WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional nursing roles

  1. The psychological boundary of nurses separating professional and maternal roles

    OpenAIRE

    Laušmanová, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Author: Alexandra Laušmanová Institute: Institute of social medicine FM CU in Hradec Králové Nursing department Title: The Psychological Boundary of Nurses separating Professional and Maternal Roles Supervisor: Bc. Eva Prchalová Number of pages: 131 Number of attachments: 4 Year of defense: 2007 Keywords: psychological boundary, social role, family, child needs, psychological strain on nurses, work conditions of nurses, realistic options in compatibility of professional and parent role This b...

  2. Professional nurses' perception of their clinical teaching role at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four themes representing the perceptions of the professional nurses emerged in the analysis: (i) the clinical teaching role; (ii) the complexities of clinical teaching; (iii) learners have their issues; and (iv) making it work. Conclusion. Professional nurses understand and appreciate their educational role in the development of ...

  3. Professional role identity in shaping community nurses' reactions to nursing policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lawrie; Kennedy, Catriona; Raeside, Robert

    2015-05-01

    To establish the extent to which professional role identity shapes community nurses' reactions before the implementation of a policy that sought to introduce a generic role. Many countries seek to alter community nurse roles to address changes in population health and health workforce. We know little about the influences that might shape nurses' reaction to these policies before their implementation and our theoretical understanding is poorly developed at this point in the policy-making cycle. Self completed cross-sectional survey of 703 community nurses before the introduction of a generic Community Health Nurse role in Scotland. The minority (33%) supported the new role. The professional role identity of those who were supportive differed significantly from those who did not support the policy or were uncertain of it. It is possible that the new policy acted to increase the value of the professional role identity of those who were supportive and conversely devalued the professional role identity of those who were unsupportive or uncertain of it. Professional role identity should be considered by policy makers in any country seeking to introduce policies that aim to radically change the role of community nurses and that this is acknowledged at an early stage in the policy-making cycle. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Professional practice leadership roles: the role of organizational power and personal influence in creating a professional practice environment for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankshear, Sara; Kerr, Michael S; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Wong, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    Professional practice leadership (PPL) roles are those roles responsible for expert practice, providing professional leadership, facilitating ongoing professional development, and research. Despite the extensive implementation of this role, most of the available literature focuses on the implementation of the role, with few empirical studies examining the factors that contribute to PPL role effectiveness. This article will share the results of a research study regarding the role of organizational power and personal influence in creating a high-quality professional practice environment for nurses. Survey results from nurses and PPLs from 45 hospitals will be presented. Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized model and relationships between the key variables of interest. Results indicate that there is a direct and positive relationship between PPL organizational power and achievement of PPL role functions, as well as an indirect, partially mediated effect of PPL influence tactics on PPL role function. There is also a direct and positive relationship between PPL role functions and nurses' perceptions of their practice environment. The evidence generated from this study highlights the importance of organizational power and personal influence as significantly contributing to the ability of those in PPL roles to achieve desired outcomes. This information can be used by administrators, researchers, and clinicians regarding the factors that can optimize the organizational and systematic strategies for enhancing the practice environment for nursing and other health care professionals.

  5. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Reconciling professional identity: A grounded theory of nurse academics' role modelling for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, A; Mills, J; Birks, M; Budden, L

    2017-12-01

    Role modelling by experienced nurses, including nurse academics, is a key factor in the process of preparing undergraduate nursing students for practice, and may contribute to longevity in the workforce. A grounded theory study was undertaken to investigate the phenomenon of nurse academics' role modelling for undergraduate students. The study sought to answer the research question: how do nurse academics role model positive professional behaviours for undergraduate students? The aims of this study were to: theorise a process of nurse academic role modelling for undergraduate students; describe the elements that support positive role modelling by nurse academics; and explain the factors that influence the implementation of academic role modelling. The study sample included five second year nursing students and sixteen nurse academics from Australia and the United Kingdom. Data was collected from observation, focus groups and individual interviews. This study found that in order for nurse academics to role model professional behaviours for nursing students, they must reconcile their own professional identity. This paper introduces the theory of reconciling professional identity and discusses the three categories that comprise the theory, creating a context for learning, creating a context for authentic rehearsal and mirroring identity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes.

  8. The impact of professional identity on role stress in nursing students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Gao, Ying; Yang, Juan; Zang, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yao-Gang

    2016-11-01

    As newcomers to the clinical workplace, nursing students will encounter a high degree of role stress, which is an important predictor of burnout and engagement. Professional identity is theorised to be a key factor in providing high-quality care to improve patient outcomes and is thought to mediate the negative effects of a high-stress workplace and improve clinical performance and job retention. To investigate the level of nursing students' professional identity and role stress at the end of the first sub-internship, and to explore the impact of the nursing students' professional identity and other characteristics on role stress. A cross-sectional study. Three nursing schools in China. Nursing students after a 6-month sub-internship in a general hospital (n=474). The Role Stress Scale (score range: 12-60) and the Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing students (score range: 17-85) were used to investigate the levels of nursing students' role stress and professional identity. Higher scores indicated higher levels of role stress and professional identity. Basic demographic information about the nursing students was collected. The Pearson correlation, point-biserial correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to analyse the data. The mean total scores of the Role Stress Scale and Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing Students were 34.04 (SD=6.57) and 57.63 (SD=9.63), respectively. In the bivariate analyses, the following independent variables were found to be significantly associated with the total score of the Role Stress Scale: the total score of the Professional Identity Questionnaire for Nursing Students (r=-0.295, pstudent was an only child or not (r=-0.114, pstudent had experience in community organisations or not (r=0.151, pNursing Students (standardised coefficient Beta: -0.260, pstudent had experience in community organisations (standardised coefficient Beta: 0.107, pnursing students' level of role stress at the end of

  9. An exploration of role model influence on adult nursing students' professional development: A phenomenological research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felstead, Ian S; Springett, Kate

    2016-02-01

    Patients' expectations of being cared for by a nurse who is caring, competent, and professional are particularly pertinent in current health and social care practice. The current drive for NHS values-based recruitment serves to strengthen this. How nursing students' development of professionalism is shaped is not fully known, though it is acknowledged that their practice experience strongly shapes behaviour. This study (in 2013-14) explored twelve adult nursing students' lived experiences of role modelling through an interpretive phenomenological analysis approach, aiming to understand the impact on their development as professional practitioners. Clinical nurses influenced student development consistently. Some students reported that their experiences allowed them to learn how not to behave in practice; a productive learning experience despite content. Students also felt senior staff influence on their development to be strong, citing 'leading by example.' The impact of patients on student professional development was also a key finding. Through analysing information gained, identifying and educating practice-based mentors who are ready, willing, and able to role model professional attributes appear crucial to developing professionalism in nursing students. Those involved in nurse education, whether service providers or universities, may wish to acknowledge the influence of clinical nurse behaviour observed by students both independent of and in direct relation to care delivery and the impact on student nurse professional development. A corollary relates to how students should be guided and briefed/debriefed to work with a staff to ensure their exposure to a variety of practice behaviours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prison Health--A Role for Professional Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Rodriguez, Terry

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the history of health care services in prisons and the difficulties in providing prison medical services today. Indicates that prison nurses require more than just traditional nursing skills. (JOW)

  11. A literature review of the Dutch debate on the nurse practitioner role: efficiency vs. professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Maten-Speksnijder, A; Grypdonck, M; Pool, A; Meurs, P; van Staa, A L

    2014-03-01

    To explore the debate on the development of the nurse practitioner profession in the Netherlands. In the Netherlands, the positives and negatives of nurse practitioners working in the medical domain have been debated since the role was introduced in 1997. The outcome of the debate is crucial for nurse practitioners' professional development and society's justification of their tasks. Review of 14 policy documents, 35 opinion papers from nurses, 363 opinion articles from physicians and 24 Dutch research papers concerning nurse practitioners from 1995 to 2012. Two discourses were revealed: one related to efficiency and one to the development of the profession. In both, the nurse practitioner role was presented as a solution for healthcare and workforce problems, while arguments differed. The efficiency discourse seemed most influential. Opinions of nurse practitioners were underrepresented; taking up new responsibilities was driven by the wish to improve patient care. While most physicians were willing to delegate tasks to nurse practitioners, they wished to retain final responsibility for medical care. All available publications were extensively studied, which could not include unpublished policy documents from the government or influential parties. This may have led to some selectivity. The case of the Netherlands shows that nurses in developing their advanced role are facing barriers, similar to those in other countries. The dominance of efficiency arguments combined with protection of medical autonomy undermines the development towards nursing care that really benefits patients. Nurse practitioners should strive to obtain positions in which they are allowed to make their own decisions and wise use of healthcare resources for the good of patients and society. Nurse practitioners should aim to become members of influential healthcare Boards in their countries, in which they can raise their voices and be involved in policy making. © 2013 International Council of

  12. The mediating role of spirituality on professional values and self-efficacy: a study of senior nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won Hee; Lee, Gyungjoo

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the significance of spirituality in enhancing self-efficacy related to professional values in senior nursing students. Self-efficacy can predict job satisfaction and performance as professional nurses in clinical settings. Senior nursing students should have the level of self-efficacy that enables them to perform professional roles based on professional values, because they will enter clinical settings immediately after graduation. Spirituality may help senior nursing students during the transition to professional life to reflect on their skills, knowledge and situations to enhance self-efficacy based on professional values. An exploratory, cross-sectional design was used in this study. A total of 194 senior nursing students in South Korea were recruited in 2014. They completed self-reported questionnaires consisting of demographic questions, Spiritual Assessment Scale, Self-Efficacy Scale and Nursing Professional Values inventory. A Sobel test was done to determine the mediating effect of spirituality on the relationship between nursing professional values and self-efficacy. The findings showed a positive correlation between professional values, spirituality and self-efficacy in nursing students. According to the Sobel test, spirituality had a mediating effect on the relationship between professional values and self-efficacy in senior nursing students. Spirituality can be a foundation that provides senior nursing students with higher self-efficacy so that they are able to perform their professional roles based on their professional values. The findings can guide nursing educators to include spiritual development of nursing students to enhance the self-efficacy of senior nursing students, the future of the nursing profession. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Role conflicts in nursing and allied health: a comparison of professional and organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, L G; Rigolizzo-Gurenlian, J

    1985-02-01

    Role compatibility and conflict between organizational and professional commitment for nurses, high school teachers, college faculty, and social workers have been the focus of several studies over the past two decades. The typical view has been that the professional employee must choose between the profession and the employing organization, since the values of each conflict. Primarily, studies have shown a basic incompatibility between professionals and organizations: the professional is seen as responding to authority based on expertise, while the organization is characterized by authority based on hierarchical position. Since a study of this type has not been conducted in allied health specifically, the purpose of this study was to examine whether bureaucratic and professional role concepts conflict with the allied health professional. Recent graduates and graduates with two years of employment experience representing nursing and four allied health disciplines at one institution were surveyed. Results of the study indicated that the respondents were able to maintain a high degree of professional commitment without perceiving undue conflict from the demands of the organization. Based on the findings, allied health educators are encouraged to examine the curriculum to ensure graduates are prepared for the realities of employment as well as committed to their respective professions.

  14. Perception of nursing students about couples' violence: knowledge, beliefs and professional role 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol-Cuadra, Assumpció; Galbany-Estragué, Paola; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció; Burjales-Martí, Maria Dolors; Rodríguez-Martín, Dolors; Ballester-Ferrando, David

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to analyse the knowledge, beliefs and perception of the professional role that nursing students have, about exerted violence against women in relationships. METHOD: a descriptive qualitative study following the ecological model through 16 focus groups realized with 112 students from four nursing courses of four Spanish universities. RESULTS: the analytical categories were: knowledge, professional role, and beliefs about ones behaviour before the victim and the abuser. Students are unfamiliar with the characteristics of abuse, guidelines, protocols and screening questions and demand patterns for specific intervention. They do not identify their own professional role, be it delegated or specialized. Beliefs regarding their behaviour with the victim, not guided by professional criteria, perceive violence as a specific situation and disassociate the prevention of health care. They perceive the abuser as mentally ill, justifying the tolerance or delegation of performances. CONCLUSIONS: students define preconceived ideas about couples' violence. Speeches reproduce and reinforce stereotypical myths, values indicative of inadequate training for nursing studies which raises the need to fortify the competencies in relation to intimate couples' violence in the curriculum. PMID:26312637

  15. Perception of nursing students about couples' violence: knowledge, beliefs and professional role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assumpció Rigol-Cuadra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to analyse the knowledge, beliefs and perception of the professional role that nursing students have, about exerted violence against women in relationships.METHOD: a descriptive qualitative study following the ecological model through 16 focus groups realized with 112 students from four nursing courses of four Spanish universities.RESULTS: the analytical categories were: knowledge, professional role, and beliefs about ones behaviour before the victim and the abuser. Students are unfamiliar with the characteristics of abuse, guidelines, protocols and screening questions and demand patterns for specific intervention. They do not identify their own professional role, be it delegated or specialized. Beliefs regarding their behaviour with the victim, not guided by professional criteria, perceive violence as a specific situation and disassociate the prevention of health care. They perceive the abuser as mentally ill, justifying the tolerance or delegation of performances.CONCLUSIONS: students define preconceived ideas about couples' violence. Speeches reproduce and reinforce stereotypical myths, values indicative of inadequate training for nursing studies which raises the need to fortify the competencies in relation to intimate couples' violence in the curriculum.

  16. Clinical Skills Performed By Iranian Emergency Nurses: Perceived Competency Levels and Attitudes Toward Expanding Professional Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Hasanzadeh, Firooz; Powers, Kelly A; Dadash Zadeh, Abbas; Rajaie, Rouzbeh

    2017-07-26

    Emergency nurses play an important role in the care of critically ill and injured patients, and their competency to perform clinical skills is vital to safe and effective patient care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of clinical skills performed and perceived competency levels among Iranian emergency nurses. In addition, attitudes toward expanding the professional roles of Iranian emergency nurses were also assessed. In this descriptive correlational study, 319 emergency nurses from 30 hospitals in northwest Iran participated. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to present the findings. Overall competency of the emergency nurses was 73.31 ± 14.2, indicating a good level of perceived competence. The clinical skills most frequently performed were in the domains of organizational and workload competencies (3.43 ± 0.76), diagnostic function (3.25 ± 0.82), and the helping role (3.17 ± 0.83). A higher level of perceived competence was found for skills within these domains. Less frequently, participants performed skills within the domains of effective management of rapidly changing situations (2.70 ± 0.94) and administering and monitoring therapeutic interventions (2.60 ± 0.97); a lower perceived level of competence was noted for these clinical skills. There was a significant correlation between frequency of performing clinical skills and perceived competency level (r = 0.651, P nurse managers and educators who may consider offering more frequent experiential and educational opportunities to emergency nurses. Expansion of nurses' roles could also result in increased experience in clinical skills and higher levels of competency. Research is needed to investigate nurses' clinical competence using direct and observed measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluid role boundaries: exploring the contribution of the advanced nurse practitioner to multi-professional palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catriona; Brooks Young, Patricia; Nicol, Jacqueline; Campbell, Karen; Gray Brunton, Carol

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the introduction of Advanced Nurse Practitioners in a specialist, multi-professional palliative care context. The objective is to explore the core domains and competencies of the advanced nurse practitioner role in a multi-professional palliative care context. New models of health care and service delivery are emerging alongside expanded levels of autonomy, skills and decision-making for nurses and midwives. This has resulted in some confusion in the health service community internationally about the professional role and scope of the advanced nurse practitioner. A qualitative evaluation study (n = 21). Three phases of data collection were conducted over 10 months. Twenty-one participants took part from a specialist palliative care unit in one health board in a U.K. region spanning ANPs (n = 2) multi-professional staff (n = 14) and patients/carers (n = 5). Data collection methods included individual and focus group interviews with key stakeholders and observation of the advanced nurse practitioners at work and their reflexive diaries. The findings of this evaluation demonstrate that if the advanced nurse practitioner role can flourish it has the potential to shape 'new identities', re-construct the boundaries of nursing roles and emphasise the relationship based elements of excellent nursing work. The advanced nurse practitioner has the potential to enhance specialist palliative care service delivery through fluid role boundaries. The context in which advanced nurse practitioner roles are developed is important as acceptance of the role is linked to the co-construction of a different nursing identity. Our findings support the need to define, defend and name the work of advanced nursing roles. The advanced nurse practitioner roles were regarded as providing a unique contribution to service delivery and were characterised by fluid role boundaries which crossed the traditional disciplinary boundaries between nursing and medicine. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons

  18. Grounding our practice in nursing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2014-07-01

    The Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice is foundational to the work of nurses in a continuing professional development role. Use of the practice and professional performance aspects of the standards supports both quality of learning activities and the continuous growth process of nurses engaged in this area of practice. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. The Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Stephanie; Mauk, Kristen L; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Larsen, Pamala D; Rye, Jill; Wintersgill, Wendy; Cave, Christine E; Dufresne, David

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitation nursing is practiced in various settings along the healthcare continuum. No framework is noted in the literature that defines the necessary competencies of the rehabilitation nurse. To develop a Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing and its application to clinical and educational practice. A seven-member Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) task force was convened; conducted a literature review, reviewed current and historical ARN documents, including the Strategic Plan, and developed a Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing practice. The Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing delineates four domains of rehabilitation nursing practice and essential role competencies. The Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing addresses this diverse specialty practice in the current healthcare arena. This framework can be used to guide nurses practicing at different levels of proficiency in various settings. The Competency Model can be used as a structure for staff orientation, evaluation tools, clinical ladder components, role descriptions and rehabilitation nursing courses. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  20. The role of a practice model in professional education: The case of nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievert, Anne; Chaiklin, Seth

    of the professional practice for which students are being prepared. Without such a model, how will teachers be able to show the connections between specific topics and the practice in general, and how will students be able to relate specific topics? In our case, we focus on nursing as the professional practice...... for understanding nursing practice, and give a tool for both teachers and nursing students to relate specific topics in the nursing education to the practice of nursing. We conclude with some illustrations of how this model can be used in teaching specific topics within the nursing education....... attempt to formulate such a general model for nursing practice. As part of his work on developing a general approach for subject-matter teaching for schoolchildren, Vasili Davydov elaborated the importance of using models as a way of developing theoretical thinking (i.e., understanding the general...

  1. The effect of preceptor role effectiveness on newly licensed registered nurses' perceived psychological empowerment and professional autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Chanell; Hart, Patricia L; Mareno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    The first year turnover rate for newly licensed registered nurses is roughly 30% and increases to about 57% in the second year (Twibell et al., 2012). An effective preceptorship has been shown to better facilitate the first year transition (Hodges et al., 2008) and increase retention rates (Pine and Tart, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between newly licensed registered nurses' perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment and professional autonomy. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Sixty-nine newly licensed registered nurses were recruited and surveyed. Newly licensed registered nurses were found to have moderately high levels of perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment, and professional autonomy. Preceptor role effectiveness had significant, moderately, positive relationships with professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. There was also a significant relationship found between professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Results show that preceptor role effectiveness is linked to increased professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Therefore, effective preceptorships are necessary in easing the newly licensed registered nurse's transition to practice. Strategies to ensure effective preceptorships and enhance the NRLN's transition to practice are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Trying on the professional self: nursing students' perceptions of learning about roles, identity and teamwork in an interprofessional clinical placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Kerry; Cant, Robyn; Leech, Michelle; Baulch, Julie; Gilbee, Alana

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to describe how senior nursing students viewed the clinical learning environment and matured their professional identity through interprofessional learning in a student-led hospital 'ward'. Undergraduate nursing and medical student teams participated in a trial of ward-based interprofessional clinical learning, managing patients over 2 weeks in a rehabilitation ward. Qualitative and quantitative program evaluation was conducted using exit student focus groups and a satisfaction survey. Twenty-three nursing and medical students in three placement rounds provided positive feedback. Five main themes emerged describing their engagement in 'trying on' a professional role: 'experiencing independence and autonomy'; 'seeing clearly what nursing's all about'; 'altered images of other professions'; 'ways of communicating and collaborating' and 'becoming a functioning team'. Ward-based interprofessional clinical placements offer senior students authentic ideal clinical experiences. We consider this essential learning for future interprofessional collaboration which should be included in senior nursing students' education. © 2014.

  3. The educational needs and professional roles of Canadian physicians and nurses regarding genetic testing and adult onset hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; Blaine, Sean; Carroll, June C; Esplen, Mary Jane; Evans, Jane; Nicolson Klimek, Mary Lou; Meschino, Wendy; Ritvo, Paul

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the knowledge, professional involvement and confidence of Canadian nurses and physicians in providing genetic services for adult onset hereditary disease. 1,425 physicians and 1,425 nurses received a mailed questionnaire with reminders. The response rates were 50% (n = 543) and 79% (n = 975), respectively. Forty-eight percent of physicians and 31% of nurses lacked formal education in genetics. Respondents reported being involved in caring for people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Their levels of confidence that they could perform tasks, such as counselling about predictive genetic tests, however, were lower than their levels of expectation that it would be important for them to provide these services. The expected roles and educational needs of Canadian nurses and physicians have broad areas of overlap suggesting the possibility of combined professional education programs and multiple ways of organizing teams to provide genetic services to people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Learnt and perceived professional roles of a new type of nurse specialized in Gerontology and Geriatrics, a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, Petra; Finnema, Evelyn; Roodbol, Petrie

    Aim. To gain insight into a new type of nurse specialized in gerontology and geriatrics, how they find meaning in the care of older persons and how this relates to the seven professional roles derived from the CanMEDS theoretical framework. Background. To promote the quality of care for older

  5. An intrepreneurial innovative role: integration of the clinical nurse specialist and infection prevention professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Paula A

    2013-01-01

    Hospital quality and financial sustainability rely on reducing healthcare-associated events/infections, length of stay, and readmissions. This project focused on designing an integrated role for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and the infection prevention professional (IPP) to proactively manage the delivery of evidence-based practice to high-risk surgical patients. The healthcare industry is in the midst of a paradigm shift driven by changing health policy focusing on quality indicators, patient satisfaction, and lowering costs. Coupled with these indicators is the expectation and responsibility to provide evidence-based practice at all levels of the healthcare continuum. This paradigm shift places healthcare facilities in a very competitive atmosphere as they rally for the revenue of a fixed payer mix. A literature search using CINHAL, PubMed, and the CNS national listserve databases was completed to identify if there was any previously written information available on an integrated role of the CNS/IPP. An online business plan template was used to communicate the significance, implications, and return on organizational investment to practice with establishing this role. Chronic health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms can place patients at an increased risk for developing a surgical site infection or complications. The CNS/IPP will proactively manage these risk factors, including the patient and family in a preventive care model to manage the acute inpatient high-risk surgical patient. Care management will include coordinated, collaborative, and consultative follow-up by the CNS/IPP in the acute care, long-term care facilities, and home settings. The infection prevention skill set brings a level of clinical expertise that makes a unique CNS. The IPP is immersed in using epidemiological principles that examine the impact of comorbidities and the added risk that can

  6. Leadership and nurse retention: the pivotal role of nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Mary K; Standing, Theresa S; Glick, JoAnn; Duffy, Martha; Paschall, Fran; Sauer, Mary R; Sweeney, Denise Kosty; Modic, Mary Beth; Dumpe, Michelle L

    2005-03-01

    As the link between executives and bedside nurses, nurse managers assume roles that bridge both organizational and professional goals. Nurse retention is one of the many responsibilities that characterize the nurse manager's work. To better understand the pivotal role of nurse managers, the authors describe the views of 32 nurse managers regarding their roles and the characteristics they need to promote retention.

  7. School nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of role as opinion leader, and professional practice regarding human papillomavirus vaccine for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; Goodson, Patricia; Thompson, Bruce; Wilson, Kelly L

    2015-02-01

    Because human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates remain low, we evaluated US school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, and professional practice regarding HPV vaccine, and assessed whether knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of being an opinion leader influenced their professional practice regarding the HPV vaccine. We used a cross-sectional design by recruiting members from the National Association of School Nurses. All participants (N = 505) were e-mailed a survey designed for this study. Structural equation modeling (SEM) tested direct and indirect effects. Overall, school nurses had knowledge about HPV and the vaccine, and positive attitudes toward the vaccine. They had less-than-enthusiastic perceptions of their role as opinion leaders regarding the vaccine and implemented few activities related to providing vaccine information. The model revealed a good fit (χ(2)=20.238 [df=8, popinion leaders. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  8. Becoming Socialized into a New Professional Role: LPN to BN Student Nurses' Experiences with Legitimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Melrose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from a qualitative descriptive study that explored the professional socialization experiences of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs who attended an online university to earn a Baccalaureate degree in nursing (BN, a prerequisite to writing the Canadian Registered Nurse (RN qualifying exam. The project was framed from a constructivist worldview and Haas and Shaffir’s theory of legitimation. Participants were 27 nurses in a Post-LPN to BN program who came from across Canada to complete required practicums. Data was collected from digital recordings of four focus groups held in different cities. Transcripts were analyzed for themes and confirmed with participants through member checking. Two overarching themes were identified and are presented to explain how these unique adult learners sought to legitimize their emerging identity as Registered Nurses (RNs. First, Post-LPN to BN students need little, if any, further legitimation to affirm their identities as “nurse.” Second, practicum interactions with instructors and new clinical experiences are key socializing agents.

  9. Specialist nurse key worker in children's cancer care: Professionals' perspectives on the core characteristics of the role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana; Aldiss, Susie; Gibson, Faith

    2016-10-01

    To describe the development and implementation of the specialist nurse key worker role across 18 children's cancer centres in the United Kingdom, and draw out significant factors for success to inform future development of the role across a range of specialities. Data were obtained through 42 semi-structured interviews and a focus group with 12 key workers. Framework analysis revealed two main themes: models of care and key workers' perspectives of the role. Four models of care were identified and described, roles were organised along a continuum of in reach and outreach with either the presence or absence of home visits and direct delivery of clinical care. Key workers' perspectives of the advantages of the role included: coordination of care (being the main point of contact for families/professionals), experience and expertise (communication/information) and the relationship with families. The main challenges identified were: time, caseload size, geographical area covered, staffing numbers and resources available in the hospital and community. The label 'key worker' was disliked by many participants, as the loss of 'specialist nurse' in the title failed to reflect professional group. Leaving aside terminology, key workers shared core role elements within a continuum of in reach and outreach work and their involvement in direct clinical care varied throughout the pathway. Irrespective of the model they worked in, the key worker provided clinical, emotional, educational, and practical support to families, through the coordination of care, experience and expertise and relationship with families and professionals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. General and professional values of student nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Karosas, Laima; Kaseliene, Snieguole

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and compare the self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators in Lithuania. Contemporary nursing requires strong moral motivation and clear values as nurses confront many ethical dilemas in their practice. Students acquire essential values of the nursing profession through the appropriate role modelling of their educators. Nursing students seek to become capable in providing ethical and professional patient care while their educators attempt to model desired behaviours. A national cross-sectional comparative study was carried out in March 2011. Four-hundred eight respondents participated: 316 undergraduate nursing students and 92 nurse educators. A 57-item questionnaire was delivered to nursing programs at three universities and six colleges. Permission to conduct the study was granted by The Center on Bioethics. Student nurses and their educators rated the general value of altruism equally. Educators, in comparison with students, ranked honesty and intellectualism significantly higher and more often admired truth-telling in any circumstance. Students were more likely to avoid intellectual challenges in reading and placed lower importance on academic qualifications for career advancement. The professional nursing values of honesty, intellectualism and authority were ranked significantly higher by nurse educators than student nurses. The study revealed differences in self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators. The values of nurse educators were not always stronger than those of students. Positive relationships between particular general and professional values in both students and educators confirmed the link between professional and personal values. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nurses' professional and personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure professional and personal values among nurses, and to identify the factors affecting these values. The participants were 323 Israeli nurses, who were asked about 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The three fundamental professional nursing values of human dignity, equality among patients, and prevention of suffering, were rated first. The top 10 rated values all concerned nurses' responsibility towards patients. Altruism and confidentiality were not highly rated, and health promotion and nursing research were rated among the last three professional values. For personal (instrumental) values, honesty, responsibility and intelligence were rated first, while ambition and imagination were rated 14th and 16th respectively out of 18. Significant differences (P values rated as functions of culture, education, professional seniority, position and field of expertise. The results may assist in understanding the motives of nurses with different characteristics and help to promote their work according to professional ethical values.

  12. Caring in Nursing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary Brigid

    2015-01-01

    Caring science has been identified and examined in the discipline of nursing for over 40 years. Within this period, the topic has been analyzed and studied resulting in theories, models, books, and articles published nationally and internationally. Although advancements have been made in caring knowledge development, opportunities to integrate caring science into all aspects of nursing abound, including the specialty of nursing professional development. The focus of this article is to present ways in which nursing professional development specialists may incorporate caring science into practice, using Ray's (2010) Transcultural Caring Dynamics in Nursing and Health Care model as an exceptional exemplar for understanding, awareness, and choice for nurses and patients.

  13. The role of professional and team commitment in nurse-physician collaboration: A dual identity model perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Guberti, Monica; Borgognoni, Patrizia; Prandi, Carmen; Spaggiari, Ivana; Vezzani, Emanuela; Iemmi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-physician collaboration involves healthcare operators from different professions working together. The dual identity model predicts that nurse-physician interprofessional collaboration could improve if these operators feel they belong to both their professional category and care unit. This study tested this prediction by analyzing the effect of professional and team commitments on interprofessional collaboration between nurses and physicians in a hospital based in Northern Italy. A cross-section questionnaire survey was administered to 270 nurses and 95 physicians. Results indicate that interprofessional collaboration is positively affected by team commitment, while professional commitment had no effect. In accordance with the dual identity model, results indicate that interprofessional collaboration is higher when: (i) both professional and team commitment is high, and (ii) when team commitment is high and professional commitment is low. These results support dual identity model predictions and suggest that interprofessional collaboration can be increased by bolstering both team and professional commitment of nurses and physicians.

  14. The Changing Role of Health Care Professionals in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Literature Review of a Decade of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend R. van Stenis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the role of health care professionals is known to have changed over the last years, few formal efforts have been made to examine this change through means of a scientific review. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to investigate the changing role of health care professionals in nursing homes, as well as the conditions that make this change possible. A systematic review of health care literature published in the last decade (2007–2017 was utilized to address these goals. Our findings suggest that although health care in nursing homes is shifting from task-oriented care to relation-oriented care (e.g., through an increased focus on patient dignity, various obstacles (e.g., negative self-image, work pressure, and a lack of developmental opportunities, needs (e.g., shared values, personal development, personal empowerment, team development, and demonstrating expertise, and competences (e.g., communication skills, attentiveness, negotiation skills, flexibility, teamwork, expertise, and coaching and leadership skills still need to be addressed in order to successfully facilitate this change. As such, this paper provides various implications for health care research, health care institutions, practitioners, HR professionals and managers, and occupational health research.

  15. The Changing Role of Health Care Professionals in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Literature Review of a Decade of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stenis, Arend R; van Wingerden, Jessica; Kolkhuis Tanke, Isolde

    2017-01-01

    Although the role of health care professionals is known to have changed over the last years, few formal efforts have been made to examine this change through means of a scientific review. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to investigate the changing role of health care professionals in nursing homes, as well as the conditions that make this change possible. A systematic review of health care literature published in the last decade (2007-2017) was utilized to address these goals. Our findings suggest that although health care in nursing homes is shifting from task-oriented care to relation-oriented care (e.g., through an increased focus on patient dignity), various obstacles (e.g., negative self-image, work pressure, and a lack of developmental opportunities), needs (e.g., shared values, personal development, personal empowerment, team development, and demonstrating expertise), and competences (e.g., communication skills, attentiveness, negotiation skills, flexibility, teamwork, expertise, and coaching and leadership skills) still need to be addressed in order to successfully facilitate this change. As such, this paper provides various implications for health care research, health care institutions, practitioners, HR professionals and managers, and occupational health research.

  16. Effect of professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China: the mediator role of organisational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu; Hu, Xiuying

    2015-10-01

    To examine the associations among professional self-concept, organisational commitment and burnout, and to analyse the mediating role of organisational commitment on the relationship between professional self-concept and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Previous studies have focused on work environmental variables that contributed to burnout in nurses. However, no study has explored the mediating effect of organisational commitment on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout in community health nurses. A cross-sectional descriptive study. This study was conducted at 36 community health centres in Chengdu, China with 485 nurses sampled using a two-stage sampling method. The measures used in our study included Nurses' Self-concept Questionnaire, Organisational Commitment Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. The results of structural equation model techniques indicated that, in the direct approach, positive professional self-concept resulted in increased organisational commitment and reduced burnout. Higher organisational commitment resulted in less burnout. In the indirect approach, organisational commitment performed as a partial mediator on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout. Positive perception of professional self-concept can result in reduced burnout via enhancing organisational commitment. It is crucial for nursing administrators to develop effective intervention strategies such as skills escalator training and assertive training, and establishing a supportive working environment to enhance nurses' professional self-concept and organisational commitment, and decrease burnout. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. An exploration of emotional protection and regulation in nurse-patient interactions: The role of the professional face and the emotional mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Penelope; Glass, Nel

    2015-01-01

    While interpersonal styles of nurse-patient communication have become more relaxed in recent years, nurses remain challenged in emotional engagement with patients and other health professionals. In order to preserve a professional distance in patient care delivery however slight, nurses need to be able to regulate their emotions. This research aimed to investigate nurses' perceptions of emotional protection and regulation in patient care delivery. A qualitative approach was used for the study utilising in-depth semi-structured interviews and researcher reflective journaling. Participants were drawn from rural New South Wales. Following institutional ethics approval 5 nurses were interviewed and reflective journaling commenced. The interviews and the reflective journal were transcribed verbatim. The results revealed that nurses' emotional regulation demonstrated by a 'professional face' was an important strategy to enable delivery of quality care even though it resulted in emotional containment. Such regulation was a protective mechanism employed to look after self and was critical in situations of emotional dissonance. The results also found that nurses experience emotional dissonance in situations where they have unresolved personal emotional issues and the latter was a individual motivator to manage emotions in the workplace. Emotions play a pivotal role within nurse-patient relationships. The professional face can be recognised as contributing to emotional health and therefore maintaining the emotional health of nurses in practice. This study foregrounds the importance of regulating emotions and nurturing nurses' emotional health in contemporary practice.

  18. High Job Demands and Low Job Control Increase Nurses' Professional Leaving Intentions: The Role of Care Setting and Profit Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendsche, Johannes; Hacker, Winfried; Wegge, Jürgen; Rudolf, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    We investigated how two types of care setting (home care and nursing home) and type of ownership (for-profit vs. public/non-profit) of geriatric care services interacted in influencing registered nurses' intention to give up their profession. In prior research, employment in for-profit-organizations, high job demands, and low job control were important antecedents of nurses' intent to leave. However, the impact of care setting on these associations was inconclusive. Therefore, we tested a mediated moderation model predicting that adverse work characteristics would drive professional leaving intentions, particularly in for-profit services and in nursing homes. A representative German sample of 304 registered nurses working in 78 different teams participated in our cross-sectional study. As predicted, lower job control and higher job demands were associated with higher professional leaving intentions, and nurses reported higher job demands in public/non-profit care than in for-profit care, and in nursing homes compared to home care. Overall, RNs in nursing homes and home care reported similar intent to leave, but in for-profit settings only, nurses working in nursing homes reported higher professional leaving intentions than did nurses in home care, which was linked to lower job control in the for-profit nursing home setting, supporting mediated moderation. Taken together, our results indicate that the interplay of care setting and type of ownership is important when explaining nurses' intentions to give up their profession. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The role of physician oversight on advanced practice nurses' professional autonomy and empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Polly A; Way, Sandra M

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of physician oversight on advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Examination of these relationships provides insight into the strength of independent practice. The purpose of this study was to examine whether APRNs' perceptions of autonomy and empowerment varied according to type of physician oversight, whether facilitative or restrictive. A cross-sectional survey design was used to examine whether APRNs' perceptions of autonomy and empowerment varied according to physician oversight, geographical location, and practice setting. Five hundred questionnaires were mailed in March 2013 with 274 returned. Participants were asked about autonomy, empowerment, demographics, physician oversight, geographical location, and practice setting. Among surveyed respondents, physician oversight was related to increased empowerment, regardless of whether the oversight was defined in facilitative or restrictive terms; both had similar positive effects on empowerment. If APRNs are to be part of the solution to the growing problem of healthcare access, it is important to study factors that contribute to their success. We speculate that increasing opportunities for collaboration and interaction with physicians, and possibly other healthcare professionals, could facilitate APRN empowerment, optimizing their contribution. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. A concept mapping exploration of social workers' and mental health nurses' understanding of the role of the Approved Mental Health Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressington, Daniel T; Wells, Harvey; Graham, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    This study uses concept mapping and participant interviews to explore how differing professional viewpoints and levels of knowledge held by social workers and mental health nurses affect perceptions of the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) role during an interprofessional training programme. The results suggest that social workers entering the programme had a greater understanding of the role in comparison to mental health nurses; however, on completion of the programme, both professional groups demonstrated similar levels of learning. The study challenges assumptions that nurses may be inherently disadvantaged by their professional background in terms of learning about a role that is traditionally associated with social work practice. Study participants valued the concept mapping process and felt that the approach may be a valuable tool for clinical supervision. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Health Care Professionals in Breaking Bad News about Death: the Perspectives of Doctors, Nurses and Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rassin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The way a death is notified to family members has a long-term effect on their coping with their loss. The words caregivers use and the sentiments they express can stay with their hearers for the rest of theirlife. Aims: To study the views of three caregivers groups—doctors, nurses and social workers—as to their role in breaking a death news in an ED.Methods: One hundred and fifteen health care professionals participated in the research (51 nurses, 38 doctors and 26 social workers. They completed a 72-item questionnaire comprising behaviour descriptions, attitudes and statements. Content validation of the questionnaire was conducted by the help of experts group, and the internal reliability, measures in all its parts was 0.78 on average (α = 0.78.Results: Doctors gave a higher score than the other groups to their responsibility for breaking bad news (p<0.005 and to the content of the information they provide. Social workers scored the mental support given the family significantly higher than doctors and nurses did (p<0.000. Nurses scored the instrumental support given(tissues, water to drink significantly higher than doctors and social workers (p<0.000. Breaking bad news caused social workers more mental distress than it did either doctors or nurses. All three groups gave a high score to the emotional exhaustion, sadness and identification this task caused them. Nurses felt more fear at theprospect of a notifying a death and made more effort to escape the task.Conclusions: The findings of the study will help develop performance guidelines for notifying a death and provide input for simulation and other training workshops.

  2. Professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chabell

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid changes taking place in the country, including the education system in general and nursing education in particular, the role of professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators need to be re-visited in order to meet the changing health needs of the communtiy and to facilitate outcome- based nursing education and evidence-based quality nursing care. The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the perceptions of professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators in the clinical learning units, within the context of a specific health-care service in Gauteng. A phenomenological method using descriptive naïve sketches was used to collect data from twenty professional nurses complying with certain inclusion criteria. A content analysis was performed and eight categories (main concepts were identified in order of priority as follows: communication/collaboration; role-modelling; continuous assessment and evaluation; up-to-date knowledge; scientific approach; clinical teaching; management and professionalism. After a literature control was conducted, these main concepts were confirmed. It is recommended that a model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education be developed, using these concepts as basis for the provisional conceptual framework.

  3. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Professional competence of practising nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Meretoja, Riitta; Isoaho, Hannu; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2013-05-01

    To compare nurse competence in terms of its quality and frequency of action in medical, surgical, paediatric/obstetric/gynaecological and psychiatric clinical fields. One challenge of current health care is to target practising nurses' competencies to optimal use. Therefore, a systematic assessment of nurse competence is justified. Studies using the Nurse Competence Scale have found that nurses' competence is on a good or very good level and it increases with age and work experience. A cross-sectional comparative survey using the Nurse Competence Scale. A purposive sample of 2083 nurses in a major University Hospital in Finland participated in this study in 2007-2008. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics' anova with Bonferroni correction, and Pearson/Spearman correlation coefficients were used to analyse the data. The overall level of competence of nurses was good, and the quality of action correlated positively with the frequency of action. Nurses in the psychiatric field reached somewhat higher overall mean scores than nurses in other clinical fields. On item level, nurses seemed to be the most competent in actions related to immediate individualised patient care, the maintenance of their own professional competence and commitment to nursing ethics. Age and particularly work experience were positively correlated with the competence. Findings from this large data corroborate previous study results on the category level assessment of nurse competence using the Nurse Competence Scale indicating a good level of competence. On item level, findings revealed more detailed themes of nurse competence, which complements earlier knowledge retrieved from the category level analysis and could be used to target nurses' competencies to even more optimal use. Competence assessment and targeted interventions are recommended as tools for the management for planning nurses' career development and continuing education to ensure competent and motivated work force and

  5. Nurse as a facilitator to professional communication: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Peyravi, Hamid

    2014-11-16

    Nurses need to establish communication with other healthcare professionals to facilitate the process of care. Healthcare professionals have complementary roles in providing care to patients. As the key members of the healthcare team, nurses also have an important role in establishing communication among other healthcare professionals. The final outcome of professional communication is effective care and improved patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' role in establishing professional communications with other healthcare professionals. This was a descriptive qualitative study. The study was conducted by using the content analysis approach. A purposive sample of sixteen healthcare professionals was recruited from six teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Study data were gathered by conducting personal face-to-face semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by using the qualitative content analysis approach. The three main themes of the study were 'Nurse as the mediator of communication', 'Nurse as the executor of others' duties, and 'Nurse as a scapegoat'. Study findings can be used by nurses, managers, and health policy-makers to develop effective strategies for exactly determining and clarifying nurses and other healthcare professionals' roles as well as for informing the public and other healthcare professionals about nurses' roles and importance.

  6. The Current Status of Nursing Professionalism Among Nursing Faculty in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Taketomi, Kikuko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2017-02-01

    The faculty of nursing schools plays an important role in the successful execution of nursing education. Therefore, faculty behavior strongly affects the professional development of nurses. However, few studies have examined professional nursing behaviors from the perspective of nursing faculty. Members of nursing faculty in Japan were surveyed regarding their perspectives on behaviors related to professionalism. The model, Miller's Wheel of Professionalism in Nursing, was used as the theoretical framework. The Behavioral Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing (BIPN) was completed by 74 full-time nursing faculty who were currently working at 10 institutes of nursing education in Japan. The mean BIPN score for the participants was 11.56 (SD = 6.08) of a possible total of 27. The highest and lowest BIPN category scores were for "research development, use, and evaluation" and "community service," respectively. Professionalism was found to relate significantly to higher educational preparation (F = 32.17, p professionalism (p professionalism and both educational preparation (r = .85, p professionalism. The professional behavior scores suggest that "community service" is an issue that requires further improvement among Japanese nursing faculty. Awareness of extrinsic factors such as education is important to maximize nursing professionalism. The findings of this study may help nursing faculty continue their self-development.

  7. Finding Florence: Shedding Light on Nurse Practitioners' Professional Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. ter Maten-Speksnijder (Ada)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe new professional rolenurse practitioner’ (in Dutch: verpleegkundig specialist) challenges nurses to distuinguish themselves from nurses educated at the Bacher level by the criteria: independency, expertise, and an active attitude to role development. A crucial aspect of their

  8. A Study of the Effect of the Type and Timing of Professional Development and Job Satisfaction in the Nurse Faculty Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble-Britton, Pinky A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to adapt to one's profession and display satisfaction while in that role has been a subject of discussion for educators. This quantitative, cross-sectional survey examined how types of professional development activities and their timing affected job satisfaction among nurse faculty members in Tennessee. Results indicated that the…

  9. School Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, Perceptions of Role as Opinion Leader, and Professional Practice Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L.; Goodson, Patricia; Thompson, Bruce; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates remain low, we evaluated US school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, and professional practice regarding HPV vaccine, and assessed whether knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of being an opinion leader influenced their professional…

  10. Experiences of nurse case managers within a central discharge planning role of collaboration between physicians, patients and other healthcare professionals: A sociocultural qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Jorun E; Waite, Marion A

    2017-11-17

    To gain knowledge of nurse case managers' experiences within the German acute care context of collaboration with patients and physicians in a discharge planning role; further to learn about patients' assignment to the management of the nurse case managers; and explicitly to explore critical incidences of interactions between nurse case managers, patients and healthcare practitioner in discharge planning to understand the factor that contributes to effective collaboration. The defined role of nurse case managers in many contexts is a patient-centred responsibility for a central task of discharge management of patients with complex physical and social needs. Some studies have indicated that the general impact of the role reduces readmission rates. Given the necessity to work interprofessionally to achieve a safe discharge, little is known about how nurse case managers achieve this collaboratively. A qualitative case study within a German teaching hospital of nurse case managers (N = 8). Data were collected through semi-structured interviews prompted by a critical incident technique and rigorously analysed through the lenses of sociocultural theory. Consistent object being worked upon was a safe and effective discharge from hospital with a focus on patient advocacy. Significant themes were a self-value or recognition by others of professional expertise, reciprocal value on the capabilities of others thorough relational expertise and negotiation with patients and an identification of case trajectories. More continuity of nurse case managers' care and management, clarity of role and transparency to peers, physicians and other professionals would be beneficial in ensuring appropriate referral of complex patients to nurse case managers responsibility. Clearer role description and benefit realisation of the nurse case managers could be achieved by interventions that are interprofessional and focus on the tasks that matter from a collaborative perspective. This could lead

  11. Nursing role implications for family caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; Ferrell, Betty

    2012-11-01

    To describe the clinical, education, and research roles of professional nurses caring for family caregivers. DATA SCORES: Review of literature and Websites on the professional nursing role and family caregivers. The growing number of family caregivers of cancer patients will need education and support. The professional oncology nurse is best suited to assess, teach, and support these family caregivers, as well as contribute to the evidence base of these areas of practice. Professional nurses caring for oncology patients need to expand their role to include additional support and education of family caregivers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Nephrology Clinical Research Nurse Role: Potential Role Conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklos, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is becoming more visible to nephrology professionals. As more nephrology practices and units are participating in clinical trials, clinical research nursing is gaining interest as a career niche among nephrology nurses. This unique specialty requires that nephrology clinical nurse nurses (CRNs) reconcile the roles of nurse as caregiver and nurse as researcher, which may result in a role conflict. Nephrology nurses should be aware that they may experience this role conflict when transitioning from patient care to a position as a clinical research nurse. These nurses can rely on the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics for Nurses and the Oncology Nursing Society's Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse Competencies to help reconcile the potential role conflict.

  13. Professional behaviours and factors contributing to nursing professionalism among nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Taketomi, Kikuko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    To examine the perception of professional behaviours and factors contributing to nursing professionalism among nurse managers. Professional behaviours influence nursing professionalisation and managers' behaviours strongly impact professional development. In Japan, few studies have examined professional nursing behaviours from the nurse managers' perspective. The Behavioural Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing was performed with 525 nurse managers representing 15 facilities in Japan. The highest professional behaviours score obtained was 'competence and continuing education' and the lowest behavioural score was 'publication and communication'. The results demonstrate that higher nursing professionalism is related significantly to the increased length of nursing experience, a higher level of educational preparation and the current position as a nurse administrator. This study demonstrated that nursing professionalism is influenced by years of experience and nursing management education. Awareness of extrinsic professional factors is important continually to maintain nursing professionalism. The findings of our study may help nurse managers to continue their self-development and to realise the potential of their nursing staff by developing professionalism. These findings also provide an understanding of international professionalism trends to achieve higher levels of nursing professionalism through the evaluation of professional nursing behaviours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Professional Values Among Female Nursing Students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allari, Rabia S; Ismaile, Samantha; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Professional values are essential to nursing practice because they guide standards for working, provide a structure for evaluating behavior, and influence decisions making. The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of Saudi female nursing students on professional values and to assess the correlation between their perception of professional values in relation to their year of academic studies. We used a cross-sectional descriptive study where a survey was administered to 150 Saudi female nurses living in Riyadh. Results show that Saudi female nurses have a high perception of professional values relating to confidentiality, privacy, moral and legal rights, health and safety, and the work environment. Whereas Saudi nursing students have a low perception for participating in professional nursing activities, utilizing research in practice, peer review, public policy, and engaging in on-going self-evaluation. There was positive correlation between different professional values and academic years. The highest correlations were for the items related to caring and trust more than activism because nursing students at higher academic levels viewed the relationship with patients as more important than advancing health care systems through public policy, research, and professional organizations. In conclusion, nursing program administrators should put emphasis on improving the development of professional values through a role modeling approach to promote activism and professional values through the arrangement of meetings, exchange forums, and conferences with other nurses, managers, policy makers, innovators, and researchers within the nursing field.

  15. Factors relating to professional self-concept among nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Şimşek, Belkıs

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the self-concept in nurse managers in Turkey and the effects of certain variables on professional self-concept. Professional self-concept plays a significant role in improving certain professional behaviours. Nursing managers have the potential to influence other members of the profession with their attitudes and behaviours. The study was designed as a cross-sectional descriptive study. This study was conducted with 159 nurse managers in nine different hospitals. The study data were collected with a Personal Information Form and Professional Self-concept Nursing Inventory, and the data analysis was accomplished with descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha coefficients and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector analyses. The professional self-concept score of nurse managers was 3·33 (SD = 0·308). Professional competence subdimension had the highest scores, while professional satisfaction subdimension had the lowest. The types of hospital were found to be influential on professional self-concept. The types of hospital were reported to influence the professional self-concept of nurses. Nursing managers are visionaries who can potentially influence nursing practices and decisions. Nursing leaders must monitor and administer strategies to improve their professional self-concept. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Korean nurses' ethical dilemmas, professional values and professional quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Han, Yonghee; Kim, Ji-su

    2015-06-01

    In the changing medical environment, professional stress continuously increases as the individual's quality of life suffers. Of all the healthcare professions, nursing is especially prone to burnout, compassion fatigue and reduced compassion satisfaction, due to the tensions resulting from the physical and psychological stress of caring for extremely ill patients. This study examined the professional quality of life of clinical nurses in Korea and the relationship between their experiences in ethical dilemmas and professional values. This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample consisting of 488 clinical nurses. We used four questionnaires to measure the participants' demographic characteristics, experiences in ethical dilemmas, professional nursing values and professional quality of life (ProQOL assessment, Version 5). Ethical considerations: This study received approval from the Institutional Review Board of Bronco Memorial Hospital. Written informed consent was given by all participants. The nurses' professional quality of life was affected by ethical dilemmas and professional nursing values. The factors influencing compassion satisfaction were age, client domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness, professionalism of nursing and the roles of nursing services in professional values. The factors influencing burnout were marital status (married), religion (yes), human life domain, professional work domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness and the role of nursing services in nursing professional values. The factors influencing secondary traumatic stress were human life domain, client domain and the professional work domain of ethical dilemmas. Intervention to help nurses increase their professional quality of life will have a greater chance of success if they are based on the nurses' values and beliefs about the ethical dilemmas they face and foster the establishment of positive professional values. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. An evaluation of nurses' professional autonomy in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykara, Zehra Göçmen; Şahinoğlu, Serap

    2014-06-01

    The development of a profession's autonomy closely relates to that profession's level of autonomy in performing its specific role. For the nursing profession, this key role is nursing care. This study was undertaken to evaluate the professional autonomy of nurses in care provision, from an ethical perspective. A mixed methods approach is employed in this research, which makes use of both quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative dimension of this research covers sociodemographic aspects and makes use of the Sociotropy-Autonomy Scale. The qualitative dimension of the research relates to the factors that affect professional autonomy in nursing care. The sample consisted of 30 nurses working in the orthopedics, neurology, or intensive care units of three hospitals. Before conducting this research, we received permission from the ethical committee, as well as written permits from all the institutions in which the research was carried out. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. According to the findings of this study, only 6.7% of the nurses surveyed stated that nurses had professional autonomy; they also stated that professional autonomy in nursing was mostly restricted by the need to be "dependent upon the physician in nursing implementations" and that autonomy in nursing care was mostly limited by a "high number of patients per nurse." This study determined that delays in resolving problems with regard to professional autonomy in nursing care in Turkey could be creating many of the professional and ethical problems that nurses face there. It is recommended that: individuals choose the nursing profession conscientiously; nurses need to be given professional awareness; their professional organizations need to be strengthened; and plans need to be made to increase research and to accumulate both knowledge and expertise. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Professional nurses' understanding of clinical judgement: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An explorative and descriptive qualitative design was followed in this study to reach an understanding of clinical judgement in the clinical nursing environment from the perspective of professional nurses. Eleven ... Keywords: Clinical nursing environment, Cognitive reasoning skills, Quality nursing care, Nursing student ...

  19. The changing role of health care professionals in nursing homes: A systematic literature review of a decade of change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stenis, A.R. (Arend R.); J. Van Wingerden (Jessica); Tanke, I.K. (Isolde Kolkhuis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAlthough, the role of health care professionals is known to have changed over the last years, few formal efforts have been made to examine this change through means of a scientific review. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to investigate the changing role of health care professionals

  20. The relationship between gender role stereotypes and requisite managerial characteristics: the case of nursing and midwifery professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkery, Elaine; Tiernan, Siobhan; Morley, Michael

    2014-09-01

    To examine the relationship between gender role stereotypes and requisite managerial characteristics within the nursing and midwifery profession. Studies have been carried out to determine gender role stereotypes and requisite managerial characteristics across a number of industries and among student samples. No study has been carried out within the nursing and midwifery profession. In order to allow for direct comparisons with previous research Schein's Descriptive Index (SDI) was used. A total 239 undergraduate and 171 postexperience responses were collected. Female nurses and midwives did not gender type the managerial role, whereas males gender typed the managerial role in favour of men. Student nurses and midwives recorded a stronger correlation between women and management than their qualified counterparts. Males gender typed the managerial role in favour of men. With an increase in numbers of men joining the profession and increased representation of males at the Clinical Nurse Manager (CMN) level there is a possibility that the profession will become two tiered. Health care organisations should pay careful consideration to career development and implement career structures which ensure equal access to managerial roles for both genders. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Supporting students in professional socialisation: Guidelines for professional nurses and educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester Cathrina (Rina de Swardt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional socialisation of nursing students involves learning skills, attitudes, behaviour and professional roles, largely in the clinical area. During clinical accompaniment and reflective discussions with a group of undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing students in South Africa, students reported negative professional socialisation experiences, primarily in the clinical area. Such experiences could influence the quality of patient care. The objective of this study was to develop and validate guidelines to support professional nurses and educators in the professional socialisation of student nurses. Evidence was generated from an exploration and description of the perceptions of professional nurses regarding their role in the professional socialisation of students, the perceptions of nurse educators regarding the teaching and facilitation of professional socialisation of students, and the socialisation experiences of students. Following a sequential mixed-methods design, qualitative data guided the collection of quantitative data. All data and literature directed the development of these guidelines, which experts reviewed and validated according to a set of criteria. These guidelines focus on the clinical, nursing educational institution environment and values and beliefs of the nursing profession. Facilitation of sound work ethics, professional behaviour, cultural and gender awareness, role modelling and the application of a range of teaching strategies is proposed.

  2. Factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalene H. Awases

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional nurses play a vital role in the provision of health care globally. The performance of health care workers, including professional nurses, link closely to the productivity and quality of care provision within health care organisations. It was important to identify factors influencing the performance of professional nurses if the quality of health care delivery was to improved.Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.Method: A quantitative, descriptive survey was used to collect data by means of a questionnaire. A random sample of 180 professional nurses was selected from six hospitals in three regions of Namibia.Results: Factors affecting the performance of nurses negatively were identified such as: lack of recognition of employees who are performing well, quality performance outcomes and an absence of a formal performance appraisal system and poor working conditions. Various factors contribute to both the positive and negative performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Strategies were developed for addressing the negative factors that could positively affect the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.Conclusions: This study emphasises the importance of developing strategies to promote the performance of nurses; build knowledge and expertise; develop mechanisms for improving the performance of nurses; expand leadership and management capacity; and generate information and knowledge through research.

  3. Factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalene H. Awases

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional nurses play a vital role in the provision of health care globally. The performance of health care workers, including professional nurses, link closely to the productivity and quality of care provision within health care organisations. It was important to identify factors influencing the performance of professional nurses if the quality of health care delivery was to improved.Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.Method: A quantitative, descriptive survey was used to collect data by means of a questionnaire. A random sample of 180 professional nurses was selected from six hospitals in three regions of Namibia.Results: Factors affecting the performance of nurses negatively were identified such as: lack of recognition of employees who are performing well, quality performance outcomes and an absence of a formal performance appraisal system and poor working conditions. Various factors contribute to both the positive and negative performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Strategies were developed for addressing the negative factors that could positively affect the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.Conclusions: This study emphasises the importance of developing strategies to promote the performance of nurses; build knowledge and expertise; develop mechanisms for improving the performance of nurses; expand leadership and management capacity; and generate information and knowledge through research.

  4. Organizational impact of nurse supply and workload on nurses continuing professional development opportunities: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, Tracey H; Maslin-Prothero, Sian E; Smith, Gilly

    2015-12-01

    To identify the best evidence on the impact of healthcare organizations' supply of nurses and nursing workload on the continuing professional development opportunities of Registered Nurses in the acute care hospital. To maintain registration and professional competence nurses are expected to participate in continuing professional development. One challenge of recruitment and retention is the Registered Nurse's ability to participate in continuing professional development opportunities. The integrative review method was used to present Registered Nurses perspectives on this area of professional concern. The review was conducted for the period of 2001-February 2015. Keywords were: nurs*, continuing professional development, continuing education, professional development, supply, shortage, staffing, workload, nurse: patient ratio, barrier and deterrent. The integrative review used a structured approach for literature search and data evaluation, analysis and presentation. Eleven international studies met the inclusion criteria. Nurses are reluctant or prevented from leaving clinical settings to attend continuing professional development due to lack of relief cover, obtaining paid or unpaid study leave, use of personal time to undertake mandatory training and organizational culture and leadership issues constraining the implementation of learning to benefit patients. Culture, leadership and workload issues impact nurses' ability to attend continuing professional development. The consequences affect competence to practice, the provision of safe, quality patient care, maintenance of professional registration, job satisfaction, recruitment and retention. Organizational leadership plays an important role in supporting attendance at continuing professional development as an investment for the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The influence of Masters education on the professional lives of British and German nurses and the further professionalization of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Dianne

    2011-12-01

     This article reports on findings from a qualitative study which explored the influence of a Masters in Nursing on the professional lives of British and German nurses and its role in further professionalizing nursing. A collaborative Masters programme was delivered in the United Kingdom and Germany. This provided an opportunity to study the influence of the programme on the professionalization of nursing in different country contexts. Continuing education is thought to contribute to furthering professionalization. Evidence to support this in the field of nursing is limited. An interpretive research design was used and data were collected via semi-structured interviews with ten German nurses and nine British nurses. Data were collected in the United Kingdom and Germany from August 2006 to February 2007. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and data were analysed using a template approach with further immersion and crystalization of the data. Nurses' personal and professional confidence improved; research-based evidence was used to underpin changes made to practice; new roles and careers emerged; multi-professional working was enhanced; and nurses rediscovered nursing and championed the profession. A diagram is presented based on the findings. Masters education is at the centre as the catalyst with four interconnecting circles, which depict elements that contribute to professionalization. The diagram highlights overlap and interplay between nurses' increased personal confidence, improved cognitive functioning, evidence-based practice development and enhanced professionalism. Findings support the theory that this Masters in Nursing programme enhanced practice and further professionalization of nursing in both countries. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Professional burnout among studying nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bielan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a response to stress, the source of which is the situation at work. This phenomenon concerns mainly representatives of professions whose essence is to work with people, including doctors, nurses, paramedics and others; their close committed interactions with others constitute the core of professional activity and determine the success and development. Participants of the study were 281 students of extramural complementary nursing course at the University of Warmia and Mazury, mostly aged 40-60 years, employed in hospital wards and with employment contracts. In the study, the authors’ demographic questionnaire of structuralized interview and the MBI questionnaire, developed by Maslach and Jackson, in the Polish version by Pasikowski (2004, were used. The obtained results were statistically analysed. The performed analysis of burnout has confirmed that emotional exhaustion is associated with the length of employment, the number of days off and the number of institutions where nurses were employed. We did not observe, however, any correlation with these variables between depersonalisation and a sense of the lack of achievements. Furthermore, no dependence of the severity of the professional burnout symptoms on the surveyed groups’ age was found. It turned out that the persons working in shifts system felt much stronger depletion of emotion than nurses working in a daily system. It was also observed that nurses employed in hospitals felt much stronger symptoms in both areas of occupational burnout than those working in other institutions. Furthermore, it was not confirmed that the absence of the sense of achievement depended on where the respondents were employed. Taking into account the reference levels of the three dimensions of burnout acc. to MBI it was found out that most respondents were characterized by a low value within the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation and a high value in terms of a sense of the lack of

  7. Professionalism and professional quality of life for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Kyunghee

    2016-10-01

    To identify the relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life among oncology nurses working at tertiary hospitals in Korea. Oncology nurses are combined with core competencies and qualities required in cancer patient care. Professionalism that means compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue is a main concept in problem-solving strategies as motivation. Their satisfaction is representative of professionalism and professional quality of life. However, little research has focused on professionalism and professional quality of life. A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. A total of 285 nurses from two tertiary hospitals were included. Data collection was undertaken using Korean version of professionalism scale derived from the Hall Professional Inventory Scale and professional quality of life. Data were analysed by spss 21.0 for Windows Program using t-test, anova, and multiple regression. The mean score of professionalism in oncology nurses was 77·98 ± 7·31. The mean professional quality of life score for compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress was 33·84 ± 5·62, 28·38 ± 5·36 and 28·33 ± 5·48. Compassion satisfaction was affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 49·2%. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress were affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 39·3% and 4·8%. The higher the professionalism leads to the higher the compassion satisfaction, the lower the compassion fatigue. The relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life for a health work environment requires further investigation. Our study supports the idea that enhancing professionalism can increase professional quality of life. It is necessary to develop professionalism by recognised qualifications and applied rewards in advanced nursing organisational culture. Furthermore, compassion satisfaction is increased by

  8. Professional ethics in nursing: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Pakkanen, Piiku; Korhonen, Anne

    2015-08-01

    To conduct an integrative review and synthesize current primary studies of professional ethics in nursing. Professional ethics is a familiar concept in nursing and provides an ethical code for nursing practice. However, little is known about how professional ethics has been defined and studied in nursing science. Systematic literature searches from 1948-February 2013, using the CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus electronic databases to look at previously published peer-reviewed studies. A modified version of Cooper's five-stage integrative review was used to review and synthesize current knowledge. Fourteen papers were included in this research. According to our synthesis, professional ethics is described as an intra-professional approach to care ethics and professionals commit to it voluntarily. Professional ethics consist of values, duties, rights and responsibilities, regulated by national legislation and international agreements and detailed in professional codes. Professional ethics is well established in nursing, but is constantly changing due to internal and external factors affecting the profession. Despite the obvious importance of professional ethics, it has not been studied much in nursing science. Greater knowledge of professional ethics is needed to understand and support nurses' moral decision-making and to respond to the challenges of current changes in health care and society. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Professional nursing values: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bonnie J; McArthur, Erin C

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this concept analysis is to clarify the meaning of professional nursing values. In a time of increasing ethical dilemmas, it is essential that nurses internalize professional values to develop and maintain a professional identity. However, nursing organizations and researchers provide different conceptions of professional nursing values, leading to a lack of clarity as to the meaning and attributes of this construct. Walker and Avant's (2011) method was used to guide an analysis of this concept. Resources published from 1973 to 2016 were identified via electronic databases and hand-searching of reference lists. A review of the literature was completed and the data were analyzed to identify uses of the concept; the defining attributes of the concept; borderline, related, contrary, and illegitimate examples; antecedents and consequences; and empirical referents. Professional nursing values were defined as important professional nursing principles of human dignity, integrity, altruism, and justice that serve as a framework for standards, professional practice, and evaluation. Further research is needed in the development and testing of professional nursing values theory, and the reassessment of values instruments. Core professional values that are articulated may help unify the profession and demonstrate the value of nursing to the public. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Personal and professional values held by baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hülya; Işik, Burçin; Şenyuva, Emine; Kaya, Nurten

    2017-09-01

    Values are ideals and beliefs that individuals and groups uphold and lie at the core of the diverse world of human behaviour and are expressed in every human decision and action, both consciously and unconsciously. They represent basic beliefs of what is right, good or desirable and motivate both personal and professional behaviour. In the context of nursing profession, values are essential in order to maintain high standards of the nursing care. This study was planned to examine changes in nursing students' personal and professional values between entering and graduating from an undergraduate nursing programme. Ethical considerations: Measures to protect participants included obtaining Deaconship of Nursing Faculty approval, obtaining signed informed consent and maintaining confidentiality. This study was designed as longitudinal quality. The research population included 143 students registered at a first grade of a nursing faculty for the 2009-2010 academic year. Data were collected with a Questionnaire Form, the Value Preferences Scale, the Professional Values Precedence Scale and the Nursing Professional Values Scale. According to the results, social values have statistical differences in 4-year nursing education. Nursing students in second class have higher score in terms of social values than those in third class. Also, majority of students ranked human dignity as first and justice as second and third from first to fourth classes, and they have very high scores on Nursing Professional Values Scale and its subscales and stated that all items of Nursing Professional Values Scale are very important. As a result, nursing education has vital role in acquiring and maintaining professional values.

  11. The nursing role during end-of-life care in the intensive care unit related to the interaction between patient, family and professional: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noome, Marijke; Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, Deirdre M; van Leeuwen, Evert; Dijkstra, Boukje M; Vloet, Lilian C M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how intensive care unit (ICU) nurses describe their role during End-of-Life Care (EOLC) in the ICU, related to the interaction between patient, family and professionals (care triad). Three electronic databases, PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE, and reference lists of included studies were searched for studies in English, Dutch or German between January 2002 and August 2015. Studies were included if they presented data about EOLC in the adult ICU, and the role of ICU nurses around EOLC. Quantitative and qualitative studies and opinion articles were extracted. Inductive content analysis was carried out to analyse and categorise the data. Twenty studies were included. Four categories emerged: care for the ICU patient, care for the family, environmental aspects of EOLC and organisational aspects of EOLC. Regarding the care triad, a gap exists between theoretical models and the actual care provided by ICU nurses during EOLC. The relational aspect of care, like aimed with care triad, is absent. The literature clearly indicates that the role of ICU nurses concerns care for the patient, family and environment. It described which care should be given, but it remains unclear how care should be given (attitude). Therefore, it is difficult for ICU nurses to provide this care. Further, it seems that care provided to family mainly consists of giving advice on how to care for the patient; care for family members themselves was only mentioned in a few studies. Therefore, it seems that family does not always receive adequate care yet, which may be helpful in preventing problems like depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder. It can be concluded that it is important for ICU nurses to be aware of the existing relationships; however, comparing the literature, care triad does not appear to be reached. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Spiritual care : implications for nurses' professional responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Post, Doeke; Jochemsen, Henk

    Aim. This paper aimed to gain insight into the spiritual aspects of nursing care within the context of health care in the Netherlands and to provide recommendations for the development of care in this area and the promotion of the professional expertise of nurses. Background. International nursing

  13. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  14. The relationship experiences of professional nurses with nurse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This qualitative study was undertaken to explore and describe the experiences of professional nurses in their relationships with nurse managers. Concerns about declining nursing care standards have been expressed in radio newsbulletins, television interviews and newspapers. This decline is thought to come from the ...

  15. Identifying emotional intelligence in professional nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooker, Barbara Molina; Shoultz, Jan; Codier, Estelle E

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the shortage of registered nurses in the United States will double by 2010 and will nearly quadruple to 20% by 2015 (Bureau of Health Professionals Health Resources and Services Administration. [2002]. Projected supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses, 2000-2020 [On-line]. Available: http:bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/rnprojects/report.htm). The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of emotional intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice to identify factors that could be related to improved nurse retention and patient/client outcomes. The stories reflected evidence of the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence and were related to nurse retention and improved outcomes. Nurses recognized their own strengths and limitations, displayed empathy and recognized client needs, nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and acted as change agents. Nurses were frustrated when organizational barriers conflicted with their knowledge/intuition about nursing practice, their communications were disregarded, or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Elements of professional nursing practice, such as autonomy, nurse satisfaction, respect, and the professional practice environment, were identified in the excerpts of the stories. The shortage of practicing nurses continues to be a national issue. The use of emotional intelligence concepts may provide fresh insights into ways to keep nurses engaged in practice and to improve nurse retention and patient/client outcomes.

  16. Using a nursing student conduct committee to foster professionalism among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Katherine Kaby; Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Gambescia, Stephen F

    2014-01-01

    This article explains how a university nursing program in the United States created and implemented a nursing student code of conduct and a faculty-led nursing student conduct committee to review and adjudicate violations of academic or professional misconduct. The need for and role of the nursing student conduct committee in providing substantive and fair due process is illustrated with two cases. Professional misconduct has been associated with preventable error and patient safety and is of great concern to nurse educators who are entrusted with producing the next generation of nursing professionals. Accountability and consequences for violations of professional standards must be an integral part of the nursing education curriculum throughout the world to ensure quality and safety and mitigate the adverse effects of nursing error. Given the professional and patient safety implication of such violations, the authors believe that it is prudent to have nursing programs adjudicate nursing majors' professional violations as an alternative or supplement to the general university judicial board. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Second generation professional doctorates in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Gary; Davies, Ruth

    2009-09-01

    This paper traces the increase in number and diversity of professional doctorates over the last two decades and discusses the evolution from first to second generation doctorates as a response to the rise of the knowledge economy and new understandings of knowledge-production. Distinctions between first and second generation doctorates are interpreted in the light of Gibbons et al. [Gibbons, M., Limoges, C., Nowotny, H., Schwartzman, S., Scott, P., Trow, M., 1994. The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage, London] taxonomy of knowledge-production, and it is argued that second generation doctorates, based on Mode 2 knowledge-production, are not only relevant to the economy but also have the potential to transform practice. However, as this paper highlights, this reconceptualisation of the professional doctorate presents particular challenges to academia and the discipline of nursing, which centre upon the threats posed to the power and authority of the University by the radical nature of Mode 2 knowledge generation and application in the workplace. Implications of these threats are discussed in relation to the current debate about the rigour of professional doctorates and the call by some for a return to the traditional doctorate or PhD. We conclude that the discipline of nursing has much to gain from embracing, rather than retreating from, the challenges posed by second generation professional doctorates, and that these offer an alternative but no less academically sound education in preparing nurses to pay a full and active role at the theory-practice interface.

  18. Professional career development for male nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-I; Gau, Meei-Ling; Shiau, Shu-Jen; Hu, Wei-Herng; Shih, Fu-Jin

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a study to: (a) explore Taiwanese male nurses' motivations for becoming a nurse; (b) reveal their professional developmental process in nursing; (c) understand the difficulties hindering their professional development from both professional and gender aspects; and (d) identify the strategies they use to cope with these difficulties. Hindered by historical, cultural, economic and warfare factors, the proportion of male nurses in Taiwan remains low. Taiwanese male nurses' career development process has not been well investigated yet. A descriptive qualitative research design was used, with a convenience sample of 15 male nurses (mean age 30.8 years) with a Bachelor's degree in Nursing Science. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews and analysed by content analysis. Taiwanese male nurses' entrance into the nursing profession involved three phases: pre-study, study and employment. The difficulties encountered during career development were related to the gender expectations of patients and the general public. The nurses received support more from superiors than from colleagues. The strategies they used included (a) improving their professional knowledge and skills to obtain higher levels of satisfaction and better opportunities for promotion; (b) thinking aggressively about job promotion; (c) choosing specialist departments as appropriate environments for graduate study and personal growth; and (d) changing their professional track for personal growth. Based on the nature of nursing work and clinical experiences, Taiwanese male nurses believed that nursing was a profession suitable for both men and women. Their preparation for career development started at the pre-study phase. The major strategies they used were related to a strong desire for personal growth and professional promotion. Finally, a conceptual framework was developed to depict this complex phenomenon.

  19. Prison Nursing: Formation of a Stable Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Khurshid; Armstrong, David; Dregan, Alexandru

    The aim of this study was to analyze how working within prison environments can influence the self-identity and professional identity of nurses. The prison environment can be a difficult environment for nurses to deliver care within, with nurses having to carry out activities that seem to go against their professional role, while at the same time providing care to prisoners who have greater health needs than the general population. There is a lack of theoretical consideration of how prison nurses carry out their role in the face of such challenges. This study used a review of literature published over the last 11 years exploring nurses' beliefs, thoughts, and feelings toward delivering care within prison environment. With time, nurses working within prison environments develop specific skills to be able to deliver appropriate care to their patients. These skills include adapting to both the prison environment and the prison culture. Ultimately, adaptations lead to a change in identity allowing nurses to work effectively within prison. Providers of prison healthcare should ensure that induction (orientation) processes for new nurses are designed to address specific challenges that nurses face including the potential for cognitive dissonance. They should ensure that nurses receive training to develop and acquire the skills highlighted in this review. Ensuring that this training is in place may increase nurse retention.

  20. Communication satisfaction of professional nurses working in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J-D; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to establish and describe the level of communication satisfaction that professional nurses experience in selected public hospitals in the City of Johannesburg, South Africa. The success of any organisation depends on the effectiveness of its communication systems and the interaction between staff members. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, based on the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), from a sample of 265 professional nurses from different categories, chosen using a disproportionate random stratified sampling method. The results indicated poor personal feedback between nurse managers (operational managers) and professional nurses, as well as dissatisfaction among nurse managers and professional nurses with regard to informal communication channels. A lack of information pertaining to policies, change, financial standing and achievements of hospitals was identified. Nurse managers should play a leadership role in bringing staff of different departments together by creating interactive communication forums for the sharing of ideas. The results emphasise the need for nurse managers to improve communication satisfaction at all levels of the hospital services in order to enhance staff satisfaction and create a positive working environment for staff members. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Essential professional core competencies for nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2010-10-01

    Core competency is vital to the nursing profession. Such helps guarantee the high quality and effectiveness of delivered care and maintains the social value and status of the nursing profession. This article introduces the definition of nursing core competency and its connotations. The core competency profile for the nursing profession embraces basic behavioral attributes as well as mastery of advanced practice skills. The former include such attributes as gentleness, willingness to serve, keen observation and judgment, efficiency, skillfulness, responsibility and accountability. The latter embraces skills in general care, communication and collaboration, management, self-development, innovation and research, and stress-adjustment. To cultivate competent nurses, academic education should emphasize critical thinking skills, integrate problem-based and evidence-based learning approaches into curricula, and use objective structured clinical examination to evaluate learning outcomes. In the healthcare sector, systematic professional training models such as the clinical ladder with multidiscipline rotation hold the potential to train novice nurses as expert professionals. Meanwhile, to advance the professional capabilities of nurses, nursing administrators should provide a positive work environment to fuel and maintain learning motivation. Education and healthcare systems should work closely together to promote the professional competence of nurses and to strengthen the value of the nursing profession.

  2. Nurses perceptions about the nurse's social role in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavdaniti M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available B A C K G R O U N D : There is great evidence in nursing literature about the nurses’ perceptions on their role. Moststudies are focused on nursing practice and the actual role in hospitals, and other skills on basic-, intermediate- andadvanced- level patient care. In Greece, there are no studies examining the social role of nurses and nurses’ perceptionsabout it.A I M : Τo assess how nurses in Greece perceive their social role and investigate the factors influencing their social role.M A T E R I A L - M E T H O D : 342 nurses working in hospitals in the wider area of Thessaloniki were recruited inthis study. Data collection was carried out through one self-completed questionnaire developed by the researchers.R E S U L T S : 47.5% (n=162 agreed that society expects from nurses a particular behaviour, and almost half of theparticipants [51.8% (n=176] totally agreed that nurses are practicing a ‘litourgima’. 49.1% (n=165 agreed that nursesare health educators in society and another 46.3% (n=157 totally agreed that nurses undertake actions in order toeliminate patient discrimination. 47.6% (n=160 of the participants totally agreed that nurses should be dedicated toquality improvement and 40.9% of the sample (n=138 agreed that nurses should provide care during an epidemicwhile 41.3% totally agreed that nurses execute duties of other professionals. 45.7% (n=155 totally agreed that nursesshouldn’t deny care for patients with infectious diseases. A high percentage of nurses (60.1%, n=197 agreed that apart of the nursing role is patient advocacy.C O N C L U S I O N S : The findings of the present study indicate the importance of nurses’ social role, which mayallow them to empower patients to further recognize the role of nursing during hospitalization.

  3. The experiences of male professional nurses regarding nursing as a career in a private hospital in Johannesburg

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Cur. (Professional Nursing Science: Nursing Management) The history of nursing focuses almost exclusively on a female-dominated profession, created with the assumption that such a role is inherently natural to women only. Yet, men have worked as nurses since the profession’s infancy, 250 BC, but their contributions seem to be unnoticed and underrepresented. Male nurses ascribe to a minority status within the nursing profession, with only 6.8% currently registered with the South African N...

  4. Preventing the 'professional cleansing' of nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpin-Davies, P J

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to argue that contrary to perceived wisdom nursing education ought to abandon the lecturer practitioner role on the grounds that it is a flawed concept predicated on a false assumption. In addition, and more seriously, it is in effect a significant hidden subsidy to service at the expense of education. It is suggested that by restructuring the nurse educator's role using the concepts of primary nursing as a method of organizing nurse educator's core activities, the perception and reality of teaching practice could be transformed. Calpin-Davies suggests that such a strategy enables nurse educators to be considered as practising nurses. It also has the added advantage that it is consistent with the form of organizing nursing expected of clinical colleagues. In addition it provides a basis for partnership with clinical nurses and with students, it responds to the imagined theory--practice gap, and affords nurse educators the means of becoming a credible role model.

  5. The effect of perceived organisational support on burnout among community health nurses in China: the mediating role of professional self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu

    2016-01-01

    To examine the mediating effect of professional self-concept on the association between perceived organisational support and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Burnout is a common phenomenon among nurses and previous studies have focused on work environmental factors contributing to burnout. Limited studies have examined the effects of perceived organisational support and professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses. This was a cross-sectional study with 551 community health nurses in Chengdu, China, which included a two-stage sampling method. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the relationships among perceived organisational support, professional self-concept and burnout. The final sample included 456 nurses (82.7%). Perceived organisational support was a significant positive direct predictor for professional self-concept and a significant negative direct predictor for burnout. Professional self-concept was a significant negative direct contributor to burnout. Professional self-concept had a mediating effect on the relationship between perceived organisational support and burnout. Perceived organisational support may result in reduced burnout by facilitating the development of positive professional self-concept. Strategies such as establishing a supportive work environment and professional competence training may be effective methods for burnout prevention and management among community health nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Nurses' perceptions of professional dignity in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Laura; Kangasniemi, Mari Katariina; Rocco, Gennaro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Stievano, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The concept of dignity can be divided into two main attributes: absolute dignity that calls for recognition of an inner worth of persons and social dignity that can be changeable and can be lost as a result of different social factors and moral behaviours. In this light, the nursing profession has a professional dignity that is to be continually constructed and re-constructed and involves both main attributes of dignity. The purpose of this study was to determine how nurses described nursing's professional dignity in internal medicine and surgery departments in hospital settings. The research design was qualitative. This study was approved by the ethics committees of the healthcare organizations involved. All the participants were provided with information about the purpose and the nature of the study. A total of 124 nurses participated in this study. The data were collected using 20 focus group sessions in different parts of Italy. The data were analysed by means of a conventional inductive content analysis starting from the information retrieved in order to extract meaning units and sorting the arising phenomena into conceptually meaningful categories and themes. Nursing's professional dignity was deeply embedded in the innermost part of individuals. Regarding the social part of dignity, a great importance was put on the values that compose nursing's professional identity, the socio-historical background and the evolution of nursing in the area considered. The social part of dignity was also linked to collaboration with physicians and with healthcare assistants who were thought to have a central role in easing work strain. Equally important, though, was the relationship with peers and senior nurses. The organizational environments under scrutiny with their low staffing levels, overload of work and hierarchical interactions did not promote respect for the dignity of nurses. To understand these professional values, it is pivotal to comprehend the role of different

  7. An exploratory study: student nurses' perceptions of professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, June; Templeman, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    To explore final year nursing students' perceptions of professionalism using a reflective approach. A phenomenological approach informed the study, and data was collected by a focus group and five individual semi-structured interviews. Participants were ten final year student nurses studying on the adult nursing education programme in the United Kingdom. Thematic analysis resulted in an extensive list of general statements or 'units of meaning', from which meaningful categories describing a phenomenon evolved. The findings revealed that student nurse's perceived vulnerability, symbolic representation, role modelling, discontent and professional development as elements that informed their own professionalism. Additionally, being able to observe the behaviours of registered nurses appeared to be significant to the student in the development of their own sense of professional identity, using positive and negative role models constructively. It appears that final year student nurses are cognisant of the impact of practice scenarios and observational influences, affecting their own perceptions of professionalism. They are able to clearly identify and make sense of experiences in practice, and constructively use this knowledge to positively inform their practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Professionals' training and refusal of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    A patient's refusal of nursing care concerns the caregivers. Future professionals must be prepared for it and student nurses are trained to deal with such situations. It is also important to empower patients and support them in their choice. This article presents the example of the Haute École Robert Schuman in Libramont, Belgium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [The professional mobility of hospital nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schingen, Édith; Ladegaillerie, Geneviève; Lefebvre, Hélène; Challier, Marie-Pierre; Rothan-Tondeur, Monique

    2015-09-01

    For several decades, hospitals have been faced with the voluntary departures of nurses. In parallel to this external mobility, internal mobility is also on the rise and is not always initiated by the nurse. This new mode of management has repercussions for professionals, patients as well as for the quality of care. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Erin J; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Click, Elizabeth R; Krouse, Helene J; Clavelle, Joanne T

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership (TL) practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations (PNAs). Professional nursing associations are vehicles to provide educational opportunities for nurses as well as leadership opportunities for members. Little has been published about the leadership practices of PNA members. E-mail surveys of 448 nurse leaders in PNAs were conducted in 2013 using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The top 2 TL practices of these nurse leaders were enabling others to act and encouraging the heart. Respondents with more leadership training reported higher TL practices. This is the 1st study to describe TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs. Results of this study show that nurse leaders of PNAs emulate practices of TL. Transformational leaders can mobilize and direct association members in reaching shared values, objectives, and outcomes. Understanding TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs are important to the future of nursing in order to enable nurses to lead change and advance health through these organizations.

  11. [Theories of nursing professionals about the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlemeier, N; Weber, G; Nassehi, A; Saake, I; Watermann, R

    1997-08-01

    Our study emphasizes the implicit theories of nursing professionals about the elderly and their influence on nursing behavior styles. According to our central hypothesis we expected a correlation between the differentiation of attitudes towards the elderly and the quality of nursing interventions. By means of a new methodological approach based on Forgas' theory of "social episodes" we investigated attitudes towards the elderly and behavior intentions in specific nursing situations. The sample consists of 133 professionals working in nursing homes for the elderly or in home care services. In a first step the structure of attitudes towards the elderly was examined by employing multivariate techniques, e.g. factor analysis and multidimensional scaling. Three aspects of older patients' competence constitute the images which influence nursing personnel's interactions with the elderly. In the next step a significant correlation between the complexity of attitudes towards the elderly and the quality of nursing behavior could be demonstrated. In general, the findings in our sample support personalized rather than stereotyped perceptions of the elderly. In particular such qualities will be stressed by nursing professionals which facilitate or disturb the nursing process.

  12. [The Taiwan Nurses Association and professional diplomacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheuan

    2014-08-01

    The Taiwan Nurses Association (TWNA) is publishing a special centenary issue to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the association in 2014. For this issue, TWNA invited the author to write a review article that addresses the involvement of the TWNA in professional diplomacy and international exchange over the past century. The author reviews the history of both TWNA and the International Council of Nurses and introduces the contributions of the association in the field of professional diplomacy and the positive contributions of many Taiwan nursing leaders to global healthcare and society. The purpose of the paper is to convey the traditions and experiences of TWNA forward to the next generation.

  13. New graduate nurses professional commitment : Antecedents and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilroy, S.C.; Chênevert, Denis; Guerrero, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the factors that increase new graduate nurses' professional commitment and how this professional commitment in turn affects professional turnover intentions, anxiety, and physical health symptoms. Design: The study was carried out in association with the nursing

  14. Registered Nurses' work experiences: personal accounts integrated with professional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2004-05-01

    The work context is important for the development of Registered Nurses' skills and identity as professionals, but the work context and organization can also hinder their professional development. This paper reports a study whose purpose was to understand the meaning of Registered Nurses' narratives of their work experience 5 years after graduation. Data were collected in 2001 from interviews with 16 Registered Nurses 5 years after graduation and analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, influenced by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. Analyses of the narratives resulted in three themes: 'The meaning of caring and protection of patients', 'The meaning of work organization in nurses' work' and 'The implied meaning of using one's individual attributes in one's professional role'. Since the number of nurses participating in the study is small, it is important to re-contextualize the results when transferring them to other contexts. There is a complex interrelationship between the health care organization, individual attributes of nurses (including self-esteem) and patient care. Provision of adequate resources and support for nurses' professional and personal development is needed to ensure high quality patient care, and these are political issues.

  15. Managing boundaries between professional and lay nursing following the influenza pandemic, 1918-1919: insights for professional resilience today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela J

    2017-03-01

    To examine lay-professional nursing boundaries, using challenges to the New Zealand nursing profession following the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic as the example. The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 had an overwhelming international impact on communities and the nursing profession. After the pandemic, the expectation for communities to be able to nurse the sick reflects today's increasing reliance on families to care for people at home. It similarly raised questions about the profession's role and professional boundaries in relation to volunteer or lay nursing. In New Zealand, the postpandemic challenge to build community lay nursing capacity tested these boundaries. Historical research. Analysis of historical primary sources of official reports, newspaper accounts, articles in New Zealand's professional nursing journal Kai Tiaki and the memoir of Hester Maclean, the country's chief nurse. Interpretation of findings in relation to secondary sources examining similar historical tensions between professional and lay nursing, and to the more recent notion of professional resilience. Maclean guarded nursing's professional boundaries by maintaining considerable control over community instruction in nursing and by strenuously resisting the suggestion that this should be done in hospitals where professional nurses trained. This historical example shows how the nursing profession faced the perceived threat to its professional boundaries. It also shows how competing goals of building community lay nursing capacity and protecting professional boundaries can be effectively managed. In the context of a global nursing shortage, limited healthcare budgets and a consequently increasing reliance on households to provide care for family members, this historical research shows nurses today that similar issues have been faced and effectively managed in the past. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Resilience: a personal attribute, social process and key professional resource for the enhancement of the nursing role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Resilience is the positive adjustment to adversity. Nursing work is characterised by assisting patients and families to cope through varying types of adversity- accidents, illness, disasters and upheaval and also in encouraging and supporting people to adapt, recover and maintain wellbeing. Thus strategies to promote resilience need to be integral to nurses' daily practice. Adverse conditions are also commonly experienced by nurses themselves and this impacts negatively on attitude to work, stress and burnout and this affects the whole profession through ongoing shortages, and disengagement with the work still to be done by nursing in terms of research and practice development. This paper will discuss the meaning of resilience, how it has been researched and applied to health care and to nursing. It will suggest pro-active strategies that educators, researchers and clinical nurses can implement that work on building strength, focus and endurance in individuals, communities and the workplaces.

  17. Professional development in rural nursing: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Cindy

    2009-03-01

    Nurses working in rural settings face challenges not found in urban and suburban areas. These challenges affect nursing care, the nursing profession, and the professional development of the individual nurse. To understand rural nursing, a clear definition of rural nursing and of rural nursing theory is essential. There are many challenges in the rural setting for nursing, particularly regarding enhancement of nurses' professional development. With a clear understanding of rural nursing practice, nurse leaders and educators can work to meet the challenges and embrace the opportunities afforded by nursing in the rural setting.

  18. Iranian nursing students' perspectives on transition to professional identity: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neishabouri, M; Ahmadi, F; Kazemnejad, A

    2017-09-01

    To explore Iranian nursing students' transition to professional identity. Professional identity is an important outcome of nursing education that has not been fully explored in the Iranian nursing education system. Professional identity is a significant factor influencing the development of nursing education and practice. The transition of nursing students to professional identity is the main concern of nursing education and fundamental prerequisite for policymaking and planning in the field of nursing education. This was a qualitative content analysis study. In-depth unstructured interviews were held with 35 Iranian bachelor's degree nursing students recruited through purposive sampling. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. The data analysis led to the development of four themes and 15 categories: 'satisfaction with professional practice (attending clinical settings and communicating with patients, the feeling of being beneficial)'; 'personal development (growing interest in nursing, feeling competent in helping others, changing character and attitude shift towards patients)'; 'professional development (realizing the importance of nursing knowledge, appreciating professional roles, a changing their understanding of nursing and the meaning it)'; and 'attaining professional commitment (a tendency to present oneself as a nurse, attempting to change oneself, other students and the public image of nursing)'. Development of professional identity is a continual process of transition. The greatest transition occurred in the last year of the programme. Nursing students experienced transition to PI through gaining satisfaction with professional practice, undergoing personal and professional development and developing a professional commitment. Educational policymakers can use our findings for developing strategies that facilitate and support nursing students' transition to professional identity. © 2016 International Council of

  19. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  20. The personal and professional: nurses' lived experiences of adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foli, Karen J; Schweitzer, Roberta; Wells, Courtenay

    2013-03-01

    Nurses provide healthcare services to members of the adoption triad (AT; birth parents, adoptive parents, and the child) in a number of settings. However, nurses' perceptions of and interactions with members of the AT have not been investigated. This study describes the lived experiences of nurses and the care rendered to the AT using a descriptive phenomenological approach. In response to an invitation published in a national electronic newsletter, nurses were asked to submit narratives about their experiences in caring for members of the AT. Researchers coded 17 narratives using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Four themes emerged from the texts: (1) Where the personal and professional selves meet ("I see so many issues from both sides"); (2) The paradox of adoption ("...an emotional rollercoaster"); (3) Unique contexts of adoptive families ("We all have a story"); and (4) Reframing nurses' perceptions surrounding adoption ("There are several areas we could improve"). Nurses often have a personal connection to adoption and this potentiates the care delivered to AT members. Serving as role models for their peers and advocates for a better understanding of the dynamics of relinquishment and placement, nurses can improve clinical practices for these patients. Themes reflected insights gained from both personal and professional roles and offer specific interventions that enhance care of the AT. Nursing education and practice guidelines should include care rendered to the AT.

  1. Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is experiencing a serious shortage of nurses, which has to be addressed to prevent crises in health care services. Previous studies (Fletcher 2001:324; Oosthuizen 2005:117 found that nurses change their work environment due to dissatisfaction with their job situations. This implies that creating a favourable environment in the workplace situation could help retain professional nurses in their posts, implying that retention strategies should be effective.

    An exploratory, descriptive, contextual and qualitative design was used to describe nurse managers’views on factors which could influence professional nurse retention, as well as their views regarding attributes that were required to enable them to contribute towards enhancing professional nurse retention. A purposive sample of nurse managers employed in public and private hospitals in the Gauteng province was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 nurse managers.The results were analysed qualitatively and contextualised within Vogt, Cox, Velthouse and Thames’s Cork-Top (Bottleneck Theory of Nurse Retention (1983 and Lewin’s Force-Field Analysis Theory (1952.

    Factors pertaining to individual nurses, the organisation and nurse managers could influence the retention of professional nurses. Poor working conditions, long and inconvenient working hours,uncompetitive salaries and professional development of nurses have to be addressed to enhance professional nurses’ retention. Unsafe working environments and a lack of resources threaten the safety and well-being of nurses and patients and contribute to high turnover rates. Nurse managers have to address shortcomings in their managerial and leadership skills and implement changes within a multigenerational nursing workforce and challenging working environments.

    Opsomming

    Suid-Afrika ervaar ’n ernstige tekort aan verpleegkundiges wat aangespreek moet word ten einde krisisse

  2. "This is nursing": nursing roles as mediated by precepting nurses during clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Pilhammar, Ewa; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2010-11-01

    In nursing education, it has been argued that professional socialization is facilitated by clinical experiences where students work together with precepting nurses. However, few studies found have focused on how nurses think and act as preceptors, hence providing a base for professional socialization to occur. Therefore; this study aimed to describe how preceptors mediated nursing as a profession to undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice. This was an ethnographic study guided by symbolic interactionism. A purposeful sampling of 13 precepting nurses was observed during the field work period. In addition, 16 staff nurses, purposively selected, and experienced in precepting, participated in focus group interviews. All text from field notes and interviews were read as a whole and analyzed following the ethnographic approach. Findings illustrated how nursing was mediated as the medical-technical, the administrative, and the caring role. Preceptors aimed for professionalism in their students by teaching the students to reflect on what they can do independently as nurses. Preceptors strived to verbalise their practical knowledge to make theory explicit and contextualize to student nurses. This knowledge can guide implementation of preceptor programmes focusing on the meaning and implications of professionalism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Respect for nursing professional: silence must be heard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    The value of care giving seems to be at an all-time low. whether it is clinical (bedside) or for children and elderly at home (homemakers). Currently, individuals who pass away any opportunity (for themselves) to care for another individual instead are considered weak and/or unmotivated. Thus, it is not surprising that modern society often fails to respect the nursing professionals to the extent of underplaying their strengths, skills, and even clinical abilities. While qualities such as kindness, team spirit, and willingness to get their hands dirty are the core of this profession, nursing professionals have a complex variety of set duties, involving drug dosage, trouble-shooting, ongoing patient monitoring, and providing holistic comfort and support to the sick and needy. Beyond classical role, the nursing professional has currently ventured into other roles as well, as a nurse practitioner, administrator, researcher, or even an educator. Thus, considering the wide spectrum of duties performed by nursing professionals, they do deserve more status and power rather than be treated like "ward housewives." Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Perceptions of professionalism among nursing faculty and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Baumann, Andrea; Kolotylo, Camille; Lawlor, Yvonne; Tompkins, Catherine; Lee, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Although there is no consensus about the definition of professionalism, some generally recognized descriptors include knowledge, specialization, intellectual and individual responsibility, and well-developed group consciousness. In this study, Q-methodology was used to identify common viewpoints about professionalism held by nursing faculty and students, and four viewpoints emerged as humanists, portrayers, facilitators, and regulators. The humanists reflected the view that professional values include respect for human dignity, personal integrity, protection of patient privacy, and protection of patients from harm. The portrayers believed that professionalism is evidenced by one's image, attire, and expression. For facilitators, professionalism not only involves standards and policies but also includes personal beliefs and values. The regulators believed that professionalism is fostered by a workplace in which suitable beliefs and standards are communicated, accepted, and implemented by its staff. The differences indicate that there may be numerous contextual variables that affect individuals' perceptions of professionalism.

  5. Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Jane E.

    The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

  6. The leadership role of nurse educators in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes.

  7. Among nurses, how does education level impact professional values? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibandze, B T; Scafide, K N

    2018-03-01

    Professional nursing values have been acknowledged globally as the foundation of daily nursing care practice. Understanding how nurses identify, comprehend and apply their professional nursing values is an important step towards improving nursing practice and patient care quality. Research has demonstrated that nurses' professional values are cultivated during prelicensure academic education. The aim of this systematic review was to determine how level of education affects professional nursing values of clinical practising nurses. A systematic search of quantitative research published through December 2015 was performed in the following five electronic databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Web of Science and Religion and Philosophy Collection. The search was not limited to country of origin. The studies were assessed for methodological quality using established criteria. Of 1501 articles identified through the literature search, only seven studies met the inclusion criteria with the majority being of good to high quality. Most of the studies found registered nurses pursuing a bachelor of science in nursing or higher had a greater awareness and application of professional values than nurses with lower levels of academic or non-academic education. Nurses with higher education also embraced professional values as fundamental for quality nursing care practice. Health and academic institutions should support nurses through quality continuing and higher education that reinforces professional values, thus improving the quality of patient care. The level of nurses' education appears to play an important role in developing both an awareness and an integration of professional values into practice. More research is needed to discover methods that may be used to promote nurses' professional values among nurses already practising clinically. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Professional development utilizing an oncology summer nursing internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle; Hyman, Zena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an oncology student nursing internship on role socialization and professional self-concept. This mixed-methods study utilized a convergent parallel approach that incorporated a quasi-experimental and qualitative design. Data was collected through pre and post-survey and open-ended questions. Participants were 11 baccalaureate nursing students participating in a summer oncology student nursing internship between their junior and senior years. Investigators completed a content analysis of qualitative questionnaires resulted in categories of meaning, while the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to compare pre and post internship scores. Aggregated mean scores from all instruments showed an increase in professionalism, role socialization, and sense of belonging from pre to post-internship, although no differences were significant. Qualitative data showed participants refined their personal philosophy of nursing and solidified their commitment to the profession. Participants did indicate, however, that the internship, combined with weekly debriefing forums and conferences, proved to have a positive impact on the students' role socialization and sense of belonging. Despite quantitative results, there is a need for longitudinal research to confirm the effect of nursing student internships on the transition from student to professional. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Career advancement and professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Rita K; Smith-Glasgow, Mary Ellen; Bhattacharya, Anand; Xu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Excellence underscores the need for nurses to keep their skills and competencies current through participation in professional development and career advancement. Evidence suggests that internationally educated nurses (IENs) progress relatively slowly through the career ladder and participate less in professional development compared with nurses educated in the United States (UENs). Mentorship and self-efficacy are considered major determinants of career advancement. The aim of the study was to understand the differences in levels of mentorship function and self-efficacy as well as the differences in participation in professional development and career advancement between UENs and IENs. A descriptive survey design was implemented using a Web-based survey. Significant disparities were noted in the role model function of mentoring and some professional development and career advancement measures between UENs and IENs. Mentorship is essential for professional growth. Sociodemographic characteristics of mentors are important because mentors are role models. Standardized career advancement structures are needed to promote professional growth. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  10. Living with grey: role understandings between clinical nurse educators and advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2006-12-01

    Professionalization efforts in nursing have opened up new opportunities for nurses to develop the roles in which they work. One of these roles is advanced nursing practice. However, the development of the advanced roles, with their aims of making an advanced contribution in education, administration, research and practice, results in role overlap and confusion. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that explored the ways in which nursing educators understand, value, utilize and interact with nurses in the advanced practice role. Data were collected among nurse educators and advanced nurse practitioners in an urban, acute care setting. The findings demonstrate how nurses in potentially conflicting roles differentiate themselves and define their job duties. Organizational supports for implementing clear advanced roles are suggested, adding to the knowledge upon which nursing administrators can base their strategic human resources decisions.

  11. The Professional Consequences of Whistleblowing by Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sally; Ahern, Kathy

    2000-01-01

    A study of 70 nurses self-described as whistleblowers and 25 who did not repot misconduct showed that whistleblowers experienced severe reprisals (demotion, reprimand, threats, rejection, pressure to resign). There were few professional consequences for those who remained silent. (SK)

  12. The development of professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the current role of general practice nurses and the scope of nursing practice to inform the development of national professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses. Increasing numbers of nurses have been employed in Australian general practice to meet the growing demand for primary care services. This has brought significant changes to the nursing role. Competency standards for nurses working in general practice were first developed in Australia in 2005, but limited attention has been placed on articulating the contemporary scope of practice for nurses in this setting. Concurrent mixed methods design. Data collection was conducted during 2013-2014 and involved two online surveys of Registered and Enrolled Nurses currently working in general practice, a series of 14 focus groups across Australia and a series of consultations with key experts. Data collection enabled the development of 22 Practice Standards separated into four domains: (i) Professional Practice; (ii) Nursing Care; (iii) General Practice Environment and (iv) Collaborative Practice. To differentiate the variations in enacting these Standards, performance indicators for the Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse and Registered Nurse Advanced Practice are provided under each Standard. The development of national professional practice standards for nurses working in Australian general practice will support ongoing workforce development. These Standards are also an important means of articulating the role and scope of the nurses' practice for both consumers and other health professionals, as well as being a guide for curriculum development and measurement of performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A cross sectional study on factors influencing professionalism in nursing among nurses in Mekelle Public Hospitals, North Ethiopia, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Professionalism is defined as the conceptualization of obligations, attributes, interactions, attitudes, and role behaviors required of professionals in relationship to individual clients and to society as a whole. Professionalism attributes include knowledge, spirit of inquiry, accountability, autonomy, advocacy, innovation and visionary, collaboration and collegiality, and ethics. The study assessed level and attributes of professionalism in nursing in Mekelle, Tigray, Ethiopia. Methods Institutional based cross sectional study supplemented by qualitative design was employed. Self administered semi structured questionnaire developed from RANO guideline was used. The FGD guideline was developed from different literatures. Data was analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Descriptive statistics and significance was checked at p Professionalism was measured using ANOVA. Qualitative of data were analyzed using coding technique. Written informed consent was obtained from the nurses and confidentiality was assured for all the information provide. Results The mean scores for the nurses in Mekelle public hospitals on the professionalism were 140.50, knowledge (25.06), followed by ethics (25.00). The attitudes of respondents on professionalism were at high, moderate, low and very low level. Pearson product–moment correlation analysis revealed small yet significant associations among several professionalism attributes and characteristics of nurses in Mekelle Public hospitals. Age of respondents and work experience were significantly correlated with total professionalism. Work setting in Mekelle hospital was significantly associated with professionalism. Depending on FGD, the major factors were workload, had no vision, FMOH did not focused nursing as a profession, Weakness of the Ethiopian Nursing Association, lack of life insurance as well as the Health professionals and society’s views of the profession. Conclusion Nurses with longer years of experience and the older

  14. Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify core competencies that are most significant for nursing faculty to develop as they transition from novice to expert faculty. Professional development in a systematic approach may guide faculty to learn what is significant as they progress in the nurse faculty role. A quantitative…

  15. Nursing professional facing patient privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel López Espuela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Privacy of patients admitted to the hospital is played down in favour of other needs considered more basic by the healthcare system and more related to the disease than to patients themselves. Situations and factors where privacy is damaged are frequent, but it is known that when these are avoided by professionals’ attitude, through strategies and different mechanisms, it becomes one of the most satisfactory elements to patients.Objectives: To identify and analyze situations and factors which affect privacy in hospital environment as well as the adaptation capacity of patients to them.Methodology: Phenomenological, qualitative research. By means of discussion groups with professionals, the following questions where answered: ‘What do professionals understand by privacy? Which situations and factors jeopardize it during the hospital stay? How do they think patients get adapted?Results: The concept of privacy is complex, personal and non-transferable. Situations in which it is jeopardized were divided in 5 main areas. Numerous behaviors regarding adaptation of patients to these were collected.Discussion: Although there is little nursery research referring to privacy and its defense in the professional-patient relationship field, concern about this aspect always shown by nursery staff stands out.As a conclussion, we observe the need to complement this research with the perception patients have about these same questions, establishing the importance they give to privacy.

  16. Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mokoka

    2010-11-01

    An exploratory, descriptive, contextual and qualitative design was used to describe nurse managers’views on factors which could influence professional nurse retention, as well as their views regarding attributes that were required to enable them to contribute towards enhancing professional nurse retention. A purposive sample of nurse managers employed in public and private hospitals in the Gauteng province was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 nurse managers.The results were analysed qualitatively and contextualised within Vogt, Cox, Velthouse and Thames’s Cork-Top (Bottleneck Theory of Nurse Retention (1983 and Lewin’s Force-Field Analysis Theory (1952. Factors pertaining to individual nurses, the organisation and nurse managers could influence the retention of professional nurses. Poor working conditions, long and inconvenient working hours,uncompetitive salaries and professional development of nurses have to be addressed to enhance professional nurses’ retention. Unsafe working environments and a lack of resources threaten the safety and well-being of nurses and patients and contribute to high turnover rates. Nurse managers have to address shortcomings in their managerial and leadership skills and implement changes within a multigenerational nursing workforce and challenging working environments. Opsomming Suid-Afrika ervaar ’n ernstige tekort aan verpleegkundiges wat aangespreek moet word ten einde krisisse in gesondheidsorgdienste te voorkom. Vorige studies (Fletcher 2001:324; Oosthuizen 2005:117 het bevind dat verpleegkundiges hulle werksomgewing verander as gevolg van ontevredenheid met hulle werksituasies. Dit impliseer dat die daarstelling van ’n gunstige omgewing in die werkpleksituasie, kan help om professionele verpleegkundiges in hulle poste te behou, wat beteken dat retensiestrategieë doeltreffend moet wees. ’n Verkennende, beskrywende, kontekstuele, kwalitatiewe ontwerp was gebruik om verpleegbestuurders se

  17. Role modeling in undergraduate nursing education: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Adele; Mills, Jane; Birks, Melanie; Budden, Lea

    2014-06-01

    The transition of nursing education from the hospital setting to the university sector over recent decades has opened dialog about who is guiding the development of nursing students' professional identity. In addition, there is ongoing debate over real or perceived gaps between nursing student learning in the university and the clinical area, how this translates into professional behaviors and how well students make the transition between the two settings. This paper presents the findings of an integrative literature review into the topic of role modeling in undergraduate nursing education. This review was conducted to identify and appraise research findings about role modeling of professional behaviors for undergraduate nursing students. Literature reviewed from 2000 onwards assesses what is currently known about role modeling of undergraduate nursing students. A systematic search of the databases of CINAHL, Scopus and PubMed from 2000 onwards resulted in the selection of 33 articles for deeper analysis. Two clear themes emerged from the literature, the first relating to nurse clinicians as role models for students during clinical placements and the second relating to nurse academics as role models in the academic setting. Findings from this integrative literature review show an imbalance in the recognition of the role modeling of professional behaviors in the clinical versus the academic setting. Nurses in academic settings have more contact with the students over their period of study and as such, the significance of nurse academics as student role models requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Exploration of Professional Values Held by Nurses at a Large Freestanding Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cara; Sortedahl, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Professional values form the basis for nurse attitudes and behavior, and are cornerstones to guiding nurses' clinical practice decisions. The purpose of this descriptive study of nurses at a large children's hospital is to describe the professional values of employed registered nurses and describe differences based on demographic characteristics, such as generation, years of experience, education, and professional role. This study is based on Benner's (1984) theoretical framework of novice to expert. The Nurses Professional Values Scale: Revised (NPVS-R) (Weis & Schank, 2004) was administered to working RNs at the children's hospital. The results of this descriptive study indicate that nurses' professional values differed based on characteristics, such as education, generation, job classification, and years of experience.

  19. Delegating and supervising unregistered professionals: the student nurse experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Felicity; McKenna, Hugh P; Keeney, Sinead

    2013-03-01

    Changing models of healthcare have resulted in the need for registered nurses to be competent in delegating and supervising the unregistered health care assistant. However research evidence suggests nurse education does not prepare students for the practicalities of this role. This paper reports on undergraduate student nurses' level of preparation when working with health care assistants (HCA). It is part of a large scale project, undertaken between 2005 and 2011, which explored pre-registration student nurses' perceptions of the role of the HCA and how this affects their clinical learning. A sequential transformative mixed method research design was adopted. One higher educational institution in the United Kingdom. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students took part in phase one and 662 participated in phase two. Phase one used focus groups (n=32) and interviews (n=13) and phase two used a semi-structured questionnaire. Whilst most students reported that they were familiar with the role of the health care assistant, findings showed that nurse training did not initially prepare students for the realities of clinical practice, however as students progressed they became more aware of such issues. For some such skills were learnt on the job and they identified a number of barriers they faced when delegating tasks such as fear of causing conflict. Overall the lack of initial preparation was perceived by participants to be a hindrance to meeting the goals of clinical learning and to understanding the dynamics within the nursing hierarchy. Students in this study highlighted gaps in their educational programme and clinical experiences regarding their preparation for a delegatory and/or supervisory role. Given the importance of such skills, it is imperative that universities provide pre-registration student nurses with the education necessary to develop delegation strategies and to adapt to their evolving professional role. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Kareshki, Hossein; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses' competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses' competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses' competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses' competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients.

  1. Iranian nurses' professional competence in spiritual care in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zehtabchi, Samira; Fini, Ismail Azizi

    2017-06-01

    The holistic approach views the human as a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual being. Evidence suggests that among these dimensions, the spiritual one is largely ignored in healthcare settings. This study aimed to evaluate Iranian nurses' perceived professional competence in spiritual care, the relationship between perceived competence and nurses' personal characteristics, and barriers to provide spiritual care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2014. Participants and research context: The study population consisted of nurses working in teaching hospitals in Kashan city. Using a stratified, systematic random method, 250 samples were selected from a total of 1400 nurses. An indigenous instrument was used to assess the nurses' competencies in spiritual care. Ethical considerations: A research ethics committee approved the study. All the participants were briefed on the study aims, were assured of the confidentiality of their personal information, and signed a written informed consent. Among a total of 250 nurses, 239 answered the questionnaire completely, and in total, 23%, 51%, and 26% had poor, moderate, and favorable competence in spiritual care, respectively. No significant differences were found between the mean competence scores of spiritual care in terms of gender, marital status, employment status, and level of qualification. Significant difference was found between nurses' overall score of competence in spiritual care and receiving training on spiritual care, nurses' position, and the ward they worked in. Confirming the findings of the international literature, this study puts light on the situation of nurses' perceived competence and barriers to providing spiritual care in Iran as an eastern and Islamic context. Three-quarters of the nurses had moderate or unfavorable competence in spiritual care. Due to the crucial role of spiritual care in quality of care and patient satisfaction, nurses should be trained and supported to provide spiritual care.

  2. Nurse prescribing as an aspect of future role expansion: the views of Irish clinical nurse specialists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lockwood, Emily B

    2008-10-01

    AIM: Nurses and midwives are expanding the scope of their professional practice, assuming additional responsibilities including the management and prescribing of medications. The aim of the study was to discover the attitudes of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Ireland to nurse prescribing and to examine perceived barriers to engaging in this aspect of future role expansion. BACKGROUND: The expansion of the nursing role in relation to nurse prescribing is an ongoing process and is subject to incremental iterations of legislation and professional policy. Nurse prescribing as an expanded role function has become a reality in many countries. Ireland has addressed the matter in a formal and systematic way through legislation. METHOD: A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 283 CNSs practising in a variety of care settings in Ireland. Attitudes were measured using Likert-type attitudinal scales, designed specifically for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that the majority of clinical nurse specialists were positively disposed toward nurse prescribing as a future role expansion. The fear of litigation was identified as the most significant barrier to nurse prescribing. The majority of respondents equated nurse prescribing with increased autonomy and holistic care. The findings indicate that there is a need for further examination of the educational requirements of the CNS in relation to nurse prescribing. The legislative implications for nurse prescribing and fear of legal consequences need to be considered prior to any implementation of nurse prescribing. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: While senior clinicians are willing to embrace future role expansion in the area of nurse prescribing, their Nurse Managers should recognize that facilitation of nurse prescribing needs to address the legal and educational requirements for such activity. Failure to address these requirements can represent a barrier to role expansion. This paper offers

  3. [Perception of professional identity in nursing amongst undergraduate students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albar, María-Jesús; Sivianes-Fernández, María

    2016-01-01

    To identify the perception of the nursing professional identity between first and fourth grade students. A descriptive study using a questionnaire. A random sample of 50 and 51 students were selected from the first and fourth grade, respectively. The questionnaire was prepared by expert consensus, and it included a sociodemographic data register, 14 items, and two open questions. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed on the data, using the Chi-squared test to determine the possible differences between both grades. SPSS 22.0 statistics software was employed. The open questions were submitted to a content analysis. Statistically significant differences were found between the items related to the diversity of roles that the nursing professionals can develop within the health care system (professional and academic), and between the autonomous nature of their practices. These data were confirmed by the information obtained with the open questions. Academic training is of great importance in the process of acquiring the professional identity of future professionals in nursing, but changing the public image of the profession is the responsibility of all the social agents involved in its development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Professional socialization of students in clinical nurse specialist programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Terri L

    2014-11-01

    Graduate nursing programs facilitate the transition of RNs to advanced roles through a complex process of professional socialization. The purpose of this study was to explore the professional socialization of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students. Two hundred twenty-five students, representing 73 CNS programs, responded to an online survey. Both preprogram variables and educational experiences contributed to an adequate level of CNS socialization. Students' self-concept was strong, and they felt prepared to practice in the role, which was highly correlated with their perceptions of how well the program prepared them academically and experientially. Having a CNS mentor was positively associated with readiness to practice. Outcomes did not vary with cohort status, and online instruction did not impede socialization. These findings provide implications for CNS program advisement and design. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Professional exercise of nursing and the implications for the performance on mental health and psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Pique, Ana María; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Pinilla Alarcón, Maribel

    2011-01-01

    This situation of mental health of the population in the world and in Colombia, raises great challenges and responsibilities to the nursing professional who as a natural caretaker of health and life, is a main resource for providing restorative help that allows persons, groups and communities to reach integrative wellbeing. The tendencies in health for the next years force us to rethink nursing education and nursing professional roles in order to be able to respond, in a humanistic form to th...

  6. The Impact of the Expanded Nursing Practice on Professional Identity in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Karin; Kolbæk, Raymond; Ottmann, Goetz

    2012-01-01

    . The aim of this case study was to explore the impact of “nurse consultations,” representing an expanded nursing role, of 5 nurses focusing on their perception of autonomy, self-esteem, and confidence. Methods: The case study used semistructured interviews with 5 participants triangulated and validated...... gained a higher sense of autonomy, self-esteem, and confidence in their practice. These elements have a positive impact on their professional identity. Conclusion: The research demonstrates that for the nurses involved in expanded professional practice, the boundaries of professional practice have...

  7. Creating a Culture of Professional Development for Oncology Nursing in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsun Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of professional development of oncology nursing in Asia is growing along with growth in the cancer burden and disparity in cancer incidence and mortality between more- and less-developed regions, the latter of which includes most Asian countries. This paper proposes ways to advance the oncology nursing in terms of education, practice, and research in Asia. It also describes major challenges expected in developing and implementing a unique professional role for oncology nurses in Asia. This study will provide insights for Asian oncology nurses in developing culturally sensitive oncology nursing practices with limited health care resources.

  8. Creating a Culture of Professional Development for Oncology Nursing in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun

    2016-01-01

    The importance of professional development of oncology nursing in Asia is growing along with growth in the cancer burden and disparity in cancer incidence and mortality between more- and less-developed regions, the latter of which includes most Asian countries. This paper proposes ways to advance the oncology nursing in terms of education, practice, and research in Asia. It also describes major challenges expected in developing and implementing a unique professional role for oncology nurses in Asia. This study will provide insights for Asian oncology nurses in developing culturally sensitive oncology nursing practices with limited health care resources. PMID:27981133

  9. Creating a Culture of Professional Development for Oncology Nursing in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun

    2016-01-01

    The importance of professional development of oncology nursing in Asia is growing along with growth in the cancer burden and disparity in cancer incidence and mortality between more- and less-developed regions, the latter of which includes most Asian countries. This paper proposes ways to advance the oncology nursing in terms of education, practice, and research in Asia. It also describes major challenges expected in developing and implementing a unique professional role for oncology nurses in Asia. This study will provide insights for Asian oncology nurses in developing culturally sensitive oncology nursing practices with limited health care resources.

  10. A model for mentorship of newly qualified professional nurses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for mentorship of newly qualified professional nurses (NQPNs) employed in community health care services. ... improvement of good relationships between NQPNs and community should be emphasised during training of nursing students to become professional nurses.

  11. The facilitation of professional values amongst student nurses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Phase One of the study, data was collected from the nurse educators through focus group interviews and from the student nurses by means of written narratives. The groups separately described their perceptions about those professional values they deemed important for nursing and how these professional values ...

  12. Professional practice leader: a transformational role that addresses human diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournes, D A; DasGupta, T L

    1997-01-01

    The role of the professional practice leader is to provide leadership in the transformation of nursing practice from a provider focused model to a patient focused model. Nursing standards for patient focused care were developed to define the quality of the nurse-person relationship in a manner consistent with Parse's theory of human becoming. Multiple strategies have been developed to challenge nurses to redefine the purpose, vision, and core values by which they practice. It is only through uncovering the values and beliefs of every person that nurses will be able to care for individuals whom they recognize as unique human beings.

  13. Nurses' professional values and attitudes toward collaboration with physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sara S; Lindell, Deborah F; Dolansky, Mary A; Garber, Jeannie S

    2015-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that collaborative practice improves healthcare outcomes, but the precursors to collaborative behavior between nurses and physicians have not been fully explored. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to describe the professional values held by nurses and their attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration and to explore the relationships between nurses' characteristics (e.g. education, type of work) and professional values and their attitudes toward nurse-physician collaboration. This descriptive correlational study examines the relationship between nurses' professional values (Nurses Professional Values Scale-Revised) and their attitudes toward nurse-physician collaboration (Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration). Permission to conduct the study was received from the hospital, and the Institutional Review Boards of the healthcare system and the participating university. A convenience sample of 231 registered nurses from a tertiary hospital in the United States was surveyed. A significant positive relationship was found between nurses' professional values and better attitudes toward collaboration with physicians (r = .26, p Attitude toward collaboration with physicians was also positively associated with master's or higher levels of education (F(3, 224) = 4.379, p = .005). The results of this study can be helpful to nurse administrators who are responsible for developing highly collaborative healthcare teams and for nurse educators who are focused on developing professional values in future nurses. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. An investigation of the roles and functions of nurse preceptors in the clinical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Cele

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the confusion that exists in the clinical areas concerning proper accompaniment of student nurses. There is a feeling that professional nurses in clinical areas are not always actively involved in clinical teaching. The clinical instructors and nurse educators are unable to accompany student nurses properly because of staff shortages. Some hospitals have identified one professional nurse per unit to work as a nurse preceptor for accompaniment of student nurses. This has resulted in the need to find out if the professional nurse preceptor is solving the problem of lack of student accompaniment in clinical areas. The aim of this study therefore is to investigate the roles and functions of nurse preceptors in improving student accompaniment as compared to other professional nurses in clinical areas namely, clinical instructors, nurse educators and professional nurses working in clinical areas as viewed by student nurses themselves. A comparative descriptive study was done in one of the hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal (Region D on a purposely selected sample of (80 4 years comprehensive diploma student nurses, (16 nurse preceptors and (40 randomly-selected professional nurses. Open and closed-ended questions were used for collection of data. The study revealed that the most student nurses 87,5% (70 identified nurse preceptors as playing an important role in their accompaniment as compared to other professional nurses.

  15. Online Module to Assure Success as Prelicensure Nursing Students Transition to Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Diana-Lyn; Shaefer, Sarah J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Prelicensure nursing students have a final capstone, practicum, or clinical course as they transition to the professional nurse role. Generally, the student role requires increased independent practice and this can be a challenge. To maximize learning in this clinical experience, an online module was designed. This article will describe course…

  16. The impact of regulatory perspectives and practices on professional innovation in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlke Wall, Sarah

    2017-07-05

    Since at least the 1970s in Canada, there have been calls for health system reforms based on innovative roles and expanded scopes of practice for nurses. Professional regulatory organizations, through legislation, define the standards and parameters of professional nursing practice. Nursing regulators emphasize public protection over the advancement of nursing; regulatory processes and decisions tend to be conservative and risk-averse. This study explored the impact that regulatory processes have on innovation in nursing roles. Nurses in a range of unique practice situations were interviewed, including nurses in non-traditional roles and/or settings, those with cross-jurisdictional career histories, and those working in interdisciplinary practices and educational settings. For these nurses, nursing practice was viewed through a traditional clinical lens, which did not fit for them. They experienced hassle, delay, and inconsistencies in regulatory practices. They felt mistreated and fearful of the regulator and lamented the ways in which ambitious, creative, capable nurses were stymied in attempting new applications for nursing knowledge. Nursing is constraining its own mandate to contribute to health care through stringent licensing processes. Healthcare reform provides an opportunity for nursing regulators to rethink their processes and provide the latitude for nurse-driven change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The development of the Professional Values Model in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ayla; Boz, İlkay

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important criteria for professionalism is accumulation of knowledge that is usable in professional practice. Nursing models and theories are important elements of accumulating nursing knowledge and have a chance to guarantee the ethical professional practice. In recent years, there has been an increase in the use of models in nursing research and newly created terminology has started to be used in nursing. In this study, a new model, termed as the Professional Values Model, developed by the authors was described. Concepts comprising the conceptual framework of the model and relations between the concepts were explained. It is assumed that awareness about concepts of the model will increase not only the patients' satisfaction with nursing care, but also the nurses' job satisfaction and quality of nursing care. Contemporary literature has been reviewed and synthesized to develop this theoretical paper on the Professional Values Model in nursing. Having high values in nursing increases job satisfaction, which results in the improvement of patient care and satisfaction. Also, individual characteristics are effective in the determination of individual needs, priorities, and values. This relation, proved through research about the Professional Values Model, has been explained. With development of these concepts, individuals' satisfaction with care and nurses' job satisfaction will be enhanced, which will increase the quality of nursing care. Most importantly, nurses can take proper decisions about ethical dilemmas and take ethical action when they take these values into consideration when giving care. The Professional Values Model seems suitable for nurse managers and it is expected that testing will improve it. Implementation of the Professional Values Model by nurse managers may increase motivation of nurses they work with. It is suggested that guidance by the Professional Values Model may help in enhancement of motivation efforts of the nurse managers

  18. Teaching Professionalism in Nursing: A Quantitative Survey of Beginning Student Nurse Perceptions of Professional Values Interpreted within a Leadership Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Jocelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    The researcher designed this quantitative dissertation research to explore the perceptions of beginning nursing students toward professionalism in nursing, specific to professional values within the context of curriculum delivery for a leadership and management course in one baccalaureate nursing program. In addition, the researcher reviewed the…

  19. How work setting and job experience affect professional nurses' values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Feito, Ana; Palmeiro-Longo, María Del Rosario; Hoyuelos, Salomé Basurto; García-Díaz, Vanesa

    2017-01-01

    The development of professional values in nursing is directly related to quality and ethical clinical practise and may also increase practitioner and patients' satisfaction. Some factors, such as work setting or work experience, can influence the importance granted to the professional values of nursing. To compare in primary care nurses and hospital care nurses the importance granted to professional values and to contrast this perception as a function of professional experience. Research design, participants and research context: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants were 380 nursing professionals from the public health system (primary care and hospital care). Three dimensions were analysed: ethics, professional expertise and professional mastery. Data were collected from January to June 2015. Ethical considerations: We obtained permission from the Ethics Committee and participants' informed consent. Hospital care professionals attached more importance to all the values analysed, regardless of their work experience. Ethical values, such as confidentiality and respect for the person, were considered to be very important in both systems. Values related to professional expertise obtained lower scores, especially in primary care. In general, professionals with more than 20 years' experience granted less importance to the values. The professional setting influenced the importance assigned to professional nursing values, and clear differences were observed between primary and hospital care. The domain of ethics was considered the most important. It is necessary to reflect on the significance attributed to professional values, especially in more expert nursing staff.

  20. Moral distress: challenges for an autonomous nursing professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Luiz Devos Barlem

    Full Text Available Constantly experiencing limiting situations that hinder a professional practice coherent with its principles - of autonomy and advocacy of users' interests -, and often conditioned to experience moral distress, the nursing profession plays a prominent role in the current health model because it has the characteristic of managing the care rendered to users in a perspective of social inclusion, both in the basic health network and in hospitals. Aiming at carrying out a reflection on the nursing practice and the difficulties present in its work routine, and considering its characteristics as a profession, this article sought to make a reflection between the practice of nursing and the numerous moral challenges imposed by the routine, resulting, in many cases, in a value crisis that can reverberate directly on the quality of the service rendered, and in abandonment of the ideals of advocacy for users.

  1. Louisa May Alcott and Hospital Sketches: An Innovative Approach to Gender and Nursing Professionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choperena Armendáriz, Ana; Fairman, Julie

    2017-11-23

    To show the development of an emerging nursing profession through the eyes of Louisa May Alcott and Hospital Sketches. In Hospital Sketches, Louisa May Alcott recounts her experiences when she worked as a nurse of injured soldiers during the American Civil War, in an autobiographically and masked-referential way, which allows her to negotiate between transgression and convention. Unlike other reviews, in this paper the relevance of nursing remains highlighted. Discussion paper. Existing literature on data bases, history books and our own reading of facts. Illuminating overlooked meanings hidden in nurses' personal sources enables to approach their contribution to history, improve their visibility and project the future of nursing. Nursing care, whether domestic or professional, was and remains a catalyst for change. Through Alcott's words we understand the transition of nursing care as a gradual extension of the middle class woman's domestic role and a progressive definition of nurses' identity. In particular, we highlight how certain professional nursing nuances which appear in the text are compatible with the gradual extension of the boundaries of women's domesticity. Furthermore, Alcott's use of literary devices reveals the delicate balance between women's domestic role and some new nursing professional features, which anticipates nursing professionalization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. [Promotion of and reflections on the professional image of community health nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2009-08-01

    Deteriorating global economic conditions, contractions in medical service budgets, and the excessive medicalization of community service systems have marginalized the role of the community health nurse. As such, community health nursing experts have a responsibility to do their best to reconstruct a positive and active image for community health nursing. This article provides four recommended actions to promote the image of community health nurses. These include: (1) Enhance community nursing practice level and scope; (2) Promote autonomous and independent practice; (3) Facilitate cultural competence and (4) Advance education and in-service training. It is hoped that information in this article may serve as a reference for nursing researchers in making relevant plans and encourage the development of a more specialized role for community health nursing. The ultimate goal of such should be successful promotion of the professional image of community nurses and of community nursing.

  3. The effect of nursing leadership on hospital nurses' professional practice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovich, Milisa

    2005-01-01

    To understand the effect of unit-level nursing leadership on the relationship of structural empowerment and nursing self-efficacy to professional nursing practice behaviors. Nursing leadership at both organizational and unit levels is a major influence on professional nursing practice. The interaction between environmental factors, such as structural empowerment and unit-based nursing leadership, and self-efficacy for nursing practice may determine whether a nurse's practice behaviors are either professional or more task-focused. A nonexperimental, comparative survey design was used. Instruments included the Conditions for Work Effectiveness-II, Caring Efficacy Scale, Manager's Activities Scale, and Nurse Activity Scale. Multigroup path analysis demonstrated the effects of strong and weak nursing leadership on variables of interest. Nursing leadership contributed to the effects of empowerment and self-efficacy on practice behaviors. Strong nursing leadership also contributed to an additional relationship between empowerment and self-efficacy. Nursing leadership helped to explain 46% of the variance in nursing practice behaviors overall. Nurses may be able to practice more professionally when they perceive strong nursing leadership. By providing more access to structural empowerment factors for staff, strong unit-level nursing leadership may also influence nurses' self-efficacy, which in turn leads to more professional practice behaviors.

  4. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  5. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care. © 2013.

  6. Caring for abused women: impact on nurses' professional and personal life experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Hadass

    2009-08-01

    This article is a report of a study of the impact of caring for abused women on nurses' professional and personal life experiences. Encountering abused women can have emotional, cognitive and behavioural influences on nurses, known as vicarious traumatization. They may feel incompetent to deal with such an overwhelming problem and may avoid screening survivors of abuse. Thus, nurses treating these survivors need to be aware of their attitudes, emotions and differential responses during these interactions. A phenomenological study was carried out in 2005 in Israel. The data were collected using in-depth, interviews with 22 female Israeli nurses in hospitals and community healthcare clinics. Data analysis revealed one main theme, 'Struggling on work and home fronts', based on two subthemes: 'Encounter with domestic violence: a challenge to nurses' professional role perception' and 'Between work and home'. Nurses experience perplexity regarding abused women and their professional care. Encounters with these women challenge nurses' personal and professional attitudes, as well as influencing their personal lives (intimate relationships, parenthood and gender attitudes). These encounters induce empathy and compassion, but also anger and criticism towards abused women, creating emotional labour for the nurses. The dissonance between personal values, attitudes and emotions and the desirable professional intervention procedures might impede nurses' performance in caring for abused women. Implementing training programmes for screening and intervening with abused women might reduce the emotional labour required, enhance nurses' responses to domestic violence, and enable personal growth.

  7. [The Role of Nursing Education in the Advancement of the Nursing Profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yeh, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The present article discusses the role of nursing education in the advancement of the nursing profession in the context of the three facets of knowledge: generation, dissemination, and application. Nursing is an applied science and the application of knowledge in practice is the ultimate goal of the nursing profession. The reform of the healthcare delivery model requires that nurses acquire and utilize evidence-based clinical knowledge, critical thinking, effective communication, and team collaboration skills in order to ensure the quality of patient care and safety. Therefore, baccalaureate education has become the minimal requirement for pre-licensure nursing education. Schools of nursing are responsible to cultivate competent nurses to respond to the demands on the nursing workforce from the healthcare system. Attaining a master's education in nursing helps cultivate Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to further expand the roles and functions of the nursing profession in order to promote the quality of care in clinical practice. Nursing faculty and scholars of higher education institutions generate nursing knowledge and develop professional scholarship through research. Attaining a doctoral education in nursing cultivates faculties and scholars who will continually generate and disseminate nursing knowledge into the future.

  8. The professional paradigm of qualified psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, U A

    1995-10-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine the professional paradigm of the qualified psychiatric nurse and the factors influencing the formation of this paradigm. The research was both explorative and descriptive, and both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. The research approach was deductive and based on the theory of paradigm of Törnebohm. The test persons comprised three groups: Swedish-speaking Finns, Swedes and Finns. In each group there were eight students in the final stages of their psychiatric nursing training. A total of 40 questionnaires were distributed to each group. The research revealed four different characteristic types of qualified psychiatric nurses: caring science oriented, partly caring science oriented, general humanist and finally the personality- and experience-oriented. The results also indicate that there is a discrepancy between will and ability within caring. This can partly be interpreted as an expression of the discrepancy between philosophical and ideological impressions and real acts but it may partly indicate a lack of information. Many informants had difficulty naming a theoretical frame of reference for their work and stating aspects of psychiatric caring that would be important to know but on which no information so far exists. Many informants expressed the need for more research and development but did not indicate the subjects.

  9. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Bonnie; Laurant, Miranda G; Reeves, David

    2006-07-03

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected patients. Reductions in cost are context dependent and rarely achieved. This is because savings on nurses' salaries are often offset by their lower productivity (due to longer consultations, higher patient recall rates, and increased use of tests and investigations). Gains in efficiency are not achieved when GPs continue to provide the services that have been delegated to nurses, instead of focusing on the services that only doctors can provide. Unintended consequences of extending nursing roles include loss of personal continuity of care for patients and increased difficulties with coordination of care as the multidisciplinary team size increases. Rapid access to care is, however, improved. There is a high capital cost involved in moving to multidisciplinary teams because of the need to train staff in new ways of working; revise legislation governing scope of practice; address concerns about legal liability; and manage professional resistance to change. Despite the unintended consequences and the high costs, extending nursing roles in primary care is a plausible strategy for improving service capacity without compromising quality of care or health outcomes for patients.

  10. Exploring nursing roles across North American borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Alice F; Chircop, Andrea; Downe-Wamboldt, Barbara; Sheppard-LeMoine, Debbie; Murnaghan, Donna; Elliott, Judy; Critchley, Kim; MacNaughton, Neil S; Méndez, Lourdes; Wittstock, Lucille; Ramírez, Guadalupe; Arteaga, Sabrina; Espinoza, Silvia; Herbert, Rosemary; Judge-Ellis, Tess; Cárdenas, Velia

    2005-01-01

    Professional nurses are challenged by the increasing complexity of their own healthcare delivery systems and by the growing interconnectivity of healthcare systems worldwide. There are increasing calls for practice across boundaries; however, the role and scope of nursing practice within individual countries are often unclear, ill-defined, and misunderstood by nurses from other countries. In this collaborative educational project among six schools of nursing located in Canada, México, and the United States, nursing students and faculty are exploring the role of the nurse within each country's healthcare system while striving to develop their multicultural awareness. Participating faculty describe the process, challenges, and keys to success found in creating and living this international project. They share strategies for addressing challenges, which included meeting deadlines, time differences, differing academic schedules, writing joint documents in two languages, designing and presenting a shared course, and creating an exchange process between the six partner schools. They describe the evolution of their working relationships, the language challenges, and the joy of coming together as newfound colleagues and friends.

  11. Supporting band 5 practitioners in professional and leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kathleen; Morrow, Karen

    2015-10-07

    Interest in professionalism and leadership has increased within the nursing and midwifery community. The NHS Lanarkshire Practice Development Centre established a study day on these concepts for band 5 practitioners. This formed part of NHS Lanarkshire's implementation of Scotland's nursing and midwifery leadership development strategy, Leading Better Care. The aims of the study day were to reinforce individual professional responsibility, promote the principles of professionalism and explore the concept of leadership in the band 5 role. This article reports on the development, implementation and evaluation of the study day.

  12. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Heydari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses’ competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses’ competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Results: Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses’ competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Conclusion: Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses’ competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients.

  13. Traditional Healers And Nurses: A Qualitative Study On Their Role ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of traditional healers in sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS and collaboration between the traditional and biomedical health care systems as seen by nurses and traditional healers. A convenient sample of 15 professional nurses and 15 traditional healers were ...

  14. The organizational and performance effects of nurse practitioner roles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, MAG; Knip, M

    Background. Most studies evaluating the roles of Nurse Practitioners have compared the care delivered by individual Nurse Practitioners with that provided by other professionals. These studies should be complemented by research focusing on a higher unit of analysis, namely the organization of the

  15. An Analysis of Role Stress among Hospital Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenburgh, Donald J.; Trinkaus, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Using a sample of 566 nurses, this study focused on role stress, conceptualized in terms of role conflict, uncertainty about acceptance of one's behavior by supervisors and peers, and role ambiguity. Results indicated that individual attributes, including education, locus of control, and professional commitment, predicted role stress. (Author/RC)

  16. Professional values of Turkish nurses: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkaya-Uslusoy, Esin; Paslı-Gürdogan, Eylem; Aydınlı, Ayse

    2017-06-01

    Professional values improve the quality of nurses' professional lives, reduce emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, increase personal success, and help to make collaborations with the members of the healthcare team more frequent. The purpose of this study was to describe the professional values of Turkish nurses and to explore the relationships between nurses' characteristics. This was a descriptive study of a convenience sample consisting of 269 clinical nurses. A questionnaire was used to identify socio-demographic characteristics, and the Nurses' Professional Values Scale was applied. Ethical considerations: Permission to conduct the study was received from the hospital and the Institutional Review Boards of the Süleyman Demirel University ethic committee. The mean scale score of the participant nurses was 165.41 ± 20.79. The results of this study revealed that human dignity was the most important professional value for nurses, and the importance attached to these values showed statistically significant differences by age, length of service, educational level, marital status, position at work, and receiving relevant in-service training. Nurses' Professional Values Scale scores showed that nurses give above average and attached importance to professional values.

  17. [The development and impacts of professional nursing in senior care and senior business management: the perspective of a U.S.-based nurse entrepreneur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Theresa

    2008-10-01

    The three main parts of this article include (1) the process of transition from a clinical nurse to a nurse entrepreneur, (2) senior care business management and social responsibility and (3) the development of senior care business in the future as well as the chances for nursing development. The article analyzes the development of gerontology nursing careers in the United States and Taiwan and the role professional nurses can play in ageing societies. A prospective plan for collaboration between gerontology nurses and long-term care health professionals in the United States and Taiwan concludes the article.

  18. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses: a biographical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Inge A; Poell, Rob F; Berings, Marjolein G M C; ten Cate, Olle

    2015-05-01

    A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age, leading to the expectation that motives for continuing professional development also change. Nevertheless, little is known about nurses' continuing professional development strategies in different age groups. To explore continuing professional development strategies among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, from a biographical perspective. Data were analysed using a vertical process aimed at creating individual learning biographies, and a horizontal process directed at discovering differences and similarities between age groups. Twenty-one nurses in three age groups from general and academic hospitals in the Netherlands. In all age groups, daily work was an important trigger for professional development on the ward. Performing extra or new tasks appeared to be an additional trigger for undertaking learning activities external to the ward. Learning experiences in nurses' private lives also contributed to their continuing professional development. Besides these similarities, the data revealed differences in career stages and private lives, which appeared to be related to differences in continuing professional development strategy; 'gaining experience and building a career' held particularly true among younger nurses, 'work-life balance' and 'keeping work interesting and varied' to middle-aged nurses, and 'consistency at work' to older nurses. Professional development strategies can aim at performing daily patient care, extra tasks and other roles. Age differences in these strategies appear to relate to tenure, perspectives on the future, and situations at home. These insights could help hospitals to orientate continuing

  19. The perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to explore the perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in clinical areas. A qualitative hermeneutic phenomenological research was conducted to determine the meaning of mentoring as perceived by professional nurses and to identify the successes and challenges ...

  20. Professional nurses' requests to remove their names from the South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide a severe shortage of professional nurses is expected to occur between 2005 and 2020 - when the ";baby boomers"; born between 1947 and 1962 reach retirement age. This shortage will differ from any previous shortage because there will be no large pool of non-practising professional nurses as was the case ...

  1. The experiences of divorced professional nurses in the workplace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Considerable research has been done on the impact of divorce on married persons, their children and families but little has been done on its impact on professional nurses work performance. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the lived experiences of divorced female professional nurses at East London ...

  2. Professional Quality of Life and Clinical Competencies among Korean Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghee Kim, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that it is possible to directly examine the relationship between professional quality of life level and clinical competence among nurses. Thus, interventions to increase nurses' compassion satisfaction and relieve compassion fatigue are needed, as professional quality of life may affect clinical competence.

  3. Compassionate nursing professionals as good citizens of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy J; Brannigan, Michael; Baird, Martha

    2006-01-01

    Globalization is reshaping the world and its people. Nursing, likewise, is in the process of expanding its worldview to one that accommodates global care. The authors further articulate a global ethic for nursing by distinguishing 2 concepts: world citizenship, as described by Martha Nussbaum, which calls nurses to critically evaluate personal and culture-based beliefs, and compassionate professional, which calls nurses to nurture partnerships of mutual respect. It is also important that nursing participate and support professional and international organizations that address social injustices related to healthcare, poverty, and public health.

  4. Constructing nurses' professional identity through social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willetts, Georgina; Clarke, David

    2014-04-01

    The profession of nursing continues to struggle with defining and clarifying its professional identity. The definitive recognition of nursing as a profession was the moving of training from the hospital apprentice model to the tertiary sector. However, this is only part of the story of professional identity in nursing. Once training finishes and enculturation into the workplace commences, professional identity becomes a complicated social activity. This paper proposes social identity theory as a valuable research framework to assist with clarifying and describing the professional identity of nurses. The paper outlines the key elements of a profession and then goes on to describe the main concepts of social identity theory. Lastly, a connection is made between the usefulness of using social identity theory in researching professional identity in nursing, recognizing the contextual nature of the social activity of the profession within its workplace environment. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Time to clarify--the value of advanced practice nursing roles in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Grainne; Plummer, Virginia; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Boyd, Leanne

    2012-03-01

    This article presents a discussion of the importance of providing meaningful advanced practice nursing role definition and clarity to improve international standards of nursing titles and scopes of practice. A plethora of international literature exists discussing advanced practice nursing roles and their contribution to healthcare delivery in various countries. However, lack of consistency around title, role definition and scope of practice remains. CINAHL and Medline databases were searched using 'nurse practitioner', 'nurse practitioner role', 'nurse practitioner practice', 'nurse practitioner in public health', 'advanced practice nursing roles' and 'development of new nursing roles' with articles limited to years 1995-2010. Citations used in those articles were also explored. All cited articles were in the English language. This article supports the need to strengthen the Nurse Practitioner role in health care and professional clarity is identified as a strategy to enhance this. Themes around role clarity, professional identity, ability to enhance healthcare provision and inter-professional issues are examined. The need to more clearly articulate advanced nursing roles in light of the evolution of the Nurse Practitioner role is highlighted. Much work has already occurred in this domain and a means of adapting and broadening these developments for a wider, more global audience whilst maintaining local context is discussed. Although evidence exists that advanced practice nursing roles are increasing internationally, uncertainty around role clarity remains. This is problematic because the valuable contribution of nursing roles is lost, if the ability to clearly express their function does not exist. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Specialty satisfaction, positive psychological capital, and nursing professional values in nursing students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chung Hee; Park, Ju Young

    2017-10-01

    Ideally, college majors should be chosen to achieve self-realization and correspond to self-concept. However, some students select a major based on extrinsic factors, rather than aptitude or interests, because of a lack of employment opportunities. If they have negative college experiences with an unsatisfactory major, they might not engage fully in their occupation following graduation. This study aimed to identify factors affecting specialty satisfaction in preclinical practice nursing-college students. A cross-sectional descriptive survey. A nonprobability convenience sample of 312 nursing-college students at colleges in Deajeon City, South Korea. The survey questionnaire was distributed to those who agreed to participate. Freshmen and sophomore nursing students (n=312). Participants were 312 students at colleges in Deajeon City. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which were analyzed using SPSS/WIN. Positive psychological capital and nursing professional values were positively correlated with specialty satisfaction. Significant predictors for specialty satisfaction included hope and optimism (as components of positive psychological capital), the roles of nursing service and originality of nursing (as nursing professional values), and aptitude/interests and job value (as motives for selecting a major). The findings suggested that nursing students' specialty satisfaction was partially linked to positive psychological capital and professional values. Therefore, the promotion of positive factors should be useful in enhancing specialty satisfaction in preclinical-practice nursing-college students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Professional and cultural conflicts for intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring intensive care nurses' experiences of conflicts related to practical situations when they encounter culturally diverse families of critically ill patients. Conflicts can arise in critical care settings as a result of differing cultural and professional values. Nurses and families with diverse cultural backgrounds bring beliefs and understandings to the care situation that can have an impact on the care process. Such families are challenged in their efforts to maintain traditions, while some nurses are not sufficiently culturally aware. A limited number of studies have focused on such conflicts. Sixteen critical care nurses took part in multistage focus group interviews conducted from October 2005 to June 2006. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The main theme, 'conflict between professional nursing practice and family cultural traditions', was based on three pairs of conflicting themes: 'culturally based need to participate actively in the care vs. nurses' professional perceptions of themselves as total care providers'; 'nurses' professional obligation to provide comprehensible information vs. culturally based communication difficulties and responses to illness'; and 'families' needs for cultural norms and self-determination vs. nurses' professional responsibility for the clinical environment'. In addition, each pair of themes contained several sub-themes. Nurses need to negotiate with culturally diverse family members to address conflicts. In their encounters with such families, they should establish a balance between ethnocentricity and cultural sensitivity. An implication for practice is to increase nurses' competence in assessment of diversity.

  8. Contesting the dominance of emotional labour in professional nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Robert; Murphy, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The main intension of this paper is to challenge the dominance of emotional labour in professional nursing. The article begins by evaluating the central conceptual and definitional aspects of emotional labour, emotion work and emotional work. The purpose of this discussion is to argue against the false public and private dichotomy that has plagued emotional labour and emotion work. Second, it is proposed that the central and helpful defining aspects of emotional labour and emotion work are Marx's concepts of exchange-value and use-value. These defining attributes are used in conjunction with other re-conceptualisations, which unite these terms in order to create more encompassing constructs that are useful for focusing on the waged and unwaged aspects of professional nurses' emotional work response behaviours. Finally, the use of emotional labour in professional nursing is contested on the grounds that the construct has limited theoretical and empirical utility for researching the complex nature of professional nurses' emotional work response behaviours. It is recommended that a more robust encompassing concept needs to be developed, which accurately reflects the nature and complexity of professional nurses' waged and unwaged emotional work response behaviours, as they are important overlooked facets of behaviour that can be theoretically related to professional nurses' contextual performance. The paper provides a better understanding of professional nurses' emotional work response behaviours, which benefit nursing research and practice by drawing on other areas of theory and research.

  9. Bedside to blueprints: the role of nurses in hospital design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Erin

    2014-01-01

    To explore the role and function of nurses in the healthcare design industry. The design of a new hospital requires collaboration among multiple disciplines to develop an environment that allows for high-quality care to be delivered and received. This article investigates the role of nurses as an integral part of the design team when creating optimal spaces for patients and caregivers. While nurses fulfill many roles in healthcare, this investigation focused on the role of nurses as end-users, nurse leaders, and consultants. An informal interview method was used to elicit information from 13 members of the healthcare design industry across disciplines and across the United States. Those interviewed included nurses, architects, and consultants. Common themes that emerged from this investigation included the importance of nurses as an integral part of the design team and a continued need to understand optimal utilization to be an effective team member. A number of organizations and events welcome nurses to help foster design innovation and interprofessional collaboration. The role of the professional nurse continues to expand and there are many opportunities for nurses to step out of their traditional role and into the industry of healthcare design. Design process, interdisciplinary, nursing, strategy, planning.

  10. Nurses' and managers' perceptions of continuing professional development for older and younger nurses : A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Ten Cate, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuing professional development of nurses is increasingly necessary to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Therefore, future strategies for continuing professional development should be directed at both younger and older

  11. "Hit the ground running": perspectives of new nurses and nurse managers on role transition and integration of new graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomas, Wanda M; Care, W Dean; McKenzie, Jo-Ann Lapointe; Guse, Lorna; Currie, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The workplace for new graduates must be a constructive learning environment to facilitate their development. Nurse managers need new graduates who can "hit the ground running." Conflict between the needs of new nurses and the realities of the workplace often creates role confusion and tension in new graduates and threatens employers' ability to retain them. As part of a larger study that examined the effectiveness of a new strategy on new nurse retention and workplace integration, we conducted focus groups with new nurses and nurse managers. This paper discusses the perspectives of new nurses on their role transition from graduates to practising professionals and the perspectives of nurse managers on the workplace integration of new nurses. The thematic findings integrate new nurses' perspectives on their needs during role transition with the perspectives of nurse managers in meeting those needs. The discussion includes strategies to facilitate successful transition and integration of new nurses into the workplace within the context of recruitment and retention.

  12. Core professional nursing values of baccalaureate nursing students who are men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bonnie J

    2016-09-01

    The perceptions of core professional nursing values of men in baccalaureate nursing programs are poorly understood. The study purpose was to understand and interpret the meaning of core professional nursing values to male baccalaureate nursing students. One-to-one interviews were conducted with male nursing students from a public university in the Midwest, following interpretive phenomenology. Measures to protect participants included obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, obtaining signed informed consent, and maintaining confidentiality. The study revealed five themes and several subthemes under an overarching finding of caring. Acquisition of professional nursing values began prior to the nursing program and continued to varying degrees throughout the program. Several implications are offered for nursing education, nursing practice, research, and public policy. These include identification of common values, teaching-learning strategies, inclusive environments, teamwork, and conflict resolution. Caring was revealed using a metaphor of a puzzle. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. A Study of the Relationship Between Nurses' Professional Self-Concept and Professional Ethics in Hospitals Affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandavar, Nehleh; Rahmanian, Afifeh; Badiyepeymaie Jahromi, Zohreh

    2015-07-31

    Commitment to ethics usually results in nurses' better professional performance and advancement. Professional self-concept of nurses refers to their information and beliefs about their roles, values, and behaviors. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between nurses' professional self-concept and professional ethics in hospitals affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences. This cross sectional-analytical study was conducted in 2014. The 270 participants were practicing nurses and head-nurses at the teaching hospitals of Peimanieh and Motahari in Jahrom University of Medical Science. Sampling was based on sencus method. Data was collected using Cowin's Nurses' self-concept questionnaire (NSCQ) and the researcher-made questionnaire of professional ethics. The average of the sample's professional self-concept score was 6.48±0.03 out of 8. The average of the sample's commitment to professional ethics score was 4.08±0.08 out of 5. Based on Pearson's correlation test, there is a significant relationship between professional ethics and professional self-concept (P=0.01, r=0.16). In view of the correlation between professional self-concept and professional ethics, it is recommended that nurses' self-concept, which can boost their commitment to ethics, be given more consideration.

  14. Competencies within a professional clinical ladder: differences in understanding between nurse managers and staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoche, Erin L; Meucci, Joanne H

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ladders provide a framework for professional nursing development and have shown increased personal and professional satisfaction. This article describes a standardized approach for clinical ladder implementation. Managers' and staff nurses' knowledge of the model must align for important stakeholders to perceive the clinical ladder as valuable. Understanding differences and perspectives can be useful as the basis for education and further clinical ladder refinement augmenting the potential for increased nursing satisfaction and professional development.

  15. The pivotal role of nurse managers, leaders and educators in enabling excellence in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Robert; Pearce, Paddy; Grimwood, Karen; McSherry, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to present the findings from a discursive analysis of key issues associated with providing excellence in nursing care; and to provide an exemplar framework to support excellence in nursing care and describe the potential benefits when excellence in nursing care occurs. The challenge facing the nursing profession is in ensuring that the core principles of dignity, respect, compassion and person (people) centered care become central to all aspects of nursing practice. To regain the public and professional confidence in nursing, nurse leaders, managers and educators play a pivotal role in improving the image of nursing. Excellence in nursing care will only happen by ensuring that nurse managers, leaders and educators are able to respond to the complexity of reform and change by leading, managing, enabling, empowering, encouraging and resourcing staff to be innovative and entrepreneurial in practice. Creating healthcare environments that enable excellence in nursing care will not occur without the development of genuine shared working partnerships and collaborations between nurse managers, leaders and educators and their associated organizations. The importance of adopting an authentic sustainable leadership approach to facilitating and supporting frontline staff to innovate and change is imperative in restoring and evidencing that nurses do care and are excellent at what they do. By focusing attention on what resources are required to create a healthcare environment that enables compassion, safety and excellence in nursing care and what this means would be a reasonable start on the journey to excellence in nursing. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. PROFESSIONAL NURSING ENGAGED IN TEACHING: limits and possibilities

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    Magno Conceição das Merces

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was developed with the aim of analyzing the pedagogical practice of nursing professionals engaged in teaching in a Private Institution of Higher Education in State of Bahia Brazil. The discussion on the role of teachers in education and the way of teaching how to develop a humane and collective way. In an exploratory stage, there was a semi structured interview to 19 nursing teachers. Data were analyzed with reference to the assumptions of content analysis. The results indicated that to obtain a good performance of the educator, this should guide their practice in daily observation of emerging interests and needs of students in your group. Another important issue concerns the lack of job opportunities in health care, which leads many professionals to seek the way of teaching as a professional alternative, not necessarily taking into account the personal fitness. Although we have observed that the reflection and concern for teaching are present in their speech and that many constantly try to overcome existing difficulties in practice, this issue raises a detailed analysis.

  17. Sentido del rol de profesional de enfermería en el primer nivel de atención en salud Sense of the professional`s role of nursing in the first level of attention in health Manizales (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Pico Merchán

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo busca develar vivencias frente al rol en torno a: valor atribuido a su rol en esta área, creencias sobre el trabajo y quehacer profesional. El análisis y la interpretación se realizan con base en datos recogidos por entrevistas en profundidad a dieciséis enfermeras. De la información emergen categorías definitivas: enfermera como persona, cuidados de enfermería, enfermera en organización de salud y, contexto normativo, educativo y socioeconómico; después de analizadas se identifica que la enfermera tiene un conflicto entre: formación del pregrado y oferta laboral; determinantes sociales, normativos y educativos del rol y ejercicio del mismo; cuidado a las personas y cuidado institucional. La enfermera se mueve entre ese conflicto y la resignificación de vivencias laborales por la utilidad en su vida personal y familiar, el prestigio de su labor administrativa, el deber de cuidar y satisfacción por la abogacía a favor de los usuarios.This work can be described as an ethnography of the sense that the nurses have of their role as first level healthcare providers in Manizales, Colombia. As well as their experiences in their role as nurses, concerning the value attributed to their profession, the beliefs that other have of their work and occupation. The analysis and the interpretation were done by means of the information obtained through in-depth interviews with sixteen nurses. Definite categories emerged from the information such as: the nurse as a person; nursing cares; the nurse in the health organization; and, the normative, educational and socioeconomic context. After analyzing the categories it was identified that nurses have a conflict between undergraduate formation and job opportunities; social, normative and educational determiners of the role and execution of their occupation; taking care of others and institutional care. The nurses are torn between this conflict and the resignificance of labor experiences to be

  18. From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudacek, Sharon Smith; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Turkel, Marian C

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model," found on pages 104-112, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 28, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the benefits and barriers to participation in a community-based academic-practice partnership. Identify three

  19. Work climate, work values and professional commitment as predictors of job satisfaction in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Sala, Rachele La; Marletta, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Giulia; Ampollini, Monica; Fabbri, Anna; Ricchi, Alba; Scardino, Marcello; Artioli, Giovanna; Mancini, Tiziana

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of some psychosocial variables on nurses' job satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction is one of the most important factors in determining individuals' intention to stay or leave a health-care organisation. Literature shows a predictive role of work climate, professional commitment and work values on job satisfaction, but their conjoint effect has rarely been considered. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was adopted. Participants were hospital nurses and data were collected in 2011. Professional commitment and work climate positively predicted nurses' job satisfaction. The effect of intrinsic vs. extrinsic work value orientation on job satisfaction was completely mediated by professional commitment. Nurses' job satisfaction is influenced by both contextual and personal variables, in particular work climate and professional commitment. According to a more recent theoretical framework, work climate, work values and professional commitment interact with each other in determining nurses' job satisfaction. Nursing management must be careful to keep the context of work tuned to individuals' attitude and vice versa. Improving the work climate can have a positive effect on job satisfaction, but its effect may be enhanced by favouring strong professional commitment and by promoting intrinsic more than extrinsic work values. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Establishing roles in genetic nursing: interviews with Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; McCullum, Mary; Balneaves, Lynda G; Esplen, Mary Jane; Carroll, June; Kelly, Mary; Kieffer, Stephanie

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe nurses' roles in providing clinical genetic services related to adult onset hereditary disease and factors that influence genetic nursing practice in Canada. The study involved semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 nurses from 5 Canadian provinces with full-time or part-time roles in providing genetic services. The interviews included open-ended questions to elicit descriptions of genetic nursing roles and factors that support and limit opportunities in genetic nursing practice. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed that, in addition to genetic counselling, the nurses reported a wide range of roles and responsibilities related to the provision of genetic services that drew directly on their nursing background (e.g., patient assessment, health promotion). Factors identified as supporting genetic nursing roles included nursing background, being part of a multidisciplinary team, and receiving mentorship. Challenges in establishing roles in genetic nursing were related to role ambiguity, lack of recognition of nursing expertise, limited availability of genetics education, isolation, and instability of nursing positions. Recommendations to support the development and expansion of genetic nursing practice were identified. A coordinated national effort among all stakeholders is needed to provide the resources necessary to support the appropriate and effective use of nursing expertise as genetics is integrated into the Canadian health-care system.

  1. Professional Quality of Life and Clinical Competencies among Korean Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Han, Yonghee; Kwak, Yeunhee; Kim, Ji-su

    2015-09-01

    Clinical competence among nurses is an essential requirement for the provision of safe and effective patient care. This study aims to classify types of professional quality of life experienced by Korean nurses, and examine the relationship between demographic and professional characteristics and clinical competence among nurses experiencing each type. A total of 335 nurses completed questionnaires assessing professional quality of life, clinical competence, and demographic and professional characteristics. Following identification of the underlying factors of professional quality of life, we classified participants into three clusters. There were significant differences in age, marital status, religion, educational status, and position between clusters. Results also revealed that nurses with high compassion satisfaction and low compassion fatigue (burnout, secondary traumatic stress) tended to have higher clinical competence. This study demonstrated that it is possible to directly examine the relationship between professional quality of life level and clinical competence among nurses. Thus, interventions to increase nurses' compassion satisfaction and relieve compassion fatigue are needed, as professional quality of life may affect clinical competence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Nursing roles and responsibilities in general practice: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Léonie; Clendon, Jill; Nelson, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    Primary care nursing teams may now comprise registered nurses (usually termed practice nurses), nurse practitioners, physician assistants, enrolled nurses, and primary care practice assistants, clinical assistants, or nursing assistants. There is a need to understand how practitioners in the different roles work with patients in the changed environment. The aim of this study was to describe the different configurations of health professionals' skill-mix in three dissimilar primary care practices, their inter- and intra-professional collaboration and communication, and to explore the potential of expanded nursing scopes and roles to improve patient access. Document review, observation and interviews with key stakeholders were used to explore how health practitioners in three practice settings work together, including their delegation, substitution, enhancement and innovation in roles and interdisciplinary interactions in providing patient care. A multiphase integrative, qualitative and skill-mix framework analysis was used to compare findings related to nursing skill-mix across case studies. Three models of primary care provision, utilising different nursing skill-mix and innovations were apparent. These illustrate considerable flexibility and responsiveness to local need and circumstances. Enabling nurses to work to the full extent of their scope, along with some adjustments to the models of care, greater multidisciplinary cooperation and coordination could mitigate future workforce shortages and improve patient access to care.

  3. Defining professionalism from the perspective of patients, physicians, and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Marianne; Zick, Amanda; Makoul, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    Although professionalism has always been a core value in medicine, it has received increasingly explicit attention over the past several years. Unfortunately, the terms used to explain this competency have been rather abstract. This study was designed to identify and prioritize behaviorally based signs of medical professionalism that are relevant to patients, physicians, and nurses. The qualitative portion of this project began in 2004 with a series of 22 focus groups held to explore behavioral signs of professionalism in medicine. Separate groups were held with patients, inpatient nurses, outpatient nurses, resident physicians, and attending physicians from different specialties, generating a total of 68 behaviorally based items. In 2004-2006, quantitative data were collected through national patient (n = 415) and physician leader (n = 214) surveys and a statewide nurse (n = 237) survey that gauged the importance these groups attach to the behaviors as signs of professionalism and determined whether they are in a position to observe these behaviors in the clinical setting. The surveys of patients, physician leaders, and nurses provided different perspectives on the importance and visibility of behavioral signs of professionalism. Most of the behaviors were deemed very important signs of professionalism by at least 75% of patients, physicians, and/or nurses; far fewer were considered observable in the clinical setting. This study demonstrates that it is possible and instructive to define professionalism in terms of tangible behaviors. Focusing on behaviors rather than attributes may facilitate discussion, assessment, and modeling of professionalism in both medical education and clinical care.

  4. Inter-professional education: registered nurses + ODPS = theatre practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevenson, Grania

    2006-11-01

    The structure of theatre management should ensure that the patient receives the most appropriate care available, with every team member knowing their role and their expected contribution in order to meet the needs of the patient. Inter-professional healthcare is an integral feature of the NHS and this article will focus on the interaction and teamwork experienced in the theatre department between qualified nurses and qualified operating department practitioners (ODPs) and the perceived differences and similarities in their roles both historically and in future practice. Taylor and Campbell (1999) state the operating department is unique in that various members of the multidisciplinary teams are all present at the same time and work together for the successful completion of the perioperative period of care. Anonymous clinical examples have been used to highlight certain points and to illustrate the differing roles of the perioperative staff.

  5. Reorienting Public Health Nurses' Practice With a Professional Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Cheryl; Cohen, Benita; Mignone, Javier; Chartier, Mariette J; Lutfiyya, Zana

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Documents articulating public health nurses' (PHNs') roles, including Canadian standards and competencies, depict a broad focus working at multiple levels to improve population outcomes through the promotion of health equity. Conversely, Canadian experts depict a looming crisis, based on the rising disconnect between daily activities and ideal practice. While perfectly positioned, PHNs' skills and abilities are under-utilized and largely invisible. The intention of this study was to develop a model to support the full scope of equity-focused PHN practice. Method A participatory action research approach was used. Qualitative data were gathered using semistructured interview guides during audio-recorded meetings. The data were coded into central themes using content analysis and constant comparison. A researcher reflexive journal and field notes were kept. A significant feature was full participant involvement. Results The outcome was a professional practice model to reframe the PHN role to focus on population health and equity. The model was imperative in promoting full scope of practice, dealing with workload pressures, and describing PHNs' value within the organization and broader health system. Conclusion Professional practice models hold promise as frameworks to depict autonomous practice activities, situated within organizations and healthcare systems, and underpinned by nursing knowledge.

  6. The evolving professional identity of the clinical research nurse: A qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunhunny, Swapna; Salmon, Debra

    2017-12-01

    To examine the perspectives of CRNs in the UK on their professional role identity, in order to inform the professional practice of Clinical Research Nursing. Clinical research nurses (CRN) make a significant contribution to healthcare research within the UK and internationally. However, lack of clarity about their role, and scope of practice renders their contribution within the profession and in the minds of the wider public invisible. This has implications in terms of promoting the role nurses play not only in terms of recruitment, retention, and care of research participants but also as research leaders of the future. Exploratory qualitative design using thematic analysis conducted within a realist paradigm. Participants viewed the positive aspects of their identity 'as agents of change' who were fundamental to the clinical research process. Resourcefulness and the ability to guide members of the research team were valued as key to job satisfaction. Successful navigation through the complexity of advice, support, management and leadership tasks related to their role in caring for research patients were role affirming and generated a sense of pride. However, lack of recognition, clarity of the role and career development opportunities within an identified structure undermined the CRN identity and optimism about progression in the future. Participants reported feeling invisible to colleagues within the clinical community, isolated and excluded from wider nursing groups. The study describes UK CRN practice, highlighting the positive benefits and challenges associated with the role, including the need to support professional and career development to maximise their research contribution. This study provides nurses, health care and research organisations and academic nursing educators with a broadened understanding of the professional role, identity and context of clinical research nursing practice in the United Kingdom, with recommendations to improve its

  7. Assessing the professional development needs of experienced nurse executive leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda Searle; McFarland, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the professional development topics that senior nurse leaders believe are important to their advancement and success. Senior/experienced nurse leaders at the executive level are able to influence the work environment of nurses and institutional and health policy. Their development needs are likely to reflect this and other contemporary healthcare issues and may be different from middle and frontline managers. A systematic way of assessing professional development needs for these nurse leaders is needed. A descriptive study using an online survey was distributed to a convenience sample of nurse leaders who were members of the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL) or have participated in an ACNL program. Visionary leadership, leading complexity, and effective teams were the highest ranked leadership topics. Leading change, advancing health: The future of nursing, healthy work environments, and healthcare reform were also highly ranked topics. Executive-level nurse leaders are important to nurse retention, effective work environments, and leading change. Regular assessment and attention to the distinct professional development needs of executive-level nurse leaders are a valuable human capital investment.

  8. Finessing incivility: The professional socialisation experiences of student nurses' first clinical placement, a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Juliet; Jinks, Annette; Jack, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice is where student nurses are socialised into a professional role and acquire the distinct behaviour, attitudes and values of the nursing profession. Getting it right at the outset can maximise the development of a professional identity and the transmission of robust value systems. To explore the impact of the first clinical placement on the professional socialisation of adult undergraduate student nurses in the United Kingdom. Data of a longitudinal qualitative nature were collected and analysed using grounded theory. First year student nurses in hospital ward placements comprising a rural District General Hospital and a large inner city Hospital kept daily unstructured diaries for six weeks. A total of 26 undergraduate adult student nurses were purposefully sampled between 2008 and 2010 before undertaking their initial clinical placement. Data collection and analysis used grounded theory and the key question asked of the diarists 'tell me what it is like to be a first year nurse on a first placement' was theoretically adjusted during constant comparison and as the theory emerged. Ethical approval and consent was obtained. The theory of finessing incivility comprises a conceptual framework depicting how student nurses deal with professional incivility during their initial clinical placement and sustain a student identity. Being disillusioned with their role as worker rather than learner yields a sense of 'status dislocation'. Despite needing professional benevolence, they remain altruistic and seek recompense from significant others to negotiate for learning opportunities and relocate their student status. Despite the stressful transition into clinical practice rather than 'fit in', the student nurses want to belong as learners. His or her own resilience to learn nursing and be a professional student maintains their resolve, their altruism and strengthens their existing values to be benevolent towards an indifferent profession. This behaviour

  9. Psychosocial issues and care in pediatric oncology: medical and nursing professionals' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Gemma; Meyler, Emma; Guerin, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Children with cancer and their families have psychosocial support needs. Medical and nursing professionals in pediatrics and pediatric oncology are in a position to identify and help manage these. However, little is known about their perceptions of psychosocial issues and interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology including their awareness of the psychosocial impact of childhood cancer on families and their knowledge and views of psychosocial interventions. A phenomenological approach was taken whereby semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 10 physicians and nurses. Findings showed that despite a lack of formal training in psychosocial issues, professionals identified a number of psychosocial issues associated with childhood cancer, including effects for family members. In addition, findings illustrated the psychosocial roles that they frequently adopt in relation to the identification, treatment, and referral of psychosocial issues. Finally, physicians and nurses recognized the value of formal intervention, reporting benefits for children, families, and themselves. These findings give a preliminary insight into physicians' and nurses' perceptions and awareness of the psychosocial issues experienced by children with cancer and their families and their knowledge of psychosocial interventions. They highlight ways to enhance the delivery of care in pediatric oncology. Specifically, they suggest the need for more formal training on psychosocial issues for medical and nursing professionals, for additional experienced psychosocial professionals to be recruited, and for more access to services for both families and medical and nursing professionals.

  10. Fulfilment of administrative and professional organisational obligations and nurses' customer-oriented behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the perceived quality of organisational exchange and nurses' customer-oriented behaviours. Hospitals face increasing competitive market conditions. Registered nurses interact closely with patients and therefore play an important front-office role towards patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Registered nurses (n = 151) of a Belgian hospital received a questionnaire to assess the fulfilment of administrative and professional organisational obligations and their customer-oriented behaviours. We found a positive relationship between psychological contract fulfilment and nurses' customer-oriented behaviours. More precisely administrative and professional psychological contract fulfilment relates significantly to nurses' service delivery and external representation. In case of internal influence only administrative psychological contract fulfilment was significantly related. Nurses' perceptions of the fulfilment of administrative and professional obligations are important to their customer-oriented behaviours. Nurse managers must be aware of the impact of fulfilling both administrative and professional obligations of registered nurses in order to optimise their customer-oriented behaviours. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Improvement of Iranian nurses' competence through professional portfolio: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Masoud; Moattari, Marzieh; Shahamat, Shohreh; Dobaradaran, Sina; Ravanipour, Mariam

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a portfolio-based professional development program on nurses' competence in a university hospital in Iran. A pre-test/post-test, controlled, quasi-experimental design was used. From the university hospital's 18 general wards, four wards were randomly selected. Two wards were randomly allocated as the experimental group (35 subjects) and two wards as the control group (38 subjects). Nurses in the experimental group participated in a 12-month portfolio-based professional development program and nurses in the control group participated in the routine professional development programs of their wards. The data were collected by the Nurse Competence Scale and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and independent and paired t-tests. After intervention, the average nurses' competence in the experimental group increased significantly (P nurses' competence. The professional portfolios help nurses update their knowledge, skills, and competence towards their full role as nurses. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Exploring how nursing uniforms influence self image and professional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kate; Timmons, Stephen

    Uniforms are thought to hold personal significance for those who wear them and act as powerful symbols representing the profession's identity and image. To gain an insight into the influence of uniform on self image and professional identity among student nurses. Fourteen qualitative, semi structured interviews were carried out with pre registration nurses on diploma and degree programmes at a university in England. Uniform raised issues in a number of areas including gender, equality, power and identity. Pride, combined with a strong self image and professional identity, lead to enhanced confidence and, therefore, better performance in clinical practice. Since this study shows the importance of uniform to students, uniforms need to balance a professional and modern image while retaining an appreciation for nursing's heritage. This will project a realistic image to the public and help nurses to form a positive professional identity.

  13. Using the hidden curriculum to teach professionalism in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Zohreh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Mohammadi, Easa; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2014-03-01

    Professionalism in nursing is critical for creating credibility and a positive image. This study was carried out to explain the use of hidden curriculum in teaching professionalism in nursing students. This qualitative study was conducted through purposeful sampling strategy by the participation of 32 nursing students. The data were collected by using semi-structured interviews, and this process was continued until achieving data saturation and themes' emergence. Content analysis method was used for data analysis. DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THREE MAIN THEMES: Development of understanding the professionalism elements, Variety of influenceability strategies, and Influenceability to various resources. Each theme consisted of some subthemes. The nursing students learnt the professionalism elements by different methods from different resources through the hidden curriculum. Therefore, exploration of the currently administered hidden curricula is suggested.

  14. A qualitative study of nurse practitioner promotion of interprofessional care across institutional settings : perspectives from different healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; van Soeren, Mary; MacMillan, Kathleen; Sidani, Souraya; Donald, Faith; Reeves, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Interprofessional care, an aim of institutional healthcare settings globally, promotes safe, cost-effective, quality care. How professionals act to enable interprofessional care has not been described. The nurse practitioner role, with its expertise in both medicine and nursing, is known to enhance collaboration and promote interprofessional care delivery. The objective of this study was to identify, from the healthcare professionals' perspective, nurse practitioner strategies used...

  15. Impact of Nursing Students' Free-Clinic Experiences on Subsequent Professional Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christina Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Bachelors of Science Nursing students at a small liberal arts college in the upper Midwest volunteer with an instructor at a free clinic as part of their curriculum. This study's purpose was to identify the impact of nursing students' free-clinic experiences on their subsequent professional nursing practice and their ability to attend to: (a)…

  16. The freelance nurse writer role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, B

    1999-01-01

    Freelance nurse writers are skilled in facilitating a dialogue and writing from the perspective of the group. This article, written by an experienced freelance author, describes efficient methods to incorporate information gleaned from group interviews. The author provides tips on what type of projects to look for, how to develop the role, and even how to charge.

  17. Depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Darlan dos Santos Damásio; Tavares, Natália Vieira da Silva; Alexandre,Alícia Regina Gomes; Freitas,Daniel Antunes; Brêda,Mércia Zeviani; Albuquerque, Maria Cícera dos Santos; Melo Neto, Valfrido Leão de

    2015-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE Discussing the factors associated with major depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals. METHOD An integrative review in PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and BDENF databases, between 2003 and 2015. RESULTS 20 published articles were selected, mostly from between 2012 and 2014, with significant production in Brazil. Nursing professionals are vulnerable to depression when young, married, performing night work and having several jobs, and when they have a high l...

  18. Professional values of nurse lecturers at three universities in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pereira, Arabely; Arango-Bayer, Gloria

    2017-03-01

    To describe the professional values of the nurse lectures according to 241 nursing students, who participated voluntarily, in three different universities of Bogotá. This is a quantitative, descriptive cross-sectional study that applied the Nurses Professional Values Scale-permission secured-Spanish; three dimensions of values were applied: ethics, commitment, and professional knowledge. Ethical consideration: Project had ethical review and approval from an ethics committee and participants were given information sheets to read before they agreed to participate in the project. It was concluded that nursing students, in general, do perceive these values in their professors, and they give priority to the dimension of ethics, followed by the knowledge dimension, and finally, commitment. It is evident that professional values are transmitted by professors and students place importance to such values. Values related to the other's care are paramount in nursing training in Colombia as well as in other countries. It was found that participating students observed professors directly in relation to values focused on direct patient care, respect for privacy, respect for life, while matters related to professional improvement, participation in unions were not actually analyzed may be due to poor promotion activities and unions during undergraduate studies. The results obtained are primary approach to the study of values related to nursing, a topic which needs to be researched, something vital to all the country offering nursing training programs.

  19. Continuing Professional Development in Nursing: Does Age Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare the views of nurses of different ages on continuing professional development (CPD). The authors were interested in possible differences in the use of formal and especially informal CPD practices between nurses of different ages, and likewise in possible differences in attitudes of…

  20. Imagining alternative professional identities: reconfiguring professional boundaries between nursing students and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langendyk, Vicki; Hegazi, Iman; Cowin, Leanne; Johnson, Maree; Wilson, Ian

    2015-06-01

    The transition of a medical student or a nursing student into a health care practitioner requires many changes. Among these is the development of an appropriate professional identity, which assists in the establishment of a sound base for professional practice and therefore should be a focus for health professions educators. There is evidence, however, that medical education and nursing education face challenges in guiding students' development of appropriate professional identities. In medicine, there is concern that medical education may contribute to the development of professional identities that alienate patients rather than identities that are patient centered. The nursing profession struggles with poor retention rates in the workforce, which have been attributed in part to discrepancies between the professional identities that students develop during nursing school and the realities of professional practice.In this Perspective, the authors explore the importance of and the pedagogical strategies used to facilitate professional identity formation for medical and nursing students. They argue that medical and nursing educators aim to instill in their students strong occupational identities which may perpetuate hierarchical disciplinary boundaries. They suggest that health professions educators should move beyond current disciplinary silos and create interprofessional education opportunities for medical students and nursing students to learn together to facilitate the development of the collaborative interprofessional identities necessary for the delivery of high-quality, patient-centered health care.

  1. What are the professional development and mentorship needs of advanced practice nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerksen, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the professional development and mentorship needs of an existing group of advanced practice nurses. A prospective mixed-methods design included a survey followed by focus groups. The Strong Model (M. H. Ackerman, L. Norsen, B. Martin, J. Wiedrich, and H. Kitzman, 1996) recently provided a framework for the survey and discussions. It consists of five domains of practice: direct comprehensive care, education, research, support of systems, and publication and professional leadership. Fourteen advanced practice nurses participated, representing a variety of clinical areas in the clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner roles. Results demonstrate that advanced practice nurses identify various professional development and mentorship needs in all aspects of their roles. Although research was identified as a need that develops over time, it was consistently regarded as a primary focus for development and required mentorship. Respondents offered specific examples and the positions or roles that would be helpful in meeting their professional development and mentorship needs. Main themes that arose from the focus group were formal versus informal needs, needs change over time, and intellectual, administrative, and financial support. The advanced practice nurses' willingness to contribute to a mentorship program was explored.

  2. Enhancing Role Clarity for the Practical Nurse: A Leadership Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankshear, Sara; Rush, Janet; Weeres, Annette; Martin, Dianne

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors contributing to practical nurse (PN) role confusion and the impact on nursing intraprofessional team collaboration. There is limited literature describing the intraprofessional relationship of the RN and PN in areas such as role conflict, scope of practice, and team collaboration. A mixed-methods design was used targeting Ontario RNs and PNs, including an online survey and focus groups. Results (N = 1101) revealed varying levels of knowledge regarding the distinct and overlapping scope of practice for each role, with shared opinions regarding areas such as respect, teamwork, and the role of leadership. Nurses' roles will continue to evolve in response to changes in patient populations and healthcare systems. As such, role clarity is essential to support optimal use of nursing knowledge for safe patient care. Leadership is key to establishing parameters for professional practice and creating a culture of collaboration and respect.

  3. The role of practice development nurses in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elmira; Camilleri, Michelle

    2015-09-23

    To develop an understanding of the role of practice development nurses in Malta and to identify any barriers or opportunities associated with this role. An exploratory single case study methodology was used. Ten of the total population of 11 practice development nurses agreed to participate in the study. Participants were twice interviewed in person about their understanding of the role. Data were analysed thematically. The main themes identified were: professional growth through lifelong learning, leadership in a changing practice environment and fostering research-based clinical practice. Participants reported that ambiguities associated with their role, role conflict and unclear hospital infrastructure were barriers to executing their role effectively. Healthcare organisations should create an appropriate working environment that supports practice development nurses and clearly distinguishes their responsibilities and authority. Practice development nurses should become more socio-economically and politically focused to enable them to function strategically and effectively in their clinical working environment.

  4. Work leave among nursing professionals due to psychological etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Douglas de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the incidence and the length of periods off work specifically linked to psychological causes among nursing professionals. Furthermore, the study tried to identify risk factors for the work leaves and suggest actions that can mitigate the problems encountered. Methods: This was a retrospective, ecological study, in the largest public hospital of Curitiba-PR, with data from 3,692 nurses (2,294 auxiliary nurses, 590 nursing technicians and 808 nurses from January 2007 to September 2010. An exploratory review was performed to form the theoretical basis of this study. The annual incidences for each type of work leave due to psychological causes were identified, among the nursing professionals. Results: It was found that the main cause of absenteeism were depressive episodes (F32, with 784 leaves. As for the length of time, the cause for longer periods off among nurses (40.62 days on average was the bipolar affective disorder (F31. Nursing assistants and technicians were away from work due to recurrent depressive disorder (F33 on average for 40.47 days and 54.33 days, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high incidence of depressive episodes and the mean duration of absenteeism due to psychological causes was over 30 days, pointing to the need of investments in prevention and in healthcare for nursing professionals. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p554

  5. Knowledge as a factor in vulnerability to tuberculosis among nursing students and professionals

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    Thaís Virgínia Felício Mussi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify vulnerability to tuberculosis (TB related to knowledge about the disease among 76 nursing students and professionals. A quantitative descriptive study was conducted using a closed questionnaire for the collection of data regarding transmission, preventive and biosafety measures, diagnosis, and prejudice regarding the disease. The SAS software version 9.1.3 was used for data analysis, with the level of significance set at 5% (p < 0.05. Nursing students and professionals showed a vulnerability to TB related to knowledge about transmission, preventive and biosafety measures, and diagnosis of the disease. With respect to transmission, vulnerability was higher among nursing professionals. The results indicate the need for investment by healthcare institutions surrounding this topic in view of the important role of nursing in the establishment of strategies for prevention and control of the disease.

  6. Nurse managers' role in older nurses' intention to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Stassen, Marjorie; Freeman, Michelle; Cameron, Sheila; Rajacic, Dale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model of the underlying mechanisms linking perceived availability of human resource (HR) practices relevant to older nurses and older nurses' intentions to stay with their hospitals. Quantitative data were collected from randomly selected older registered nurses (N=660) engaged in direct patient care in hospitals in Canada. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypothesized model. The relationship between perceptions of HR practices (performance evaluation, recognition/respect) and intentions to stay was mediated by the perceived fairness with which nurse managers managed these HR practices and nurse manager satisfaction. When nurse managers were perceived to administer the HR practices fairly (high perceived procedural justice), older nurses were more satisfied with their nurse manager and, in turn, more likely to intend to stay. The cross-sectional research design does not allow determination of causality. It is important that nurse managers receive training to increase their awareness of the needs of older nurses and that nurse managers be educated on how to manage HR practices relevant to older nurses in a fair manner. Equally important is that hospital administrators and HR managers recognize the importance of providing such HR practices and supporting nurse managers in managing these practices. The findings increase the understanding of how HR practices tailored to older nurses are related to the intentions of these nurses to remain with their hospital, and especially the crucial role that first-line nurse managers play in this process.

  7. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with professional competence and work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    To explore newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with their self-assessed professional competence and other work-related factors. As a factor affecting nurse turnover, newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with work-related factors needs exploring to retain adequate workforce. Nurses' commitment has mainly been studied as organisational commitment, but newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its association with work-related factors needs further studying. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation design. A convenience sample of 318 newly graduated nurses in Finland participated responding to an electronic questionnaire. Statistical software, NCSS version 9, was used in data analysis. Frequencies, percentages, ranges, means and standard deviations summarised the data. Multivariate Analyses of Variance estimated associations between occupational commitment and work-related variables. IBM SPSS Amos version 22 estimated the model fit of Occupational Commitment Scale and Nurse Competence Scale. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment was good, affective commitment reaching the highest mean score. There was a significant difference between the nurse groups in favour of nurses at higher competence levels in all subscales except in limited alternatives occupational commitment. Multivariate analyses revealed significant associations between subscales of commitment and competence, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, earlier professional education and work sector, competence counting only through affective dimension. The association between occupational commitment and low turnover intentions and satisfaction with nursing occupation was strong. Higher general competence indicated higher overall occupational commitment. Managers' recognition of the influence of all dimensions of occupational commitment in newly graduated nurses' professional development is important. Follow

  8. The meaning of interaction between nursing professionals and newborns/families in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Eliana Moreira; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da; Angelo, Margareth; Ribeiro, Circéa Amália

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the meaning of the nursing team's communication with newborns and families during care delivered in a neonatal unit and also to develop a theoretical model. Symbolic Interactionism and Hargie's model were used as theoretical and Grounded theory as the methodological reference framework. The study was carried out at the nursery of a hospital in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. The study sample was composed of three nurses and four nursing auxiliaries. The theoretical model Being mediated by the strength of motivation was based on findings and revealed the role the nursing professionals' motivation played during interactions with newborns and families. The conclusion is that more humanized interactions with newborns and families result from the nursing professionals' motivation.

  9. Percepción del rol profesional de alumnos de enfermeria de la Universidad de Concepción, Chile Professional role perception in undergraduate nursing students from University of Concepcion, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jara Concha

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudio descriptivo exploratorio cuyo objetivo es describir la percepción de rol profesional que tienen los alumnos de enfermería de la Universidad de Concepción, Chile, en los diferentes niveles de formación, durante el año 2000. La muestra fue intencionada, 250 estudiantes agrupados en fracciones: A del primer año, B del tercer año y C del quinto año. Se aplicó un cuestionario elaborado por las autoras, basado en estudios previos de rol entre profesionales. La información se analiza descriptivamente para cada fracción por separado y luego se hace un análisis comparativo de las fracciones. Se utilizó análisis estadístico con Chi2 para las fracciones B y C. En relación con la imagen de rol, la mayoría percibe a la enfermera como coordinadora del trabajo en equipo y sólo un 18% como dadora del cuidado. En cuanto a la representación del concepto de rol planteado en situaciones de ejercicio profesional, mayoritariamente se identifican con el rol como cuidadora. En ambas, el análisis estadístico con Chi2 resultó no significativo. En los niveles B y C, se señala preferentemente el carácter expresivo del rol, encontrándose diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Se concluye que la percepción de rol que tienen los alum¬nos varía según el nivel de formación, y priman algunos factores educativos claves como los modelos de profesores y modelos enfermeras(os en campos clínicos.The aim of this descriptive exploratory research is to describe the professional role perception the undergraduate nursing students attending University of Concepción (CHILE have, in their different instructional levels, during academic year, 2000. An intentional sample, 250 students were chosen and grouped as follow; being A: First year, B: Third year, C: Fifth year. A questionnaire made up by the authors, based on previous role trials among professionals, was applied. The information was descriptively analyzed for each group (separately and a

  10. Leader Influence, the Professional Practice Environment, and Nurse Engagement in Essential Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Maria P; Bernhardt, Jean M; Padula, Cynthia A; Adams, Jeffrey M

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between leaders' perceived influence over professional practice environments (PPEs) and clinical nurses' reported engagement in essential professional nursing practice. There is little empirical evidence identifying impact of nurse leader influence or why nursing leaders are not perceived, nor do they perceive themselves, as influential in healthcare decision making. A nonexperimental method of prediction was used to examine relationships between engagement in professional practice, measured by Essentials of Magnetism II (EOMII) tool, and nurse leaders' perceived influence, measured by Leadership Influence over Professional Practice Environment Scale (LIPPES). A convenience sample of 30 nurse leaders and 169 clinical nurses, employed in a 247-bed acute care Magnet® hospital, participated. Findings indicated that leaders perceived their influence presence from "often" to "always," with mean scores of 3.02 to 3.70 on a 4-point Likert scale, with the lowest subscale as "access to resources" for which a significant relationship was found with clinical nurses' reported presence of adequate staffing (P leadership expectations of staff (P = .039). Relationships were seen in the outcome measure of the EOMII scale, nurse-assessed quality of patient care (NAQC), where nurse leaders' perception of their authority (P = .003) and access to resources (P = .022) positively impacted and was predictive of NAQC. Findings support assertion that nurse leaders are integral in enhancing PPEs and their influence links structures necessary for an environment that supports outcomes.

  11. Role perceptions and reported actual role content of hospital nurses in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; While, Alison E; Louise Barriball, K

    2008-04-01

    The study aimed to explore nurses' views and experiences regarding their working roles in Mainland China. Ministry of Health guidance relating to the hospital nurse's role has been widely used in Mainland China since 1982 but it does not adequately cover the development of new roles arising from recent health care system reforms. This has led to increasing concerns about the potential of role conflict and role ambiguity for nurses especially where role expectations are not reflected in actual role content leading to job dissatisfaction and higher turnover. A cross-sectional survey design using postal questionnaires comprising demographic questions and four scales measuring role perception and actual role content, job satisfaction, occupational stress, role conflict and role ambiguity was used. Five hundred and twelve hospital nurses in Beijing participated representing a response rate of 81%. Most respondents reported that staff nurses should undertake most of the roles described in the domain of patients' physical care, psychosocial and communication and professional aspects of patient care and patient care management and there was overall consensus regarding the roles of other health care personnel. Further, they reported that nurses always or sometimes carried out these roles. Different role perceptions were reported across educational groups. Additionally, nurses' ratings of role perception and actual role content were related to their ratings of job satisfaction, occupational stress, role conflict and role ambiguity (p actual role of nurses provides the basis for developing strategies to reduce resulting occupational stress, role conflict and role ambiguity and increase job satisfaction. Additionally the findings provide a basis for international comparison of actual nurse role content and the potential support needs of nurses from Mainland China who move to work in other health care systems.

  12. The emotional intelligence of professional nurses commencing critical care nursing in private hospitals in Gauteng

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Yvette Juanita

    2015-01-01

    M.Cur. (Nursing Science) The primary objective of this study was to determine the emotional intelligence (EI) of, and make recommendations to facilitate an improvement in the EI of professional nurses commencing work in critical care units in private hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa. The quality of nursing care directly affects patient outcomes such as morbidity, mortality, adverse events as well as the total cost of care. This places the nurse central in good, comprehensive health care,...

  13. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani Azad; Azimzadeh Roghaieh; Zamanzadeh Vahid; Valizadeh Leila

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study t...

  14. [Humanization: a reading from the understanding of nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Maria de Lourdes Custódio; Noro, Adelita

    2010-12-01

    The study seeks to understand how the nursing staff carry out their professional practices guided by humanization. It is a qualitative research carried out in a pediatric oncology inpatient unit of a general hospital in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Eleven nurses and nursing technicians partcipated as subjects of the study. Three categories emerged in the analysis: comprehension of humanization, realization of humanization and suggestions for a humane practice. The conclusion indicates that each professional determines how they will carry out their practices to humanize care. Yet, this requires active listening and interpersonal relationships consolidated through discussion and regular meetings.

  15. Work engagement in professional nursing practice: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyko, Kacey; Cummings, Greta G; Yonge, Olive; Wong, Carol A

    2016-09-01

    Work engagement in professional nursing practice is critically important to consider when addressing key challenges of health systems, including the global nursing shortage, pressures to reduce health care spending, and increasing demands for quality care and positive outcomes for patients. However, research on work engagement in professional nursing practice has not yet been synthesized and therefore, does not provide a sufficient foundation of knowledge to guide practice and further research. The overall aim of this systematic review is to determine what is currently known about the antecedents and outcomes of work engagement in professional nursing practice. Systematic review. The search strategy included eight electronic databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PROQUEST, SCOPUS, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Business Source Complete. The search was conducted in October 2013. Quantitative and qualitative research that examined relationships between work engagement and antecedent or outcome factors was included. Quality assessment, data extractions, and analysis were completed on all included studies. Data extracted from included studies were synthesized through descriptive and narrative synthesis. Content analysis was used to categorize factors into themes and categories. 3621 titles and abstracts were screened and yielded 113 manuscripts for full text review. Full text review resulted in 18 included studies. All factors examined were grouped into either influences or outcomes of work engagement. A total of 77 influencing factors were categorized into 6 themes: organizational climate, job resources, professional resources, personal resources, job demands, and demographic variables. A total of 17 outcomes of work engagement were categorized into 3 themes: performance and care outcomes, professional outcomes, and personal outcomes. Based on the results, we adapted the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model and developed the Nursing Job Demands-Resources (NJD-R) model for

  16. Assessor or mentor? Role confusion in professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lucy; Nettleton, Peggy

    2007-11-01

    This paper reports on research conducted as part of a multi-professional study involving nursing, medicine and midwifery, which aimed to investigate both mentee and mentor perceptions of the mentorship role and the context within which it is conducted. It is well recognised that mentorship plays a vital part in the support and training of healthcare professionals. Documentation published by regulatory bodies regarding the mentorship role and changes in it's implementation in practice has resulted in confusion among practitioners. This study consisted of questionnaires and semi-structured telephone interviews with both mentors and mentees, within three healthcare professions and focuses on the responses from the nursing profession. The mentors participating in the study struggled with their dual role as assessor and mentor and found conflict within this responsibility. The role of assessor was poorly recognised and the complexity of being both an assessor and a supporter/friend is discussed.

  17. Experiences of newly qualified professional nurses in primary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of professional nurses during their first two years of professional service, inclusive of one year of community service in Primary Health Care facilities in the Eastern Cape Province. The study followed a qualitative and exploratory approach. Its design was ...

  18. School Nurse Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and…

  19. Creating what sort of professional? Master's level nurse education as a professionalising strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Kate; McManus, Mike; Ashworth, Peter

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports on a detailed analysis of selected findings from a larger study of master's level nurse education. It locates some features of such education within the contemporary situation of nursing as a profession and interprets the role of master's level nurse education as a professionalising strategy. In-depth interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 18 nurse lecturers drawn from eight universities in the United Kingdom. The interview agenda explored participants' perspectives of the characteristics of master's level performance in practice. Interview transcripts were interpreted by drawing upon hermeneutic methodology. The following themes emerged. (a) The credibility of the master's level nurse was of central importance. In terms of the literature of professionalisation, this may be interpreted as a factor in enhancing the legitimacy of nursing as an occupation. (b) The clinical capability attributed to the nurse is interpreted as leading to an increase in the authority commanded by the expert professional. Thus, the individual capability of the master's level nurse enhances the attribution of autonomous skill to the occupation as a whole. (c) The master's level nurse is seen to exercise influence and leadership and this strengthens the power and status of nursing. Nursing does not have the appearance of a 'traditional' profession, neither has it a clear stance as a 'new profession'. Rather it appears to be especially responsive to the tide of public opinion manifest through government edicts. While nursing is employing rhetoric that espouses both positions, the direction of master's level education is anomalous.

  20. The role of clinical trial nurses: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra; Miranda, Charmaine; Watson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the number of clinical trials conducted globally has increased thereby increasing demand for nurses working as Clinical Trial Nurses (CTNs), sometimes known as Clinical Research Nurses. The role and professional issues for these nurses in Australia has not been empirically formulated. Sixty-seven clinical trial nurses were surveyed nationally using a modified version of the Clinical Trials Nursing Questionnaire (CTNQ). Findings revealed the complex CTN role can include the coordination of the trials on one or more sites. This involves all domains listed in the questionnaire from protocol development, ethics approval applications, recruitment and consenting of participants in trials, to administering or assisting with treatments within the bounds of their practice code and the evaluation of protocols. Professional issues documented were: being undervalued in the nursing workforce, having no formal educational preparation for the role and minimal recognition in publications emanating from research in which they were involved. These nurses bring their practice knowledge to benefit research outcomes that may contribute to improving patient/client care.

  1. Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

    2013-06-01

    Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p nursing students' professional nursing values and levels of self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses.

  2. Professional development needs of nurse educators. An Australian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprescu, Florin; McAllister, Margaret; Duncan, David; Jones, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Because there is a global shortage of nurse educators, highly productive and committed nurse educators are needed to supply a rapidly expanding and changing health landscape. To support the aforementioned effort professional development needs of nurse educators must be systematically identified. This study explores practical issues around professional development needs of nurse educators. One hundred and thirty eight Australian nurse educators based in Queensland answered an online survey around professional development needs. Results indicate that 83% (n = 115) of the respondents were enthusiastic about nurse education yet only 45% (n = 62) were confident in their skills and less than 10% (n = 13) saw themselves as expert nurse educators. The most desired areas of future development in teaching were information technology skills, assessment and technical knowledge. There seems to be a shared need for developing global online and offline support resources and communities of practice to support nurse educators in their teaching and research endeavours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Professional nurses' understanding of clinical judgement: A contextual inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. van Graan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher cognitive skills are essential competencies for nurses joining the technologically and increasingly complex health care environment to provide safe and effective nursing care. Educators and clinical facilitators have recognised that newly qualified nurses do not meet the expectations for entry level clinical judgement and are held accountable for finding adequate learning experiences as preparation for such practice demands. An explorative and descriptive qualitative design was followed in this study to reach an understanding of clinical judgement in the clinical nursing environment from the perspective of professional nurses. Eleven professional nurses (n = 11 working at primary health care clinics, public and private hospitals participated voluntarily. Data was collected by means of the “World Cafe” method, incorporating a combination of techniques such as interviewing, discussions, drawings, narratives and reflection. The focus was on professional nurses' knowledge of the meaning of clinical judgement and factors influencing the development of clinical judgement in the clinical environment. Qualitative thematic content analysis principles were applied during data analysis. The findings were integrated with the relevant literature to culminate in conclusions that should add to the knowledge base of clinical judgement as an essential skill for improving autonomous and accountable nursing care.

  4. Contributions of nursing residency in professional practice of graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Severi Zanoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the contributions of nursing residence in professional practice of graduates. It is a descriptive study with a quantitative approach, which was to research participant nurses who attended the residence in nursing a public university located in southern Brazil. Inclusion criteria were: having completed the course in nursing residence in the study institution (2006-2011 and agree to participate in the study, approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the institution having CAAE no 0246.0.268.000-11. Data were collected through an online form, sent to graduates via email, with open and closed questions. By 2011, 90 nurses were trained in the residence arrangements in nursing offered, mostly young and newly formed. Of these, 65 (72.2% answered the form, 86.1% reported to be working, divided into care activities (64%, management (30%, education (25% and research (13%. Cited skills acquired in residence as critical view, be a transforming agent, acting as a team, using the nursing process, work in management, develop research, act ethically, among others. Highlighted suggestions for possible changes in the specialization program in order to meet the shortcomings faced. The residence proved to be of great contribution to the development of most of the professional skills required of nurses, and therefore a training service offering educational support and various practices, making the resident a critical professional, capable of resolving more solutions and to provide the dissemination of knowledge through scientific production.

  5. An online listserv for nurse practitioners: a viable venue for continuous nursing professional development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon; Hara, Noriko

    2008-05-01

    This study reports the results of a qualitative study involving a large and longstanding online nurse listserv in the United States. A sample of 27 critical care and advanced-practice nurse practitioners was interviewed using semi-structured individual interviews. This study found evidence that participation in an online listserv offers a viable avenue for the continuous professional development of nurses by providing nurses the opportunity to make more informed decisions about their professional practice and keeping abreast with up-to-date changes in their specialty areas when they shared knowledge with one another. Follow-up interviews with 10 nurses who frequently shared their knowledge revealed six motivators that helped promote knowledge sharing: (a) reciprocity, (b) collectivism, (c) personal gain, (d) respectful environment, (e) altruism, and (f) technology. Implications for sustaining knowledge sharing in an online listserv are discussed. The finding will inform educators and administrators who support continuing education and professional development of healthcare professionals.

  6. Attitudes of nurse professionals and nursing students towards children with disabilities. Do nurses really overcome children's physical and mental handicaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziou, V; Galanis, P; Tsoumakas, C; Gymnopoulou, E; Perdikaris, P; Brokalaki, H

    2009-12-01

    Many health professionals and nurses, who are involved in the care of disabled children, do not exhibit the essential sensitivity and appropriate attitudes towards them, resulting in a poor quality of nursing care. The objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of nurse professionals (paediatric nurses) and nursing students towards disabled children. The present study is a comparative study. The sample consisted of 228 first-year nursing students, 90 post-diploma nurses attending MSc degree course and 123 nurse professionals who are employed in paediatric hospitals. After obtaining permission from the hospitals and the educational settings and informing about the subjects of the study, data were collected using the paediatric Attitude Towards Disabled Person Scale (ATDP). Overall nurses' attitudes appeared to be poor (mean ATDP score 61.7 +/- 14.2). However, the post-diploma nurses had significantly higher ATDP scores than first-year students and paediatric nurses (P children with disabilities. Special courses for treating disabled children should be integrated to the basic nursing studies. Moreover, continuing hospital education can change paediatric nurses' attitudes towards children with disabilities.

  7. The influence of role models in undergraduate nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Kirsten; Hamshire, Claire; Chambers, Alison

    2017-03-23

    To explore the concept of role modelling in undergraduate nurse education and its effect on the personal and professional development of student nurses. Effective educative strategies are important for student nurses, who have to cope with learning in both clinical and university settings. Given the contemporary issues facing nurse education and practice in the United Kingdom (UK), it is timely and important to undertake pedagogical research into the concept of role modelling as an effective educative method. A descriptive narrative approach. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 14 current/recently discontinued students from Adult and Mental Health branches of nursing degree programmes in the north-west region of England, United Kingdom (UK). Data were thematically analysed. Students valued exposure to positive role models in clinical and university settings and viewed them as beneficial to their learning. Exposure to negative role models occurred, and this provided students with opportunities to consider the type of nurse they aspired to become. In some cases, students' exposure to perceived poor practice had an adverse effect on their learning and led to negative feelings about nursing work. Clinical staff might be perceived as more relevant role models than those in the university setting although there were still opportunities for academic staff to model professional behaviours. The study found that role modelling is an effective way to support learning and led to student satisfaction across both clinical and university settings. The findings support the use of role models in nurse education, and further research about conscious positive modelling of practice is required. Exploring the use of role models is important when examining ways in which the quality of nurse education might be developed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [The Role Development of Informatics Nurse Specialists in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Lee, Ying-Li; Lee, Tso-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The development of information technology has changed the world and allowed the innovation of nursing-care services. In recent years, the development of nursing informatics in Taiwan has been catching up with international trends and has been regarded positively by the international medical informatics community. The integration of information technology into medical care system has created the new nursing role of "informatics nurse." Although the certification system and job descriptions for these nurses have become increasingly comprehensive in many nations, Taiwan remains in the early development stage in these regards. Taiwan informatics nurses continue to face unclear and inadequately stated role responsibilities and job titles, undefined training requirements, and a lack of a clear qualification / certification system. This paper introduces the role functions and professional growth of informatics nurses and introduces the framework for a certification system in order to give to various medical and paramedical staffs a better understanding of informatics nursing and to recognize the important role played by informatics nurses in the process of healthcare informatics development.

  9. [Depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals: an integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Darlan Dos Santos Damásio; Tavares, Natália Vieira da Silva; Alexandre, Alícia Regina Gomes; Freitas, Daniel Antunes; Brêda, Mércia Zeviani; Albuquerque, Maria Cícera Dos Santos de; Melo, Valfrido Leão de Neto

    2015-12-01

    Discussing the factors associated with major depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals. An integrative review in PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and BDENF databases, between 2003 and 2015. 20 published articles were selected, mostly from between 2012 and 2014, with significant production in Brazil. Nursing professionals are vulnerable to depression when young, married, performing night work and having several jobs, and when they have a high level of education, low family income, work overload, high stress, insufficient autonomy and a sense of professional insecurity and conflict in the family and workrelationship. Suicide risk was correlated with the presence of symptoms of depression, high levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment; characteristics of Burnout Syndrome. Suicide risk among nursing professionals is associated with symptoms of depression and correlated with Burnout Syndrome, which can affect work performance.

  10. Depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlan dos Santos Damásio Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Discussing the factors associated with major depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals. METHOD An integrative review in PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and BDENF databases, between 2003 and 2015. RESULTS 20 published articles were selected, mostly from between 2012 and 2014, with significant production in Brazil. Nursing professionals are vulnerable to depression when young, married, performing night work and having several jobs, and when they have a high level of education, low family income, work overload, high stress, insufficient autonomy and a sense of professional insecurity and conflict in the family and workrelationship. Suicide risk was correlated with the presence of symptoms of depression, high levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment; characteristics of Burnout Syndrome. CONCLUSION Suicide risk among nursing professionals is associated with symptoms of depression and correlated with Burnout Syndrome, which can affect work performance.

  11. How Baccalaureate Nursing Students Value an Interprofessional Patient Safety Course for Professional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, Amy A.; Fuji, Kevin T.; Galt, Kimberly A.; Paschal, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students need foundation knowledge and skills to keep patients safe in continuously changing health care environments. A gap exists in our knowledge of the value students place on interprofessional patient safety education. The purpose of this exploratory, mixed methods study was to understand nursing students’ attitudes about the value of an interprofessional patient safety course to their professional development and its role in health professions curricula. Qualitative and quantita...

  12. Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nurse managers have to address shortcomings in their managerial and leadership skills and implement changes within a multigenerational nursing workforce and challenging working environments. Opsomming. Suid-Afrika ervaar 'n ernstige tekort aan verpleegkundiges wat aangespreek moet word ten einde krisisse in ...

  13. Easing student transition to graduate nurse: a SIMulated Professional Learning Environment (SIMPLE) for final year student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Koh, Yiwen; Dawood, Rabiah; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Zhou, Wentao; Lau, Siew Tiang

    2014-03-01

    Preparing nursing students for making the transition to graduate nurse is crucial for entry into practice. Final year student nurses at the National University of Singapore (NUS) are required to undergo a consolidated clinical practice to prepare them for their transition to graduate nurse. To describe the development, implementation and evaluation of a simulation program known as SIMulated Professional Learning Environment (SIMPLE) in preparing the final year student nurses for their clinical practicum in transition to graduate nurse practice. A set of simulation features and best practices were used as conceptual framework to develop and implement the simulation program. 94 final year student nurses participated in the 15-hour SIMPLE program that incorporated multiple simulation scenarios based on actual ward clinical practices. Pre and post-tests were conducted to assess the students' preparedness for their clinical practice in transition to graduate nurse practice. The students also completed a satisfaction questionnaire and open questions to evaluate their simulation experiences. The student nurses demonstrated a significant improvement (t=12.06, pnurse practice. They were highly satisfied with their simulation learning. Themes emerged from the comments on the most valuable aspects of the SIMPLE program and ways to improve the program. The study provided evidences on the effectiveness of the SIMPLE program in enhancing the students' preparedness for their transition to graduate nurse practice. A key success of the SIMPLE program was the used of simulation strategy and the involvement of practicing nurses that closely linked the students with the realities of current nursing practice to prepare them for the role of staff nurses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality and relevance of master degree education for the professional development of nurses and midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Azzurra; Marzuillo, Carolina; Di Muzio, Marco; Vacchio, Maria Rosaria; D'Andrea, Elvira; Villari, Paolo; De Vito, Corrado

    2017-06-01

    Advanced education in nursing is essential to provide safe, high quality and efficient health services in line with population needs. However, there is an almost complete lack of studies on how nurses view the usefulness of post-graduate education for their current employment and for professional advancement. To evaluate how nurse graduates view the quality, relevance and applicability of the knowledge and skills acquired during the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree. Multicentre cross-sectional study. A multicenter cross-sectional study was carried out through an online questionnaire mailed (July 2014-June 2015) to 560 nurses who obtained the MSN degree from 23 Italian universities in the academic year 2010-2011. A total of 426 nurses completed the survey (response rate 76.1%), 80% of whom believed they had acquired knowledge and skills useful in their professional life after graduation. A multiple logistic regression model highlighted the characteristics of nurse graduates who judged the master's course relevant for their present role. In brief, they are expert nurses (OR=3.41, 95% CI=1.54-7.54) who achieved professional growth after the course (OR=5.25, 95% CI=2.67-10.33) and who judged the course very good or excellent (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.04-4.52). Only 8% of the respondents achieved a full professional growth after the course. In Italy, MSN courses are able to provide a high level of skills and competencies. However, given the low rate of professional growth after the course, specific policies should increase the employment rates of new master's graduate nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Making a role for nurses in CCGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2016-07-13

    What do nurses in clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) do? The answer is lots, but their role and influence varies greatly between CCGs. In May, a report from NHS Clinical Commissioners (NHSCC) - the membership organisation of CCGs - highlighted the key responsibilities of nurses and the important contribution they make in what are often pressured and demanding roles (see tinyurl.com/CCG-nurses ).

  16. Professional identity and the culture of community nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dee

    2011-03-01

    Using an ethnographic approach, data collection was carried out using participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Two teams of nurses from one primary care trust in the West Midlands participated in this study. Data were analysed using James Spradley's (1979) thematic cultural analysis. Findings include: sharing information and planning ahead, helping across teams and busyness and how other professions view community nursing. Issues of community nurses invisibility and the articulation of expertise are presented. Although many studies have been carried out exploring the handover, there is a dearth of work focusing upon community nursing. In the current social and financial climate it is essential to make the case for continuity of care to be safeguarded. Additionally, the importance of protecting reporting time for community nurses is suggested. The reporting time serves to enhance group identity, reduce anxieties and relieve isolation. Finally, report time crucially encourages the articulation of expertise between community nurses at a time when they are feeling professionally devalued.

  17. Nurses as role models in health promotion: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, Joy; Baillie, Lesley; Gillison, Fiona

    2017-09-28

    There are national and international expectations that nurses are healthy role models; however, there is a lack of clarity about what this concept means. This study used concept analysis methodology to provide theoretical clarity for the concept of role models in health promoting behaviour for registered nurses and students. The framework included analysis of literature and qualitative data from six focus groups and one interview. Participants (n=39) included pre-registration students (adult field), nurse lecturers and registered nurses (RNs), working in NHS Trusts across London and South East London. From the findings, being a role model in health promoting behaviour involves being an exemplar, portraying a healthy image (being fit and healthy), and championing health and wellness. Personal attributes of a role model in health promoting behaviour include being caring, non-judgemental, trustworthy, inspiring and motivating, self-caring, knowledgeable and self-confident, innovative, professional and having a deep sense of self.

  18. The impact of organizational support and leader-member exchange on the work-related behaviour of nursing professionals: the moderating effect of professional and organizational identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Pauwels, Yarrid; Henninck, Charlene; Clays, Els

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relations between perceived organizational support, the quality of leader-member exchange, in-role and extra-role behaviour, professional identification and organizational identification among registered nurses and nurse assistants. Theoretically, employees will reciprocate received beneficial treatment with positive attitudes and behaviour. Recently, it has been shown that this principle may be more complex than originally anticipated. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey design was used. The quality of social exchange and identification was scored by the involved registered nurses and nurse assistants; in-role and extra-role behaviour was rated by the head nurse. The survey was administered to nurses and nurse assistants (n = 196) working in five Belgian nursing homes. Data were collected from February-March 2012. Pearson correlation analyses, t-test analyses and hierarchical regression were used to analyse the data. Our results showed no relationship between perceived organizational support and leader-member exchange and in-role behaviour. A positive relationship was found between perceived organizational support and extra-role behaviour and a trend towards significance between leader-member exchange and extra-role behaviour. Organizational and professional identification moderated the relationship between perceived organizational support and extra-role behaviour. Our study demonstrates the importance of social exchange to nurses and nurse assistants and therefore nursing administrators and leaders. When registered nurses and nurse assistants perceive high-quality social exchange, they are more likely to go the extra mile on behalf of the organization. Fostering social identification could enhance this. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Education Methods for Improving the Ability to Use Nursing Information, with a Focus on Issues Related to the Role of the Head Nurse: A Post-Workshop Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Takako; Majima, Yukie

    2016-01-01

    The use of information technology in medical setting is becoming increasingly prevalent; therefore, it is necessary to examine education methods that promote improvements among nursing professionals in the ability to use nursing information. With a focus on the role of the head nurse, the aim of this study, which consisted of two separately organized workshops, was to examine the effectiveness of behavior modification to resolve workplace issues identified by nursing professionals. After participating in these workshops, all nursing professionals demonstrated an increased ability to use nursing information and effectively resolve issues through behavior modification.

  20. The Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistant: Issues and challenges associated with this emerging advanced practice nursing role in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Andrew; Brownie, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistants' views about their emerging new role in contemporary nursing practice in Australia. Internationally advanced practice nursing has led to a range of specialist roles aimed at delivering higher quality, efficient nursing care. In 2005 an Australian university developed the Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistant graduate education and training program to provide nurses with an opportunity to gain advanced practice knowledge and extended skills specifically in the perioperative setting. This study was a qualitative research design that used online surveys and in-depth interviews to explore the issues and challenges associated with the introduction of the (currently non-accredited) Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistant role in Australia. Experienced Australia perioperative nurses who had undertaken graduate education and training in this field were recruited for this study. Data were collected between August and October 2011. An inductive thematic analysis was used to interpret the findings. Eighteen nurses completed the online survey and six were interviewed (n = 24). Nurses cited their commitment to professional development and the delivery of high quality patient care, along with surgeons' encouragement for them to complete specialist clinical training, as key reasons for undertaking Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistant education and training. The Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistant role led to greater job satisfaction and autonomy, and assisted nurses to better meet the needs of patients, surgeons and clinical perioperative teams. Without formal recognition of the Perioperative Nurse Surgeon's Assistant role its future in the Australian health care system is under threat.

  1. Core areas of practice and associated competencies for nurses working as professional cancer navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sandra; Fillion, Lise; Fitch, Margaret; Veillette, Anne-Marie; Matheson, Tanya; Aubin, Michèle; de Serres, Marie; Doll, Richard; Rainville, François

    2013-01-01

    Fillion et al. (2012) recently designed a conceptual framework for professional cancer navigators describing key functions of professional cancer navigation. Building on this framework, this study defines the core areas of practice and associated competencies for professional cancer navigators. The methods used in this study included: literature review, mapping of navigation functions against practice standards and competencies, and validation of this mapping process with professional navigators, their managers and nursing experts and comparison of roles in similar navigation programs. Associated competencies were linked to the three identified core areas of practice, which are: 1) providing information and education, 2) providing emotional and supportive care, and 3) facilitating coordination and continuity of care. Cancer navigators are in a key position to improve patient and family empowerment and continuity of care. This is an important step for advancing the role of oncology nurses in navigator positions and identifying areas for further research.

  2. Community health nursing in Australia: a critical literature review and implications for professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Kim; Davidson, Patricia; Daly, John; Hancock, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on community-based mandates an examination of the community health nurse (CHN). A critical literature review of the CHN role internationally, with an emphasis on Australia, was undertaken in order to understand historical precedents and inform policy and strategic directions for the CHN. A search of the CINAHL, EMBASE, and COCHRANE electronic data-bases from 1982 to June 2002 using community' and 'nursing' as key words and hand searching of books and government reports was undertaken. This search strategy revealed a lack of literature compared with other areas of nursing. Key themes emerging from this review are: (1) an absence of clear role definitions and lack of clarity of roles; (2) variability in educational requirements for CHNs; (3) diminished CHN power in policy decision making; (3) conflicting role expectations between different facets of the health care system; (4) underutilisation and untapped potential of the role of the CHN in the contemporary health care system; (5) the emerging influence of specialist nurses in community based-care; (6) uptake of traditional nursing roles by non-nurses and (7) an absence of a cohesive model of professional development of CHN that is able to articulate with contemporary social, political and economic trends in health care delivery. Community health nursing in Australia has a low professional profile when compared to other nursing specialties. An emerging issue, gleaned from the literature review is the tension and debate between specialist and generalist services. It is apparent from this review that CHN have to more actively participate in research and peer reviewed debate in order to have their voice heard and promote their unique and valuable contribution to the nursing profession and the health care system.

  3. Practice nurses' workload, career intentions and the impact of professional isolation: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Graham CM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice nurses have a key role within UK general practice, especially since the 2004 GMS contract. This study aimed to describe that role, identify how professionally supported they felt and their career intentions. An additional aim was to explore whether they felt isolated and identify contributory factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey in one large urban Scottish Health Board, targeted all practice nurses (n = 329. Domains included demographics, workload, training and professional support. Following univariate descriptive statistics, associations between categorical variables were tested using the chi-square test or chi-square test for trend; associations between dichotomous variables were tested using Fisher's Exact test. Variables significantly associated with isolation were entered into a binary logistic regression model using backwards elimination. Results There were 200 responses (61.0% response rate. Most respondents were aged 40 or over and were practice nurses for a median of 10 years. Commonest clinical activities were coronary heart disease management, cervical cytology, diabetes and the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although most had a Personal Development Plan and a recent appraisal, 103 (52.3% felt isolated at least sometimes; 30 (15.5% intended leaving practice nursing within 5 years. Isolated nurses worked in practices with smaller list sizes (p = 0.024 and nursing teams (p = 0.003; were less likely to have someone they could discuss a clinical/professional (p = 0.002 or personal (p Conclusions A significant proportion of practice nurses reported feeling isolated, at least some of the time. They were more likely to be in small practices and more likely to be considering leaving practice nursing. Factors contributing to their isolation were generally located within the practice environment. Providing support to these nurses within their practice setting may help

  4. Review: the legal duty of care for nurses and other health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2009-11-01

    To explore the nature and extent of the legal duty of care in relation to contemporary healthcare practice. The paper seeks to re-frame and update the legal duty of care for clinical nursing practice in the 21st century, taking into account collaborative and partnership working in healthcare practice. Doctrinal legal 'approach'. 'Black letter' legal research methodology used for data collection and analysis. Literature search using Westlaw and LexisNexis database(s) to identify recent common law decisions. There has been a perceptible doctrinal shift away from paternalism and toward patient empowerment and autonomy in the last decade. This has implications for nurses and other healthcare professionals in terms of consenting patients and acting reasonably to ensure quality patient care. A number of experienced nurses are currently assuming extended roles and some are completing medical tasks, traditionally allocated to doctors. These specialist practitioners must remember that additional responsibility invariably means increased professional risk and accountability. Therefore, it is essential that those engaging in advanced nursing practice, fully understand the nature and reach of their professional duty of care and the significance of statutory and common law developments. Nurses and other healthcare professionals must update their clinical skills and practice within a legal framework and to certain standards. The cases cited and discussed are relevant to all branches of nursing and indeed to all health professions.

  5. The importance of professional values from clinical nurses' perspective in hospitals of a medical university in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorchangizi, Batool; Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mirzaee, Moghaddameh; Borhani, Fariba

    2017-03-01

    Today, nurses are required to have knowledge and awareness concerning professional values as standards to provide safe and high-quality ethical care. Nurses' perspective on professional values affects decision-making and patient care. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the importance of professional values from clinical nurses' perspective. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 in four educational hospitals of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data were collected via the Persian version of Nursing Professional Values Scale-Revised (NPVS-R) by Weis and Schank. Sampling was conducted through the use of stratified random sampling method and 250 clinical nurses participated in the study. Results indicated that the total score of the nurses' professional values was high. (102.57 ± 11.94). From nurses' perspective items such as "Maintaining confidentiality of patients" and "Safeguarding patients' right to privacy" had more importance; however, "Recognizing role of professional nursing associations in shaping healthcare policy" and "Participating in nursing research and/or implementing research findings appropriate to practice had less importance. A statistically significant relationship was observed between NPVS-R mean scores and nurses' age, work experience as well as participation in professional ethical training (P values was high, the importance of certain values was at a lower level. Owing to the emerging ethical challenges, it is indispensable to design educational programs in order to improve nurses' awareness and understanding of the comprehensive importance of professional values. Furthermore, it is recommended that mixed methods studies should be conducted in order to design an instrument to evaluate the use of values in nursing practice.

  6. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. Developing nurse leaders: a program enhancing staff nurse leadership skills and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Pauline J

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether participation in the Nursing Leadership Perspectives Program (NLPP) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, produced a change in leadership skills, increased professional activities, leadership promotion, and retention rates of participants. The NLPP is an educational program designed to enhance leadership skills and promote professionalism of registered nurses. The 6-month program provides participants with theoretical knowledge, core competencies, and opportunities to practice application of leadership skills. Outcome metrics were collected from registered nurses who completed the program (n = 15). Data analysis included descriptive and nonparametric methods. Participants reported statistically significant changes in their leadership skills after participation in the program (P = .007) on the Leadership Practices Inventory. Changes in professional behavior were also statistically significant as rated by the Nursing Activity Scale (P = .001). Participants demonstrated a change in leadership skills and professional behavior following the program.

  8. Professional nursing practice: environment and emotional exhaustion among intensive care nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panunto, Marcia Raquel; Guirardello, Edinêis de Brito

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate the characteristics of the professional nursing practice environment and its relationship with burnout, perception of quality of care, job satisfaction and the intention to leave the job...

  9. Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séroussi, B; Soualmia, L F; Holmes, J H

    2016-11-10

    Official recognition and certification for informatics professionals are essential aspects of workforce development. To describe the history, pathways, and nuances of certification in nursing informatics across the globe; compare and contrast those with board certification in clinical informatics for physicians. (1) A review of the representative literature on informatics certification and related competencies for nurses and physicians, and relevant websites for nursing informatics associations and societies worldwide; (2) similarities and differences between certification processes for nurses and physicians, and (3) perspectives on roles for nursing informatics professionals in healthcare Results: The literature search for 'nursing informatics certification' yielded few results in PubMed; Google Scholar yielded a large number of citations that extended to magazines and other non-peer reviewed sources. Worldwide, there are several nursing informatics associations, societies, and workgroups dedicated to nursing informatics associated with medical/health informatics societies. A formal certification program for nursing informatics appears to be available only in the United States. This certification was established in 1992, in concert with the formation and definition of nursing informatics as a specialty practice of nursing by the American Nurses Association. Although informatics is inherently interprofessional, certification pathways for nurses and physicians have developed separately, following long-standing professional structures, training, and pathways aligned with clinical licensure and direct patient care. There is substantial similarity with regard to the skills and competencies required for nurses and physicians to obtain informatics certification in their respective fields. Nurses may apply for and complete a certification examination if they have experience in the field, regardless of formal training. Increasing numbers of informatics nurses are pursuing

  10. Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, M. R.; Gundlapalli, A. V.; Murray, P.; Park, H.-A.; Lehmann, C. U.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Official recognition and certification for informatics professionals are essential aspects of workforce development. Objective: To describe the history, pathways, and nuances of certification in nursing informatics across the globe; compare and contrast those with board certification in clinical informatics for physicians. Methods (1) A review of the representative literature on informatics certification and related competencies for nurses and physicians, and relevant websites for nursing informatics associations and societies worldwide; (2) similarities and differences between certification processes for nurses and physicians, and (3) perspectives on roles for nursing informatics professionals in healthcare Results The literature search for ‘nursing informatics certification’ yielded few results in PubMed; Google Scholar yielded a large number of citations that extended to magazines and other non-peer reviewed sources. Worldwide, there are several nursing informatics associations, societies, and workgroups dedicated to nursing informatics associated with medical/health informatics societies. A formal certification program for nursing informatics appears to be available only in the United States. This certification was established in 1992, in concert with the formation and definition of nursing informatics as a specialty practice of nursing by the American Nurses Association. Although informatics is inherently interprofessional, certification pathways for nurses and physicians have developed separately, following long-standing professional structures, training, and pathways aligned with clinical licensure and direct patient care. There is substantial similarity with regard to the skills and competencies required for nurses and physicians to obtain informatics certification in their respective fields. Nurses may apply for and complete a certification examination if they have experience in the field, regardless of formal training. Increasing

  11. Challenges for nursing education in Angola: the perception of nurse leaders affiliated with professional education institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria; Ventura, Carla A Arena; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mazzo, Alessandra; de Godoy, Simone; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2013-07-17

    Angola is one of the African countries with the highest morbidity and mortality rates and a devastating lack of human resources for health, including nursing. The World Health Organization stimulates and takes technical cooperation initiatives for human resource education and training in health and education, with a view to the development of countries in the region. The aim in this study was to identify how nurses affiliated with nursing education institutions perceive the challenges nursing education is facing in Angola. After consulting the National Directory of Human Resources in Angola, the nurse leaders affiliated with professional nursing education institutions in Angola were invited to participate in the study by email. Data were collected in February 2009 through the focus group technique. The group of participants was focused on the central question: what are the challenges faced for nursing education in your country? To register and understand the information, besides the use of a recorder, the reporters elaborated an interpretative report. Data were coded using content analysis. Fourteen nurses participated in the meeting, most of whom were affiliated with technical nursing education institutions. It was verified that the nurse leaders at technical and higher nursing education institutions in Angola face many challenges, mainly related to the lack of infrastructure, absence of trained human resources,bureaucratic problems to regularize the schools and lack of material resources. On the opposite, the solutions they present are predominantly centered on the valuation of nursing professionals, which implies cultural and attitude changes. Public health education policies need to be established in Angola, including action guidelines that permit effective nursing activities. Professional education institutions need further regularizations and nurses need to be acknowledged as key elements for the qualitative enhancement of health services in the country.

  12. Care of Victims of Child Maltreatment: The School Nurse's Role. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Feeser, Cindy Jo; King, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that prevention, early recognition, intervention and treatment of child maltreatment are critical to the physical well-being and academic success of students. Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in the recognition…

  13. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Laurie G.; Sharpe, Susan; Feeser, Cynthia Jo; Ondeck, Lynnette; Fekaris, Nina

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) serves a vital role in the delivery of health care to our nation's students within the healthcare system reshaped by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, commonly known as…

  14. Spirituality in self-care for intensive care nursing professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Dezorzi,Luciana Winterkorn; Crossetti,Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how spirituality permeates the process of caring for oneself and for others in the intensive care scenario from nursing professionals' point of view. This study used the qualitative approach of Cabral's Creative-Sensitive Method to guide information production and analysis in nine art and experience workshops. Nine nursing caregivers from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital participated in the study. This article presents one of the topics tha...

  15. Roles and functions of Enrolled Nurses in Australia: Perspectives of Enrolled Nurses and Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Ruth; O'Connor, Margaret; Williams, Allison; Wood, Pamela; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra; Moss, Cheryle; Della, Phillip; Cross, Wendy

    2017-08-03

    The aims of the study were: To determine, from the perspectives of Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs), the current scope of EN practice and To identify the activities that most ENs frequently performed in their workplace. Enrolled Nurse scope of practice in Australia has evolved and expanded over the past decade. However, the unclear role, function and competency differentiation between EN and RN leads to role confusion and ongoing professional debate. A cross-sectional online survey of ENs and RNs across Australia was conducted examining their levels of agreement on statements related to the scope of practice and the clinical and nonclinical activities that ENs were required to perform in their workplace. Valid responses were received from 892 ENs and 1198 RNs. ENs mostly agreed that they understood their scope of practice; did not undertake roles for which they were unprepared; sometimes undertook activities other than direct patient care and believed that they operated equally to many Registered Nurses (RNs). The majority of ENs reported that they performed tasks mostly related to basic patient care in their workplace. There were a number of significant differences between perspectives of RNs and ENs CONCLUSIONS: Clarifying the roles and scope of practice between the RN and the EN is important and explicit differences in responsibility and accountability between their roles must be clearly articulated in order to harmonise perceptions about role and capability. Health service providers, policy makers and education providers need to work collaboratively to ensure that facets of EN education and scope of practice in line with regulation are affirmed by all concerned. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex role charactersitics of males in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M

    1999-09-01

    Sex role stereotypes are widely held concepts that attribute unique sets of characteristics to each sex. The feminine sex role stereotype coupled with the nature of nursing work, renders the profession more appropriate for females. Due to the pressures imposed by hegemonic masculinities, it is perceived that male nurses, as a consequence of their biological sex, are unable to possess the feminine sex role. A survey design was used to ascertain differences in sex role identity between male and female nurses in a contemporary Australian work force. The short form of the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) was distributed to 98 nurses to determine their perceived sex role identity. There was no significant difference between male and female nurses in masculine and feminine scores, and sex type categories. The results of this preliminary investigation supports the view that a significant proportion of male nurses see themselves having the personal attributes synonymous with the feminine sex role.

  17. Perception of the nursing staff about the nurse’s role in the emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayckel da Silva Barreto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the perception of the nursing staff about the nurse's role in emergency service. Methods: descriptive study of a qualitative approach. 30 nursing professionals participated and were active in a unit of Emergency. The data were subjected to Content Analysis, thematic modality. Results: the interviewees highlighted as nurses functions, the development of management activities; the leadership and supervision of nursing staff; and the care provided to seriously ill patients. From the perspective of nursing technicians, management activities receive great attention from nurses, rather than direct patient care. However, for nurses, managerial functions and leadership and supervision of staff converge for quality care. Conclusion: the importance of care work of nurses in emergency situations is perceived both by nursing technicians and by nurses. However, perceptions of their role as a manager still show up conflicting.

  18. Occupational Violence and Aggression Experienced by Nursing and Caring Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Tracey; Sheehan, Cathy; Donohue, Ross; Cooper, Brian; De Cieri, Helen

    2017-03-01

    To examine the extent and source of occupational violence and aggression (OVA) experienced by nursing and caring professionals. This study also examines the relative contributions of demographic characteristics and workplace and individual safety factors in predicting OVA. A cross-sectional study design with data collected using an online survey of employees in the nursing and caring professions in Victoria, Australia. Survey data collected from 4,891 members of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian branch) were analyzed using logistic regression. Sixty-seven percent of respondents reported experiencing OVA in the preceding 12 months, with nearly 20% experiencing OVA on a weekly or daily basis. The dominant sources of OVA were patients (79%) or relatives of patients (48%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that respondents working in public hospitals and aged care facilities were more likely to experience OVA, compared to those working in other workplaces. While higher levels of safety compliance reduced the likelihood of experiencing OVA, role overload and workplace safety factors such as prioritization of employee safety and leading indicators of occupational health and safety were stronger predictors. The likelihood of healthcare workers experiencing OVA varies across demographic and workplace characteristics. While some demographic characteristics and individual safety factors were significant predictors, our results suggest that a greater reduction in OVA could be achieved by improving workplace safety. The study's outcomes identify workforce segments that are most vulnerable to OVA. The study also highlights workplace safety factors such as the prioritization of employee safety that might assist in the reduction of OVA. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Nursing the future: a re-examination of the professionalization thesis in the light of some recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, P A

    1995-03-01

    It is now 6 years since Salvage's (1988) analysis of the position of nursing within the professionalization process; this was written in the light of the aspirations of Project 2000. Recently there have been several significant policy statements from the United Kingdom Central Council which appear to be pursuing professional status despite Salvage's contention that nursing's leaders know 'that full professional status for nursing cannot be achieved'. Elements of these statements are discussed in relation to the professionalization thesis. Using the examples of nurse prescribing and managerialism, it is argued that the deprofessionalization thesis is more appropriate to nursing since the ideals of autonomy, authority and status are being eroded in the new managerialist post-Griffiths National Health Service culture. A positive deprofessionalization notion is put forward which highlights and re-emphasizes the caring role through the new occupational strategy of Assessment of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).

  20. ETHICAL ISSUE AND NURSING STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS IN NURSING EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Idongesit I. Akpabio

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper aimed at presenting in-depth information on strategies of implementing ethical decision making in nursing practice and education in the contemporary society. The complex issues in nursing education and practice have ethical implications for the attainment of professional standard. The ability of nurses to engage in ethical practice in everyday work and to deal with ethical situations, problems and concerns could be the result of decisions made at a variety of levels. So...

  1. The relationship between professional communication competences and nursing performance of critical care nurses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyo-Suk; Choi, JiYeon; Son, Youn-Jung

    2017-10-01

    Ineffective communication of critical care nurses can lead to higher levels of burnout and negatively affect quality of patient care and patient outcomes such as higher mortality. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship between professional communication competences and nursing performance of critical care nurses in South Korea. This cross-sectional study collected data on 197 intensive care unit staff nurses in 3 tertiary academic medical centres in South Korea from July to November 2014. In the hierarchical regression analysis, the professional communication competences were the only significant predictors of nursing performance after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. In addition, the greater professional communication competences of nurses were associated with being older and having a higher education level, more years of overall clinical and intensive care unit experience, and a higher monthly salary. Our findings indicate that communication skills-related training should be included in the practical education to improve nursing performance for the quality of intensive care. Further research is needed to identify the comprehensive factors on professional communication competences of nurses in intensive care units. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    OpenAIRE

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice?theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n?=?86) and...

  3. [The process of professional qualification for the critical care nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Neuranides; Fernandes, Josicélia Dumêt

    2008-01-01

    Study of qualitative approach based on the dialectic historical materialism, that aimed at analizing the conformation of professional credentialing process of the critical care nurse of a hospital in Salvador, BA, Brazil. The subjects were 29 nurses. The analysis was based on the Analysis of Content, with the technique of Thematic Analysis, directed by the dialectic method. Three categories correlated to credentialing were generated: technological sophistication; individual and the collective organizational and as product and instrument of the work process. The results demonstrated that the institution estimulates the credentialing process; however the administrative politicies make it difficult the effectuation of the process of credentialing of the nurses.

  4. The process of Danish nurses' professionalization and patterns of thought in the 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we address how the professionalization process is reflected in the way Danish nursing textbooks present 'nursing' to new members of the profession during the 20th century. The discussion is based on a discourse analysis of seven Danish textbooks on basic nursing published between 1904 and 1996. The analysis was inspired by the work of Michel Foucault, in particular the concepts of rupture and rules of formation. First, we explain how the dominating role of the human body in nursing textbooks disappears in the mid-20th century. This transformation can of course be attributed to changes in tasks and responsibilities for nurses or to the implementation of increasing amounts of knowledge and theories from other disciplines than medicine into the nurses' knowledge base. However, inspired by Foucault, we consider these historical changes to be the conditions of possibilities and not causes. The second part of the analysis shows that along with 'the disappearance of the body', a second discursive change appears: the role of doctors and medicine changes fundamentally from about mid-20th century. Finally, we argue that this discursive reorganization enabling new patterns of thought to emerge was driven by a professional interest in describing nursing as an independent profession. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Becoming a nurse - A study of career choice and professional adaptation among Israeli Jewish and Arab nursing students: A quantitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Ofra; Mashiach-Eizenberg, Michal

    2014-10-01

    The growing shortage of nurses is a global issue, with nursing recruitment and retention recognized as priorities worldwide. Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs share residency and citizenship. However, language, religion, values, customs, symbols and lifestyle differ between the groups. This research covers only Arab citizens of Israel and not those in the occupied territories, the West Bank and Gaza. The future of the profession lies in the ability to recruit and retain the next generation of nurses. To examine career choice and professional adaptation among Israeli Jews and Israeli Arab nursing students by addressing motivation, materialistic factors and professional adaptation. 395 students, which comprised the total number of students in the first five years of the nursing program's existence, in the nursing faculty at an academic college in Israel. A questionnaire was created and administered to the students in the first week of their first year in the nursing program. Altruistic motivation, such as the opportunity to help others, was the primary factor that influenced students to choose nursing as a profession followed by professional interest. Materialistic factors, such as social status and good salary, had less influence. A significant positive correlation was found between professional adaptation and all three dimensions of role perception - teamwork, professional knowledge, and treatment skills. The female students perceived those components as more important than the male students and the Jewish students perceived themselves as more suitable for nursing than the Arab students. Career choice and professional adaptation are influenced by multiple factors. Future recruitment and retention strategies used to address the critical nursing shortage should consider these factors, as well as the role of mentors, peers, and role models in the formulation of career expectations and career choice decisions. © 2013.

  6. The role of incentives in nurses' aspirations to management roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carol A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Cziraki, Karen

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe findings from a study examining nurses' perceptions of incentives for pursuing management roles. Upcoming retirements of nurse managers and a reported lack of interest in manager roles signal concerns about a leadership shortage. However, there is limited research on nurses' career aspirations and specifically the effect of perceived incentives for pursuing manager roles. Data from a national, cross-sectional survey of Canadian nurses were analyzed (n = 1241) using multiple regression to measure the effect of incentives on nurses' career aspirations. Twenty-four percent of nurses expressed interest in pursuing management roles. Age, education, and incentives explained 43% of the variance in career aspirations. Intrinsically oriented incentives such as new challenges, autonomy, and the opportunity to influence others were the strongest predictors of aspirations to management roles. Ensuring an adequate supply of nurse managers will require proactive investment in the identification, recruitment, and development of nurses with leadership potential.

  7. The use of electronic devices for communication with colleagues and other healthcare professionals - nursing professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Niemi, Anne; Hupli, Maija

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study is to describe nursing professionals' experiences of the use of electronic devices for communication with colleagues and other healthcare professionals. Information and communication technology applications in health care are rapidly expanding, thanks to the fast-growing penetration of the Internet and mobile technology. Communication between professionals in health care is essential for patient safety and quality of care. Implementing new methods for communication among healthcare professionals is important. A cross-sectional survey was used in the study. The data were collected in spring 2012 using an electronic questionnaire with structured and open-ended questions. The target group comprised the nursing professionals (N = 567, n = 123) in one healthcare district who worked in outpatient clinics in publically funded health care in Finland. Nursing professionals use different electronic devices for communication with each other. The most often used method was email, while the least used methods were question-answer programmes and synchronous communication channels on the Internet. Communication using electronic devices was used for practical nursing, improving personnel competences, organizing daily operations and administrative tasks. Electronic devices may speed up the management of patient data, improve staff cooperation and competence and make more effective use of working time. The obstacles were concern about information security, lack of technical skills, unworkable technology and decreasing social interaction. According to our findings, despite the obstacles related to use of information technology, the use of electronic devices to support communication among healthcare professionals appears to be useful. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Narrative medicine's role in graduate nursing curricula: finding and sharing wisdom through story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangino, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are affected on a personal and professional level by the stories they hear from patients throughout their careers. Nurse educators can help graduate-level nursing students understand how these stories impact their nursing lives by incorporating narrative medicine into graduate nursing curricula. Narrative medicine is "... recognizing, absorbing, interpreting, and being moved by the stories of illness" (Charon, 2006, p. 4). Methods to incorporate narrative medicine into graduate nursing curricula include in-depth text analysis and writing exercises, with opportunities for students to read their work aloud. Narrative medicine's role in nursing must be researched through qualitative and quantitative studies.

  9. Forensic Learning Disability Nursing Role Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom; Phipps, Dianne; Melling, Kat

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study carried out on the role constructs of forensic and nonforensic Learning Disability Nursing in relation to six binary themes. The aims were to identify if there were differences in perceptions of forensic learning disability nurses and nonforensic learning disability nurses in relation to the six binary themes of the…

  10. Nurse Policy Analyst. Advanced Practice Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Marie; Hanley, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    The delivery of nursing care is enmeshed in the health care policy decisions made at state and national levels. The authors recommend an advanced practice role for nurse policy analysts, examine political decision-making processes that would be included in the curriculum, and give illustrative positions that graduate nurse policy analysts might…

  11. Developing practical knowledge content of emergency nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-06-01

    There is a paucity of published research on clinical or practical nursing knowledge. The ways that nurses acquire, develop, and maintain emergency room (ER) nursing care skills is a research area, in particular, that deserves further investigation. This study examined clinical setting learning processes to better understand the practical knowledge content of ER nurses. This study used a phenomenological approach and in-depth interviews of 10 nurses. Each participant had at least 3 years of ER experience. Researchers used Moustakas' method to analyze interview data. Findings were checked for credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. The authors identified four major practical knowledge themes for ER professionals. These were (a) basic emergency treatment procedure routines and symptom management; (b) disease mechanisms, pharmacodynamics, and treatment responses; (c) newly identified diseases, updated emergency treatments and techniques, and medical treatment discussions; and (d) identifying nursing values including nursing attitudes and continuing patient care. Participants in this study had experience with the first three themes and successfully combined various types of nursing knowledge in their nursing care duties. Only few participants indicated experience with the fourth theme. Findings clarify that clinical or practical knowledge in ER nurses evolves first from declarative knowledge (e.g., basic emergency treatment routines and operating procedures) to procedural knowledge (e.g., instructions from supervisors, actual practice, and drills) to conditional knowledge (e.g., observation and treatment involving direct interactions with patients). Nurses should combine and apply the various knowledge types in their nursing practice to assess comprehensively each patient's condition and administer effective treatment and service.

  12. Partnering to Promote Evidence-Based Practice in a Community Hospital: Implications for Nursing Professional Development Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Martha E F; Collier, Andrea; Collins, Mara; Crowley, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional development specialists working in community hospitals face significant barriers to evidence-based practice that academic medical centers do not. This article describes 7 years of a multifaceted, service academic partnership in a large, urban, community hospital. The partnership has strengthened the nursing professional development role in promoting evidence-based practice across the scope of practice and serves as a model for others.

  13. Nurses' work role in the context of gender and Chinese culture: an online forum study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi

    2010-06-01

    Nurses in Taiwan are seen as "angels in white." This image conveys that nurses are caring, kind, patient, and full of love. Another popular image of nurses is that of a candle, which implies that nurses bring light to others by sacrificing their "self." These images also reflect accurately the traditional role of women in the Chinese patriarchal society. Hence, gender and culture effects on nurses' perceptions of their work role cannot be ignored. The purpose of this article was to explore nurses' perceptions of their work role on the basis of the perspectives of Chinese gender role and culture. This study was conducted using a Web-based online forum for 4 weeks. Twenty nurses completed discussions of questions in four topic areas. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. Three themes were identified: (a) gendered work, (b) low social status, and (c) tensions among nurses. Findings indicate that certain stereotypes regarding gender roles in Taiwanese society constrained the professional growth of nurses and nursing. The social status of nurses was found to be relatively low, and nurses were at a relatively high risk of developing powerless behaviors. Nursing leaders and administrators should understand the impact of gender and Chinese culture on nursing and pay attention to the situation of nurses to provide more gender-sensitive and positive work environments for nurses.

  14. Professional socialization of baccalaureate nursing students: can students in distance nursing programs become socialized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesler, M S; Hanner, M B; Melburg, V; McGowan, S

    2001-10-01

    Distance education programs may have difficulty socializing nursing students due to limited face-to-face student-faculty interaction. Socialized attitudes toward the nursing profession were assessed using two measures with three groups--senior BSN students enrolled at campus-based programs, senior BSN students enrolled in distance programs, and non-nursing students. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether nursing students enrolled in distance programs had professional socialization outcomes comparable to nursing students enrolled in campus-based programs, and to examine the psychometric properties of two popular measures of professional socialization. Results indicated that students in the distance programs had higher scores than the campus-based nursing students, who, in turn, had higher scores than non-nursing students. A statistical interaction of RN status by program type indicated that health care experience was a critical factor in the socialization process. Of the two socialization measures examined, one had acceptable psychometric properties. These data suggest that health care and preceptorship experiences are important determinants of professional socialization and that students who opt for distance nursing programs graduate with socialization outcomes that are at least comparable to those of students who attend traditional programs.

  15. Theory and practice in the construction of professional identity in nursing students: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreciado Marañón, Antonia; Isla Pera, Ma Pilar

    2015-07-01

    The problem of nurses' professional identity continues to be seen in the disjunction between theoretical training and clinical placements. Moreover, it is not known how nursing students perceive these contradictions or how this discrepancy influences the construction of professional identity. To gain insight into nursing students' perception of their theoretical and practical training and how this training influences the process of constructing their professional identity. Qualitative, ethnographic study. Third-year nursing students at the l'Escola Universitària d'Infermeria Vall d'Hebron de Barcelona. Participant observation was conducted in the hospital setting and primary care. Discussion groups were held. The constant comparative method was used for the analysis. The study adhered to the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. Students believed that both theoretical and practical trainings were indispensable. Nevertheless, clinical placements were considered essential to confer sense to the theory and to shape their identity, as they helped student nurses to experience their future professional reality and to compare it with what they had been taught in theoretical and academic classes. The role of the clinical placement mentor was essential. With regard to theory, the skills developed in problem-based learning gave novice nurses' confidence to approach the problems of daily practice and new situations. Equally, this approach taught them to reflect on what they did and what they were taught and this ability was transferred to the clinical setting. For students, both strategies (theory and practice) are vital to nursing education and the construction of a professional identity, although pride of place is given to clinical placements and mentors. The skills developed with problem-based learning favor active and reflective learning and are transferred to learning in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. A comparative study of professional competence of nurses who have completed different bridging programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZZ Nkosi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare professional competence of nurses who completed different bridging programmes. Forty professional nurses from two different bridging programmes participated in the study. The newly qualified registered nurses were all from the province of Kwazulu- Natal working in various hospitals.The researcher utilized Slater Nursing Competencies Rating Scale. The instrument had the following categories (a psychosocial (individual, psychosocial (group, (c physical needs, (d general, (e communication and (0 professional implications. The results showed that newly qualified nurses from different bridging programmes were professionally competent. Age, experience and examination results had no relationship with the professional competency of the newly qualified nurse.

  17. [The opportunities and challenges of nursing professional development: celebrating 100 years of nursing in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Shwu-Feng

    2011-06-01

    This article used both retrospective and prospective perspectives to rethink and reflect upon the opportunities and challenges of nursing professional development in Taiwan. The authors conducted a literature review on the 2011-2015 Strategic Directions for Strengthening Nursing and Midwifery Services (SDNM) initiated by the World Health Organization (WHO) and on analyses of nursing related polices and programs from done by Taiwan health administrative offices. It is important to record the contribution of nursing to Taiwan's healthcare delivery system. Such is especially in light of the Taiwan's centenary celebrations in 2011 and of the Department of Health's consolidation into the Ministry of Health and Welfare in 2012 due to central government reforms.

  18. A profile of professional nursing practice in the private sector in the R.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pera

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of professional nursing practice in private enterprise health care services in the Republic of South Africa. In the light of the future health care needs and the relationship between the private and public sector health care establishments, information about the role and task of the I professional nurse was needed. Information would provide a data base about the registered nurse and so facilitate future health care planning. An exploratory field study was undertaken to locate the various work environments of the registered nurse in four statistical urban regions. Questionnaires were handed out and collected from a proportional stratified sample of professional nurses who were working in thirteen types of health care environments in the period between I June 1983 and 30 September 1983. A return rate of 68 percent yielded 340 completed questionnaires from 501 registered nurses. The study revealed that the majority of nurses in the private sector were relatively young. White, female, English-speaking professionals who were practising in four broad areas of health care: • Custodial care environments such as residential homes for the aged, institutions for the chronic sick and frail aged, homes for children and homes for the adult handicapped. • Hospitals and related special health centres catering for drug addicts, alcoholics and patients suffering from psychiatric/nervous disorders. • Institutions for child and adult education which included crèches/nursery schools, primary and secondary hoarding schools, special schools for the handicapped, and university based student health centres. • Medical and dental consulting room practices. • Other entrepreneurial employment settings such as business and industrial occupational health care services, nursing service agencies, and mobile emergency care units.

  19. Professional nurses' views regarding stigma and discrimination in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to determine the views of professional nurses on the manifestations of HIV and AIDS stigma and discrimination and their influence on the quality of care rendered to people living with HIV and AIDS in three rural hospitals of Limpopo province, South Africa. The study was qualitative, exploratory, ...

  20. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, E.; Derksen, E.; Prevoo, M.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Bolhuis, S.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an

  1. Strategies Utilized by Professional Nurses in the Primary Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and education, health worker and adherence guidelines, use of adherence partner or treatment buddy, addressing religious beliefs, communication skills, community mobilization and continuous counselling were the strategies that were utilized by professional nurses in the primary health care facilities to ...

  2. Knowledge and skills of professional nurses regarding integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of service delivery for IMCI needs to be improved through further training of all the professional nurses. This will serve to improve their knowledge and skills in the management of childhood conditions. It is recommended that to meet the 4th Millennium Development Goal; more effort is required regarding quality ...

  3. Problems experienced by professional nurses providing care for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the problems experienced by professional nurses providing health care to patients living with HIV and AIDS in the public hospitals of Polokwane municipality, Limpopo province. A qualitative descriptive, contextual and phenomenology design was used to described the problems ...

  4. Role-playing in nursing theory: engaging online students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Cheryle; Adelman, Deborah S

    2010-04-01

    The teaching and learning of nursing theory, at all program levels, is challenging due to the complexity and abstract nature of its content, the dry nature in which the study of theory often is approached, a perception of disconnect from practice, and faculty discomfort and avoidance of the subject matter. Adapting creative educational strategies to the online environment is an ongoing challenge for educators. Role-play relates well to the constructivist basis of creating personal meaning based on the individual's experiences. This article examines the use of role-play as an educational strategy for teaching nursing theory in an online baccalaureate program. In a core professional issues course, students adopt the persona of a specific nursing theorist, interacting with other "nursing theorists" played by their peers. Student engagement and active learning reflect excitement and interest, and course evaluations have been extremely positive for this content and method.

  5. Context and the leadership experiences and perceptions of professionals: a review of the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Therese; Klass, Des; Lord, Linley; Nowak, Margaret; Thomas, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Leadership studies which focus on categorising leadership styles have been critiqued for failure to consider the lived experience of leadership. The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of Jepson's model of contextual dynamics to explore whether this framework assists understanding of the "how and why" of lived leadership experience within the nursing profession. Themes for a purposeful literature search and review, having regard to the Jepson model, are drawn from the contemporary and dynamic context of nursing. Government reports, coupled with preliminary interviews with a nurseleadership team, guided selection of contextual issues. The contextual interactions arising from managerialism, existing hierarchical models of leadership and increasing knowledge work provided insights into leadership experience in nursing, in the contexts of professional identity and changing educational and generational profiles of nurses. The authors conclude that employing a contextual frame provides insights in studying leadership experience. The author propose additions to the cultural and institutional dimensions of Jepson's model. The findings have implications for structuring and communicating key roles and policies relevant to nursing leadership. These include the need to: address perceptions around the legitimacy of current nursing leaders to provide clinical leadership; modify hierarchical models of nursing leadership; address implications of the role of the knowledge workers. Observing nursing leadership through the lens of Jepson's model of contextual dynamics confirms that this is an important way of exploring how leadership is enacted. The authors found, however, the model also provided a useful frame for considering the experience and understanding of leadership by those to be led.

  6. Impact of nurses' uniforms on patient and family perceptions of nurse professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Wocial, Lucia; Meyer, Kathryn H; Na, Jie; Trochelman, Kathleen

    2008-11-01

    Patients and visitors may perceive nurses as professional based on uniform color and style. Nurse image may affect patient and visitor trust and satisfaction with nursing care. Fitted white dresses have been replaced by loose-fitting or scrub white, colored, or patterned pant sets. This study examines nurse professionalism by assessing the nurse image traits of eight pant uniforms as perceived by pediatric patients, adult patients, and adult visitors. We also examined if uniform preference is congruent with nurse image traits. A convenience sample of 499 patients and visitors were surveyed at a large Midwestern tertiary health care center. Subjects viewed photographs of the same registered nurse identically posed in eight uniforms and rated each by image traits. Kruskal-Wallis, Steel-Dwass multiple comparison method, and Wilcoxon signed-rank sum tests were used to test for differences in the Nurse Image Scale (NIS) score by uniform style and color and subject demographics. Subjects were 390 adult patients and visitors (78%) and 109 pediatric patients (21.4%); 66% were female, and 78% were Caucasian. In adults, NIS scores for white uniforms (two styles) were higher than NIS scores for uniforms with small print, bold print, or solid color (all p satisfaction with nursing care.

  7. Concussions--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Anne L.; Wyckoff, Leah J.

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention…

  8. Virtual Nursing Avatars: Nurse Roles and Evolving Concepts of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Miriam Bowers; Shaw, Peggy

    2016-08-15

    Advances in computer software have provided interactive tools that perform many of the duties once in the domain of the nursing profession. Sometimes referred to as 'virtual nursing avatars,' the duties delegated to this technology include facilitating check-ins for patients and coaching patients as they make lifestyle changes. Researchers continue to develop computer applications for virtual nurse avatars. As computers and smartphones take on tasks once in the domain of humans, the roles of nurses will evolve. The arc of this evolution will be determined by the limits of technology, evolving concepts of care, and changing population needs. In this article, the authors share examples of nursing avatar applications, discuss concerns about virtual nurse avatars, reinforce nursing as a caring profession, present avatars as caring agents, and consider the future of nursing avatars. They conclude that, although virtual nurse avatars can perform some nursing tasks in an acceptable manner, they are limited in their ability to make complex judgments and engage in collaboration.

  9. Doctor of Nursing Practice: The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Deborah Kirk; Polancich, Shea

    2015-11-01

    To explore the evolution and emerging roles of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). Published peer reviewed literature, cancer-related professional resources, and Web-based resources. The DNP education has prepared the APN for process improvement initiatives, providing quality care, and evidence-based practice translation, which are critical with the emerging trends in this complex health care environment. DNP-prepared APNs have the opportunity to impact oncology care across the cancer trajectory, in various settings, and in various innovative roles as entrepreneurs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. What is the impact of professional nursing on patients' outcomes globally? An overview of research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, Samantha; Watkins, Mary; Norman, Ian J

    2017-10-19

    provided by nurses and doctors; and task shifting to invasive procedures. There is evidence that adequate numbers of well-educated nurses working in acute care areas can reduce the risk of patient mortality, although the evidence for this is confined to studies in high income countries and the evidence is not sufficiently robust to draw up definitive nurse: patient ratios. There is also moderate evidence that well trained nurses can produce health outcomes that are equivalent to those of doctors for patients with a range of chronic health problems, particularly for those patients managed in primary care, and that nurse-led care may be more effective than medical care in promoting patient adherence to treatment and patient satisfaction. There is low to moderate evidence for the benefits of parenting support programmes delivered by nurses on a range of health outcomes; and for the impact of home visiting on improving function and other health service outcomes for older people. The wider societal benefits of home visiting by nurses and the impact of this on long term outcomes and related cost-effectiveness of home visiting has not been established. There is limited available information regarding the wider global impact of increasing the numbers of nurses and their contribution to healthcare through improved education. Moreover there is very little evidence for the cost-effectiveness of changing care providers from doctors to nurses and as the majority of cost data available has tended to come from studies based in higher income countries, their external validity in terms of applicability to settings in low and middle income countries is questionable. In addition to effectiveness, cost and safety, future research needs to address how implementing expanded nursing roles and task shifting impacts on the morale, retention, and professional development of nurses and the other workforces, and the longer term implications of these developments both locally and internationally

  11. Social Media Training for Professional Identity Development in Undergraduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Nichols, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The growth of social media use has led to tension affecting the perception of professionalism of nurses in healthcare environments. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore first and final year undergraduate student use of social media to understand how it was utilised by them during their course. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken to compare differences between first and final year student use. No difference indicated there was a lack of development in the use of social media, particularly concerning in relation to expanding their professional networks. There is a need for the curriculum to include opportunities to teach student nurses methods to ensure the appropriate and safe use of social media. Overt teaching and modelling of desired behaviour to guide and support the use of social media to positively promote professional identity formation, which is essential for work-readiness at graduation, is necessary.

  12. Professional Presentation Skills Development in a Graduate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Debra L; Jones, Deborah J

    2015-12-01

    Expert communication skills are essential for nurse leaders to effectively influence health care. Because effective communication is a learned process, the curriculum should promote the development of presentation skills. An educational strategy was designed to promote the development of effective presentation skills for learners in the Nursing Leadership and Administration (NLA) track of the master's in nursing curriculum. Sixteen learners in the NLA cohort were participants in a three-session presentation skills workshop. Following a baseline presentation, participants were taught presentation strategies and skills. Expert evaluators and learner self-assessments rated their presentation skills. Analysis of evaluators' ratings showed statistically significant (p effectiveness. Analysis of learner self-ratings showed a statistically significant (p = .008) increase in perceived effectiveness of overall presentation skills. This unique educational intervention improved nurse leaders' presentation skills. Faculty found that the professional presentation skill workshop was important to learners' success. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  14. Role clarity and role conflict among Swedish diabetes specialist nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Eva; Hörnsten, Asa; Lundman, Berit; Stenlund, Hans; Isaksson, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    To explore diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs)' perceptions of their role in terms of clarity, conflict and other psychosocial work aspects. A cross-sectional study was conducted among DSNs in a county in northern Sweden. The DSNs answered the Nordic Questionnaire of Psychological and Social Factors at Work (QPS Nordic) about psychosocial aspects of their work. Statistical analysis compared DSNs with a reference group of different health professionals. Correlations between role clarity, role conflict, and other variables were analysed. The DSNs perceived more, and higher, job demands, including quantitative, decision-making and learning demands, but also more positive challenges at work compared with the reference group. Role clarity correlated with experiences of health promotion, perception of mastery, co-worker support, and empowering leadership, while role conflict correlated with quantitative and learning demands. The DSNs perceived high demands but also positive challenges in their work. Their role expectations correlated with several psychosocial work aspects. It is important that DSNs should be presented with positive challenges as meaningful incentives for further role development and enhanced mastery of their work. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Smallpox Threat: The School Nurse's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary E.; Didion, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Today, with the threat of bioterrorism and war, there is a new dimension to the traditional role of the school nurse. The smallpox threat to public health will invoke the school nurse's role as an educator, liaison, and consultant in the community. This article discusses smallpox, the vaccination process, adverse effects, and postvaccination care.…

  16. Communities of practice and the construction of the professional identities of nurse educators: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Andrew; Cashin, Andrew; Stockhausen, Lynette

    2016-02-01

    To comprehensively review the Community of Practice literature from nursing contexts to explore whether and how these communities contribute to the social construction of nurse educator professional identity. Due to the wide scope of predominately qualitative literature on the topic, papers were analysed and themed inductively. CINAHL, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, EBSCO databases, Emerald, Proquest & Google Scholar. These online databases were searched for relevant peer-reviewed journal papers in the English language with no date range specified. The search terms 'nurs* educator' and 'nurs* teacher' were combined with each of the terms 'communit* of practice', 'identity' and 'role' resulting in 293 peer-reviewed journal papers. Where abstracts were missing, introductory and background sections were skimmed for related content. Papers that made incidental reference to either professional identity or a Community of Practice were excluded. In total, 63 primary study or discussion papers were found to have a focus on nurse educator identity and/or communities of practice in healthcare contexts. Papers specifically focused on communities of practice in nursing (n=33) could only be found from the last 10 years (2005-2015). Only five of these focused on nurse educators. Community of Practice theory and the professional teaching literature offers collaborative and active ways for nurse educators to further develop their professional identities. Despite the emergence of communities of practice in the nursing literature, further studies are required to explore how such a construct can facilitate the social construction of nurse educator professional identity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Managing professionals: The emerging leadership role of Victorian Maternal and Child Health coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiger, Kerreen; Keleher, Helen

    2004-04-01

    Drawing on research into cultural and organizational change in the Victorian Maternal and Child Health Service during the 1990s, this paper examines implications for the nursing leadership provided by service coordinators. The project included a quantitative survey of nurses and semistructured interviews with managers and coordinators. Under a strongly neo-liberal state government in Victoria, Australia, services were fundamentally restructured through tendering processes. A competitive, productivist culture was introduced that challenged the professional ethos of nurses and a primary health orientation to the care of mothers and infants. This paper focuses on the pressures that the entrepreneurial environment presented to maternal and child health nurses' identity and collegial relations and to the coordination role. It argues that coordinators emerged as a significant nursing management group at the interface of administrative change and the management of professional practice. Although many nurses skillfully negotiated tensions with peers and management, their leadership role needs further clarification and support.

  18. Nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia in conflict with professional ethical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkamo-Moisio, Anja; Kvist, Tarja; Kangasniemi, Mari; Laitila, Teuvo; Ryynänen, Olli-Pekka; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2017-02-01

    Despite the significant role of nurses in end-of-life care, their attitudes towards euthanasia are under-represented both in the current literature and the controversial debate that is ongoing in several countries. What are the attitudes towards euthanasia among Finnish nurses? Which characteristics are associated with those attitudes? Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants and research context: A total of 1003 nurses recruited via the members' bulletin of the Finnish Nurses Association and social media. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Committee on Research Ethics of the university to which the authors were affiliated. The majority (74.3%) of the participants would accept euthanasia as part of Finnish healthcare, and 61.8% considered that Finland would benefit from a law permitting euthanasia. Most of the nurses (89.9%) thought that a person must have the right to decide on his or her own death; 77.4% of them considered it likely that they would themselves make a request for euthanasia in certain situations. The value of self-determination and the ability to choose the moment and manner of one's death are emphasized in the nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia. A continuous dialogue about euthanasia and nurses' shared values is crucial due to the conflict between nurses' attitudes and current ethical guidelines on nursing.

  19. Changing values for nursing and health promotion: exploring the policy context of professional ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, J; Cribb, A

    1999-09-01

    In this article we illustrate, and argue for, the importance of researching the social context of health professionals' ethical agendas and concerns. We draw upon qualitative interview data from 20 nurses working in two occupational health sites, and our discussion focuses mainly upon aspects of the shifting 'ethical context' for those nurses with a health promotion remit who are working in the British National Health Service. Within this discussion we also raise a number of potentially substantive issues, including the risks of colluding in 'double standards', and the tensions between the practitioner and managerial roles in nursing. Overall, we hope to pose questions about the best ways to understand the ethical agency and responsibilities of health professionals.

  20. Professional caregivers' work with the dying in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Tind; Glasdam, Stinne

    2013-01-01

    International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade. A disco......International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade....... A discourse analysis inspired by Foucault was constructed. The material consists of different source documents: research articles, newspaper articles, theses, books, websites – 35 sources in total. There are constructed six positions of speech, five discourses and three themes: (1) ‘the work...... of the professional caregivers – a complex low-status work’; (2) ‘the education of the professionals – the way to ensure a good death or possessing the right qualifications’ and (3) ‘the vulnerable professionals’. The study concludes that an economical/political discourse is dominating and sets up the frames within...

  1. Dental students interacting with dental nurses: an investigation of the role of gender and ethnicity in inter-professional communication and working styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, R; McWilliams, C; Gorter, R; Williams, S

    2007-01-27

    To examine the influence of dental students' gender and ethnicity on their perceptions of dental nurses' duties and upon their communication and working styles when interacting with dental nurses (DNs). A survey of clinical dental students attending Queen's University Belfast and University of Leeds. Students were invited to complete the 34 item Communication and Working Styles Questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed the students' perceptions of the duties of a DN and the students' communication and working styles. Factor analysis revealed two communication and working styles which were friendly and difficult styles, respectively. Two hundred and forty-eight students participated giving a response rate of 88%: 58% were female and 30% of students from Leeds were from various ethnic minority groups. The students' perceptions as to the duties of a DN were affected by university attended and ethnicity. The majority of students used friendly communication styles. The type of style used was determined by university attended, gender and ethnicity. Male students had higher mean scores for friendly working styles whereas students from minority ethnic groups had higher mean scores for gender-related communication style. Female students and students from minority ethnic groups had higher mean scores for items relating to teamwork. This survey illustrates the different communication and working styles used by male and female and dental students from different ethnic backgrounds when interacting and working with DNs.

  2. Leading nurses in dire straits: head nurses' navigation between nursing and leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Erik E; Delmar, Charlotte; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports selected findings from a doctoral study exploring the negotiation between nursing and leadership in hospital head nurses' leadership practice. The importance of bringing a nursing background into leadership is currently under debate. In spite of several studies of nursing and clinical leadership, it is still unclear how nurses' navigate between nursing and leadership roles. An 11-month-long ethnographic study of 12 head nurses' work: five worked at a first line level and seven at a department level. At the first line level, leadership practices were characterized by an inherent conflict between closeness and distance to clinical practice; at the department level practises were characterized by 'recognition games'. On both levels, three interactive roles were identified, that of clinician, manager and a hybrid role. Where clinician or manager roles were assumed, negotiation between roles was absent, leading to reactive, adaptive and isolated practices. The hybrid role was associated with dialectical negotiation of roles leading to stable and proactive practices. Nursing leadership practises depend on leaders' negotiation of the conflicting identities of nurse and leader. Successful nursing leaders navigate between nursing and leadership roles while nourishing a double identity. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A qualitative study of advanced nurse practitioners' use of physical assessment skills in the community: shifting skills across professional boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, Mary; Allan, Helen

    2017-07-01

    To explore multiple perspectives on the use of physical assessment skills by advanced nurse practitioners in the UK. Physical assessment skills practices are embedded in advanced nursing practice roles in the UK. There is little evidence on how these skills are used by advanced nurse practitioners in the community. Case study. A qualitative interpretative single-embedded case study of 22 participants from South of England. A framework method analysed interview data collected by the researcher between March-August 2013. Participants included nurses, doctors, nurse educators and managers. Physical assessment skills education at universities is part of a policy shift to develop a flexible workforce in the UK. Shared physical assessment practices are less to do with role substitution and more about preparing practitioners with skills that are fit for purpose. Competence, capability and performance with physical assessment skills are an expectation of advanced nursing practice. These skills are used successfully by community advanced nurse practitioners to deliver a wide range of services in response to changing patient need. The introduction of physical assessment skills education to undergraduate professional preparation would create a firm foundation to develop these skills in postgraduate education. Physical assessment education prepares nurses with the clinical competencies to carry out healthcare reforms in the UK. Shared sets of clinical assessment competencies between disciplines have better outcomes for patients. Levels of assessment competence can depend on the professional attributes of individual practitioners. Unsupportive learning cultures can hinder professional development of advanced nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nurses', midwives' and key stakeholders' experiences and perceptions on requirements to demonstrate the maintenance of professional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Mary; Cooney, Adeline; O' Connell, Rhona; Hegarty, Josephine-Mary; Brady, Anne-Marie; O' Reilly, Pauline; Kennedy, Catriona; Heffernan, Elizabeth; Fealy, Gerard; McNamara, Martin; O' Connor, Laserina

    2017-03-01

    To present the qualitative findings from a study on the development of scheme(s) to give evidence of maintenance of professional competence for nurses and midwives. Key issues in maintenance of professional competence include notions of self- assessment, verification of engagement and practice hours, provision of an evidential record, the role of the employer and articulation of possible consequences for non-adherence with the requirements. Schemes to demonstrate the maintenance of professional competence have application to nurses, midwives and regulatory bodies and healthcare employers worldwide. A mixed methods approach was used. This included an online survey of nurses and midwives and focus groups with nurses and midwives and other key stakeholders. The qualitative data are reported in this study. Focus groups were conducted among a purposive sample of nurses, midwives and key stakeholders from January-May 2015. A total of 13 focus groups with 91 participants contributed to the study. Four major themes were identified: Definitions and Characteristics of Competence; Continuing Professional Development and Demonstrating Competence; Assessment of Competence; The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland and employers as regulators and enablers of maintaining professional competence. Competence incorporates knowledge, skills, attitudes, professionalism, application of evidence and translating learning into practice. It is specific to the nurse's/midwife's role, organizational needs, patient's needs and the individual nurse's/midwife's learning needs. Competencies develop over time and change as nurses and midwives work in different practice areas. Thus, role-specific competence is linked to recent engagement in practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Innovative teaching methods in the professional training of nurses – simulation education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Miertová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article is aimed to highlight usage of innovative teaching methods within simulation education in the professional training of nurses abroad and to present our experience based on passing intensive study programme at School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Salford (United Kingdom, UK within Intensive EU Lifelong Learning Programme (LPP Erasmus EU RADAR 2013. Methods: Implementation of simulation methods such as role-play, case studies, simulation scenarios, practical workshops and clinical skills workstation within structured ABCDE approach (AIM© Assessment and Management Tool was aimed to promote the development of theoretical knowledge and skills to recognize and manage acutely deteriorated patients. Structured SBAR approach (Acute SBAR Communication Tool was used for the training of communication and information sharing among the members of multidisciplinary health care team. OSCE approach (Objective Structured Clinical Examination was used for student’s individual formative assessment. Results: Simulation education is proved to have lots of benefits in the professional training of nurses. It is held in safe, controlled and realistic conditions (in simulation laboratories reflecting real hospital and community care environment with no risk of harming real patients accompanied by debriefing, discussion and analysis of all activities students have performed within simulated scenario. Such learning environment is supportive, challenging, constructive, motivated, engaging, skilled, flexible, inspiring and respectful. Thus the simulation education is effective, interactive, interesting, efficient and modern way of nursing education. Conclusion: Critical thinking and clinical competences of nurses are crucial for early recognition and appropriate response to acute deterioration of patient’s condition. These competences are important to ensure the provision of high quality nursing care. Methods of

  6. Nursing professionals' anxiety and feelings in terminal situations in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Faria,Daniella Antunes Pousa; Maia,Eulália Maria Chaves

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate, through a cross-sectional study, factors that influence anxiety levels and feelings of a nursing team who care for terminal patients with cancer. The sample consisted of 50 Nursing Assistants and Technicians from the Hospital reference on cancer care in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Data were collected through the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results showed that 69.8% of the professionals have medium anxiety levels and 30.2% have high levels of anxiety. The N...

  7. Japanese professional nurses spend unnecessarily long time doing nursing assistants' tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    In environments in which professional nurses do simple tasks, e.g., laundry, cleaning, and waste disposal, they cannot concentrate on technical jobs by utilizing their expertise to its fullest benefit. Particularly, in Japan, the nursing shortage is a serious problem. If professional nurses take their time to do any of these simple tasks, the tasks should be preferentially allocated to nursing assistants. Because there has been no descriptive study to investigate the amount of time Japanese professional nurses spent doing such simple tasks during their working time, their actual conditions remain unclear. Professional nurses recorded their total working time and the time they spent doing such simple tasks during the week of the survey period. The time an individual respondent spent doing one or more simple tasks during that week was summed up, as was their working time. Subsequently, the percentage of the summed time he or she spent doing any of those tasks in his or her summed working time was calculated. A total of 1,086 respondents in 19 hospitals that had 87 to 376 beds were analyzed (response rate: 53.3%). The average time (SD) that respondents spent doing those simple tasks and their total working time were 2.24 (3.35) hours and 37.48 (10.88) hours, respectively. The average percentage (SD) of the time they spent doing the simple tasks in their working time was 6.00% (8.39). Hospital administrators must decrease this percentage. Proper working environments in which professional nurses can concentrate more on their technical jobs must be created.

  8. Professional nursing practice: environment and emotional exhaustion among intensive care nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Panunto M.R.; Guirardello E de B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the characteristics of the professional nursing practice environment and its relationship with burnout, perception of quality of care, job satisfaction and the intention to leave the job in the next 12 months. METHOD: cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach to data. The sample was composed of 129 nurses working in adult Intensive Care Units from a region in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. RESULTS: Th...

  9. Opportunities, hurdles, solutions, and approaches to transition military veterans into professional nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia E; Armstrong, Myrna L; Saladiner, Jason E; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Conard, Patricia L

    2014-01-01

    Capitalizing on the almost 2.2 million service members returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn (OIF) in Iraq, and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan, baccalaureate educators are encouraged to create realistic, applicable nursing transitional programs for the health and health-related oriented military veterans. Opportunities, hurdles, and solutions related to the veteran's unique socio-economic circumstances of education, finances, and advisement are provided so the potential veteran student is successful within the university's milieu. Transitional nursing educational interventions related to assessment, didactic, and clinical used by two baccalaureate nursing curriculums, including the eLineMilitary* (ELM) Program, provide approaches of how to propel the veteran's journey toward graduation in a professional nursing program. These interventions include modular didactic, competency based education, as well as the concentrated, collegial time within the Faculty/Clinical Coach triad for essential role modeling, care, and skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A qualitative analysis of stress, uplifts and coping in the personal and professional lives of Singaporean nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joanne; Hepworth, Julie; Bogossian, Fiona

    2011-05-01

    This paper is a report of a descriptive study of nurses' experiences of daily stress and coping. Much of the research on stress in nursing is quantitative and has focused on only work stressors. Moreover, few studies have examined the uplifting side of living and the role it may play in moderating stress. A theoretical framework on stress and coping, 'hassles' and 'uplifts' was used to examine nurses' experiences across their personal and professional lives from a qualitative perspective. A purposive sample of Singaporean hospital nurses (n = 23) identified using a snowball sampling technique, participated in two sets of email interviews in 2009. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were identified as constituting daily hassles: (i) time pressures, (ii) nature of nursing work and (iii) multiple roles. Uplifts were expressed in relation to one main theme of feeling good extending across nurses' personal and professional lives. Three themes were identified as ways of coping: (i) taking time out, (ii) seeking emotional support and (iii) belief systems. The interaction between personal and professional life plays a major role in Singaporean nurses' experiences of stress and coping. However, stress may be ameliorated through effective management and strong familial support. Nurses and employers are recommended to use uplifts and identify ways of coping to minimize attrition and contribute to the development of a healthy workforce. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Regulation in health care: the role of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Cechinel Peiter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the activities developed by nurses in the context of regulation in health care. Methods: this is a qualitative study with techniques of focal group (with eight subjects, participant observation and documentary analysis. Results: the subcategories Nurse’s role in the Regulation sector and Interface of the activities of the nurse working in the Regulation sector with the other professionals revealed the presence of nurses in leadership positions and their articulation with management and managers. Competencies such as communication, leadership, decision-making, planning, personnel management and teamwork were highlighted, and permanent education was perceived as a strategy for process improvement and team qualification. Conclusion: the participating nurses understand the activities they develop in the context of regulation in health care aimed at communication, leadership, decision-making, planning, personnel management and teamwork, which are instruments for autonomous action in the managerial context.

  12. The lived experience of nurse practitioners practicing within the Transformational Advanced Professional Practice Model: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Elizabeth C; Walden, Marlene; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Fredland, Nina

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experiences of nurse practitioners (NPs) practicing within the Transformational Advanced Professional Practice (TAPP) Model, a professional practice model (PPM). A descriptive phenomenological analysis using semistructured interviews of 11 NPs across multiple inpatient and outpatient clinical areas at Texas Children's Hospital. Member checking and theming data occurred using Colaizzi's Method concurrently with Mind Mapping technique. Main themes included: (a) transforming professional practice, (b) cultivating the inner self, and (c) mentoring professional transitions. The findings of this study provide qualitative evidence that the TAPP Model influences role transition and professional development. Transforming NP practice within organizations and within the nursing profession itself will take mindfulness with an intentional approach to design PPMs specifically for NPs. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Development and validation of a new tool measuring nurses self-reported professional competence--the nurse professional competence (NPC) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jan; Johansson, Eva; Egmar, Ann-Charlotte; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Marianne; Gardulf, Ann

    2014-04-01

    To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formal competence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHO guidelines. A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometric properties. 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges. The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88 items and covering eight factors: "Nursing care", "Value-based nursing care", "Medical/technical care", "Teaching/learning and support", "Documentation and information technology", "Legislation in nursing and safety planning", "Leadership in and development of nursing care" and "Education and supervision of staff/students". All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted in two main themes: "Patient-related nursing" and "Nursing care organisation and development". In addition, evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained. The NPC Scale, which is based on national and international professional competence requirements for nurses, was comprehensively tested and showed satisfactory psychometrical properties. It can e.g. be used to evaluate the outcomes of nursing education programmes, to assess nurses' professional competences in relation to the needs in healthcare organisations, and to tailor introduction programmes for newly employed nurses. © 2013.

  14. THE PRACTICE OF SELF-CARE BY TEACHING PROFESSIONAL NURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Cristina Bicudo de Souza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-care is a process cognitive, affective and behavioral in which the individual takes responsibility for his own life, conquering integrity in relationships with themselves and the world in which it is inserted. The nurse is teaching who prepares specifically the nurse who, among other duties, is responsible for the care in health care. However it is important to safeguard your health, take care of yourself and then you can take care of the next expressively. Objective: To identify how teachers professional nursing care for their health. Method: This was a qualitative-descriptive research technique used as the focus group was held in an undergraduate degree in nursing from an institution of Vale do Paraíba Paulista, with nurses teachers who teach in vocational education. Data collection was conducted between July and August 2011. Results: Application of focus group technique enabled the development of a process in which the understanding of participants' experiences, their own point of view and feelings of each, thinking collectively about a topic of daily facilitated group discussion and observation controversies. And yet, the development of central ideas found in the reports and direct observation involved. Final considerations: The reports and observations with the group led to perceive the involvement of teachers nurses regarding care of their families. Self-care corresponds to the physical and spiritual.

  15. The role performance of public health nurses as clinical instructors in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotera, S; Matsuda, N

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the factors associated with the role performance of public health nurses as clinical instructors in Japan. Newly graduated public health nurses in Japan have competencies that are below the minimum requirements of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare because of their limited clinical experience in undergraduate clinical education. Public health nurses play crucial roles in the clinical practicum and their role performance as clinical instructors is a key to successful learning outcomes. This study targeted public health nurses in governmental public health centres and those who had gained experience as an undergraduate clinical instructor for nursing students. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a national sample of 1467 public health nurses. Data were collected from July 2011 to September 2011. In total, 722 of 1467 questionnaires were completed (nurse age 22-64 years). Of the participants, almost half (49%) strongly disagreed (3%) or disagreed (46%) that they had confidence in their role as a clinical instructor, and preparation programmes for clinical instructors had been attended by just 262 (36.3%). Years of experience as public health nurses, previous attendance of preparation programmes, viewing their role positively, professional identity and professional competency were significantly associated with performance. Logistic regression analysis revealed that nurses with higher role performance scores had higher self-confidence, greater interests in their role and higher professional identity. The self-confidence and interests of public health nurses in their role as clinical instructors as well as their professional identity were found to be significant predictors of their role performance as clinical instructors. The factors identified in our investigation can be used to predict effective clinical instructors and to develop preparation programmes to enhance their confidence and interests and potentially increase their

  16. The relationship of education to critical thinking ability and values among nurses: socialization into professional nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarmann, L; Freitas, L; Rapps, J; Riegel, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to faculty is assumed to positively influence critical thinking ability and professional values; therefore, faculty must be assumed to be superior in these characteristics. As a first step toward testing these assumptions, this study used a cross-sectional survey technique to compare critical thinking ability and values in ADN-prepared (n = 32) and BSN-prepared (n = 32) registered nurses, nursing faculty (n = 32), and sophomore college students (n = 32) beginning a baccalaureate degree program in nursing. The critical thinking ability of faculty was not significantly higher than that of sophomore nursing students when the influence of age was controlled statistically. The values of all three groups of nurses were strikingly similar, although faculty valued achievement most highly (P = .0001), while sophomore students valued goal orientation most highly (P = .001). All subjects valued support highly, but only sophomore students valued benevolence highly.

  17. Use of Simulated Psychosocial Role-Playing to Enhance Nursing Students' Development of Soft Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrecht, Christina; Montenery, Susan

    2016-08-01

    Effective communication and interaction enable nurses to develop caring, empathetic, and respectful relationships with patients and families. However, most nurses feel a lack of preparation in the "soft" skills of communication, professionalism, and leadership. Nurse managers are seeking graduates with strong emotional quotient characteristics such as self-awareness, motivation, self-regulation, empathy, and social skills. Assisting nursing students to develop these intangible, high-level skills presents an ongoing challenge to nurse educators. This creative teaching learning strategy examines the use of psychosocial role-playing skits to enhance nursing student development of the soft skills of nursing. In this strategy, senior level nursing students work in small groups to develop and present realistic 3- to 5-minute skits based on common nurse-patient, nurse-family, or nurse-health care team interactions that incorporate the concepts of therapeutic communication, interpersonal interaction, empathy, active listening, teamwork, delegation, and/or professionalism, followed by a debriefing session. Student feedback suggests that confidence and competence related to the skills of therapeutic communication, interpersonal interaction, empathy, active listening, teamwork, delegation, and professionalism may improve by incorporating soft skill psychosocial role-playing into a nursing education course of study.

  18. Role of directorates in promoting nursing and midwifery across the various States of India: call for leadership for reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, Rajni; Jaiswal, Vaishali; Tiwari, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    While the roles and responsibilities of nursing professionals have multiplied over the years, but there are huge concerns with regard to the development of the nursing workforce and human resources (HR) issues for their career growth. The major lacuna is in not involving the nursing professionals in policy framing and decision-making. As a result, there is a leadership crisis of the nursing workforce across India. The paper, is part of the WHO supported study, entitled "Study on Nursing and Midwifery in India: a critical review", is developed with the objective to review the current organizational and management structure for the nursing positions at the State Directorates in India and obtain a Leadership perspective to strengthen nursing management capacities to address maternal health issues. The study descriptive and qualitative in nature and the sources of information were both primary and secondary collected from 16 states of India. Since none of the states have neither a Nursing Cell nor the post of Director Nursing, final decision-making powers rest with state health secretaries and medical directors. The nursing management structure majorly managed by senior policy makers from the medical fraternity, and provides very little scope for nursing professionals to participate in policy decision making to bring about reforms. There is no uniformity on HR issues concerning career graphs and pay structures across the states. In order to strengthen nursing as a profession and for facilitating their role at the policy level, more powers and autonomy needs to be given to them and this requires HR policy guidelines for nurses. Setting up a separate nursing directorate, to be headed by a senior nursing professional, is suggested in every state along with a strong nursing division at the National level. This total paradigm shift will empower nursing professionals to take up the leadership role at the policy level to bring about necessary reforms. Across the country

  19. The professional profile of UFBA nursing management graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Mirian Santos; Coelho, Edméia de Almeida Cardoso; Nascimento, Enilda Rosendo do; Melo, Cristina Maria Meira de; Fernandes, Josicelia Dumêt; Santos, Ninalva de Andrade

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the professional profile of the nursing graduate students of Federal University of Bahia, more specifically of the nursing management area. This descriptive, exploratory study was performed using documental research. The data was collected from the graduates' curriculum on the Lattes Platform and from the graduate program documents, using a form. The study population consisted of graduates enrolled under the line of research The Organization and Evaluation of Health Care Systems, who developed dissertations/theses addressing Nursing/Health Management. The data were stored using Microsoft Excel, and then transferred to the STATA 9.0 statistical software. Results showed that most graduates are women, originally from the State of Bahia, and had completed the course between 2000 and 2011; faculty of public institutions who continued involved in academic work after completing the course. These results point at the program as an academic environment committed to preparing researchers.

  20. Social media in nurse education: Utilization and E-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Valda J A; Anstey, Allan; Carter, Sandra; Gosse, Natalie; Hutchens, Karen M; Marsh, Janice A

    2017-10-01

    To explore faculty and student utilization of social media and its professional implications in nurse education. A descriptive study. Five hundred six Bachelor of Nursing students, 112 Practical Nursing students and 74 faculty members were invited to complete a questionnaire of 28 questions relating to social media. Three hundred thirty-seven students and 29 faculty responded. Students spent significantly more time using social media compared to faculty and both groups used it mainly for personal use. However, almost twice as many students used social media for educational purposes than did faculty (58.5% vs 27.6%, pused social media to talk about academic related problems, only 28% of faculty did so (pacademic related problems. YouTube and text messaging were popular platforms for educational purposes. While Facebook was also a popular educational site for students (95% used it for informal learning; 67% for formal learning), it was much less commonly used by faculty (45% used it for informal learning; 17% for formal learning). More students than faculty felt that they were aware of privacy features, and of the professional behavior expected when using social media. In addition, more students (90.7%) than faculty (71.43%) used these privacy features (pacademic staff to view (p=0.003). There is a high reported usage of social media among students and faculty. Utilization of public platforms, while potentially beneficial, can have professional implications if not used appropriately with both personal and academic use. Developing best practice approaches for using social media in nurse education is essential to ensure that faculty and students are informed of e-professionalism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Creating a personalized professional practice framework for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Kelly S; Vallish, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Any organization on the journey to nursing excellence might initiate its search for a professional practice framework by exploring the many nursing-specific theories, frameworks, and conceptual models that are readily available in the literature. Although adopting an "off the shelf" professional practice framework for nursing may sound easier for a nursing organization than creating its own framework, achieving a good fit into an existing culture is more difficult when adopting rather than creating a practice framework. ven though creating a customized framework requires a considerable amount of upfront time, dedication, and a willingness to make some mistakes along the way, in the end a customized framework ensures cultural alignment. SThis framework describes the foundational structures and guiding principles, the key processes that influence how work is conducted, and the outcomes desired as the result of the work. Identifying evaluative methods for determining progress on identified strategic intents was crucial in bridging the gap between theory and outcomes. This model continues to provide flexibility and adaptability to meet needs in a constantly changing health care environment and difficult economic times.

  2. Creating a Nursing Student Center for Academic and Professional Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Mary; Marconi, Maria A; Rideout, Kathy; Anson, Elizabeth A; Reifenstein, Karen A

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of an innovative broad-based initiative supportive of academic and professional success, the Center for Academic and Professional Success (CAPS) at the University of Rochester School of Nursing. While CAPS was founded to support all nursing students, it was also carefully developed to meet the special needs of students in the accelerated program for non-nurses (APNN) due to their diversity and the intensity and rapidity of the APNN program. Faculty discussion, literature review, and student needs assessment findings informed program development. Outcome data obtained during the past 4 years are presented. Data revealed a correspondence between identified student needs and use of program services, as well as high satisfaction ratings. Findings supported the provision of both traditional academic support, as well as other critical supports to address the academic and social stressors associated with the transitions experienced by nontraditional, working, and graduate nursing students. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):235-239.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. New nurses' perceptions of professional practice behaviours, quality of care, job satisfaction and career retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Zhu, Junhong; Read, Emily

    2016-07-01

    To test a model examining the effects of structural empowerment and support for professional practice on new graduate nurses' perceived professional practice behaviours, perceptions of care quality and subsequent job satisfaction and career turnover intentions. The nursing worklife model describes relationships between supportive nursing work environments and nurse and patient outcomes. The influence of support for professional practice on new nurses' perceptions of professional nursing behaviours within this model has not been tested. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to analyse data from a national survey of new nurses across Canada (n = 393). The hypothesised model was supported: χ²(122) = 346.726, P = 0.000; CFI = 0.917; TLI = 0.896; RMSEA = 0.069. Professional practice behaviour was an important mechanism through which empowerment and supportive professional practice environments influenced nurse-assessed quality of care, which was related to job satisfaction and lower intentions to leave nursing. Job satisfaction and career retention of new nurses are related to perceptions of work environment factors that support their professional practice behaviours and high-quality patient care. Nurse managers can support new graduate nurses' professional practice behaviour by providing empowering supportive professional practice environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Alcohol use and health behavior among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Marcelle Aparecida de Barros; Ferreira, Maria Cristina de Moura; Soares, Gabriel Terêncio; Brito, Isadora Eufrásio de; Pires, Priscilla Larissa Silva; Santos, Manoel Antônio Dos; Pillon, Sandra Cristina

    2017-11-27

    To evaluate the problematic use of alcohol and health behavior among the nursing staff of a general hospital. Cross-sectional study conducted at a general hospital. A questionnaire with socio-demographic information, the alcohol and substance use screening test, and a questionnaire on health behavior were applied. A total of 416 professionals participated in the study. In the final model of logistical regression, male professionals (OR 4.3), singles (OR 3.7), those that professed to having other religions (OR 3.8), worked as nursing technician (OR 2.3), did not consume low doses of alcoholic beverages per day (OR 2.0), used tobacco (OR 8.9), avoided consuming beverages with caffeine (OR 1.9) and avoided noisy environments (OR 2.0) showed higher chances of consuming alcohol at a problematic level. Among nursing professionals, the use of alcohol and not engaging in health behavior are strongly associated. These findings have implications for the implementation of strategies for the promotion of health and the prevention of alcohol use in work relationships.

  5. The role of the laparoscopic nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, C

    Since the appointment of the author as laparoscopic nurse practitioner at Milton Keynes Hospital Trust, there have been more cholecystectomy operations, but fewer patients have required open surgery or inpatient admission, with substantial cost savings. The author describes how the role developed and the opportunities it presents for nurses.

  6. Nurturing charge nurses for future leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrician, Patricia A; Oliver, Douglas; Miltner, Rebecca S; Dawson, Martha; Ladner, Kathleen A

    2012-10-01

    Charge nurses are untapped leadership resources that can be groomed for future advanced leadership positions in healthcare organizations. The purpose of this study was to understand the development needs for the charge nurse role. This study demonstrates they receive little or no training for assuming positions of leadership and offers suggestions for enhancement of preparation.

  7. Australia's health care reform agenda: implications for the nurses' role in chronic heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betihavas, Vasiliki; Newton, Phillip J; Du, Hui Yun; Macdonald, Peter S; Frost, Steven A; Stewart, Simon; Davidson, Patricia M

    2011-08-01

    The importance of the nursing role in chronic heart failure (CHF) management is increasingly recognised. With the recent release of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (NHHRC) report in Australia, a review of nursing roles in CHF management is timely and appropriate. This paper aims to discuss the implications of the NHHRC report and nursing roles in the context of CHF management in Australia. The electronic databases, Thomson Rheuters Web of Knowledge, Scopus and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), were searched using keywords including; "heart failure", "management", "Australia" and "nursing". In addition policy documents were reviewed including statements and reports from key professional organisations and Government Departments to identify issues impacting on nursing roles in CHF management. There is a growing need for the prevention and control of chronic conditions, such as CHF. This involves an increasing emphasis on specialist cardiovascular nurses in community based settings, both in outreach and inreach health service models. This review has highlighted the need to base nursing roles on evidence based principles and identify the importance of the nursing role in coordinating and managing CHF care in both independent and collaborative practice settings. The importance of the nursing role in early chronic disease symptom recognition and implementing strategies to prevent further deterioration of individuals is crucial to improving health outcomes. Consideration should be given to ensure that evidence based principles are adopted in models of nursing care. Copyright © 2010 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nursing thesis database project: a cooperative venture for nursing faculty and computer science professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, J; Geisler, E; Vang, P

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an educational database project designed to promote the accessibility of nursing administration theses data for graduate students and faculty in a university nursing administration program. The roles of a nursing faculty member, a computer laboratory administrator, and a programmer are detailed as they work together from the concept phase of the project through its evaluation. The results of their combined efforts provided a reliable and efficient database, resulted in a closer interdisciplinary relationship, and allowed valuable nursing research information to be shared more widely within the university.

  9. Predictors of Burnout in Professional and Paraprofessional Nurses Working in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jan; And Others

    Burnout is a phenomenon in which the cumulative effects of a stressful work environment gradually overwhelm the defenses of staff members, causing them to psychologically withdraw. To understand the experience of professional and paraprofessional nurses suffering from burnout requires a close examination of the environments in which they function.…

  10. Nurse consultants: organizational influences on role achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Valerie A; Webb, Christine; Prowse, Morag

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports on organizational influences on nurse consultant post holders. The influence of individual characteristics has been the subject of another paper. Nurse consultant posts were set up in the United Kingdom from the late 1990s onwards and, therefore, there has been little opportunity to report on evaluations of these innovative initiatives. A cross-sectional design, using a convenience sample, was adopted. Ten nurse consultants working in a variety of settings and specialties participated in in-depth, tape-recorded interviews. The data were analysed using the Framework approach. Support systems were important influences on nurse consultants' role achievement levels. These took the form of internal trust networks, nurse consultant forums and links with higher education institutions. Post holders both gave and received support and acted to empower other nurses. Thus, relationships were vital to successful role integration. The culture and structures of the National Health System were also a powerful influence in terms of local and national modernization policies, and participants had to be careful in their choice of strategies to deal with the traditional medically dominated culture. The new nurse consultant role is challenging and innovative, but a major area of contention is how much post holders are expected to take on work previously done by doctors rather than developing their nursing role. Organizational support and commitment are needed if nurse consultants are to maximize the benefits of this innovation. The findings show that new nursing roles are not always easily accepted in multidisciplinary settings and that holders of such post need to have the appropriate previous knowledge, skills and personal characteristics, as well as the ability to negotiate their way through organizational influences.

  11. Teaching nursing students about terminating professional relationships, boundaries, and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2016-02-01

    Nurse educators should teach students about the nature of the nurse-patient relationship, which is a professional relationship and different from other relationships they have. In addition to teaching students how to establish relationships with their patients, nurse educators should also teach students about terminating relationships with patients. Without this professional guidance, nursing students may be tempted to use social media to maintain a relationship with patients. This may inadvertently lead to professional boundary violations, causing harm to patients and problems for nursing students or nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient safety manifesto: a professional imperative for prelicensure nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debourgh, Gregory A; Prion, Susan K

    2012-01-01

    Nurses in practice and students in training often fear hurting a patient or doing something wrong. Experienced nurses have developed assessment skills and clinical intuition to recognize and intervene to prevent patient risk and harm. Beginning nursing students have not yet had the opportunity to develop an awareness of patient risk, safety concerns, or a clear sense of their accountability in the nurse role as the primary advocate for patient safety. In this Safety Manifesto, the authors call for educators to critically review their prelicensure curricula for inclusion of teaching and learning activities that are focused on patient safety and offer recommendations for curricular changes with an emphasis on integration of instructional strategies that develop students' skills for clinical reasoning and judgment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing professional values and authentic leadership dimensions in baccalaureate nursing students: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Kathleen H; Roman, Tammy C; Smith, Charlene M; Bowllan, Nancy M; Dollinger, Marilyn L; Blaine, Bruce Evan

    2015-06-01

    A series of three baccalaureate Nursing Leadership and Patient-Centered Care (NLPCC) courses were developed to strengthen students' perceptions and preparation as leaders in the delivery of patient-centered care through more effective professional socialization. A mixed-methods design was used, administering two surveys to students at the start of the junior year and the end of their senior year, plus two qualitative questions were administered after the second-semester junior and senior years. Qualitative data reflected a growing awareness of the professional nurse's role and responsibilities beyond the bedside. Graduating senior students demonstrated a heightened awareness for the socialization and realities of practice and a growing sense of readiness and empowerment to embrace the professional role of an RN. Through role modeling, scripted conversations, and focused dialogue, the infusion of knowledge, skills, and attitudes from the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies allowed students to hone their socialization skills prior to entering the workforce. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. The nursing profession : public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    Aim To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Background Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  15. Relationships Between Clinical Decision-Making Patterns and Self-Efficacy and Nursing Professionalism in Korean Pediatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Miyoung; Kim, Jisoo

    2015-01-01

    As pediatric nurses must make decisions on a regular basis when caring for hospitalized children, clinical decision-making abilities are necessary in this profession. In the present study, we explored clinical decision-making patterns and their association with self-efficacy and nursing professionalism in pediatric nurses. We surveyed 173 pediatric nurses and analyzed the relationships between their clinical decision-making patterns and self-efficacy and nursing professionalism. Factor analysis identified 5 clinical decision-making patterns: patient-family-nurse collaborative (PNC), individual patient-oriented (IP), nurse model-oriented (NM), pattern-oriented intuitive (PI), and nursing knowledge-oriented (NK). The most frequently observed clinical decision-making pattern was the PNC. The self-efficacy and nursing professionalism were found to be higher in pediatric nurses using the IP and NM, and were lower for those using the PNC. Thus, the present results suggest that pediatric nurses' clinical decision-making patterns are influenced by nursing professionalism and self-efficacy. Therefore, intervention programs focusing on these variables might improve clinical decision-making in pediatric nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between job satisfaction, professional identity and intention to leave the profession among nurses in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanciogullari, Selma; Dogan, Selma

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction, professional identity and intention to leave the profession among nurses in Turkey. Although there are many studies on job satisfaction among nurses in Turkey, there is a gap in the literature in relation to professional identity, particularly for intentions to leave the profession. This cross-sectional, descriptive and correlational study was conducted with 2122 nurses from Turkey. A positive and significant correlation was determined between the nurses' job satisfaction and professional identities. It was found that 15.5% of the nurses intended to leave their profession. Intention to leave the profession was greater among the nurses with inadequate professional identity development and low job satisfaction. Professional identity is a factor affecting job satisfaction. Both professional identity and job satisfaction are important factors affecting nurses' intention leaving the profession. Given that professional identity and job satisfaction affect intention to leave the profession and professional identity affects job satisfaction, nurse managers who are mainly responsible for the quality of nursing care should develop strategies that support nurses' professional identity and increase their job satisfaction if they are to prevent nurses from leaving the profession. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Professionalism and the role of medical colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, David J; Grigg, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There has been substantial interest and emphasis on medical professionalism over the past twenty years. This speaks to the history of the medical profession, but increasingly to a broader understanding of the importance of socialisation and professional identity formation. A literature review was undertaken of professionalism and the role of professions and medical professional organisations. A key outcome has been the recognition that medical professionalism must be actively taught and assessed. Substantial effort is required to improve the educational environment, so that it nurtures the development of professionalism within the work-place. Although medical colleges have been prominent in identifying and progressing the recent developments within professionalism there is still much to be done to deliver fully on the societal contract between the public and the profession. There are key gaps to address, particularly with regards to self-regulation, civil behaviour and effective leadership and advocacy. Medical colleges need to take direct responsibility for the professionalism of their members. The expectations of the community are increasingly clear in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role delineation study of advanced practice nursing, a cross-sectional study of practice domains and trends in role functions

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Guerra, Sonia; Zabalegui, Adelaida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The expansion of professional roles has been probed as an innovative solution across some countries in order to help address healthcare integration, coordination, continuity, access and health care sustainability. The development and implementation of different roles in Advanced practice Nursing (APN) has been considered one of those innovations in pioneering healthcare system reforms. The need for nurses to take a leadership role in all settings has been a necessary step to mee...

  19. Nurses' leadership styles in the icu: association with personal and professional profile and workload

    OpenAIRE

    Balsanelli, Alexandre Pazetto; Cunha,Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm; Whitaker,Iveth Yamaguchi

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the association between nurses' leadership styles and personal and professional nursing profile and workload. The sample consisted of seven nurses and seven nursing technicians who were grouped into pairs. At the end of three months, nurses were queried regarding what leadership style would be adopted when the nursing technician under their evaluation delivered care to patients admitted to the ICU. Relevant data was analyzed by applying descriptive statistics, Tukey...

  20. Caring science and human caring theory: transforming personal and professional practices of nursing and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This article explores some of the latest developments of the emergence of Caring Science as the moral, theoretical, and philosophical foundation for nursing, leading to transformative personal/professional practices. Through nurse's taking responsibility for advancing nursing qua nursing, practitioners, patients, and systems alike are witnessing a revolution in nursing, which is restoring the heart of nursing and health care through theory-guided philosophical practices of heart-centered love and caring as the foundation for healing.

  1. A longitudınal study on the effect of tailored training and counseling on the professional attitude of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, Ayise; Hisar, Filiz; Göçmen Baykara, Zehra; Çalışkan, Nurcan; Karabulut, Hatice; Öztürk, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    The development of professional attitudes in nursing students is influenced by their learning experiences (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) and instructors' professional behaviors. Instructors can enhance students' professional attitude by organizing the training environment, being a role model, and providing counseling. This study was conducted as a tailoring intervention study over 4 years (2010-2013) examining 73 nursing students (34 intervention, 39 control) to determine the effect of training and counseling on nursing students' professional attitudes. Data were collected utilizing the Introductory Characteristics Form and the Instrument of Professional Attitude for Student Nurses. Intervention group students were provided training and counseling complementing their current education to develop their professional attitudes. Controls proceeded with their current education. Instrument for Professional Attitude for Student Nurses posttest scores of the intervention group were significantly higher than those of control group students. Furthermore, intervention group scores on all subscales other than "competence and continuous education" significantly increased after training. Controls showed no growth in professional attitudes, other than in "contribution to scientific knowledge." The training and counseling program had a positive influence on the professional attitudes of nursing students. Thus, providing tailored training and counseling associated to professionalism throughout the educational process at schools providing nursing training is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Maintaining equilibrium in professional role identity: a grounded theory study of health visitors' perceptions of their changing professional practice context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, Alison I; Machin, Tony; Pearson, Pauline

    2012-07-01

    This article reports the study of a group of United Kingdom health visitors' interactions with their changing practice context, focusing on role identity and influences on its stability. United Kingdom policies have urged health visitors to refocus their role as key public health nurses. Reduced role identity clarity precipitated the emergence of different models of health visiting public health work. An inconsistent role standard can lead to role identity fragmentation and conflict across a group. It may precipitate individual role crisis, affecting optimum role performance. Seventeen health visitors in two United Kingdom community healthcare organizations participated in a grounded theory study, incorporating constant comparative analysis. Direct observations and individual interviews were undertaken between 2002 and 2008. Four interlinked categories emerged: professional role identity (core category); professional role in action; interprofessional working; and local micro-systems for practice; each influencing participants' sense of identity and self-worth. The Role Identity Equilibrium Process explains interactive processes occurring at different levels of participants' practice. Re-establishing equilibrium and consistency in health visiting identity is a priority. This study's findings have significance for other nurses and health professionals working in complex systems, affected by role change and challenges to role identity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. [The Role of Mid-Career Nurses in Educating New Nurses: from the Perspective of Self-Efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Hiromi; Ishida, Chiemi; Yasukata, Fumiko

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to clarify the relationship between the educational role behavior of mid-career nurses toward new nurses, and their sense of self-efficacy. Educational role behaviors of mid-career nurses toward new nurses were set to 13 items related to career ladder and previous researches. To identify the relationship between the sense of self-efficacy in mid-career nurses and performing these 13 behaviors in their educational role toward new nurses, we had 310 mid-career nurses complete a questionnaire survey and analyzed the resulting data using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. We found that mid-career nurses who had served as preceptors (senior nurses who teach practical nursing skills to new nurses on a one-on-one basis) four or more times had a significantly higher sense of self-efficacy than those who had served as preceptors three times or less for four behaviors only (1. demonstrating specific methods when instructing new nurses on various support methods, 7. being receptive to new nurses, 11. striving for professional self-improvement in practical nursing as a mid-career nurse, and 12. co-ordinating interpersonal relationships in the organization). No relationships were observed between the total number of years of nursing experience and the number of years of working at the station concerned. For all 13 educational role behaviors, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 0.5-0.7 indicated a significant relationship between implementation of the educational role behavior and a sense of self-efficacy. We believe that the high sense of self-efficacy that results from the performance of the 13 behaviors by mid-career nurses in their role of teaching new nurses leads them to demonstrate these behaviors in their everyday practice. It was also found that experience alone did not mean that mid-career nurses could adopt educational role behaviors with little burden, suggesting that support is universally

  4. Professional Nurse Traineeship Grants: Who Gets Them and Where Do They Work after Graduation? Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenneth D.; Wooldridge, Judith; de Saw, Cheryl; Sinclair, Michael

    The Professional Nurse Traineeship (PNT) program was created to provide nursing schools that place high proportions of their graduates in medically underserved communities with additional funding to support students in graduate nursing education or training. A total of 4,332 nurses who graduated in the academic years of 1996-1997 or 1997-1998 from…

  5. Beginning Students' Definitions of Nursing: An Inductive Framework of Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Tom H.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Bess, Carolyn J.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with 114 beginning nursing students were distilled into an inductive framework of professional nursing identity based on their definitions of nursing. Multiple categories were classified into three themes: nursing as noun, verb, and transaction. Results show the extent of students' understanding of the profession. (Contains 21…

  6. Thinking Like a Nurse and Perceived Readiness for Professional Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdoin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Thinking like a nurse (TLN) has been identified as a core competency of professional nursing practice. The term embraces the full context of the daily metacognitive process nurses use to provide competent nursing care and was theorized in this study to have four attributes: critical thinking, clinical judgment, moral reasoning, and professional…

  7. Progression of the mental health nurse practitioner role in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, T; White, K

    2007-10-01

    The guiding principle of health care is to serve the needs of the public. Healthcare services are therefore required to be increasingly flexible and open to new approaches to meet changing demands. They must also adjust and expand as new challenges are presented. Public awareness of mental health issues and the current demands placed on health services for access to affordable and appropriate mental health care have never been so great. The introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs) in Australia is a proud and long-anticipated moment for the discipline of nursing. However, a major challenge for the introduction of NPs in Australia will be to reassure medical colleagues, allied health professionals and the public that NPs are able to deliver high-quality primary care. This paper elaborates on the progress of the mental health NP role in Australia. Attention is centred on the characteristics the mental health NP role, the maintenance of professional competency to practise at an advanced clinical level, and the prospects and potential significance of NPs for mental health nursing practice. The nurse-led clinic, implemented through the process of consultation and systematic evaluation, is identified as an avenue for the extension of mental health NP practice in the delivery of autonomous primary care.

  8. Interprofessional training for nursing and medical students in Norway: Exploring different professional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aase, Ingunn; Hansen, Britt Sætre; Aase, Karina; Reeves, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an explorative case study focusing on interprofessional training for medical and nursing students in Norway. Based on interviews with, and observations of, multiple stakeholder groups--students, university faculty, and hospital staff--content analysis was applied to investigate their perspectives regarding the design of such educational training. The findings revealed a positive perspective amongst stakeholders while voicing some concerns related to how communication issues, collaboration, workflow, and professional role patterns should be reflected in such training. Based on our data analysis we derive three themes that must be considered for successful interprofessional training of nursing and medical students: clinical professionalism, team performance, and patient-centered perspective. These themes must be balanced contingent on the students' background and the learning objectives of future interprofessional training efforts.

  9. [Burnout and perceived health in Critical Care nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Risquez, M I; Peñalver Hernández, F; Godoy Fernández, C

    2008-01-01

    To assess the level of burnout syndrome in a sample of critical care nursing professionals and analyze its relation with the perception of general health and other sociodemographic and work characteristics. Cross-sectional descriptive study. SITE: Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia-Spain. Three evaluation tools were used. These included a sociodemographic and work survey, the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) questionnaires and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) in order to assess professional burnout and the general health condition perceived, respectively. Only 42 out of the 56 questionnaires included in the study were valid. This means an answering rate of 75%. The mean score obtained on the emotional tiredness dimension (25.45 6 11.15) stands out. About 42.9% of the sample presented psychological or psychosomatic symptoms that could require specialized care. Correlation between burnout and general health perception was statistically significant (r = 0.536; p burnout found was moderate to high among critical care nursing professionals. A total of 11.9% of the studied sample had a high score in the 3 dimensions of the burnout syndrome: emotional tiredness, depersonalization, and lack of personal job performance. Burnout and health levels found indicate high vulnerability in the sample studied and the need to establish prevention/intervention programs in this work context.

  10. Measuring professional satisfaction and nursing workload among nursing staff at a Greek Coronary Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gouzou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To explore potential associations between nursing workload and professional satisfaction among nursing personnel (NP in Greek Coronary Care Units (CCUs. Method A cross-sectional study was performed involving 66 members of the NP employed in 6 randomly selected Greek CCUs. Job satisfaction was assessed by the IWS and nursing workload by NAS, CNIS and TISS-28. Results The response rate was 77.6%. The reliability of the IWS was α=0.78 and the mean score 10.7 (±2.1, scale range: 0.5-39.7. The most highly valued component of satisfaction was “Pay”, followed by “Task requirements”, “Interaction”, “Professional status”, “Organizational policies” and “Autonomy”. NAS, CNIS and TISS-28 were negatively correlated (p≤0.04 with the following work components: “Autonomy”, “Professional status”, “Interaction” and “Task requirements”. Night shift work independently predicted the score of IWS. Conclusion The findings show low levels of job satisfaction, which are related with nursing workload and influenced by rotating shifts.

  11. Nursing on television: student perceptions of television's role in public image, recruitment and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Koch, Jane; Jackson, Debra

    2013-12-01

    To explore nursing students' perceptions of how their profession is portrayed on medical television programmes. Recruitment and retention in nursing have been linked to the image of the profession in society. Images of nursing in popular media frequently draw on stereotypes that may damage the appeal of nursing for potential students and denigrate the value and status of the profession. A growing body of work analyses how nursing is portrayed in popular media, but less research asks nursing students themselves to reflect on this area. Convergent parallel mixed methods. Data were collected in 2011 from surveys of 484 undergraduate nursing students at a large university in New South Wales, Australia, that included demographic data, their viewing habits of medical television programmes and their opinions of how the shows handled nursing ethics and professionalism and the image of nursing on television and nursing role models. Most students watch medical television programmes. Students who do not speak English at home watched fewer programmes but were more positive about the depictions of professionalism. The qualitative data showed students were concerned that television can have a negative influence on the image of nursing, but they also recognized some educational and recruitment value in television programmes. It is important for nurses, educators and students to be critically engaged with the image of their profession in society. There is value in engaging more closely with contemporary media portrayals of nursing for students and educators alike. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Spirituality in self-care for intensive care nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezorzi, Luciana Winterkorn; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how spirituality permeates the process of caring for oneself and for others in the intensive care scenario from nursing professionals' point of view. This study used the qualitative approach of Cabral's Creative-Sensitive Method to guide information production and analysis in nine art and experience workshops. Nine nursing caregivers from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital participated in the study. This article presents one of the topics that emerged during this process: spirituality in self-care, which is evidenced in the daily practices that take place through prayers, close contact with nature, as well as in the sense of connection with a Higher Power that provides peace, welfare, and greater strength to ICU caregivers' life and work. Self-knowledge emerged as an essential practice in caring for oneself, in order to deliver better care to others.

  13. A Professional Containment Method in Acute Psychiatric Care: Nursing Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Sabancigullari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Observation is a method that is used in place of other control methods such as chemical and physical detention, isolation. Observation is used especially as an interference method to ensure the safety of the patients with suicidal and aggressive behaviors in acute psychiatric care in many countries. Especially in acute psychiatric wards using observations of nursing as a professional control method is an important issue. This article aims to draw attention to the importance of the subject in our country about using nursing observations as a control method in acute psychiatric care from the view of the literature. In this article several studies related to risk assessment, decision making, the levels of observation, the application of observation and the ethical aspects of observation on acute psychiatric care have been discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 79-91

  14. A qualitative study of collaboration in general practice: understanding the general practice nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To explore the nature of collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners in Australian general practice. There is international recognition that collaboration between health professionals can improve care coordination, enhance health outcomes, optimise the work environment and reduce healthcare costs. However, effective collaboration requires a clear understanding of each team member's role. A qualitative approach guided by Naturalistic Inquiry was used to elicit and interpret participant narratives. Eight general practitioners and fourteen registered nurses working in general practice were purposefully recruited. Data were collected via individual, semi-structured face-to-face interviews during February to May 2015. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Data revealed three overarching themes. This study presents the data for the overarching theme 'Understanding the general practice registered nurse's role'. Many general practitioner participants lacked clarity around the role and scope of practice of the registered nurse. At the same time, nursing participants often articulated their role as an assistant rather than as an independent health professional. This limited collaboration and the nurses' role within the team. Collaboration was enhanced when general practitioners actively sought an understanding of the registered nurses scope of practice. Clarifying the nurses' role promotes collaboration and supports nurses to work to the full extent of their practice. This is important in terms of optimising the nurses' role within the team and reinforcing their professional identity. Identification of key issues around understanding the nurses' role may help inform strategies that improve collaboration and workplace relations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [The role and future task of the occupational health nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Tomoko

    2013-10-01

    The Industrial Safety and Health Act was enacted focusing on occupational disease prevention in 1972. It has been revised over the years to include consideration of work associated diseases, and the participation and cooperation of employer and employees. From now, positive participation of employer-and-employees in occupational health activity becomes important in order to achieve the expanded purpose of the law. It is necessary to empower all workers to be able to perform occupational health activity independently. Florence Nightingale defined nursing in the 1850's. "Nursing is to put the patient in the best condition by improvement of environment, including a population approach. The goal of nursing is to enable the patient to use his faculty fully." The Public Health Nurse is, "assistance to the process of solving one's health, identifying health issues based on a community, using systematic measures which lead to prevention, and aiming at public responsibility." The daily activity of Nurses including Occupational Health Nurses (OHNs) is based on the theory and technology of "empowerment". In promoting the employer-and-employees independent Occupational Safety and Health Activity, the OHN's professional specialty of "empowerment" can play an important role.

  16. Teamwork in nursing: restricted to nursing professionals or an interprofessional collaboration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Geisa Colebrusco de; Peduzzi, Marina; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez

    2016-01-01

    To understand the nursing professionals' conceptions of teamwork and their elements. A qualitative study conducted in an oncological hospital using a semi-structured interview with 21 nursing professionals. Two conceptions emerged from the accounts: teamwork restricted to nursing professionals and teamwork with interprofessional collaboration with particular importance for interactive dimensions: communication, trust and professional bonds, mutual respect and recognition of the other's work, collaboration, and conflict, with this last subcategory considered as an obstacle to teamwork. Nursing conceives teamwork as an interprofessional practice, which is a result of the quality of interaction among professionals from different areas and involves the recognition and handling of conflicts. Compreender as concepções dos profissionais de enfermagem sobre trabalho em equipe e seus elementos constituintes. Pesquisa qualitativa, realizada em hospital oncológico, por meio de entrevista semiestruturada com 21 profissionais de enfermagem. Duas concepções emergiram dos relatos, trabalho em equipe circunscrito à enfermagem e trabalho em equipe com colaboração interprofissional, com destaque para dimensão interativa: comunicação, confiança e vínculo, respeito mútuo e reconhecimento do trabalho do outro, colaboração e conflito. Esta última subcategoria foi apontada como obstáculo para o trabalho em equipe. A enfermagem concebe majoritariamente o trabalho em equipe como ação interprofissional, e isto decorre da qualidade da interação entre os profissionais das diferentes áreas e o reconhecimento e manejo de conflitos.

  17. NURSES' PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE COMPONENTS SELF-ASSESSMENT IN BUILDING A POSITIVE HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Miķelsone, Madara; Renigere, Ruta; Dreimane, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' professional competence consists of several interrelated components, which during interacting of critical thinking, reflection and experience, characterizes the essence of the profession of nurses. Critical thinking applies not only to the educational process, it is an expression the nurses’ responsible and professional action during the health care process. Critical thinking and reflection make up of various specific competence component interactions of nurses professional healthcare...

  18. Stress from Role Conflict: Consequences for Professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ex-post facto data collected from 600 teachers and 2400 senior secondary two students from Cross River State were analyzed to determine the influence of stress arising from role conflict on professional effectiveness. One hypothesis was tested using One-Way Analysis of Variance. The result of the data analyses ...

  19. Nurse educator orientation: professional development that promotes retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sandra L

    2010-09-01

    Formalized orientation can prepare and socialize nurse educators for academic roles, increasing job satisfaction and retention. This article describes a community college nursing faculty orientation program that includes goals, pre- and post-assessment, a group-determined instructional plan, support and mentoring, and outcomes evaluation. Posttest scores showed that at program completion, perceived teaching competency was either the same or greater in all identified skill areas (increase of 40% to 60% above the original group baseline). Nurse educator participants reported that the program contributed to their overall perception of support and satisfaction with academia, with open group discussion times rated highest. At the end of 3 years, 91% of novice faculty (n=11) were retained. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Reaching the top: career anchors and professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ruth; Shmulevitz, Carmela; Raviv, Dennie

    2009-01-01

    This study, based on Shein's conceptual theory of career anchors, examined the relationship between career anchors, professional development and emerging career patterns for graduates of 12 consecutive two year second career programs in nursing (N=231) compared to graduates of concurrent four year academic programs (N=273). A 2-group comparison design was used and data collection tools included a demographic profile, a professional profile and a career anchor questionnaire. Statistically significant differences were found in regard to career anchors (padministrative specialization (34%) compared to the second career tract (6.5%). Researchers propose that each group develops differently and contributes to the workplace and the importance of both certification and academic incentives to ensure recruitment.

  1. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always value the skills and competences nurses have acquired through education and innovation. Discussion paper. We identified 1216 relevant studies by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases in the period 1997-2010. Finally, 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. The included studies show that the actual public image of nursing is diverse and incongruous. This image is partly self-created by nurses due to their invisibility and their lack of public discourse. Nurses derive their self-concept and professional identity from their public image, work environment, work values, education and traditional social and cultural values. Nurses should work harder to communicate their professionalism to the public. Social media like the Internet and YouTube can be used to show the public what they really do. To improve their public image and to obtain a stronger position in healthcare organizations, nurses need to increase their visibility. This could be realized by ongoing education and a challenging work environment that encourages nurses to stand up for themselves. Furthermore, nurses should make better use of strategic positions, such as case manager, nurse educator or clinical nurse specialist and use their professionalism to show the public what their work really entails. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Growing up and Role Modeling: A Theory in Iranian Nursing Students’ Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Jamileh Mokhtari; Ebadi, Abbas; Alhani, Fatemeh; Rejeh, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    One of the key strategies in students’ learning is being affected by models. Understanding the role-modeling process in education will help to make greater use of this training strategy. The aim of this grounded theory study was to explore Iranian nursing students and instructors’ experiences about role modeling process. Data was analyzed by Glaserian’s Grounded Theory methodology through semi-structured interviews with 7 faculty members, 2 nursing students; the three focus group discussions with 20 nursing students based on purposive and theoretical sampling was done for explaining role modeling process from four nursing faculties in Tehran. Through basic coding, an effort to comprehensive growth and excellence was made with the basic social process consisting the core category and through selective coding three phases were identified as: realizing and exposure to inadequate human and professional growth, facilitating human and professional growth and evolution. The role modeling process is taking place unconscious, involuntary, dynamic and with positive progressive process in order to facilitate overall growth in nursing student. Accordingly, the design and implementation of the designed model can be used to make this unconscious to conscious, active and voluntarily processes a process to help education administrators of nursing colleges and supra organization to prevent threats to human and professional in nursing students’ education and promote nursing students’ growth. PMID:25716391

  3. Development of a conceptual model of the role of hospital nurses in health promotion in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoqirat, N

    2015-05-19

    International evidence reveals that hospital nurses have not been able to incorporate health promotion effectively into the framework of their care. This can be attributed to unclear conceptualizing of the barriers and facilitators to the role of nurses in health promotion. An integrative review was carried out to develop a conceptual model to assist hospital nurses in Jordan to understand how health promotion activities can be developed. Factors affecting the involvement of nurses in health promotion - ranging from limited knowledge about health promotion to the social image of nursing - can be structured into three levels: the micro (individual), meso (organizational) and macro (population). By understanding the interplay of factors between and within the levels, nurses and other health professionals can draw on the individual, social and organizational factors that influence nurses' role in health promotion. The proposed model can be considered as a springboard for developing health promotion activities related to hospitals in other Muslim-majority contexts.

  4. Professional responsibility and decision-making in the context of a disease-focused model of nursing care: The difficulties experienced by Spanish nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Olga; Caïs, Jordi; Monforte-Royo, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    When, in 1977, nurse education in Spain was transferred to universities a more patient-centred, the Anglo-American philosophy of care was introduced into a context in which nurses had traditionally prioritised their technical skills. This paper examines the characteristics of the nurse's professional role in Spain, where the model of nursing practice has historically placed them in a position akin to that of physician assistants. The study design was qualitative and used the method of analytic induction. Participants were selected by means of theoretical sampling and then underwent in-depth interviews. The resulting material was analysed using an approach based on the principles of grounded theory. Strategies were applied to ensure the credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability of the findings. The main conclusion is that nurses in Spain continue to work within a disease-focused model of care, making it difficult for them to take responsibility for decision-making. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Factors influencing nurse participation in continuing professional development activities : Survey results from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brekelmans, G.A.; Maassen, S.; Poell, R.F.; Weststrate, J.; Geurdes, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Professionals are individually responsible for planning and carrying out continuing professional development (CPD) activities, ensuring their relevance to current practice and career development. The key factors that encourage nurses to undertake CPD activities are not yet clear. Several

  6. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a project to examine the expectations of senior nurses regarding graduate roles of registered and enrolled nurses educated in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed an online survey to indicate whether predetermined competencies were in the roles of graduate enrolled or registered nurses or not in the role of either nurse. Chi-squared analysis was used to identify differences between participant groups. Participants expressed variations in role expectations for the different level of graduate nurse. Although basic nursing care was undertaken by both graduate enrolled and registered nurses, no specific role was identified for enrolled nurses. Differences were found in the opinions of senior nurses over the roles of graduate nurses, demonstrating considerable variation in expectations. Management, education and research roles were not identified as the role of either nurse on graduation. Differences were found in the expectations of the different senior nurse groups regarding the roles of the enrolled nurse, particularly in the new skills taught in the enrolled nurse diploma program. Confusion exists regarding the roles of both types of nurse on graduation. Further research across Australia is required to clarify the roles of the different level of nurse in different practice contexts.

  7. Ethics of caring and professional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jens Erik

    2011-03-01

    Normative discussions about modern health care often revolve around principles stating what must not be done or how to ration scarce resources in the name of justice. These are important discussions. However, in order to have an impact on clinical roles, ethical reflection must be able to describe and address the complexities and challenges of modern nursing and doctoring, and maybe even the patient role. A multi-principled approach, such as the one suggested by Beauchamp and Childress, can obviously address almost any such issue, but a great deal of translation is often required in order to address role-related issues. I shall here argue that an ethics of caring is better suited to grasping the big picture when the question is how to create value-informed clinical roles in an era of rapid development.

  8. Discourses of social justice: examining the ethics of democratic professionalism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    This essay provides a critical exploration of discourses of social justice in nursing. It examines commitments to social justice in the work of international nursing scholars and in professional codes of ethics in international nursing organizations. The analysis touches on salient conversations in philosophy, relating these ways of knowing to social justice as an ethical pattern in nursing practice. On the basis of this analysis, the discussion explores questions of professional formation in nursing, noticing when commitments to social justice are taken up or evaded in different models of professionalism. In concluding comments, implications of democratic professionalism are explored for professional formation in nursing, arguing for teaching, learning, and knowledge projects that contribute to social justice in our democracy.

  9. Nurse Practitioner Role Transition: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    A concept analysis of nurse practitioner (NP) role transition. The Affordable Care Act is expected to provide 32 million Americans with health insurance, and NPs are gaining attention in addressing this increasing demand for healthcare providers. However, there is limited analysis of the transition from registered nurse to NP. Oftentimes, during this transition, there is a shift from an experienced, expert status to an inexperienced, novice status, with a subsequent loss of confidence in one's ability and competence. This can hinder successful role development and affect employment continuity within the first year of practice. NP role transition was examined using Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis. Electronic databases were searched using the terms role transition and nurse practitioner. Thirty articles from nursing, psychology, and business were included. The four defining attributes of NP role transition are absorption of the role, the shift from provider of care to prescriber of care, straddling two identities, and mixed emotions. Personal and environmental antecedents and consequences of the concept are identified. The development of empirical knowledge on NP role transition through further research is important in order for new-to-practice NPs to become high-quality, full-functioning providers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. ["Scholar officials": thoughts on the involvement of professional nurses in the political process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2014-08-01

    A growing number of nurses are concerned with / participate in public affairs, politics, and policymaking processes. In particular, nursing leaders are actively leveraging their collective power to create interdisciplinary alliances aimed at encouraging the media and government to confront key nursing issues and implement healthcare reform. This article highlights the political participation and policy-making process to address the meaning and essence of politics, politics and nursing, training and strategies of public affairs and political participation, the shift from academia to health policy, and facilitation of important health policies. It is hoped that nurses may appropriately use their status and influence to actively participate in political campaigns and the policymaking process. By using their professional knowledge and skills, nurses may not only protect patient safety and public health but also facilitate nursing professional development and promote the professional image of nursing.

  11. Community mental health nurses speak out: the critical relationship between emotional wellbeing and satisfying professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

    2006-10-01

    The article reports on selected findings of a research study concerning emotional wellbeing and professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). It highlights the relationship between community mental health nurses' and emotional wellbeing, and their capacity to provide satisfying professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). The notion of emotional wellbeing, factors that impacted upon the participants' emotional wellbeing, and the relationship of emotional wellbeing to professional practice were revealed in the study. These findings were based on a qualitative critical feminist research inquiry and specifically, interviews with five women community mental health nurses in Australia. Whilst complex, emotional wellbeing was found to be both implicitly and explicitly linked to the participants intertwined personal and professional experiences. Four key components were identified: the nebulous notion; the stress relationship; the mind, body, spirit connection; and, inner sense of balance. In terms of emotional wellbeing and professional practice, three themes were revealed. These were: being able to speak out (or not); being autonomous (or not) and being satisfied (or not). The authors argue that the emotional wellbeing of nurses working in community mental health settings is critical to satisfying professional practice. Furthermore nursing work involves emotional work which impacts on one's emotional wellbeing and emotional wellbeing is integrally linked to professional practice. It is recommended that health organisations must be pro-active in addressing the emotional needs of nurses to ensure the delivery of health care that is aligned to professional practice. This approach will ensure nurses will feel more recognised and validated in terms of their nursing practice.

  12. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Azimzadeh, Roghaieh; Rahmani, Azad; Valizadeh, Leila

    2010-06-15

    Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57) were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04) and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03) higher than nurses. The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their interactions with patients, to validate the effect their intended caring

  14. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Azad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. Methods This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57 were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. Results The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04 and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03 higher than nurses. Conclusions The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their

  15. Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Gardulf, Ann; Johansson, Eva; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Nilsson, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported. To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented. A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university. In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded. Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students. Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nurses' Role in Preventing Prescription Opioid Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manworren, Renee C B; Gilson, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Prescription opioid abuse is at epidemic levels. Opioids diverted from friends and family members who have legitimate prescriptions are a major source of abused prescription opioids. Nurses are vital to any effort to combat this public health crisis because they have the opportunity to provide essential anticipatory guidance every time a patient receives prescription medication. The purpose of this article is to inform nurses of the magnitude of opioid diversion, the nonmedical use of opioids, and opioids' inappropriate disposal. The authors propose three potential interventions in which nurses can play a critical role: teaching patients about the risks of opioid diversion, providing patients with information on the safekeeping and proper disposal of opioids, and tracking patients' analgesic use to improve our knowledge of prescription analgesic requirements for pain management. Nurses are in an ideal position to help reverse the occurrence and potentially fatal consequences of prescription opioid diversion.

  17. Reliability and validity of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Chun; Lee, Sheuan; Ueng, Steve Wen-Neng; Tang, Woung-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the reliability and construct validity of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale. The role of nurse practitioners has attracted international attention. The advanced nursing role played by nurse practitioners varies with national conditions and medical environments. To date, no suitable measurement tool has been available for assessing the roles and competencies of nurse practitioners in Asian countries. Secondary analysis of data from three studies related to nurse practitioners' role competencies. We analysed data from 563 valid questionnaires completed in three studies to identify the factor structure of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale. To this end, we performed exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis extraction with varimax orthogonal rotation. The internal consistency reliabilities of the overall scale and its subscales were examined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The scale had six factors: professionalism, direct care, clinical research, practical guidance, medical assistance, as well as leadership and reform. These factors explained 67·5% of the total variance in nurse practitioners' role competencies. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the overall scale was 0·98, and those of its subscales ranged from 0·83-0·97. The internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale were good. The high internal consistency reliabilities suggest item redundancy, which should be minimised by using item response theory to enhance the applicability of this questionnaire for future academic and clinical studies. The Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale can be used as a tool for assessing the roles and competencies of nurse practitioners in Taiwan. Our findings can also serve as a reference for other Asian countries to develop the nurse practitioner role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Workplace violence against nurses in Korea and its impact on professional quality of life and turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Hye; Lee, Haeyoung

    2017-10-01

    To inform countermeasures against nurses' workplace violence by reviewing the experience of violence. Violence is an important issue in medical settings that influences turnover intention of nurses. However, few studies have dealt with the effects of violence experienced by nurses on professional quality of life and turnover intention. A descriptive study using a structured questionnaire and data were analysed using t-test, one-way anova and hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Of 358 nurses 95.5% reported that they had experienced workplace violence during the previous 1 year. Findings indicated that turnover intention was positively associated with years worked as a nurse, functional nursing delivery system, exposure types of violence with physical threats, and mild or severe burnout. Nurses experienced diverse workplace violence, which could decrease their professional quality of life and be a factor affecting their turnover intention. Role of leadership in creating a positive work environment is needed. Prevention of workplace violence should focus on at-risk groups to reduce workplace violence. Workplace violence should be communicated regularly and feedback should be given if there is unintentional non-physical violence. In particular it is important to investigate post-violence management in nurses who have experienced violence to reduce secondary trauma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Nurse Practitioner Role in Oncology: Advancing Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlke Wall, Sarah; Rawson, Krista

    2016-07-01

    To explore and describe the characteristics of the nurse practitioner (NP) role in cancer care in a Canadian province, identify the ways in which NPs add value to cancer care, and suggest ways in which organizations can better support the NP role.
. Exploratory, qualitative design.
. Three cancer care facilities in a western Canadian province.
. 12 NPs in cancer care, 12 physicians working with NPs, and 5 administrators responsible for implementing the role.
. Interpretive description, a qualitative method aimed at systematically exploring and analyzing a topic and applying the findings back into practice.
. Each group had a different perspective on the role and its value. Physicians regarded these high-level practitioners as "help" within their own practices. Administrators tended to use NPs to manage patient workload within the traditional physician-focused system, but they could see value in NP-led innovation. The NPs themselves envisioned a nontraditional, holistic, patient-centered approach to care that challenged the interventionist focus of the medical model. Suggestions for enhancing the potential of the role were offered by all groups. 
. Lack of clarity about the NP role persists. Traditional professional hierarchies and expectations about care delivery continue to affect role implementation.
. Nursing leaders must be proactive about NP role implementation to maximize its potential. Additional research is needed about the outcomes of the role and the process of implementation.

  20. [Nursing role in reporting adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Garaicoechea, Ana; Reis-Carvalho, Joana; Ripa-Aisa, Irantzu; Jiménez-Mendoza, Ana; Díaz-Balén, Almudena; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous report system, in which suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR) are reported by healthcare workers, is currently one of the primary methods to prevent and discover new and serious ADR to marketed medicinal products. The collaboration of nursing professionals with this task makes it possible to improve patient safety and to reduce ADR costs. Although a total of 781 cases of ADR cases were reported in Navarra in 2011, only 7.33% were reported by nurses. The objectives werw to determine the factors that influence nurses in reporting of ADR, and second, to devise strategies which help to increase reporting. A bibliographic search for articles that included the words: reacciones adversas medicamentosas (adverse drug reactions), notificación (reporting) and enfermería (nursing) was conducted using the PubMed and Cinhal databases. A total of 107 articles were retrieved, of which 27 were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The conclusion learned by reading and analyzing the selected articles was that the factors that affect the notification depend on the attitude of the notifier, as well as personal and professional factors. The main strategies to encourage notification are education and training, motivation, and the availability of facilitating tools. The main factors that have an influence on under-notification are the lack of knowledge and motivation among professionals. To solve the problem of under-notification, the main actions and strategies to undertake are education, motivation and persistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Students' voices: the lived experience of faculty incivility as a barrier to professional formation in associate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prato, Darlene

    2013-03-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in constructing learning environments that foster the positive formation of future nurses. The students' construction of a nursing identity is grounded in social interactions with faculty and is shaped by values and norms learned in both the formal and informal curriculum. The informal curriculum is communicated in faculty teaching practices and relationships established with students. To acquire an understanding of the students' lived experience in associate degree nursing education and identify educational practices that support students' professional formation. A phenomenological design was chosen to study the lived experience of nursing education. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 participants. Five students participated in second interviews for a total of 18 interviews. Symbolic interactionism guided data analysis. Participants represented three ADN programs in the northeastern U.S. and were diverse in terms of gender and age and to a lesser extent race, and sexual orientation. Faculty incivility included demeaning experiences, subjective evaluation, rigid expectations, and targeting and weeding out practices. Targeting practices contributed to a perceived focus on clinical evaluation and inhibited clinical learning. Faculty incivility hindered professional formation by interfering with learning, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and confidence. Faculty who model professional values in the formal and hidden curriculum contribute to the positive formation of future nurses. Nursing faculty should be formally prepared as educators to establish respectful, connected relationships with students. Faculty should role model professional values, deemphasize their evaluative role, provide constructive formative feedback, and remain open to the student's potential for growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Professional Values, Job Satisfaction, and Intent to Leave Among Nursing Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Kaya, Ayla

    2017-08-01

    The professional values that are typically attributed to nursing managers influence the behaviors of staff nurses as well as of nursing managers. Therefore, the efficient planning and implementation of nursing services require that nursing managers raise their awareness of professional nursing values. This study aims to investigate the correlations between professional values, job satisfaction, and intent to leave the job and the institution. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted on 216 nursing managers in nine different hospitals in Turkey. The data were collected using a personal information form, Nursing Professional Values Scale, Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire, and scales on intent to leave the job and the institution. Results indicate a positive correlation between the professional values of nurses and their job satisfaction and suggest a negative correlation between professional values and intent to leave the job and the institution. Furthermore, agency was found to be a determinant of job satisfaction. Strong professional values were found to increase job satisfaction and decrease the intent to leave the job and the institution.

  3. Expectation of fairness: a turning point in the professional satisfaction of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Forooshani, Zahra Sadat Dibaji

    2016-06-01

    The professional satisfaction of staff is one of the most challenging organizational concepts that can enhance the efficiency level of organizations. In a similar vein, the professional satisfaction of nurses is of considerable importance, in that, professional dissatisfaction among nurses could result in emotional detachment, depression, anger, evasion from work, and inefficacy and would negatively impact the organization's work rate. The aim of this study was to understand Iranian nurses' experiences of the concept of professional satisfaction. This was a qualitative study conducted with a targeted sampling of 10 nurses (4 men and 6 women) in 2015. The data were collected through conducting in-depth interviews, and textual data were analyzed subsequently using the Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) method. The findings of this study pointed to "fair conduct," which was comprised of three sub-categories, i.e., expectation of fairness in social-professional settings, expectation of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and expectation of fairness in the area of professional interactions. There are various ups and downs in nursing due to the challenging nature of the profession, from the initial education at the university until retirement. According to the findings of this study, a lack of fairness in social-professional settings, a lack of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and a lack of fairness in the area of professional interactions were among the factors that have great impacts on the degree of professional dissatisfaction among nurses.

  4. Impact of Professional Nursing Tutors on National Council Licensure Examination Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondeik, Shelly L.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the impact of professional nursing tutors on National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) success. Thirty-eight nursing student success rates from Northcentral Technical College, a two year technical college in Wisconsin, were analyzed by using NCLEX pass rate information, professional tutoring logs, and a…

  5. Correlation between burnout and professional value in Chinese oncology nurses: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Clinical implication: The prevalence of job burnout in oncology nurses is high, and this could be improved by increasing perception of professional value. It is urgent for managers to strengthen professional value education and to take strategies that reduce job burnout, which is important for the overall quality and safety of nursing.

  6. Critical Care Nurses' Reasons for Poor Attendance at a Continuous Professional Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Myra; Coetzee, Isabel; Heyns, Tanya

    2016-12-01

    Society demands competent and safe health care, which obligates professionals to deliver quality patient care using current knowledge and skills. Participation in continuous professional development programs is a way to ensure quality nursing care. Despite the importance of continuous professional development, however, critical care nurse practitioners' attendance rates at these programs is low. To explore critical care nurses' reasons for their unsatisfactory attendance at a continuous professional development program. A nominal group technique was used as a consensus method to involve the critical care nurses and provide them the opportunity to reflect on their experiences and challenges related to the current continuous professional development program for the critical care units. Participants were 14 critical care nurses from 3 critical care units in 1 private hospital. The consensus was that the central theme relating to the unsatisfactory attendance at the continuous professional development program was attitude. In order of importance, the 4 contributing priorities influencing attitude were communication, continuous professional development, time constraints, and financial implications. Attitude relating to attending a continuous professional development program can be changed if critical care nurses are aware of the program's importance and are involved in the planning and implementation of a program that focuses on the nurses' individual learning needs. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  7. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvonne ten Hoeve; Prof. Dr. Petrie F. Roodbol; Gerard Jansen

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses’ self-concept and professional identity. Background. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always

  8. Evaluation of the neonatal nurse practitioner role: the next frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus-Frank, M E; Conner-Bronson, J; Mullaney, D; McNamara, L M; Laurizio, V A; Edwards, W H

    1996-08-01

    The neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, has been in place since 1989. As part of the professional growth and development of this NNP group, the necessity for a useful evaluation instrument emerged. This instrument needed to be congruent with the job description, practice philosophy, and strong commitment to peer review. The literature search and institutional survey failed to uncover an acceptable option, so an evaluation instrument was developed, tested, and refined. This instrument captures the diverse scope of NNP practice and incorporates a continuum of novice to expert competencies based on the work of Patricia Benner. This evaluation mechanism has had a profound effect on our group, encouraging the development of a shared vision of the NNP role and stimulating professional growth.

  9. Nursing care of children in general practice settings: roles and responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Barnes, Margaret; Mitchell, Amy E

    2015-11-01

    To examine roles and responsibilities of Practice Nurses in the area of child health and development and in advising parents about child health issues. As the focus of Australia's health care system shifts further towards the primary health care sector, governmental initiatives require that Practice Nurses are knowledgeable, confident and competent in providing care in the area of child health and development. Little is known about roles and responsibilities of Practice Nurses in this area. Cross-sectional survey design. Practice Nurses completed a national online survey examining the roles and responsibilities in child health and development, professional development needs and role satisfaction. Data were collected from June 2010-April 2011. Respondents (N = 159) reported having a significant role in well and sick child care and were interested in extending their role. Frequent activities included immunization, phone triage/advice, child health/development advice, wound care and Healthy Kids Checks. However, few had paediatric/child nursing backgrounds or postgraduate qualifications in paediatric nursing and they reported limited preparation for the role. Practice Nurses reported difficulties with keeping up-to-date with child health information and advising parents confidently. Satisfaction was relatively low regarding opportunities and encouragement to undertake professional development and expand scope of practice. Practice Nurses are largely unprepared to meet the demands of their child health role and need support to develop and maintain the skills and knowledge base necessary for high-quality, evidence-based practice. Both financial and time support is needed to enable Practice Nurses to access child health professional development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: Framing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Johnson, Ann

    2017-05-01

    The NASN Code of Ethics upholds that it is the responsibility of the school nurse to maintain competency and pursue personal and professional growth. Designing professional development activities that are relevant and support the needs of the school nurse can be a challenge. The Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice provides a model rooted in evidence-based standards of practice that can be utilized to assess an existing professional development program and identify gaps in learning opportunities. Nurse leaders can use the Framework for 21st Century Nursing Practice to provide a roadmap toward a professional development program that will be meaningful to school nurse staff, help restore or maintain joy in their practice, and allow them to achieve the goal of advancing the well-being, academic success, and lifelong achievement and health of students.

  11. Perspectives on age and continuing professional development for nurses : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Ten Cate, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    The need for nurses to participate in continuing professional development (CPD) is growing to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Ageing leads to changes in biological, psychological, and social functioning. Little is known about the

  12. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Heydari; Hossein Kareshki; Mohammad Reza Armat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses’ competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses’ competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, sh...

  13. High School Counselors' Knowledge of Professional Nursing as a Career Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Deolinda; Cadenhead, Gerry; McKee, Adam

    2002-01-01

    A survey completed by 189 high school counselors assessed their knowledge of professional nursing in terms of educational preparation, career opportunities, and salary and mobility potential. Most felt well informed about nursing careers. Females and whites rated nursing higher as a profession than did males and African Americans. (SK)

  14. Reconnecting with Your Passion: An Action Research Study Exploring Humanities and Professional Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was two-fold. The first purpose was to examine the process of how nurses engaged in a professional development program that drew upon reading and creative writing related to their lives and work as nurses. Secondly, this study examined the nurses' perspectives on how their involvement in the process…

  15. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  16. Nurse's role in controlling cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfudh, Salma Said

    2011-10-01

    Nurses spend more time with patients than any other member of the healthcare team. They play a critical, active and very important part in controlling cancer patients' pain and alleviating suffering. In controlling cancer pain the nurse needs to understand the psychological state of the cancer patient, cancer pain, cancer pain treatment, deleterious effects of unrelieved cancer pain and patient's socio cultural background. She needs to understand that there are two types of pain, nociceptive and neuropathic pains and that 80% of the cancer patients in pain could have 2 or more than 4 different pains at the same time. Nurses' role in controlling cancer pain include believing the patient, assessing pain, identifying the root of the problem, planning the care, administering medication, evaluating effectiveness, ensuring good pain control and individualizing treatment. It also includes nursing interventions such as giving tender nursing care, preventing pain, educating, advocating, communicating, comforting, supporting, and counseling the patient. The nurse must use both pharmacological and non pharmacological treatments to individualize treatment, know all the drugs that are used for the treatment of Cancer Pain, how these drugs relieve pain and what their side effects are. She must use the WHO guidelines to treat pain and must choose the right drug, right dose, given at the right times, with the right intervals and to the right patient. She must evaluate effectiveness of treatment, give PRN doses for breakthrough pain and recommend for specific changes. The role of the nurse is to anticipate the patient's pain needs, advocate for the patient for what feels appropriate for him within his cultural context and incorporate the patient's belief. The nurse can physically relieve pain by promoting comfort, support painful area, gentleness in handling the patient and use nursing treatments. The nurse can recommend physiotherapy, (TENS)/Acupuncture, Occupational therapy

  17. Prescribing: A Crucial Factor in the Professionalization of Nursing in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Haririan

    2016-01-01

    Based on the results of various studies, it has been illustrated that one of the main factors in the professionalization of nurses is having independency in their job [1, 3, 10]. Since nurse prescribing has several advantages for patients, nurses, and even physicians, and because it creates a sense of being useful, independency, and professional identity for nurses [2-4, 11], it can be introduced as a Discipline for the society. Therefore, it seems necessary to develop and design native structures for nurse prescribing in Iran.

  18. The clinical nurse specialist's role as coach in a clinical practice development model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C K

    1996-06-01

    Over the past 5 years, nursing leadership at St. Luke's Medical Center in Milwaukee has been considering various mechanisms in response to recurrent comments from nursing staff regarding our career ladder. A lack of satisfaction with our career ladder led to the adoption of a new model for nursing. This shift from a career ladder to a clinical ladder has taken place over many years. In April 1994 all staff nurses were staged and transitioned to a clinical practice development model (CPDM). The CPDM is based solely on nursing practice. Our new model was developed from more than 100 narratives of clinical practice submitted by nurses at St. Luke's. Narratives are first-person accounts of an actual clinical experience. The model is based on research conducted by Patricia Benner, PhD, RN, which focused on how nurses acquired their clinical skills and what characteristics are embedded in nurses' practice. This article describes the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role as a "coach" in facilitating nursing staff transition from a career ladder to a CPDM. The CNS is in a unique position to contribute directly to quality patient care, and also indirectly by fostering professional growth and development of staff nurses. CPDM supports staff development along a continuum. The challenge for the CNS role is to further develop the coaching role to move staff along the continuum.

  19. The first evaluation of the advanced practice nurse role in Finland - the perspective of nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerström, Lisbeth; Glasberg, Ann-Louise

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe nurse leaders' (NLs) experiences of the role of advanced practice nurses (APNs). The first group of advanced practice nurses (17) in Finland graduated in 2006 and were thereafter employed by seven different organizations in more or less clearly defined advanced practice nurses roles. Seven nurse leaders at the relevant organizations were interviewed a year after the introduction of the advanced practice nurses role. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. All of the nurse leaders emphasized the importance of the advanced practice nurses role in their organization. The advanced practice nurses' scope of practice comprised a more autonomous and independent role than registered nurses. Advanced practice nurses are an important resource in the care of patients with chronic diseases and acute health problems. An important aspect regarding support for the advanced practice nurses role is the provision of information to all health-care personnel and patients about the role and clearly defined areas of responsibility. Advanced practice nurses are an important resource in the development of evidence-based nursing and improve the availability of health-care services for patients. Nurse leaders are responsible for creating sustainable structures and the prerequisites needed for advanced practice nursing through the formation of supportive organizational systems. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Understanding the bereavement care roles of nurses within acute care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Anita; Lee, Susan F; Bloomer, Melissa J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate nurses' roles and responsibilities in providing bereavement care during the care of dying patients within acute care hospitals. Bereavement within acute care hospitals is often sudden, unexpected and managed by nurses who may have limited access to experts. Nurses' roles and experience in the provision of bereavement care can have a significant influence on the subsequent bereavement process for families. Identifying the roles and responsibilities, nurses have in bereavement care will enhance bereavement supports within acute care environments. Mixed-methods systematic review. The review was conducted using the databases Cumulative Index Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus, Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CareSearch and Google Scholar. Included studies published between 2006-2015, identified nurse participants, and the studies were conducted in acute care hospitals. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and the research results were extracted and subjected to thematic synthesis. Nurses' role in bereavement care included patient-centred care, family-centred care, advocacy and professional development. Concerns about bereavement roles included competing clinical workload demands, limitations of physical environments in acute care hospitals and the need for further education in bereavement care. Further research is needed to enable more detailed clarification of the roles nurse undertake in bereavement care in acute care hospitals. There is also a need to evaluate the effectiveness of these nursing roles and how these provisions impact on the bereavement process of patients and families. The care provided by acute care nurses to patients and families during end-of-life care is crucial to bereavement. The bereavement roles nurses undertake are not well understood with limited evidence of how these roles are measured. Further education in bereavement care is needed for acute care nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nurses' attitudes and experiences surrounding palliative sedation: components for developing policy for nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bansari; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie; Shega, Joseph W

    2012-04-01

    Nurses play an integral role in providing care for patients with end of life (EOL) symptoms refractory to conventional treatments and that may necessitate palliative sedation (PS). A paucity of research on nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and experience with PS exists, despite nurses being instrumental in evaluating its appropriateness and carrying out the care plan. The objective of the study was to elicit nurses' perspectives and conceptualizations of knowledge and skills needed to administer PS in order to inform development of a hospital policy that addresses identified concerns. Four focus groups were conducted with nurses likely to have had exposure to PS (oncology, intensive care, and hospice) at an academic medical center. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and coded for salient themes. Grounded theory principles were used for the analysis. Among the four focus groups (n=31), 87% were female, 58% between the ages of 36 and 55, and more than 40% reported 10-plus years of providing patient care. Five domains emerged as important in developing a PS policy: 1) ability to define PS; 2) criterion for using PS; 3) skill set for administering PS; 4) policy and procedural guidelines; and 5) education on PS and EOL care. Nurses identified knowledge, skills, and guidelines as key considerations for implementing PS. Comprehensive policies along with adequate training are needed to expand the availability of PS in acute care hospitals and hospice programs.

  2. Copyright Law Basics for the Nursing Professional: Part 2: Protecting Your Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVelle, Meghan B; LaVelle, Beth Elchek; Port, Kenneth L; Sherlock, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the discussion of Copyright Law (found in JNPD 31:5) as it applies to nursing professionals. This part focuses on the definition of "work made for hire" and how nursing professional development specialists can both protect and share their own work. Many nurses assume that they own the works they create, but authorship is not necessarily the same as ownership. Misunderstanding copyrights could put one's job and hard work at risk!

  3. Newly graduated nurses' empowerment regarding professional competence and other work-related factors

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Liisa; Leino-Kilpi, H.; Numminen, Olivia; Isoaho, H.; Flinkman, M.; Meretoja, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although both nurse empowerment and competence are fundamental concepts of describing newly graduated nurses? professional development and job satisfaction, only few studies exist on the relationship between these concepts. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how newly graduated nurses assess their empowerment and to clarify professional competence compared to other work-related factors. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional and correlational design was applied. ...

  4. [Professional adaptation of nurses as a factor influencing the efficiency of medical care for hospitalised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala-Pawelczyk, Grazyna; Parkitna, Joanna; Panek, Dariusz

    2002-01-01

    Adaptation is defined as a specific kind of human accommodation to a particular environment. Such definition allows to describe professional adaptation as a process which prepares an employee to work effectively in a given position. Professional adaptation may comprise an employee's adaptation for professional work as well as his working community. An employee learns to perform his professional as well as social duties in a new workplace. Professional adaptation is one of the components of management in employment policy which influences the effectiveness of operation of the health care system. In the present study the author tries to answer the following questions. What are the factors influencing the course of nurses' professional adaptation? How do nurses evaluate the course of their professional adaptation? Do nurses think that the process of professional adaptation influences the effectiveness of medical operations performed by nurses with regard to hospitalised patients? The research included 120 section nurses employed for the first time in maintenance departments of different hospitals (not including clinical hospitals). The research was conducted in the autumn of 2000 in the whole country. A questionnaire for section nurses was employed. As a result of the analysis of the data obtained in the research the posed questions (among other things) were answered. The investigated nurses positively assess the course of professional adaptation which they underwent at the beginning of their professional careers. Among the factors influencing the course of professional adaptation the following were named among others: adaptation programme, choice of adaptation tutor, organisation of the working process and allocation of tasks during adaptation, the relations in the group, the equipment in departments. According to the investigated nurses correct course, properly prepared and realised professional adaptation programme helps to reduce professional difficulties and is

  5. Direct cost of monitoring conventional hemodialysis conducted by nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Fernandes Costa Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the mean direct cost of conventional hemodialysis monitored by nursing professionals in three public teaching and research hospitals in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Method: this was a quantitative, explorative and descriptive investigation, based on a multiple case study approach. The mean direct cost was calculated by multiplying (clocked time spent per procedure by the unit cost of direct labor. Values were calculated in Brazilian real (BRL. Results: Hospital C presented the highest mean direct cost (BRL 184.52, 5.23 times greater than the value for Hospital A (BRL 35.29 and 3.91 times greater than Hospital B (BRL 47.22. Conclusion: the costing method used in this study can be reproduced at other dialysis centers to inform strategies aimed at efficient allocation of necessary human resources to successfully monitor conventional hemodialysis.

  6. Mentoring Relationships and the Levels of Role Conflict and Role Ambiguity Experienced by Neophyte Nursing Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    After an examination of the current issues related to the shortages of nurses and nursing faculty in the United States, the importance of facilitating the transition of interested nurse clinicians into their roles as nurse educators in order to address the decreased number of nurses and nursing faculty became apparent. Mentoring in nursing…

  7. Clients with chronic conditions: community nurse role in a multidisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cioffi, Jane; Cummings, Joanne; Warne, Bronwyn; Harrison, Kathleen

    2014-03-01

    To define and validate the role of the community nurse in a multidisciplinary team caring for clients with chronic and complex needs. A key factor in optimising care for clients with chronic and complex conditions in the community is the use of multidisciplinary teams. A team approach is more effective as it enables better integration of services. The role of the community nurse in the multidisciplinary team has as yet not been delineated. A modified Delphi technique was used in this study. A group of 17 volunteer registered nurses who were experienced in the care of clients with chronic conditions and complex care needs in the community formed a panel of experts. Experts were emailed a series of three questionnaires. Main findings show that the role of the community nurse in a multidisciplinary team for clients with chronic conditions has six main domains - advocate, supporter, coordinator, educator, team member and assessor. A consensus on the role of the community nurse in the multidisciplinary team is described. The six key role domains reaffirm the generic role of the nurse and the validation of the role clarifies and reinforces the centrality of the community nurse in the team. Further refinement of the community nurse role is indicated to increase comprehensiveness of role descriptors particularly for the role domain, advocate. Community nurses working in multidisciplinary teams caring for clients with chronic conditions can define their role as a team member. The working relationship of the community nurse with other health professionals in the multidisciplinary team as a key approach to more integrated care for clients and carers enables the use of this approach to be better understood by all team members. With this increased understanding, community nurses are in a position to build stronger and more effective care teams. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A survey of registered nurses' perceptions of the code of professional conduct in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Janita P-C; Lam, Lai-Wah; Lui, May H-L; Ip, Wan-Yim; Chien, Wai-Tong; Lee, Iris F-K; Thompson, David R

    2010-12-01

    To examine the perceptions of the code of professional conduct among practising registered nurses in Hong Kong. A code of professional conduct is intended to guide nurses in their practice and to ensure congruence with nursing goals and objectives. Such a code for nurses in Hong Kong has been in effect for two decades but, to date, no study has examined the perceptions of it among practising nurses. A survey of 320 practising registered nurses working in a hospital cluster in Hong Kong (mean postregistration experience=11.8 years). A questionnaire developed to assess nurses' perceptions of the Code of Professional Conduct devised by the Nursing Council of Hong Kong. Providing safe and competent care, practising in accordance with the law and maintaining agreed standards were ranked in order as the three most important aspects. Safeguarding informed decision-making for patients who were mentally incapacitated or unable to speak for themselves, participating in continuing nursing education and raising objections to practices that compromise safe and appropriate care were considered the most challenging aspects to achieve in professional nursing practice. To educate nurses to become more assertive in safeguarding patients' rights and to encourage and support lifelong learning remains a major challenge in professional nursing practice. The profession and statutory bodies need to consider how best to enable practising nurses to address these issues. Examining the perceptions of practising nurses about the professional code is necessary to ensure that the profession is prepared to meet the ever-changing demands and expectations of the public whom it claims to serve. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Wetzels; MD E.J.M. Wouters; J. van Hoof; A.M.C. Dooremalen; H.T.G. Weffers

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in

  10. Metasynthesis of research on the role of psychiatric inpatient nurses: what is important to staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R; Johnson, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient psychiatric nurses are a large workforce, but their work is poorly articulated and thus poorly understood outside of the professional inpatient community. To learn how inpatient psychiatric nurses depict their work, define important aspects of their role, and view the impact of the unit environment on their clinical practice. Metasynthesis of research that has focused on the ideas and perceptions of inpatient psychiatric nurses around their role and practice on inpatient psychiatric units. Three themes emerged from the analysis; the first was an umbrella for three important aspects of nursing work: the nurses' efforts to forge engagement with patients; their activities which maintained the safety of the unit and interventions nurses viewed as educating/empowering patients. The second theme captures the conditions that enabled nurses to do this work such as a cohesive nursing team and their sense of self-direction in their role. The final theme centers on difficulties nurses encountered in enacting their role which included multiple responsibilities for patient care and management of the milieu; intense work often with low visibility and scant support within the organization. Nurses need to articulate their practice so they can assert for the staffing and resources needed to keep units safe and promote patients' well-being, strive toward quality, and promote the development of the specialty.

  11. Nurses' and midwives' knowledge and perceptions of their role in genetic teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, H; Oweis, A; Hamad, K H

    2010-12-01

    There is a high incidence of birth defects and genetic disorders in Jordan. The purpose of this study was to explore Jordanian nurses' and midwives' knowledge and perceptions of their role in genetic teaching. A descriptive cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 200 registered nurses and midwives was used. Nurses and midwives were recruited from three maternal and child health hospitals located in the northern part of Jordan. Eligible participants who met the inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study. A sociodemographic data form and a questionnaire concerning nurses' and midwives' attitudes and perceptions of their role in genetic teaching were developed for self-administration. Findings indicated that the majority (86 per cent) of nurses and midwives had an inadequate level of knowledge regarding genetic teaching regarding their roles in obtaining family history and pedigrees, and providing genetic information for affected persons or high-risk families. Furthermore, the findings indicated that nurses and midwives perceived that genetic teaching is the responsibility of other health professionals or the responsibility of genetic services centres rather than their responsibility. Nurses and midwives need to be better educated about genetics to effectively assume new roles as genetic educators and counsellors. This study documented how Jordanian nurse educators have to work to generate a new cadre of people who are adequately prepared to deliver such a service and who identify with the need for this service. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  12. Cardiovascular disease in China: an urgent need to enhance the nursing role to improve health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingjuan; Davidson, Patricia M; DiGiacomo, Michelle

    2009-03-01

    This paper reviews the role of cardiac nursing in China and the potential of this professional group to take an important role in secondary and tertiary prevention initiatives. China is undergoing unprecedented economic growth, yet globalisation of Chinese society has caused an increase in the prevalence of chronic conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease. Studies recognise that health providers and members of the public are not fully aware of the risks associated with cardiovascular disease and consequently are not equipped to deal with this looming epidemic. Position paper. This position paper summarises and discusses the burden of cardiovascular disease in China within the context of evidence for nurse-coordinated interventions. Barriers and facilitators to developing the nursing role in contemporary China are discussed. A key strategy for promoting the role of nurse-led programmes in China is increasing research skills among Chinese nurses to promote independent, collaborative interdisciplinary research. Promoting doctoral education in China, increasing the status of nursing in interdisciplinary teams, collaborating with cardiovascular nurses internationally and increasing the public's awareness of cardiovascular disease are critical steps in promoting nurse-led programmes to improve the health and well-being of the community. Given the positive relationship between knowledge and skill levels of nurses and clinical outcomes, China's investment in the education and training of its nursing workforce is critical in improving practice and outcomes in cardiovascular disease.

  13. Cardiovascular risk estimation by professionally active cardiovascular nurses: Results from the Basel 2005 Nurses Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte op Reimer, W.J.M.; Moons, P.; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Lenzen, M.; Martensson, J.; Norekval, T.M.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A; Thompson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Nurses play a key role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and one would, therefore, expect them to have a heightened awareness of the need for systematic screening and their own CVD risk profile. The aim of this study was to examine personal awareness of CVD risk among a

  14. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice-theory gap. A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses' fitness for practice. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Registered nurse job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Karen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the initial assessment of job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment of registered nurses working on units where a professional practice model was implemented and the relationship between these two variables. The nursing shortage has been linked to overall job satisfaction and specifically to nurses' satisfaction with the professional practice environment. Initiatives to increase retention and recruitment and decrease turnover have been linked to work satisfaction among nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used with participants (N = 101) from four patient care units; this represented a 55% response rate. The nurses were moderately satisfied with the professional practice environment but had overall low job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between overall work satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment (P job satisfaction that were not being met. Thus, the nurses may have become more knowledgeable about the potential needs in these areas. Nurse managers and leaders must recognize that job satisfaction consists of many dimensions, and each of these dimensions is important to nurse retention. Implementation of a professional practice model may heighten awareness of the missing components within a practice environment and lead to decreased overall satisfaction. A broader understanding of characteristics associated with increased satisfaction may aid in development of organizational change necessary to retain and attract nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. [An Investigation of the Role Responsibilities of Clinical Research Nurses in Conducting Clinical Trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Yin; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Pai, Ya-Ying; Hu, Wen-Yu

    2015-06-01

    Clinical research nurses (CRNs) play an important role in improving the quality of clinical trials. In Taiwan, the increasing number of clinical trials has increased the number of practicing CRNs. Understanding the role responsibilities of CRNs is necessary to promote professionalism in this nursing category. This study investigates the role responsibilities of CRNs in conducting clinical trials / research. A questionnaire survey was conducted in a medical center in Taipei City, Taiwan. Eighty CRNs that were registered to facilitate and conduct clinical trials at this research site completed the survey. "Subject protection" was the CRN role responsibility most recognized by participants, followed by "research coordination and management", "subject clinical care", and "advanced professional nursing". Higher recognition scores were associated with higher importance scores and lower difficulty scores. Participants with trial training had significantly higher difficulty scores for "subject clinical care" and "research coordination and management" than their peers without this training (p role responsibilities" (p management" (p role responsibilities, explaining 21.9% of the total variance. To further promote CRN as a professional career in Taiwan, the findings of this study recommend identifying the core competences of CRNs and adding CRN-related study materials into the advanced nursing curriculum. Long-term and systematic educational training may help CRNs understand the importance of their role responsibilities, better recognize their professional role, and reflect these responsibilities in clinical practice.

  17. The effect of fluency in English on the continuing professional development of nurses educated overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Louise M; Carr, Graham; Williams, Linda

    2013-03-01

    In the United Kingdom, many nurses who were educated overseas and are not native English speakers are undertaking continuing professional development study within their host country. This study investigated the effect of fluency in English on the teaching and learning of registered nurses undertaking continuing professional development within a health and social care faculty in a U.K. university. A qualitative, interpretive method was used. Data were obtained through thematic analysis of semi-structured individual interviews with educators, nurses educated in the United Kingdom, and nurses educated overseas who were not native English speakers and were undertaking continuing professional development. Participants included six educators, six registered nurses who were educated in the United Kingdom, and six registered nurses who were educated overseas and were not native English speakers. Educators resorted to generalizations in describing nurses' teaching and learning characteristics. Classroom dynamics that impeded nurses' learning were reported. Critical thinking, academic success, and integration within the classroom were affected by the ability to research, question, and discuss new or complex continuing professional development topics in English. Fluency in academic nursing English is necessary for successful continuing professional development. Educators should use and develop strategies to encourage integration in the classroom between nurses who were educated in the United Kingdom and those who were educated overseas and are not native English speakers to support critical thinking and engagement by all participants. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Exploring Educational Issues: International Nursing Students Enrolled in Professional Nursing Programs in South Texas and Their Perceptions of Educational Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Wanda R.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study explores educational challenges as manifested in the experiences of the English language learner (ELL) nursing students enrolled in a professional nursing program in San Antonio, Texas. Eleven participants were interviewed for this study using 7 open-ended questions. The research methodology applied in this study was…

  19. Impact of professional nursing practice environment and psychological empowerment on nurses' work engagement: test of structural equation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Yanhui

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of professional nursing practice environment and psychological empowerment on nurses' work engagement. Previous researchers have acknowledged the positive influence that nurse work environment and psychological empowerment have on engagement. However, less is known about the mechanisms that explain the links between them. A predictive, non-experimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 300 clinical nurses from two tertiary first class hospitals of Tianjin, China. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and the Psychological Empowerment Scale were used to measure the study variables. Structural equation modelling revealed a good fit of the model to the data based on various fit indices (P = 0.371, χ(2) /df = 1.056, goodness of fit index = 0.967), which indicated that both professional practice environment and psychological empowerment could positively influence work engagement directly, and professional practice environment could also indirectly influence work engagement through the mediation of psychological empowerment. The study hypotheses were supported. Psychological empowerment was found to mediate the relationship between practice environments and work engagement. Administrators should provide a professional nursing practice environment and empower nurses psychologically to increase nurse engagement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The changing training needs of clinical nurse managers: exploring issues for continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D; Kelly, D; Goldstone, L; Maidwell, A

    2001-04-01

    To identify areas where clinical nurse managers perceived that they would benefit from further training and to make recommendations for planning future programmes to meet their needs. The effectiveness of the clinical nurse manager has traditionally been associated with maintaining standards of care. Continuing professional development (CPD) is essential to ensure this important group feel adequately prepared to perform their role and has been recognized as an important factor in maintaining job satisfaction and reducing wasteful staff turnover. A review of the literature indicated that since the 1980s the CPD needs of clinical nurse managers have tended to be overlooked despite increasing complexity of the tasks expected of them. Thus it appeared that a fresh study to address these needs would be justified and should take into account sources of work-related stress and variables relating to job satisfaction. The study involved clinical nurse managers employed in all four acute hospital National Health Service (NHS) trusts where training needs were served by a major inner city educational consortium. Data collection proceeded in two stages. Initially interviews were undertaken with a random sample of 15 clinical nurse managers to provide in-depth, qualitative data. This information was used to develop a survey questionnaire distributed to the remaining 182 clinical nurse managers in each of the trusts. Data from the interviews indicated that clinical nurse managers appeared to feel clinically competent but generally experienced lack of confidence when dealing with a range of issues, in particular; human resources, managing budgets, deputizing for senior colleagues across the trust ('acting up') and using information technology in everyday practice. Response rate to the survey was good (65%). The results corroborated the interview findings, indicating a need for updating in the same wide range of topics. There were few differences in training needs across all four

  1. Advancing general practice nursing in Australia: roles and responsibilities of primary healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Riki; Halcomb, Elizabeth; McKenna, Lisa; Zwar, Nicholas; Naccarella, Lucio; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Russell, Grant

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Given increased numbers and enhanced responsibilities of Australian general practice nurses, we aimed to delineate appropriate roles for primary health care organisations (PHCOs) to support this workforce. Methods A two-round online Delphi consensus process was undertaken between January and June 2012, informed by literature review and key informant interviews. Participants were purposively selected and included decision makers from government and professional organisations, educators, researchers and clinicians from five Australian states and territories Results Of 56 invited respondents, 35 (62%) and 31 (55%) responded to the first and second invitation respectively. Participants reached consensus on five key roles for PHCOs in optimising nursing in general practice: (1) matching workforce size and skills to population needs; (2) facilitating leadership opportunities; (3) providing education and educational access; (4) facilitating integration of general practice with other primary care services to support interdisciplinary care; and (5) promoting advanced nursing roles. National concerns, such as limited opportunities for postgraduate education and career progression, were deemed best addressed by national nursing organisations, universities and peak bodies. Conclusions Advancement of nursing in general practice requires system-level support from a range of organisations. PHCOs play a significant role in education and leadership development for nurses and linking national nursing organisations with general practices. What is known about the topic? The role of nurses in Australian general practice has grown in the last decade, yet they face limited career pathways and opportunities for career advancement. Some nations have forged interprofessional primary care teams that use nurses' skills to the full extent of their scope of practice. PHCOs have played important roles in the development of general practice nursing in Australia and internationally

  2. The management of professionals: the preferences of hospital sisters and charge nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, D

    1995-05-01

    This analysis of the preferences of how sisters and charge nurses are managed is the result of a two centre descriptive study using theoretical models of professionalism, developing preferences and exercising situational leadership. It was conducted to determine if the management structure preferred by sisters and charge nurses, in a general acute hospital setting, supported the professionalism of nursing. The outcomes were intended to help develop a strategic plan for the future of nursing and the management of nurses. The research instruments were a self-completed questionnaire (19 were returned, a response rate of 31.1%) and four semi-structured interviews. The findings disclosed some dissatisfaction with the present management arrangements. The sisters and charge nurses felt that their priorities for practice and professional issues were better supported by clinically involved, ward-based senior nurses than by unit-based senior nurses with a general management function. However, sisters' and charge nurses' discussions with ward-based senior nurses were apparently less effective than discussions in peer groups which led to influential collegial autonomy. This preferred management style can be supported by the use of situational leadership theory which would enhance collegial autonomy and professional satisfaction. Recognition of the sisters and charge nurses preferences and adjustment of their management would therefore enable them to participate effectively in organizational decision-making.

  3. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the organ donor process: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Käthe; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Eide, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study that explored Norwegian intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence to identify educational needs in the organ donor process. Intensive care professionals are requested to consider organ donation each time they care for patients with severe cerebral lesion to ensure donor organs for transplantation. The donor process challenges intensive care nurses' professional competence. Nurses' knowledge and experience may influence their professional competence in caring for organ donors and their relatives. METHODS.: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in all 28 Norwegian donor hospitals between October 2008 and January 2009. Intensive care nurses (N = 801) were invited to participate and the response rate was 71·4%. Dimensions of professional competence, learning needs and contextual and demographic variables were explored. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Few intensive care nurses had extensive experience of or competence and training in organ donation. Nurses working at university hospitals had more experience, but lesser training than nurses in local hospitals. Experience of donor acquisition had an impact on intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the donor process. Discussions on the ward and educational input were seen as important for the further development of professional competence. Training provided by experienced colleagues and a culture that encourages discussion about aspects of the donor process can develop nurses' professional competence and communally defined professional practice. Educational input that cultivates various types of knowledge can be beneficial in organ donation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The Lived Experiences of Nurses Transitioning to a Preceptor Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Janice Ampil

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of nurses who have transitioned to a nurse preceptor role and provides examples of how individuals learn in the workplace. Historically, nurses who agreed to become preceptors were chosen based on their availability and experience, not necessarily their teaching and learning abilities. Nursing research has…

  5. Nursing students’ experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldal, Maiken Holm; Kristiansen, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION / OBJECTIVE The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on nursing students’ experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit. More specifically the research questions are: How do nursing students...... describe their experiences of professional patient care in a hospital unit? What kinds of experiences do nursing students have in professional patient care encounters? INCLUSION CRITERIA Types of participants This review will consider studies that include undergraduate and postgraduate nursing students....... The range of participants includes all nursing students independently of the level of their clinical period. There will be no limitations regarding the age, gender or ethnicity of participants. Types of phenomena of interest This review will consider studies that investigate nursing students' learning...

  6. Sustainability as an Ethical Principle: Ensuring Its Systematic Place in Professional Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Alongside the central focus on the persons requiring nursing care in professional nursing practice, the perspective of the sustainability of interventions and the use of materials (for example, nursing aids and hygiene articles) is gaining prominence in nursing decision-making processes. This contribution makes the principle of sustainability concrete and delineates its importance in the context of professional nursing practice and decision-making. It further suggests the development of an ethical policy in order to systematically ensure that sustainability has a place in ethical reflection and decision-making, and describes the elements involved. Finally, a synthesis is made between the importance of the principle of sustainability, suggested ethical policies (system of ethical reflection) as they affect nursing practice and professional reflection, decision-making, and practice. PMID:27417590

  7. Factors that facilitate registered nurses in their first-line nurse manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziraki, Karen; McKey, Colleen; Peachey, Gladys; Baxter, Pamela; Flaherty, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    To determine the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role. The first-line nurse manger role is pivotal in health-care organisations. National demographics suggest that Canada will face a first-line nurse manager shortage because of retirement in the next decade. Determination of factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses will assist organisations and policy makers to employ strategies to address this shortage. The study used an exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach, consisting of semi-structured individual interviews with 11 Registered Nurses in first-line nurse manager roles. The findings revealed a discrepancy between the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role, underscored the importance of the mentor role and confirmed the challenges encountered by first-line nurse managers practicing in the current health-care environment. The first-line nurse manager role has been under studied. Further research is warranted to understand which strategies are most effective in supporting first-line nurse managers. Strategies to support nurses in the first-line nurse manager role are discussed for the individual, programme, organisation and health-care system/policy levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Genealogy as a critical toolbox: deconstructing the professional identity of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Bonet, Margalida; Bover-Bover, Andreu; Moreno-Mulet, Cristina; Miró-Bonet, Rosa; Zaforteza-Lallemand, Concha

    2014-04-01

    To discuss the Foucauldian concept of genealogy as a framework for understanding and transforming nurses' professional identity. The professional identity of nurses has primarily been defined by personal and interpersonal attributes and by the intradisciplinary dimensions of nursing, leading to its conceptualization as a universal, monolithic phenomenon. The Foucauldian genealogical perspective offers a critical lens to examine what constitutes this professional identity; Spanish nursing offers a historical case study of an active effort to impose an identity that fits the monolithic ideal. Five of the 33 professional conduct manuals for nurses' training published from 1956-1976 during the Franco dictatorship in Spain and six interviews with nursing instructors or students at the time were analysed using a theoretical framework drawn from Foucault's writing. Foucault's genealogical framework considers practices of normalization and resistance as a means of understanding knowledge continuities and discontinuities, clarifying practices that constitute nurses' professional identity in a particular way in specific contexts and analysing the implications of this theoretical frame. The genealogy concept offers valuable tools to determine how professional identities are constituted, questions assumptions about the profession and its professionals and envisions alternative approaches. This theoretical approach helps both scholars and practitioners understand, question and transform their practices as needed. The genealogical approach prioritizes analysis of the phenomenon over its description and challenges many unknown, forgotten, excluded and/or unquestioned aspects of identity from a position of diversity and complexity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nursing Students' Experiences of Learning Numeracy for Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Rachel; Hodgen, Jeremy; Coben, Diana; Bretscher, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines nursing students' experiences of the teaching and assessment of numeracy for nursing. Data from interviews with eight student nurses at a large school of nursing in the United Kingdom are analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach to explore their perceptions of any disjunctures between the ways in which numeracy…

  10. Nursing Students' Use of Electronic and Social Media: Law, Ethics, and E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the promotion of professionalism in nursing students with regard to the use of electronic and social media. Misuse of social media can lead to disciplinary actions and program dismissal for students and to legal actions and lawsuits for nursing programs. Programs are concemed about breaches of patient confidentiality and release of private or inappropriate information that jeopardizes clinical placements and relationships. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and National Council of State Boards of Nursing social media guidelines provide a foundation for promoting e-professionalism in students. Recent law cases involving students who were dismissed from nursing programs due to social media misuse are analyzed. Schools need policies that clearly establish expectations and the consequences of misuse of social media platforms. Lessons learned from the legal cases presented provide further guidance for both nursing students and nursing programs.

  11. "Discrimination", the Main Concern of Iranian Nurses over Inter-Professional Collaboration: an Explorative Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Irajpour, Alireza; Shohani, Masoumeh

    2015-06-01

    People in various professions may face discrimination. In the nursing field, discrimination among nurses in the workplace, regardless of race, gender or religion have not been studied; a problem that leads to a reduction in the quality of nursing care and nurse turnover. Discovery of the concerns of nurses about inter-professional collaboration is the purpose of this study. The present study is conducted by using a qualitative content analysis. The data collection process included 22 unstructured and in-depth interviews with nurses between April 2012 and February 2013 in the medical teaching centers of Iran. A purposive sampling method was used. All interviews were recorded, typed, and analyzed simultaneously. The category obtained from explaining nurses' experiences of inter-professional collaboration was "discrimination" that included two subcategories, namely (1) lack of perspective towards equality in authorities, and (2) professional respect and value deficit. Nurses' experiences are indicating their perception of discrimination that influences the collaboration between nurses, which should be taken into account by managers. The findings of the present study help to managers about decision making on how to deal with staff and can be helpful in preventing nurse turnover and providing better services by nurses.

  12. "Discrimination", the Main Concern of Iranian Nurses over Inter-Professional Collaboration: an Explorative Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People in various professions may face discrimination. In the nursing field, discrimination among nurses in the workplace, regardless of race, gender or religion have not been studied; a problem that leads to a reduction in the quality of nursing care and nurse turnover. Discovery of the concerns of nurses about inter-professional collaboration is the purpose of this study. Methods: The present study is conducted by using a qualitative content analysis. The data collection process included 22 unstructured and in-depth interviews with nurses between April 2012 and February 2013 in the medical teaching centers of Iran. A purposive sampling method was used. All interviews were recorded, typed, and analyzed simultaneously. Results: The category obtained from explaining nurses' experiences of inter-professional collaboration was "discrimination" that included two subcategories, namely (1 lack of perspective towards equality in authorities, and (2 professional respect and value deficit.Conclusion: Nurses' experiences are indicating their perception of discrimination that influences the collaboration between nurses, which should be taken into account by managers. The findings of the present study help to managers about decision making on how to deal with staff and can be helpful in preventing nurse turnover and providing better services by nurses.

  13. Tensions in learning professional identities - nursing students' narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practice: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta; Allvin, Renée; Blomberg, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Clinical practice is a pivotal part of nursing education. It provides students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have acquired from lectures into practice with real patients, under the guidance of registered nurses. Clinical experience is also essential for shaping the nursing students' identity as future professional nurses. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the ways in which students learn practical skills and apply knowledge within and across different contexts, i.e. how they apply clinical skills, learnt in the laboratory in university settings, in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how nursing students describe, and use, their prior experiences related to practical skills during their clinical practice. An ethnographic case study design was used. Fieldwork included participant observations (82 h), informal conversations, and interviews (n = 7) that were conducted during nursing students' (n = 17) clinical practice at an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden. The overarching theme identified was "Learning about professional identities with respect to situated power". This encompasses tensions in students' learning when they are socialized into practical skills in the nursing profession. This overarching theme consists of three sub-themes: "Embodied knowledge", "Divergent ways of assessing and evaluating knowledge" and "Balancing approaches". Nursing students do not automatically possess the ability to transfer knowledge from one setting to another; rather, their development is shaped by their experiences and interactions with others when they meet real patients. The study revealed different ways in which students navigated tensions related to power differentials. Reflecting on actions is a prerequisite for developing and learning practical skills and professional identities. This highlights the importance of both educators' and the preceptors' roles for socializing

  14. Role Expectations for United States Air Force Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    performing psychotherapy. They found a positive correlation between educational level and openness to PCNS psychotherapists . Further, nurse educators were most...as a professional colleague on the mental health multidisciplinary team, setting standards for inpatient mental healtn nursing care, and educating...one behavior not identified to be characteristic of the PCNS role was, "serves as subordinate member of the mental nealth multidisciplinary team." .°I j

  15. Exploring Current and Future Roles of Non-Dental Professionals: Implications for Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Hannah L; Farrell, Christine; Gwozdek, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The health care system is undergoing transformation in which oral health is not only valued as an aspect of overall health, but health care delivery systems are aligning to better deliver total patient care. As a result of this transformation, education for many non-dental professionals incorporates oral health content to prepare them to practice in comprehensive delivery models. While some non-dental professionals already incorporate oral health care in their service, many opportunities exist for expansion of oral health care delivery by other non-dental professionals, including radiologic technicians, nursing staff, and human services professionals. As non-dental professionals take on expanded roles in oral health care, the dental hygiene workforce must be prepared to practice in settings with new types of professionals. Dental hygiene curricula should prioritize interprofessional education to best prepare these students for practice in evolved delivery models. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  16. [Quality of professional life and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodarte-Cuevas, Lilia; Araujo-Espino, Roxana; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla María; González-Tovar, José

    To characterize the conditions of quality of working life, the presence of muscle- skeletal disorders and the association between these variables in nursing staff of a public hospital in Zacatecas, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with descriptive-correlational scope was designed. A stratified random sampling per shift was used in 107 cases. The Questionnaire Professional Quality of Life (CVP-35) was applied as well as the Nordic Questionnaire Standardized for musculoskeletal pain and work-related risk factors questionnaire. The quality of working life gained an average of 55.62 (SD=13.57), the intrinsic motivation was the best rated component with (M=75.06, SD=18.44), contrary to managerial support that got the lowest scores with (M=43.74, SD=21.71). The presence of risk factors in the development work of musculoskeletal problems obtained a mean of 50.10 (SD=26.69). The main musculoskeletal disorders occurred in the neck region, lumbar spine and knees with 42.1% for each one. The quality of working life decreased in the presence of muscle-skeletal problems in the lumbar region with (-0.188, p≤.050), dorsal (-0.206, p≤.050), neck (-0.175, p≤.050) and knees (-0.220, p≤.010). It is necessary to improve the working conditions of nurses to reduce the presence of musculoskeletal problems and improve their quality of working life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of nurse educators in grooming future nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Rose O; Bishop, Mary

    2007-07-01

    The authors have found in their research that too often our current nurse leaders have "fallen into" their positions, rather than choosing nursing leadership as a career path. With the impending retirements of so many nurse leaders, there is a need for a more proactive approach to ensure the next generation of nurse leaders is ready to assume the leadership of our profession. Guiding the development of a leadership mindset and promoting nursing leadership as a career choice are two important strategies. Nurse educators are in a key position to influence students and start grooming our future nurse leaders. There is no time to waste.

  18. Role and working conditions of nurses in public health in Mexico and Peru: a binational qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Córdova, Maria Isabel Peñarrietade; Mier, Nelda; Quirarte, Nora Hilda Gonzales; Gómez, Tranquilina Gutiérrez; Piñones, Socorro; Borda, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    This exploratory study conducted in Mexico and Peru investigated nurses' perceptions about their role in public health and working conditions. Health reform efforts in many countries are redefining the role of health professionals in public health. Little is known about the role of nurses working in public health contexts in Latin America. Fourteen focus groups were conducted in Mexico and Peru with 82 nurses working in government-sponsored community health centres. Data were analysed using a content analysis technique. Themes identified were: nurses' job descriptions in public health settings; organisational factors influencing the nurses' work, and influence of academic and social image factors. Management barriers and limited training influences the role and working conditions of public health nurses in Mexico and Peru. The professional role of nurses working in public health in Latin America is not well defined because of the health-care system infrastructure and the lack of a clear public health nurse job description. Further research is needed to better understand the role of public health nurses and strengthen their training, particularly in relation to nursing management encompassing abilities for decision-making processes and public health program planning and evaluation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Views of professional nurses regarding low tuberculosis cure rate in Greater Giyani Municipality, Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandzumuni V. Maswanganyi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of patients suffering from tuberculosis (TB after discharge from hospital plays a critical role in the cure rate of TB. Despite interventions developed by the World Health Organization (WHO to improve the cure rate, TB remains a worldwide health problem.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the views of professional nurses regarding the low TB cure rate in primary healthcare facilities of Greater Giyani Municipality in Limpopo Province, South Africa, with the aim of determining strategies that can be used to improve this low rate.Method: This study was qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual in nature. The population consisted of professional nurses working in primary healthcare facilities within Greater Giyani Municipality, which has a TB cure rate below the national target of 85 %. Data gathering was through individual face-to-face interviews using an interview guide. Open-coding was used to analyse the data in this study.Results: The theme that emerged from data was ‘factors contributing to low TB cure rate’. This theme was supported by the following sub-themes: poor referral system, lack of knowledge about TB and its treatment, stigma attached to TB, and cultural and religious beliefs. The professional nurses suggested counselling of TB patients upon diagnosis, advice about patients’ responsibilities and the involvement of family members.Conclusion: The involvement of community stakeholders in TB prevention, health promotion and education activities devoted to disease spread and cure is vital so that the stigma attached to TB can be eliminated. TB education and awareness programmes should be included in the curriculum of primary schools.

  20. Spiritual formation, secularization, and reform of professional nursing and education in antebellum America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libster, Martha Mathews

    The origin story of professional nursing associated with antebellum American faith communities is all but lost. This paper provides historical evidence for professional nursing for that period using a case study approach that examines three faith communities: the Sisters and Daughters of Charity, the Shakers, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The purpose is to present an historical analysis of the three communities' health beliefs, recipes and remedies that were foundational to the spiritual formation and education of professional nurses within their communities. The focus of the analysis is to place the evidence for professional nursing in these faith communities within the broader context of the contemporary American narrative of the "secularization" of professional nursing associated with the adoption of the Nightingale Training Model after 1873. Nursing became a profession in America because of the courage and passion of many for spiritual formation in community around a need to relieve suffering and demonstrate kindness. The history of American nursing is comprised of stories of powerful nurse ancestors that have the potential to inspire and unite us in that same purpose today despite the ambiguities that may still exist around spirituality, religiosity, and secularization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the clinical supervision and professional development of student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinsson, Elisabeth; Sand, Ase

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical supervision and professional development of student nurses during their undergraduate education. Nursing education has undergone radical changes as a result of improvements in the academic-based clinical education required for the Bachelor's degree. The sample consisted of student nurses (n = 147) and data were collected by means of questionnaires. The results demonstrated that the frequency of sessions and the supervision model employed influence the student nurses' professional development. Several significant correlations were found, most of which were related to the development of the student nurses' professional relationships with their supervisors and reflection on the development of their skills. From the patients' perspective, a high correlation was found between the factors 'preserving integrity' and 'protecting participation by patients and family members'. Clinical supervision strongly influences the student nurses' development of a professional identity, enhancing decision-making ability and personal growth. However, development of documentation skills should include a greater level of user involvement. The findings highlight the need for management and staff nurses to engage in on-going professional development. Transformative leadership, which is value driven, can facilitate and enhance the supervision and development of student nurses. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The influence of empowerment, authentic leadership, and professional practice environments on nurses' perceived interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Sandra; Laschinger, Heather K S; Wong, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of structural empowerment, authentic leadership and professional nursing practice environments on experienced nurses' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration. Enhanced interprofessional collaboration (IPC) is seen as one means of transforming the health-care system and addressing concerns about shortages of health-care workers. Organizational supports and resources are suggested as key to promoting IPC. A predictive non-experimental design was used to test the effects of structural empowerment, authentic leadership and professional nursing practice environments on perceived interprofessional collaboration. A random sample of experienced registered nurses (n = 220) in Ontario, Canada completed a mailed questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used. Higher perceived structural empowerment, authentic leadership, and professional practice environments explained 45% of the variance in perceived IPC (Adj. R² = 0.452, F = 59.40, P < 0.001). Results suggest that structural empowerment, authentic leadership and a professional nursing practice environment may enhance IPC. Nurse leaders who ensure access to resources such as knowledge of IPC, embody authenticity and build trust among nurses, and support the presence of a professional nursing practice environment can contribute to enhanced IPC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Role of Directorates in Promoting Nursing and Midwifery Across the Various States of India: Call for Leadership for Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, Rajni; Jaiswal, Vaishali; Tiwari, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Background: While the roles and responsibilities of nursing professionals have multiplied over the years, but there are huge concerns with regard to the development of the nursing workforce and human resources (HR) issues for their career growth. The major lacuna is in not involving the nursing professionals in policy framing and decision-making. As a result, there is a leadership crisis of the nursing workforce across India. Objectives: The paper, is part of the WHO supported study, entitled “Study on Nursing and Midwifery in India: a critical review”, is developed with the objective to review the current organizational and management structure for the nursing positions at the State Directorates in India and obtain a Leadership perspective to strengthen nursing management capacities to address maternal health issues. Materials and Methods: The study descriptive and qualitative in nature and the sources of information were both primary and secondary collected from 16 states of India. Results: Since none of the states have neither a Nursing Cell nor the post of Director Nursing, final decision-making powers rest with state health secretaries and medical directors. The nursing management structure majorly managed by senior policy makers from the medical fraternity, and provides very little scope for nursing professionals to participate in policy decision making to bring about reforms. There is no uniformity on HR issues concerning career graphs and pay structures across the states. Conclusions: In order to strengthen nursing as a profession and for facilitating their role at the policy level, more powers and autonomy needs to be given to them and this requires HR policy guidelines for nurses. Setting up a separate nursing directorate, to be headed by a senior nursing professional, is suggested in every state along with a strong nursing division at the National level. This total paradigm shift will empower nursing professionals to take up the leadership role at

  4. Role of Directorates in Promoting Nursing and Midwifery Across the Various States of India: Call for Leadership for Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Bagga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While the roles and responsibilities of nursing professionals have multiplied over the years, but there are huge concerns with regard to the development of the nursing workforce and human resources (HR issues for their career growth. The major lacuna is in not involving the nursing professionals in policy framing and decision-making. As a result, there is a leadership crisis of the nursing workforce across India. Objectives: The paper, is part of the WHO supported study, entitled "Study on Nursing and Midwifery in India: a critical review", is developed with the objective to review the current organizational and management structure for the nursing positions at the State Directorates in India and obtain a Leadership perspective to strengthen nursing management capacities to address maternal health issues. Materials and Methods: The study descriptive and qualitative in nature and the sources of information were both primary and secondary collected from 16 states of India. Results: Since none of the states have neither a Nursing Cell nor the post of Director Nursing, final decision-making powers rest with state health secretaries and medical directors. The nursing management structure majorly managed by senior policy makers from the medical fraternity, and provides very little scope for nursing professionals to participate in policy decision making to bring about reforms. There is no uniformity on HR issues concerning career graphs and pay structures across the states. Conclusions: In order to strengthen nursing as a profession and for facilitating their role at the policy level, more powers and autonomy needs to be given to them and this requires HR policy guidelines for nurses. Setting up a separate nursing directorate, to be headed by a senior nursing professional, is suggested in every state along with a strong nursing division at the National level. This total paradigm shift will empower nursing professionals to take up the

  5. The role of advanced practice nurses in transplant center staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Haley; Alexander, Susan; Payne, Jerita; Zavala, Edward

    2011-12-01

    Despite increased rates of solid organ transplantation and frequent use of advanced practice nurses (APNs) to manage patients, no established staffing model including APNs and their roles exists. To characterize the role and integration of APNs in the staffing models of existing transplant centers. Descriptive research using a researcher-designed survey of transplant APN professionals. 53 attendees of a national APN transplant clinical management symposium. Investigator-designed survey tool consisting of 21 questions delivered in a paper format with 1 open-ended question about adequacy of current staffing and ideas for improvement. 53 responses from staff members of 21 different transplant centers were collected. In addition to APNs, members of existing transplant staffing models were identified as licensed practical nurses, registered nurses, social workers, administrative assistants, and data managers. The primary responsibilities of APNs were both inpatient and outpatient, before and after transplant, and consisted primarily of collecting patients' medical histories, doing physical examinations, handling clinic visits, and education. Licensed practical and registered nurses handled pre-transplant referral management and phone triage duties. Social workers, administrative assistants, and data managers were responsible for social support, medical record management, and regulatory documentation, respectively. Most respondents (57%) found current staffing to be inadequate in their centers and suggested areas for improvement. APNs play a vital role in management of transplant patients. Transplant centers use APNs in different capacities, depending on the individual needs of the institution. Across institutions, support staff is crucial in the perception of adequate staffing. Additional research is needed to determine the most efficient use of APNs in transplant centers.

  6. Elderly abuse: risk factors and nursing role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Ivshina, Evgeniya; Ferrara, Nicola; Solimeno Cipriano, Angela; Campobasso, Carlo Pietro

    2015-04-01

    Elderly abuse is still a hidden problem, often underestimated. It is much more common than the data available suggest. Unfortunately, the incidence is expected to grow with the progressive increase in the elderly population in the future. The aim was to examine the available literature in the last 5 years to define the state of art on this phenomenon, with particular regard to the nursing role in elderly abuse, focusing on the possible types of mistreatment, the motivations and preventive interventions. Articles published in the last 5 years regarding the mistreatment of the elderly were selected, by using scientifically recognized databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medline, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge. Several keywords were used for the query among which were: "elderly abuse" and "elderly abuse in nursing home". Moreover, to better understand the entity of the phenomenon, we also searched the corresponding keywords for child abuse. Considering the Scopus database, only 78 out of 1,342 published articles in the last 5 years deal with abuse of the elderly in relation to nursing, representing a very small part (5.81%) of the considered sample. Comparing the number of articles, the ratio child/elderly is equal to 1/0.04, underlying the poor interest of research on this phenomenon. Moreover, it was observed that elderly abuse in nursing homes is still underreported in both original articles and reviews. Despite the aging of the population, elderly abuse and neglect still remain hidden problems, overlooked and also underestimated in the literature.

  7. Seeing the big picture in nursing: a source of human and professional pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Erik E; Hall, Elisabeth O C

    2011-10-01

    This article presents a discussion of the meaning of the phenomenon of seeing the big picture in nursing. Seeing the big picture is a frequent expression among Danish nurses. It is used when trying to understand a situation in its wider context. However, it has a rather imprecise meaning that might lead to misunderstandings. This paper draws on studies undertaken in the mid 1990s and the early 2000s, but with the current discussion developed in the context of contemporary nursing. Seeing the big picture indicates a desire to do good for patients' and staff. This desire expressed through saying 'I need to see the big picture' is discussed to be a backbone in nursing and nursing leadership and a source of human and professional pride. There is, however, a dilemma if nurses overlook needs of patients that require immediate actions and if a nurse leader does not intercept staff members in crisis. The pride is oscillating between seeing the here-and-now and seeing the long-term in the big picture. We assumed seeing the big picture had to do with practical knowledge. Wonder and reasoning, however, brought us to virtues. Seeing the big picture as mentioned among nursing leaders and clinical nurses demonstrates human and professional pride. The study is useful in organizational, clinical and educational settings in updating policies for nursing, enlarging nurses understanding of practice and training students in understanding nursing practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Nursing professionals' experiences of the facilitators and barriers to the use of telehealth applications: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-08-03

    The aim of the study was to synthesise the best available research evidence on nursing professionals' experiences of the facilitators and barriers to the use of online telehealth services in nursing practice. Telehealth is used to deliver healthcare services and health-related information by means of information and communication technology (ICT). The systematic review of qualitative studies was conducted using thematic synthesis of previous studies. International electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, Eric, Web of Science/Web of Knowledge and Scopus, and Finnish databases Medic and Ohtanen were searched in spring 2013. In addition, the search was complemented in fall 2015. Following critical appraisal, 25 studies from 1998 to fall 2015 were reviewed and the findings were synthesised. Both facilitators and barriers were grouped into five main categories which were related to nurses' skills and attitudes, nurses' work and operations, organisational factors, patients and technology. The highest number of facilitators and barriers was found in the category focusing on nurses' work and operations. Based on the findings, nurses' skills and attitudes are preventing factors in the implementation of telehealth. There is also a need to focus on patients' role in telehealth usage although the findings support positive adoption of ICT tools among patients. The findings call for further development of technological tools used in nursing practice and healthcare services. The change from traditional face-to-face nursing to the use of telehealth calls for local agreements and further discussions among professionals on how this change will be accepted and implemented into practice. In addition, organisations need to make sure that nurses have enough resources and support for telehealth use. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Assessment of clinical practice and the role of the nurse teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, C

    1994-08-01

    The assessment of the practice of student nurses in the UK is a complex process that has evolved from school based practical assessment, carried out by nurse teachers to clinically based continuous practical assessment where students are assessed by clinical staff (i.e. registered nurses) on the ward. The role played by nurse teachers in the latter model is an advisory one in which they offer guidance to the clinical staff completing the assessment. Nurse teachers also monitor the process of assessment by monitoring and responding to learner evaluations of their clinical experience and by undertaking educational audit. This system is not without problems and raises questions about the ideal 'location' for assessment of clinical skills and the respective roles of registered nurse and the nurse teacher in the assessment process. It will be argued that the present system of distancing the nurse teacher from the assessment of practice creates a conflict in which perhaps the least experienced practitioners contribute the most to the assessment of clinical skills. A change in this system demands a review of the nurse teacher's role with particular focus, first of all on time spent in clinical practice. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of this problematic issue. There are implications in this analysis for teachers and other groups of health care professionals.

  10. Nurses' roles in health promotion practice: an integrative review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kemppainen, Virpi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Nurses play an important role in promoting public health. Traditionally, the focus of health promotion by nurses has been on disease prevention and changing the behaviour of individuals with respect to their health...

  11. [Attitude towards immigration a study among nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza del Pino, Fernando Jesús

    2009-12-01

    Somewhat more than 5 million foreigners reside in Spain; they make up 11.3% of the total population, their presence implies an increase in the cultural diversity of the people who make use of public health services. By means of a descriptive quantitative study which used interviews, we have been able to discover the attitudes towards immigration which nursing professionals in the three public hospitals in the province of Almeria hold; and to analyze whether or not significant differences exist among them. After analyzing the results of more than 200 questionnaires collected, we can conclude that there are few clearly positive or negative attitudes while almost 75% of this sample show moderate attitudes and there are no statistically significant differences based on work place; therefore, we can suppose that the percentage of foreigners attended to does not determine the attitude toward immigration by personnel in each hospital. This research project was financed by the Andalucian Government's Health Council as part of those Biomedical and Health Sciences Research Projects subsidized in Andalucia in 2007, according to the official Andalucian Government publication "BOJA no 149 de fecha 30 de julio. Expediente: Pl 424-2007".

  12. Palliative Care Professional Development for Critical Care Nurses: A Multicenter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Noort, Janice; Pearson, Diana; Boyle, Deborah; Grywalski, Michelle; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Moore, Eric; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Mitchell, William; Edmonds, Kyle; Fairman, Nathan; Joseph, Denah; MacMillan, John; Milic, Michelle M; Miller, Monica; Nakagawa, Laura; O'Riordan, David L; Pietras, Christopher; Thornberry, Kathryn; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2017-09-01

    Integrating palliative care into intensive care units (ICUs) requires involvement of bedside nurses, who report inadequate education in palliative care. To implement and evaluate a palliative care professional development program for ICU bedside nurses. From May 2013 to January 2015, palliative care advanced practice nurses and nurse educators in 5 academic medical centers completed a 3-day train-the-trainer program followed by 2 years of mentoring to implement the initiative. The program consisted of 8-hour communication workshops for bedside nurses and structured rounds in ICUs, where nurse leaders coached bedside nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. Primary outcomes were nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills in surveys, and nurses' identification of palliative care needs during coaching rounds. Each center held at least 6 workshops, training 428 bedside nurses. Nurses rated their skill level higher after the workshop for 15 tasks (eg, responding to family distress, ensuring families understand information in family meetings, all P palliative care needs and created plans to address them. Communication skills training workshops increased nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills. Coaching rounds supported nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. The politics of interprofessional working and the struggle for professional autonomy in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhani, Daniel; Coulter, Ian

    2009-04-01

    This study of interprofessional work relations in a Canadian mental health team examines how nursing deployed different forms of power in order to alter the mental health division of labour, to gain administrative, organizational and content control over its own work, expand its jurisdictional boundaries by expropriating the work of other professionals, and exclude others from encroaching on its old and newly acquired jurisdictions. This is set against the context of nursing's long-standing professional project to consolidate and expand its professional jurisdiction. Using an ethnographic study of a single interprofessional mental health team in a psychiatric hospital in Canada, the paper attempts to understand the politics and paradoxes involved in realizing nursing's professional project and how the politics of professional autonomy and professional dominance are actually conducted through micro-political struggles. The data demonstrates the effects of the political struggles at the organizational and work process levels, particularly in the forms of collaboration that result. Nurses gained substantial autonomy from medical domination and secured practical dominion over the work of non-medical professionals. New forms of interprofessional collaboration were accomplished through both simultaneous and sequential micro-political struggles with psychiatrists and non-medical professionals, and the formation of political alliances and informal agreements. Nursing solidarity at the elite level and substantial effort by the elite nurses and their committed colleagues to mobilize their less enthused members were fundamental to their success. The nurses deployed political (power) strategies and tactics to organize and reorganize themselves and other professionals on multiple levels (politically, organizationally, ideologically, socially and culturally). This study reveals the complexity and robustness of micro-political dynamics in the constitution of professional and

  14. Nurses' leadership styles in the ICU: association with personal and professional profile and workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsanelli, Alexandre Pazetto; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the association between nurses' leadership styles and personal and professional nursing profile and workload. The sample consisted of seven nurses and seven nursing technicians who were grouped into pairs. At the end of three months, nurses were queried regarding what leadership style would be adopted when the nursing technician under their evaluation delivered care to patients admitted to the ICU. Relevant data was analyzed by applying descriptive statistics, Tukey's multiple comparison test and Student's t-test (pleadership styles chosen by nurses (p>0.05). The determine, persuade, and share leadership styles prevailed. However, whenever the nursing workload peaked, the determine and persuade styles were used (p<0.05).

  15. 'A very valuable fusion of classes': British professional and volunteer nurses of the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Christine E

    2014-06-01

    Public perceptions of the work of nurses and VAD-volunteers in the First World War have been heavily influenced by a small number of VAD-writings. The work of trained, professional nurses in supporting and supervised the work of VADs has been largely overlooked. This paper examines several of the writings of both volunteers and professionals, and emphasises the overlooked supervisory, managerial and clinical work of trained nurses. In this centenary year of the First World War's opening months, the paper also explores the ways in which the British mass-media--notably the BBC--have chosen to cling to a romantic image of the untrained nurse, whilst at the same time acknowledging the significance of trained, professional nursing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sleep, quality of life and mood of nursing professionals of pediatric intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Caetano Guerra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To assess sleep, quality of life and mood of nursing professionals of pediatric intensive care units. METHOD Quantitative, cross-sectional and descriptive study. Professionals grouped by morning, afternoon and evening shifts were assessed by means of the instruments: Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; Epworth Sleepiness Scale; Generic questionnaire for the assessment of quality of life (SF-36; Beck Depression Inventory; Beck Anxiety Inventory; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. RESULTS Sample consisted of 168 professionals, with prevalence of neutral typology (57.49%. There was no statistical significance regarding sleep, despite scores showing a poor quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness for the three shifts. Quality of life did not reveal any statistical significance, but in the field "social role functioning" of the evening shift, a lower score was observed (p<0.007. There was no statistical significance regarding levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION The results suggest that these professionals may present sleeping problems, but they do not have lower scores of quality of life or mood disorders. Likely explanations for these findings may include an adaptation to their work type over time and the fact that working with children is rewarding.

  17. Theory-praxis relationship in education of nursing professionals: an integrative literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laura Elvira Piedrahita Sandoval; Ana Lucia Rosero Prado

    2017-01-01

    ..., CUIDEN, Ovid, Pub Med and TESEO, between 2000 and 2014. This study aimed to identify, in scientific literature, the problems of the theory-praxis relationship in the education of nursing professionals...

  18. Affective temperament, job stress and professional burnout in nurses and civil servants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcin Jaracz; Izabela Rosiak; Anna Bertrand-Bucińska; Maciej Jaskulski; Joanna Nieżurawska; Alina Borkowska

    2017-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to assess the affective temperament, the level of job stress and professional burnout, as well as the relationships between these variables, in public servants and nurses