padang vocational school students' achievement

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    Ramli Bakar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined: (1 the competency of professional teachers teaching in the classroom, (2 students' achievement in vocational schools in Padang, and (3 the influence of professional teachers on vocational school students' achievement in Padang. The population was 2,647 students in vocational schools. The sample, consisting of 160 students, was selected using a multistage, random sampling technique. Data were collected using questionnaires and documentation, and then analyzed and presented using the SPSS software. The results showed: (1 overall, the professional teachers of vocational schools in Padang had good qualifications in pedagogical competence, professional competence, social competence, and personal competence, (2 the learning process of vocational schools in Padang was going well and in general, student achievement was at a good level of performance, and (3 there was a significant influence of professional teachers on vocational school students' achievement in Padang. Keywords: professional teacher, student achievement, vocational school

  6. Survey of New Mexico School Health Professionals Regarding Preparedness to Support Sexual Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Inas; Jevertson, Jenn; Schrader, Ronald; Nelson, Anna; Ramos, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: For schools to be safe and supportive for students, school health professionals should be aware of the particular challenges lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) students face, especially the risk for discrimination, violent victimization, and depression in the school setting. We assessed school health…

  7. The relationship between departments as professional communities and student achievement in secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomos, C.; Hofman, R.H.; Bosker, R.J.

    Secondary school teaching is organized in departments and effective departments functioning as collaborative teams have been associated with effective schools. Therefore, this study investigates the relationship of mathematics departments perceived as professional communities and student achievement

  8. School-Based Screening to Identify At-Risk Students Not Already Known to School Professionals: The Columbia Suicide Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Holly C.; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Davies, Mark; Hicks, Roger C.; Turner, J. Blake; Shaffer, David

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine the degree of overlap between students identified through school-based suicide screening and those thought to be at risk by school administrative and clinical professionals. Methods. Students from 7 high schools in the New York metropolitan area completed the Columbia Suicide Screen; 489 of the 1729 students screened had positive results. The clinical status of 641 students (73% of those who had screened positive and 23% of those who had screened negative) was assessed with modules from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. School professionals nominated by their principal and unaware of students' screening and diagnostic status were asked to indicate whether they were concerned about the emotional well-being of each participating student. Results. Approximately 34% of students with significant mental health problems were identified only through screening, 13.0% were identified only by school professionals, 34.9% were identified both through screening and by school professionals, and 18.3% were identified neither through screening nor by school professionals. The corresponding percentages among students without mental health problems were 9.1%, 24.0%, 5.5%, and 61.3%. Conclusions. School-based screening can identify suicidal and emotionally troubled students not recognized by school professionals. PMID:19059865

  9. Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

    2013-01-01

    The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

  10. Promoting Elementary School Students' Autonomous Reading Motivation: Effects of a Teacher Professional Development Workshop

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    De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Haerens, Leen; Aelterman, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Responding to the declining trend in reading motivation in and beyond the elementary school years, the authors aimed to enhance late-elementary school students' autonomous reading motivation. Toward this end, the authors evaluated the influence of a teacher professional development grounded in self-determination theory on fifth-grade students' (n…

  11. Effects of a Teacher Professional Development Program on the Mathematics Achievement of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample McMeeking, Laura B.; Orsi, Rebecca; Cobb, R. Brian

    2012-01-01

    The effect of a 15- to 24-month in-service professional development (PD) program on state accountability mathematics test scores for middle school students was examined using a quasi-experimental design. Middle level mathematics teachers (n = 128) from 7 school districts and 64 middle schools volunteered for a PD sequence of content-oriented…

  12. Students' Evaluation of Professional Personality Competencies of Physical Education Teachers Working in High Schools

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    Demir, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the relationship between professional personality competencies of physical education teachers working in high schools and gender, school type, and class variables of students. The study was organised according to the screening model. The study was carried out in a total of 17 schools, 16 state and one…

  13. School Counselors' Professional Experience and Practices Working with Students Who Self-Harm: A Qualitative Study

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    Roberts, Ellen Adams

    2013-01-01

    The professional experiences and practices of school counselors and the interventions they employ while working with adolescent students who self-harm is an underrepresented area within current research. This generic qualitative study provides a rich description and a deeper understanding of the professional experiences and practices of school…

  14. Evaluation of Professional Personality Competence of Physical Education Teachers Working in Secondary Schools by Students

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    Demir, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to assess how students evaluate the professional personality competence of physical education teachers working in secondary schools, and to investigate differences based on the variables of gender, school type and class. In line with these aims, this study was completed as a screening model cross-sectional study, which…

  15. Confusion, Crisis, and Opportunity: Professional School Counselors' Role in Responding to Student Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Cynthia; Grothaus, Tim; Craigen, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    With the array of challenges facing today's youth, school counselors are in a unique position to recognize and respond to the diverse mental health needs of students. After a brief examination of the challenges and some promising responses, this article will consider the use of advocacy, collaboration, and professional development to aid school…

  16. Relationships among Job Satisfaction, Professional Efficacy, Student and School Performance, and Teacher Absenteeism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Laura Beckham

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among job satisfaction, professional efficacy, student and school performance, and teacher absenteeism in Mississippi. This study also addressed methods that can be used by policymakers to better ensure low rates of absenteeism. The study measured the relationship between teachers'…

  17. [Realities and professional expectations of medical students attending Guinea Bissau's medical school in 2007 school year].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronteira, Inês; Rodrigues, Amabélia; Pereira, Camilo; Silva, Augusto P; Mercer, Hugo; Dussault, Guilles; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    In Guinea Bissau, the majority of university level professionals are still being trained abroad and most of them do not return to their country. This was a major incentive for creating Guinea Bissau's Medical School. An observational, cross-sectional, analytic study was conducted on the second trimester of 2007 to characterize the socio-demographic, familial and educational profile of medical students, their satisfaction levels, difficulties and expectations concerning the medicine course. A questionnaire was used and a response rate of 63% achieved (81 students). Data was analyzed using SPSS v.17 for descriptive statistics. Students are very committed to their education. They tend to decide to take the medicine course early in their lives and are influenced by their relatives. They choose to be medical doctors because they like it but also for altruistic reasons and the desire to save lives. Although many face financial and material difficulties, they tend to have success in their academic live. They live with their parents, do not have children and some have side jobs to provide for extra income to help with their education. They expect their education to make them good doctors in any part of the world and want to work simultaneously in the public (to serve their country and pay their debt to the State) and in the private sector (to enhance their income). The large majority wants to work in a hospital, in Bissau, and to be a pediatrician or obstetrician. They have unreasonably high expectations concerning their future income as medical doctors.

  18. Serving Special Needs Students in the School Library Media Center. Greenwood Professional Guides in School Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Caren L., Ed.; Keefe, Margaret J., Ed.

    This collection of papers considers how the school library media specialist serves special needs students and classroom teachers in multiple roles as teacher, information specialist, and instructional consultant or collaborator. Included are the following papers: "Teaching Library and Information Skills to Special Needs Students" (Caren…

  19. Students' response to disaster: a lesson for health care professional schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-11-16

    The response of medical students, young physicians, and other health professionals to the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami in Chile provides important lessons about health care delivery during disasters and about the development of professionalism. Tertiary and secondary care of victims of these disasters was possible because local and national resources were available and field hospitals provided by Chile's armed forces and foreign countries replaced damaged hospitals. However, primary care of persons living on the outskirts of towns and in small villages and coves that were destroyed and isolated by the disaster required the involvement of volunteer groups that were largely composed of students and other young members of the health professions, all of whom were motivated by solidarity, compassion, and social commitment. This experience, similar to previous catastrophes in Chile and elsewhere, reinforces that medical and other health professional schools must instill in graduates an understanding that the privileges of being a health professional come with responsibilities to society. Beyond providing high-quality scientific and technological education, curricula in these schools should include training that enables graduates to meaningfully contribute in the setting of unexpected disasters and that nurtures a sense of responsibility to do so.

  20. Market orientation of business schools and development of professional competencies of students in the tourism business

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    Rosi Maja

    2016-01-01

    development of key recent trends in the industry? The main objective of this paper is to identify the key aspects of the dynamic adaptation of university business schools and to elaborate on the possible linkage between the development of professional competences of students in the field of tourism and the professional requirements of organizations in this industry. We will use the comparative method (overview and comparison of tourist programs of selected faculties in selected countries of the former Yugoslavia, review and comparison of their programs regardless of any possible accreditation and benchmarking analysis that will help us identify differences in achieved professional student competencies in selected faculties and compare them against achieved professional student competencies of selected, leading faculties in central Europe in the field of tourism.

  1. Performance of the education professionals concerning the school inclusion of the student with intelectual disability

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    Anaí Cristina da Luz Stelmachuk

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated how regular teachers and school-unit supervisors have behaved in relation to students with intellectual deficiencies, having in view the addition of an assistant teacher in the classroom. The theoretical fundaments were based both on specialized literature as well as documented research regarding the Brazilian legislation and official publications on Special Education. The field research followed the qualitative approach, and had as subjects 10 school supervisors and 16 regular teachers from the first years in Elementary School at the Public Municipal Network from the town União da Vitória - Paraná State. For the data collection the subjects answered questionnaires and 30% of the supervisors and 31.25% of the teachers were interviewed. The answers were categorized as: meaning of school inclusion; concept of intellectual deficiency, and educational aims in relation to the intellectually deficient student; facilities and difficulties involving the inclusion of such students in the regular schools; and conditions for the support to the inclusion. After the data was analyzed it was verified that: the assistants are requested the Municipal Board of Education by the schools; 88.46% of the subjects in this research give directions to the assistants. 69.23% feel partially prepared and 23.07% feel prepared for such a position. Teachers consider that students with intellectual deficiency present a greater necessity of support in the academic area. Both, supervisors and teachers consider that the support of an assistant teacher in the classroom reflects positively in the academic and social development of the students, evidencing safeguards in relation to the development of the autonomy. The subjects questioned the profile and educational background of the assistants and suggested continuing education for such professionals as well as for themselves.

  2. Opinions of students from a Brazilian medical school regarding online professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Paulo Novis; de Castro, Naara Alethéa Azael

    2014-05-01

    Unprofessional online behavior by medical students or physicians may damage individual careers, and the reputation of institutions and the medical profession. What is considered unprofessional online behavior, however, is not clearly defined and may vary in different cultures. To determine the frequency with which students from a Brazilian Medical School come across ten given examples of unprofessional online behavior by medical students or physicians, and gather the opinions of participants regarding the appropriateness of these behaviors. A cross-sectional survey of 350 students from the Medical School of Bahia, Brazil. Only those who had a profile in social media were included in the final analyses. 336/350 (96.0%) medical students kept a profile in social media. Only 13.5% reported having discussions about online professionalism during ethics classes. They reported witnessing the investigated examples of unprofessional online behavior with varying frequencies, ranging from 13.7% for "violation of patient's privacy" to 85.4% for "photos depicting consumption of alcoholic beverages". Most participants felt neutral about posting "pictures in bathing suits", whereas the vast majority rated "violation of patient's privacy" as totally inappropriate. When presented with a case vignette illustrating violation of patients' privacy (publication of pictures of hospitalized children or neonates in social media), however, most participants felt neutral about it. Participants considered all investigated examples of unprofessional online behavior more inappropriate if carried out by doctors rather than by students. Medical students are witnessing a high frequency of unprofessional online behavior by their peers and physicians. Most investigated behaviors were considered inappropriate, especially if carried out by physicians. Participants were not able to recognize the publication of pictures of hospitalized children or neonates in social media as cases of violation of

  3. The investigation of STEM Self-Efficacy and Professional Commitment to Engineering among female high school students

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    Yi-hui Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study employed social cognitive theory and social cognitive career theory (SCCT as foundations to explore the influence of high school students' beliefs about female gender roles and female engineer role models on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM self-efficacy and professional commitment to engineering. A total of 88 students from a national girls' high school participated in STEM project-based learning. A survey questionnaire named The STEM Self-efficacy and Professional Commitment to Engineering Questionnaire, developed by the researchers, was administered to collect data, and a structured equation model was employed to confirm the multi-theoretical model developed in this study. The results of this study show that enhancing the gender role beliefs and engineer role models of female students may increase their STEM self-efficacy and professional commitment to engineering. In other words, the female high school students' professional commitment to engineering model can explain students' intentions for future engineering careers. Thus, this study suggests integrating STEM project-based learning into the curricula of various schools and integrating female engineer role models into STEM project-based learning activities for female students, which can enhance female high school students' STEM self-efficacy and professional commitment to engineering.

  4. The Role of School Counselors in Meeting Students' Mental Health Needs: Examining Issues of Professional Identity

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    DeKruyf, Lorraine; Auger, Richard W.; Trice-Black, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The professional identity of school counselors has evolved over time. This article traces the historical context driving this evolution, and suggests it is time for the profession to conjoin the roles of educational leader and mental health professional. This proposal is prompted by heightened awareness of unmet student mental health needs,…

  5. A science methods course in a professional development school context: A case study of student teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Linda Diane

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how six student teachers constructed their personal understanding about teaching science to elementary students in the context of a professional development school (PDS). The science methods course was one of five university courses that they attended at the PDS site. The participants spent the remainder of the school day in an assigned classroom where they assisted the classroom teacher in a paraprofessional role. This study was an attempt to determine the knowledge that the participants constructed of science instruction and the school during the preservice semester of their PDS experience and what knowledge was transferred into their student teaching practices. The methodology selected was qualitative. A case study was conducted to determine the constructs of the participants. Data collection included documents concerning the PDS school and personal artifacts of the student teachers. Student teachers, cooperating teachers, and administrators were interviewed. The student teachers were also observed teaching. Triangulation was achieved with the use of multiple data sources, a reflexive journal, and peer debriefers. A cross case comparison was used to identify issues salient to the research questions. The PDS context immediately challenged the participants' prior conceptions about how children learn and should be instructed. Participants believed that the situational knowledge constructed during the PDS semester contributed to their self-confidence during student teaching. The instructional emphasis on standardized tests in the PDS and the limited emphasis on science curriculum and instruction constructed an image of science as a minor component in the elementary curriculum. The student teachers were able to transfer knowledge of inquiry-based instructional strategies, as modeled and practiced in their science methods course, into their science lesson during student teaching. One student teacher used inquiry

  6. Professionalism perspectives among medical students of a novel medical graduate school in Malaysia

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    Haque M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque,1 Zainal Zulkifli,2 Seraj Zohurul Haque,3 Zubair M Kamal,4 Abdus Salam,5 Vidya Bhagat,2 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi,2 Nor Iza A Rahman2 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Jalan Sultan Mahmud, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 3School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK; 4Sleep Research Unit, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: Defining professionalism in this constantly evolving world is not easy. How do you measure degrees of benevolence and compassion? If it is so obvious to our profession, what professionalism is, then why is it so difficult to teach it to medical students and residents? Today’s definition of medical professionalism is evolving – from autonomy to accountability, from expert opinion to evidence-based medicine, and from self-interest to teamwork and shared responsibility. However, medical professionalism is defined as the basis for the trust in the patient–physician relationship, caring and compassion, insight, openness, respect for patient dignity, confidentiality, autonomy, presence, altruism, and those qualities that lead to trust-competence, integrity, honesty, morality, and ethical conduct. The purpose of this study is to explore professionalism in terms of its fundamental elements among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA. This was a cross-sectional study carried out on medical students of UniSZA. The study population included preclinical and clinical medical students of UniSZA from Year I to Year V of academic session 2014/2015. The simple random sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were

  7. PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT THREE-FACTOR MODEL OF EDUCATING HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

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    T. A. Lopatukhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented publication is to discuss the changes in the practice of professional higher education which consist in strengthening and emphasis of an educational component in educational process.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of a condition of higher education and the provisions of the Federal Law on Education regulating its functioning in the Russian Federation; text-centered approach to education of the person of culture – the professional specialist, responsible for the activities.Results and scientific novelty. It states that some drawbacks of the existing present-day education organization are being constantly discussed by a pedagogical community of the Russian Federation: the absence of development stability; the absence of effective strategies and technologies of their implementation; the triumph of national nihilism confirmed by high schools and individual scientists participation in different foreign educational projects, usually having world notorious reputation; penetration of commercial principals in to an education system, the latter having been turned in to an education service, etc. As a result the personality quality itself has greatly deteriorated as well as Russia society intellect, on the whole, according to some law, psychological, philosophical and pedagogical analysis. The article stresses that the way out maybe found in restoring Russian national traditions and lost values and returning them to Russian education via adequate upbringing process. The authors describe their innovative model comprising three directions: 1 the integral three-factor spiritual, moral and intellectual upbringing of the students; 2 specially selected text content professional information using text-centered approach and 3 peculiar interaction of two education subjects: a student and a teacher. Their cooperation envisages the following stages: first, teacher’s strict guidance of a student; then

  8. State of Mechanisms of Adaptation to Teaching Loads for High-school Students with Different Levels of Professional Preparedness

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    G.N. Danilenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of functional adaptability of 69 high-school students with different levels of professional preparedness had been carried out. The dynamics of the indices of heart rate variability and hemodynamics indices during the academic year had been studied. The difference in adaptive capacity, depending on the personal characteristics of students, the level of preparedness of adolescents to professional choice had been shown.

  9. Professional choice self-efficacy: predicting traits and personality profiles in high school students

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    Rodolfo Augusto Matteo Ambiel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to verify the predictive capacity of the Big Five personality factors related to professional choice self-efficacy, as well as to draw a personality profile of people with diverse self-efficacy levels. There were 308 high school students participating, from three different grades (57.5 % women, from public and private schools, average 26.64 years of age. Students completed two instruments, Escala de Autoeficácia para Escolha Profissional (Professional Choice Self-efficacy Scale and Bateria Fatorial de Personalidade (Factorial Personality Battery. Results were obtained using multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance with repeated measures profile and Cohen’s d to estimate the effect size of differences. Results showed that Extraversion, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness were the main predictors of self-efficacy. Differences from medium to large were observed between extreme groups, and Extraversion and Conscientiousness were the personality factors that better distinguish people with low and high levels of self-efficacy. Theses results partially corroborate with the hypothesis. Results were discussed based on literature and on the practical implications of the results. New studies are proposed.

  10. EFFECTS OF A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ON BEHAVIORAL ENGAGEMENT OF STUDENTS IN MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL

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    GREGORY, ANNE; ALLEN, JOSEPH P.; MIKAMI, AMORI Y.; HAFEN, CHRISTOPHER A.; PIANTA, ROBERT C.

    2017-01-01

    Student behavioral engagement is a key condition supporting academic achievement, yet student disengagement in middle and high schools is all too common. The current study used a randomized controlled design to test the efficacy of the My Teaching Partner-Secondary program to increase behavioral engagement. The program offers teachers personalized coaching and systematic feedback on teachers’ interactions with students, based on systematic observation of videorecordings of teacher-student interactions in the classroom. The study found that intervention teachers had significantly higher increases, albeit to a modest degree, in student behavioral engagement in their classrooms after 1 year of involvement with the program compared to the teachers in the control group (explaining 4% of variance). In exploratory analyses, two dimensions of teachers’ interactions with students—their focus on analysis and problem solving during instruction and their use of diverse instructional learning formats—acted as mediators of increased student engagement. The findings offer implications for new directions in teacher professional development and for understanding the classroom as a setting for adolescent development. PMID:28232767

  11. Prevalence of smoking habits, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs among Health Professional School students: a cross-sectional study

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    Margherita Ferrante

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine smoking prevalence, attitudes, knowledge and behaviours/beliefs among Health Professional School students according to the Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS approach. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in Catania University Medical Schools. The GHPSS questionnaires were self-administered. Logistic regression model was performed. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: 422 students answered to the questionnaire. Prevalence of current smokers was 38.2%. 94.3% of the total sample believe that health professionals should receive specific training to quit smoking, but only 21.3% of the sample received it during the study courses. CONCLUSIONS: Given the high prevalence of smokers among health professionals and their key role both as advisers and behavioral models, our results highlight the importance of focusing attention on smoking cessation training addressed to them.

  12. Exploring the Malaysian Rural School Teachers' Professional Local Knowledge in Enhancing Students' Thinking Skills

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    Jamil, Hazri; Arbaa, Rohani; Ahmad, Mohamad Zohir

    2017-01-01

    This paper discussed a qualitative research findings on the case of Malaysian teachers employed their professional local knowledge for enhancing students' thinking skills in classroom practices. In this paper, a teacher's professional local knowledge is viewed as a teacher's professional knowledge and skills developed through the combination of…

  13. Connecticut Professional School Counselors: College and Career Counseling Services and Smaller Ratios Benefit Students

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    Lapan, Richard T.; Whitcomb, Sara A.; Aleman, Nancy M.

    2012-01-01

    Results connect the implementation of the college and career counseling components of a comprehensive school counseling program and lower student-to-school-counselor ratios to a reduction in suspension rates and disciplinary incidents for Connecticut high school students. Principal ratings of college and career counseling services provided in…

  14. Professionally Oriented Practice in Graduate Students in the Context of Networking between University and School

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    Gutina G.Y.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the experience of organising professionally oriented practice for graduate students in the context of networking. The model of in-depth professionally oriented practice for students of the master’s programme in Psychology and Education was created and approved by the leading Russian pedagogical universities within the project “Developing and approving new modules of basic master’s programme of professional training in Psychology and Education on the basis of networking between educational organisations providing general and higher education programmes implying in-depth professionally oriented student practice”. The model of in-depth practice is constructed on the grounds of activity- and competency-based approaches. Practical training of graduate students focuses on the structure and content of work functions (actions defined in the professional standard for educational psychologists.

  15. The Investigation of STEM Self-Efficacy and Professional Commitment to Engineering among Female High School Students

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    Liu, Yi-hui; Lou, Shi-jer; Shih, Ru-chu

    2014-01-01

    This study employed social cognitive theory and social cognitive career theory (SCCT) as foundations to explore the influence of high school students' beliefs about female gender roles and female engineer role models on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) self-efficacy and professional commitment to engineering. A total of 88…

  16. Identifying and Intervening with Students Exhibiting Signs of Gaming Addiction and Other Addictive Behaviors: Implications for Professional School Counselors

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    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Young, Tabitha

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses strategies professional school counselors can use to recognize and intervene with students who are presenting with signs of addictive behaviors. First, the authors present a definition of addictive behaviors. The authors then define and discuss the most common addictive behaviors impacting adolescents, with a special…

  17. The Impact of Teacher Professional Development to Reposition Pedagogy for Indigenous Students in Mainstream Schools

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    Hynds, Anne S.; Hindle, Rawiri; Savage, Catherine; Meyer, Luanna H.; Penetito, Wally; Sleeter, Christine

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of empirical evidence that examines the impact of teacher professional development for culturally responsive pedagogies, particularly on Indigenous student achievement and teacher practices. Te Kotahitanga was a large-scale professional development initiative for culturally responsive practices for secondary teachers in New…

  18. School Nutrition Professionals' Usage and Perceptions of USDA Recipes and the Impact of Student Enrollment

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    Rushing, Keith; Johnson, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the frequency of usage of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Recipes for Schools and investigate factors influencing their usage. The relationship between these variables and school district size (student enrollment) was also investigated. Methods: An expert panel…

  19. Promoting Middle School Students' Proportional Reasoning Skills through an Ongoing Professional Development Programme for Teachers

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    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff; Dole, Shelley; Goos, Merrilyn

    2016-01-01

    Proportional reasoning, the ability to use ratios in situations involving comparison of quantities, is essential for mathematical competence, especially in the middle school years, and is an important determinant of success beyond school. Research shows students find proportional reasoning and its foundational concepts difficult. Proportional…

  20. Professionalism perspectives among medical students of a novel medical graduate school in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Zulkifli, Zainal; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Salam, Abdus; Bhagat, Vidya; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi; Rahman, Nor Iza A

    2016-01-01

    Defining professionalism in this constantly evolving world is not easy. How do you measure degrees of benevolence and compassion? If it is so obvious to our profession, what professionalism is, then why is it so difficult to teach it to medical students and residents? Today's definition of medical professionalism is evolving - from autonomy to accountability, from expert opinion to evidence-based medicine, and from self-interest to teamwork and shared responsibility. However, medical professionalism is defined as the basis for the trust in the patient-physician relationship, caring and compassion, insight, openness, respect for patient dignity, confidentiality, autonomy, presence, altruism, and those qualities that lead to trust-competence, integrity, honesty, morality, and ethical conduct. The purpose of this study is to explore professionalism in terms of its fundamental elements among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA). This was a cross-sectional study carried out on medical students of UniSZA. The study population included preclinical and clinical medical students of UniSZA from Year I to Year V of academic session 2014/2015. The simple random sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were collected using a validated instrument. The data were then compiled and analyzed using SPSS Version 21. Out of 165 questionnaires distributed randomly among Year I to Year V medical students of UniSZA, 144 returned, giving a response rate of 87%. Among the study participants, 38% (54) and 62% (90) were males and females, respectively. The grand total score was 170.92±19.08. A total of 166.98±20.15 and 173.49±18.09 were the total professionalism score of male and female study participants, respectively, with no statistically significant (P=0.61) differences. This study found almost similar levels of familiarity with all fundamental issues of professionalism with no statistically (P>0.05) significant differences. Medical faculty members

  1. Sexting: New Challenges for Schools and Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Adriana G.; McEachern-Ciattoni, Renee T.; Martin, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    Sexting, the practice of sending sexually explicit messages or photographs of oneself or others on digital electronic devices, presents challenges for schools and professional school counselors. The implications of sexting for schools, school counselors, students, and parents are discussed. School counselor interventions, developing school…

  2. Characterizing and Assessing Co-Curricular Activities for Graduate and Professional-School Students: Exploring the Value of Intentional Assessment Planning and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryas, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores the importance of systematic evaluation of co-curricular activities directed at graduate- and professional- school students. Approaches to assessment and benefits of sound practice are presented along with the critical role that institutional researchers can play.

  3. The Relationship between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Anne Guerin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by the Pharmacy Professionalism Domain instrument) in first and third year pharmacy students at seven different schools of pharmacy. Engagement provides the…

  4. Role of professional motivation in the system of education of students in physical culture high schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N.I.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The main approaches to the professional motivation formation in the system of education in the physical culture шт. high educational institutions have been determined in the article. Content of programs, textbooks and training manuals of professionally orientated disciplines aiming to determine their topic orientation on the sport pedagogue profession have been analyzed. It has been shown that didactical provision of the "Theory and Methods of the Chosen Type of Sports" and psychological-pedagogical disciplines, generally, does reflect a setting towards forming of theoretical competence in students. The main conditions of the students motivation development have been noted, such as renewing of the content and technology of the educational activity in the high educational institutions with including such components like didactical provision (of content, methods of realization, means of cooperation in the system "lecturer-student", which is based on the integration of pedagogical and sport components of context approach based training; professionally oriented tasks, which are actualizing students life experience in connection with the specialty; taking part in the pedagogical activity; psychological-pedagogical interaction in motivation development.

  5. A Professional Development School in Action: Meeting the Needs of Military-Connected Students and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risberg, Sandy; Curtis, Laurie; Shivers, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    In the fall of 2011, an undergraduate student who is also a military spouse and mother of school-aged children, shared with the College of Education (COE) at Kansas State University faculty her concerns about the necessity of intentional preparation of teachers and counselors regarding the unique needs of military-connected children. From that…

  6. Vital School Professionals Eliminated: Student Health, Career Preparation, Art Exposure Suffer. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Until last year, Ohio had in place a rule requiring a minimum level of staffing for music, visual arts, physical education, counselors, librarians, nurses, social workers and visiting teachers. School districts had to have at least five of these eight positions for every 1,000 students. In March 2015, the State Board of Education eliminated this…

  7. Mathematics and Science Teachers Professional Development with Local Businesses to Introduce Middle and High School Students to Opportunities in STEM Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rhea; Slagter van Tryon, Patricia J.; Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2015-01-01

    TechMath is a professional development program that forms collaborations among businesses, colleges, and schools for the purpose of promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers. TechMath has provided strategies for creating highquality professional development by bringing together teachers, students, and business…

  8. Narrative Counseling for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafziger, Jacinta; DeKruyf, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces narrative counseling concepts and techniques for professional school counselors. The authors provide a case study of narrative school counseling with an elementary student struggling with selective mutism. Examples also demonstrate how a narrative approach could be used at elementary, middle, and high school levels within…

  9. “It is the Law”: the 9-year Primary School from the perspective of Pedagogy professionals/students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Silvia P. de M. L. da Rocha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a qualitative research with the general objective of identifying the opinions of Pedagogy professionals and students with regards to the new 9-year Primary School (EF – Ensino Fundamental. The methodological procedures applied were the production of a text about the EF and semi-structured interviews. In this article, the focus is on the results obtained from the text production. The research was based on 33 Pedagogy students from a private university in the countryside of São Paulo, who were to graduate in 2010. The empirical material has been analyzed based on categories defined a posteriori, after intensive reading of the material, searching for thematic cores recurrent in the productions, interpreted through the historical-cultural theory. From the results, it is possible to highlight essentially positive opinions about the new EF, comments on the importance of the teachers and schools preparation, and the incipient approach of recreational activities (with a predominantly generic treatment to them These results allow us to (i locate the important points to be approached on the initial and continuous formation of the teachers who work and will work on building the new EF, and (ii problematize the way the Pedagogy professional/ student interprets the regulations in the Education area.

  10. Models of professional readiness of students of higher military schools of the Armed Forces of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.P. Sergienko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Creating models of professional readiness, namely, physical, mental, psycho-physiological and functional training based on the integral method developed. Material / Methods : The study involved 60 students of the fourth graduating class of 30 people in the control and experimental groups. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed method was used testing the physical qualities, psychological questionnaires, the study of cognitive processes, as well as functional tests. Results: It was established that at the beginning of the experiment between the control and experimental groups was not significant differences in all indicators. After the study of the experimental group experienced an improvement of performance as compared to the control group. So on average, in terms of physical fitness, they increased by 9.34 %, mental qualities to 21.25 %, physiological capacity of 14.7 % and a functional readiness to 21.13 %. The results obtained are reliable. Conclusions : The developed method allowed to increase the individual results of students to build models that characterize the professional readiness of future officers, as well as increase the adaptive processes of all systems to service and combat activities.

  11. INTERESES PROFESIONALES DE ESTUDIANTES DE SECUNDARIA DE LA CIUDAD DE BARRANQUILLA -- PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN BARRANQUILLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARBEL GRAVINI DONADO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a study about vocational interests and preferences of students close to graduation at five schools in Barranquilla. The population was represented by 95 students in 10th and 11th grade, whose ages ranged between 14 and 17 years. The study employed the descriptive quantity methodology and the “Test de Preferencias Profesionales de Nivel Superior” (Professional Preferences Test. The results show that the participants are mainly interested in occupations or professions in the business sector, e.g. administration. Medicine, medical assistance, and informatics also were among the favored areas. Literature, humanities, geography, history, and risk and action on the other hand only achieved low interest points.

  12. Influences on students' assistive technology use at school: the views of classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students with cerebral palsy and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Petra; Johnston, Christine; Barker, Katrina

    2017-09-07

    This study explored how classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students with cerebral palsy, and their parents view high-tech assistive technology service delivery in the classroom. Semi-structured interviews with six classroom teachers and six parents and their children were conducted. Additionally, two focus groups comprising 10 occupational therapists and six speech pathologists were carried out. Ethical and confidentiality considerations meant that the groups were not matched. Results revealed that it is often untrained staff member who determine students' educational needs. The participants' experiences suggested that, particularly in mainstream settings, there is a need for support and guidance from a professional with knowledge of assistive technology who can also take a lead and guide classroom teachers in how to meet students' needs. Students' motivation to use the technology was also found to be critical for its successful uptake. The study points to the need for classroom teachers to be given sufficient time and skill development opportunities to enable them to work effectively with assistive technology in the classroom. The participants' experiences suggest that such opportunities are not generally forthcoming. Only in this way can it be ensured that students with disabilities receive the education that is their right. Implications for Rehabilitation Classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students, parents need ongoing support and opportunities to practise operational, strategic and linguistic skills with the assistive technology equipment. System barriers to the uptake of assistive technology need to be addressed. To address the lack of time available for training, programing and other support activities around assistive technology, dedicated administrative support is crucial. Professional development around the use of the quality low cost ICF-CY checklist is recommended for both school and allied health staff.

  13. Supporting Disadvantaged Students in an English Primary School: Matters of Entrepreneurial and Traditional Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores issues of teacher professionalism. The focus is on the competition, control and standardisation that tend to be associated with 'entrepreneurial' professionalism on the one hand, and the autonomy, care and criticality that tend to be associated with 'traditional' professionalism, on the other. The paper presents a series of…

  14. [The attitude of the nursing students of Public Higher Medical Professional School in Opole towards the smoking problems in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtal, Mariola; Kurpas, Donata; Bielska, Dorota; Steciwko, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been main reason of the Polish society health hazard and one of the most widespread unhealthy element of the human life style. Aim of the study is to evaluate the attitude of the nursing students of Public Higher Medical Professional School in Opole towards the smoking problems in Poland. Most of respondents considered the nicotinism problem in Poland as very important--3 of them evaluate importance of problem on the scale of 0 - 10, estimated it from 8, 9 and 10 points. 74.3% of respondents support the opinion to put the total injunction from smoking at public areas into practice. According to respondents, the most effective forms to express a non-smoking lifestyle is to promote the idea of the total injunction from smoking at public areas and the promotion of the nonsmoking people at the mass media.

  15. Utilization of Professional Mental Health Services Related to Population-Level Screening for Anxiety, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Public High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, John D; Le, Vi Donna; Baillargeon, Jacques; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    This study examines results from three mental health screening measures in a cohort of adolescent public school students in seven public schools in Southeast Texas affiliated with the Dating it Safe study. We estimated the odds of receiving professional mental health treatment in the previous year given results from different mental health screening batteries: the CES-D 10 battery for depression screening, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, and the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screen. Overall, students with higher scores on screening instruments for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and combinations of screening instruments were more likely to have sought past-year professional mental health treatment than non-symptomatic youth. However, the proportion of students screening positive and receiving professional treatment was low, ranging from 11 to 16 %. This study emphasizes the need for broader evaluation of population-based mental health screening among adolescents.

  16. Analyses of inter-rater reliability between professionals, medical students and trained school children as assessors of basic life support skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stefanie; Ruhnke, Bjarne; Issleib, Malte; Daubmann, Anne; Harendza, Sigrid; Zöllner, Christian

    2016-10-07

    Training of lay-rescuers is essential to improve survival-rates after cardiac arrest. Multiple campaigns emphasise the importance of basic life support (BLS) training for school children. Trainings require a valid assessment to give feedback to school children and to compare the outcomes of different training formats. Considering these requirements, we developed an assessment of BLS skills using MiniAnne and tested the inter-rater reliability between professionals, medical students and trained school children as assessors. Fifteen professional assessors, 10 medical students and 111-trained school children (peers) assessed 1087 school children at the end of a CPR-training event using the new assessment format. Analyses of inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient; ICC) were performed. Overall inter-rater reliability of the summative assessment was high (ICC = 0.84, 95 %-CI: 0.84 to 0.86, n = 889). The number of comparisons between peer-peer assessors (n = 303), peer-professional assessors (n = 339), and peer-student assessors (n = 191) was adequate to demonstrate high inter-rater reliability between peer- and professional-assessors (ICC: 0.76), peer- and student-assessors (ICC: 0.88) and peer- and other peer-assessors (ICC: 0.91). Systematic variation in rating of specific items was observed for three items between professional- and peer-assessors. Using this assessment and integrating peers and medical students as assessors gives the opportunity to assess hands-on skills of school children with high reliability.

  17. [Practical nursing training in the University School of Nursing of the Community of Madrid. Opinion of students and health professionals. Qualitative study with discussion groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Andrés, Cristina; Alameda Cuesta, Almudena; Albéniz Lizarraga, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    In the nursing schools, the contrast between what is taught in the classrooms and what is practiced at the health care centers usually creates a great deal of confusion on the part of the students. The objective of this research is to ascertain the opinion of the students and of the professionals at the health care centers where they are doing their training with regard thereto in order to detect their problems and see what differences exist between primary and specialized care. This research was conducted throughout the first half of 2000 employing qualitative methodology, by means of four discussion groups comprised of students, former students, primary care training advisors and nursing professionals at the hospitals where the students of the school in question are doing their nursing training. The initial involvement employed was indirect. The comments of the nursing students and of their training advisors with regard to the practice nursing during the diploma studies reveal dissatisfaction on the part of both of these groups. In all of the groups point out anxiety as the leading factor involved in their teaching as well as learning activities and during professional training. The lack of identification as a group of professionals seems to be related to the lack of recognition on the part of the others, the demand for a degree being granted for their college studies and for the setting up of specialities would contribute to their social recognition and, as a result thereof, to their identification as a professional group. Until a solution is provided to the anxiety which the nursing professionals feel with regard to their professional practice, which they pass on to their students during nursing training, it will not be possible to achieve a higher degree of satisfaction with nursing training experiences either on the part of the training advisors or on the part of the students.

  18. An Investigation of the Benefits and Challenges of a New Professional Development School Partnership That Embedded the Three-Student Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Teacher candidates in one Professional Development School did make a difference in children's academic growth. This paper describes a mixed-methods study that investigated student achievement of elementary children after receiving interventions from teacher candidates and identified the perceived benefits and challenges of a new Professional…

  19. [Profile and professional expectations for nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonín, M; Ballester, D; Esteve, J; Guilera, A; Pérez, I; Ortega, O; Tarruella, M; Peya, M; Guitard, M L; Ricomà, R; Teixidor, M; Ubiergo, I; Valls, M; Zabalegui, A

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the profile corresponding to students enrolled in first, second and third year courses to become registered nurses in Catalonia, along with their professional and job expectations; the authors examine students' perceptions of the university environment. This information will be a great aid to, on the one hand, update the performances and initiatives taken by those responsible for nursing schools, and on the other hand, to obtain a preliminary view on future nursing professionals. At the same time, this information will provide useful elements for students themselves to reflect on their studies and their future as professionals.

  20. Association between School District Policies That Address Chronic Health Conditions of Students and Professional Development for School Nurses on Such Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. Everett; Brener, Nancy D.; Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2015-01-01

    Supportive school policies and well-prepared school nurses can best address the needs of students with chronic health conditions. We analyzed nationally representative data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study to examine whether districts with policies requiring that schools provide health services to students with chronic…

  1. Reflections of Turkish accounting and financial reporting standards on vocational school students: A research on comparing perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seldüz Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to compare the perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates on accounting and financial reporting standards. A significant part of accounting process is carried out by vocational school graduate intermediate and mid-level accounting professionals. However, it can be claimed that adequate education about accounting and financial reporting standards isn’t given in vocational schools although these standards structure the whole accounting process. A survey is conducted over students of the related vocational school in Aksaray University. The results indicate no significant difference on students’ perceptions in terms of their school year, high school type, job or internship experience and intention to perform the profession after graduation. These results can be traced to inadequacy of present curriculums and internship programs which can’t create a difference. Based on the results, the content of internship applications is rearranged and an optional subject named as “Accounting and Reporting Standards” is established.

  2. Primary School Puberty/Sexuality Education: Student-Teachers' Past Learning, Present Professional Education, and Intention to Teach These Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; Coleman, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary school teachers are often tasked with puberty/sexuality education for students who are undergoing sexual maturation at ever-earlier ages. This study explores the changing trajectories of the pre-service learning and teaching of primary school puberty/sexuality education at an urban university, including student-teachers' childhood…

  3. Professional performance in school

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Professional performance in education is now calling the attention of researcher due to its role in the professionalizing process intended to increase international education standards. In this article the term professional performance is examined from the two socio-historic traditional roles involved in training the individuals as a bio-psychic and social entity: teachers and executive. By means of scientific methods, the author gives the theoretical grounds connecting professional performan...

  4. A Study of the Impact of Transformative Professional Development on Hispanic Student Performance on State Mandated Assessments of Science in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carla C.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study of the impact of the transformative professional development (TPD) model on student achievement on state-mandated assessments of science in elementary school. Two schools (one intervention and one control) participated in the case study where teachers from one school received the TPD intervention across a 2-year period while teachers at the other school received no program and continued business as usual. The TPD program includes a focus on the core conceptual framework for effective professional development (Desimone in Educ Res 38:181-199, 2009) as well as an emphasis on culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP) and other effective science instructional strategies. Findings revealed that participation in TPD had a significant impact on student achievement for Burns Elementary with the percentage of proficient students growing from 25 % at baseline to 67 % at the end of the 2-year program, while the comparison school did not experience similar growth. Implications for future research and implementation of professional development programs to meet the needs of teachers in the realm of CRP in science are discussed.

  5. Teacher Job Satisfaction and Student Achievement: The Roles of Teacher Professional Community and Teacher Collaboration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Neena; Stearns, Elizabeth; Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Studies have not conclusively established whether teacher job satisfaction improves student achievement or whether the advantages to students from having satisfied teachers vary with the broader school culture. In this article, we investigate two research questions: (1) Is there a relationship between teacher job satisfaction and students' math…

  6. Professional performance in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional performance in education is now calling the attention of researcher due to its role in the professionalizing process intended to increase international education standards. In this article the term professional performance is examined from the two socio-historic traditional roles involved in training the individuals as a bio-psychic and social entity: teachers and executive. By means of scientific methods, the author gives the theoretical grounds connecting professional performance, learning and individual capacity of using them in solving problem at his labor position. The professional performance is regarded as a human value that stimulates the activity. By predicting educational alternatives, the paper portraits a model of professional performance in education, referring the necessary actions needed for achieving the goals of education. Searching and discussing such alternatives leads to reinterpret professional problems and to find out ways of improving educational standards.

  7. Creative, Professional, and Moral Wherewithal in the Schooling of Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The author is grateful that this journal has taken on the production of a special theme issue entitled "Immigration and Teacher Education: The Crisis and the Opportunity." In her estimation, the "crisis" is not so much that the United States may indeed continue to enroll more immigrant children and youth in its schooling system…

  8. The effect of video interviews with STEM professionals on STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest of middle school students in conservative Protestant Christian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsup, Philip R.

    Inspiring learners toward career options available in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is important not only for economic development but also for maintaining creative thinking and innovation. Limited amounts of research in STEM education have focused on the population of students enrolled in religious and parochial schools, and given the historic conflict between religion and science, this sector of American education is worthy of examination. The purpose of this quantitative study is to extend Gottfredson's (1981) Theory of Circumscription and Compromise as it relates to occupational aspirations. Bem's (1981) Gender Schema Theory is examined as it relates to the role of gender in career expectations, and Crenshaw's (1989) Intersectionality Theory is included as it pertains to religion as a group identifier. Six professionals in STEM career fields were video recorded while being interviewed about their skills and education as well as positive and negative aspects of their jobs. The interviews were compiled into a 25-minute video for the purpose of increasing understanding of STEM careers among middle school viewers. The research questions asked whether middle school students from conservative, Protestant Christian schools in a Midwest region increased in STEM-subject attitude and STEM-career interest as a result of viewing the video and whether gender interacted with exposure to the video. A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control groups, pretest/posttest factorial design was employed to evaluate data collected from the STEM Semantic Survey. A Two-Way ANCOVA revealed no significant differences in dependent variables from pretest to posttest. Implications of the findings are examined and recommendations for future research are made. Descriptors: STEM career interest, STEM attitude, STEM gender disparity, Occupational aspirations, Conservative Protestant education.

  9. [The nursing students of Public Higher Medical Professional School in Opole spreading non-smoking lifestyle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtal, Mariola; Kurpas, Donata; Bielska, Dorota; Steciwko, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The promotion of health is a science and art of helping people to change their environment and lifestyle to a health friendly one, in order to strengthen and build up their wellbeing. Smoking cigarettes is a most disadvantageous element of a lifestyle. Important elements of promotion of non-smoking lifestyle, by our students, as future Health Service members, are: promoting of smoke-free environment, encouraging of non-smoking fashion, education of health consequences of smoking cigarettes, motivation to quit smoking, advisement in the field of smoking addiction treatment. Public health and health promotion, these are classes where smoking cigarettes' problem has been discussed mostly. Over 90% of students' respondents claim that were able to give a nonsmoking advice to any patient. Because of the awareness of health threats caused by smoking cigarettes and because of the role of education in prevention and addiction fighting, over 82.4% of students were convinced that every doctor should ask every patient, about his/her attitude towards smoking cigarettes.

  10. Interdisciplinary Roles of Professionals Involved in Mainstreaming Black Exceptional Students in the Mainstream of a Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Kathleen; And Others

    A Connecticut school's interdisciplinary team approach toward maintaining black handicapped students in the mainstream of a secondary school is described from the point of view of individual team members. The team consists of a social worker, a guidance counselor/psychologist, special education teacher, and reading specialist. The special…

  11. Knowledge of youth about HCV virus infection on an example of research of the students in high school and basic professional school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Sierpińska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infection with HCV is an important clinical problem diagnostic, epidemiological, economic and social in Poland and in the world. Purpose of the work. Good knowledge of the basic school and youth Professional on infection with HCV. Material and method. The study was conducted in three secondary schools (high school, technical school, vocational school principal in the story. The study included 109 students. Research was a diagnostic survey, questionnaire, and tools were the original questionnaire surveys that include questions about demographic and social characteristics and standard questionnaire survey by the Polish group of experts HCV. Statistical analysis was conducted using the statistical package StatSoft Statistica 12.0 PL and Microsoft Office. The results. The vast majority of young people (82 respondents - 75.2% knew that the HCV virus is the cause of hepatitis c. Girls more often (81.8% than boys (64.8% knew that the HCV virus can infect through contact with infected blood. More than a third of boys (37.0% and girls (36.4% knew that in Poland about 700 thousand people are infected with HCV. A large group of young people (80.7% knew that everyone is vulnerable to infection with HCV. Girls more often (76.4% than boys (59.3% correctly reported examples of situations which may lead to infection. More than half of the test (67.0% knew that by doing a blood test for the presence of anti-HCV antibodies, you can verify that you are infected with HCV and 67.0% of respondents knew that there is no developed hepatitis b vaccine hepatitis C. Less than half of the test (44.0% had knowledge of the possibility of cure people infected with HCV. Conclusions. Investigated young people had a high level of knowledge about the causes of hepatitis c. Should motivate school students to broaden knowledge about the prevention of infection with HCV, risk and sources of infection with HCV with particular attention to drug addicts, to beauty salons

  12. Professional Learning Communities: Teachers' Perceptions and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLC's) are designed to help schools improve student achievement; all decisions are based on the needs of students. PLC's are an effective way to receive professional development (PD), allow for collaboration with fellow teachers, and offer timely intervention to all students. In a district known for PLC…

  13. Positive School Climate: What It Looks Like and How It Happens. Nurturing Positive School Climate for Student Learning and Professional Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tami Kopischke; Connolly, Faith; Pryseski, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The term "school climate" has been around for more than a hundred years to explore the idea of school environmental or contextual factors that might have an impact on student learning and academic success. During the past three decades there has been growing research to support the importance of a positive school climate in promoting…

  14. What Do Schools Need? School Professionals' Perceptions of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtola, Annarilla; Kiiski-Mäki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Indirect work of school psychologists has not actualized itself widely in everyday practices. To understand this contradiction, the working environment of school psychologists, that is, the school, is worthy of closer examination. In the present study, we wanted to find out which factors affect school professionals' perceptions of school…

  15. The personal is professional: Connecting white urban middle school science teachers' biographies to their teaching of all students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oey, Esther Ruth

    The purpose of this study was to examine if and in what ways white, urban middle school science teachers use experiences of being marginalized or feeling different to connect to students coming from backgrounds unlike their own---especially students who are racially, culturally, linguistically and otherwise different from them, the school culture and the dominant society. Personal biography was used to frame this study. Data consisted of structured and semi-structured interviews and classroom observations of one female and two male science teachers gathered over one academic year. Results indicated that experiences with difference may be used to inform teachers' practices, but personal biography alone was insufficient to enable the teachers to reflect on their experiences with race, class, gender, and difference. Also, attending to emotions appeared to be an important factor in helping students develop cognitive skills in science classrooms.

  16. Evaluation of the awareness and perception of professional students in medicine, business and law schools of Karachi, regarding the use of (recreational) cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Sameen; Zaidi, Wajeeha; Ahmad, Farah

    2014-09-01

    To assess the awareness and perception of students attending professional medicine, law and business schools regarding recreational use of cannabis. The cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2010 and November 2010. Using convenience sampling, 150 students from medical, business and law schools from both private and public sectors were enrolled. Government institutions included, Sindh Medical College, Institute of Business Administration and S.M. Law College, private schools were Ziauddin Medical College, SZABIST and Lecole for advanced studies. Data was collected through self-administered questionnaire. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. A total of 250 students were approached out of which 150(60%) filled the questionnaire. Of them 91(60.7%) were males and the overall mean age of the respondents was 22 ± 2 years. A total of 68 (45.3%) students were from the medical field, 53 (35.3%) from business and 29 (19.3%) from law. The private and public sectors were equally represented at 75 (50%) each. Overall, 93 (62%) agreed that hashish is a serious problem concerning student population. When asked to identify factors encouraging abstinence, 67 (44.7%) respondents each cited religion and health risks. Our youth is not only concerned about the menace of hashish and but want proper awareness to be provided.

  17. Professional Development for School Library Media Professionals: Elements for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carol A.; Dotson, Lana Kaye; Yontz, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    The American Association for School Librarians suggests an important mission for school librarians is to ensure personal growth through ongoing exposure to conferences, journal articles, webinars, presentations, and membership in professional organizations. As professional educators, School Librarians should exemplify the vision for being…

  18. Professional values in Korean undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kyung Sook; Kang, Jeong Hee; Jun, Myung Hee; Kim, Hyun Sook; Son, Haeng Mi; Yu, Su Jeong; Kwon, Mi Kyung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Developing professional values among undergraduate nursing students is important since such values are a significant predictor of quality care, clients' recognition, and therefore nurses' job satisfaction. This study explored South Korean nursing students' perception of nursing professional values (NPV) and compared the NPV scores between groups according to participants' demographic characteristics. The study participants comprised of 529 students, mostly female (96.4%), with a mean age of 22.29years, sampled from six universities throughout the country. The NPV scores, measured with the 29-item Likert scale developed by Yeun et al. (2005), were significantly higher in students who entered nursing schools following their aptitude or desire for professional job than in those who entered the schools just because their entrance exam scores were sufficient. The NPV scores were also higher in students who were planning to pursue graduate study than in those who had not yet decided. The NPV scores were significantly different between the six regions, suggesting needs of in-depth studies to understand the underlying reasons. The NPV scores were not correlated, at the .05 level of significance, with academic year, gender, or academic performance. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. School Diagnostic: Perceptions of Educational Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Caridade

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AimThe school is a privileged context to prevent certain problems that may begin during the development of young students. The main objective is to assess the perceptions of educational professionals about the school structure, functioning, and organization, as well as students’ behaviors.MethodWe developed an exploratory study using a questionnaire, applied to a sample of 81 educational agents, teachers and non-teachers, aged between 25 and 62 years (M = 45.8, SD = 10.6.ResultsDespite the positive perception of the participants about the physical school environment, it is necessary to create spaces for leisure and sport, logistic conditions and multidisciplinary teams in order to maximize the overall good functioning of schools. Adding to this, participants described the participation of parents in the school life as negative; they also identified several disruptive behaviours among students and referred to a general lack of active participation in life school.ConclusionIt is important to create action plans in schools, which should be multimodal and multi-agent in order to have intervention perspectives with connected actions developed by different educational agents.

  20. When do medical students become professionals? | Williams | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essential characteristics of student professionalism are commitment, honesty, discretion, co-operation, participation, diligence and temperance. Students need to know how to deal with unprofessional behaviour, whether their own or other students' or teachers'. Medical schools must have comprehensive programmes for ...

  1. Professional self-concept and professional values of senior students of the nursing department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çöplü, Mehtap; Tekinsoy Kartın, Pınar

    2018-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine professional self-concept and professional values in the students, who were studying in the final year of the nursing department in schools providing undergraduate education in the Inner Anatolia Region. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 619 senior students of nursing departments in the Inner Anatolia Region. Data were collected using a Student Information Form, Professional Self-Concept Scale for the Student Nurses, and The Nurses' Professional Values Scale. Descriptive statistics, the Shapiro-Wilk test, the t-test, analysis of variance, and the Bonferroni tests were used for data analysis. Ethical Considerations: A written consent was obtained from Ethics Board of Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine and from nursing schools participating in the study. Prior to data collection, students were informed about the purpose of the study and gave written and verbal consents. Participation in the study was on voluntary basis. In the study, students' total and sub-dimension scores from the Professional Self-Concept Scale for the Student Nurses and total scores from the Nurses' Professional Values Scale were moderately high. It was detected that women received higher scores than men from the sub-dimension of professional attributes; the students who had positive perception of the nursing image and voluntarily selected their department received high scores from professional satisfaction, professional competence, and professional attributes sub-dimensions of the Professional Self-Concept Scale for the Student Nurses ( p concept and professional values, it is thought that students' awareness should be increased on these topics.

  2. Professional Competence of Student Teachers to Implement Species Identification in Schools – A Case Study from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Lindemann-Matthies

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates how well prepared student teachers are to implement species identification in school. Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire and a PowerPoint presentation in which local plant and animal species were presented. Participants (n = 357 correctly identified, on average, 23% of the plants and 44% of the animals. They identified plants mainly by flower characteristics and leaves, and animals mainly by shape and colour. Family and school were key sources of participants’ knowledge of species. The self-estimated competence of participants to identify species was positively correlated with their taxonomic knowledge and the amount of time they had spent on species identification during their own schooldays. The number of correctly identified plant and animal species increased with interest in identifying species and participation in species identification courses. Participants considered learner-centred education and experience-based learning, and the use of living organisms to be most important when identifying species in school.

  3. Intellectual Capital: The Intangible Assets of Professional Development Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Carole G., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    A Professional Development School (PDS) offers unique university-school relationships that can change the culture of learning and add value to students and the community. Initially created in the 1980s, the PDS movement is growing across the country and is now a respected teacher education model. In this book, Carole G. Basile has collected…

  4. Factors influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Vitti; Chan, Fong; Chan, Jacob Yui-Chung; Lee, June Ka Yan; Sung, Connie; H Wilson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Transition from high school to college can be particularly difficult and stressful for Chinese college students because of parent expectations. The purpose of this study was to examine therapist variables influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals using conjoint analysis. Two hundred fifty-eight community college students in Hong Kong were asked to rate the profile of 55 mental health professionals representing a combination of therapist characteristics (i.e., gender, age, race/ethnicity, professional background, and training institutions) from the most to least preferred therapist from whom to seek psychological counselling. Results indicated that students' preference formation was based largely on professional background and training institution of the mental health professionals. Clinical psychologists and clinical social workers were preferred over educational psychologists (school psychologists), counsellors, and psychiatrists. Mental health professionals who received training from more prestigious schools were preferred over those trained at less prestigious schools. Understanding clients' preference formation for choosing mental health professionals could be the first step to gain insights for developing effective educational and outreach strategies to promote help seeking behavior and mental health service utilization among Chinese college students.

  5. Creating Professional Learning Communities: The Work of Professional Development Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Gini; Sudeck, Maria; Rattigan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    If professional learning communities offer opportunities for improving the teaching and learning process, then developing strong professional development school (PDS) partnerships establish an appropriate framework for that purpose. PDS partnerships, however, can be less than effective without proper planning and discussion about the aims of those…

  6. Choice of Professional and Educational Route in High School Students with Disabilities: University Education in the Context of Motivation and Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantor V.Z.

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a questionnaire survey in the context of the idea of continuity of school and university education of persons with disabilities. 90 senior students with visual, hearing and motor impairments were the respondents of the survey. The purpose of the survey was to study the motives, preferences and needs of school graduates among disabled people, which determine the choice of their vocational and educational route. The survey reveals features of motivation for professional choice of various categories of enrollees with disabilities and its informational support; assesses the level of these enrollees needs in helping by career counselors; identifies the preferred forms of higher education by persons with disabilities; characterizes the needs of people with disabilities in special equipment and services in obtaining higher education, as well as in adaptation of educational programs in the university. The resulting practical-oriented conclusions concern both purpose and content of the work with disabled enrollees from among school graduates as well as approaches to the organization of higher education for persons with disabilities.

  7. Teacher Collaboration and Student Learning in a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Mary Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have endorsed teacher collaboration within a professional learning community (PLC) that is focused on student learning. Despite these research-based endorsements, several Algebra 1 teachers in a southeastern high school implemented components of a PLC with little or no results in student achievement. The purpose of this study was to…

  8. Assessing Student Interest and Familiarity with Professional Psychology Specialty Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Wiggins, Tina L.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate psychology students' (N = 83) self-reported interest in and familiarity with five specialty areas in professional psychology: counseling psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, forensic psychology, and criminal profiling. Results suggest that although students are quite interested in careers…

  9. Reflections of Turkish accounting and financial reporting standards on vocational school students: A research on comparing perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Seldüz Hakan; Seldüz Emine

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to compare the perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates on accounting and financial reporting standards. A significant part of accounting process is carried out by vocational school graduate intermediate and mid-level accounting professionals. However, it can be claimed that adequate education about accounting and financial reporting standards isn’t given in vocational schools although these standards structure the whole accounting proces...

  10. "I'm in a Professional School! Why Are You Making Me Do This?" A Cross-Disciplinary Study of the Use of Creative Classroom Projects on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Candyce; Stevens, Dannelle D.; West, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Creative thinking skills are essential for today's workplace. Three faculty members from different professional schools (business, higher education administration, teacher education) examined student responses to the creative assignments in their courses. The assignments exemplify the following criteria: invited taking risks, encouraged innovative…

  11. Professional Socialization of Iranian BSN Students: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinmohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Peyrovi, Hamid; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-12-01

    Introduction: Professional socialization is a critical aspect of nursing students' development, which begins with entry into the nursing program and continues when their professional practice begins. The aim of this study was to explore the socialization of Iranian BSN students in the nursing profession. Methods: An exploratory qualitative approach utilizing Straussian version of the grounded theory (1998) method was used. Individual in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 14 participants chosen from two large nursing schools in an urban area through purposive and theoretical sampling. The data were analyzed, using the constant comparative method. Results: Five main categories and eleven subcategories emerged and integrated around one core category. Professional metamorphosis as the core variable was a complex and interrelated process (consisting of three stages: dependence, disintegration, and integration) with dynamic, ongoing, and personal features influenced by professional and extra-professional context. The students assumed a passive role in the initial of their studies. However, during the last year of the educational program, they gradually involved actively in dealing with own personal and professional issues. Conclusion: This study introduced "professional metamorphosis of BSN students" as a substantive grounded theory in the socio-cultural context of the health care system in Iran. During this process, students move from outsider personal position to insider professional position. The nurse educators and administrators may develop effective educational interventions to promote professional socialization of students with an understanding of the promoting and driving forces influencing socialization.

  12. Student plagiarism and professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    With the ever-increasing availability and accessibility of the Internet, students are able to access a multitude of resources in support of their studies. However, this has also led to an increase in their ability to cheat through plagiarising text and claiming it as their own. Increased pressures of balancing work and study have contributed to this rise. Not only confined to the student population, some academics are also guilty of engaging in this practice providing a less than favourable role model for their students. Of increasing concern is the links of this practice to professionalism or indeed in this case unprofessionalism. Both pre- and post-registration nursing students who plagiarise risk bringing the reputation of the profession into disrepute. There are a number of methods that may be used to detect plagiarism but often the penalties are menial and inconsistently applied. Overall it is essential that academic institutions foster a culture of honesty and integrity amongst its academic community. A culture that clearly emphasises that plagiarism in any form is unacceptable.

  13. Assisting Students in the College Choice Process: Three Essays on the Role and Effectiveness of College Advising Professionals in Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Ashley Brooke

    2016-01-01

    To address the importance of college access and the gaps in scholarship concerning college advising, this study is comprised of three essays, each focused on college advising professionals in public high schools. Though the majority of research in this area has focused on traditional school counselors, these studies examined the role and…

  14. The Influence of Mathematics Professional Development, School-Level, and Teacher-Level Variables on Primary Students' Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew; Wang, Chuang; Martin, Christie; Lambert, Richard; Pugalee, David; Middleton, Catherina

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the influence of a professional development project about an internet-based mathematics formative assessment tool and related pedagogies on primary teachers' instruction and student achievement. Teachers participated in 72 h of professional development during the year. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses of…

  15. The Impact of Professional Learning Communities on Student Achievement at an Underperforming School: Teachers' and Administrators' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaide-Cunningham, Cora E.

    2017-01-01

    This three-article dissertation contains three approaches to the topic of professional learning communities and their impact on student achievement. Article I is a synthesis of the literature related to the purpose of professional learning communities. Implications in educational settings are also presented in this article. The context of the…

  16. Developing a Comparative Measure of the Learning Climate in Professional Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Donald D.; Kilmann, Ralph H.

    1975-01-01

    The Learning Climate Questionnaire (LCQ) compares the objective properties of schools with measures of overall student satisfaction. The validity of the instrument suggests its use for substantive research investigations into the organizational dynamics of professional schools. (Author/JR)

  17. The Process of Professional School Counselor Multicultural Competency Development: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    Professional School Counselors who work in schools with a range of student diversity are posed with a unique set of challenges which require them to develop their multicultural competencies. The following qualitative study examined the process of developing multicultural competence for four professional school counselors. The four professional…

  18. Using movies to teach professionalism to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2011-08-23

    Professionalism topics are usually not covered as a separate lesson within formal curriculum, but in subtler and less officially recognized educational activities, which makes them difficult to teach and assess. Interactive methods (e.g. movies) could be efficient teaching methods but are rarely studied. The aims of this study were: 1) to test the relevance and usefulness of movies in teaching professionalism to fourth year medical students and, 2) to assess the impact of this teaching method on students' attitudes towards some professionalism topics. This was an education study with qualitative data analysis in a group of eleven fourth year medical students from the Medical School of University Maribor who attended an elective four month course on professionalism. There were 8 (66.7%) female students in the group. The mean age of the students was 21.9 ± 0.9 years. The authors used students' written reports and oral presentations as the basis for qualitative analysis using thematic codes. Students recognised the following dimensions in the movie: communication, empathy, doctors' personal interests and palliative care. It also made them think about their attitudes towards life, death and dying. The controlled environment of movies successfully enables students to explore their values, beliefs, and attitudes towards features of professionalism without feeling that their personal integrity had been threatened. Interactive teaching methods could become an indispensible aid in teaching professionalism to new generations.

  19. Using movies to teach professionalism to medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemenc-Ketis Zalika

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism topics are usually not covered as a separate lesson within formal curriculum, but in subtler and less officially recognized educational activities, which makes them difficult to teach and assess. Interactive methods (e.g. movies could be efficient teaching methods but are rarely studied. The aims of this study were: 1 to test the relevance and usefulness of movies in teaching professionalism to fourth year medical students and, 2 to assess the impact of this teaching method on students' attitudes towards some professionalism topics. Method This was an education study with qualitative data analysis in a group of eleven fourth year medical students from the Medical School of University Maribor who attended an elective four month course on professionalism. There were 8 (66.7% female students in the group. The mean age of the students was 21.9 ± 0.9 years. The authors used students' written reports and oral presentations as the basis for qualitative analysis using thematic codes. Results Students recognised the following dimensions in the movie: communication, empathy, doctors' personal interests and palliative care. It also made them think about their attitudes towards life, death and dying. Conclusions The controlled environment of movies successfully enables students to explore their values, beliefs, and attitudes towards features of professionalism without feeling that their personal integrity had been threatened. Interactive teaching methods could become an indispensible aid in teaching professionalism to new generations.

  20. Teachers' Professional Development in Schools: Rhetoric versus Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeda, Fekede Tuli; Fiorucci, Massimiliano; Catarci, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Across the country of Ethiopia, a centrally planned and prescribed professional development programme was implemented in schools, with the intention of enhancing teachers' knowledge, skills and disposition, thereby improving student learning and achievement. This article explores and describes the lived experiences of teachers involved in…

  1. School Culture and Postgraduate Professional Development: Delineating the "Enabling School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Linet; Marland, Harriet; Pill, Amanda; Rea, Tony

    2010-01-01

    The culture of the "enabling school" is investigated within the context of the government's policy of continuing professional development and postgraduate professional development for teachers in England. This context is problematised by considering teachers' conceptualisations of their professional autonomy, status and personal…

  2. An Analysis of U.S. Student Drug and Alcohol Policies through the Lens of a Professional Ethic for School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Mark E.; Frick, William C.; Mackey, Hollie J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the moral complexity of student drug and alcohol policies that are often disciplinary, punitive, and exclusionary in nature. The Ethic of the Profession and its Model for Students' Best Interests (Shapiro & Stefkovich, 2016; Stefkovich, 2013), a professional ethical construct for educational leadership and for school…

  3. Refusing Relevance: School Administrator Resistance to Offering Professional Development Addressing LGBTQ Issues in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Elizabethe C.; Smith, Melissa J.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide insight to the multiple ways that school leaders resist, avoid, or block LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, queer, and questioning) professional development for their staff and, thus, resist the conversations around school responsibility to these students and families. Research…

  4. An assessment of professionalism on students' Facebook profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, K N; Byrne, H; Nason, G J; O'Connell, B

    2018-02-01

    With the advent of social media, healthcare professionals not only need to be conscious of professionalism in their face-to-face interactions but also in the electronic environment. The aim of this study was to assess the level of online professionalism on Facebook profiles available for public viewing of students from a dental school. A search was performed via a new Facebook account of all students in the University Dental School (dental hygiene, dental nursing, dental science and dental technology). Profiles were categorised as 'private' or 'public'. Demographic details and photographs/comments of unprofessional behaviour were recorded for each individual Facebook profile. Each profile was subsequently scored with regard to professionalism based on a previously published score. There are a total of 287 students in the dental school. Of these, 62% (n = 177) had a Facebook account. Three per cent (n = 6) had a public account (fully accessible) whilst 97% (n = 171) had a private account (limited access); 36% (n = 63) of students mentioned the dental school/hospital on their profile; 34% (n = 60) had questionable content on their profile whilst 3% (n = 6) had definite violations of professionalism on their profile; and 25% (n = 44) had unprofessional photographs on their profile. Of those with unprofessional content, 52% (n = 23) of these had a documented affiliation with the dental school also visible on their profile. There was a concerning level of unprofessional content visible on students' Facebook profiles. Students need to be fully aware of their professional responsibility in the setting of social media. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Dental Education Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Teacher ambivalence towards school evaluation : promoting and ruining teacher professionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Hult, Agneta; Edström, Charlotta

    2016-01-01

    Today’s evaluation society makes teachers participate in a stream of external evaluations. How teachers experience evaluation in school and how this affects their work and professionalism is the focus of this article. Teachers’ views of external and internal evaluations and of the consequences for school practice are described and analysed. The interviewed teachers emphasised the importance of internal evaluations performed close to daily teaching practice and jointly with students and collea...

  6. Evaluation of National School for Professional Technology Education in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys

    2005-01-01

    The National School for Professional Technology Education (CONALEP) is Mexico's largest and oldest technical education system. CONALEP serves low-income students at the upper-secondary school level in Mexico. The labor market performance of CONALEP graduates has been evaluated four times in the past. These evaluations have yielded encouraging results, showing that CONALEP's graduates find jobs faster and earn higher wages than similar "control" groups. In contrast, using non-experimental meth...

  7. Cigarette smoking among healthcare professional students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It is aknown fact that health professionals can play a critical role in reducing tobacco use. In fact, it has been shown that even brief and simple advice from health care professionals can substantially increase smoking cessation rates. Students in healthcare professions are future healthcare professionals ...

  8. Schooling Teachers: Professionalism or Disciplinary Power?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Terri; Lidstone, John; Ryan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Since public schooling was introduced in the nineteenth century, teachers in many western countries have endeavoured to achieve professional recognition. For a short period in the latter part of the twentieth century, professionalism was seen as a discourse of resistance or the "enemy" of economic rationalism and performativity. However,…

  9. Supervision Experiences of New Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultsma, Shawn A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the supervision experiences of 11 new professional school counselors. They reported that their supervision experiences were most often administrative in nature; reports of clinical and developmental supervision were limited to participants whose supervisors were licensed as professional counselors. In addition,…

  10. TA Professional Development: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are essential for teaching large introductory physics classes. In such courses, undergraduates spend approximately half of their in-class contact time in instructional environments (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by GTAs, which means GTAs can have a large impact on student learning. Therefore it is crucial to adequately prepare GTAs before they first enter the classroom, and to offer them continued support throughout. Since many of the skills required to become effective teachers will also be relevant to their future research careers, it is useful for a GTA preparation program to also include professional development strategies. But what exactly do GTAs get out of these programs? The School of Physics at Georgia Tech runs a preparation and mentoring program for GTAs that focuses on pedagogical knowledge, physics content, and professional development, as well as their intersections. Nearly seventy graduate students have gone through this program in the three years since it was established. Here we discuss the impact this program has had on our GTAs, from their own point of view: the program's effect on their teaching abilities, how it has influenced their attitudes towards teaching, what elements they have found useful, and what changes they have suggested to its curriculum. We find that, in general, GTAs are more receptive when the curriculum is more hands-on and they are presented with frequent opportunities for practice and feedback.

  11. Differentiated Accountability Policy and School Improvement Plans: A Look at Professional Development and Inclusive Practices for Exceptional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Marsha; Black, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) of 2004 and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002 (NCLB) require that students with disabilities have equal access to general education curricula and contexts. Florida's Differentiated Accountability Program (DAP) is designed to support educators in meeting IDEA and NCLB…

  12. Professional International Service Learning as an International Service Learning Opportunity Appropriate for Graduate or Professional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Yun

    2015-01-01

    Graduate and professional schools are increasingly using short-term international study abroad courses as one way for internationalizing their curriculum. While international service learning can be a means for improving students' engagement in international learning experiences and providing a structure for learning, it is difficult to design…

  13. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Mental Health Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-20

    This podcast highlights the role of school mental health professionals in the management of food allergies in schools. It also identifies CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/20/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/20/2015.

  14. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Nutrition Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-13

    This podcast highlights the role of school nutrition professionals in the management of food allergies in schools. It also identifies CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/13/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/13/2015.

  15. The school librarian professional performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ubeda, Jonny de la Caridad

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the librarian’s professional role within the context of the society of knowledge. The objective was to characterize the professional performance of librarians consequently the study was carried out by means of theoretical methods and procedures to systematize the ideas of contemporary author on the topic. Data has been multiplied geometrically as a result of scientific development, such a prolific production of data together with innovation in the field of the sciences o...

  16. Bureaucracy, professionalization and school centred innovation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines an attempt to promote a school centred innovation strategy within a highly centralized educational system. The School Based Curriculum Project Scheme, which was introduced into Hong Kong in 1988, is analysed in terms of a professional-bureaucratic dichotomy. It is argued that the operational details of the scheme are designed to satisfy a range of bureaucratic concerns and these are not conducive to promoting the professional work ethic which is required for school centred innovation. Finally the paper identifies the implications which arise for policies designed to promote curriculum innovation.

  17. Recognizing the Signs: What School Mental Health Professionals Can Do about Suicide and Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In the everyday bustle of high school life, a student can have wounds--physical or emotional--that often go unnoticed. A lot of issues affect adolescents of all backgrounds. Two particularly serious issues among U.S. high school students are suicide and self-injury. This article discusses what school mental health professionals can do about…

  18. The school librarian professional performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubeda, Jonny de la Caridad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the librarian’s professional role within the context of the society of knowledge. The objective was to characterize the professional performance of librarians consequently the study was carried out by means of theoretical methods and procedures to systematize the ideas of contemporary author on the topic. Data has been multiplied geometrically as a result of scientific development, such a prolific production of data together with innovation in the field of the sciences of education and information make new demands for the training of librarian and their subsequent performance, which the study attempt to portray.

  19. Fundamentalization of the content of physical culture and health education of students in the largest medical schools of different professional orientation.

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlenko V.A.

    2017-01-01

    The content of competence of physical culture and health work reveals. It causes the affects the physical development of students, effective self-realization in the sphere of future professional activity, the need for physical activity, awareness and acceptance of the values of physical culture for the preservation and strengthening of individual health. The directions of the fundamentalization of education for the acquisition of basic knowledge in physical culture and sports, forming student...

  20. Student Values and Professional Self-Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Patrick R.

    To investigate the fundamental cultural values and political attitudes of communications students at the beginning of their professional education, and to compare the differing attitudes of students in advertising, print and broadcast journalism, telecommunications, and public relations, a study surveyed journalism and communications students at…

  1. "School Banding": Principals' Perspectives of Teacher Professional Development in the School-Based Management Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daphnee Hui Lin; Chiu, Chi Shing

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how principals' leadership approaches to teacher professional development arise from school banding and may impact upon teacher professional capital and student achievement. Design/methodology/approach: The case study is situated within the context of school-based management, comprising reflective…

  2. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  3. Implementing Action Research and Professional Learning Communities in a Professional Development School Setting to Support Teacher Candidate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews teacher candidates' use of action research and the Professional Learning Community (PLC) concept to support their work in their pre-student teaching field experience. In this research study, teacher candidates are involved in a professional development school relationship that uses action research and PLCs to support candidate…

  4. Webinar: Healthy Schools, Healthy Students: Taking Action to Improve IAQ in Your School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    A page to register to view the first webinar in the IAQ Knowledge-to-Action Professional Training Webinar Series: Healthy Schools, Healthy Students: Taking Action to Improve IAQ in Your School District

  5. Where the Two Shall Meet: Exploring the Relationship between Teacher Professional Culture and Student Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jennie M.; Higgins, Monica C.

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the understudied connection between teachers' and students' perceptions of school culture. Utilizing a longitudinal sample of approximately 130,000 students and 9000 teachers in 225 New York City traditional public schools, we investigate how professional culture among teachers intersects with students' collective emotional…

  6. Toward Understanding Business Student Professional Development Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Blessley, Misty; Kunkle, Matthew; Schirmer, Michael; Regan, Laureen

    2017-01-01

    Professional development engagement (PDE) is defined as the level of perceived undergraduate engagement in professional development activities. An 11-item measure of PDE exhibited a good reliability. Using a complete data sample of 467 graduating business undergraduates, four variable sets (student background or precollege variables,…

  7. Management of professionals in school practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Alice Juel; Buch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    related to an under-standing of professionals are used to investigate the practices involved in the change processes. The article argues that the ambiguity of a primus inter pares management position among professionals leads to several paradoxes, deadlocks, and detours, all of which affect the work......This article investigates organizational reform changes as they are con-structed in the interaction between managers and teachers in a school context. The empirical basis is comprised of case studies carried out in Danish upper secondary schools. An ethnographic approach and a concept of paradox...

  8. Your professionalism is not my professionalism: congruence and variance in the views of medical students and faculty about professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Kamran; Roff, Sue; Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2016-11-08

    Medical professionalism is an essential aspect of medical education and practice worldwide and it must be adopted according to different social and cultural contexts. We examined the current congruence and variance in the perception of professionalism in undergraduate medical students and faculty members in one medical school in Saudi Arabia. The target population was first year to final year medical students of College of Medicine, King Saud University. Out of a total of 1431 students at College of Medicine 750 students (52 %) participated in the study. Fifty faculty members from clinical and non-clinical departments of the College of Medicine were randomly selected for this study and all participated in the study. The respondents recorded their responses through the Bristol online survey system, using a bilingual (English and Arabic) version of the Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory I: Academic integrity, which has 34 items. There are 17 lapses (50 % of the total) in professional behaviour where none of the faculty recommend the ignore sanction while students recommended a variable ignore sanction in a range of 6-29 % for different behaviours. Students and faculty recommended similar sanctions for 5 lapses (14.7 % of the total) in professional behaviours. Furthermore, there is statistically significant two level difference between the sanctions approved by faculty and students in the recommended sanctions for 12 lapses (35 % of the total (p < 0.050). These results raised concerns in relation to the students' understanding of professionalism. It is therefore, important to enhance their learning around the attributes of medical professionalism.

  9. Facilitating Trust Engenderment in Secondary School Nurse Interactions with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summach, Anne H. J.

    2011-01-01

    School nurses are involved in a complex framework of interactions with students, other professionals, parents, and administrators. Trust between nurse and student is critical for interaction effectiveness. The goal of this study was to understand through phenomenology the process of engendering trust in school nurse-high school student…

  10. Matching Students to Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Trifunovic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the problem of matching students to schools by using different matching mechanisms. This market is specific since public schools are free and the price mechanism cannot be used to determine the optimal allocation of children in schools. Therefore, it is necessary to use different matching algorithms that mimic the market mechanism and enable us to determine the core of the cooperative game. In this paper, we will determine that it is possible to apply cooperative game theory in matching problems. This review paper is based on illustrative examples aiming to compare matching algorithms in terms of the incentive compatibility, stability and efficiency of the matching. In this paper we will present some specific problems that may occur in matching, such as improving the quality of schools, favoring minority students, the limited length of the list of preferences and generating strict priorities from weak priorities.

  11. Erosion of Digital Professionalism During Medical Students' Core Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Olszewski, Aleksandra E; Bell, Sigall K; Roberts, David H; Crotty, Bradley H

    2017-05-03

    The increased use of social media, cloud computing, and mobile devices has led to the emergence of guidelines and novel teaching efforts to guide students toward the appropriate use of technology. Despite this, violations of professional conduct are common. We sought to explore professional behaviors specific to appropriate use of technology by looking at changes in third-year medical students' attitudes and behaviors at the beginning and conclusion of their clinical clerkships. After formal teaching about digital professionalism, we administered a survey to medical students that described 35 technology-related behaviors and queried students about professionalism of the behavior (on a 5-point Likert scale), observation of others engaging in the behavior (yes or no), as well as personal participation in the behavior (yes or no). Students were resurveyed at the end of the academic year. Over the year, perceptions of what is considered acceptable behavior regarding privacy, data security, communications, and social media boundaries changed, despite formal teaching sessions to reinforce professional behavior. Furthermore, medical students who observed unprofessional behaviors were more likely to participate in such behaviors. Although technology is a useful tool to enhance teaching and learning, our results reflect an erosion of professionalism related to information security that occurred despite medical school and hospital-based teaching sessions to promote digital professionalism. True alteration of trainee behavior will require a cultural shift that includes continual education, better role models, and frequent reminders for faculty, house staff, students, and staff. ©Arash Mostaghimi, Aleksandra E Olszewski, Sigall K Bell, David H Roberts, Bradley H Crotty. Originally published in JMIR Medical Education (http://mededu.jmir.org), 03.05.2017.

  12. School Health Promotion and Teacher Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Didier; Simar, Carine; Deasy, Christine; Carvalho, Graça S.; McNamara, Patricia Mannix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health and education are inextricably linked. Health promotion sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools, often remaining a marginal aspect of teachers' work. The purpose of this paper is to examine the compatibility of an HP-initiative with teacher professional identity. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research design was…

  13. Sustainable school development: professional learning communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof.Dr. E. Verbiest

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution we report about a project about Professional Learning Communities.This project combines development and research. In this contribution we pay attention to the effect of the organisational capacity of a school on the personal and interpersonal capacity and to the impact of a

  14. Impacts of Professional Development in Classroom Assessment on Teacher and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randel, Bruce; Apthorp, Helen; Beesley, Andrea D.; Clark, Tedra F.; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe an impact study of Classroom Assessment for Student Learning (CASL), a widely used professional development program in classroom and formative assessment. Researchers randomly assigned 67 elementary schools to receive CASL materials or continue with regularly scheduled professional development. Teachers in CASL schools formed…

  15. Developing Students' Professional Digital Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas; Antonczak, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the myth of the "Digital Native" and the ubiquity of Facebook use, we have found that students' digital identities are predominantly social with their online activity beyond Facebook limited to being social media consumers rather than producers. Within a global economy students need to learn new digital literacy skills to…

  16. Student Affairs Capitalism and Early-Career Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny J.; Helm, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study explores student affairs capitalism as the alteration of professional practice towards the financial interests of institutions. Student affairs capitalism has the potential to create dynamics in which the interests of students become secondary to the institution's economic needs. This study examined this phenomenon from the perspectives…

  17. Views of Students about Technology, Effects of Technology on Daily Living and Their Professional Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghan, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the views of students about technology and their professional preferences and put forth the correlation between professional preferences and views about technology. For this purpose, in a private school in Ankara, 109 students from 6th and 7th grades were asked about their views on what technology is, the…

  18. Students "Hacking" School Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Del

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with students hacking school computer systems. School districts are getting tough with students "hacking" into school computers to change grades, poke through files, or just pit their high-tech skills against district security. Dozens of students have been prosecuted recently under state laws on identity theft and unauthorized…

  19. 'You're judged all the time!' Students' views on professionalism: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Gabrielle; Garner, Jayne; Sawdon, Marina

    2010-08-01

    This study describes how medical students perceive professionalism and the context in which it is relevant to them. An understanding of how Phase 1 students perceive professionalism will help us to teach this subject more effectively. Phase 1 medical students are those in the first 2 years of a 5-year medical degree. Seventy-two undergraduate students from two UK medical schools participated in 13 semi-structured focus groups. Focus groups, carried out until thematic saturation occurred, were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed and coded using NVivo 8, using a grounded theory approach with constant comparison. From the analysis, seven themes regarding professionalism emerged: the context of professionalism; role-modelling; scrutiny of behaviour; professional identity; 'switching on' professionalism; leniency (for students with regard to professional standards), and sacrifice (of freedom as an individual). Students regarded professionalism as being relevant in three contexts: the clinical, the university and the virtual. Students called for leniency during their undergraduate course, opposing the guidance from Good Medical Practice. Unique findings were the impact of clothing and the online social networking site Facebook on professional behaviour and identity. Changing clothing was described as a mechanism by which students 'switch on' their professional identity. Students perceived society to be struggling with the distinction between doctors as individuals and professionals. This extended to the students' online identities on Facebook. Institutions' expectations of high standards of professionalism were associated with a feeling of sacrifice by students caused by the perception of constantly 'being watched'; this perception was coupled with resentment of this intrusion. Students described the significant impact that role-modelling had on their professional attitudes. This research offers valuable insight into how Phase 1 medical students

  20. Professional Learning Among School Leaders in Secondary Education : The Impact of Personal and Work Context Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, Ruth; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Endedijk, Maaike D.

    Purpose: School leadership is fundamental in efforts to successfully implement school reform and improve student and teacher learning. Although there is an abundant amount of research on school leaders’ formal training, assessment, and practice, little is known about their informal professional

  1. Mobile Technology in Hospital Schools: What Are Hospital Teachers' Professional Learning Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Aidan; Maor, Dorit; McConney, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify hospital teachers' professional learning needs to enable effective use of mobile technology in hospital schools. Hospitalized students cannot attend their regular schools and as a result their educational progress and development can suffer. In an attempt to address this, hospital schools provide learning…

  2. Professional Burnout among School Counselors in Basic School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kovač

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available School counsellors are often stressed due to the nature of their work. This stress can, when unsatisfyingly treated, easily evolve to a professional burnout. In Slovenia no research with the specific aim to explore the professional burnout among school counsellors has been performed so far. Hence the aim of the present research is to compensate this shortage in the area of school counselling. The paper presents some theoretical foundations of occupational burnout and results of empirical research. The purpose of the empirical research was to determine the perceptions of occupational burnout among school counselors. We were interested in the level of occupational burnout and existing differences in terms of age, education and presence of supervision. We analysed the results of the present study according to three dimensions of occupational burnout in school counselors, namely lesser fulfilment, exhaustion and depersonalization. Results have shown that the perceived level of the avarage occupational burnout in most school counsellors is relatively homogenous. Within the individual dimensions of professional burnout among school counselors the sense of lesser fulfillment has proven to be the most strongly expressed. The study also showed that the greatest differences are seen in the dimension of lesser fulfilment and emotional exhaustion with regard to education and presence of supervision.

  3. Quality Science Teacher Professional Development and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies show that socio-economic background and parental education accounts for 50-60 percent of a child's achievement in school. School, and other influences, account for the remaining 40-50 percent. In contrast to most other professions, schools require no real apprenticeship training of science teachers. Overall, only 38 percent of United States teachers have had any on-the-job training in their first teaching position, and in some cases this consisted of a few meetings over the course of a year between the beginning teacher and the assigned mentor or master teacher. Since individual teachers determine the bulk of a student's school experiences, interventions focused on teachers have the greatest likelihood of affecting students. To address this deficiency, partnerships between scientists and K-12 teachers are increasingly recognized as an excellent method for improving teacher preparedness and the quality of science education. Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers' (founded in 1990) basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have no firsthand experience doing science, hence the Program's motto, "Practice what you teach." Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers provides strong evidence that a teacher research program is a very effective form of professional development for secondary school science teachers and has a direct correlation to increased student achievement in science. The author will present the methodology of the program's evaluation citing statistically significant data. The author will also show the economic benefits of teacher participation in this form of professional development.

  4. 'Part of the team': professional identity and social exclusivity in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Peters, Kath; Koch, Jane; Wilson, Ian

    2011-12-01

    Medical students must develop not only their professional identity but also inclusive social attitudes for effective medical practice in the future. This study explores the elements that contribute to medical students' sense of professional identity and investigates the concept of social exclusivity and how this might relate to students' development of their identity as medical professionals. The study is based on qualitative data gathered in telephone interviews with 13 medical students enrolled in Years 1 or 3 at an undergraduate medical school at a university in Australia. The questions were open-ended and asked students about their experiences in medical school, sense of identity and social connections. Two main components contributed to a strong sense of professional identity in medical students: professional inclusivity and social exclusivity. Students experienced professional inclusivity when they attended clinical placements and when they were treated as future medical professionals by lecturers, doctors and patients. Social exclusivity was demonstrated by participants' perceptions of themselves as socially separate from non-medical students and isolated from students in other disciplines. Students described a sense of peer unity and a shared sense of identity as medical students within the medical school. It is important to understand how students develop their sense of identity as medical professionals and the ways in which medical education and clinical placements can influence this professional identity. Although this study noted a very strong sense of social exclusivity in its findings, there were also high levels of intra-discipline inclusivity. These results suggest that there is a reciprocal and reinforcing relationship between student experiences of professional inclusivity and social exclusivity that creates a defined sense of professional identity. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  5. Teaching of students technology early professional orientation of schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanshina, S. I.; Sagitova, R. N.; Gilmanshin, I. R.; Kamaleeva, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    The necessity of early professional orientation of schoolchildren on the engineering profession and a new type of teacher was proved. Theoretically substantiated and experimentally tested pedagogical conditions of training of students - future teachers of technology early professional orientation of schoolchildren in the system of university preparation of teacher of a new type. This development of courses of special disciplines, aimed at developing of future teachers of readiness for early career guidance activities; development of interactive group projects for schoolchildren of different age groups (including primary school), expanding their understanding of the world of professions; practical testing of career guidance projects dealing with children’s audience.

  6. Facebook and the professional behaviours of undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Jayne; O'Sullivan, Helen

    2010-06-01

    The rapid growth and accessibility of social networking websites has fundamentally changed the way people manage information about their personal and professional lives. In particular, it has been suggested that interaction in virtual communities erodes elements of responsibility, accountability and social trust that build traditionally meaningful communities. The purpose of this study was to investigate how undergraduate medical students use the social network website Facebook, and to identify any unprofessional behaviour displayed online. A voluntary anonymous online survey was devised by the University of Liverpool, and emailed to students. Question topics included the use of Facebook, privacy settings, groups relating to the course and professional behaviours. Results were input to spss for analysis. The response rate was 31 per cent (n = 56). The majority of respondents did have a Facebook account and admitted there were photos they found embarrassing on the site. Over half of the respondents reported they had seen unprofessional behaviour by their colleagues on Facebook. Although students say that they are aware of the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) guidance, unprofessional behaviour is still demonstrated on the site. This research highlights the issue of social networking websites and professionalism amongst medical students. Further guidance from the GMC and medical schools should remind students that images and information placed on social networking sites is in the public domain, and could impact upon their professional reputation and identity. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  7. DIT - Culinary Student Professional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Seberry, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    A 1 day Culinary Food Tour - For International Masters Degree Students The Aim of the Programme - To explore the trace the source of ingredients linked to 5 major award winning Food Products. Specific Objectives - To meet the food producers behind 5 award winning food products. To investigate the success factors linked to 5 Prominent Artisan Food Producers from the Boyne Valley Region of Ireland.

  8. Values in nursing students and professionals: An exploratory comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-López, F Rosa; Roales-Nieto, Jesus Gil; Seco, Guillermo Vallejo; Preciado, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have explored personal values in nursing, but none has assessed whether the predictions made by the theory of intergenerational value change are true for the different generations of nursing professionals and students. This theory predicts a shift in those personal values held by younger generations towards ones focussed on self-expression. The purpose of the study was to identify intergenerational differences in personal values among nursing professionals and nursing students and to determine whether generational value profiles fit the predictions made by the theory. An exploratory comparative design with a cross-sectional survey method was used. Participants were recruited from four public hospitals and 10 Primary Care Centres in medium-size cities in Spain. A sample of 589 nurses and 2295 nursing students participated in the study. An open survey method was used to collect data that were classified grouping reported values into categories following a method of value lexicon construction and analysed by contingency tables with Pearson's χ (2) and standardized residuals. Approval to conduct the study was obtained from the Deans of the nursing schools and the Directors of Nursing of the institutions. Anonymity was guaranteed, participation was voluntary and participants were informed of the purpose of the study. The results can be synthesized in two age-related trends in the reporting of values among three groups of participants. First, among younger nurses and students, some nursing core values (e.g. ethical and professional) decreased in importance, while other values centred on social relationships and personal well-being increased. This study shows intergenerational change in personal values among both nursing students and young nursing professionals. Findings suggest the need to pay more attention to value training and professional socialization during the schooling period. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Some aspects of school seen as a Professional Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradea Adela

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Each school is part of the community and at the same time, a provider of education services. This makes school a Learning Community for both teachers and students. While in the case of students this is a mission accomplished, in that of teachers’ things seem to be a bit more difficult. The latter ones should see themselves as members of a Professional Learning Community (PLC, where each teacher should cooperate with the other to achieve common goals, engage in common research activities for the progress of their school, take part in evaluating school results and propose plans to improve them etc. This research aimed to identify teachers’ perception of the role of school as a Professional Learning Community, to identify how school boards support and encourage this idea through participative management and to identify lines of joint research in which teachers are involved. The instrument used was a questionnaire having 30 close-ended items, administered to pre-university teachers from Bihor county, Romania. The implementation period was January to June 2016. The results show that there is collaboration between the same subject area teachers, who form committees to discuss, analyse and propose solutions. The research has also showed that more effort is required to improve collaboration between more experienced teachers and those who are at the beginning of their career, to improve collaboration between different subject area teachers by getting them to engage in joint projects, but above all, there is a need for a greater involvement of teachers, of school boards in managing schools so that participative management is achieved.

  10. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  11. Affective Commitment among Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Student affairs professionals in the United States were surveyed to determine the predictive value of overall job satisfaction, organizational support, organizational politics, and work/nonwork interaction on affective organizational commitment. Results indicate that a supportive work environment leads to increased affective attachment to the…

  12. Professional competences in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2015-01-01

    shows that ‘a production logic’ and economic values are emphasized in the motivation of the project and in the knowledge base underpinning the competency-framework. The discussion of the responsiveness of the formulations in relation to school health promotion points out that there are matches between......The purpose of the study is to critically explore the formulations of competencies and standards in the European project “Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion Capacity Building in Europe”, and to discuss them in relation to school health promotion. The analysis...... these formulations, and essential values and approaches in school health promotion. However, by underemphasizing the potential of education and learning, and reducing changes at individual and group level to behavioral change, the formulations of competencies and standards are not in concert with essential values...

  13. All Together Now: Authentic University-School Partnerships for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Patricia A.; Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Hickman, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Opportunities for professional development can benefit the practice of teaching, the learning of students, and the culture of schooling. Thus, considerable attention has been given to effective professional development programs and many reform agendas have made such initiatives a priority (No Child Left Behind, 2002; National Board for…

  14. Collaborative School Innovation Project as a Pivot for Teachers' Professional Development: The Case of Acharnes' Second Chance School in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou, Eleni; Tsafos, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    A collaborative school innovation project is explored as a pivot for the professional development of the teachers involved. The Second Chance School (SCS) of Acharnes in Greece constitutes such a collaborative innovative project, regarding the underlying theory of multiliteracies, its decentralised character, respect for student individuality, and…

  15. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  16. Factors Influencing Student Affairs Professionals' Attainment of Professional Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Kristyn; Grabsch, Dustin; Moore, Lori

    2018-01-01

    Limited research exists that examines factors influencing student affairs professionals' attainment of the professional competencies that are expected of them. The study described in this article analyzed student affairs professionals' survey responses to determine which demographics, pre-professional experiences, and educational experiences…

  17. Professional mentoring in student affairs: evaluation of a global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IASAS) offered a global professional mentoring programme that would link student affairs leaders internationally with new graduates and early career professionals in student services. Protégé participants were primarily new graduates of ...

  18. Professionalism among multicultural medical students in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Alsalehi, Shahd; Husain, Zahra S M; Nair, Satish C; Carrick, Frederick Robert

    2017-01-01

    Moral competencies and ethical practices of medical professionals are among the desired outcomes of academic training. Unfortunately, academic dishonesty and misconduct are reported from medical colleges across the world. This study investigates the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. Validated and customized version of Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory-1 detailing lapses of professionalism in undergraduate health professions education was used to determine the perceived prevalence and self-reported lapses of academic integrity in this study. This study shows that the majority (458/554, 83%) of medical students have admitted to acts of academic dishonesty mentioned in the questionnaire. Approximately 42% (231/554) of the students have given proxy for attendance and 71% of them considered this as an offense. Similarly, 12% (66/554) have copied from the record books of others, and 86% (477/554) have considered it unethical. In addition, 5% (28/554) of the students revealed forging a teacher's signature in their record or logbooks, with 16% (91/554) of them reporting that they have seen others forge signatures. This is the first multi-center, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic study involving a large number of participants that addresses academic professionalism among medical students in the Middle East. Certainly, the paucity of data limits definitive conclusions about the best approach to prevent academic misconduct in the UAE medical schools. Yet, the results of our study are anticipated not only to benefit the UAE but also to find application in the Arab world, with similar medical school programs, values, culture and tradition.

  19. Learning from Educator Experiences in a Hawaiian School: Peak Professional Learning and A'O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Laurie U'ilani

    2016-01-01

    Due to rapid advancements in the world and shifting priorities at the school level, educators must keep abreast of current developments and how to continue to engage and challenge students in creative ways. This study examined the experiences 21 Kamehameha Schools educators indicated best support their professional learning to gain further…

  20. Fieldwork Using the Professional Development Schools Model: Developing a Social Justice Orientation and Multicultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.; Krell, Megan M.; Hayden, Laura A.; Gracia, Robert; Denitzio, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Practicum fieldwork was conducted in an urban high school setting using a Professional Development Schools (PDS) model, with a focus on multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC). Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the journal responses of 16 counseling students to ascertain MSJCC development during…

  1. Assessing the Change Process in Comprehensive High Schools Implementing Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLC) have been identified as scaffolds that can facilitate, support, and sustain systemic change focused on improving student achievement. PLCs represent the application of the theoretical constructs of the learning organization within the framework of schools and school systems. Little is known about the change…

  2. Culture in Inclusive Schools: Parental Perspectives on Trusting Family-Professional Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Grace L.; Blue-Banning, Martha; Turnbull, Ann P.; Hill, Cokethea; Haines, Shana J.; Gross, Judith M. S.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study improves understanding of parent perspectives about the factors that facilitate family-professional partnerships in schools recognized for inclusive practices. Five themes emerged from 11 focus groups consisting of parents of students with and without disabilities and with varying levels of involvement with the school: (a)…

  3. Inter-professional education of prospective speech-language therapists and primary school teachers through shared professional practice placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leanne; McNeill, Brigid; Gillon, Gail T

    2017-07-01

    Preliminary studies of inter-professional education (IPE) among student speech-language therapists (SLTs) and student teachers suggest that workshop-based applications are beneficial in preparing participants for elements of collaborative practice. Situating IPE within the students' professional practice placements may provide another useful avenue to develop attitudes, knowledge and skills for inter-professional collaboration. Research examining the impact of different approaches to IPE is required to advance our understanding of effective design and evaluation of such initiatives. To understand how student SLTs and student teachers develop competency for collaborative practice when co-working during professional practice placements to support children's speech and literacy development. A case study design was used to monitor the impact of the IPE. Student SLTs (n = 4) were paired with student teachers (n = 4) to participate in shared professional practice placements in junior school classrooms. An inductive thematic analysis of interviews conducted with participants after the IPE was employed to explore the development of competencies in collaborative practice. Change in inter-disciplinary knowledge and perceptions over the IPE was evaluated via survey to further explore the development of collaborative competencies. Integration of qualitative and quantitative findings suggested that participants began to develop four broad areas of collaborative competency: understanding of professional roles and expertise, communication skills to support shared decision-making, inter-dependency in supporting children's learning, and flexibility to implement alternative instructional practices. Interview analysis also revealed factors related to the facilitators and learning contexts that supported and/or limited the collaboration between participants. Shared placement experiences between student SLTs and student teachers may be an effective method for building participants

  4. Psychological and Educational Support in Professional Self-Determination in Students: Through the Lens of Professional Standard for Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonova M.V.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the importance of organized educational support for students in their professional self-determination. It reviews the list of professional competencies defined in the professional standard for teachers dealing with self-determination in students and analyses the basic requirements set for teacher education programmes. The system of professional self-determination for young people is described basing on the experience of the Republic of Mordovia, where career guidance in schools is regulated by the Regional Educational Module “Start into the Profession”. This module was developed according to the specifics of the given region and represents an integrated system of activities aimed at efficient career guidance for students living in rural and urban areas of the Republic of Mordovia.

  5. School Safety Concerns All Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that school safety is an issue that concerns all students. Discusses how the staff of the Rockwood South (Missouri) "RAMpage" covered the shootings at Columbine High School in a 14-page issue and in follow-up issues. Suggests that the student newspaper covered the controversial topic in an appropriate, tasteful manner. (RS)

  6. The Effect of School Culture on the Management of Professional Development in Secondary Schools in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Parwazalam Abdul; Ali, Syed Kamaruzaman Syed; Aluwi, Aliza; Noor, Nor Afizah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the influence of school culture on the management of professional development in secondary schools in Malaysia. It illustrates how school culture influences the school professional development management. The instrument used in this study is a self-administered questionnaire involving 515 secondary school teachers. The results…

  7. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support

  8. Professional expectations of students of the oral health technician course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Lima Junior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the expectations of students enrolled in the oral health technician course conducted by the School of Public Health of Ceará, about their professional future. Methods:This work presents a quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study held with students of seven classes in dental hygiene course conducted by the School of Public Health. Data collection was conducted between March and April 2011, through the application of a semistructured questionnaire, which addressed the professional profile of the participants, their expectations about the labor market and the profession. Statistical analysis was performedwith a degree of significance of 0.05. Results: 154 students were interviewed, of whom 96.1% were women, mean age of 32.9 (± 7.3 years. Most (93.8%, N = 120 graduated from high school and 71.1% (N = 108 were registered at the Regional Council of Dentistry. Regardingtheir insertion in the labor market, 42.9% believed it would be satisfactory and 58% that it would occur in public service. The biggest obstacle mentioned by the subjects about the insertion of oral health technicians in the labor market was the difficulty of hiring (45.5%. When asked to punctuate some actions that they would play as TSB, 82.2% cited clinical and collective actions. The majority (96% claimed to feel safe to act as TSB. Conclusion:The students’ expectations regarding their professional future are positive. However, it is necessary to develop further research in this area, so that the profession has a growing support within the labor market.

  9. Professional preferences of students in physical education and sport sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The actual context has enhanced job opportunities in the field of sport in order to respond to the current market demand. Thus, Physical Education and Sport Science graduates who begin to do differents jobs to the traditional ones but relate to their study field. The aim of this study was to guess which are the job preferences of the students of Physical Education and Sport Science of Seville University by gender and age doing the second cycle of their college degree and determine if there are significant differences. A descriptive analysis was carried out, using a questionnaire based on several researches, it was related to professional opportunities in sport sciences. The sample was of 118 students which represented 40.7% of the overall registered students. Results shown that sport management is the most preferable professional opportunity for women and men of the total sample, following in second place by teaching in secondary school for people older than 25 years of both sexes and teaching in primary school for the younger than 25 years. These findings announce changes in occupational trends in sports, to be taken into account in the framework of the European higher education (Degree of Science in Sport and Physical Activity, own US Masters and Official, lifelong learning programs....

  10. Social media use, attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of online professionalism amongst dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Philip; Johnson, Ilona Gail

    2016-01-01

    Use of social media has increased amongst health professionals. This has benefits for patient care but also introduces risks for confidentiality and professional fitness to practise. This study aimed to examine dental student attitudes towards professional behaviour on social media. The secondary aim was to establish the extent and nature of social media use and exposure to potentially unprofessional behaviours.\\ud \\ud A cross-sectional study was carried out in one dental school. Data were co...

  11. Mathematic Achievement of Canadian Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Francoise Jane; Wei, Yichun; Clifton, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    Very little Canadian research has examined the academic achievement of private school students. Data from The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 were used to examine the achievement of private school students. The study found that private school students outperformed their public school peers. In addition, the students'…

  12. Excellence in leadership: demands on the professional school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A professional school principal is the educational leader and manager of a school, and is therefore responsible for the work performance of all the people in the school (i.e. both staff and learners). People are the human resources of schools. They use material resources (such as finances, information equipment, and ...

  13. Professionals and students in a lobbying experiment. Professional rules of conduct and subject surrogacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, J.; van Winden, F.A.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Lobbying is studied in a series of signaling game experiments. Students as well as professional lobbyists are used as subjects. In contrast with some earlier studies, comparing students and professionals, we find significant differences in the behavior of the two subject pools. Professional subjects

  14. Psychological aspects of professional identity and professional choices of intellectually gifted students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron I. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available in the work determines the relevance of psychological research of professional self-determination of intellectually gifted students. The results of diagnostics of psychological characteristics of intellectually gifted students that affect the success of their professional identity and professional choices.

  15. Training Digital Age Journalists: Blurring the Distinction between Students and Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Eddie

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, top-tier journalism and media schools are entering into partnerships with mainstream media organizations to create and distribute student-produced content. While internships have long been a sanctioned way students learn professional practices, downturns in the economy have led to reductions in paid internship programs. On the rise…

  16. Longitudinal Effects of Technology Integration and Teacher Professional Development on Students' Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Ali; Capraro, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    MathForward is a program that provides teacher professional development and integrates the use of technology as a tool in the classroom. The present study examined students' mathematics growth from 2012 to 2013 and observed how students' mathematics scores changed after their school implemented the MathForward program. The sample consisted of two…

  17. Seeing the Paradigm: Education Professionals' Advocacy for the Gifted Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costis, Patricia Anne

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the needs of the gifted student with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) requires addressing both conditions. Education professionals are in a unique position to begin this process by referring the student to school specialists for evaluation. However, diagnostic confusion surrounding autism, misconceptions about special education, varying…

  18. Teacher Characteristics and School-Based Professional Development in Inclusive STEM-focused High Schools: A Cross-case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Nancy Kay

    Within successful Inclusive Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)-focused High Schools (ISHSs), it is not only the students who are learning. Teachers, with diverse backgrounds, training, and experience, share and develop their knowledge through rich, embedded professional development to continuously shape their craft, improve their teaching, and support student success. This study of four exemplars of ISHSs (identified by experts in STEM education as highly successful in preparing students underrepresented in STEM for STEM majors in college and future STEM careers) provides a rich description of the relationships among the characteristics of STEM teachers, their professional development, and the school cultures that allow teachers to develop professionally and serve the needs of students. By providing a framework for the development of teaching staffs in ISHSs and contributing to the better understanding of STEM teaching in any school, this study offers valuable insight, implications, and information for states and school districts as they begin planning improvements to STEM education programs. A thorough examination of an existing data set that included site visits to four ISHSs along with pre- and post-visit data, provided the resource for this multiple case study with cross-case analysis of the teachers and their teacher professional development experiences. Administrators in these ISHSs had the autonomy to hire teachers with strong content backgrounds, philosophical alignment with the school missions, and a willingness to work collaboratively toward achieving the schools' goals. Ongoing teacher professional development began before school started and continued throughout the school day and year through intense and sustained, formal and informal, active learning experiences. Flexible professional development systems varied, but aligned with targeted school reforms and teacher and student needs. Importantly, collaborative teacher learning

  19. Making the Invisible Visible: School Counselors Empowering Students with Disabilities through Self-Advocacy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Trish; Shelton, T.; Monk, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Professional School Counselors (PSCs) are trained to be leaders in school reform, collaborators with other educators, and advocates for all students. While PSCs provide academic, career, and personal/social interventions for the student body as part of a comprehensive school counseling program the needs of students with disabilities are often…

  20. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: Framing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Johnson, Ann

    2017-05-01

    The NASN Code of Ethics upholds that it is the responsibility of the school nurse to maintain competency and pursue personal and professional growth. Designing professional development activities that are relevant and support the needs of the school nurse can be a challenge. The Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice provides a model rooted in evidence-based standards of practice that can be utilized to assess an existing professional development program and identify gaps in learning opportunities. Nurse leaders can use the Framework for 21st Century Nursing Practice to provide a roadmap toward a professional development program that will be meaningful to school nurse staff, help restore or maintain joy in their practice, and allow them to achieve the goal of advancing the well-being, academic success, and lifelong achievement and health of students.

  1. The Impact of Professional Development Schools on Teacher Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Michael N.

    2010-01-01

    Although there is no common definition for teacher leadership, the concept is continually advanced as a key component for both the success of schools and professionalization of teachers. Studies have shown that teachers who feel empowered as leaders are more effective in the classroom. Professional development schools (PDSs) provide multiple…

  2. Attributes of Students Graduating from Schools and Colleges of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optometric Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This report by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry identifies desired attributes of students graduating from schools and colleges of optometry. Introductory information includes information on the report's development and assumptions. Personal and professional attributes are then listed followed by a list of 10 knowledge-area…

  3. Leading and Managing Continuing Professional Development: Developing People, Developing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Peter; Bubb, Sara

    2004-01-01

    This book has been written for those who lead and manage continuing professional development (CPD). Continuing professional development co-coordinators hold a key role and one that needs to be developed further in many schools. This book is intended to help people think more deeply about the professional development and training of staff--all…

  4. Professional Development in Technology at High Achieving Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed educators' perception of professional development offered through schools in the area of technology implementation and tried to define its perceived effectiveness in meeting the professional development conceptual framework defined by Gardner, Baker, Vogt, and Hodel in "Four Approaches to Professional Development".…

  5. Does School Choice Improve Student Performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Kaja Høiseth Brugård

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between school choice and student performance for high school students in Norway. The analysis exploits both the fact that the degree of school choice formally differs between counties, and detailed information on travelling distances to high schools, which more closely reflects the students' actual school choice possibilities. Information on students' residence, high school location, and the degree of formal school choice is used to estimate the effect on ...

  6. Schools or Students? Identifying High School Effects on Student Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Smith, E. Christine

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is clear that discipline in high school is associated with negative outcomes across the life course. Not only are suspensions related to declining academic trajectories during high school in the form of attendance and academic achievement, students suspended once are also more likely to be suspended again and also substantially increase…

  7. Assessing medical students' perceptions of patient safety: the medical student safety attitudes and professionalism survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Joshua M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Williams, S Tyler; Berger, David H; Bell, Sigall K; Thomas, Eric J

    2014-02-01

    To develop and test the psychometric properties of a survey to measure students' perceptions about patient safety as observed on clinical rotations. In 2012, the authors surveyed 367 graduating fourth-year medical students at three U.S. MD-granting medical schools. They assessed the survey's reliability and construct and concurrent validity. They examined correlations between students' perceptions of organizational cultural factors, organizational patient safety measures, and students' intended safety behaviors. They also calculated percent positive scores for cultural factors. Two hundred twenty-eight students (62%) responded. Analyses identified five cultural factors (teamwork culture, safety culture, error disclosure culture, experiences with professionalism, and comfort expressing professional concerns) that had construct validity, concurrent validity, and good reliability (Cronbach alphas > 0.70). Across schools, percent positive scores for safety culture ranged from 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-43%) to 64% (30%-98%), while those for teamwork culture ranged from 47% (32%-62%) to 74% (66%-81%). They were low for error disclosure culture (range: 10% [0%-20%] to 27% [20%-35%]), experiences with professionalism (range: 7% [0%-15%] to 23% [16%-30%]), and comfort expressing professional concerns (range: 17% [5%-29%] to 38% [8%-69%]). Each cultural factor correlated positively with perceptions of overall patient safety as observed in clinical rotations (r = 0.37-0.69, P safety behavioral intent item. This study provided initial evidence for the survey's reliability and validity and illustrated its applicability for determining whether students' clinical experiences exemplify positive patient safety environments.

  8. Student Voice in High School: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    This action research study examined the effects of student voice in one high school and the self-reflection of the researcher-administrator involved in the effort. Using three cycles of action research, the researcher-administrator completed a pilot study, implemented a student voice project in one class, and developed a professional development…

  9. Relationships between medical student burnout, empathy, and professionalism climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, Chantal M L R; Schroeder, Robin; Rovi, Sue; Boyd, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Medical student burnout is prevalent, and there has been much discussion about burnout and professionalism in medical education and the clinical learning environment. Yet, few studies have attempted to explore relationships between those issues using validated instruments. Medical students were surveyed at the beginning of their fourth year using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy-Student Version, and the Professionalism Climate Instrument. The data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, and Spearman correlation analysis was performed. Scores indicative of higher medical student burnout were associated with lower medical student empathy scores and with lower professionalism climate scores observed in medical students, residents, and faculty. Investigators observed relationships between medical student burnout, empathy, and professionalism climate. These findings may have implications for the design of curriculum interventions to promote student well-being and professionalism.

  10. Online Professional Skills Workshops: Perspectives from Distance Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvreau, Sarah; Hurst, Deborah; Cleveland-Innes, Martha; Hawranik, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    While many online graduate students are gaining academic and scholarly knowledge, the opportunities for students to develop and hone professional skills essential for the workplace are lacking. Given the virtual environment of distance learning, graduate students are often expected to glean professional skills such as analytical thinking,…

  11. Psychological and pedagogical grounds for applying communicative method of teaching foreign languages in higher school with the purpose of realization of students professional orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Yavoruk, O.; Gridneva, S.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with the notion of “professional orientation”, its components and levels. The principles of communicative method of teaching foreign languages are analyzed from psychological and pedagogical point of view. Expediency of applying the given method with the purpose of realization of students’ professional orientation is substantiated.

  12. Bullying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  13. The motivation of massage therapy students to enter professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Paul

    2004-12-01

    In Ontario massage therapy is a regulated health profession, and it has been speculated that massage therapy students are motivated primarily by altruistic values, as has been documented in medicine. Students at Sutherland-Chan School and Teaching Clinic in Ontario were surveyed regarding their motivation to enter massage therapy education, with the intention of assessing the influence of certain value complexes on their decision. The results indicate that their decision was influenced more strongly by intrinsic values related to helping and working with people than by the prospect of extrinsic rewards (p < 0.0005). This supports a belief commonly held within the professional community, and bodies well for the future of massage therapy as a caring profession.

  14. School Shootings and Student Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Panu Poutvaara; Olli Ropponen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study how high school students reacted to the shocking news of a school shooting. The shooting coincided with national high-school matriculation exams. As there were exams both before and after the shooting, we can use a difference-in-differences analysis to uncover how the school shooting affected the test scores compared to previous years. We find that the average performance of young men declined due to the school shooting, whereas we do not observe a similar pattern for ...

  15. Supporting students in professional socialisation: Guidelines for professional nurses and educators

    OpenAIRE

    Hester Cathrina (Rina) de Swardt; Gisela H. van Rensburg; M.J. Oosthuizen

    2017-01-01

    Professional socialisation of nursing students involves learning skills, attitudes, behaviour and professional roles, largely in the clinical area. During clinical accompaniment and reflective discussions with a group of undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing students in South Africa, students reported negative professional socialisation experiences, primarily in the clinical area. Such experiences could influence the quality of patient care. The objective of this study was to develop and valida...

  16. Maintaining Professional Commitment as a Newly Credentialed Athletic Trainer in the Secondary School Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Myers, Sarah L; Walker, Stacy E; Kirby, Jessica

    2018-03-01

    Professional commitment, or one's affinity and loyalty to a career, has become a topic of interest in athletic training. The expanding research on the topic, however, has omitted newly credentialed athletic trainers (ATs). For an impressionable group of practitioners, transitioning to clinical practice can be stressful.   To explore the professional commitment of newly credentialed ATs in the secondary school setting.   Secondary school.   Qualitative study.   A total of 31 newly credentialed ATs (6 men, 25 women; mean age = 24 ± 3 years) participated. Of these, 17 ATs (4 men, 13 women; mean age = 25 ± 4 years) were employed full time in the secondary school setting, and 14 ATs (2 men, 12 women; mean age = 23.0 ± 2.0 years) were graduate assistant students in the secondary school setting.   All participants completed semistructured interviews, which focused on their experiences in the secondary school setting and transitioning into the role and setting. Transcripts were analyzed using the phenomenologic approach. Creditability was established by peer review, member checks, and researcher triangulation.   Four main findings related to the professional commitment of newly credentialed ATs in the secondary school setting were identified. Work-life balance, professional relationships formed with the student-athletes, enjoyment gained from working in the secondary school setting, and professional responsibility emerged as factors facilitating commitment.   Affective commitment is a primary facilitator of professional commitment. Newly credentialed ATs who enjoy their jobs and have time to engage in nonwork roles are able to maintain a positive professional commitment. Our findings align with the previous literature and help strengthen our understanding that rejuvenation and passion are important to professional commitment.

  17. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's interpretation and conceptual analysis of students’ socio-professional mobility, and its contribution to the future professional growth. The author considers both the objective and subjective factors affecting the uncertainty of students' professional future: objective factors include socio-economic conditions of postindustrial society, systems of vocational education and guidance; subjective factors deal with the intrapersonal conflicts of professional self-determination, discrepancy of socio-professional orientation, and low auto-competency level.The research findings reveal the structure and characteristic features of students' social and professional mobility: psycho-physiological qualities, cognitive abilities, socio-professional experience and orientation, as well as the negative impact factors. Based on the content analysis and expert evaluation, the author singles out and defines the key characteristics of students’ mobility: adaptability, initiative, innovativeness, learning ability, behavioral flexibility, reflexivity and excessive activity.Practical significance: the research outcomes provide the ground for extrapolation of students' career prospects in vocational schools, career counseling and job placement centers.

  18. School nurse summer institute: a model for professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and spring. Coalition building is an important tool to enhance the influence of the school nurse in improving the health of individuals, families, and communities. School nurses and nursing educators with expertise in the specialty of school nursing could replicate this model in their own regions.

  19. Mary E. Hall: Dawn of the Professional School Librarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alto, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    A century ago, a woman named Mary E. Hall convinced school leaders of the need for the professional school librarian--a librarian who cultivated a love of reading, academic achievement, and independent learning skills. After graduating from New York City's Pratt Institute Library School in 1895, Hall developed her vision for the high school…

  20. School Culture and Leadership of Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore supportive and shared leadership structures at schools as a function of school culture policies and procedures. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was conducted at three secondary schools in the Midwestern USA. Administrators and teachers were interviewed, professional learning…

  1. Exploring the Evolving Professional Identity of Novice School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamgbose, Olamojiba Omolara

    2017-01-01

    The study employed a grounded theory approach to explore the evolving professional identity of novice school counselors. Participants, who are currently employed as school counselors at the elementary, middle, or high school level with 1-4 years' experience, were career changers from other helping professions and graduates from an intensive school…

  2. Accelerated Schools as Professional Learning Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Julie K.

    The goal of the Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) is to develop schools in which all children achieve at high levels and all members of the school community engage in developing and fulfilling the school's vision. But to fully implement the ASP model, a school must become a learning community that stresses relationships, shared values, and a…

  3. Students with Chronic Health Conditions: The Role of The School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Laurie G.; Mattern, Cheryl; Fleming, Laurie; Killingsworth, Suzie

    2017-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that to optimize student health, safety, and learning, a professional registered school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) be present all day, every day. The American Academy of Pediatrics' Council on School Health (2016) highlights the important role school nurses…

  4. Using Dance Therapy with High School Students: A Strategy for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibbaro, Julia S.; Holland, Charleta Reshae

    2013-01-01

    Professional school counselors are challenged to meet the needs of all students and need a variety of interventions enabling them to meet those needs. High school is a time when many adolescents struggle with social, emotional, and physical issues (Gysbers & Henderson, 2006). Ninth through twelfth grades are critical years of any teenager's…

  5. A course on professional development for astronomy graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Eileen D.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasingly wide-spread recognition in astronomy that professional training must broaden beyond its traditional approaches to academic classes and research. Many recent community advisory reports, including the National Academy of Sciences Decadal survey, Astro2010, recommend that graduate education accommodate the variety of career paths taken by graduates, taking into account the wide range of activities scientists engage in and the skills necessary to succeed in career options both inside and outside academia and specific scientific disciplines. In response to this need, Indiana University has recently offered a new graduate seminar in astronomy to provide this broader perspective and to prepare students for a variety of career paths after graduate school. The course uses a mixture of class discussion on selected topics supplemented by short readings, activities that prepare students for seeking employment and practice some necessary skills, and discussions with astronomers who have followed a variety of career paths. An important part of the seminar is the practical preparation of complete applications for typical positions students are likely to pursue following graduation, and the revision of these applications to be appropriate for a non-traditional career path. The goal of the course is to make students aware of the many options for careers that will be available to them and the skills that will be important for their success, and to equip students with strategies for following a personally satisfying career path.

  6. SOCIAL AND PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION OF THE OLD SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Plotnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The change in the conditions of the person's life activity and its innovative mentality intensified the problems of personal and professional self-determination. The senior school age is a period of primary, ambivalent options. At this age, the foundations of the moral attitude to different kinds of work are laid, the formation of a system of personal values that determine the selectivity of the attitude of high school students to various professions. The purpose of the study was to study the socio-pedagogical conditions for the vocational guidance of high school students. The object of research is the professional orientation of high school students. The subject of the study is the design of the socio-pedagogical conditions for the vocational guidance of high school students. The article analyzes the following social and pedagogical conditions for the vocational guidance of high school students: the development of individual abilities of schoolchildren, the expansion of differentiated education in accordance with their inclinations and educational needs, the development of a network of specialized classes with in-depth study of various subjects, ensuring the level of secondary education meets the requirements of scientific and technological progress. The authors emphasize that vocational guidance is one of the key functions of a basic school in modern conditions. It is the activities of vocational guidance that contribute to the adequate professional choice of schoolchildren, which gives them further success in life, and the labor market - specialists of the required quality and in the required quantity. Consequently, the effectiveness of this work requires regular evaluation through interviews with high-school students aimed at identifying their vocational and educational orientations and assessing the quality of career counseling services. Such studies are necessary to improve the quality of vocational guidance work carried out by schools.

  7. Improving of professional training of future primary school teachers by means of independent work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Інна Анатоліївна Нагрибельна

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue of independent professional and methodological training of future primary school teachers in the context of higher education reforming in Ukraine is analyzed in the article. The attention is focused on the role of independent work as an important means of students' professional development. The model of the individual work topic in the course "Methods of Teaching Ukrainian Language" is given

  8. School Students' Leisure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhenko, Liudmila Fedorovna

    1990-01-01

    Reports on a survey involving 700 students and 300 parents in Volgodonsk, Russia. Itemizes types of leisure activities and hours per week of leisure time enjoyed by students and examines amount of organized leisure. Notes that television viewing consumed much of students' leisure time. Underscores parents' critical influence in determining student…

  9. Vaccination policies among health professional schools: evidence of immunity and allowance of vaccination exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B; Libby, Tanya E; Lindley, Megan C; Ahmed, Faruque; Stevenson, John; Strikas, Raymond A

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize health professional schools by their vaccination policies for acceptable forms of evidence of immunity and exemptions permitted. METHODS Data were collected between September 2011 and April 2012 using an Internet-based survey e-mailed to selected types of accredited health professional programs. Schools were identified through accrediting associations for each type of health professional program. Analysis was limited to schools requiring ≥1 vaccine recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP): measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, varicella, pertussis, and influenza. Weighted bivariate frequencies were generated using SAS 9.3. RESULTS Of 2,775 schools surveyed, 75% (n=2,077) responded; of responding schools, 93% (1947) required ≥1 ACIP-recommended vaccination. The proportion of schools accepting ≥1 non-ACIP-recommended form of evidence of immunity varied by vaccine: 42% for pertussis, 37% for influenza, 30% for rubella, 22% for hepatitis B, 18% for varicella, and 9% for measles and mumps. Among schools with ≥1 vaccination requirement, medical exemptions were permitted for ≥1 vaccine by 75% of schools; 54% permitted religious exemptions; 35% permitted personal belief exemptions; 58% permitted any nonmedical exemption. CONCLUSIONS Many schools accept non-ACIP-recommended forms of evidence of immunity which could lead some students to believe they are protected from vaccine preventable diseases when they may be susceptible. Additional efforts are needed to better educate school officials about current ACIP recommendations for acceptable forms of evidence of immunity so school policies can be revised as needed.

  10. School Libraries and Student Learning: A Guide for School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Innovative, well-designed school library programs can be critical resources for helping students meet high standards of college and career readiness. In "School Libraries and Student Learning", Rebecca J. Morris shows how school leaders can make the most of their school libraries to support ambitious student learning. She offers…

  11. Professional Mentoring in Student Affairs: Evaluation of a Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mentoring, professional development, student affairs, global programme, ... multinational research report was released in 2014 profiling the educational ... associations play in providing those essential contacts and peer learning opportunities. ... admissions, academic success, student advising and career services to new ...

  12. Supporting students in professional socialisation: Guidelines for professional nurses and educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester Cathrina (Rina de Swardt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional socialisation of nursing students involves learning skills, attitudes, behaviour and professional roles, largely in the clinical area. During clinical accompaniment and reflective discussions with a group of undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing students in South Africa, students reported negative professional socialisation experiences, primarily in the clinical area. Such experiences could influence the quality of patient care. The objective of this study was to develop and validate guidelines to support professional nurses and educators in the professional socialisation of student nurses. Evidence was generated from an exploration and description of the perceptions of professional nurses regarding their role in the professional socialisation of students, the perceptions of nurse educators regarding the teaching and facilitation of professional socialisation of students, and the socialisation experiences of students. Following a sequential mixed-methods design, qualitative data guided the collection of quantitative data. All data and literature directed the development of these guidelines, which experts reviewed and validated according to a set of criteria. These guidelines focus on the clinical, nursing educational institution environment and values and beliefs of the nursing profession. Facilitation of sound work ethics, professional behaviour, cultural and gender awareness, role modelling and the application of a range of teaching strategies is proposed.

  13. Pre-Professional Ideologies and Career Trajectories of the Allied Professional Undergraduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Anesa; Rao, Namrata

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students sometimes pursue degrees that are aimed at allied jobs. This research examines how students in one allied professional degree, education studies, conceptualise their pre-professional ideology and how these ideologies relate to their intended career trajectory. The research draws upon a year-long qualitative survey of over 70…

  14. A Professor Returns to the Classroom in a Professional Development School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Lawrence

    This paper describes one professor's sabbatical leave, when he returned to a third/fourth grade classroom as a teacher. It examines logistical arrangements necessary for success and insights gained. He worked in a Professional Development School (PDS) for 1 year, mentoring a PDS intern, 2 student teachers in the traditional preservice program, and…

  15. University-School Collaboration as a Tool for Promoting Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Professional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Hulya; Tunc Pekkan, Zelha

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss pre-service mathematics teachers' professional gains from a university-school collaboration where they were given opportunity to observe two teacher educators' instructional practices in a 6th grade classroom, interact with students in one-to-one fashion and reflect on the teacher educators' and their own practices. Three…

  16. Staying Focused on What Really Matters: Further Thoughts on Empowerment Theory for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipolito-Delgado, Carlos P.; Lee, Courtland C.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide their reactions to the commentaries of Mitcham-Smith and Schmidt on their study. As Mitcham-Smith and Schmidt in their responses both suggest, it is evident that if professional school counselors are to be successful in facilitating the empowerment of students, they must engage in a self-reflective process…

  17. The Professional Development Needs of Special Needs Assistants in Irish Post-Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerins, Pauline; Casserly, Ann Marie; Deacy, Evelyn; Harvey, Deirdre; McDonagh, Dolores; Tiernan, Bairbre

    2018-01-01

    According to government policy in Ireland, special needs assistants (SNAs) may be employed in post-primary schools to support students deemed to have chronic and serious care needs. There is currently no national policy regarding the continuing professional development (CPD) of SNAs, to meet the requirements of their role. This study investigated…

  18. Professional Development for Secondary School Mathematics Teachers: A Peer Mentoring Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Professional development is important for all teachers, and in low socio-economic schools where the challenges of teaching are greater this need is crucial. A model involving a combination of one-on-one peer mentoring integrated with group peer mentoring was piloted with experienced mathematics teachers of senior students in low socio-economic…

  19. Multidisciplinary Professional Learning Communities in a Public High School: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    During professional development time in secondary schools, teachers often engage in peer exchanges that can have positive influence on instruction and learning, but often this time is focused within departmental groupings on content development without an emphasis on how to improve instruction through a more diverse student lens. This research…

  20. Preparing School Counselors to Support LGBT Youth: The Roles of Graduate Education and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Ryan M.; Kosciw, Joseph G.; Greytak, Emily A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether school counselors' LGBT-related graduate education and professional development predicted more frequent efforts to support LGBT students, and whether their LGBT-related self-efficacy mediated the relationship between their training experiences and supportive efforts. Results from ordinary least squares (OLS) regression…

  1. The Influence of Teacher Education on Mentor Teachers' Role Perception in Professional Development Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieger, Aviva; Oster-Levinz, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Apprenticeship and professional development schools (PDSs) are two models for teacher education. The mentors that are the focus for this research completed their initial teacher training through one of these models and now mentor in PDSs. The paper reports on how the way in which they were trained as student teachers influenced their role…

  2. Methods of Forming Professional Competence of Students as Future Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarov, Yessen B.; Toktarbayev, Darkhan Gabdyl-Samatovich; Rybin, Igor Vyacheslavovich; Saliyevaa, Aigul Zhanayevna; Zhumabekova, Fatima Niyazbekovna; Hamzina, Sholpan; Baitlessova, Nursulu; Sakenov, Janat

    2016-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of the problem of professional competence; a methodological basis of forming professional competence of college students as future teachers is established. The essence of professional competence is defined. The structure has been experimentally proved and developed; the contents, criteria and levels of professional…

  3. Conceptualizations of professional competencies in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2016-01-01

    by a theoretical perspective on health promotion agency and professional competencies to identify core competency domains and elements. This is followed by a discussion of focus, gaps, and links in conceptualizations of competency domains and elements. Findings: The synthesis identifies five core competency...... delineates an overall professional competency model for SHP, discusses the specific demands on professional competencies within this field in relation to this model, and addresses three critical gaps in the conceptualizations of competency. Keywords: Professionals, competence, school health promotion Paper......Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design: The paper is based a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided...

  4. Conceptualizations of professional competencies in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design: The paper is based a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided...... delineates an overall professional competency model for SHP, discusses the specific demands on professional competencies within this field in relation to this model, and addresses three critical gaps in the conceptualizations of competency. Keywords: Professionals, competence, school health promotion Paper...... by a theoretical perspective on health promotion agency and professional competencies to identify core competency domains and elements. This is followed by a discussion of focus, gaps, and links in conceptualizations of competency domains and elements. Findings: The synthesis identifies five core competency...

  5. Beyond the Professional Development School Model: The Professional Development District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Nancy Lourie; Whittaker, Andrea

    This paper examines the conditions of university/districtwide partnering that can aid systemic public education change. It introduces a university/school partnership known as the Triple "L" (Lifelong Learning and Leadership) Collaborative. The text details shared responsibility, shared accountability, alignment of teacher-performance standards,…

  6. The effects of professional development related to classroom assessment on student achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzie, Dawn Danielle

    This study investigated the relationship between students' standardized test scores in science and (a) increases in teacher assessment literacy and (b) teacher participation in a Teacher Quality Research (TQR) project on classroom assessment. The samples for these studies were teachers from underperforming schools who volunteered to take part in a professional development program in classroom assessment. School groups were randomly assigned to the treatment group. For Study 1, teachers in the treatment received professional development in classroom assessment from a trained assessment coach. Teachers in the control received no professional development. For Study 2, teachers in Treatment 1 received professional development in classroom assessment from a trained assessment coach and teachers in Treatment 2 received professional development in classroom assessment from a facilitator with one day of training. Teachers in both groups completed a measure of assessment literacy, the Teacher Quality Research Test of Assessment Literacy Skills (TQR_TALS), prior to the beginning and then again at the conclusion of the four month professional development program. A hierarchical linear model (HLM) analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between students' standardized test scores in science and (a) increases in teacher assessment literacy and (b) teacher TQR status. Based upon these analyses, the professional development program increased teachers' assessment literacy skills; however, the professional development had no significant impact on students' achievement.

  7. Multilevel Boundary Crossing in a Professional Development School Partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Sanne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217379788; Bruining, Ton

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand the recurrent challenges of professional development school (PDS) partnerships experienced by many countries. It does so by conceptualizing PDS partnerships as endeavors to cross institutionally and epistemologically developed boundaries between teacher education,

  8. Barriers to Chinese College Students Seeking Psychological Help from Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese students were found less likely to seek professional help for psychological problems compared to their western counterparts. The purpose of the present research was to investigate the barriers to Chinese college students seeking psychological help from professionals. Quantitative data on Asian values, social supports, self-stigma,…

  9. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  10. Professionalism, Portfolios and the Development of School Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Wallace, John

    1998-01-01

    Describes how two reforms--portfolio culture and teacher professionalism--converge in a systemwide program for school leaders' professional development. Investigates use of portfolios to help (Australian) principals, deputy principals, and department heads improve their performance and accountability. Participants used portfolios as evidence of…

  11. Students Who Self-Injure: School Counselor Ethical and Legal Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Kress, Victoria E.; Costin, Amanda; Drouhard, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    This article explores ethical considerations that school counselors may need to address when providing counseling services to self-injurious students. Ethical issues related to student confidentiality, responsibilities to parents and to the school, and professional competence are discussed in relation to the American School Counselor Association's…

  12. The School Psychology and Perception of Education Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Gravena Vanalli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at verifying the education professionals' perception about the performance of school psychologists. To attain this goal, 24 education professionals were interviewed, being 19 educators and five school psychologists from 11 private and public schools of two cities of São Paulo state. Based on descriptions about the psychologists' performance found in the literature, it is possible to compare them to the school psychologists' performance and to the education professionals' perception. From the data obtained, it was verified that the participants had knowledge, even though in a general perspective, about the performance area and considered important the service of those professionals to the school as an institution. However, it was noticed the difference of perception between the performances reported by the psychologists and these professionals' performance described by the other education professionals interviewed, seeming to generate dissatisfaction and possible conflicts. Therefore, it is necessary that the psychologist attributions become clearer and widespread so their interventions could match educators' expectations, provide satisfying results and be more frequently included in school institutions.

  13. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day? 36.82 Section 36.82 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  14. Professional development for teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing: facing the assessment challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities, such as students who are deaf or hard of hearing, face unique challenges in putting education policy into practice. The present article presents professional development findings from the Third Annual National Survey of Accommodations and Assessment for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (Cawthon, Hersh, Kim, & Online Research Lab, in press). A total of 391 participants described professional development they had experienced related to assessment of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Teachers reported greater exposure to topics in school/district sessions and discussion with their colleagues than in their preparation programs. Teaching at a school for the deaf or teaching students in high school were significant predictors of an increased prevalence of professional development opportunities on assessment-related topics for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  15. Secondary School Student's Attitude towards Consumer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Keywords: Consumer Education, Attitude, Home Economics, Secondary. School Students. ... Home Management taught at Senior Secondary School level. Today ..... indicate that facilities for teaching Consumer Education especially textbooks.

  16. The impact of professional identity on role stress in nursing students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Gao, Ying; Yang, Juan; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yao-Gang

    2016-11-01

    As newcomers to the clinical workplace, nursing students will encounter a high degree of role stress, which is an important predictor of burnout and engagement. Professional identity is theorised to be a key factor in providing high-quality care to improve patient outcomes and is thought to mediate the negative effects of a high-stress workplace and improve clinical performance and job retention. To investigate the level of nursing students' professional identity and role stress at the end of the first sub-internship, and to explore the impact of the nursing students' professional identity and other characteristics on role stress. A cross-sectional study. Three nursing schools in China. Nursing students after a 6-month sub-internship in a general hospital (n=474). The Role Stress Scale (score range: 12-60) and the Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing students (score range: 17-85) were used to investigate the levels of nursing students' role stress and professional identity. Higher scores indicated higher levels of role stress and professional identity. Basic demographic information about the nursing students was collected. The Pearson correlation, point-biserial correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to analyse the data. The mean total scores of the Role Stress Scale and Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing Students were 34.04 (SD=6.57) and 57.63 (SD=9.63), respectively. In the bivariate analyses, the following independent variables were found to be significantly associated with the total score of the Role Stress Scale: the total score of the Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing Students (r=-0.295, pNursing Students (standardised coefficient Beta: -0.260, pStress Scale. The multiple linear regression model explained 18.2% (adjusted R 2 scores 16.5%) of the Role Stress Scale scores variance. The nursing students' level of role stress at the end of the first sub-internship was high. The students with higher

  17. Professional Stereotypes of Interprofessional Education Naive Pharmacy and Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Maria Miller; Chesson, Melissa M; Harris, Elaine C; Ryan, Gina J

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To assess and compare interprofessional education (IPE) naive pharmacy and nursing student stereotypes prior to completion of an IPE activity. Methods. Three hundred and twenty-three pharmacy students and 275 nursing students at Mercer University completed the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire. Responses from pharmacy and nursing students were compared, and responses from different level learners within the same profession also were compared. Results. Three hundred and fifty-six (59.5%) students completed the survey. Pharmacy students viewed pharmacists more favorably than nursing students viewed pharmacists for all attributes except the ability to work independently. Additionally, nursing students viewed nurses less favorably than pharmacy students viewed nurses for academic ability and practical skills. There was some variability in stereotypes between professional years. Conclusion. This study confirms the existence of professional stereotypes, although overall student perceptions of their own profession and the other were generally positive.

  18. Professional Stereotypes of Interprofessional Education Naive Pharmacy and Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Maria Miller; Harris, Elaine C.; Ryan, Gina J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To assess and compare interprofessional education (IPE) naive pharmacy and nursing student stereotypes prior to completion of an IPE activity. Methods. Three hundred and twenty-three pharmacy students and 275 nursing students at Mercer University completed the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire. Responses from pharmacy and nursing students were compared, and responses from different level learners within the same profession also were compared. Results. Three hundred and fifty-six (59.5%) students completed the survey. Pharmacy students viewed pharmacists more favorably than nursing students viewed pharmacists for all attributes except the ability to work independently. Additionally, nursing students viewed nurses less favorably than pharmacy students viewed nurses for academic ability and practical skills. There was some variability in stereotypes between professional years. Conclusion. This study confirms the existence of professional stereotypes, although overall student perceptions of their own profession and the other were generally positive. PMID:28720912

  19. School Liability: Student to Student Injuries Involving Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettenhausen, Sherrie

    In the absence of immunity, courts have held schools and school personnel liable for personal injury by a student with a disability that resulted from negligent failure to provide a reasonable safe environment, failure to warn of known hazards, or failure to provide adequate supervision. Case law is presented to demonstrate the extent that school…

  20. Student and resident perspectives on professionalism: beliefs, challenges, and suggested teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily J; Bradley-Klug, Kathy L; Monroe, Alicia D H

    2014-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of medical students and residents regarding the practice of professionalism, their perceived challenges, and ideas for the development of a new curriculum in medical professionalism. Data were collected from four focus groups comprised of 27 residents and medical students recruited from the University of South Florida Morsani School of Medicine and Residency Programs between January and March 2012. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion. Data were transcribed for thematic analysis. Learners expressed beliefs regarding key attributes of professional behaviors, factors perceived to be associated with lapses of professional behavior, skills that need to be taught, and strategies to teach professionalism from the learners' perspective. Learners perceived that the values of professionalism are often disconnected from the reality evidenced in clinical training due to a myriad of personal and contextual challenges. Residents and students need help in negotiating some of the challenges to medical professionalism that are encountered in clinical settings. We recommend a learner's centered model of curriculum development in medical professionalism that takes into consideration perceived challenges and strategies for modeling and reinforcing medical professionalism.

  1. Collaborative Professional Development for Distributed Teacher Leadership towards School Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Auxiliadora; Moliner, Lidón; Francisco Amat, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Professional development that aims to build school change capacity requires spaces for collaborative action and reflection. These spaces should promote learning and foster skills for distributed leadership in managing school change. The present study analyses the case of the Seminar for Critical Citizenship (SCC) established by teachers of infant,…

  2. Conceptualizations of Professional Competencies in School Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided by a theoretical perspective on…

  3. Implementation of School Health Promotion: Consequences for Professional Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, N. M. W. M.; de Vries, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This case study aimed to examine the factors influencing the implementation of health promotion (HP) policies and programs in secondary schools and the consequences for professional assistance. Design/methodology/approach: Group interviews were held in two schools that represented the best and worst case of implementation of a health…

  4. School Principals in Spain: An Unstable Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritacco Real, Maximiliano; Bolívar Botía, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The article proposes an emerging approach in research on school leadership, within the framework of the "International Successful School Principalship Project (ISSPP)", where one of the three key research strands is "Principals' identities". It formulates, first, the theoretical framework for the professional identity from a…

  5. Professional Development Urban Schools: What Do Teachers Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tanya R.; Allen, Mishaleen

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative causal-comparative study compared perceptions of professional development opportunities between high-achieving and low-achieving elementary-middle school teachers in an urban school district using the Standards Assessment Inventory (SAI). A total of 271 teachers participated including 134 (n = 134) teachers from high-achieving…

  6. Principals' Perceptions of Public Schools' Professional Development Changes during NCLB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated public school principals' reports of professional development implementation at the school level while working in different state- and local-level contexts (state accountability level, geographic locations, socioeconomic status, demographics, and grade levels). I attempted to measure principals' reported changes in levels…

  7. Teacher Learning in Technology Professional Development and Its Impact on Student Achievement in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Longhurst, Max; Campbell, Todd

    2017-01-01

    This research investigated teacher learning and teacher beliefs in a two-year technology professional development (TPD) for teachers and its impact on their student achievement in science in the western part of the United States. Middle-school science teachers participated in TPD focused on information communication technologies (ICTs) and their…

  8. The Impact of a Teacher Professional Development Program on Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kristin; Shin, Seon-Hi; Hagans, Kristi S.; Cordova, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is associated with many positive outcomes, including academic achievement, school persistence, and social-emotional well-being. The present study examined whether the Freedom Writers Institute, a professional development program designed to improve teachers' skills in creating personalized learning environments, can increase…

  9. How Teachers Integrate a Math Computer Game: Professional Development Use, Teaching Practices, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, M. N.; Long, J. J.; van Es, E. A.; Reich, S. M.; Rutherford, T.

    2018-01-01

    As more attention is placed on designing digital educational games to align with schools' academic aims (e.g., Common Core), questions arise regarding how professional development (PD) may support teachers' using games for instruction and how such integration might impact students' achievement. This study seeks to (a) understand how teachers use…

  10. The efficacy beliefs of preservice science teachers in professional development school and traditional school settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Demetria Lynn

    Teachers' efficacy beliefs have been shown to correlate positively with to the successful implementation of science reform measures (National Research Council, 1996) and are context specific (Koul & Rubba, 1999). Studies on teacher efficacy in specific contexts have been conducted including the availability of resources and parent support (Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2002), classroom management (Emmer & Hickman, 1990; Raudenbush, Rowen, & Cheong, 1992); and institutional climate and behavior of the principal (Hoy & Woolfolk, 1993). The purpose of this study was to compare the science teaching efficacy beliefs of teacher interns prepared in professional development schools with those of student teachers prepared in traditional school settings. Other variables examined included academic level, academic major, and area of science concentration. Preservice science teacher efficacy beliefs were measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument for Preservice Science Teachers, STEBI Form B (Enoch & Riggs, 1990) with demographic information being collected by an accompanying questionnaire. Analyses included scoring the surveys on two scales, Personal Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Scale and the Outcome Expectancy Scale, calculating descriptive statistics, as well as performing MANOVAS and correlations. Results indicate that preservice science teachers working in professional development schools exhibit higher personal science teaching efficacy beliefs. This finding corroborates previous studies on the efficacy beliefs of preservice teachers working in PDS schools (Long, 1996; Sandholtz & Dadlez, 2000). Results also show a strong correlation between the personal science teaching efficacy beliefs and the setting where student teaching takes place. In addition, significant differences were found in the personal science teaching efficacy beliefs between elementary education majors and science majors, science education majors, and secondary education majors

  11. Impact of Pre-Pharmacy Work Experience on Development of Professional Identity in Student Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Timothy J; Smith, Jennifer D; Rich, Wesley

    2017-12-01

    Objective. To determine the benefit of pharmacy work experience on the development of student pharmacists' professional identity. Methods. Students in all four professional years were surveyed using a validated Professional Self-identity Questionnaire (PSIQ). They were also asked about pharmacy experience prior to matriculation and their performance on Drug Information tests given midway through the P1 year and at the beginning of the P3 year. PSIQ responses and test results were compared based on pharmacy experience. Results. The PSIQ was completed by 293 student pharmacists, for a 67% response rate, with 76% of respondents reporting pharmacy experience prior to matriculation. Statistically higher scores on responses to 6 of the 9 PSIQ Likert-type items were observed from students in the first professional year for those with pharmacy experience; however, only one item in the second year showed differences with none in the third and fourth years. No impact of experience was observed on Top 100 or Top 300 grades. Conclusion. Pre-matriculation pharmacy experience may increase development of professional identity early in the student experience but may have little impact on academic readiness. Schools and colleges of pharmacy hoping to recruit students with an early sense of professional identity should consider adding such experience to their admissions requirements.

  12. Analysis of the professional practice of social educators in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita González Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the social educator as a professional in the social education context who is qualified to carry out social education activities in schools, taking on functions aimed at resolving situations and problems that affect students and families. The main objective of this study was to see which professionals were responsible for attending to the socio-educational needs that arise in secondary schools in Spain’s different Autonomous Communities, and to analyse what functions they carry out. It is a descriptive-correlational study in which a digital questionnaire was given to a sampleof 440 agents of socio-educational intervention. Descriptive techniques of central tendency and dispersion as well as correlational and inferential techniques were used through non-parametric testing of hypotheses. The results show that the social educator is a professional that performs social-educational functions addressed to attending to situations of conflict or needon a more regular basis than other professionals who work in schools. The results show that the work of social educators focuses mainly on actions aimed at preventing absenteeism and controlling the students as they arrive at school, tasks of detection and prevention of risk factors, organising parents’ schools and information programmes, conflict mediation, development of communication programmes, socio-educational support and assessment for the educational community, and preparation of cultural events.

  13. Exploring educational interventions to facilitate health professional students' professionally safe online presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Marcus A; Hawken, Susan; MacDonald, Joanna; McKimm, Judy; Brown, Menna; Moriarty, Helen; Gasquoine, Sue; Chan, Kwong; Hilder, Jo; Wilkinson, Tim

    2017-09-01

    To establish the most effective approach and type of educational intervention for health professional students, to enable them to maintain a professionally safe online presence. This was a qualitative, multinational, multi-institutional, multiprofessional study. Practical considerations (availability of participants) led us to use a combination of focus groups and individual interviews, strengthening our findings by triangulating our method of data collection. The study gathered data from 57 nursing, medical and paramedical students across four sites in three countries (Aotearoa/New Zealand, Australia and Wales). A content analysis was conducted to clarify how and why students used Facebook and what strategies they thought might be useful to ensure professional usage. A series of emergent codes were examined and a thematic analysis undertaken from which key themes were crystallized. The results illuminated the ways in which students use social networking sites (SNS). The three key themes to emerge from the data analysis were negotiating identities, distancing and risks. Students expressed the wish to have material about professional safety on SNS taught to them by authoritative figures to explain "the rules" as well as by peers to assist with practicalities. Our interactive research method demonstrated the transformative capacity of the students working in groups. Our study supports the need for an educational intervention to assist health professional students to navigate SNS safely and in a manner appropriate to their future roles as health professionals. Because health professional students develop their professional identity throughout their training, we suggest that the most appropriate intervention incorporate small group interactive sessions from those in authority, and from peers, combined with group work that facilitates and enhances the students' development of a professional identity.

  14. The School Nurse's Role in Behavioral Health of Students. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Elizabeth; Bohnenkamp, Jill Haak; Freedland, Mary; Baker, Dian; Palmer, Karla

    2017-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that registered, professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in promoting positive behavioral health outcomes in students through evidence-based programs and curricula in schools and communities. Behavioral health is as critical to…

  15. Self-Efficacy and Burnout in Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between burnout and self-efficacy among school counselors. Also, the level of their burnout and self-efficacy was examined in terms of the social support, task perception and the number of students. A sample of 194 school counselors filled out the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The School Counselors…

  16. A Phenomenological Examination of Middle School African American Adolescent Men's Experiences with Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Ahmad Rashad

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study was conducted with a sample of five (5) middle school African American adolescent men from two different schools in the same school district to explore their perceptions of and experiences with their professional school counselors. Phenomenological qualitative methodology was used to complete this study. To gather research…

  17. The Schools Transgender Students Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In May 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Education issued guidance to schools intended to provide transgender students with safe and inclusive learning environments. On the heels of this guidance, Ellen Kahn, the Human Rights Campaign's director of Children, Youth, and Families Program, offers advice for educators…

  18. Professional identity in medical students: pedagogical challenges to medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ian; Cowin, Leanne S; Johnson, Maree; Young, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Professional identity, or how a doctor thinks of himself or herself as a doctor, is considered to be as critical to medical education as the acquisition of skills and knowledge relevant to patient care. This article examines contemporary literature on the development of professional identity within medicine. Relevant theories of identity construction are explored and their application to medical education and pedagogical approaches to enhancing students' professional identity are proposed. The influence of communities of practice, role models, and narrative reflection within curricula are examined. Medical education needs to be responsive to changes in professional identity being generated from factors within medical student experiences and within contemporary society.

  19. CONCEPT OF HEALTH: A STUDY WITH HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS AND STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Oliveira Ribeiro da Silva

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of a questionnaire, the degree of knowledge that pediatricians, maternal-infant health nurses and medical and nursing students have of the concept of health. Methods: It was a cross-sectional and prospective study, previously approved by UNIFENAS Committee on Ethics in Research, having been carried out with pediatricians (n=42, maternal-infant health nurses (n=69, medical students (n=118, and nursing students (n=68 from two southern towns of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, which have medical and nursing schools. A survey was done in hospitals, medical clinics, City Health Bureaus and universities to reach the total number of students and professionals, weighing the possibility of a professional working in more than a job. The replies were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. For the open questions the contents analysis was used, according to BARDIN (1977. The data were presented in table. Results: According to the answer of 71,74% of the pediatricians 72,60% of the maternal-infant unit nurses, 77,77% of the medical school students and 63,76% of the nursing school students, health is a total physical, mental and social well-being. Health was also found to be a balance between the body and its environment by 10,87% of the pediatricians, 10,95% of the maternal-infant unit nurses, 15.07% of the medical school students and 18,84% of the nursing school students. Conclusions: The difficulty to define health is well known, once it is a condition with different meanings. The notions of health and disease are strongly influenced by the cultural context in which they occur. The binomial health / disease is not related only to microorganisms, but also to socioeconomic, political and educational issue, and, the students as well as the health professionals are committed with this new health concept.

  20. Challenges for Teachers in Developing their Teaching Professionalism: A Case Study of Secondary School in Makassar, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Tanang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying challenges for teachers in developing their professionalism in teaching to improve students’ learning outcomes. The focus was addressed on the development of teaching professionalism in improving knowledge and skills of Junior High School teachers in Makassar Indonesia. This study employed qualitative methods through a case study to identify the barriers of professionalism in teaching. 36 samples for open-ended questionnaire and nine of them are selected purposively to be interviewed. The data was analyzed by coding based on themes related to constraints in teaching management. The results showed four obstacles experienced by teachers in developing their professionalism, namely constraints on textbooks and student worksheets, school laboratory usage, ICT-based media, and the students themselves. The identification could encourage the community and parents support to finance the development of professionalism in teaching and to help the teachers work effectively

  1. Elm Street School:A Case Study of Professional Development Expenditures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Alix Gallagher

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the question of how much is spent on teachers' professional development.  A review of the literature finds two problems that have frequently led to inaccurate estimates of professional development spending: 1 the accounting codes that are used in many studies provide little description of spending, and 2 studies generally focus on district or state expenditures for professional development, but do not collect data on school-level spending.  These problems are compounded by the fact that studies define professional development spending differently, and thus it is difficult to compare findings across studies.  In an effort to begin to address this problem, this study utilizes a detailed cost structure to analyze both district and school site expenditures on professional development across cost categories.  The study found that school-level expenditures were a significant source of professional development for teachers.  This has implications for the methodologies used to estimate current professional development expenditures and what level of expenditures would be necessary to generate dramatic improvements in student achievement.

  2. Integrating Professional Development into STEM Graduate Programs: Student-Centered Programs for Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, L.; McCay, D.; Driscoll, C. T.; Glas, R. L.; Gutchess, K. M.; Johnson, A.; Millard, G.

    2017-12-01

    Recognizing that over half of STEM Ph.D. graduates are finding work outside of academia, a new, NSF-funded program at Syracuse University, EMPOWER (or Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research) is encouraging its graduate students to take ownership of their graduate program and design it to meet their anticipated needs. Launched in 2016, EMPOWER's goal is to prepare graduate students for careers in the water-energy field by offering targeted workshops, professional training coursework, a career capstone experience, a professional development mini-grant program, and an interdisciplinary "foundations" seminar. Through regular student feedback and program evaluation, EMPOWER has learned some important lessons this first year: career options and graduate students' interests are diverse, requiring individualized programs designed to meet the needs of prospective employers and employees; students need exposure to the range of careers in their field to provide a roadmap for designing their own graduate school experience; effective programs nurture a culture that values professional development thereby giving students permission to pursue career paths and professional development opportunities that meet their own needs and interests; and existing university resources support the effective and efficient integration of professional development activities into graduate programs. Many of the positive outcomes experienced by EMPOWER students may be achieved in departmental graduate programs with small changes to their graduate curricula.

  3. Teaching Research Methodologies to Professionally Oriented Honors Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Julie; Mandel, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of encouraging undergraduate students to pursue independent research have been well documented (Craney; Guterman; Hathaway et al.; Ishiyama; Kremer and Bringle; Volkwein and Carbone). Introducing students to research processes and protocols is always a challenge, particularly for students enrolled in professionally oriented,…

  4. Helping Competencies of Student Affairs Professionals: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather student affairs professionals' perceptions of the knowledge and skills needed to effectively help students. Using the Delphi method, 159 entry-level and mid-level student affairs administrators from institutions across the United States were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the helping skills they use…

  5. School lunch waste among middle school students: nutrients consumed and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Richardson, Scott; Austin, S Bryn; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2013-02-01

    The National School Lunch Program has been guided by modest nutrient standards, and the palatability of meals, which drives consumption, receives inadequate attention. School food waste can have important nutritional and cost implications for policymakers, students, and their families. Nutrient losses and economic costs associated with school meal waste were examined. The study also assessed if school foods served were valid proxies for foods consumed by students. Plate waste measurements were collected from middle school students in Boston attending two Chef Initiative schools (n=1609) and two control schools (n=1440) during a 2-year pilot study (2007-2009) in which a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to make healthier school meals. The costs associated with food waste were calculated and the percentage of foods consumed was compared with a gold standard of 85% consumption. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. Overall, students consumed less than the required/recommended levels of nutrients. An estimated $432,349 of food (26.1% of the total food budget) was discarded by middle school students annually at lunch in these Boston middle schools. For most meal components, substantially less than 85% was consumed. There is substantial food waste among middle school students in Boston. Overall, students' nutrient consumption levels were below school meal standards, and foods served were not valid proxies for foods consumed. The costs associated with discarded foods are high; if translated nationally for school lunches, roughly $1,238,846,400 annually is wasted. Students might benefit if additional focus were given to the quality and palatability of school meals. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. School Lunch Waste among Middle School Students: Implications for Nutrients Consumed and Food Waste Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F.W.; Richardson, Scott; Austin, S. Bryn; Economos, Christina D.; Rimm, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The National School Lunch Program has been guided by modest nutrient standards, and the palatability of meals, which drives consumption, receives inadequate attention. School food waste can have important nutritional and cost implications for policy makers, students, and their families. Purpose Nutrient losses and economic costs associated with school meal waste were examined. The study also assessed if school foods served were valid proxies for foods consumed by students. Methods Plate waste measurements were collected from middle school students in Boston attending two Chef Initiative schools (n=1609) and two control schools (n=1440) during a two-year pilot study (2007-2009) where a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to make healthier school meals. The costs associated with food waste were calculated and the percent of foods consumed was compared with a gold standard of 85% consumption. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. Results Overall, students consumed less than the required/recommended levels of nutrients. An estimated $432,349 of food (26.1% of the total food budget) was discarded by middle school students annually at lunch in Boston middle schools. For most meal components, significantly less than 85% was consumed. Conclusions There is substantial food waste among middle school students in Boston. Overall, students' nutrient consumption levels were below school meal standards and foods served were not valid proxies for foods consumed. The costs associated with discarded foods are high; if translated nationally for school lunches, roughly $1,238,846,400 annually is wasted. Students would benefit if additional focus was given to the quality and palatability of school meals. PMID:23332326

  7. Are Student Communications with School Psychologists Legally Privileged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ross; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2017-01-01

    As a trusted link between district personnel, students, and their families, school psychologists often have questions about whether their communications are privileged like those of other professionals. In some jurisdictions, state statutes and common, or case, law recognize privileged communications for certain specified paired roles, including…

  8. Students with Pediatric Cancer: A Prescription for School Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Genevieve H.; Nabors, Martha L.; Sullivan, Alexandra; Zygmund, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    Due to medical advances, many students with acute chronic illnesses, like pediatric cancer, are able to attend school. The professional literature reflects the need for reform of educational strategies for children facing cancer treatment and who will be absent for extended periods of time. In order to promote successful educational services and…

  9. The Development and Impact of a Social Media and Professionalism Course for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandra W; Butera, Gisela; Chretien, Katherine C; Kind, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate social media behavior can have detrimental effects on students' future opportunities, but medical students are given little opportunity to reflect upon ways of integrating their social media identities with their newly forming professional identities. In 2012, a required educational session was developed for 1st-year medical students on social media and professional identity. Objectives include identifying professionalism issues and recognizing positive social media use. The 2-hour large-group session uses student-generated social media examples to stimulate discussion and concludes with an expert panel. Students complete a postsession reflection assignment. The required social media session occurs early in the 1st year and is part of the Professionalism curriculum in The George Washington University School of Medicine. Reflection papers are graded for completion. The study began in 2012 and ran through 2014; a total of 313/505 participants (62%) volunteered for the study. Assessment occurred through qualitative analysis of students' reflection assignments. Most students (65%, 203/313) reported considering changes in their social media presence due to the session. The analysis revealed themes relating to a broader understanding of online identity and opportunities to enhance careers. In a 6-month follow-up survey of 76 students in the 2014 cohort who completed the entire survey, 73 (94%) reported some increase in awareness, and 48 (64%) made changes to their social media behavior due to the session (response rate = 76/165; 46%), reflecting the longer term impact. Opportunities for discussion and reflection are essential for transformational learning to occur, enabling understanding of other perspectives. Incorporating student-submitted social media examples heightened student interest and engagement. The social media environment is continually changing, so curricular approaches should remain adaptable to ensure timeliness and relevance. Including

  10. There's a New Alphabet in Town: ESSA and Its Implications for Students, Schools, and School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackborow, Mary; Clark, Elizabeth; Combe, Laurie; Morgitan, Judith; Tupe, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The 2015 passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) provides state education agencies with more local control over educational planning, requires development of state accountability plans, and provides opportunities for advocacy surrounding school nursing-sensitive indicators of student success. Federal Title I, II, and IV funds are available for state and local education agency utilization in meeting educational needs of impoverished students and for development of high-quality instructional and support personnel. As Specialized Instructional Support Personnel, school nurses can utilize ESSA Title funding to positively impact chronic absenteeism, school climate, and school nurse staffing. ESSA can be a resource for funding school health services and professional education. This article will assist school nurses in better understanding ESSA and how funding is allocated to states and local education agencies.

  11. School Psychology 2010--Part 2: School Psychologists' Professional Practices and Implications for the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Every 5 years, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) conducts a national study of the field. Surveys are sent to randomly selected regular members of NASP to gather information on school psychologists' demographic characteristics, context for professional practices, and professional practices. The latest iteration of the national…

  12. Serving Fish in School Meals: Perceptions of School Nutrition Professionals in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T.; Pickus, Hayley A.; Contesti, Amy; Dawson, Jo; Bersamin, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Fish and other seafood high in omega-3 fats are important components of a healthy diet. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions regarding serving fish in school meals among nutrition professionals in Alaska. Methods: Interviews with 22 school nutrition professionals in Alaska were conducted to investigate the…

  13. School Uniform Policies: Students' Views of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Teresa M.; Moreno, Josephine

    2001-01-01

    Focus-group interviews of New York City middle-school students about their perceptions of the effectiveness of the school-uniform policy. Finds that students' perceptions of the effects of school-uniform policy on school culture varied considerably with those intended by the principal. (Contains 40 references.) (PKP)

  14. Negotiating School Conflicts to Prevent Student Delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cecco, John P.; Roberts, John K.

    One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter presents a model of negotiation as a means to resolve school conflict. The assumption is that school conflict is inevitable, but student delinquency is not. Delinquent behavior results from the way that the school deals with conflict. Students resort to…

  15. Professional Issues in School Counseling and Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents and has become a public health concern in the United States. In addition, certain groups of students are more at risk for suicide than others. School counselors have an ethical obligation to protect their students and are in an ideal position to educate students and staff about the risks…

  16. Student nurses as school nurse extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Carol L; Dood, Florence V; Squires, Darcy A

    2012-12-01

    The severe underuse of school nurses leaves students with unaddressed health needs that impact their safety and learning ability. An undergraduate pediatric clinical focusing on nursing students and the role of a school nurse in an elementary school setting can be a unique approach to combining the needs of school children and educating student nurses. One school of nursing created such a project to help address these needs and collect data on the activities student nurses performed in school nurse role and their impact on student health. This project serves as both a practice improvement project and an innovation in pediatric clinical education. The purposes of this project were to quantify baccalaureate nursing student activities related to the school nurse role and to evaluate the results that have the potential to impact on student health in an urban elementary school. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of analytical competencies and professional identities through school-based learning in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Bent B.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the main results of a case study on teachers' professional development in terms of competence and identity. The teachers involved in the study are allocated time by their schools to participate in professional "affinity group" meetings. During these meetings, the teachers gather and analyse school-based data about factors which persistently create and sustain challenges in effective student education (grade K-10). This process improves their understanding and undertaking of job-related tasks. The affinity group meetings also influence the teachers' professional identity. The research findings thus illustrate the fact that the analytical approach of affinity groups, based on the analysis of the difficulties in their daily job, provides good results in terms of competencies and identity perception. In general, as a result of meeting in affinity groups, adult learners develop professional competencies and identities which are considered crucial in rapidly changing schools characterised by an increased focus on, among other things, lifelong learning, social inclusion, school digitalisation, and information literacy. The research findings are thus relevant for ministries and school owners, teacher-trainers and supervisors, schools and other educational institutions, as well as teachers and their organisations worldwide.

  18. Photoelectric professional students in common universities cultivate way to explore under the background of professional certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-jun; Wang, Li; Leng, Yan-bing

    2017-08-01

    In view of the engineering education professional certification of specialty construction and the specific requirements of the training system, combining with our school optoelectronic information science and engineering characteristics, analysis of the optoelectronic information science and engineering in our school problems and challenges, to locate the specific professional training objectives. From the service oriented industry demand for talent ability, at the same time, according to the ministry of education professional norms of the development of the photoelectric teaching steering committee, and the professional development and the characteristics of target, to build a set to conform to the goal of cultivating the professional curriculum system. At the same time set up a from fundamental to professional practice teaching system, covers the course experiment, course design, case teaching, comprehensive training, such as graduation design practice. Which implements a whole ability training from the practice of foundation to high-end chain, embodies the training goal emphasize "outstanding practical skills, quality education is distinct culture characteristic. By further speed up the professional construction, professional certification standards to standardize our training process, improved the level of professional training, and improve the comprehensive quality of the graduates and talent of social competitiveness, fostered more professional talents for the country.

  19. School Related Alienation: Perceptions of Secondary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Richard C.; And Others

    Responses to questionnaires administered to 10,000 senior high school students to ascertain their feelings of alienation as related to their schools are presented. The questionnaire items concerned: School as an Institution, The School as Teacher, Authority--Autonomy, and Parental Interest in School. The findings that resulted from the…

  20. Internship programmes – bridge between school and professional life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goia Agoston Simona Irina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available All stakeholders involved in the academic educational process (e.g. students, universities, organizations, state institutions have a direct interest in developing appropriate skills among students aimed at increasing their employability chances on the very competitive labour market and in the same time lessening the transition from school to professional life. Qualitative internship programs are considered a useful instrument which can be used in order to achieve the aforementioned objective. In the last years in Romania this field boomed, many internship programs emerged and were developed and tailored according to specific needs of certain domains. This growth was triggered of one hand side by the initiatives of the socio-economic environment but also by incentives offered by the public sector in form of financing the development of such programs in universities. Which are the main characteristics of internship programs? How are they identified and structured? Which are the factors that influence their quality from students’ perspective? What strategies and measures can be adopted in order to improve the quality of internship programs? The present paper aims at addressing the above questions by analysing the responses of over 450 students which were surveyed within a questionnaire based research conducted in the Bucharest University of Economic Studies in Romania. Various research methods – starting with the analysis of descriptive statistics and continuing with factor analysis and regression analysis- were used in order offer an overview – as comprehensible as possible- of the situation of internship programs in various sectors in the field of business, economics and administration. The outcomes of the study can be of interest for several groups of stakeholders and can be taken into consideration when formulating and proposing improvement recommendations of the policies, regulations and operational measures in this field.

  1. A Digital Ethnography of Medical Students who Use Twitter for Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Katherine C; Tuck, Matthew G; Simon, Michael; Singh, Lisa O; Kind, Terry

    2015-11-01

    While researchers have studied negative professional consequences of medical trainee social media use, little is known about how medical students informally use social media for education and career development. This knowledge may help future and current physicians succeed in the digital age. We aimed to explore how and why medical students use Twitter for professional development. This was a digital ethnography. Medical student "superusers" of Twitter participated in the study The postings ("tweets") of 31 medical student superusers were observed for 8 months (May-December 2013), and structured field notes recorded. Through purposive sampling, individual key informant interviews were conducted to explore Twitter use and values until thematic saturation was reached (ten students). Three faculty key informant interviews were also conducted. Ego network and subnetwork analysis of student key informants was performed. Qualitative analysis included inductive coding of field notes and interviews, triangulation of data, and analytic memos in an iterative process. Twitter served as a professional tool that supplemented the traditional medical school experience. Superusers approached their use of Twitter with purpose and were mindful of online professionalism as well as of being good Twitter citizens. Their tweets reflected a mix of personal and professional content. Student key informants had a high number of followers. The subnetwork of key informants was well-connected, showing evidence of a social network versus information network. Twitter provided value in two major domains: access and voice. Students gained access to information, to experts, to a variety of perspectives including patient and public perspectives, and to communities of support. They also gained a platform for advocacy, control of their digital footprint, and a sense of equalization within the medical hierarchy. Twitter can serve as a professional tool that supplements traditional education. Students

  2. Addressing Student Burnout: What Medical Schools Can Learn From Business Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S; Cassel, Christine K

    2018-03-13

    Although they enter school with enthusiasm for a career in medicine, medical students in the United States subsequently report high levels of burnout and disillusionment. As medical school leaders consider how to address this problem, they can look to business schools as one source of inspiration. In this Commentary, the authors argue-based on their collective experience in both medical and business education-that medical schools can draw three lessons from business schools that can help reinvigorate students. First, medical schools should offer more opportunities and dedicated time for creative work. Engaging with diverse challenges promotes intellectual curiosity and can help students maintain perspective. Second, schools should provide more explicit training in resiliency and the management of stressful situations. Many business programs include formal training in how to cope with conflict and how to make high-stakes decisions whereas medical students are typically expected to learn those skills on the job. Finally, medical schools should provide better guidance on practical career considerations like income, lifestyle, and financial skills. Whether in medicine or business, students benefit from open discussions about their personal and professional goals. Medical schools must ensure students have an outlet for those conversations.

  3. Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background This study investigated whether the introduction of professional development teaching in the first two years of a medical course improved students' observed communication skills with simulated patients. Students' observed communication skills were related to patient-centred attitudes, confidence in communicating with patients and performance in later clinical examinations. Methods Eighty-two medical students from two consecutive cohorts at a UK medical school completed two videoed consultations with a simulated patient: one at the beginning of year 1 and one at the end of year 2. Group 1 (n = 35) received a traditional pre-clinical curriculum. Group 2 (n = 47) received a curriculum that included communication skills training integrated into a 'professional development' vertical module. Videoed consultations were rated using the Evans Interview Rating Scale by communication skills tutors. A subset of 27% were double-coded. Inter-rater reliability is reported. Results Students who had received the professional development teaching achieved higher ratings for use of silence, not interrupting the patient, and keeping the discussion relevant compared to students receiving the traditional curriculum. Patient-centred attitudes were not related to observed communication. Students who were less nervous and felt they knew how to listen were rated as better communicators. Students receiving the traditional curriculum and who had been rated as better communicators when they entered medical school performed less well in the final year clinical examination. Conclusions Students receiving the professional development training showed significant improvements in certain communication skills, but students in both cohorts improved over time. The lack of a relationship between observed communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may be a reflection of students' inexperience in working with patients, resulting in 'patient-centredness' being an abstract concept

  4. Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubacki Angela M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated whether the introduction of professional development teaching in the first two years of a medical course improved students' observed communication skills with simulated patients. Students' observed communication skills were related to patient-centred attitudes, confidence in communicating with patients and performance in later clinical examinations. Methods Eighty-two medical students from two consecutive cohorts at a UK medical school completed two videoed consultations with a simulated patient: one at the beginning of year 1 and one at the end of year 2. Group 1 (n = 35 received a traditional pre-clinical curriculum. Group 2 (n = 47 received a curriculum that included communication skills training integrated into a 'professional development' vertical module. Videoed consultations were rated using the Evans Interview Rating Scale by communication skills tutors. A subset of 27% were double-coded. Inter-rater reliability is reported. Results Students who had received the professional development teaching achieved higher ratings for use of silence, not interrupting the patient, and keeping the discussion relevant compared to students receiving the traditional curriculum. Patient-centred attitudes were not related to observed communication. Students who were less nervous and felt they knew how to listen were rated as better communicators. Students receiving the traditional curriculum and who had been rated as better communicators when they entered medical school performed less well in the final year clinical examination. Conclusions Students receiving the professional development training showed significant improvements in certain communication skills, but students in both cohorts improved over time. The lack of a relationship between observed communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may be a reflection of students' inexperience in working with patients, resulting in 'patient-centredness' being

  5. Professional values and career choice of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaya, Sultan Ayaz; Yaman, Şengül; Simones, Joyce

    2018-03-01

    Professional values are abstract and general behavioral principles that provide basic standards to judge aims and actions, and these principles are formed by strong emotional loyalty of members of the profession. Research was conducted to compare the career choice and professional values of nursing students at two universities in the upper Midwest of the United States and in the middle of Turkey. A descriptive and comparative design was used. The participants of the study were comprised nursing students from a university in the upper Midwest of United States and a university in the middle of Turkey. The sample consisted of 728 students in all grades. Data were collected by a questionnaire, The Nurses Professional Values Scale-Revised and Vocational Choices in Entering Nursing Scale. Number, percentage distribution, mean, standard deviation, t test, and one-way variance analysis were used in the analysis of data. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Commission. Informed consent was received from the students. The students' mean age for American students was 24.3 ± 5.6 years, while the mean age for Turkish students was 19.8 ± 1.7 years. Mean score of American students on The Vocational Congruency (a subgroup of the Vocational Choices in Entering Nursing Scale) was 38.5 ± 5.9 and Turkish students was 29.6 ± 8.9 (p Values Scale-Revised was 109.2 ± 12.3 and that of Turkish students was 101.6 ± 17.0. This study concluded that the majority of nursing students had high professional values, and when students' scores were compared, American students had higher professional values, and in career choice, they considered primarily fitness of the profession to themselves and their goals, while Turkish students primarily thought of their living conditions.

  6. Reflecting on BCMP students' experiences of professionalism during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... in training, and should be trained in the same environment in which they ... Negative experiences of professionalism (46.2%) were context-specific and perceived by students ..... Dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the.

  7. Grounding formative assessment in high-school chemistry classrooms: Connections between professional development and teacher practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisterna Alburquerque, Dante Igor

    This study describes and analyzes the experiences of two high-school chemistry teachers who participated in a team-based professional development program to learn about and enact formative assessment in their classrooms. The overall purpose of this study is to explain how participation in this professional development influenced both teachers' classroom enactment of formative assessment practices. This study focuses on 1) teachers' participation in the professional development program, 2) teachers' enactment of formative assessment, and 3) factors that enabled or hindered enactment of formative assessment. Drawing on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) and using evidence from teacher lessons, teacher interviews, professional development meetings as data sources, this single embedded case study analyzes how these two teachers who participated in the same learning team and have similar characteristics (i.e., teaching in the same school, teaching the same courses and population of students, and using the same materials) differentially used the professional development learning about formative assessment as mediating tools to improve their classroom instruction. The learning team experience contributed to both teachers' development of a better understanding of formative assessment---especially in recognizing that their current grading and assessment practices were not appropriate to promote student learning---and the co-creation of artifacts to gather evidence of students' ideas. Although both teachers demonstrated understanding about how formative assessment may serve to promote student learning and had a set of tools available to utilize for formative assessment use, they did not enact these tools in the same way. One teacher appropriated formative assessment as mediating tool to verify if the students were following her explanations, and to check if the students were able to provide the correct response. The other teacher used the mediating tool to promote

  8. Listening to Students from Refugee Backgrounds: Lessons for Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthethwa-Sommers, Shirley; Kisiara, Otieno

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a study that examined how students from refugee backgrounds cope with victimization and bullying in three urban high schools in the United States. Qualitative methods of data collection and analysis were employed. Twelve high school students from refugee backgrounds participated in the study, which involved focus group…

  9. Promoting healthy computer use among middle school students: a pilot school-based health promotion program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Marina; Portsmouth, Linda; Harris, Courtenay; Jacobs, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of notebook computers in many schools has become integral to learning. This has increased students' screen-based exposure and the potential risks to physical and visual health. Unhealthy computing behaviours include frequent and long durations of exposure; awkward postures due to inappropriate furniture and workstation layout, and ignoring computer-related discomfort. Describe the framework for a planned school-based health promotion program to encourage healthy computing behaviours among middle school students. This planned program uses a community- based participatory research approach. Students in Year 7 in 2011 at a co-educational middle school, their parents, and teachers have been recruited. Baseline data was collected on students' knowledge of computer ergonomics, current notebook exposure, and attitudes towards healthy computing behaviours; and teachers' and self-perceived competence to promote healthy notebook use among students, and what education they wanted. The health promotion program is being developed by an inter-professional team in collaboration with students, teachers and parents to embed concepts of ergonomics education in relevant school activities and school culture. End of year changes in reported and observed student computing behaviours will be used to determine the effectiveness of the program. Building a body of evidence regarding physical health benefits to students from this school-based ergonomics program can guide policy development on the healthy use of computers within children's educational environments.

  10. The perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The purpose of the study was to explore the perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in clinical areas. A qualitative hermeneutic phenomenological research was conducted to determine the meaning of mentoring as perceived by professional nurses and to identify the successes and challenges ...

  11. Professionalism in Student Online Social Networking: The Role of Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, A.; Kienhuis, M.; Pisani, H.; Shahwan-Akl, L.; White, K.

    2013-01-01

    Social media now form a common part of university students' experience. Both at university and after graduation, in their personal and professional lives, social media offer opportunities for connection previously unavailable. The ubiquitous nature of social networking has brought with it professional and ethical issues that need to be…

  12. Pre-Licensed Nursing Students Rate Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garee, Denise L.

    2016-01-01

    Ethical decision making of new nurses relies on professional values and moral development obtained during training. This descriptive, comparative study demonstrated the importance values attributed to the items of the Nurses' Professional Values Scale-Revised (Weis & Schank, 2009), by a sample of senior ADN and BSN students from across the…

  13. Student Preparation for Professional Practice in Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Jennifer R.; Coufal, Kathy L.; Subramanian, Anu

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of students for professional practice in the field of early intervention has changed as a result of mandates through Part C, Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The purpose of this survey research was to describe the knowledge and skill areas, specific to early intervention, included in pre-professional curricula…

  14. Graduate Students' Perceptions of Professional Power in Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly; Quijano, Louise M.; Bubar, Roe

    2013-01-01

    The study of ways that professional power is perceived in social work practice is limited. This exploratory qualitative study analyzes second-year MSW students' perceptions of professional power in social work practice. This inquiry is guided by social constructivism and symbolic interactionism perspectives. The authors used constant comparison…

  15. Professional Values Among Female Nursing Students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allari, Rabia S; Ismaile, Samantha; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Professional values are essential to nursing practice because they guide standards for working, provide a structure for evaluating behavior, and influence decisions making. The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of Saudi female nursing students on professional values and to assess the correlation between their perception of professional values in relation to their year of academic studies. We used a cross-sectional descriptive study where a survey was administered to 150 Saudi female nurses living in Riyadh. Results show that Saudi female nurses have a high perception of professional values relating to confidentiality, privacy, moral and legal rights, health and safety, and the work environment. Whereas Saudi nursing students have a low perception for participating in professional nursing activities, utilizing research in practice, peer review, public policy, and engaging in on-going self-evaluation. There was positive correlation between different professional values and academic years. The highest correlations were for the items related to caring and trust more than activism because nursing students at higher academic levels viewed the relationship with patients as more important than advancing health care systems through public policy, research, and professional organizations. In conclusion, nursing program administrators should put emphasis on improving the development of professional values through a role modeling approach to promote activism and professional values through the arrangement of meetings, exchange forums, and conferences with other nurses, managers, policy makers, innovators, and researchers within the nursing field.

  16. Social and physiological peculiarities and professional orientation of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Toussova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes personality features, self-regulation patterns and professional orientation of medical students. It represents the results of the study conducted among the fourth year students. The sample is characterized with high enough behavior regulation, extraversion, high learning potential, flexible thinking, following intuition and personal opinion in profession choice. High anxiety as personality feature and stress vulnerability is typical for female students; independence tendency is typical for male students.

  17. Connecting Scientists, College Students, Middle School Students & Elementary Students through Intergenerational Afterschool STEM Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Paglierani, R.; Raftery, C. L.; Romero, V.; Harper, M. R.; Chilcott, C.; Peticolas, L. M.; Hauck, K.; Yan, D.; Ruderman, I.; Frappier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Multiverse education group at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Lab created the NASA-funded "Five Stars Pathway" model in which five "generations" of girls and women engage in science together in an afterschool setting, with each generation representing one stage in the pathway of pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM). The five stages are: elementary-age students, middle-school-age students, undergraduate-level college students, graduate-level college students and professional scientists. This model was field-tested at two Girls Inc. afterschool locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and distributed to Girls Inc. affiliates and other afterschool program coordinators nationwide. This presentation will explore some of the challenges and success of implementing a multigenerational STEM model as well as distributing the free curriculum for interested scientists and college students to use with afterschool programs.

  18. Nursing Students' Use of Electronic and Social Media: Law, Ethics, and E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the promotion of professionalism in nursing students with regard to the use of electronic and social media. Misuse of social media can lead to disciplinary actions and program dismissal for students and to legal actions and lawsuits for nursing programs. Programs are concemed about breaches of patient confidentiality and release of private or inappropriate information that jeopardizes clinical placements and relationships. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and National Council of State Boards of Nursing social media guidelines provide a foundation for promoting e-professionalism in students. Recent law cases involving students who were dismissed from nursing programs due to social media misuse are analyzed. Schools need policies that clearly establish expectations and the consequences of misuse of social media platforms. Lessons learned from the legal cases presented provide further guidance for both nursing students and nursing programs.

  19. General and professional values of student nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Karosas, Laima; Kaseliene, Snieguole

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and compare the self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators in Lithuania. Contemporary nursing requires strong moral motivation and clear values as nurses confront many ethical dilemas in their practice. Students acquire essential values of the nursing profession through the appropriate role modelling of their educators. Nursing students seek to become capable in providing ethical and professional patient care while their educators attempt to model desired behaviours. A national cross-sectional comparative study was carried out in March 2011. Four-hundred eight respondents participated: 316 undergraduate nursing students and 92 nurse educators. A 57-item questionnaire was delivered to nursing programs at three universities and six colleges. Permission to conduct the study was granted by The Center on Bioethics. Student nurses and their educators rated the general value of altruism equally. Educators, in comparison with students, ranked honesty and intellectualism significantly higher and more often admired truth-telling in any circumstance. Students were more likely to avoid intellectual challenges in reading and placed lower importance on academic qualifications for career advancement. The professional nursing values of honesty, intellectualism and authority were ranked significantly higher by nurse educators than student nurses. The study revealed differences in self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators. The values of nurse educators were not always stronger than those of students. Positive relationships between particular general and professional values in both students and educators confirmed the link between professional and personal values. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Creating intentionally inviting schools through professional development: an appreciative inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Steyn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The professional development (PD of teachers plays an important role in schools; it is indispensable for continuous school development. When schools are exposed to new approaches to learning and teaching, teachers are granted the opportunities to change their thinking and behaviour. In 2009, two South African schools with specific inviting characteristics were nominated for the inviting school award given by the International Alliance for Invitational Education (IAIE. However, the inviting characteristics of these schools were not explicitly intentional according to the IE philosophy, therefore they had to follow a professional development programme aimed at raising teachers’ awareness of invitational education (IE. Workshops were held to equip staff members with IE knowledge and skills, and to increase their understanding of their current practices with a view of making them more intentionally inviting. The study focused on the following two questions: What are the positive experiences of teaching staff concerning the current approach to teaching and learning in schools?; and What strategies may be introduced to assist teachers and their schools in becoming intentionally inviting? These two questions are based on appreciative inquiry (AI and IE. A qualitative research design was most appropriate for the purpose of this study. An analysis of the data revealed two categories (the discovery phase: discovering the best of what exists in the school and the dreaming phase: creating a new future on which AI is based.

  1. Student versus athlete: Professional socialisation influx | Burnett ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... sport and increased professional opportunities for high performance athletes, ... Continued participation and self-reported high levels of motivation relate to sporting success (69.4%), ...

  2. Innovative conditions of professionally applied training for maritime-students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podlesny A.I.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The author considers organizational and methodological terms of implementation of professional and applied physical training for maritime students subject to their motivation to physical self-perfection. The purpose of the research is to define organizational and pedagogical terms for professional and applied physical training of maritime students to improve their physical condition and special physical attainment. The applied methods were: anthropometric metrology, functional probes, tonometry, pulsometry, motion tests and mathematical analysis. 70 students of 17-18 years participated in the research. It was determined that organizational and pedagogical terms directed on acceleration of making necessary for students to self-improve physically, positively impact on development of special physical state that are fundamental for professional activities of maritime students.

  3. The main problem solving differences between high school and university in mathematical beliefs and professional behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhlaghi Garmjani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Teaching science and math has been underdeveloped in nurturing the talents and motivations of young people who are in search of professions in these fields. Identifying and strengthening the students' problem solving beliefs and behaviors, can be a great help to those involved in teaching mathematics. This study investigates on the university and high school students, teachers and professors' problem solving beliefs and behaviors. Considering the research method, this study is a field research in which questionnaire is used. Participants in this research were senior high school and university students, math teachers and math professors. Data collection method for beliefs and behavior variables was via the use of a questionnaire. The Mann-Whitney test results showed that problem solving in high school and university was different and the main difference was in mathematical professional beliefs and behaviors.

  4. The Professional Development of High School Chemistry Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Carmeli, Miriam; Shore, Relly

    2004-02-01

    The implementation of new content and pedagogical standards in science education necessitates intensive, long-term professional development of science teachers. In this paper, we describe the rationale and structure of a comprehensive and intensive professional development program of school-based leaders, namely school chemistry coordinators. The year-long program was designed so that the chemistry teachers who enrolled in the program were able to develop in three interrelated aspects: content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and leadership ability. Several strategies for the development of these aspects were adopted from Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love, & Stiles (1998). The evaluation of the program focused on the changes that participating teachers underwent regarding their personal beliefs and their functioning as school chemistry coordinators in their schools.

  5. The Relationship between School Leadership and Professional Learning Communities in Thai Basic Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somprach, Kanokorn; Tang, Keow Ngang; Popoonsak, Pongtorn

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the role of essential leadership styles of school principals in encouraging teachers' participation in professional learning communities (PLCs) in basic education schools in northeastern Thailand. It aimed to identify the nine leadership styles practiced by school principals and teachers' participation in PLCs, and to…

  6. Preparing Professional School Counselors as Collaborators in Culturally Competent School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith; Bustamante, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    In collaboration with principals and other leadership team members, professional school counselors have ethical responsibilities in promoting culturally competent school environments. Pre-service training is the ideal time for school counselors and principals to develop the necessary background information, tools, and assessment skills to assist…

  7. Sexting by High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, Donald S; Cann, Deanna; Velarde, Valerie

    2017-08-01

    In the last 8 years, several studies have documented that many adolescents acknowledge having exchanged sexually explicit cell phone pictures of themselves, a behavior termed sexting. Differences across studies in how sexting was defined, recruitment strategies, and cohort have resulted in sometimes significant differences in as basic a metric as what percentage of adolescents have sent, received, or forwarded such sexts. The psychosocial and even legal risks associated with sexting by minors are significantly serious that accurate estimates of its prevalence, including over time, are important to ascertain. In the present study, students (N = 656) from a single private high school were surveyed regarding their participation in sexting. Students at this same school were similarly surveyed four years earlier. In this second survey, reported rates of sending (males 15.8%; females 13.6%) and receiving (males 40.5%; females 30.6%) sexually explicit cell phone pictures (revealing genitals or buttocks of either sex or female breasts) were generally similar to those reported at the same school 4 years earlier. Rates of forwarding sexts (males 12.2%; females 7.6%) were much lower than those previously acknowledged at this school. Correlates of sexting in this study were similar to those reported previously. Overall, our findings suggest that sexting by adolescents (with the exception of forwarding) remains a fairly common behavior, despite its risks.

  8. The Perceptions of Elementary School Teachers Regarding Their Efforts to Help Students Utilize Student-to-Student Discourse in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Jennifer Lovejoy

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the perceptions of elementary teachers who teach science as opposed to science teacher specialists regarding their efforts to help students use student-to-student discourse for improving science learning. A growing body of research confirms the importance of a) student-to-student discourse for making meaning of science ideas and b) moving students' conceptual development towards a more scientific understanding of the natural world. Based on those foundations, the three research questions that guided this study examined the value elementary teachers place on student-to-student discourse, the various approaches teachers employ to promote the use of student-to-student discourse for learning science, and the factors and conditions that promote and inhibit the use of student-to-student discourse as an effective pedagogical strategy in elementary science. Data were gathered from 23 elementary teachers in a single district using an on-line survey and follow-up interviews with 8 teachers. All data were analyzed and evolving themes led to the following findings: (1) elementary teachers value student-to-student discourse in science, (2) teachers desire to increase time using student-to-student discourse, (3) teachers use a limited number of student-to-student discourse strategies to increase student learning in science, (4) teachers use student-to-student discourse as formative assessment to determine student learning in science, (5) professional development focusing on approaches to student-to-student discourse develops teachers' capacity for effective implementation, (6) teachers perceive school administrators' knowledge of and support for student-to-student discourse as beneficial, (7) time and scheduling constraints limit the use of student-to-student discourse in science. Implications of this study included the necessity of school districts to focus on student-to-student discourse in science, provide teacher and

  9. Remote Research Mentoring of Virginia High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby, Joanna; Dirienzo, W. J.; Beaton, R.; Pennucci, T.; Zasowski, G.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students at the University of Virginia (UVa) are volunteering as research advisors on astronomy projects for Virginia's science and technology high schools. In previous years, we have worked with more than a dozen students through a research class at Central Virginia Governor's School in Lynchburg to develop an astronomy research curriculum that teaches background concepts and terminology, guides students in data analysis, and prepares them to present material in poster and oral forums. In our fourth year of operation, we are continuing to work with Central Virginia Governor's School and adapting the research curriculum to an independent course at Roanoke Valley Governor's School in Roanoke. Because both schools are far from UVa in Charlottesville, the program operates remotely; graduate advisors and high school students interact through "virtual" means, establishing a successful framework for meaningful remote mentoring. In the current year, six students will complete projects on astrophysical topics including megamasers, astrochemistry, and pulsars using data taken by the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Students at Roanoke Valley were directly trained on the GBT as part of a separate outreach program called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, and all six students will receive hands-on experience in handling GBT data. The current projects are components of larger research efforts by graduate student and professional level researchers, so that the projects contribute to high-level projects only possible with the GBT. This stands as a rare outreach program that uses the principle of “deliberative practice” to train high school students in the development of skills that are crucial to success in science. Furthermore, it provides graduate students with an opportunity to plan and advise research projects, developing a skill set that is required in more advanced academic positions. Our poster discusses the implementation of our online curriculum in two distinct

  10. Comparing Levels of Professional Satisfaction in Preschool Teachers Whose Classes Include or Do Not Include a Special-Needs Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyutürk, Nazife; Sahbaz, Ümit

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the professional satisfaction of the preschool teachers in whose class there is a student with special needs to the preschool teachers in whose class there are not any students with special needs. The research study group was composed of 185 pre-school teachers who work in the city and county center in…

  11. Third Culture Kids: Implications for Professional School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Dodie; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2011-01-01

    The increase of international business, military placements, and immigration has led to an increase in students attending schools in a country other than where they were born: third culture kids (TCKs). TCKs have unique educational needs, necessitating the support of their school counselors. This article (a) defines and introduces the needs and…

  12. Cyber-Security Concerns Mount as Student Hacking Hits Schools: Districts Straining to Safeguard Online Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    While schools rightly fear break-ins to their computer systems by professional criminals, students are increasingly giving educators almost as much to worry about. Reports of students' gaining access to school networks to change grades, delete teachers' files, or steal data are becoming more common, experts say, and many districts remain highly…

  13. A Window into South Korean Culture: Stress and Coping in Female High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderGast, Tim S.; Foxx, Sejal Parikh; Flowers, Claudia; Rouse, Andrew Thomas; Decker, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to increase multicultural competence, professional counselors in the United States analyzed archival data from high school students from Seoul, South Korea. A sample of all female (N = 577) high school students responded to survey questions related to stress and coping. Results demonstrated statistical significance in levels of stress…

  14. Korean Graduate Students' Perceptions of Guidance and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kent; Lee, Hikyoung

    2017-01-01

    Past studies have indicated shortcomings in the training of graduate students in the US, especially for practical career skills, teaching skills, and non-academic careers. Students thus find professional development and guidance lacking for the demands of the modern marketplace. This study extends this research to the unique situation of current…

  15. The Future of Our Organizations: Students and Early Career Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana; Wang, Sherry C.; Warrior, Anitra M.

    2012-01-01

    This response focuses on the significance of ethnic minority psychology organizations and other related membership structures to early career psychologists (ECPs) and counseling psychology students. We discuss not only reasons for why students and ECPs may not be joining professional organizations, but also strategies for recruiting, supporting,…

  16. What Desktop Publishing Can Teach Professional Writing Students about Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobberstein, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Points out that desktop publishing is a metatechnology that allows professional writing students access to the production phase of publishing, giving students hands-on practice in preparing text for printing and in learning how that preparation affects the visual meaning of documents. (SR)

  17. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  18. Efficacy of Orientation for New Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Laura A.; Saunders, Sue A.; Thompson, George F.; Cooper, Dianne L.

    2011-01-01

    New staff orientation is a strategy that can positively affect job satisfaction and productivity, especially for those beginning careers in student affairs. In this study, new student affairs professionals were surveyed to determine their perceptions about the content and efficacy of their orientation experiences. Despite literature encouraging…

  19. Students' reflections in a portfolio pilot: highlighting professional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffling, Ann-Christin; Beckman, Anders; Pahlmblad, Annika; Edgren, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Portfolios are highlighted as potential assessment tools for professional competence. Although students' self-reflections are considered to be central in the portfolio, the content of reflections in practice-based portfolios is seldom analysed. To investigate whether students' reflections include sufficient dimensions of professional competence, notwithstanding a standardized portfolio format, and to evaluate students' satisfaction with the portfolio. Thirty-five voluntary final-year medical students piloted a standardized portfolio in a general practice (GP) attachment at Lund University, Sweden. Students' portfolio reflections were based upon documentary evidence from practice, and aimed to demonstrate students' learning. The reflections were qualitatively analysed, using a framework approach. Students' evaluations of the portfolio were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. Among professional issues, an integration of cognitive, affective and practical dimensions in clinical practice was provided by students' reflections. The findings suggested an emphasis on affective issues, particularly on self-awareness of feelings, attitudes and concerns. In addition, ethical problems, clinical reasoning strategies and future communication skills training were subjects of several reflective commentaries. Students' reflections on their consultation skills demonstrated their endeavour to achieve structure in the medical interview by negotiation of an agenda for the consultation, keeping the interview on track, and using internal summarizing. The importance of active listening and exploration of patient's perspective was also emphasized. In students' case summaries, illustrating characteristic attributes of GP, the dominating theme was 'patient-centred care', including the patient-doctor relationship, holistic modelling and longitudinal continuity. Students were satisfied with the portfolio, but improved instructions were needed. A standardized portfolio in a

  20. How High School Students Select a College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Joseph E., Jr.; And Others

    The college selection process used by high school students was studied and a paradigm that describes the process was developed, based on marketing theory concerning consumer behavior. Primarily college freshmen and high school seniors were interviewed, and a few high school juniors and upper-level college students were surveyed to determine…

  1. Student Achievement in Title I Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Abby T.

    2017-01-01

    This researcher seeks to answer the following question: How did two elementary Title I schools, identified as "high performing" on the first Smarter Balanced assessment, address elements of Maslow's hierarchy of needs when developing school-wide initiatives to enhance student achievement? Many students in Title I schools face barriers to…

  2. Frequent fliers, school phobias, and the sick student: school health personnel's perceptions of students who refuse school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens Armstrong, Anna M; McCormack Brown, Kelli R; Brindley, Roger; Coreil, Jeannine; McDermott, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    This study explored school personnel's perceptions of school refusal, as it has been described as a "common educational and public health problem" that is less tolerated due to increasing awareness of the potential socioeconomic consequences of this phenomenon. In-depth interviews were conducted with school personnel at the middle school (N = 42), high school (N = 40), and district levels (N = 10). The findings focus on emergent themes from interviews with school health personnel (N = 12), particularly those themes related to their perceptions of and role in working with school-refusing students. Personnel, especially school health services staff, constructed a typification of the school-refusing student as "the sick student," which conceptualized student refusal due to reasons related to illness. Personnel further delineated sick students by whether they considered the illness legitimate. School health personnel referenced the infamous "frequent fliers" and "school phobics" within this categorization of students. Overarching dynamics of this typification included parental control, parental awareness, student locus of control, blame, and victim status. These typifications influenced how personnel reacted to students they encountered, particularly in deciding which students need "help" versus "discipline," thus presenting implications for students and screening of students. Overall, findings suggest school health personnel play a pivotal role in screening students who are refusing school as well as keeping students in school, underscoring policy that supports an increased presence of school health personnel. Recommendations for school health, prevention, and early intervention include the development of screening protocols and staff training. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  3. Stressors in the professional lives of South African secondary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We identify current stressors in the professional lives of South African secondary school educators. The study was exploratory, using a questionnaire, which listed 19 possible causes of stress and was completed by 987 educators from all racial groups and provinces in the country. South African educators in general ...

  4. The Bowie State University Professional Development Schools Network Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Eva; Taylor, Traki; Madden, Maggie; Beiter, Judy; Davis, Julius; Farmer, Cynthia; Nowlin, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    The Bowie State University PDS Network Partnership is one of the 2015 Exemplary PDS Partnerships recognized by the National Association for Professional Development Schools. This partnership is built on a series of signature programs that define and support our partnership work. This article describes each of those signature programs that make our…

  5. Inclusion Professional Development Model and Regular Middle School Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, Otelia; Reglin, Gary L.; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a professional development model on regular education middle school teachers' knowledge of best practices for teaching inclusive classes and attitudes toward teaching these classes. There were 19 regular education teachers who taught the core subjects. Findings for Research Question 1…

  6. Professional Insiders/Outsiders? Teacher Professionalism and the Primary School Physical Education Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Caroline; DinanThompson, Maree

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a context for exploring the positioning of Physical Education specialist teachers (PE specialist teachers) in primary schools in Queensland in the discourses of teacher professionalism. A critical analysis of literature on the history and status of the subject and its practitioners aims to contextualize discourses in and about…

  7. Attention to diversity in the regular school: a way to professional teacher’s development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Rodríguez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The school as an educational institution that embodies the principles of social inclusion and integration emanating from the UNESCO convention has yet to join efforts and willingness to implement them in educational practice. Educators, along with other professionals who work with students with functional diversity, must play a transformers role, having difficulties, requiring an immediate solution as a system of contradictions appear to corroborate this fact and take action according to foster a positive social impact.

  8. Creation of a Professionalism Scale for Hospitality Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammie J. Kaufman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The hospitality industry is dependent on a professional staff to exceed guests’ expectations. Existing research has focused primarily on the various attributes necessary for success in the hospitality industry. The primary focus of this research was professionalism and hospitality students’ self-perception of their professional attributes. Data collected from a focus group of hospitality human resource managers were used to develop a professionalism scale. The scale produced five factors that explained 53.6% of the variance in the responses. Students were more likely to agree in their preparedness for the interview process, but less in agreement of their preparedness for workplace issues. This research provides an exploratory study into a student’s perception of his or her own professional abilities and could be used as a placement tool for human resource managers and a benchmark to determine student’s professional aptitude by hospitality management professors.

  9. Conceptualizations of professional competencies in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the conceptualization and discussion of professional competencies needed for supporting the development of the whole-school approach in school health promotion (SHP). Design: The paper is based a conceptual synthesis of literature, guided...... by a theoretical perspective on health promotion agency and professional competencies to identify core competency domains and elements. This is followed by a discussion of focus, gaps, and links in conceptualizations of competency domains and elements. Findings: The synthesis identifies five core competency...... domains: 1) policy-development, 2) organizational development, 3) professional development, 4) development of students’ learning, and 5) development of health promotion activities. Three critical gaps in the conceptualizations of competency domains and elements are identified and discussed: 1...

  10. Law School Intentions of Undergraduate Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Thomas; Flanagan, David J.; Palmer, Timothy B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that influence business students' intentions to enroll in law school. Scant research has focused on factors that influence business students' decisions to enroll in law school. This paper attempts to fill that gap. Hypotheses about student intentions are based on Ajzen & Fishbein's (1977) Theory…

  11. Secondary School Students' Predictors of Science Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Cemal; Genç, Murat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that affect the secondary school students' attitudes in science. This study was conducted using survey method. The sample of the study was 503 students from four different secondary schools in Bartin and Düzce. Data were obtained using the Survey of Factors Affecting Students' Science Attitudes…

  12. Student Voices in School-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Siu Yin Annie; Adamson, Bob

    2015-01-01

    The value of student voices in dialogues about learning improvement is acknowledged in the literature. This paper examines how the views of students regarding School-based Assessment (SBA), a significant shift in examination policy and practice in secondary schools in Hong Kong, have largely been ignored. The study captures student voices through…

  13. Occupational Stress and Professional Development of Primary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Modrej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The occupation of primary school teachers is considered one of the most stressful professions. The survey was used to determine the incidence of stress in 110 primary school teachers in urban and rural schools in Slovenia, depending on seniority. Its aim was to learn about stress symptoms, stressful situations and strategies to manage stress among teachers. The results show that teachers evaluate their work as a very responsible one and in majority do not think about changing their job. Teachers most often perceive physical and emotional symptoms of stress. They are faced with stressful situations when working with pupils, at their professional work, and in relations with colleagues, school management, and parents. When difficulties arise in their work, teachers most often turn for help to a colleague or the school management; and they manage their stress by going for a walk and talking to their friends.

  14. Secondary students in professional laboratories: Discoveries about science learning in a community of practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mary Elizabeth

    This study explores what educators may learn from the experiences of secondary students working in professional scientific laboratories. My investigation is guided by the methodology of phenomenological; I depend primarily on interviews conducted with students and professional researchers. This material is supported primarily by on-site observations, and by informal conversations between me and the study participants. My dissertation has three goals: (one) to use the work of secondary students in scientific research laboratories to consider how they know the discipline; (two) to distinguish the students' professional accomplishments from science learning at school; and, (three) to engage readers in a reflection about authority within the scientific community, and the possibility that by accomplishing research, students take their legitimate place among those who construct scientific knowledge. My methods and focus have allowed me to capture qualities of the student narratives that support the emergence of three major themes: the importance of doing "real work" in learning situations; the inapplicability of "school learning" to professional research arenas; and the inclusive nature of the scientific community. At the same time, the study is confined by the narrow pool of participants I interviewed over a short period of time. These talented students were all academically successful, articulate, "well-rounded" and in this sense, mature. They typically had strong family support, and they talked about ideas with their parents. Indeed, the students were all capable story-tellers who were anxious to share their experiences publicly. Yet they themselves remind the reader of their struggles to overcome naivete in the lab. By doing so they suggested to me that their experiences might be accessible to a broad range of young men and women; thus this study is a good beginning for further research.

  15. A model to facilitate collaborative social support for pregnant students in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matlala SF

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sogo F Matlala Department of Public Health, University of Limpopo, Sovenga, South Africa Abstract: Pregnancy among secondary school students remains a public health problem and is associated with school dropout as well as poor maternal and child health outcomes. Schools in South Africa no longer expel pregnant students as was the case before 2000. Instead, the government encourages them to remain in class to complete their education, but pregnant students often face stigma, and some drop out of school as a result. To remain in class and access antenatal care, pregnant students require social support from teachers, parents and professional nurses. Unfortunately, teachers, parents and professional nurses support pregnant students on an ad hoc basis, and this calls for a model to facilitate collaborative social support. The purpose of this paper is to present and describe a model to facilitate collaborative social support for pregnant students attending secondary schools in South Africa, using the model description steps of Chinn and Kramer. The model is designed as a tool to enable pregnant students to remain in school, attend antenatal care and in the end, deliver healthy babies. The professional nurse, as a member and leader of the school health team which visits secondary schools to provide a package of school health services, is the agent or facilitator of the model. Keywords: communication, health team, learner pregnancy, maternal and child health, school health services, social network

  16. School Nurses: An Investment in Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin D.

    2018-01-01

    School nurses help students with the prevention and management of chronic physical and mental health issues, but not all schools have a full-time registered nurse on their staff. The author argues that investing in school nursing has benefits that extend beyond the school and into the community.

  17. Analysis of the Contribution to Professional Knowledge of the Job Training within the Student Perspective in the 3+1 Education Model--The Example of Honaz Vocational School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksit, Adnan; Arpat, Bulent; Kalfa, Veli Riza

    2017-01-01

    A well-educated and qualified workforce is one of the most important outputs in vocational and technical education. Vocational schools constitute the last circle in Turkey for the preparing students about the vocational and technical education in order to meet the need for the intermediate staff needed by the labor market. The educational model…

  18. The personal and contextual contributors to school belongingness among primary school students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Vaz

    Full Text Available School belongingness has gained currency among educators and school health professionals as an important determinant of adolescent health. The current cross-sectional study presents the 15 most significant personal and contextual factors that collectively explain 66.4% (two-thirds of the variability in 12-year old students' perceptions of belongingness in primary school. The study is part of a larger longitudinal study investigating the factors associated with student adjustment in the transition from primary to secondary school. The study found that girls and students with disabilities had higher school belongingness scores than boys, and their typically developing counterparts respectively; and explained 2.5% of the variability in school belongingness. The majority (47.1% out of 66.4% of the variability in school belongingness was explained by student personal factors, such as social acceptance, physical appearance competence, coping skills, and social affiliation motivation; followed by parental expectations (3% out of 66.4%, and school-based factors (13.9% out of 66.4% such as, classroom involvement, task-goal structure, autonomy provision, cultural pluralism, and absence of bullying. Each of the identified contributors of primary school belongingness can be shaped through interventions, system changes, or policy reforms.

  19. Personal and professional readiness university students as the goal and the result training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro Koval

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is theoretically grounded personal and professional readiness of students of higher educational institutions for professional work. Identifies the components of personal and professional readiness and the characteristics of the component availability. Defined quality ensuring the success of professional activity of future professionals.Key words: Personality-professional readiness, professional orientation, personal potential, spirituality means of art.

  20. School climate: perceptual differences between students, parents, and school staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Christine M.; Spira, Adam P.; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Rebok, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that school climate can have a great impact on student, teacher, and school outcomes. However, it is often assessed as a summary measure, without taking into account multiple perspectives (student, teacher, parent) or examining subdimensions within the broader construct. In this study, we assessed school climate from the perspective of students, staff, and parents within a large, urban school district using multilevel modeling techniques to examine within- and between-school variance. After adjusting for school-level demographic characteristics, students reported worse perceptions of safety and connectedness compared to both parent and staff ratings (all p climate ratings within a school. Understanding how perceptions differ between informants can inform interventions to improve perceptions and prevent adverse outcomes. PMID:28642631

  1. Inter-Professional Education of Prospective Speech-Language Therapists and Primary School Teachers through Shared Professional Practice Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leanne; McNeill, Brigid; Gillon, Gail T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Preliminary studies of inter-professional education (IPE) among student speech-language therapists (SLTs) and student teachers suggest that workshop-based applications are beneficial in preparing participants for elements of collaborative practice. Situating IPE within the students' professional practice placements may provide another…

  2. Becoming professionally qualified: The school-based mentoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on a study which explored the mentoring experiences of professionally unqualified practicing teachers enrolled in a part-time Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. The study sought to understand the mentoring experiences these students received ...

  3. The Educational and Professional Trajectories of Secondary School Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherednichenko, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Research on Russian students shows that obtaining a higher level of education and adding to one's knowledge, skills, abilities, and motivations increases levels of social and professional status. Investment in human capital in Russia, especially in education, also brings benefits that are not directly related to income, such as a rise in social…

  4. Differences in Professional Interests Between School Librarians and School Directors of Audio-Visual Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Winston

    Since the state of Ohio has combined the certification requirements for the professions of school librarians and directors of audiovisual services, the professional interests of these two groups were compared to discover if they have identical interests. A questionnaire was devised with rating scales for areas of professional concern. The…

  5. Professional Student Organizations and Experiential Learning Activities: What Drives Student Intentions to Participate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Laura; Miller, Richard; Poole, Sonja Martin

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning theory has been referenced as a possible method for attracting and retaining members in student organizations. In a survey, undergraduate students evaluated a variety of organizational features pertaining to their intention to participate in professional student organizations. The study found that students value activities…

  6. Medical students' preparedness for professional activities in early clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Josefin; Maaz, Asja; Hitzblech, Tanja; Holzhausen, Ylva; Peters, Harm

    2017-08-22

    Sufficient preparedness is important for transitions to workplace participation and learning in clinical settings. This study aims to analyse medical students' preparedness for early clerkships using a three-dimensional, socio-cognitive, theory-based model of preparedness anchored in specific professional activities and their supervision level. Medical students from a competency-based undergraduate curriculum were surveyed about preparedness for 21 professional activities and level of perceived supervision during their early clerkships via an online questionnaire. Preparedness was operationalized by the three dimensions of confidence to carry out clerkship activities, being prepared through university teaching and coping with failure by seeking support. Factors influencing preparedness and perceived stress as outcomes were analysed through step-wise regression. Professional activities carried out by the students (n = 147; 19.0%) and their supervision levels varied. While most students reported high confidence to perform the tasks, the activity-specific analysis revealed important gaps in preparation through university teaching. Students regularly searched for support in case of difficulty. One quarter of the variance of each preparedness dimension was explained by self-efficacy, supervision quality, amount of prior clerkship experience and nature of professional activities. Preparedness contributed to predicting perceived stress. The applied three-dimensional concept of preparedness and the task-specific approach provided a detailed and meaningful view on medical students' workplace participation and experiences in early clerkships.

  7. STRATEGIC PERSONAL BRANDING FOR STUDENTS AND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ioana ILIEȘ

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In a society dominated more than ever by a competitive environment, self-development can play a key role in gaining the wanted job or internship program for students and young professional. Learning how one can develop a personal branding program in a strategic way is, in this context, an important acquisition. The present study leads to the development of a simple model that young adults can use to create a personal branding process. Following some simple steps, young people aspiring to a successful professional life can have more opportunities and a better start in their professional activity. The study will first follow a literature review of relevant works in personal branding theory. The second objective of the study is to present the model developed by the author and that is used in the activity of creating a personal branding plan with students studying communication and public relations in a university of Romania. The study is based on a cross-sectional observation research method, conducted on a sample of 286 students from a faculty of communication, public relations and advertising in Romania, over a five-year period, students who attended a personal branding course. The results identified the needs and aspirations of students interested in personal development through personal branding strategies and led to the creation of a simple model of personal branding that can be followed by students and young professionals.

  8. Student-teacher relationships matter for school inclusion: school belonging, disability, and school transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B; McMahon, Susan D

    2014-01-01

    For students with disabilities, the process of school inclusion often begins with a move from segregated settings into general education classrooms. School transitions can be stressful as students adjust to a new environment. This study examines the adjustment of 133 students with and without disabilities who moved from a school that served primarily students with disabilities into 23 public schools in a large urban school district in the Midwest. These students and 111 of their teachers and other school staff rated the degree that students felt they belonged in their new schools and the quality of their social interactions. Results show that students who experienced more positive and fewer negative social interactions with school staff had higher school belonging. Teachers accurately noted whether students felt they belonged in their new settings, but were not consistently able to identify student perceptions of negative social interactions with staff. Implications for inclusion and improving our educational system are explored.

  9. Professional practice of dietitians in the Brazilian School Feeding Program: A multiple case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Fernanda Ferreira PIRES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To assess dietician’s numerical parameters for school feeding and discuss limitations and possibilities for professional practice in the municipalities of Vale do Ivaí, in Northern Paraná, Brazil. Methods: This is a multiple case study. A semi-structured interview was administered to dietitians working at the School Feeding Program in nine cities located in Vale do Ivaí, Paraná, Brazil. Resolution nº 465/2010, from the Brazilian Federal Board of Dietitians, was used to calculate the adequacy of working hours of dietitians. The legistation of the Brazilian School Feeding Program was applied to discuss professional practice. Results: All the cities had at least one dietitian responsible for the School Feeding Program. The percentage of adequate working hours was from 20 to 66%. Some dietitians were involved in management activities, administration, procurement, and accounting, in addition to dietitian assignments for the School Feeding Program. Most dietitians worked in other sectors of the municipalities such as the health system, social assistance, and at events. This practice could compromise compliance of technical activities that must be met by the dietitians of the School Feeding Program. Conclusion: The number of dietitians in most of cities working at School Feeding Program is not sufficient to meet the number of students. The insuficient workload and excessive activities could hinder the development of dietitian’s private activities. The hiring of nutrition and dietitian technicians and administrative assistants for bureaucratic activies is recommended.

  10. Using movies to teach professionalism to medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Professionalism topics are usually not covered as a separate lesson within formal curriculum, but in subtler and less officially recognized educational activities, which makes them difficult to teach and assess. Interactive methods (e.g. movies) could be efficient teaching methods but are rarely studied. The aims of this study were: 1) to test the relevance and usefulness of movies in teaching professionalism to fourth year medical students and, 2) to assess the impact of ...

  11. attitude of secondary school students towards guidance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth Egbochuku

    gender and school location significantly influenced students' attitude towards guidance ... students respond and perceive guidance and counselling services will, to ... counsellors will be appointed in post-primary institutions and tertiary levels.

  12. "KiDS and Diabetes in Schools" project: Experience with an international educational intervention among parents and school professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Glaucia Margonari; Castelo Branco, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Avelino Luiz; Chinnici, Daniela; Chaney, David; Calliari, Luis Eduardo P; Franco, Denise Reis

    2018-06-01

    Although it is known that school care is a major challenge in diabetes treatment, there is still no published international initiative. The aims of this study were to introduce an international educational intervention tool, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) KiDS and Diabetes in Schools project (KiDS project), and to describe its impact on diabetes knowledge and behavior of caregivers and school professionals. The KiDS project was developed with the support of IDF and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes and provides online free material in 10 languages, directed to caregivers and school personnel. A pilot evaluation of the KiDS intervention was performed in Brazil. An educational intervention was conducted in 5 primary schools, with 42 parents and school staff, followed by 2 individual interviews after 1 and 3 months. The results were evaluated in a qualitative study with a descriptive design based on content analysis. School staff acquired new knowledge on diabetes and its treatment. They felt more confident when helping students with diabetes and said the educational intervention promoted a positive impact on the teacher-student relationship, on the caring for health, and on school infrastructure. Family members of children with diabetes stated that the educational intervention gave them an opportunity to strengthen and update information on treatment and improve their knowledge. The KiDS project is the first international tool directed to foster a safe and supportive environment and a better understanding of diabetes in schools. In this pilot evaluation, it achieved the goal of informing and changing the behavior of parents and school staff, thus improving the care provided to children with diabetes in schools. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sociological Analysis of Professional Identity of the Students, Case Study: Students of University of Mazandaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Heydari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By studying of present situation of universities in Iran, through research regarding students' lives, this article seeks to consider the features of students' professional identity. The professional identity is a social one, made, in relation with other individuals, through practical learning and instruction and professional experiments. For the students, the formally start of a social involvement, coincides with the start of their studies, and the formation of their professional identities will be intensified and reinforced through practical instructions concerning their fields. The method used in this study is qualitative research in the way of grounded theory method. To create the sample, the theoretical method is used and continued to reach saturation stage. The findings, hence, are collected applying the prevalence interview technique for 19 students and group interview for 15 students of University ofMazandaran. The research findings suggest that, the professional identities of the students have two features of scientific and personal identities. The students' scientific identity is formed by the students' tendencies and attitudes, and also their scientific actions and efforts. The personal identity is a perception that student builds up of himself as a scientific actor present at university environment. The development of a professional identity, in addition, is associated with the position of the individual within the community. Hence, the gender, socio-economic status, supports by family and friends, individual's social environment and networks influence on the formation of his professional identity.

  14. Summer Students: getting professional at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

  15. Transition through Teamwork: Professionals Address Student Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bube, Sue Ann; Carrothers, Carol; Johnson, Cinda

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 2013, there was no collaboration around the transition services for deaf and hard of hearing students in Washington State. Washington had numerous agencies providing excellent support, but those agencies were not working together. It was not until January 29, 2013, when pepnet 2 hosted the Building State Capacity to Address Critical…

  16. The Demonstration of Organizational Legitimacy among Independent Professional Schools of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Independent professional schools were a significant part of higher education in the United States until the rise of universities at the beginning of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the overwhelming majority of professional schools are indeed affiliated with universities; however there are a growing number of professional schools in variety…

  17. Action Research as a School-Based Strategy in Intercultural Professional Development for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Auxiliadora; Traver, Joan A.; Garcia, Rafaela

    2011-01-01

    Teacher professional development is a key factor for transforming professional and school culture. This article describes a case study undertaken in a Spanish school during the 2007-2008 academic year. Our aim is to explain how action research methodology was applied to encourage professional and school culture towards an intercultural and…

  18. Violence Prevention after Columbine: A Survey of High School Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau-Hobson, M. Franci; Filaccio, Marylynne; Gottfried, Linda

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined changes in mental health services and violence prevention strategies in public high schools since the shootings at Columbine High School. Surveys were mailed to school mental health professionals at public high schools in Colorado. Respondents included school counselors, school psychologists, school social workers, principals,…

  19. Medical professionalism on television: student perceptions and pedagogical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Wilson, Ian; Langendyk, Vicki

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has pointed to the role television can play in informing health practices and beliefs. Within the academic setting in particular, some educators have raised concerns about the influence of medical dramas on students. Less research, however, draws on the perspectives of students, and this study therefore explores medical students' perceptions of medical practice and professionalism in popular medical television programmes. Qualitative data from surveys of Australian undergraduate medical students showed that students perceived professionalism in dichotomous ways, with three main themes: cure-care, where a doctor's skill is either technical or interpersonal; work-leisure, where a doctor is either dedicated to work or personal life; and clinical-administration, where work is either direct patient care or administration. There continue to be imagined divisions between curing and caring for students, who express concerns about balancing work and leisure, and expectations that doctors should have little administrative work. Given students were able to identify these important contemporary issues around professionalism on television, there is pedagogical value in using popular images of the medical world in medical education. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Democratic School Leadership in Canada's Public School Systems: Professional Value and Social Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Paul T.; Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    Democratic leadership processes are desirable for schools not only because they reflect socially mandated ethical commitments to collective process. They can be professionally justified as a necessary approach to leading schools effectively in the increasingly culturally diverse communities and a world transformed by the effects of technology and…

  1. How Professional Organizations Can Help Meet the Professional Development Needs of Middle School Business and Technology Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Tena B.

    2007-01-01

    Middle school business and technology educators were surveyed to examine how professional organizations could meet their professional development needs. A 26 percent response rate (n = 148) was received from middle school educators in 37 states. This research was designed to identify the business and technology courses being taught at the middle…

  2. Teachers' Experience from a School-Based Collaborative Teacher Professional Development Programme: Reported Impact on Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out how science teachers who have participated in a one-year school-based collaborative teacher professional development programme, perceive the programme's impact on their professional development. Constant comparative analysis was used on data from three schools to generate the findings in this study. The…

  3. The training and professional expectations of medical students in Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fronteira Inês

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the professional expectations of medical students during the 2007-2008 academic year at the public medical schools of Angola, Guinea-Bissau and Mozambique, and to identify their social and geographical origins, their professional expectations and difficulties relating to their education and professional future. Methods Data were collected through a standardised questionnaire applied to all medical students registered during the 2007-2008 academic year. Results Students decide to study medicine at an early age. Relatives and friends seem to have an especially important influence in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The degree of feminization of the student population differs among the different countries. Although most medical students are from outside the capital cities, expectations of getting into medical school are already associated with migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. Academic performance is poor. This seems to be related to difficulties in accessing materials, finances and insufficient high school preparation. Medical students recognize the public sector demand but their expectations are to combine public sector practice with private work, in order to improve their earnings. Salary expectations of students vary between the three countries. Approximately 75% want to train as hospital specialists and to follow a hospital-based career. A significant proportion is unsure about their future area of specialization, which for many students is equated with migration to study abroad. Conclusions Medical education is an important national investment, but the returns obtained are not as efficient as expected. Investments in high-school preparation, tutoring, and infrastructure are likely to have a significant impact on the success rate of medical schools. Special attention should be given

  4. Personal and professional values held by baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hülya; Işik, Burçin; Şenyuva, Emine; Kaya, Nurten

    2017-09-01

    Values are ideals and beliefs that individuals and groups uphold and lie at the core of the diverse world of human behaviour and are expressed in every human decision and action, both consciously and unconsciously. They represent basic beliefs of what is right, good or desirable and motivate both personal and professional behaviour. In the context of nursing profession, values are essential in order to maintain high standards of the nursing care. This study was planned to examine changes in nursing students' personal and professional values between entering and graduating from an undergraduate nursing programme. Ethical considerations: Measures to protect participants included obtaining Deaconship of Nursing Faculty approval, obtaining signed informed consent and maintaining confidentiality. This study was designed as longitudinal quality. The research population included 143 students registered at a first grade of a nursing faculty for the 2009-2010 academic year. Data were collected with a Questionnaire Form, the Value Preferences Scale, the Professional Values Precedence Scale and the Nursing Professional Values Scale. According to the results, social values have statistical differences in 4-year nursing education. Nursing students in second class have higher score in terms of social values than those in third class. Also, majority of students ranked human dignity as first and justice as second and third from first to fourth classes, and they have very high scores on Nursing Professional Values Scale and its subscales and stated that all items of Nursing Professional Values Scale are very important. As a result, nursing education has vital role in acquiring and maintaining professional values.

  5. USE OF MARK-RATING SYSTEM IN ESTIMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS OF PEDIATRIC DEPARTMENT DURING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gumenyuk O.I.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors demonstrate the results of using mark-rating system in estimation of professional competence of the fifth-year students of pediatric department during summer professional practice.

  6. Effects of biology teachers' professional knowledge and cognitive activation on students' achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förtsch, Christian; Werner, Sonja; von Kotzebue, Lena; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effects of teachers' biology-specific dimensions of professional knowledge - pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and content knowledge (CK) - and cognitively activating biology instruction, as a feature of instructional quality, on students' learning. The sample comprised 39 German secondary school teachers whose lessons on the topic neurobiology were videotaped twice. Teachers' instruction was coded with regard to cognitive activation using a rating manual. Multilevel path analysis results showed a positive significant effect of cognitive activation on students' learning and an indirect effect of teachers' PCK on students' learning mediated through cognitive activation. These findings highlight the importance of PCK in preservice biology teachers' education. Items of the rating manual may be used to provide exemplars of concrete teaching situations during university seminars for preservice teacher education or professional development initiatives for in-service teachers.

  7. School students "Catch a Star"!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    School students from across Europe and beyond have won prizes in an astronomy competition, including the trip of a lifetime to one of the world's most powerful astronomical observatories, on a mountaintop in Chile. ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, together with the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), has just announced the winners of the 2007 "Catch a Star!" competition. ESO PR Photo 21/07 "Catch a Star!" is an international astronomy competition for school students, in which students are invited to 'become astronomers' and explore the Universe. The competition includes two categories for written projects on astronomical themes, to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, "Catch a Star!" also includes an astronomy-themed artwork competition. Students from 22 countries submitted hundreds of written projects and pieces of artwork. "The standard of entries was most impressive, and made the jury's task of choosing winners both enjoyable and difficult! We hope that everyone, whether or not they won a prize, had fun taking part, and learnt some exciting things about our Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Jan Mestan and Jan Kotek from Gymnazium Pisek in the Czech Republic, together with their teacher Marek Tyle. Their report on "Research and Observation of the Solar Eclipse" told how they had studied solar eclipses, and involved their fellow students in observations of an eclipse from their school in 2006. The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - one of the world's most powerful optical/infrared telescopes - where they will meet astronomers and be present during a night of observations on the 2600m high Paranal mountaintop. "It's fantastic that we will see the

  8. The Use of Professionalism Scenarios in the Medical School Interview Process: Faculty and Interviewee Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Kleshinski, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of professionalism scenarios on the medical school admissions process from applicant and faculty perspectives. Specifically, do completing professionalism scenarios as part of the medical school interview process have an impact on both the interviewee’s and the faculty’s perception of the process and outcome?Method: Ninety-one faculty interviewed 199 applicants from January 2007 through April 2007 at The University of Toledo College of Medicine. All applicants were asked one standard professionalism scenario in each of their two interviews. A total of six scenarios were used for the entire interviewing season in rotation every two months. A survey was administered by an admissions office staff member to both the interviewed applicants as well as faculty who conducted interviews about how these scenarios impacted their interview experience.Results: Asking applicants to respond to professionalism scenarios during the interview was described as having a positive influence on their interview experience. This was also associated with leaving an impression on the applicant about what our institution values in its students and contributed an element of personal reflection about what will be expected of them in the medical profession. Applicants more often reported that asking questions about professionalism was an important aspect of the interview than did faculty. Overall, there was an association between the interviewer’s perception of the applicant’s response and the interviewer’s assessment of professionalism.Conclusions: Professionalism scenarios can be a worthwhile tool for use in the admissions process. The interview process should encourage participation from faculty who value this as an important component in the evaluation of an applicant. Determinants of faculty perception of the role of assessing professionalism in the interview process should be investigated in future

  9. Awareness of Consumer Protection Act among dental health professionals in dental schools of Ghaziabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta; Dhingra, Chandan; Anand, Richa

    2013-12-01

    The study aimed to assess the awareness of the Consumer Protection Act among dental health professionals in dental schools of Ghaziabad, India. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out on dental health professionals in dental schools of Ghaziabad, India. A total of 348 dental health professionals (170 males and 178 females) were surveyed, out of which 116 were MDS faculty, 45 were BDS faculty and 187 were pursuing post graduation. The questionnaire comprised of 24 questions about the awareness of consumer protection act. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, student's t test and ANOVA. A total of 84.8% (n=295) reported to be aware of consumer protection act. Amongst them, MDS faculty showed more awareness as compared to BDS faculty and those pursuing post-graduation. Considering the present scenario, MDS faculty dental professionals have more awareness of consumer protection act compared to other dental professionals. So, we must upgrade our knowledge on consumer protection act at all levels of our profession and change our attitude by inculcating a practice to spread the message of consumer protection act for delivering quality dental care.

  10. Factors affecting the impact of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice, student outcomes & efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ingvarson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This report examines effects of structural and process features of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice and efficacy. It is based on four recent (2002-2003 studies undertaken through the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme, designed to enhance teacher quality. The total data set for the survey study includes 3,250 teachers who had participated in eighty individual professional development1 activities within these studies. Teachers were surveyed at least three months after participating in an activity, which provided them with the opportunity to gauge the impact of programs on their practice. To investigate factors affecting impact, a theoretical model was developed based on recent research into the characteristics of effective professional development and tested using blockwise regression analysis. The model included contextual factors (e.g., school support, structural features of programs (e.g. ,length, process features (e.g., emphasis on content; active learning; examination of student work; feedback; follow-up, a mediating variable (level of professional community generated, and four outcome measures (knowledge; practice; student learning and efficacy. Consistent significant direct effects were found across the four studies for the impact of content focus, active learning, and follow-up on knowledge and professional community. Feedback was rarely incorporated into program design. Impact on efficacy was strongly related to the perceived impact of activities on teachers' practice and student learning outcomes.

  11. High School Students' Views on Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Ibrahim Umit; Akbayin, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to determine the high school students' views on blended learning. The study was carried out in biology course for the lesson unit of "Classification of Living Things and Biodiversity" with 47 9[superscript th] grade students attending Nevzat Ayaz Anatolian High School in the second term of the academic year of…

  12. Dual Enrollment for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Linsey; Hughes, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Dual enrollment programs allow high school students to enroll in college courses and potentially earn college credit. The term concurrent enrollment is sometimes used interchangeably with dual enrollment, and sometimes to refer to a particular model of dual enrollment. In some programs, students earn high school and college credit simultaneously;…

  13. Mobile Technologies in Schools: The Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Emma-Leigh; Robertson, Neville; Sargisson, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate and high school students spend a large amount of time using mobile devices (Lauricella, Cingel, Blackwell, Wartella, & Conway, 2014), and such devices are increasingly being integrated into our school system. We conducted a series of student-led focus groups, with this early adolescent cohort, in order to better understand their…

  14. Scientific Literacy of High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Keith B.; Tulip, David F.

    This investigation was undertaken in order to establish the status of scientific literacy among three groups of secondary school students in four Brisbane, Australia high schools, and to reduce the apparent reticence of science teachers to evaluate students' achievement in the various dimensions of scientific literacy by demonstrating appropriate…

  15. ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL SKILLS OF STUDENTS IN IT-BASED CONTROLLED EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF A UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeiy Nikolaevich Boyarov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article looks at the problem of estimating professional skills of students, the process of their building and assessing their level in IT-based controlled educational environment of a university. The author presents research findings of professional skills level of future educational professionals in the field of Life Safety[1] based on their academic results.Goal: to develop and show by experiments efficiency of building professional skills of students in IT-based controlled educational environment of a university.Results: increasing the level of professional skills in IT-based controlled educational environment of a university.Scope of application of results: field of higher professional education.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-1[1] Life Safety or Fundamentals of Health and Safety is a secondary school subject, which involves teaching basic rules of how to act in dangerous situations in everyday life (natural disasters, fires, terrorist attacks, etc., provide first aid, etc.

  16. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  17. Charter Schools and Student Compositions of Traditional Public Schools

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    Nevbahar Ertas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most contentious urban education policy issues in the United States today is the expansion of charter schools and its repercussions. Does the expansion of charter schools affect the racial and socioeconomic composition of traditional public schools in the United States? This study provides empirical evidence on this question by relying on a panel design that uses school-level data from two states that have experimented with charter schools for more than 15 years: Ohio and Texas. Using county-level, spatial, and enrollment-based measures of charter exposure, the changes from pre- to post-charter-legislation stages in the student compositions of public schools that do and do not face competition from charters are examined. The results suggest that charter school presence contributes to aggregate-level changes in the share of non-Hispanic White and free-lunch-eligible students in traditional public schools in both states in different ways.

  18. School nurses’ experiences working with students with mental health problems : A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Julia; Maltestam, Malin; Bengtsson-Tops, Anita; Garmy, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe school nurses’ experiences working with students with mental health problems. In this inductive qualitative study, interviews were conducted with 14 school nurses in Sweden. The content analysis revealed three themes:(1) sense of worriedness about working with students with mental health problems, (2) taking care of students with mental health issues was an opportunity for personal and professional development, and (3) the experience of making a difference for young pe...

  19. International note: between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangyang, Liu

    2012-08-01

    The present study examined the between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements. In a sample of 1870 Chinese 10th grade students, the results indicated that Chinese high school students' academic achievements were correlated across nine subjects. In line with the previous Western findings, the findings suggested that academic achievement was largely domain-general in nature. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High School Physics Students' Personal Epistemologies and School Science Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen

    2017-11-01

    This case study explores students' physics-related personal epistemologies in school science practices. The school science practices of nine eleventh grade students in a physics class were audio-taped over 6 weeks. The students were also interviewed to find out their ideas on the nature of scientific knowledge after each activity. Analysis of transcripts yielded several epistemological resources that students activated in their school science practice. The findings show that there is inconsistency between students' definitions of scientific theories and their epistemological judgments. Analysis revealed that students used several epistemological resources to decide on the accuracy of their data including accuracy via following the right procedure and accuracy via what the others find. Traditional, formulation-based, physics instruction might have led students to activate naive epistemological resources that prevent them to participate in the practice of science in ways that are more meaningful. Implications for future studies are presented.

  1. Teachers’ dialogue in a learner centered professional development initiative In a us urban high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Alvarez Gutiérrez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using paradigms emerging from Learner Centered Professional Development (LCPD, dialogic education and Transformative Pedagogical Practices (TPPs, this research study examined pedagogies that ignited a revitalization of shared values as a community of learners, challenged assumptions about learning while invigorating professional identities and cultivating possibilities for transforming praxis of a group of female teachers and female administrators in an urban high school. The LCPD initiative engaged teachers (13 and administrators (3 in dialogue, self-examination, and reflection, while also chipping away dearth perceptions of Latina/o student as learners and nourish possibilities for their successes. The data for this study is part of a larger corpus of data exploring teacher professional development initiatives in a large urban city in the southwestern region of Texas. Narrative analysis was the methodological tool used to code and analyze the data. The authors highlight the pedagogies that served to renew teachers and administrators’ sense of community, professional identities and modifications of teachers’ attitudes and pedagogies regarding themselves and Latina/o students. Our research findings underscore the urgency of educational reform to include on-going LCPD in order to transform and encourage professional enrichment, teacher agency and revive pedagogies that support all students’ academic and social successes.

  2. The Student Teacher Portfolio as Autobiography: Developing a Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonek, Janis L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Argues that student teacher portfolios are a viable, effective, appropriate tool for documenting teacher growth and development and for promoting reflective practice. Traces the unique paths of two pre-service foreign language teachers who constructed a professional identity from the historical and cultural conditions of their classroom…

  3. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Esther; Derksen, Els; Prevoo, Mathieu; Laan, Roland; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Koopmans, Raymond

    Objectives The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an

  4. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, E.; Derksen, E.; Prevoo, M.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Bolhuis, S.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an

  5. Preaching Our Practice: On Sharing Professional Work with Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Describes one teacher-author's classroom use of interview samples, editors' comments, and other materials from his own article-then-in-progress for the "New York Times Magazine." Describes how students, who were creating their own in-depth magazine articles, could see principles and techniques discussed in class applied on a professional level.…

  6. Enabling the development of student teacher professional identity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the views of student teachers who were provided vicarious learning opportunities during an educational excursion, and how the learning enabled them to develop their teacher professional identity. This qualitative research study, using a social-constructivist lens highlights how vicarious learning ...

  7. The facilitation of professional values amongst student nurses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to formulate guidelines to facilitate the internalisation of professional values in student nurses in order to enable them to become caring registered nurses. To realise this goal, the researcher followed a quantitative, qualitative, descriptive, exploratory and contextual approach. In Phase One of ...

  8. Impact of a School-Based Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program Facilitated by Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; El-Mubasher, Abeer; Gallagher, Martina; Tyler, Chermaine; Woehler, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated a school-based obesity intervention for elementary school children (N = 835) where health professionals assisted teachers with the integration of healthy messages into the school curriculum. Methods: Schools were randomized into a professional-facilitated intervention (PFI; N = 4) or a self-help (SH; N = 3)…

  9. Impact of a school-based pediatric obesity prevention program faciliated by health professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated a school-based obesity intervention for elementary school children (N=835) where health professionals assisted teachers with the integration of healthy messages into the school curriculum. Schools were randomized into a professional-facilitated intervention (PFI; N=4) or a self-...

  10. The Perceptions of Administrators in the Implementation of Professional Learning Communities: A Case Study in an Oklahoma School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    In January of 2002, President George Bush implemented the No Child left behind act that required all students to be proficient on state standards by the year 2014. One way a school district in Oklahoma met these new requirements was through the implementation of the principles of a Professional Learning Community. This case study was designed…

  11. Teaching Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan; Willingham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Working with two teachers and thirty-four high school seniors, the authors developed procedures and assessments to teach ethics in an American high school civics class. This approach requires high school students to discover an agreement or convergence between Kantian ethics and virtue ethics. The authors also created an instrument to measure…

  12. A system of activities for the professional orientation in the students of Soldadura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pérez Prats

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article a problem is not approached solved by the Cuban education: the orientation toward the specialties of the Technical Education and Professional. In the same one it offers a system of activities that it has present the potentialities of the polytechnical school to strengthen the process, once the students enter it. The activities proposed with systemic character leaves of the students´ necessities to offer a solution in the specialty worker qualified in Welding that is studied in the polytechnical center Primero de Mayo, in Pinar de Rio.

  13. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Derksen, Els; Prevoo, Mathieu; Laan, Roland; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Koopmans, Raymond

    2010-07-01

    The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an assistant nurse while training to be a doctor may offer valuable learning experiences, but may also present the student with difficulties with respect to identity and identification issues. The aim of the present study was to describe first-year medical students' perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors before and after a nursing attachment. A questionnaire containing open questions concerning students' perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors was administered to all Year 1 medical students (n=347) before and directly after a 4-week nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes. We carried out two confirmatory focus group interviews. We analysed the data using qualitative and quantitative content analyses. The questionnaire was completed by 316 students (response rate 91%). Before starting the attachment students regarded nurses as empathic, communicative and responsible. After the attachment students reported nurses had more competencies and responsibilities than they had expected. Students' views of doctors were ambivalent. Before and after the attachment, doctors were seen as interested and reliable, but also as arrogant, detached and insensible. However, students maintained positive views of their own future roles as doctors. Students' perceptions were influenced by age, gender and place of attachment. An early nursing attachment engenders more respect for the nursing profession. The ambivalent view of doctors needs to be explored further in relation to students' professional development. It would seem relevant to attune supervision to the age and gender differences revealed in this study.

  14. Learning professionalism during the third year of medical school in a 9-month-clinical rotation in rural Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Therese; Halaas, Gwen Wagstrom; Brooks, Kathleen D

    2009-11-01

    Professionalism is now an explicit part of the medical school curricula. To examine the components that are part of developing professionalism during the Rural Physician Associate Program (RPAP) experience, a 9-month rotation in a rural community during the third year of medical school. Two researchers analysed 3 years of essays for themes. IRB approval was obtained. Themes were organized using Van de Camp's model of professionalism. Students described how patients taught them about illnesses, the affects on their lives and the lives of their families. Preceptors role-modelled how to relate to patients with compassion and respect (Professionalism Towards the Patient). As a member of the health care team, clinic and hospital staff taught students how to be a good team member (Towards Other Health Care Professionals). Shadowing preceptors in their roles as physicians and community members, students learned about their responsibilities to the community (Towards the Public). Multiple opportunities for self-evaluation and reflection taught students to know themselves and find balance between work responsibilities and their personal lives (Towards Oneself). The RPAP appears to create a supportive learning environment that incorporates psychological safety, appreciation of differences, openness to new ideas and time for reflection - an ideal environment for developing professionalism.

  15. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school students. To evaluate usability, we analyzed students' task performance and task completion time as they worked on an activity with the repurposed modeling technology. In stage 1, we conducted remote testing of an early modeling prototype with urban middle school students (n = 84). In stages 2 and 3, we used screencasting software to record students' mouse and keyboard movements during collaborative think-alouds (n = 22) and conducted a qualitative analysis of their peer discussions. Taken together, the study findings revealed two kinds of usability issues that interfered with students' productive use of the tool: issues related to the use of data and information, and issues related to the use of the modeling technology. The study findings resulted in design improvements that led to stronger usability outcomes and higher task performance among students. In this paper, we describe our methods for usability testing, our research findings, and our design solutions for supporting students' use of the modeling technology and use of data. The paper concludes with implications for the design and study of modeling technologies for science learning.

  16. PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AND COMPETENCE CORRELATION OF RURAL SCHOOLS TEACHERS IN THE CONDITIONS OF EDUCATION MODERNIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Gavrilova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article deals with the problem of teacher's professional activity in conditions of education modernization. The subject of analysis is professional mobility and competence correlation of rural schools teachers and the conditions of its formation. The authors’ aim to reveal the concepts of teacher’s "professional mobility", "professional competence" in rural schools and to determine its nature and structure in the changing paradigm of education. Results. The results of this work are that the authors give the definition of teacher’s "professional competence" and "professional mobility" in rural schools; concern teacher’s professional competence as a part of professional mobility in rural schools and suggest the conditions of studying to improve teacher’s professional competence and mobility. Practical implications. The results of the study can be applied in the field of teachers retraining and advanced training in primary and secondary school.

  17. Understanding Military Culture: A Guide for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Rebekah F.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors must be knowledgeable about military culture in order to help military students and their families in a culturally competent manner. This article explores the nature of this unique culture, which is often unfamiliar to educators, including its language, hierarchy, sense of rules and regulations, self-expectations and…

  18. A Discussion of Professional Identity Development in Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Maginnis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Becoming a nurse requires development of professional capabilities, specifically socialisation into the profession and developing a professional identity (PI. A search of the literature highlights a lack of empirical research in PI development during pre-registration nursing education. A range of factors will be explored that relate to PI, including identity, professional socialisation, a sense of belonging to the profession and clinical placement. Exploring the development of a PI in nursing students can assist with identifying drivers and inhibitors. The aim of this paper is to describe PI development in pre-registration nursing students’ education and the relationship between development of a PI and the tertiary provided education. There are a multitude of factors that impact on developing a PI such as identity, professional socialisation, belonging, clinical placements and educators. Nursing students predominantly develop a nursing PI in the pre-registration program with professional socialisation through exposure to academia, clinical practice and role models. The onus of responsibility for developing a PI in nursing students is attributed to educational institutions. An expected outcome of the pre-registration program is that nursing students will have formed a PI. A greater depth of understanding PI is important in supporting the education of the nurses of the future. There may not be one simple explanation for what PI is, or how it is developed, but a greater depth of understanding of PI by both the tertiary sector and the nursing profession is important in supporting the education of the nurses of the future. Further research will enable a dialogue describing the development of a PI in nursing students and an understanding of the attributes and conceptions attributed to a nursing PI.

  19. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  20. Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Schools: Results from Two Schools in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Reginard Milinga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quest for equal access, participation and success in education for persons with disabilities is paramount in today’s global education context, and Tanzania is no exception. Since the ages of “denial” to “full inclusion”, educating students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms has had been responded differently by teachers and students alike across countries. Confronted by different challenges in their education, students with disabilities are to devise mechanisms to excel in such restrictive learning environments. Informed by interpretive research traditions with 59 purposefully selected participants, this paper explores challenges that students with disabilities are faced with and coping strategies used by these students in their schooling in two inclusive secondary schools in Tanzania. The findings indicate that, students with disabilities are faced with challenges which are teacher and environment-related. Consequently, the students with disabilities use complaints, assistance seeking, self-initiatives, isolation and despair, and assertiveness to cope with the challenges. The study concludes that; educational stakeholders should work collaboratively in order to lessen the impact of the restrictive nature of learning environments for students with disabilities. The paper recommends on improved teacher preparation and continued professional development in order to cater for the learning needs of students with disabilities in inclusive schools.

  1. The teaching professional performance on the subjects of Labor Education and Informatics on the Secondary School level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Zayas Molina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Different transformation s are assume d i n the Secondary School that require the teacher ́s professional performa nce in two different subjects , Labor Education and Informatics , to be able to solve social and environment problems of the school context, taking into account the technological development achieved. This Issue is of great importance for the fulfilment of b asic and comprehensive training of students in that level.

  2. Professional Technical Standards in Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tricia M.; Chichester, Clinton O.; Sanoski, Cynthia A.; Woodward, Donald A.; Worley, Marcia M.; Early, Johnnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, characteristics, and use of professional technical standards among colleges and schools of pharmacy accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). Methods The Web site of every college and school of pharmacy accredited by ACPE was searched to identify information regarding the availability, content, and use of technical standards and to obtain demographic information. Results Information was obtained from all of the 114 colleges and schools of pharmacy and 67 (59%) had technical standards in place. Common themes for technical standards were: observation; communication; motor; intellectual, conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social attributes. Of those colleges and schools with technical standards, 61 (91%) had standards that addressed all 5 of these themes and 34 (51%) specified that the technical standards were used in their admission, progression, and graduation procedures. Conclusion More than half of the colleges and schools of pharmacy examined in this study have technical standards; however, 41% have yet to develop and implement them. Colleges and schools of pharmacy looking for guidance in technical standards development could use the technical standards themes identified in this study. PMID:21655404

  3. An Assessment of Need for Instructional Professional Development for Middle School Science Teachers Using Interactive Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Amanda

    Numerous studies on the impact of interactive lessons on student learning have been conducted, but there has been a lack of professional development (PD) programs at a middle school focusing on ways to incorporate interactive lessons into the science classroom setting. The purpose of this case study was to examine the instructional practices of science teachers to determine whether the need for an interactive lessons approach to teaching students exists. This qualitative case study focused on teachers' perceptions and pedagogy to determine whether the need to use interactive lessons to meet the needs of all students is present. The research question focused on identifying current practices and determining whether a need for interactive lessons is present. Qualitative data were gathered from science teachers at the school through interviews, lesson plans, and observations, all of which were subsequently coded using an interpretative analysis. The results indicated the need for a professional development (PD) program centered on interactive science lessons. Upon completion of the qualitative study, a detailed PD program has been proposed to increase the instructional practices of science teachers to incorporate interactive lessons within the science classroom. Implications for positive social change include improved teaching strategies and lessons that are more student-centered resulting in better understanding and comprehension, as well as performance on state-mandated tests.

  4. A longitudınal study on the effect of tailored training and counseling on the professional attitude of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, Ayise; Hisar, Filiz; Göçmen Baykara, Zehra; Çalışkan, Nurcan; Karabulut, Hatice; Öztürk, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    The development of professional attitudes in nursing students is influenced by their learning experiences (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) and instructors' professional behaviors. Instructors can enhance students' professional attitude by organizing the training environment, being a role model, and providing counseling. This study was conducted as a tailoring intervention study over 4 years (2010-2013) examining 73 nursing students (34 intervention, 39 control) to determine the effect of training and counseling on nursing students' professional attitudes. Data were collected utilizing the Introductory Characteristics Form and the Instrument of Professional Attitude for Student Nurses. Intervention group students were provided training and counseling complementing their current education to develop their professional attitudes. Controls proceeded with their current education. Instrument for Professional Attitude for Student Nurses posttest scores of the intervention group were significantly higher than those of control group students. Furthermore, intervention group scores on all subscales other than "competence and continuous education" significantly increased after training. Controls showed no growth in professional attitudes, other than in "contribution to scientific knowledge." The training and counseling program had a positive influence on the professional attitudes of nursing students. Thus, providing tailored training and counseling associated to professionalism throughout the educational process at schools providing nursing training is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The training for health equity network evaluation framework: a pilot study at five health professional schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Simone J; Preston, Robyn; Lindemann, Iris C; Matte, Marie C; Samson, Rex; Tandinco, Filedito D; Larkins, Sarah L; Palsdottir, Bjorg; Neusy, Andre-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet), a group of diverse health professional schools aspiring toward social accountability, developed and pilot tested a comprehensive evaluation framework to assess progress toward socially accountable health professions education. The evaluation framework provides criteria for schools to assess their level of social accountability within their organization and planning; education, research and service delivery; and the direct and indirect impacts of the school and its graduates, on the community and health system. This paper describes the pilot implementation of testing the evaluation framework across five THEnet schools, and examines whether the evaluation framework was practical and feasible across contexts for the purposes of critical reflection and continuous improvement in terms of progress towards social accountability. In this pilot study, schools utilized the evaluation framework using a mixed method approach of data collection comprising of workshops, qualitative interviews and focus group discussions, document review and collation and analysis of existing quantitative data. The evaluation framework allowed each school to contextually gather evidence on how it was meeting the aspirational goals of social accountability across a range of school activities, and to identify strengths and areas for improvement and development. The evaluation framework pilot study demonstrated how social accountability can be assessed through a critically reflective and comprehensive process. As social accountability focuses on the relationship between health professions schools and health system and health population outcomes, each school was able to demonstrate to students, health professionals, governments, accrediting bodies, communities and other stakeholders how current and future health care needs of populations are addressed in terms of education, research, and service learning.

  6. Student Trust in Teachers and Student Perceptions of Safety: Positive Predictors of Student Identification with School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Kensler, Lisa; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of student trust in teacher and student perceptions of safety on identification with school. Data were collected from one large urban district in an eastern state. Participants included 5441 students in 3rd through 12th grades from 49 schools. Students responded to surveys that assessed student trust in teachers,…

  7. [Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubin, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship.

  8. refractive errors among secondary school students in Isuikwuato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eyamba

    STUDENTS IN ISUIKWUATO LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF ... the prevalence and types of refractive errors among secondary school students ... KEYWORDS: Refractive error, Secondary School students, ametropia, .... interviews of the teachers as regards the general performance of those students with obvious visual.

  9. Medical Professionalism: the Effects of Sociodemographic Diversity and Curricular Organization on the Attitudinal Performance of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Silva dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Socioeconomic and demographic diversity in the educational environment and the development of professional attitudes enhance the quality of health care delivery. Despite the importance of diversity for equity and accessibility to health care, its repercussions for students’ attitudinal learning have not been adequately evaluated. Purpose: Evaluate the influence of academic sociodemographic diversity and curricular organization in the development of professional attitudes in different phases of the undergraduate medical curriculum. Method: In 2012, the attitudinal performance of 310 socioeconomically diverse medical students was evaluated by the administration of a five-point professional attitudes scale. The participants were at different points in their education at a Brazilian public school of medicine in Brasília, Federal District. The scale comprised 6 factors: communication, ethics, professional excellence, self-assessment, beliefs, social determinants; and a general factor called medical professionalism and was validated for the purpose of this research. The reliability coefficients (aCronbach ranged from 0.65 to 0.87, according to different scale dimensions. Student diversity was analyzed according to differences in gender, age, religious affiliation, system of student selection and socioeconomic background. Results: The authors observed a decline in the mean attitude scores during the clinical phase compared to the preclinical phase of the curriculum. Female students displayed more positive attitudes than male students, and the students who declared a religious affiliation recorded higher attitude scores compared to those who declared themselves atheist, agnostic or non-religious. There was no correlation between family income or the system of student selection and the students’ attitude scores. The students who had attended public schools expressed a greater interest in working in the public health system

  10. [Perception of professional identity in nursing amongst undergraduate students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albar, María-Jesús; Sivianes-Fernández, María

    2016-01-01

    To identify the perception of the nursing professional identity between first and fourth grade students. A descriptive study using a questionnaire. A random sample of 50 and 51 students were selected from the first and fourth grade, respectively. The questionnaire was prepared by expert consensus, and it included a sociodemographic data register, 14 items, and two open questions. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed on the data, using the Chi-squared test to determine the possible differences between both grades. SPSS 22.0 statistics software was employed. The open questions were submitted to a content analysis. Statistically significant differences were found between the items related to the diversity of roles that the nursing professionals can develop within the health care system (professional and academic), and between the autonomous nature of their practices. These data were confirmed by the information obtained with the open questions. Academic training is of great importance in the process of acquiring the professional identity of future professionals in nursing, but changing the public image of the profession is the responsibility of all the social agents involved in its development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Professional Learning Community in Secondary Schools Community in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Abdullah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a research towards an initial assessment of the stage of the PLC in secondary schools in Malaysians secondary school with teachers as the main focus. A brief philosophy of the importance of learning organization and its development in various countries was reviewed and incorporated by the current situations, leading to the objectives and methodology for this study. The result showed the teachers can be active in their learning and improving their schools as to enhance the learning performance of the students in the first four characteristic dimensions refer to the practice of shared values, goals, mission and vision among teachers which play an important role in shaping the PLC in secondary school.

  12. Professional development of medical students: problems and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, D

    1997-12-01

    Observers and critics of the medical profession, both within and without, urge that more attention be paid to the moral sensibilities, the characters, of medical students. Passing on particular moral values and actions to physicians has always been an essential core of medical training, and this call for renewal is not new in modern medicine. Some of the structures and characteristics of modern medical education, however, often work directly against the professionalism that the education espouses. For example, medical students are socialized into a hierarchy that has broad implications for relations among health care professionals, other health care workers, and patients, and academic medicine has not promoted and taught critical reflection about the values and consequences of this hierarchy. Further, behind the formal curriculum lies the "hidden curriculum" of values that are unconsciously or half-consciously passed on from the faculty and older trainees. Two resources for thinking anew about professional development for medical students are feminist standpoint theory and critical multicultural theory, each of which raises important and fundamental questions about defining the role of medicine in society and the role of the physician in medicine. The author discusses these two theories and their implications for medical education, showing how they can be used to move discussions of professional development into analysis of the widespread social consequences of how a society organizes its health care and into critical reflection on the nature of medical knowledge.

  13. American high school students shine a spotlight on CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Between 2 and 7 April eighteen American high school students were let loose at CERN armed with video cameras. Their mission? To take on the role of broadcast journalists and inspire their peers across the US with short documentaries and blogs illuminating the work happening at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Members of the teams of budding physicists and broadcast journalists pose in front of the ATLAS detector.Following in the footsteps of professional journalists around the world, six teams of American high school students recently travelled to CERN to experience the increasing excitement in the run-up to the switch-on of the LHC. The six teams are from five states across the US and were the winners of a competition sponsored and funded by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the National Science Foundation. Each team consists of three students plus a teacher, who combine their knowledge of ph...

  14. Professional Identity and Burnout among Pre-School, Elementary, and Post-Elementary School Teachers in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisherman, Shraga

    2015-01-01

    The novelty of the present study is its attempt to distinguish between pre-school, elementary, and post-elementary school teachers, regarding the relationship between professional identity and burnout. Two hundred and forty teachers responded to two questionnaires: professional identity and teacher burnout scales. Pre-school teachers were found to…

  15. Climate Change Professional Development Approaches: Design Considerations, Teacher Enactment, and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, A.; Henderson, J.; Mouza, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is one of the most pressing challenges facing society, and climate change educational models are emerging in response. This study investigates the implementation and enactment of a climate change professional development model for science educators and its impact on student learning. Using an intrinsic case study methodology, we focused analytic attention on how one teacher made specific curricular, pedagogical, and content decisions, and the implications of those decisions for student's conceptual learning.The research presented here reports on the instructional design, pedagogical enactment, and subsequent effects on student learning of a climate change professional development (PD) model in the United States. Using anthropological theories of conceptual travel, we traced salient ideas from the PD through instructional delivery and into the evidence of student reasoning. We sought to address the following research questions: 1) How did a middle school teacher integrate climate change concepts into her science curriculum following PD participation? and 2) How did climate change instruction influence student understanding of key climate change constructs?From observation of the classroom instruction, we determined that the teacher effectively integrated new climate change information into her pre-existing schema. Additionally, through retrospective analysis of the PD, we found the design of the PD foregrounded the causes, mechanisms and likely effects of anthropogenic climate change at the expense of mitigation and adaptation strategies, and this differentially shaped how climate change was taught in the teacher's classroom. Analysis of student reasoning evidence showed that students gained an increased understanding of the enhanced greenhouse effect and the implications of human activity on this enhanced effect at statistically significant levels and with moderate effect sizes. However, students demonstrated a limited, though non-significant gain on

  16. Attitudes of High School Students towards Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Avcı

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, attitudes of high school students towards geometry were investigated in terms of gender, grade, types of the field and school. Population of research includes students who were studying at high school in five distincs of Mersin in 2013-2014 academical year. Sample of research includes 935 students from twelve high schools. Attitude scale which was developed by Su-Özenir (2008 was used for data collection. For data analysis, mean, standart deviation, t test and ANOVA were used. A meaningful difference between students’ attitudes towards geometry and variance of gender and grade level wasn’t observed, on the other hand a meaningful difference according to field and school type is observed.Key Words:    Attitudes towards geometry, high school geometry lesson, attitude scale

  17. School ethnic diversity and students' interethnic relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2014-03-01

    School ethnic desegregation has been a topic of strong societal and educational concern. Research has examined the effects of ethnic school composition on students' interethnic relations with diverging outcomes and sometimes inconsistent results. In this review paper, we provide an assessment of this literature to explain why and when school desegregation might improve or worsen ethnic relations and to identify important future research directions. We discuss different theoretical perspectives predicting positive versus negative aspects of school ethnic diversity: intergroup contact theory and the perspectives of group threat and power differences. Subsequently, we consider a number of school and educational characteristics that can moderate the impact of ethnic diversity on students' interethnic relations and that could be considered in future research. Furthermore, we discuss the need for studying underlying psychological and social processes as well as the importance of investigating interethnic relations in combination with academic adjustment. School ethnic diversity is not enough to promote interethnic tolerance. It is important to examine diversity in relation to other aspects of the school environment that may influence how students respond to the ethnic diversity within school. Important factors to consider are the presence of multicultural education and inclusive school identities, student-teacher relationships, and peer norms and networks, but also the role of parents and of peer relations outside the school context. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Peer mentoring: Enhancing the transition from student to professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Margaret; Stanyer, Rachel

    2018-05-01

    to share the experience of a model of peer mentoring in a pre-qualification midwifery programme DESIGN: description of the framework and benefits of the model SETTING: University and practice PARTICIPANTS: third year midwifery students INTERVENTIONS: practical activities meeting regulatory body requirements in a pre-qualification mentorship module MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: informal evaluations by students of key activities undertaken during peer mentoring demonstrated a range of positive outcomes. These included enhanced confidence, self-awareness, interpersonal and teaching skills, team-working and leadership - factors also associated with emotional intelligence. Students developed an appreciation of the accountability of the mentor including making practice assessment decisions. They stated that the learning achieved had aided their professional development and enhanced employability. this module equips students with skills for their future role in facilitating learners and contributes to development of a 'professional persona', enhancing their transition to qualified midwives. The Peer Mentoring Model would be easily adapted to other programmes and professional contexts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A suicide awareness and intervention program for health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Eve; Bowerman, Lisa; Zimitat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Many emergency service professionals and health professionals play important roles in the assessment and management of suicide risk but often receive inadequate mental health training in this area. A 'Suicide Awareness and Intervention Program' (SAIP) was developed for first year medical, paramedical and pharmacy students at the University of Tasmania, Australia. The program aimed to increase students' knowledge and awareness about suicide-related issues, develop interpersonal skills around suicide screening and increase awareness of available support services. A 5-hour experiential SAIP was embedded within the curriculum. A pre and post evaluation of knowledge, skills and attitudes was conducted, with an open-ended follow-up survey regarding use of what was learned in the program. Pre and post SAIP surveys showed significant improvement inknowledge and practical skills. Feedback from students and the counselling service indicated enduring impact of the program. Participation in the SAIP increased knowledge, skills and attitudes related to the assessment and management of individuals at risk for suicide, and the application of this ability to students' personal and professional lives.

  20. Examining School Counseling Students' Multicultural and Sexual Orientation Competencies through a Cross-Specialization Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidell, Markus P.

    2012-01-01

    Professional school counselors have an opportunity to directly address the educational, emotional, and social problems facing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth. The purpose of this study was to examine the multicultural and sexual orientation counselor competencies of school counseling students through a…

  1. School Principals, Leadership Coaches, and Student Achievement: Enhancing Self-Efficacy through the Coaching Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Virginia E.

    2011-01-01

    School principals face an increasing number of professional demands, especially the challenge of improving student achievement. As such, the purpose of this dissertation is to study the effect of leadership coaching on a school principal's responsibilities related to carrying out these demands. Specifically, the researcher examined a subset of…

  2. The Preparation of Pre-Service Student Teachers' Competence to Work in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sylvia Y. F.; Cheng, May M. H.; Wong, Angel K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Competence to work in schools is an important dimension of professional competence, although it is often a neglected dimension of teacher development. This article reports a qualitative study that examined student teachers' learning experiences in initial teacher education (ITE) in relation to competence to work in schools. In-depth interviews…

  3. Professional development in the context of Healthy Schools in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschesnes, Marthe; Tessier, Caroline; Couturier, Yves; Martin, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    This article reports preliminary research results on a professional development (PD) model as a mechanism for supporting absorption of the Healthy School (HS) approach into school functioning. The purpose of our study was to document the model implementation process and understand whether it influenced, or not, the accompanied actors' knowledge and practices about HS. The theoretical basis of the model and a description of its implementation, its appreciation by actors and its influence on their knowledge and confidence are presented. The research was conducted in three Quebec schools that had adopted this approach for at least 2 years. Multiple case study methodology, with pre- (T0) and post- (T1) intervention comparison, was adopted. The results disclose that the PD model implemented, which involves socio-constructivist accompaniment, has several assets that support the acquisition and application of new knowledge related to HS in order to promote its absorption within schools. Our findings indicate that PD likely reinforced the actors' knowledge and understanding as well as their confidence. The lessons drawn from the evaluation of this PD model could serve to enhance accompaniment methods implemented to promote the absorption of such initiatives in schools. Our data highlight the relevance and effectiveness of accompaniment anchored in action, calling for practice based on reflection and expert recommendations to meet the objectives of health and academic success. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Spanish adaptation of The Penn State College of Medicine Scale to assess professionalism in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Eliseo; Sanabria, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism is a subject of interest in medical schools around the world. The use of a questionnaire could be useful to assess professionalism in Colombia. To adapt The Penn State University College of Medicine Professionalism Questionnaire as a culturally valid instrument in the Spanish language. We followed recommendations from the IQOLA project and used forward and back translation with four independent translations, as well as a pilot evaluation and an evaluation of psychometric features with 250 students. We evaluated item-scale correlations and internal consistency with Chronbach's alpha test and conducted a principal components factor analysis. Global Cronbach's alpha was 0.86, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.83, and Bartlett's test of sphericity had a p >0.00001. We found six factors that explained 93% of the total variance and four new factors emerged in the factor analysis, while eight items had high uniqueness. The Penn State University College of Medicine Scale measures professionalism attitudes in medical students with good reliability. However, the structure of the scale demonstrated differences when used in the Latin American medical student population.

  5. Professionalizations of Danish Teachers Encountering the 'Immigrant of School Age'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padovan-Özdemir, Marta

    of integration', and as such act on behalf of the imagined collective good (Larsen 2012). This educational optimism is understood in terms of the development of the universal welfare state (Sandin 2012) and its rational engineering of social life (Petersen 1997). Petersen (1997) argues that the government...... of the collective good in the modern welfare nation-state becomes highly dependent on "the acceptance of expert knowledge as the foundation of a good life" (p. 367, my translation). The paper argues that the act of and desire for professionalization of teachers encountering the immigrant of school age should...... for the perceived threat to the collective good and as signifiers of the appropriate solutions to this threat. The proposition of problem construction to be the inner logic of professionalization of teachers feeds into the analytical framework of the paper, where relations of power/knowledge make up the history...

  6. Cinemeducation: A pilot student project using movies to help students learn medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumlertgul, Nuttha; Kijpaisalratana, Naruchorn; Pityaratstian, Nuttorn; Wangsaturaka, Danai

    2009-07-01

    Using movies has been accepted worldwide as a tool to help students learn medical professionalism. In the second year, a group of medical students conducted the "Cinemeducation" project to promote professionalism in the "Medical Ethics and Critical Thinking" course. Five movies with professionalism issues were screened with 20-30 students attending each session. After the show, participants then were asked to reflect on what they had learned in terms of professionalism. Two students led group discussion emphasizing questioning and argumentation for 60 min. Additional learning issues emerging from each session were also explored in more depth and arranged into a report. In the Cinemeducation Project, medical students have learned five main ethical issues in each film, which were the doctor-patient relationship, informed consent and clinical trials in patients, management of genetic disorders, patient management, and brain death and organ transplantation. In addition to issues of professionalism, they also developed critical thinking and moral reasoning skills. Using a case-based scenario in movies has proven to be an effective and entertaining method of facilitating students with learning on professionalism.

  7. Bureaucratic Control or Professional Autonomy? Performance Management in New Zealand Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Tanya; Youngs, Howard; Grootenboer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Investigates New Zealand teachers' perceptions of the bureaucratic and professional approaches to performance management in their schools. In climate of increasing control of teachers' work and professional activities by the state, results indicate that school managers have adopted a professional approach to staff appraisal. (Contains 41…

  8. Exploring assistive technology and post-school outcomes for students with severe disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C; Flanagan, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to understand the extent to which students with severe disabilities receive assistive technology in school and out-of-school, and the relationship between receipt of assistive technology in school and post-school outcomes for these students. This study was a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) from the USA. To analyze the data in this correlational study, researchers conducted frequency distributions, Chi Square Tests of Associations, significance tests and logistic regressions. The main results suggest (a) receipt of assistive technology in school varied greatly by disability identification; (b) receipt of assistive technology post-school also varied by disability identification, but receipt was generally lower; and (c) few statistically significant post-school outcome differences existed between students who received assistive technology and those who did not. An under-utilization of assistive technology exists in practice in the USA for students with severe disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation An under-utilization of assistive technology for secondary students and adults with severe disabilities likely exists. A need exists for improved collaboration between professionals in rehabilitation and professionals in schools to ensure continuation of needed services or aids, such as assistive technology. Additional research is needed to better understand the adult life (or post-school) outcomes of individuals with severe disabilities, factors from PK-12 schooling or post-school services that positively and negative impact those outcomes.

  9. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION PEDAGOGICAL ENVIRONMENT AS MEANS OF FORMING OF MOTIVATION TO PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Onishchenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In terms of education informatization the formation of motivation to professional activity of the future primary school teacher most effectively takes place in information and communication pedagogical environment that provides new ways of presenting information, promotes the development of needs and readiness of students to perform professional activities with application of information and communication technologies. Information and communication pedagogical environment is a complex, multi-element pedagogical system, which accumulates information, organizational, intellectual, methodological, technical, program resources and promotes information and educational interaction in the model «teacher – student – environment». This environment creates favorable terms for forming of the expressed interest in the profession of primary school teacher, motivational-valued attitude toward pedagogical activity, promotes the education of students in information and pedagogical culture and creative activity in the independent capture of professional disciplines. Forming of interest in the profession of primary school teacher is assisted by bringing in of future specialist to the creative searches by the decision of the research tasks, creative nature, creation of own electronic products, creative projects. Information and communication pedagogical environment provides the realization of the potential of students by bringing them to self-education, which in terms of the environment acquires creative and research direction and promotes for non-standard decision of professional tasks on innovative bases.

  10. Middle School and High School Students Who Stutter: A Qualitative Investigation of School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Tiffany R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and further understand the ways in which middle school and high school students perceive their school experiences within the school environment. School has an important impact on the social development of children (Milsom, 2006). Learning is not done individually as classrooms are inherently social…

  11. Academic status of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in public schools: student, home, and service facilitators and detractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Susanne; Antia, Shirin D; Kreimeyer, Kathryn H

    2008-01-01

    We examined facilitators and detractors of academic success of 25 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) students selected from a pool of 187 students attending general education classes and enrolled in a study of academic progress. Interviews with their teachers of DHH, general education teachers, principals, parents, interpreters, and students themselves were analyzed for child, family, and school facilitators and detractors of academic status. Facilitators included student self-advocacy and motivation, high family and school expectations, families' ability to help with homework, and good communication between professionals. Detractors included additional disabilities and poor family-school communication. A comparison of above- and below-average students revealed no single distinguishing facilitator or detractor. Each above-average student had many facilitators, whereas each below-average student had several significant detractors.

  12. Professional formation of school librarian since a pedagogical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniuska Tito-Durán

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Deals with the present situation of the process the professional librarians´ logic training, as well as, the role they play as active protagonists within the society of information and in the support to the educative change. The aim of this piece of paper is to think about the school  librarian´s teaching functions ,taking into account the methodological matter, the orientation and the research-upgrading. There used methods of investigation of the empiric and theoretical level, such as: historical-logical, analysis and synthesis, induction deduction; observation, survey and interview.

  13. The School Absenteeism among High School Students: Contributing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Arslan, Gökmen; Duru, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the direct and indirect relationship between student school absenteeism, personal factors (academic self- perception, attitudes towards teacher and school, goal valuation and motivation/ self-regulation), family factors (parents' educational level and income), and academic achievement in structural equation…

  14. Conflict between nursing student's personal beliefs and professional nursing values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, David; de Lacey, Sheryl; King, Lindy

    2017-01-01

    Studies have established that negative perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS exist among nursing students throughout the world, perceptions which can be detrimental to the delivery of high-quality nursing care. The purpose of this research was to explore socio-cultural influences on the perceptions of nursing students towards caring for people living with HIV/AIDS. The study was guided by stigma theory, a qualitative descriptive research approach was adopted. Data collected via semi-structured interviews were thematically analysed. Participants and research context: Participants were 21 international and Australian undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nursing programme at an Australian university. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was granted by the Social and Behavioural Research Ethics Committee at the study university. Participation was entirely voluntary; informed consent was obtained before the study commenced; confidentiality and anonymity were assured. Three major themes were found: blame, othering and values. Complex and interrelated factors constructed participant perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS, perceptions underscored by the prevailing culturally construed blame and othering associated with HIV/AIDS. The study found discordance between the negative personal beliefs and perceptions some nursing students have towards people living with HIV/AIDS, and the professional values expected of them as Registered Nurses. There was considerable commonality between this and previous studies on how homosexuality and illicit drug use were perceived and stigmatised, correlating with the blame directed towards people living with HIV/AIDS. These perceptions indicated some nursing students potentially risked not fulfilling the ethical and professional obligations the Registered Nurse. Nursing curriculum should be strengthened in relation to comprehending the meaning of being stigmatised by society. Educational institutions need to

  15. Higher Education Access for Undocumented Students: Recommendations for Counseling Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, William

    2010-01-01

    My research shows that college-eligible undocumented students exhibit high levels of academic achievement, civic engagement and resilience. Many overcome academic and socio-emotional barriers through social and moral support from family, peers, school agents and academic programs. As a result of the state residency tuition eligibility across the…

  16. Addressing Elementary School Teachers' Professional Stressors: Practical Suggestions for Schools and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Sarah D.; Mason, Erin C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Given the preponderance of education reform since the No Child Left Behind Act (U.S. Department of Education, 2001), reform efforts have shaped the nature of the work and culture in schools. The emphasis on standardized testing to determine schools' status and student performance, among other factors, has generated stress, particularly…

  17. Integrating Expressive Therapies in School-Based Counseling: A Handbook for School Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiotto, Kimberley

    2013-01-01

    Research demonstrates that addressing mental health issues in children can yield both increased academic performance and better social-emotional skills. In the past, school-based mental health services for students have been implemented inconsistently and usually in combination with community partners. When school mental health interventions are…

  18. CONCURRENT VALIDITY OF THE STUDENT TEACHER PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Živković

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of study was to examine concurrent validity of the Student Teachers Professional Identity Scale–STPIS (Fisherman and Abbot, 1998 that was for the first time used in Serbia. Indicators of concurrent validity was established by correlation with student teacher self-reported well-being, self-esteem, burnout stress and resilience. Based on the results we can conclude that the STPIS meets the criterion of concurrent validity. The implications of these results are important for researchers and decisions makers in teacher education

  19. High School Students' Perception of University Students as STEM Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    The Danish government has an ambition to recruit more high school students into STEM edu-cations (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics). The students’ choice of further education is based on the people and jobs they have knowledge of. Therefore, to recruit more students into STEM....... Some representatives transmit infor-mation and are thereby definers, whereas other representatives illustrates as personal examples and are thereby models. This study focuses on high school students’ views on STEM representatives and the impact these representatives have on the high school students...... studies, it is important to introduce high school students to good STEM representatives to make possible the development of potential STEM identities. A potential identity within a specific subject area relies on at least a situation bound relation-ship to the subject area or the person representing it...

  20. Exploring the Professional Ideals of Christian Teachers from Conservative Protestant Schools in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boele-de Bruin, H. L.; de Muynck, A.

    2018-01-01

    Professional ideals arise from personal worldviews and specify teachers' professional identities. This study aimed to explore how faith is present in the professional ideals of Christian teachers. The professional ideals of 107 Dutch teachers from conservative Protestant primary and secondary schools were explored using an open-ended…

  1. Principals' Perceptions of Professional Development in High- and Low-Performing High-Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sheila; Kochan, Frances

    2013-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part study examining issues related to professional development in high-poverty schools. The findings from the initial study indicated that principals in high-poverty, high-performing schools perceived higher levels of implementation of quality professional development standards in their schools than did principals…

  2. The Survey and Analysis of Excellent Senior High School Physics Teachers' Professional Growth Actuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haibin; Liu, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    Excellent senior high school physics teachers are the backbone power in the new course reform of physics in China. The excellent senior high school physics teachers' professional growth actuality in Shandong is surveyed in this article by the self-made "Questionnaire of Excellent Senior High School Physics Teachers' Professional Growth",…

  3. Personal and professional values grading among midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Müesser; Akpinar, Aslihan; Ergin, Ayla B

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the professional and personal values among midwifery students in Turkey and to identify whether the years of study affected these values. A total of 192 participants were asked to prioritize 16 professional and 36 personal values. The relationship between the year of study and value ranking was analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. The first three of the professional values were justice, equality, and human dignity. Equality ranked sixth among the personal terminal values, and it increased with the years of study. Of personal instrumental values, responsibility and cleanliness ranked second and fifth, which are of central importance for the profession of midwifery. However, the other two important values, privacy and preventing unnecessary suffering, ranked lower when the years of study increased, in other words when the students confront clinics. Since these values are important for midwifery, ethics courses should be given throughout the midwifery education to prepare students for the challenges they face in the clinical environment.

  4. The Impact of Short-Term Science Teacher Professional Development on the Evaluation of Student Understanding and Errors Related to Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschang, Rebecca Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a short-term professional development session. Forty volunteer high school biology teachers were randomly assigned to one of two professional development conditions: (a) developing deep content knowledge (i.e., control condition) or (b) evaluating student errors and understanding in writing samples (i.e.,…

  5. The Impact of Short-Term Science Teacher Professional Development on the Evaluation of Student Understanding and Errors Related to Natural Selection. CRESST Report 822

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschang, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a short-term professional development session. Forty volunteer high school biology teachers were randomly assigned to one of two professional development conditions: (a) developing deep content knowledge (i.e., control condition) or (b) evaluating student errors and understanding in writing samples (i.e.,…

  6. Using Coaching as a Professional Development Modality to Train Teachers in the Use of Evidence-Based Practices for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Samantha Marsh

    2013-01-01

    Professional development for teachers currently working in the classroom is an important focus of educational programs and school systems. Continuous professional development is especially important for special education teachers to maintain current information related to strategies and supports that are effective in educating students with…

  7. Supporting medical students with learning disabilities in Asian medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anwarul Azim Majumder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Md. Anwarul Azim Majumder1, Sayeeda Rahman2, Urban JA D’Souza3, Gad Elbeheri4, Khalid Bin Abdulrahman5, M Muzaherul Huq61,2Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, Bradford, UK; 3School of Medicine, University Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia; 4Centre for Child Evaluation and Teaching, Kuwait; 5College of Medicine, Al-Imam University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 6Centre for Medical Education (CME, Mohakhali, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Learning disabilities (LDs represent the largest group of disabilities in higher education (HE institutes, including medical schools, and the numbers are continuing to rise. The worrying concern is that two-thirds to half of these students with LDs remain undiagnosed when they start their undergraduate education and may even graduate without having their disabilities diagnosed. These students struggle with their academic abilities, receive poor grades and, as a result, develop lower perceptions of their intellectual abilities than do those students without LDs. All these ultimately hamper their professional practice, employment, and career progression. Appropriate and adequate educational policies, provisions, and practices help students to progress satisfactorily. In Asian countries, public and professional awareness about LDs is low, supportive provisions are limited, legislations are inadequate, data are scarce, and equal-opportunity/widening-participation policies are not implemented effectively in the HE sector. This article discusses the issues related to LDs in medical education and draws policy, provision, and practice implications to identify, assess, and support students with LDs in medical schools, particularly in an Asian context.Keywords: medical education, learning disabilities, dyslexia, Asia

  8. Supporting Students with Disabilities during School Crises: A Teacher's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura S.; Embury, Dusty Columbia; Jones, Ruth E.; Yssel, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Most schools have crisis plans to support student safety, but few plans address the complex needs of students with disabilities. School supports should include analysis of school plans and student strengths and needs to ensure that students with disabilities have the best opportunity to be safe in school crises. Recommendations include developing…

  9. How Students Utilize and Perceive Their School Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleidt, Shirley A.

    2011-01-01

    School library usage and middle school students' perceptions of the usefulness of their school library were examined in this study. 1,509 predominately Hispanic students attending rural public schools participated by completing an online survey regarding their school libraries. The vast majority of students surveyed reported that they used their…

  10. School Facility Conditions and Student Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Earthman, Glen I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper shows that the condition of school facilities has an important impact on student performance and teacher effectiveness. In particular, research demonstrates that comfortable classroom temperature and noise level are very important to efficient student performance. The age of school buildings is a useful proxy in this regard, since older facilities often have problems with thermal environment and noise level. A number of studies have measured overall building condition and its conne...

  11. [Children with learning disabilities and handicaps in inclusive schools or in special schools? The view of parents and professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, H; Hirner, V

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the view of parents and professionals on sending children with special educational needs to inclusive schools. 54 preschool children in the year before school entry and 155 school children attending a Social Pediatric Center. They displayed motor-, mental-, speech- or sensory handicaps, learning or behavioral disabilities. Questionnaires for parents of preschool- and of school children and questionnaires for the professional caring for the child were evaluated and compared. Parental expectations, experiences concerning school and the severity of disability were determined. 135 pupils attended special schools and 20 integrative schools. The parents were generally very content with both types of schools despite the fact that 33% of parents had not have a free choice of the school. They had a positive attitude to inclusive education. Preference for inclusive schooling decreased with increasing severity of the child's disability. The severity of disability was rated similar by parents and by professionals. Parents of preschool children tended more often and parents of school children less often than professionals towards sending the individual child to an inclusive school. Some parents of children with special educational needs would like to send their child to a special school, others prefer inclusive schools. It is paramount to improve the professional advice and guidance to parents since parental options to choose the school for their child are increasing in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  13. Student Affairs Professionals Supporting Students with Disabilities: A Grounded Theory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Ezekiel; Vaccaro, Annemarie; Vargas, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    In an action-based grounded theory project, the authors collected data from 31 student affairs professionals. During seven focus groups, practitioners described feeling unknowledgeable about disability law, accommodations, and diagnoses. However, they drew upon their core values and transferrable skills to support individual students. Participants…

  14. Causes of Student Absenteeism and School Dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Seyma; Arseven, Zeynep; Kiliç, Abdurrahman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the causes of student absenteeism and school dropouts at primary, secondary and high school level in Düzce Province and to develop suggestions for solving these problems. A "case study" design, which is one of the qualitative research approaches, was used in this study. The study group consisted of…

  15. Obesity and Student Performance at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Howard; Potts-Datema, William

    2005-01-01

    To review the state of research on the association between obesity among school-aged children and academic outcomes, the authors reviewed published studies investigating obesity, school performance, and rates of student absenteeism. A table with brief descriptions of each study's research methodology and outcomes is included. Research demonstrates…

  16. School ethnic diversity and students' interethnic relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuijten, Maykel

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: School ethnic desegregation has been a topic of strong societal and educational concern. Research has examined the effects of ethnic school composition on students' interethnic relations with diverging outcomes and sometimes inconsistent results. In this review paper, we provide

  17. Variation in obesity among American secondary school students by school and school characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D; Delva, Jorge; Bachman, Jerald G; Schulenberg, John E

    2007-10-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is known to vary by individual characteristics, but little is known about whether BMI varies by school and by school characteristics. Nationally representative samples of United States schools and students are used to determine the extent to which BMI and percent of students at or above the 85th percentile of BMI vary by school and by school characteristics. Data from the 1991-2004 Monitoring the Future (MTF) study were analyzed in 2006 and 2007. A relatively small proportion of variance in BMI lies between schools; intraclass correlations are on the order of 3%. Still, this is sufficient variation to provide very different environments for students attending schools that are low versus high in average BMI. There is some modest variation by school type (public, Catholic private, non-Catholic private); school size (number of students in the sampled grade); region of the country; and population density. There is more variation as a function of school socioeconomic status (SES) and racial/ethnic composition of the school. School SES in particular was negatively associated with BMI levels, even after controlling individual-level SES and racial/ethnic status. The residual differences in BMI by school suggest that some characteristic of the school and/or community environment--perhaps cultural factors or peer role modeling or differences in school food, beverage, or physical education policies--facilitate obesity in schools with a high concentration of lower socioeconomic students, beyond individual-level factors.

  18. PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AND COMPETENCE CORRELATION OF RURAL SCHOOLS TEACHERS IN THE CONDITIONS OF EDUCATION MODERNIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Vladimirovna Gavrilova; Elena Aleksandrovna Zakharova

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The article deals with the problem of teacher's professional activity in conditions of education modernization. The subject of analysis is professional mobility and competence correlation of rural schools teachers and the conditions of its formation. The authors’ aim to reveal the concepts of teacher’s "professional mobility", "professional competence" in rural schools and to determine its nature and structure in the changing paradigm of education. Results. The results of this wo...

  19. Science teachers' meaning-making when involved in a school-based professional development project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2012-01-01

    A group of teachers' meaning-making when they are collaboratively analyzing artifacts from practice in local science classrooms in a school-based professional development (PD) project is examined through repeated interviews and represented as meaning-makig maps. The interpretation of the teachers......' meaning-making includes both their reference to outcomes from the project and their expressed ideas about teaching and learning of science. All four teachers refer to experiences from experimenting in their classrooms and interpret the collected artifacts in relation to students' learning. Furthermore......, they all felt encouraged to continue collaboration around science. During the interviews, the teachers emphasize various elements apparently connected to concrete challenges they each experience in their professional work. Implications in relation to the design of PD are discussed....

  20. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...

  1. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Abdullah Faruk; Güzeller, Cem Oktay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The…

  2. School Mobility and Students' Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    The study examined estimated effects of school mobility on students' academic and behaviouiral outcomes. Based on data for 2,560 public schools from the School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) 2007-2008, the findings indicate that high schools, urban schools, and schools serving a total student population of more than 50 percent minority…

  3. Ethics interventions for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Ruokonen, Minka; Repo, Hanna; Suhonen, Riitta

    2018-03-01

    The ethics and value bases in healthcare are widely acknowledged. There is a need to improve and raise awareness of ethics in complex systems and in line with competing needs, different stakeholders and patients' rights. Evidence-based strategies and interventions for the development of procedures and practice have been used to improve care and services. However, it is not known whether and to what extent ethics can be developed using interventions. To examine ethics interventions conducted on healthcare professionals and healthcare students to achieve ethics-related outcomes. A systematic review. Five electronic databases were searched: CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Philosopher's Index, PubMed and PsycINFO. We searched for published articles written in English without a time limit using the keywords: ethic* OR moral* AND intervention OR program OR pre-post OR quasi-experimental OR rct OR experimental AND nurse OR nursing OR health care. In the four-phased retrieval process, 23 full texts out of 4675 citations were included in the review. Data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Ethical consideration: This systematic review was conducted following good scientific practice in every phase. It is possible to affect the ethics of healthcare practices through professionals and students. All the interventions were educational in type. Many of the interventions were related to the ethical or moral sensitivity of the professionals, such as moral courage and empowerment. A few of the interventions focused on identifying ethical problems or research ethics. Patient-related outcomes followed by organisational outcomes can be improved by ethics interventions targeting professionals. Such outcomes are promising in developing ethical safety for healthcare patients and professionals.

  4. Smoking Health Professional Student: An Attitudinal Challenge for Health Promotion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cauchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a major preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality. Health professionals are uniquely positioned to provide targeted interventions and should be empowered to provide cessation counselling that influence patient smoking. A cross-sectional national survey was administered to all third year students in four disciplines at the University of Malta. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was distributed to collect standardised demographic, smoking prevalence, behavioural, and attitudinal data. 81.9% completed the questionnaire (n = 173/211. A positive significant association between tobacco smoke exposure at home and current smoking status was identified. Non-smokers regarded anti-tobacco policies more favourably than smokers, being more likely to agree with banning of tobacco sales to adolescents (OR 3.6; 95% CI: 2.5–5.3; p ≤ 0.001; and with a smoking ban in all public places (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 6.1–13.1; p ≤ 0.001. Non-smokers favoured a role for health professionals in promoting smoking cessation (OR 5.1; 95% CI: 3.1–8.5; p ≤ 0.001. Knowledge of antidepressants as tools for smoking cessation was also associated with a perceived role for skilled health professionals in cessation counselling (OR 4.9; 95% CI: 1.8–13.3; p = 0.002. Smoking negatively influences beliefs and attitudes of students toward tobacco control. There is a need to adopt a standard undergraduate curriculum containing comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation training to improve their effectiveness as role models.

  5. Working While in Middle School: Student Perceptions of School Climate & Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sabrena

    2016-01-01

    Does working during the school year result in lowered perceptions of school climate and connectedness for middle school students? According to outcomes from a Rocky Mountain Region School District's (RMRSD) school climate survey, 20% of their middle school student population works during the school year. Existing literature on youth employment…

  6. Nontraditional Students and Postsecondary School Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammger, Dawne M.

    This study compared the satisfaction levels of 40 adult nontraditional students (N=40) attending one of three types of postsecondary institutions: (1) a proprietary school, (2) a community college, and (3) a university. A survey was administered to such students enrolled in the Travel and Tourism programs at Bryant and Stratton Business Institute…

  7. Caring Relationships: Perspectives from Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Nora I.; Moulton, Margaret R.

    1998-01-01

    A year-long interpretive study, framed by the theory of symbolic interactionism, examined the meanings of care to middle school students. Five themes emerged: care as control, equality, forgiveness, concern, and good teaching. Findings indicated not only some agreement between students and teachers on meanings and symbolic acts of care, but also…

  8. School Shootings; Standards Kill Students and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angert, Betsy L.

    2008-01-01

    School shootings have been in the news of late. People ponder what occurs in classrooms today. Why would a young person wish to take a life? Within educational institutions, the killings are a concern. In our dire attempt to teach the children and ensure student success, it seems many of our offspring are lost. Some students feel separate from…

  9. Climate Change Professional Development: Design, Implementation, and Initial Outcomes on Teacher Learning, Practice, and Student Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicole A.; Mouza, Chrystalla; Drewes, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present the design, implementation, and initial outcomes of the Climate Academy, a hybrid professional development program delivered through a combination of face-to-face and online interactions, intended to prepare formal and informal science teachers (grades 5-16) in teaching about climate change. The Climate Academy was designed around core elements of successful environmental professional development programs and aligned with practices advocated in benchmarked science standards. Data were collected from multiple sources including observations of professional development events, participants' reflections on their learning, and collection of instructional units designed during the Academy. Data were also collected from a focal case study teacher in a middle school setting. Case study data included classroom observations, teacher interviews, and student beliefs toward climate change. Results indicated that the Climate Academy fostered increased learning among participants of both climate science content and pedagogical strategies for teaching about climate change. Additionally, results indicated that participants applied their new learning in the design of climate change instructional units. Finally, results from the case study indicated positive impacts on student beliefs and greater awareness about climate change. Results have implications for the design of professional development programs on climate change, a topic included for the first time in national standards.

  10. Middle school student perceptions of school lunch following revised federal school meal guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed student perceptions of school meals under the new federal meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Student feedback is instrumental in developing strategies to increase and maintain NSLP participation, satisfaction, and ultimately provide students with a health...

  11. Building a Mentorship-Based Research Program Focused on Individual Interests, Curiosity, and Professional Skills at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Sarah E.; Thomas, Christopher; Roberts, Todd; Boltz, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) offers students a wide variety of real-world opportunities to develop skills and talent critical for students to gain the essential professional and personal skills that lead to success in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. One of the key avenues available…

  12. Centro TORTUGA's Integrated Research and Professional Development Training for Early Stage Hispanic Students in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, F. C.; Allen, M. R.; Barberena-Arias, M.; Clark, J.; Harris, L.; Maldonado, P. M.; Olivo-Delgado, C.; Pierson, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last five years our multidisciplinary team explored different undergraduate research and professional development (PD) strategies to improve early stage Hispanic student retention in marine science with the objective of interesting them in pursuing degrees that may ultimately lead to geoscience careers. This research led to the 2016 launch of our current project, Centro TORTUGA (Tropical Oceanography Research Training for Undergraduate Academics). Our overarching goal is to increase the number of underrepresented students from minority serving institutions in geoscience-relevant disciplines and careers. Critical to success is building a program rich in both research and PD. Based on qualitative and quantitative evaluations we found students benefited from PD efforts to increase skills in areas such as: 1) speaking and writing English; 2) science communication; 3) teamwork; 4) project management; and 5) completing internship/graduate school applications. To build student self-confidence, networking, and science skills Centro Tortuga involves students' families, bridges cultural gaps across research and non-research institutions inside and outside of Puerto Rico, and provides a gathering place (Centro TORTUGA) for students. With our partners, Universidad del Turabo (UT), Universidad Metropolitana (UMET), and University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences, we are now testing a 12-month integrated research and PD curriculum. Initial results suggest areas for improved student training include: 1) science communication (reports and graphs); 2) science ethics; and 3) poster and oral presentations. Students also identified specific preparation they would like included in the Centro TORTUGA curriculum.

  13. Exploring Self - Confidence Level of High School Students Doing Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Emir Ekinci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate self-confidence levels of high school students, who do sport, in the extent of their gender, sport branch (individual/team sports and aim for participating in sport (professional/amateur. 185 active high school students from Kutahya voluntarily participated for the study. In the study as data gathering tool self-confidence scale was used. In the evaluation of the data as a hypothesis test Mann Whitney U non parametric test was used. As a result self-confidence levels of participants showed significant differences according to their gender and sport branch but there was no significant difference according to aim for participating in sport.

  14. Students helping students: vertical peer mentoring to enhance the medical school experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Christine; Deerin, Jessica; Leykum, Luci

    2017-05-02

    Effective mentoring is an important component of medical student professional development. We provide a description of the mentoring program at our institution. Our institution UTHSCSA implemented a student-advising program (Veritas) with clinical faculty mentors and senior students (MiMs). The MiMs provided vertical peer mentoring to more junior students as an adjunct to faculty advising. The MiMs lead small group discussions that foster camaraderie, share academic and career information and promote professional identity. An optional MiM elective more intensively develops mentorship and leadership skills through a formal curriculum. The authors used annual survey data of all students as well as student mentors to evaluate program effectiveness. Overall, student perception of the program improved each year across multiple domains, including feeling more prepared, supported and satisfied with their overall experience in medical school. Student mentors also found the process rewarding and helpful to their future careers as physicians. The authors suggest implementing a vertical peer-mentoring program can be an effective adjunct to faculty mentoring.

  15. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  16. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Faruk Kılıç; Cem Oktay Güzeller

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The sample was chosen through the stratified and cluster sampling procedure. The students were chosen randomly depending on the regions of their school at...

  17. Collaboration in Transition Assessment: School Psychologists and Special Educators Working Together to Improve Outcomes for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Springer, Ben; Wilkins, Melinda K.; Anderson, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal for school psychologists, special education practitioners, and other professionals who work with adolescents with disabilities is to help students plan and prepare to transition from school to adult life with the skills and knowledge to live happy, productive, and fulfilling lives. This article describes how school psychologists…

  18. Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raee, Hojat; Amini, Mitra; Momen Nasab, Ameneh; Malek Pour, Abdolrasoul; Jafari, Mohammad Morad

    2014-07-01

    Self and peer assessment provides important information about the individual's performance and behavior in all aspects of their professional environment work. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional behavior and performance in medical students in the form of team based assessment. In a cross-sectional study, 100 medical students in the 7(th) year of education were randomly selected and enrolled; for each student five questionnaires were filled out, including one self-assessment, two peer assessments and two residents assessment. The scoring system of the questionnaires was based on seven point Likert scale.  After filling out the questions in the questionnaire, numerical data and written comments provided to the students were collected, analyzed and discussed. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the questionnaires was assessed. A p<0.05 was considered as significant level. Internal consistency was acceptable (Cronbach's alpha 0.83). Interviews revealed that the majority of students and assessors interviewed found the method acceptable. The range of scores was 1-6 (Mean±SD=4.39±0.57) for the residents' assessment, 2-6 (Mean±SD= 4.49±0.53) for peer assessment, and 3-7 (Mean±SD=5.04±0.32) for self-assessment. There was a significant difference between self assessment and other methods of assessment. This study demonstrates that a team-based assessment is an acceptable and feasible method for peer and self-assessment of medical students' learning in a clinical clerkship, and has some advantages over traditional assessment methods. Further studies are needed to focus on the strengths and weaknesses.

  19. Reading motivation in elementary school students

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Pečjak; Nataša Bucik

    2005-01-01

    Reading motivation is one of the crucial factors of reading and consequently also learning efficiency of students. The purpose of the contribution is to establish the connection between dimensions of reading motivation and reading achievement in elementary school students. Participating in the study were 1073 third-grade and 1282 seventh-grade students. We used the questionnaire of reading motivation which consists of two factors: the reading competence factor and the interest and perceived r...

  20. Citizenship Engagement: Responses from High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, the main mission of social studies education is to prepare students for citizenship. With this in mind, the following study examined 191 high school students’ views on how they demonstrated citizenship. Traditionally with this age group, personally responsible citizenship has been a common form of self-reported citizenship engagement. However, in this study, the students seemed to conceptualize citizenship differently. With the Akwesasne Mohawk students, the European Ame...

  1. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF READINESS OF TEACHERS IN VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO IMPLEMENT STUDENT-CENTERED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Tkachuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the problem of readiness for professional (educational activity of teachers in vocational schools. The paper determines the relevance of readiness of teachers of special subjects of vocational schools to personality-oriented professional interaction with students and singled pedagogical conditions that determine this process. The analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature on the interpretation of the concepts of "readiness" and "commitment to the professional (educational activities" is conducted. The features of this type of activity are revealed. It is determined that in the modern branch of science the phenomenon of readiness for professional work is studied at the personal, functional and personal-activity levels. The author suggests the generalized definition of "readiness for professional (teaching activity" in the context of personal interaction between the participants of the educational process of vocational school.

  2. The Impact of Every Classroom, Every Day on High School Student Achievement: Results from a School-Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Diane M.; Berg, Juliette K.; Alicea, Stacey; Si, Yajuan; Aber, J. Lawrence; Ryan, Richard M.; Deci, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Every Classroom, Every Day (ECED) is a set of instructional improvement interventions designed to increase student achievement in math and English/language arts (ELA). ECED includes three primary components: (a) systematic classroom observations by school leaders, (b) intensive professional development and support for math teachers and…

  3. MOTIVATING STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED EVENTS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shulgina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, increasing the motivation of future specialists’ to mastering general and special professional competences is one of the acute issues of the higher education system. Despite a wide-spread popularity and a considerable amount of studies on the problem connected with motivation of training in higher education institution, researchers have not dealt with a mechanism of start of a motivational impulse of professional self-determination and professionalizing such as participation of students in extra-curricular activities and events of professionally oriented format. At the same time, students can find many skills demanded in the chosen profession and practical experience only on condition of their active participation in extra-curricular activities, which allow them to expand and deepen knowledge of the chosen profession received during the classroom activities; to solidify separate blocks of theoretical material in an informal situation.The aims of the research presented in the article are the following: to identify and study the process of motivation to participation in the organization of extra-curricular activities and events of professional orientation among students of different university courses; to disclose the potential of similar work for formation of additional research, organizational, communicatory and other skills and abilities necessary for becoming a valuable specialist. Methodology and research methods. Analytical review and generalization of psychological, pedagogical and methodical literature on the considered problem was conducted at the initial stage of work. The methodological research base involves: conceptual substantive and procedural approaches to studying the phenomenon of motivation; David McClelland’s Human Motivation Theory; Participatory Management Theory; Active Training Theory. Interactive game technologies, anonymous questioning, methods of descriptive and variation statistics were

  4. Medical Student Perceptions of the Learning Environment in Medical School Change as Students Transition to Clinical Training in Undergraduate Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Lisette; Dekhtyar, Michael; Gruener, Gregory; CichoskiKelly, Eileen; Deitz, Jennifer; Elliott, Donna; Stuber, Margaret L; Skochelak, Susan E

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: The learning environment is the physical, social, and psychological context in which a student learns. A supportive learning environment contributes to student well-being and enhances student empathy, professionalism, and academic success, whereas an unsupportive learning environment may lead to burnout, exhaustion, and cynicism. Student perceptions of the medical school learning environment may change over time and be associated with students' year of training and may differ significantly depending on the student's gender or race/ethnicity. Understanding the changes in perceptions of the learning environment related to student characteristics and year of training could inform interventions that facilitate positive experiences in undergraduate medical education. The Medical School Learning Environment Survey (MSLES) was administered to 4,262 students who matriculated at one of 23 U.S. and Canadian medical schools in 2010 and 2011. Students completed the survey at the end of each year of medical school as part of a battery of surveys in the Learning Environment Study. A mixed-effects longitudinal model, t tests, Cohen's d effect size, and analysis of variance assessed the relationship between MSLES score, year of training, and demographic variables. After controlling for gender, race/ethnicity, and school, students reported worsening perceptions toward the medical school learning environment, with the worst perceptions in the 3rd year of medical school as students begin their clinical experiences, and some recovery in the 4th year after Match Day. The drop in MSLES scores associated with the transition to the clinical learning environment (-0.26 point drop in addition to yearly change, effect size = 0.52, p effect size = 0.14, p work-life balance and informal student relationships. There was some, but not complete, recovery in perceptions of the medical school learning environment in the 4th year. Insights: Perceptions of the medical school learning

  5. Do school context, student composition and school leadership affect school practice and outcomes in secondary education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, M.C.; van Damme, J

    This study examined effects of school context, student composition and school leadership on school practice and outcomes in secondary education in Flanders. The study reveals that relations between school characteristics do exist and that it is possible to explain an important part of the

  6. Negotiating between Family, Peers and School: Understanding the World of Government School and Private School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucharita, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper, based on an ethnographic study of a government school and a low-cost private school in Andhra Pradesh, India, argues that the students of a government school and a private school have two different worlds and are socialised differently. As children progress from childhood to adolescence, the transition is accompanied by…

  7. INTERNSHIP ROLES IN TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPEMENT OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Anca-Ioana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Romanian specialist`s studies show a harsh reality: Romanian universities programs have only theoretical value, creating specialists but not for real life, but for a more abstract environment. Our university graduates are doing very well in a stable economic and institutional environment that offers relatively easy material and financial resources, with a set of skills and professional skills which fail to meet harsh reality of the labor market. An effective solution for professional skills development is the accumulation of work experience during college in the environment and on the job we have in view by following an internship program. As a form of practical education through work, internship meets young people, particularly students keen to gain experience through practical work in a job within a company or institution chosen, giving them the opportunity to translate theoretical knowledge into practice and to develop skills and experience of labor market activities that waits for them. This paper is an original applied research conducted in the West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration. It aims to identify whether there is a need for specialization Management students to acquire work experience before graduating, to what extent they are able to assess their skills and work in a company and especially the role of internship programs in professional and personal development of students. The results show that participation in an internship program is beneficial not only for students but also for employers. Leading to increased competences and to training and professional skills and personal development, internship becomes a more attractive alternative for young people because it gives them the opportunity to be “a ringer" of an employee on the position you have in view. Without being employed, students can gain practical experience in a certain position they sought in a company or institution on the

  8. Parents and Students and Healthy Indoor School Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    School-aged children spend a great deal of time inside school buildings. Parents can play an important role in creating healthy indoor school environments. Parents and students alike can make a powerful case for protecting health in schools.

  9. Exploring the Influence of Student Focus Groups in Their Professional and Personal Development

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    Hosseini, S.; Hut, R.

    2014-12-01

    A scientific career is often more than a 9-to-5 commitment, both in terms of time and passion. An important factor that fuels this passion is engaging with the community on many levels. In the history of education and professional development, there are numerous studies that emphasis the importance of surrounding groups and like-minded peers in one's professional and personal development in a less constrained environment. In our experience, in modern days where students are surrounded with too much information and yet too little clear signal, the idea of mentor and advisor can no longer limit to one or two people. We strongly feel it is imperative to have the opportunity to share expertise on scientific issues, career options, develop presenting and writing skills, participate in professional volunteer activities with alike and advanced colleagues, share future opportunities, and successfully navigating life both inside and outside of graduate school in a relaxed environment. Most of the professional scientific and engineering communities put a lot of effort to create and maintain professional groups in masters and Ph.D. levels but the dynamics within these groups prove it to be very different and it is challenging to maintain both momentum and productivity. Authors of this report would present their experience in creating, running and maintaining various student groups in the discipline of physics, astronomy, planetary science, hydrology, and optical engineering in US, Europe and Middle East. The common factors and differences based on the supportive community, location, and the educational level would be discussed. An outline of potential helpful factors within the academic institutes and professional communities would be presented based on the examination on various successful and unsuccessful experiences.

  10. Sustained Professional Development on Cooperative Learning: Impact on Six Teachers' Practices and Students' Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Victoria A

    2017-03-01

    It has been argued, extensively and internationally, that sustained school-based continuous professional development (CPD) has the potential to overcome some of the shortcomings of traditional one-off CPD programs. Yet, the evidence base on more effective or less effective forms of CPD is contradictory. The mechanisms by which sustained support should be offered are unclear, and the impacts on teachers' and students' learning are complex and difficult to track. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a sustained school-based, tailored, and supported CPD program on teachers' practices and students' learning. Data are reported from 6 case studies of individual teachers engaged in a yearlong CPD program focused on cooperative learning. The CPD program involved participatory action research and frequent interaction/support from a boundary spanner (researcher/facilitator). Data were gathered from 29 video-recorded lessons, 108 interviews, and 35 field journal entries. (a) Individualized (external) support, (b) departmental (internal) support, and (c) sustained support impacted teachers' practices of cooperative learning. The teachers adapted their practices of cooperative learning in response to their students' learning needs. Teachers began to develop a level of pedagogical fluency, and in doing so, teachers advanced students' learning. Because this study demonstrates impact, it contributes to international literature on effective CPD. The key contribution is the detailed evidence about how and why CPD supported 6 individual teachers to learn-differently-and the complexity of the learning support required to engage in ongoing curriculum development to positively impact student learning.

  11. What students learn about professionalism from faculty stories: an "appreciative inquiry" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaintance, Jennifer L; Arnold, Louise; Thompson, George S

    2010-01-01

    To develop a method for teaching professionalism by enabling students and faculty members to share positive examples of professionalism in a comfortable environment that reflects the authentic experiences of physicians. Medical educators struggle with the teaching of professionalism. Professionalism definitions can guide what they teach, but they must also consider how they teach it, and constructs such as explicit role modeling, situated learning, and appreciative inquiry provide appropriate models. The project consisted of students interviewing faculty members about their experiences with professionalism and then reflecting on and writing about the teachers' stories. In 2004, 62 students interviewed 33 faculty members, and 193 students observed the interviews. Using a project Web site, 36 students wrote 132 narratives based on the faculty's stories, and each student offered his or her reflections on one narrative. The authors analyzed the content of the narratives and reflections via an iterative process of independent coding and discussion to resolve disagreements. Results showed that the narratives were rich and generally positive; they illustrated a broad range of the principles contained in many definitions of professionalism: humanism, accountability, altruism, and excellence. The students' reflections demonstrated awareness of the same major principles of professionalism that the faculty conveyed. The reflections served to spark new ideas about professionalism, reinforce the values of professionalism, deepen students' relationships with the faculty, and heighten students' commitment to behaving professionally. Narrative storytelling, as a variant of appreciative inquiry, seems to be effective in deepening students' understanding and appreciation of professionalism.

  12. Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOJAT RAEE

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Introducrion: Self and peer assessment provides important information about the individual’s performance and behavior in all aspects of their professional environment work. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional behavior and performance in medical students in the form of team based assessment. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 100 medical students in the 7th year of education were randomly selected and enrolled; for each student five questionnaires were filled out, including one self-assessment, two peer assessments and two residents assessment. The scoring system of the questionnaires was based on seven point Likert scale. After filling out the questions in the questionnaire, numerical data and written comments provided to the students were collected, analyzed and discussed. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of the questionnaires was assessed. A p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Internal consistency was acceptable (Cronbach’s alpha 0.83. Interviews revealed that the majority of students and assessors interviewed found the method acceptable. The range of scores was 1-6 (Mean±SD=4.39±0.57 for the residents' assessment, 2-6 (Mean±SD=4.49±0.53 for peer assessment, and 3-7 (Mean±SD=5.04±0.32 for self-assessment. There was a significant difference between self assessment and other methods of assessment. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a team-based assessment is an acceptable and feasible method for peer and self-assessment of medical students’ learning in a clinical clerkship, and has some advantages over traditional assessment methods. Further studies are needed to focus on the strengths and weaknesses.

  13. Using Insights from Applied Moral Psychology to Promote Ethical Behavior Among Engineering Students and Professional Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this essay I discuss a novel engineering ethics class that has the potential to significantly decrease the likelihood that students (and professionals) will inadvertently or unintentionally act unethically in the future. This class is different from standard engineering ethics classes in that it focuses on the issue of why people act unethically and how students (and professionals) can avoid a variety of hurdles to ethical behavior. I do not deny that it is important for students to develop cogent moral reasoning and ethical decision-making as taught in traditional college-level ethics classes, but as an educator, I aim to help students apply moral reasoning in specific, real-life situations so they are able to make ethical decisions and act ethically in their academic careers and after they graduate. Research in moral psychology provides evidence that many seemingly irrelevant situational factors affect the moral judgment of most moral agents and frequently lead agents to unintentionally or inadvertently act wrongly. I argue that, in addition to teaching college students moral reasoning and ethical decision-making, it is important to: 1. Teach students about psychological and situational factors that affect people's ethical judgments/behaviors in the sometimes stressful, emotion-laden environment of the workplace; 2. Guide students to engage in critical reflection about the sorts of situations they personally might find ethically challenging before they encounter those situations; and 3. Provide students with strategies to help them avoid future unethical behavior when they encounter these situations in school and in the workplace.

  14. Perceived role legitimacy and role importance of Australian school staff in addressing student cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J; Norberg, Melissa M; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of cannabis use by Australian secondary school students makes schools an ideal setting for the delivery of substance use prevention programs. Although efficacious school-based cannabis prevention programs exist, there is scant research investigating the perceived role legitimacy and role importance of school staff. As such, this study surveyed a sample of 1691 Australian school staff by utilizing Generation Next seminars which are attended by professionals working with young people. The self-completed survey identified that, despite elevated contact with students relative to other school staff, teachers reported the least role importance and legitimacy of all school staff. Further, teachers reported the lowest level of staff drug education training, which was an important predictor of an increased feeling of role importance and legitimacy among school staff.

  15. Associations among bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Sheri; Toomey, Russell B; Walker, Jenny L

    2013-04-01

    This study examined associations among depression, suicidal behaviors, and bullying and victimization experiences in 1491 high school students using data from the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Results demonstrated that depression mediated the association between bullying/victimization and suicide attempts, but differently for males and females. Specifically, depression mediated the link between traditional victimization and suicide attempts similarly across gender, whereas depression mediated the link between cyber victimization and suicide attempts only for females. Similarly, depression mediated the link between traditional bullying and suicide attempts for females only. Depression did not mediate the link between cyberbullying and suicide attempts for either gender. Implications of the findings are discussed, including the importance of greater detection of depression among students involved in bullying, and the need for a suicide prevention and intervention component in anti-bullying programs. Findings suggest that bullying prevention efforts be extended from middle school students to include high school students. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. THE CHALLENGES OF SCHOOL-BASED YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION: EXPERIENCES AND PERCEPTIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS

    OpenAIRE

    Woolf, Maryke; Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Youth suicidal behaviour poses a significant public health concern. Mental health care professionals working in schools have an important role to play in youth suicide prevention initiatives, although little is known of the experiences of this group of professionals in the developing world. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of mental health professionals working in South African schools and document their insights, attitudes and beliefs regarding youth suicidal behaviour. I...

  17. Attitude of teachers towards musically gifted students in grammar schools and vocational high-schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides parents and schools, the teachers as well have a major role in identification of gifted students, in their acquisition of basic knowledge, improving skills, improving self-esteem and capability of solving various tasks. Attitude of teachers towards gifted students is based on the role which is imposed on the teacher and his ability to take advantage of his role maximally. The success in implementing this role is directly related to the personal traits of a teacher. They should be different from the routine teachers and have personal qualities. They are extremely capable, distinguished by open-mindness, flexibility and high self-respect, being involved in personal and professional development. They are enthusiastic (highly motivated and devoted to their professional call, having a talent for establishing social relations with children (patience, sensitivity, sense of humour and good communication skills.

  18. Public School Uniforms: Effect on Perceptions of Gang Presence, School Climate, and Student Self-Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Kathleen Kiley; Stafford, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between public school uniforms and student self-worth and student and staff perceptions of gang presence and school climate. Surveys of middle school students and teachers indicated that although students' perceptions did not vary across uniform policy, teachers from schools with uniform policies perceived lower levels of…

  19. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as a Means for School-Based Science Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Christi L.

    The challenge of school-based science curriculum change and educational reform is often presented to science teachers and departments who are not necessarily prepared for the complexity of considerations that change movements require. The development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) focused on a science department's curriculum change efforts, may provide the necessary tools to foster sustainable school-based curriculum science changes. This research presents a case study of an evolving science department PLC consisting of 10 middle school science teachers from the same middle school and their efforts of school-based science curriculum change. A transformative mixed model case study with qualitative data and deepened by quantitative analysis, was chosen to guide the investigation. Collected data worked to document the essential developmental steps, the occurrence and frequency of the five essential dimensions of successful PLCs, and the influences the science department PLC had on the middle school science department's progression through school-based science curriculum change, and the barriers, struggles and inhibiting actions of the science department PLC. Findings indicated that a science department PLC was unique in that it allowed for a focal science departmental lens of science curriculum change to be applied to the structure and function of the PLC and therefore the process, proceedings, and results were directly aligned to and driven by the science department. The science PLC, while logically difficult to set-up and maintain, became a professional science forum where the middle school science teachers were exposed to new science teaching and learning knowledge, explored new science standards, discussed effects on student science learning, designed and critically analyzed science curriculum change application. Conclusions resulted in the science department PLC as an identified tool providing the ability for science departmental actions to lead to

  20. Facilitators and inhibitors in developing professional values in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafakhah, Mahnaz; Molazem, Zahra; Khademi, Mojgan; Sharif, Farkhondeh

    2018-03-01

    Values are the basis of nursing practice, especially in making decisions about complicated ethical issues. Despite their key role in nursing, little information exists on the factors affecting their development and manifestation in nursing students. This study identifies and describes the facilitators and inhibitors of the development and manifestation of professional values based on the experiences of nursing students and instructors and nurses. Data were collected through 29 semi-structured interviews and two focus group interviews in 2013-2015 and were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method of Elo and Kyngäs. Participants and research context: In total, 18 nursing undergraduates, five nursing instructors, and five nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and one of the teaching hospitals in Shiraz were selected through purposive sampling. Ethical considerations: The research was approved by the Ethics Committee of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and the teaching hospital examined. The findings consisted of two categories: personal and environmental factors. Personal factors consisted of the two subcategories of personal stimuli (work experience and past relationships, inner beliefs and acting on values, belief in God and a divine worldview) and personal inhibitors (the lack of professional motivation and enthusiasm, negative emotions). Environmental factors consisted of the two subcategories of environmental stimuli (cooperation, order and discipline) and environmental inhibitors (unfavorable work environment, society's negative attitude toward nursing, the violation of rights). Given the impact of personal and environmental factors on the development and manifestation of professional values in nursing students, it is upon the education authorities to take account of them in their planning, and nursing managers are also recommended to further address these factors in their development of a proper work environment, provision of