WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional nurses working

  1. Work engagement in professional nursing practice: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyko, Kacey; Cummings, Greta G; Yonge, Olive; Wong, Carol A

    2016-09-01

    Work engagement in professional nursing practice is critically important to consider when addressing key challenges of health systems, including the global nursing shortage, pressures to reduce health care spending, and increasing demands for quality care and positive outcomes for patients. However, research on work engagement in professional nursing practice has not yet been synthesized and therefore, does not provide a sufficient foundation of knowledge to guide practice and further research. The overall aim of this systematic review is to determine what is currently known about the antecedents and outcomes of work engagement in professional nursing practice. Systematic review. The search strategy included eight electronic databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PROQUEST, SCOPUS, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Business Source Complete. The search was conducted in October 2013. Quantitative and qualitative research that examined relationships between work engagement and antecedent or outcome factors was included. Quality assessment, data extractions, and analysis were completed on all included studies. Data extracted from included studies were synthesized through descriptive and narrative synthesis. Content analysis was used to categorize factors into themes and categories. 3621 titles and abstracts were screened and yielded 113 manuscripts for full text review. Full text review resulted in 18 included studies. All factors examined were grouped into either influences or outcomes of work engagement. A total of 77 influencing factors were categorized into 6 themes: organizational climate, job resources, professional resources, personal resources, job demands, and demographic variables. A total of 17 outcomes of work engagement were categorized into 3 themes: performance and care outcomes, professional outcomes, and personal outcomes. Based on the results, we adapted the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model and developed the Nursing Job Demands-Resources (NJD-R) model for

  2. Registered Nurses' perceptions of their work and professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin; Danielson, Ella

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study to elucidate Registered Nurses' perceptions of their work and professional development 6 years after graduation. Nursing education and health care has rapidly changed in the last two decades. Education and experience are important components in Registered Nurses' ability to promote a high quality of care, but a great deal depends on their work circumstances. This study emphasizes Registered Nurses' view of their work in health care, at a time in their career when they have several years of experience. Data were collected in 2003 from in-depth interviews with 15 Registered Nurses 6 years after their graduation. The interviews were semi-structured and analysed with interpretive content analysis. The findings revealed two themes and five sub-themes. The first theme, An appropriate but demanding profession, consisted of two sub-themes: 'having found one's niche' and 'growing old in nursing may be difficult'. The second theme, A profession with opportunities and obstacles, consisted of three sub-themes: 'being aware of Registered Nurses' potential', 'having knowledge that is seldom made use of' and 'attaining professional growth is no matter of course'. Keeping Registered Nurses' satisfied and avoiding their dissatisfaction is crucial for both educators and employers. It is essential that employers give priority to Registered Nurses' time with patients and to motivate and support them in professional development. Further intervention studies regarding a change of the balance between obstacles and opportunities are needed.

  3. Communication satisfaction of professional nurses working in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J-D; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to establish and describe the level of communication satisfaction that professional nurses experience in selected public hospitals in the City of Johannesburg, South Africa. The success of any organisation depends on the effectiveness of its communication systems and the interaction between staff members. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, based on the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), from a sample of 265 professional nurses from different categories, chosen using a disproportionate random stratified sampling method. The results indicated poor personal feedback between nurse managers (operational managers) and professional nurses, as well as dissatisfaction among nurse managers and professional nurses with regard to informal communication channels. A lack of information pertaining to policies, change, financial standing and achievements of hospitals was identified. Nurse managers should play a leadership role in bringing staff of different departments together by creating interactive communication forums for the sharing of ideas. The results emphasise the need for nurse managers to improve communication satisfaction at all levels of the hospital services in order to enhance staff satisfaction and create a positive working environment for staff members. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Professional caregivers' work with the dying in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Tind; Glasdam, Stinne

    2013-01-01

    International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade. A disco......International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade....... A discourse analysis inspired by Foucault was constructed. The material consists of different source documents: research articles, newspaper articles, theses, books, websites – 35 sources in total. There are constructed six positions of speech, five discourses and three themes: (1) ‘the work...

  5. Work climate, work values and professional commitment as predictors of job satisfaction in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Sala, Rachele La; Marletta, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Giulia; Ampollini, Monica; Fabbri, Anna; Ricchi, Alba; Scardino, Marcello; Artioli, Giovanna; Mancini, Tiziana

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of some psychosocial variables on nurses' job satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction is one of the most important factors in determining individuals' intention to stay or leave a health-care organisation. Literature shows a predictive role of work climate, professional commitment and work values on job satisfaction, but their conjoint effect has rarely been considered. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was adopted. Participants were hospital nurses and data were collected in 2011. Professional commitment and work climate positively predicted nurses' job satisfaction. The effect of intrinsic vs. extrinsic work value orientation on job satisfaction was completely mediated by professional commitment. Nurses' job satisfaction is influenced by both contextual and personal variables, in particular work climate and professional commitment. According to a more recent theoretical framework, work climate, work values and professional commitment interact with each other in determining nurses' job satisfaction. Nursing management must be careful to keep the context of work tuned to individuals' attitude and vice versa. Improving the work climate can have a positive effect on job satisfaction, but its effect may be enhanced by favouring strong professional commitment and by promoting intrinsic more than extrinsic work values. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Individual features, working conditions and work injuries are associated with work ability among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frida Marina; Martinez, Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate factors associated with work ability among nursing professionals. They comprised 514 nursing professionals (83.8% of the total number of workers) from a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. In 2009, we conducted a cross-sectional study that was a part of a 5-year planned cohort study initiated in 2008. We administered a comprehensive questionnaire to the participants in order to obtain data on their sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyles, and working conditions. The questionnaire also contained the Brazilian versions of the following: the Job Stress Scale (JSS), Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Questionnaire, Work-Related Activities That May Contribute To Job-Related Pain and/or Injury (WRAPI), and Work Ability Index (WAI). The results were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate linear regression analyses. On the WAI, 74.9% of the workers obtained a score of over 40 points (score range 7-49); the mean score was 42.3 points (SD=4.5). The final multivariate model showed that lower WAI scores were related to the work-related outcome, which was work injury, and the following individual characteristics and working conditions: body mass index (p=0.001), sex (female; p=0.002), sedentariness (p work (p=0.003), effort-reward ratio (p=0.001), violence at work (p=0.005), WRAPI score (p work injuries (yes; p=0.001). Various factors were associated with work ability. The results showed that a number of variables should be considered when planning and implementing actions to maintain or improve work ability among nursing professionals.

  7. Predictors of Burnout in Professional and Paraprofessional Nurses Working in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jan; And Others

    Burnout is a phenomenon in which the cumulative effects of a stressful work environment gradually overwhelm the defenses of staff members, causing them to psychologically withdraw. To understand the experience of professional and paraprofessional nurses suffering from burnout requires a close examination of the environments in which they function.…

  8. Copyright Law Basics for the Nursing Professional: Part 2: Protecting Your Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVelle, Meghan B; LaVelle, Beth Elchek; Port, Kenneth L; Sherlock, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the discussion of Copyright Law (found in JNPD 31:5) as it applies to nursing professionals. This part focuses on the definition of "work made for hire" and how nursing professional development specialists can both protect and share their own work. Many nurses assume that they own the works they create, but authorship is not necessarily the same as ownership. Misunderstanding copyrights could put one's job and hard work at risk!

  9. Impaired work functioning due to common mental disorders in nurses and allied health professionals: the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, F R; Nieuwenhuijsen, K; van Dijk, F J H; Sluiter, J K

    2012-02-01

    Common mental disorders (CMD) negatively affect work functioning. In the health service sector not only the prevalence of CMDs is high, but work functioning problems are associated with a risk of serious consequences for patients and healthcare providers. If work functioning problems due to CMDs are detected early, timely help can be provided. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a detection questionnaire for impaired work functioning due to CMDs in nurses and allied health professionals working in hospitals. First, an item pool was developed by a systematic literature study and five focus group interviews with employees and experts. To evaluate the content validity, additional interviews were held. Second, a cross-sectional assessment of the item pool in 314 nurses and allied health professionals was used for item selection and for identification and corroboration of subscales by explorative and confirmatory factor analysis. The study results in the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire (NWFQ), a 50-item self-report questionnaire consisting of seven subscales: cognitive aspects of task execution, impaired decision making, causing incidents at work, avoidance behavior, conflicts and irritations with colleagues, impaired contact with patients and their family, and lack of energy and motivation. The questionnaire has a proven high content validity. All subscales have good or acceptable internal consistency. The Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire gives insight into precise and concrete aspects of impaired work functioning of nurses and allied health professionals. The scores can be used as a starting point for purposeful interventions.

  10. Registered nurses' perceptions of their professional work in nursing homes and home-based care: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Rämgård, Margareta; Bolmsjö, Ingrid; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-05-01

    In Sweden, as well as in most industrialised countries, an increasing older population is expected to create a growing demand for health care staff. Previous studies have pointed to lack of proficient medical and nursing staff specialised in geriatric care, which poses serious threats to the care of a vulnerable population. At the same time, there are studies describing elderly care as a low-status career choice, attracting neither nurses nor student nurses. Judging from previous research it was deemed important to explore how nurses in elderly care perceive their work, thus possibly provide vital knowledge that can guide nurse educators and unit managers as a means to promote a career in elderly care. The aim of the present study was to illuminate how nurses, working in nursing homes and home-based care, perceived their professional work. This was a qualitative study using focus groups. 30 registered nurses in seven focus groups were interviewed. The participants worked in nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly in rural areas and in a larger city in southern Sweden. The interviews were analysed in line with the tradition of naturalistic inquiry. Our findings illustrate how nurses working in elderly care perceived their professional work as holistic and respectful nursing. Three categories of professional work emerged during analysis: (1) establishing long-term relationships, (2) nursing beyond technical skills, and (3) balancing independence and a sense of loneliness. The findings are important as they represent positive alternatives to the somewhat prevailing view on elderly care as depressing and undemanding. Nurse educators might use the key aspects as good examples, thus influencing student nurses' attitudes towards elderly care in a positive way. Elderly care agencies might find them helpful when recruiting and retaining nurses to a much needed area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of professional nursing practice environment and psychological empowerment on nurses' work engagement: test of structural equation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Yanhui

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of professional nursing practice environment and psychological empowerment on nurses' work engagement. Previous researchers have acknowledged the positive influence that nurse work environment and psychological empowerment have on engagement. However, less is known about the mechanisms that explain the links between them. A predictive, non-experimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 300 clinical nurses from two tertiary first class hospitals of Tianjin, China. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and the Psychological Empowerment Scale were used to measure the study variables. Structural equation modelling revealed a good fit of the model to the data based on various fit indices (P = 0.371, χ(2) /df = 1.056, goodness of fit index = 0.967), which indicated that both professional practice environment and psychological empowerment could positively influence work engagement directly, and professional practice environment could also indirectly influence work engagement through the mediation of psychological empowerment. The study hypotheses were supported. Psychological empowerment was found to mediate the relationship between practice environments and work engagement. Administrators should provide a professional nursing practice environment and empower nurses psychologically to increase nurse engagement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Psychological Capital and Perceived Professional Benefits: Testing the Mediating Role of Perceived Nursing Work Environment Among Chinese Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhen; Zhu, Yafang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Peng, Juan; Li, Qingdong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Lihui; Cai, Xiaohui; Lan, Limei

    2018-04-01

    The current descriptive cross-sectional study aimed to explore the mediating role of perceived nursing work environment (PNWE) in the relationship between psychological capital (PsyCap) and perceived professional benefits among Chinese nurses. Participants (N = 351) working in two large general hospitals in Guangdong, China completed self-report questionnaires from March to May 2017. Linear regression analyses and structural equation modeling were performed to explore the mediating effect. PsyCap (particularly for hope and optimism) had a positive effect on perceived professional benefits, and PNWE was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. A good working environment can be regarded as a mediator variable, increasing staff's competence and sense of belonging to a team. For successful implementation, nurse managers should use effective strategies to increase nurses' confidence and hope while providing a comfortable work environment. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(4), 38-47.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The motivation to care: application and extension of motivation theory to professional nursing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Roseanne C; Pesut, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to describe a model of nurses' work motivation relevant to the human caring stance of professional nursing work. The model was derived from selected theories of behavioral motivation and work motivation. Evidence-based theory addressing nurses' work motivation and nurses' motivational states and traits in relation to characteristics of organizational culture and patient health outcomes is suggested in an effort to make a distinct contribution to health services research. An integrated review of selected theories of motivation is presented, including conceptual analyses, theory-building techniques, and the evidence supporting the theoretical propositions and linkages among variables intrinsic to nurses' work motivation. The model of the Motivation to Care for Professional Nursing Work is a framework intended for empirical testing and theory building. The model proposes specific leadership and management strategies to support a culture of motivational caring and competence in health care organizations. Attention to motivation theory and research provides insights and suggests relationships among nurses' motivation to care, motivational states and traits, individual differences that influence nurses' work motivation, and the special effects of nurses' work motivation on patient care outcomes. Suggestions for nursing administrative direction and research are proposed.

  14. Newly graduated nurses' empowerment regarding professional competence and other work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuokkanen, Liisa; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Numminen, Olivia; Isoaho, Hannu; Flinkman, Mervi; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Although both nurse empowerment and competence are fundamental concepts of describing newly graduated nurses' professional development and job satisfaction, only few studies exist on the relationship between these concepts. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how newly graduated nurses assess their empowerment and to clarify professional competence compared to other work-related factors. A descriptive, cross-sectional and correlational design was applied. The sample comprised newly graduated nurses (n = 318) in Finland. Empowerment was measured using the 19-item Qualities of an Empowered Nurse scale and the Nurse Competence Scale measured nurses' self-assessed generic competence. In addition to demographic data, the background data included employment sector (public/private), job satisfaction, intent to change/leave job, work schedule (shifts/business hours) and assessments of the quality of care in the workplace. The data were analysed statistically by using Spearman's correlation coefficient as well as the One-Way and Multivariate Analysis of Variance. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to estimate the internal consistency. Newly graduated nurses perceived their level of empowerment and competence fairly high. The association between nurse empowerment and professional competence was statistically significant. Other variables correlating positively to empowerment included employment sector, age, job satisfaction, intent to change job, work schedule, and satisfaction with the quality of care in the work unit. The study indicates competence had the strongest effect on newly graduated nurses' empowerment. New graduates need support and career opportunities. In the future, nurses' further education and nurse managers' resources for supporting and empowering nurses should respond to the newly graduated nurses' requisites for attractive and meaningful work.

  15. [A study of work values, professional commitment, turnover intention and related factors among clinical nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuei-Ying; Chou, Chuan-Chiang; Huang, Jui-Lan

    2010-02-01

    The high rate of turnover in nursing positions is a global problem. There have been few studies done addressing the relationship between work values and nurse turnover intention. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between work values, professional commitment and turnover intention among clinical nurses. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between February 1st to March 10th, 2008 on a convenience sample of nurses, all of whom had at least a half year of work experience at one of four teaching hospitals in Taiwan. A total of 289 valid responses were received, with a response rate of 96.3%. Major findings included: (1) Nurses who were older, had more years of school, had worked more years, held specific job duties, earned a higher salary, held Buddhist beliefs, or were married with two or more children presented higher work values and professional commitment and lower turnover intention; (2) As a group, total work values and professional commitment scores corresponded negatively with turnover intention scores; (3) Significant factors affecting turnover intent in clinical nurses included professional commitment, institution characteristics, Buddhist beliefs and salary. These four variables accounted for 52.2% of the variation in turnover intention. This study indicated that nurses with higher work values and professional commitment tend to exhibit less turnover intention. It is highly recommended to develop strategies to bolster the teaching of altruistic values and professional commitment in nursing education in order to reduce turnover intent. Also, further studies on the influence of religious beliefs and organizational attributes on nurse turnover intentions are also suggested.

  16. Professional nursing practice in critical units: assessment of work environment characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe Sales Maurício

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: assess the autonomy, control over environment, and organizational support of nurses' work process and the relationships between physicians and nurses in critical care units. Method: cross-sectional study conducted with 162 nurses working in the intensive care units and emergency service of a university hospital. The workers' satisfaction with their work environment was assessed using Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, translated and adapted for the Brazilian culture. Results: average age was 31.6 ± 3.9 years; 80.2% were women; 68.5% Caucasians and 71.6% worked in intensive care units. The nurses considered autonomy (2.38 ± 0.64 and their relationship with physicians (2.24 ± 0.62 to be characteristics of the work environment that favored professional practice. Control over environment (2.78 ± 0.62 and organizational support (2.51 ± 0.54, however, were considered to be unfavorable. No statistically significant differences were found between the units based on the scores obtained by the professionals on the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised. Conclusion: autonomy, relationship between physicians and nurses, and organizational support were considered by the units to be characteristics that favored nurses' professional practices. On the other hand, control over environment and organizational support were considered unfavorable.

  17. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with professional competence and work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    To explore newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with their self-assessed professional competence and other work-related factors. As a factor affecting nurse turnover, newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with work-related factors needs exploring to retain adequate workforce. Nurses' commitment has mainly been studied as organisational commitment, but newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its association with work-related factors needs further studying. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation design. A convenience sample of 318 newly graduated nurses in Finland participated responding to an electronic questionnaire. Statistical software, NCSS version 9, was used in data analysis. Frequencies, percentages, ranges, means and standard deviations summarised the data. Multivariate Analyses of Variance estimated associations between occupational commitment and work-related variables. IBM SPSS Amos version 22 estimated the model fit of Occupational Commitment Scale and Nurse Competence Scale. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment was good, affective commitment reaching the highest mean score. There was a significant difference between the nurse groups in favour of nurses at higher competence levels in all subscales except in limited alternatives occupational commitment. Multivariate analyses revealed significant associations between subscales of commitment and competence, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, earlier professional education and work sector, competence counting only through affective dimension. The association between occupational commitment and low turnover intentions and satisfaction with nursing occupation was strong. Higher general competence indicated higher overall occupational commitment. Managers' recognition of the influence of all dimensions of occupational commitment in newly graduated nurses' professional development is important. Follow

  18. Nursing professional practice environments: setting the stage for constructive conflict resolution and work effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Heidi; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Finegan, Joan

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of nurses' perceived professional practice environment on their quality of nursing conflict management approaches and ultimately their perceptions of unit effectiveness from the perspective of Deutsch's theory of constructive conflict management. Rising reports of hostility and conflict among Canadian nurses are a concern to nurses' health and the viability of effective patient care delivery. However, research on the situational factors that influence nurses' ability to apply effective conflict resolution skills that lead to positive results in practice is limited. A nonexperimental, predictive design was used in a sample of 678 registered nurses working in community hospitals within a large metropolitan area in Ontario. The results supported a modified version of the hypothesized model [chi2(1) = 16.25, Goodness of Fit = 0.99, Comparative Fit Index = 0.98, Root-Mean-Square Error of Approximation = 0.15] linking professional practice environment and core self-evaluation to nurses' conflict management and, ultimately, unit effectiveness. Professional practice environment, conflict management, and core-self evaluation explained approximately 46.6% of the variance in unit effectiveness. Positive professional practice environments and high core self-evaluations predicted nurses' constructive conflict management and, in turn, greater unit effectiveness.

  19. Quality of working life: perceptions of professional nurses at Phramongkutklao Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonrod, Wallapa

    2009-02-01

    The 10th National Economic and Social Developmental Plan considered quality of human. Quality of human life was affected by quality of working life (QWL). Professional nurses had responsibility for patients' quality of life. Thus, professional nurses should have a quality of working life more effectively before they could help patients. Personal factors have relationships with the quality of working life. Thus, the present study was to describe the level of the QWL, to examine the relationships between job characteristics, organizational climate, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction with the QWL and to predict the QWL among professional nurses at Phramongkutklao Hospital. Two hundred and thirty-one professional nurses, who had worked for at least 3 years, were selected by stratified random sampling from 12 departments at Phramongkutklao Hospital. The questionnaires were developed, consisting of personal factors, job characteristics, organizational climate and commitment, job satisfaction and QWL. Content validity was examined by 9 experts. Reliability was obtained at 0.97 by means of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The over all mean score of the level of quality of working life among professional nurses was at a moderate level (mean = 3.412, SD = 0.459). Personal factors were age, status, education, position, experience, salary and wards were no relationships with the QWL. Job satisfaction was positive and related at a high level, while organizational commitment, organizational climate, and job characteristics were positive and related at a moderate level to the QWL significantly at 0.001 level (r = 0.724, 0.694, 0.640, and 0.334). Multiple regression analysis factors affecting QWL indicated that professional nurses associated negative factors with job characteristics and positive factors with job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and organizational climate at 62.10 percent (R2 = 0.621). QWL = 0.762 + 0.336 Job satisfaction + 0.265 Organizational

  20. Professional Satisfaction Of Nurses Working In Operating Room Of A Hospital School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Helena Dantas de Oliveira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to characterize in a sociodemographic way the nursing staff of the surgical center; Check the degree of importance assigned to each component of satisfaction: autonomy, interaction, professional status, task requirements, organizational policies, and pay; verify job satisfaction perceived by nurses. Method: exploratory, descriptive, quantitative study, consisting of 9 nurses working in the operating room. The research project was approved by the CEP/HULW, CAAE Nº 24597513.2.0000.5183. Data were collected through questionnaires and then analyzed using descriptive statistics in SPSS 20. Results: We found that the standby component was considered the most important for job satisfaction and Professional Status least important. Conclusion: nurses have a low level of job satisfaction, impacting the performance of its activities. Descriptors: Job Satisfaction. Perioperative Nursing. Quality of Life.

  1. [Nurses' professional satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cura, M L; Rodrigues, A R

    1999-10-01

    We carried out a study with 91 nurses, trying to find out about the feelings of these professionals regarding their satisfaction at work. We used the Work Satisfaction Assessment Questionnaire (WSAQ), drawn up and validated by Siqueira (1978) and adapted with the analysis of seven factors: General Satisfaction; Physical and Psychological Stress; "Status" of the Job; Location of the Company; Compensating Benefits; Recognition and Personal Development. Data showed nurses satisfied with their work, in its intrinsic aspects (Accomplishment, Recognition and Autonomy). The psychiatric nurses were the most mature, most experienced, showing a higher satisfaction level, whereas the pediatric nurses were the youngest, most inexperienced and presenting the highest level of dissatisfaction at work.

  2. Low back injuries related to nursing professionals working conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossmacher, Roberta; Amaral, Fernando Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Identify the prevalence of low back disorders and associated risks, as well as the characteristics and ergonomic factors present in the work of nursing professionals. Systematic review based on the search of terms such as low back pain, professionals, hospital ergonomics, work organization, nursing found in national and international databases. The prevalence of low back pain symptoms was between 14.7% and 72% and the main cause, that is, the transference of the patient from bed to chair, leaded to the profession abandonment as a main consequence. it was possible to conclude that the prevalence of low back injury is high among nursing professionals and its causes are related to occupational factors - physical or psychological, which are in many cases permanent and disabling.

  3. Professional autonomy and work setting as contributing factors to depression and absenteeism in Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Victoria; Currie, Shawn; Wang, JianLi

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of major depression in Canadian nurses is double the national average for working women. The present study sought to delineate the role of professional autonomy, health care setting, and work environment characteristics as risk factors for depression and absenteeism in female nurses. A cross-sectional, secondary analysis was conducted on a large representative sample of female nurses working in hospitals and other settings across Canada (N = 17,437). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to test the hypothesis that work environment factors are significant determinants of major depression and absenteeism in female nurses after accounting for other risk factors. Experiencing a major depressive episode in the past 12 months was significantly associated with lower autonomy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.93), higher job strain (OR = 2.2), being a licensed practical nurse (OR = 0.82), and working in a nonhospital setting (OR = 1.5). Higher absenteeism was associated with the same variables as well as having less control over one's work schedule. Efforts to increase autonomy of nurses and reduce job strain may help to address the high prevalence of major depression in this professional group. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of life and working context of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luísa Nunes Marques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine the relationship between working context and quality of life of nursing professionals of the FamilyHealth Strategy. Methods: observational, cross-sectional study with quantitative approach accomplished with 50 nursingprofessionals from urban and rural areas. Participants answered a questionnaire of socio-demographic and professionalcharacterization, the Work Context Assessment Scale and WHOQOL-brief. Data were submitted to exploratory and bivariateanalysis. Results: predominance of women, married, belonging to economic classes C/D and with only one employmentbond. The factor Work Organization and the Social domain had higher mean scores, while Socio-professional relations andthe Environmental domain, lower scores. Descriptively, there was a negative correlation between all the factors of the workcontext and the Physical, Psychological and Social domains. Conclusion: inadequate conditions to work practice, lack oforganization and the difficulty in social relationships negatively impact the quality of life of nursing professionals.

  5. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  6. Quality of life and working context of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Luísa Nunes Marques; Maria Beatriz Guimarães Ferreira; Joyce Mara Gabriel Duarte; Nara dos Santos Costa; Vanderlei José Haas; Ana Lúcia de Assis Simões

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to examine the relationship between working context and quality of life of nursing professionals of the FamilyHealth Strategy. Methods: observational, cross-sectional study with quantitative approach accomplished with 50 nursingprofessionals from urban and rural areas. Participants answered a questionnaire of socio-demographic and professionalcharacterization, the Work Context Assessment Scale and WHOQOL-brief. Data were submitted to exploratory and bivariateanalysis. Results: pred...

  7. Relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervical pain in nursing professionals under stress at work

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzebon,Daniela; Piccin,Chaiane Facco; Silva,Ana Maria Toniolo da; Corrêa,Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The appearance and evolution of some clinical pain conditions may be influenced by stress and other psychosocial factors. Face, head and cervical muscles may increase their activity and tension in the presence of stress, leading to craniocervicomandibular pain in individuals exposed to stress. Objective: To assess the relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervicomandibular pain in nursing professionals under stress at work. Materials and...

  8. Work accidents and self-esteem of nursing professional in hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Valverde Marques dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to analyze the occurrence of work accidents and the self-esteem of nurses in hospitals of a municipality of Minas Gerais. Method: descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study developed with 393 nursing professionals from three hospitals of a municipality in southern Minas Gerais. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire to characterize the population and work accidents were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using Person's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Cronbach's alpha, odds ratio and logistic regression. Results: of the professionals studied, 15% had suffered an accident at work and 70.2% presented high self-esteem. Through the analysis, it was observed that smoking, religious belief and an outstanding event in the career were significantly associated with work accidents. In relation to self-esteem, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career presented significant associations. Conclusion: factors such as smoking, religious belief, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career can cause professionals to have accidents and/or cause changes in self-esteem, which can compromise their physical and mental health and their quality of life and work.

  9. Work accidents and self-esteem of nursing professional in hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Sérgio Valverde Marques; Macedo, Flávia Ribeiro Martins; da Silva, Luiz Almeida; Resck, Zelia Marilda Rodrigues; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Terra, Fábio de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the occurrence of work accidents and the self-esteem of nurses in hospitals of a municipality of Minas Gerais. Method: descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study developed with 393 nursing professionals from three hospitals of a municipality in southern Minas Gerais. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire to characterize the population and work accidents were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using Person's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Cronbach's alpha, odds ratio and logistic regression. Results: of the professionals studied, 15% had suffered an accident at work and 70.2% presented high self-esteem. Through the analysis, it was observed that smoking, religious belief and an outstanding event in the career were significantly associated with work accidents. In relation to self-esteem, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career presented significant associations. Conclusion: factors such as smoking, religious belief, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career can cause professionals to have accidents and/or cause changes in self-esteem, which can compromise their physical and mental health and their quality of life and work. PMID:28443993

  10. Work accidents and self-esteem of nursing professional in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sérgio Valverde Marques Dos; Macedo, Flávia Ribeiro Martins; Silva, Luiz Almeida da; Resck, Zelia Marilda Rodrigues; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Terra, Fábio de Souza

    2017-04-20

    to analyze the occurrence of work accidents and the self-esteem of nurses in hospitals of a municipality of Minas Gerais. descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study developed with 393 nursing professionals from three hospitals of a municipality in southern Minas Gerais. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire to characterize the population and work accidents were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using Person's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Cronbach's alpha, odds ratio and logistic regression. of the professionals studied, 15% had suffered an accident at work and 70.2% presented high self-esteem. Through the analysis, it was observed that smoking, religious belief and an outstanding event in the career were significantly associated with work accidents. In relation to self-esteem, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career presented significant associations. factors such as smoking, religious belief, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career can cause professionals to have accidents and/or cause changes in self-esteem, which can compromise their physical and mental health and their quality of life and work.

  11. Nurses' professional and personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure professional and personal values among nurses, and to identify the factors affecting these values. The participants were 323 Israeli nurses, who were asked about 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The three fundamental professional nursing values of human dignity, equality among patients, and prevention of suffering, were rated first. The top 10 rated values all concerned nurses' responsibility towards patients. Altruism and confidentiality were not highly rated, and health promotion and nursing research were rated among the last three professional values. For personal (instrumental) values, honesty, responsibility and intelligence were rated first, while ambition and imagination were rated 14th and 16th respectively out of 18. Significant differences (P personal and professional values rated as functions of culture, education, professional seniority, position and field of expertise. The results may assist in understanding the motives of nurses with different characteristics and help to promote their work according to professional ethical values.

  12. Work satisfaction of professional nurses in South Africa: a comparative analysis of the public and private sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillay Rubin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work satisfaction of nurses is important, as there is sufficient empirical evidence to show that it tends to affect individual, organizational and greater health and social outcomes. Although there have been several studies of job satisfaction among nurses in South Africa, these are limited because they relate to studies of individual organizations or regions, use small samples or are dated. This paper presents a national study that compares and contrasts satisfaction levels of nurses in both public and private sectors. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of professional nurses conducted throughout South Africa using a pretested and self-administered questionnaire. Univariate and bivariate statistical models were used to evaluate levels of satisfaction with various facets of work and to elicit the differences in satisfaction levels between different groups of nurses. A total of 569 professional nurses participated in the study. Results Private-sector nurses were generally satisfied, while public-sector nurses were generally dissatisfied. Public-sector nurses were most dissatisfied with their pay, the workload and the resources available to them. They were satisfied only with the social context of the work. Private-sector nurses were dissatisfied only with their pay and career development opportunities. Professional nurses in the more rural provinces, those intending to change sectors and those more likely not to be in their current positions within the next five years were also more likely to be dissatisfied with all facets of their work. Conclusion This study highlighted the overall dissatisfaction among South African nurses and confirmed the disparity between the levels of job satisfaction between the public and private sectors. Health managers should address those factors that affect job satisfaction, and therefore retention, of nurses in South Africa. Improving the work environment so that it provides a context

  13. Work satisfaction of professional nurses in South Africa: a comparative analysis of the public and private sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Rubin

    2009-02-20

    Work satisfaction of nurses is important, as there is sufficient empirical evidence to show that it tends to affect individual, organizational and greater health and social outcomes. Although there have been several studies of job satisfaction among nurses in South Africa, these are limited because they relate to studies of individual organizations or regions, use small samples or are dated. This paper presents a national study that compares and contrasts satisfaction levels of nurses in both public and private sectors. This was a cross-sectional survey of professional nurses conducted throughout South Africa using a pretested and self-administered questionnaire. Univariate and bivariate statistical models were used to evaluate levels of satisfaction with various facets of work and to elicit the differences in satisfaction levels between different groups of nurses. A total of 569 professional nurses participated in the study. Private-sector nurses were generally satisfied, while public-sector nurses were generally dissatisfied. Public-sector nurses were most dissatisfied with their pay, the workload and the resources available to them. They were satisfied only with the social context of the work. Private-sector nurses were dissatisfied only with their pay and career development opportunities. Professional nurses in the more rural provinces, those intending to change sectors and those more likely not to be in their current positions within the next five years were also more likely to be dissatisfied with all facets of their work. This study highlighted the overall dissatisfaction among South African nurses and confirmed the disparity between the levels of job satisfaction between the public and private sectors. Health managers should address those factors that affect job satisfaction, and therefore retention, of nurses in South Africa. Improving the work environment so that it provides a context congruent with the aspirations and values systems of nurses is more

  14. Need for recovery from work and sleep-related complaints among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Costa, Aline; Griep, Rosane Harter; Fischer, Frida Marina; Rotenberg, Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The concept of need for recovery from work (NFR) was deduced from the effort recuperation model. In this model work produces costs in terms of effort during the working day. When there is enough time and possibilities to recuperate, a worker will arrive at the next working day with no residual symptoms of previous effort. NFR evaluates work characteristics such as psychosocial demands, professional work hours or schedules. However, sleep may be an important part of the recovery process. The aim of the study was to test the association between sleep-related complaints and NFR. A cross-sectional study was carried out at three hospitals. All females nursing professionals engaged in assistance to patients were invited to participate (N = 1,307). Participants answered a questionnaire that included four sleep-related complaints (insomnia, unsatisfactory sleep, sleepiness during work hours and insufficient sleep), work characteristics and NRF scale. Binomial logistic regression analysis showed that all sleep-related complaints are associated with a high need for recovery from work. Those who reported insufficient sleep showed a greater chance of high need for recovery; OR=2.730 (CI 95% 2.074 - 3.593). These results corroborate the hypothesis that sleep is an important aspect of the recovery process and, therefore, should be thoroughly investigated.

  15. Professional nursing practice in critical units: assessment of work environment characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurício, Luiz Felipe Sales; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Belasco, Angélica Gonçalves Silva; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2017-03-02

    assess the autonomy, control over environment, and organizational support of nurses' work process and the relationships between physicians and nurses in critical care units. cross-sectional study conducted with 162 nurses working in the intensive care units and emergency service of a university hospital. The workers' satisfaction with their work environment was assessed using Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, translated and adapted for the Brazilian culture. average age was 31.6 ± 3.9 years; 80.2% were women; 68.5% Caucasians and 71.6% worked in intensive care units. The nurses considered autonomy (2.38 ± 0.64) and their relationship with physicians (2.24 ± 0.62) to be characteristics of the work environment that favored professional practice. Control over environment (2.78 ± 0.62) and organizational support (2.51 ± 0.54), however, were considered to be unfavorable. No statistically significant differences were found between the units based on the scores obtained by the professionals on the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised. autonomy, relationship between physicians and nurses, and organizational support were considered by the units to be characteristics that favored nurses' professional practices. On the other hand, control over environment and organizational support were considered unfavorable. evaluar la autonomía, el control sobre el ambiente, el soporte organizacional del proceso de trabajo de los enfermeros y las relaciones entre médicos y enfermeros, en unidades críticas. estudio transversal realizado en 162 enfermeros de las unidades de terapia intensiva y del servicio de emergencia de un hospital universitario. La evaluación de la satisfacción del profesional con el ambiente de trabajo fue realizada utilizando el Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, traducido y adaptado para la cultura brasileña. el promedio de edad fue 31,6 ± 3,9 años, 80,2% eran mujeres, 68,5% blancos y 71,6% trabajaban en la unidad de terapia intensiva. Los

  16. Personality, organizational stress, and attitudes toward work as prospective predictors of professional burnout in hospital nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudek-Knežević, Jasna; Kalebić Maglica, Barbara; Krapić, Nada

    2011-01-01

    Aim To examine to what extent personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness), organizational stress, and attitudes toward work and interactions between personality and either organizational stress or attitudes toward work prospectively predict 3 components of burnout. Methods The study was carried out on 118 hospital nurses. Data were analyzed by a set of hierarchical regression analyses, in which personality traits, measures of organizational stress, and attitudes toward work, as well as interactions between personality and either organizational stress or attitudes toward work were included as predictors, while 3 indices of burnout were measured 4 years later as criteria variables. Results Personality traits proved to be significant but weak prospective predictors of burnout and as a group predicted only reduced professional efficacy (R2 = 0.10), with agreeableness being a single negative predictor. Organizational stress was positive, affective-normative commitment negative predictor, while continuance commitment was not related to any dimension of burnout. We found interactions between neuroticism as well as conscientiousness and organizational stress, measured as role conflict and work overload, on reduced professional efficacy (βNRCWO = -0.30; ßcRCWO = -0.26). We also found interactions between neuroticism and affective normative commitment (β = 0.24) and between openness and continuance commitment on reduced professional efficacy (β = -0.23), as well as interactions between conscientiousness and continuance commitment on exhaustion. Conclusion Although contextual variables were strong prospective predictors and personality traits weak predictors of burnout, the results suggested the importance of the interaction between personality and contextual variables in predicting burnout. PMID:21853549

  17. The influences of nursing education on the socialization and professional working relationships of Canadian practical and degree nursing students: A critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Jacqueline; Jagos, Kim

    2015-10-01

    Little evidence exists about how education influences the ways that registered nurses (RN) and registered practical nurses (RPN) negotiate their professional work relationships. This qualitative study used interviews and reflective writing from 250 Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) and Practical Nursing (PN) students to explore how education constructs intraprofessional relations. The data were collected after two joint BScN/PN education events - one held in the first semester and one in the fourth semester. The findings reveal how education conveys and establishes dominant discourses about the tiers in nursing and the boundary work and professional closure strategies used by the two groups. In addition, although the two education programs are largely segregated and education about how to work with each other is rarely discussed, PN and BScN students strive to understand the differences and perceived inequities between the two designations of nurse. The data show how students attempt to reconcile the tensions and disjunctures they experience from the power relations by activating socially constructed and hegemonic positions that have been problematic for nursing. Findings will assist nurse educators to understand how education can be used to negotiate professional boundaries and working relationships that foster equity and social inclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Disentangling the effects of insomnia and night work on cardiovascular diseases: a study in nursing professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Costa, A. [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Griep, R.H.; Rotenberg, L. [Laboratório de Educação em Ambiente e Saúde, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-21

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are known to be associated with poor sleep quality in general populations, but they have not been consistently associated with specific work schedules. Studies of CVD generally do not simultaneously consider sleep and work schedules, but that approach could help to disentangle their effects. We investigated the association between insomnia and a self-reported physician diagnosis of CVD in day and night workers, considering all sleep episodes during nocturnal and diurnal sleep. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1307 female nursing professionals from 3 public hospitals, using baseline data from the “Health and Work in Nursing - a Cohort Study.” Participants were divided into two groups: i) day workers with no previous experience in night shifts (n=281) and whose data on insomnia were related to nocturnal sleep and ii) those who worked exclusively at night (n=340) and had data on both nocturnal and diurnal sleep episodes, as they often sleep at daytime. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. Among day workers, insomnia complaints increased the odds of CVD 2.79-fold (95% CI=1.01-6.71) compared with workers who had no complaints. Among night workers, reports of insomnia during both nocturnal and diurnal sleep increased the odds of reported CVD 3.07-fold (95% CI=1.30-7.24). Workers with insomnia had similar probabilities of reporting CVD regardless of their work schedule, suggesting a relationship to insomnia and not to night work per se. The results also highlighted the importance of including evaluation of all sleep episodes (diurnal plus nocturnal sleep) for night workers.

  19. Disentangling the effects of insomnia and night work on cardiovascular diseases: a study in nursing professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Costa, A.; Griep, R.H.; Rotenberg, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are known to be associated with poor sleep quality in general populations, but they have not been consistently associated with specific work schedules. Studies of CVD generally do not simultaneously consider sleep and work schedules, but that approach could help to disentangle their effects. We investigated the association between insomnia and a self-reported physician diagnosis of CVD in day and night workers, considering all sleep episodes during nocturnal and diurnal sleep. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1307 female nursing professionals from 3 public hospitals, using baseline data from the “Health and Work in Nursing - a Cohort Study.” Participants were divided into two groups: i) day workers with no previous experience in night shifts (n=281) and whose data on insomnia were related to nocturnal sleep and ii) those who worked exclusively at night (n=340) and had data on both nocturnal and diurnal sleep episodes, as they often sleep at daytime. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. Among day workers, insomnia complaints increased the odds of CVD 2.79-fold (95% CI=1.01-6.71) compared with workers who had no complaints. Among night workers, reports of insomnia during both nocturnal and diurnal sleep increased the odds of reported CVD 3.07-fold (95% CI=1.30-7.24). Workers with insomnia had similar probabilities of reporting CVD regardless of their work schedule, suggesting a relationship to insomnia and not to night work per se. The results also highlighted the importance of including evaluation of all sleep episodes (diurnal plus nocturnal sleep) for night workers

  20. Disentangling the effects of insomnia and night work on cardiovascular diseases: a study in nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Silva-Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are known to be associated with poor sleep quality in general populations, but they have not been consistently associated with specific work schedules. Studies of CVD generally do not simultaneously consider sleep and work schedules, but that approach could help to disentangle their effects. We investigated the association between insomnia and a self-reported physician diagnosis of CVD in day and night workers, considering all sleep episodes during nocturnal and diurnal sleep. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1307 female nursing professionals from 3 public hospitals, using baseline data from the “Health and Work in Nursing - a Cohort Study.” Participants were divided into two groups: i day workers with no previous experience in night shifts (n=281 and whose data on insomnia were related to nocturnal sleep and ii those who worked exclusively at night (n=340 and had data on both nocturnal and diurnal sleep episodes, as they often sleep at daytime. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. Among day workers, insomnia complaints increased the odds of CVD 2.79-fold (95% CI=1.01-6.71 compared with workers who had no complaints. Among night workers, reports of insomnia during both nocturnal and diurnal sleep increased the odds of reported CVD 3.07-fold (95% CI=1.30-7.24. Workers with insomnia had similar probabilities of reporting CVD regardless of their work schedule, suggesting a relationship to insomnia and not to night work per se. The results also highlighted the importance of including evaluation of all sleep episodes (diurnal plus nocturnal sleep for night workers.

  1. The theory-practice gap: impact of professional-bureaucratic work conflict on newly-qualified nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Latter, Sue; Clark, Jill Macleod

    2006-08-01

    This paper reports the findings from a naturalistic enquiry undertaken in the United Kingdom into the extent to which the ideals and values of the preregistration nursing course are adopted by individual newly educated Registered Nurses. Research in several countries provides consistent evidence of the existence of a theory-practice gap in nursing. Clear disparities have been demonstrated between the best practice ideals and values that are taught and those actually encountered in everyday practice. Nurse education 'Project 2000' reforms in the United Kingdom were designed, in part, to address this issue. Few studies to date have examined the impact of these reforms on newly qualified Registered Nurses' ability to translate theory into practice. A longitudinal study was carried out in three educational institutions in the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2000. Final year nursing students (n = 72) in three colleges of nursing completed questionnaires to elicit views on their ideals and values for practice. In-depth interviews with a purposive subsample of 26 participants (at 4-6 and 11-15 months postqualification) indicated the extent to which these ideals and values were adopted in practice. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed, and data were analysed using constant comparison and negative case analysis. Although new nurses emerged from their programmes with a strong set of nursing values, a number of professional and organizational factors effectively sabotaged implementation. Professional sabotage includes obeying covert rules, lack of support and poor nursing role models. Organizational sabotage includes structural and organizational constraints such as time pressures, role constraints, staff shortages and work overload. The disparity between nursing as taught and as practised may have profound implications for the future of the profession both in the United Kingdom and internationally, in terms of morale, job satisfaction and retention. Measures to improve

  2. Grounding our practice in nursing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2014-07-01

    The Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice is foundational to the work of nurses in a continuing professional development role. Use of the practice and professional performance aspects of the standards supports both quality of learning activities and the continuous growth process of nurses engaged in this area of practice. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Copyright Law Basics for the Nursing Professional: Part 1: Using the Work of Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVelle, Meghan B; LaVelle, Beth Elchek; Port, Kenneth L; Sherlock, Jacob T

    2015-01-01

    This article covers the basics of Copyright Law as applicable to the use of protected resources and the sharing of information by nurse professionals. It explores frequently cited justifications for copyright violation, including the doctrine of Fair Use and the Technology and Copyright Harmonization Act. It also discusses why those justifications may or may not apply to the nurse professional who teaches in a clinical setting or at a conference.(See CE Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPD/A2).

  4. Practice environment and its association with professional competence and work-related factors: perception of newly graduated nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Ruoppa, Eija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    To explore newly graduated nurses' (NGN) perception of their practice environment and its association with their self-assessed competence, turnover intentions and job satisfaction as work-related factors. The impact of practice environment on nurses' work is important. Positive practice environments are associated with positive organisational, nurse and patient outcomes. How this applies to NGNs needs further exploration. A cross-sectional descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected with PES-NWI and NCS instruments from 318 Finnish registered nurses, and analysed statistically. Newly graduated nurses' perception of their practice environment was mainly positive. Most positive perceptions related to collegial nurse-physician relations, and the least positive to staffing and resource adequacy. Positive perceptions were also associated with higher professional competence, higher perceptions of quality of care and lower intentions to leave the job or profession. The findings revealed strong and significant associations between practice environment and work-related factors. Practice environment is an important element in supporting NGNs' competence, retention and job satisfaction. Nursing management should pay attention to NGNs' perceptions of their practice environment. Management's ability to create and maintain positive practice environments can foster NGNs' professional development and job satisfaction, and consequently retain them in the workforce. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF STRESS CONNECTED WITH PROFESSIONAL WORK ON THE OCCURRENCE OF BURNOUT SYNDROME IN NURSES WORKING IN SURGICAL AND MEDICAL TREATMENT WARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Nowak-Starz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursing is one of the professions where chronic stress is an inseparable characteristic and stems from the very nature of the profession itself. The job of a nurse involves particular mental burdens. The source of these is another person, one who has most often found themselves in an extreme situation. A nurse carries out her/his duties in a state of strong and long-lasting emotional strain. Inappropriate coping with stress and a lack of support from others in difficult situations leads to the development of burnout syndrome. This syndrome not only lowers, to a great extent, the quality of performed work but also prevents nurses from further professional development. Aims : The aim of the following paper is to evaluate the influence of stress connected with the professional work of a nurse on the occurrence of burnout syndrome. Material and methodology : Research was conducted on a group of 103 nurses working at eight hospital wards (surgical and medical treatment at the District Hospital in Lipsko. The research tool was a questionnaire of the author’s own devise, which contained 34 questions. Results : Among the examined nurses, 90% concluded that their professional work has a negative impact on their family life and they pointed to their own occupational burnout. Nurses who carried negative emotions over from work to their homes significantly more often showed a lack of satisfaction from their job and signs of occupational burnout. A substantial percentage of the participants considered shift-work and the professional position held to be a detrimental factor in the process of occupational burnout. Conclusion : The nurses were to a large extent exposed to mental burdens having a negative impact on their work. The vast majority of the respondents felt satisfaction from their job but a significant percentage of the respondents admitted to suffering from symptoms of chronic stress and exhaustion, which may indicate a lack of any support from co

  6. The five-factor model of personality, work stress and professional quality of life in neonatal intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The study aim was to determine the direct and indirect relations of the five-factor model of personality traits and work stress with professional quality of life in neonatal nurses. Neonatal intensive care nursing has positive and negative effects on neonatal nurses' psychological well-being. Although individual and situational factors interact to influence professional quality of life, there have been few studies of these relationships in neonatal nurses. A cross-sectional study conducted in 2016. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure professional quality of life (burnout, secondary traumatic stress and compassion satisfaction), five-factor model of personality traits (neuroticism, agreeableness, extraversion, conscientiousness and openness) and work stress (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload). One hundred and forty (34%) of 405 eligible neonatal nurses provided the data. After controlling for work stress, neuroticism and agreeableness were related to burnout, neuroticism was related to secondary traumatic stress, and extraversion was related to compassion satisfaction. Work stress controlled for personality traits was related to burnout and secondary traumatic stress, but not to compassion satisfaction. Neuroticism moderated the effect of work stress on secondary traumatic stress and agreeableness and openness moderated the effect of work stress on compassion satisfaction. Work stress mediated the effect of neuroticism and extraversion on burnout and the effects of extraversion and conscientiousness on compassion satisfaction. Strategies to reduce work stress may not lessen burnout and secondary traumatic stress or increase compassion satisfaction in neonatal nurses who are prone to high neuroticism, low agreeableness and low extraversion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervical pain in nursing professionals under stress at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pozzebon

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The appearance and evolution of some clinical pain conditions may be influenced by stress and other psychosocial factors. Face, head and cervical muscles may increase their activity and tension in the presence of stress, leading to craniocervicomandibular pain in individuals exposed to stress. Objective: To assess the relationship among perceived stress, anxiety, depression and craniocervicomandibular pain in nursing professionals under stress at work. Materials and Methods: Forty-three women under stress at work, according to the Job Stress Scale (JSS, were assessed by the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, pressure pain threshold, measured by algometry, and muscle sensitivity to hand palpation of the masticatory and cervical muscles. Results: A low moderate level of perceived stress was found in 62.79% of the sample, anxiety in 11.63% and depression in 9.30%. The psychosocial scales correlated with each other. No correlation was found between pressure pain threshold and perceived stress, anxiety and depression. The level of pain to hand palpation correlated with the perceived stress scores. Conclusion: Pressure pain threshold was not influenced by the psychosocial factors assessed. Pain intensity to hand palpation, however, was higher as the perception of stress increased.

  8. Experiencing professional strains of nurses, radiation engineers and physicians working at the Institute of oncology in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skufca Smrdel, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Since 1974 the term burnout is used in psychology. Burnout describes the end result of stress and has been described by Maslach comprising three basic components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment. In this paper we would like to describe some aspects of burnout experiences of the employees of the Institute of Oncology in Ljubljana. Subjects and methods. We used Questionnaire of professional stress, created by Zunter Nagy and Kocmur. In our research 137 health workers from four professional groups participated: physicians, graduated nurses, nurses and radiation engineers, representing 38% of all employees. Results. We found out that in the experience the professional stressof all four professional groups is relatively equalized. The most prominent feelings are of fatigue, irritability and work overload. There were no signs of depersonalization - as described by Maslach - reported in our group. In nurses and in radiation engineers a distress is significantly more often displayed due to poorer personal income and poorer material status. Nurses reported significantly more often the intention to change work position (51%), institution (57%) or job (47%). Conclusions. Workstress impacts on the experience and on the thought patterns in those participating in the study. We can describe those signs as burnout signs. However, there are more new questions opening in the future as well as the need to a longitudinal approach to the research of this more and more prominent field. (author)

  9. Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers' perspectives. ... This implies that creating a favourable environment in the workplace situation ... Unsafe working environments and a lack of resources threaten the safety and ...

  10. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  11. Impaired work functioning due to common mental disorders in nurses and allied health professionals: the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gärtner, F. R.; Nieuwenhuijsen, K.; van Dijk, F. J. H.; Sluiter, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Common mental disorders (CMD) negatively affect work functioning. In the health service sector not only the prevalence of CMDs is high, but work functioning problems are associated with a risk of serious consequences for patients and healthcare providers. If work functioning problems due to CMDs are

  12. Registered Nurses' views on their professional role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furåker, Carina

    2008-11-01

    The aim is to study Registered Nurses' opinions and reflections about their work tasks, competence and organization in acute hospital care. The definition of the role of nurses has changed over time and it is often discussed whether Registered Nurses have a professional status or not. A qualitative research design was used. Data were derived from written reflections on diaries and from focus group interviews. All respondents had difficulties in identifying the essence of their work. It can be argued that being 'a spider in the web' is an important aspect of the nursing profession. Registered Nurses tend to regard their professional role as vague. Managers must be considered key persons in defining the professional role of Registered Nurses. This study contributes to an understanding of the managers' and the importance of nursing education in Registered Nurses professional development.

  13. Nurse Perspectives on the Practical, Emotional, and Professional Impacts of Living and Working in Post-earthquake Canterbury, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Sarbjit S; Mounsey, Zoe; Brannelly, Petula; Johnston, David M

    2016-02-01

    This report explores nurses' perspectives following the Canterbury (New Zealand) 2010-2011 earthquake sequence and the subsequent recovery process. Problem Little is known about the experiences of health care professionals during a disaster recovery process, and this research generates insights about the challenges faced. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 11 nurses from the Christchurch (New Zealand) area to explore the challenges faced by the nurses during and following the earthquakes. The interviews took place three years after the start of the earthquake experience to enable exploration of longer term aspects of the recovery process. The interview transcripts were analyzed and coded using a grounded theory approach. The data analysis identified that the nurses had faced a number of challenges and these were characterized as practical, emotional, and professional. While some of the challenges were short-lived in the aftermath of the earthquakes, some were long-lasting due to the extended nature of the recovery process. Dealing with house damage, insurance negotiations, and working in damaged environments had a negative impact on the nurses. The nurses experienced a range of emotions, both negative and positive, after the disaster, though many had needed time to elapse before feeling able to reflect on their experiences. The findings suggest that secondary stressors have a negative impact on the psychosocial recovery process. The nurses recognized that they received support from others and were also required to focus on others. Keeping busy appeared to be the most common coping strategy. This lack of reflection on their experiences may have resulted in delayed emotional responses. Some of the nurses changed their work role, hours, and responsibilities suggesting that working in this environment was having a detrimental impact. The research indicates the challenges faced by nurses in the initial impact of the earthquakes and during the

  14. Emotional Distress as a Predictor of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Malaysian Nursing Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nur Azma; Quek, Kia Fatt; Oxley, Jennifer Anne; Noah, Rahim; Nordin, Rusli

    2018-04-01

    Emotional distress is becoming a great concern and is more common in both developed and developing countries. It is associated with several disease conditions. To determine the prevalence of self-perceived emotional distress and its relation to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) in nurses. A self-administered questionnaire survey was carried out on 660 female nurses working in public hospitals in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. The validated Malay version of the standardized Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (M-SNMQ) was used to identify the annual prevalence of WRMSDs; perceived emotional distress was assessed using the validated Malay short version, depression, anxiety, and stress (M-DASS) instrument. In addition, socio-demographic and occupational profiles of the participants were considered. Factors associated with WRMSDs were identified using logistic regression analysis. A total of 376 nurses completed the survey (response rate 83.3%). 73.1% of the nursing staffs experienced WRMSDs in at least one anatomical site 12 months prior to the study. 75% of nurses expressed emotional distress. Of these, over half also reported anxiety and stress. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that stress and anxiety significantly increased the risk of WRMSDs by approximately twofold. There were significant associations between emotional distress and WRMSDs. Future longitudinal studies are therefore needed to investigate and identify the sources of emotional distress (non-occupational and occupational) to be used to establish preventive strategies to reduce the risk of WRMSDs.

  15. Emotional Distress as a Predictor of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Malaysian Nursing Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Azma Amin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional distress is becoming a great concern and is more common in both developed and developing countries. It is associated with several disease conditions. Objective: To determine the prevalence of self-perceived emotional distress and its relation to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs in nurses. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey was carried out on 660 female nurses working in public hospitals in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. The validated Malay version of the standardized Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (M-SNMQ was used to identify the annual prevalence of WRMSDs; perceived emotional distress was assessed using the validated Malay short version, depression, anxiety, and stress (M-DASS instrument. In addition, socio-demographic and occupational profiles of the participants were considered. Factors associated with WRMSDs were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 376 nurses completed the survey (response rate 83.3%. 73.1% of the nursing staffs experienced WRMSDs in at least one anatomical site 12 months prior to the study. 75% of nurses expressed emotional distress. Of these, over half also reported anxiety and stress. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that stress and anxiety significantly increased the risk of WRMSDs by approximately twofold. Conclusion: There were significant associations between emotional distress and WRMSDs. Future longitudinal studies are therefore needed to investigate and identify the sources of emotional distress (non-occupational and occupational to be used to establish preventive strategies to reduce the risk of WRMSDs.

  16. The role of high-involvement work practices and professional self-image in nursing recruits' turnover: A three-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chênevert, Denis; Jourdain, Geneviève; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The retention of young graduate nurses has become a major management challenge among hospitals in Western countries, which is amplified in a context of aging of populations and an increasing demand for services from patients. Moreover, as it has been reported that 50% of experienced nurses do not recommend a career in nursing, it is likely that retention problems occur not only at the level of the organization, but also at the level of the nursing profession. Although research has identified some predictors of nurse turnover, it is unclear which factors influence nurses' turnover from the organization and from the profession and how these factors interrelate with one another over time. The present study extends previous research on nurse turnover by looking at the combined effects of nurses' pre-entry expectations, perceived high-involvement work practices, and professional self-image, on intended and actual turnover from the organization and the profession. A prospective, longitudinal study of a sample of 160 graduated nurses affiliated with the Quebec Nurses' Association, Canada, was conducted. Participants were surveyed at three points in time, spread over a 3-year period. Graduated nurses' pre-entry expectations and professional self-image were surveyed at graduation (Time 1), while perceived high-involvement work practices, professional self-image, and intention to leave the organization and the profession were captured six months following nurses' entry into the labor market (Time 2). Finally, participants were surveyed with respect to organizational and professional turnover three years after the Time 2 survey (Time 3). Structural equations modeling was used to examine the structure of the measures and the relationships among the constructs. Although pre-entry expectations had no effect, perceived high-involvement work practices were positively related to Time 2, professional self-image (controlling for pre-entry professional self-image). Moreover, high

  17. Professionalism and professional quality of life for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Kyunghee

    2016-10-01

    To identify the relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life among oncology nurses working at tertiary hospitals in Korea. Oncology nurses are combined with core competencies and qualities required in cancer patient care. Professionalism that means compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue is a main concept in problem-solving strategies as motivation. Their satisfaction is representative of professionalism and professional quality of life. However, little research has focused on professionalism and professional quality of life. A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. A total of 285 nurses from two tertiary hospitals were included. Data collection was undertaken using Korean version of professionalism scale derived from the Hall Professional Inventory Scale and professional quality of life. Data were analysed by spss 21.0 for Windows Program using t-test, anova, and multiple regression. The mean score of professionalism in oncology nurses was 77·98 ± 7·31. The mean professional quality of life score for compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress was 33·84 ± 5·62, 28·38 ± 5·36 and 28·33 ± 5·48. Compassion satisfaction was affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 49·2%. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress were affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 39·3% and 4·8%. The higher the professionalism leads to the higher the compassion satisfaction, the lower the compassion fatigue. The relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life for a health work environment requires further investigation. Our study supports the idea that enhancing professionalism can increase professional quality of life. It is necessary to develop professionalism by recognised qualifications and applied rewards in advanced nursing organisational culture. Furthermore, compassion satisfaction is increased by

  18. Overload Of Work Of The Nursing Professionals That Work In The Surgical Center And The Repercussions In The Quality Of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alany Bezerra da Rocha Alves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Surgical Center is a restricted environment of high complexity, where the professionals who work in it deal with exhausting activities, as well as complex and unexpected situations, which are potential physical and psychological stressors, and can interfere in the quality of life. This is an exploratory, descriptive, quantitative qualitative approach, with the objective of analyzing the workload of nursing professionals working at the Surgical Center and the repercussions on the quality of life, submitted and approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Health Sciences Center of the Federal University of Paraíba (CCS/ UFPB, according to the protocol n° 0156/16, CAAE: 55298616.3.0000.5188. The sample consisted of 15 nurses of both sexes who work in a Philanthropic Hospital located in the municipality of João Pessoa / PB. A questionnaire was applied to characterize the participants' profile, an interview script with data related to work overload and WHOQOL-Bref. It was found that 80% of the participants were women, the average age was 37.8 years. In the sample, 60% were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their quality of life, and 33% stated they were dissatisfied with their quality of health. It is concluded that the results obtained provided a more reflective analysis of the workload of nursing professionals working in the surgical center, besides analyzing the repercussions that affect the quality of life of these people, evaluating the association between the variables of the characterization Of the nursing professionals' profile with the domains measured by WOQOL Bref.

  19. Professional burnout among studying nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bielan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a response to stress, the source of which is the situation at work. This phenomenon concerns mainly representatives of professions whose essence is to work with people, including doctors, nurses, paramedics and others; their close committed interactions with others constitute the core of professional activity and determine the success and development. Participants of the study were 281 students of extramural complementary nursing course at the University of Warmia and Mazury, mostly aged 40-60 years, employed in hospital wards and with employment contracts. In the study, the authors’ demographic questionnaire of structuralized interview and the MBI questionnaire, developed by Maslach and Jackson, in the Polish version by Pasikowski (2004, were used. The obtained results were statistically analysed. The performed analysis of burnout has confirmed that emotional exhaustion is associated with the length of employment, the number of days off and the number of institutions where nurses were employed. We did not observe, however, any correlation with these variables between depersonalisation and a sense of the lack of achievements. Furthermore, no dependence of the severity of the professional burnout symptoms on the surveyed groups’ age was found. It turned out that the persons working in shifts system felt much stronger depletion of emotion than nurses working in a daily system. It was also observed that nurses employed in hospitals felt much stronger symptoms in both areas of occupational burnout than those working in other institutions. Furthermore, it was not confirmed that the absence of the sense of achievement depended on where the respondents were employed. Taking into account the reference levels of the three dimensions of burnout acc. to MBI it was found out that most respondents were characterized by a low value within the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation and a high value in terms of a sense of the lack of

  20. An investigation into the attitude of professional nurses towards euthanasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kunene

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify professional nurses attitudes towards euthanasia. A descriptive study of the attitudes of professional nurses towards euthanasia was undertaken. The data collecting instrument was a questionnaire, which was self-administered to 26 professional nurses working in different wards.

  1. An investigation into the attitude of professional nurses towards euthanasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kunene

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify professional nurses attitudes towards euthanasia. A descriptive study of the attitudes of professional nurses towards euthanasia was undertaken. The data collecting instrument was a questionnaire, which was self-administered to 26 professional nurses working in different wards.

  2. Using Participatory Action Research to Develop a Working Model That Enhances Psychiatric Nurses' Professionalism: The Architecture of Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Ward rules in psychiatric care aim to promote safety for both patients and staff. Simultaneously, ward rules are associated with increased patient violence, leading to neither a safe work environment nor a safe caring environment. Although ward rules are routinely used, few studies have explicitly accounted for their impact. To describe the process of a team development project considering ward rule issues, and to develop a working model to empower staff in their daily in-patient psychiatric nursing practices. The design of this study is explorative and descriptive. Participatory action research methodology was applied to understand ward rules. Data consists of audio-recorded group discussions, observations and field notes, together creating a data set of 556 text pages. More than 100 specific ward rules were identified. In this process, the word rules was relinquished in favor of adopting the term principles, since rules are inconsistent with a caring ideology. A linguistic transition led to the development of a framework embracing the (1) Principle of Safety, (2) Principle of Structure and (3) Principle of Interplay. The principles were linked to normative guidelines and applied ethical theories: deontology, consequentialism and ethics of care. The work model reminded staff about the principles, empowered their professional decision-making, decreased collegial conflicts because of increased acceptance for individual decisions, and, in general, improved well-being at work. Furthermore, the work model also empowered staff to find support for their decisions based on principles that are grounded in the ethics of totality.

  3. Probing community nurses' professional basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun

    2017-01-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating...... diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot...... ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers....

  4. Professional nurses' perception of their clinical teaching role at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Nursing education institutions in Lesotho face an increasing number of enrolments owing to a high demand for professional nurses to work in the community. Enrolments have doubled during the last 3 years, without an increase in teaching resources or staff. Professional nurses in the wards are expected to ...

  5. Professional Socialization in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Geraldine E.

    Professional socialization is the process by which individuals acquire the specialized knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, norms, and interests needed to perform their professional roles acceptably. The following interacting domains of potential professional self-growth can be defined as outcomes of the socialization process: self-image, role…

  6. Conflict between nursing student's personal beliefs and professional nursing values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, David; de Lacey, Sheryl; King, Lindy

    2017-01-01

    work towards enhancing strategies that assist nursing students to reconcile any incongruity between their personal beliefs and requisite professional nursing values.

  7. Surveillance technology: an alternative to physical restraints? A qualitative study among professionals working in nursing homes for people with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Francke, A.L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Working with surveillance technology as an alternative to traditional restraints creates obvious differences in the way care is organised. It is not clear whether professional caregivers find working with surveillance technology useful and workable and whether surveillance technology is

  8. Work satisfaction of professional nurses in South Africa: a comparative analysis of the public and private sectors

    OpenAIRE

    Pillay, Rubin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Work satisfaction of nurses is important, as there is sufficient empirical evidence to show that it tends to affect individual, organizational and greater health and social outcomes. Although there have been several studies of job satisfaction among nurses in South Africa, these are limited because they relate to studies of individual organizations or regions, use small samples or are dated. This paper presents a national study that compares and contrasts satisfaction leve...

  9. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p extrinsic motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. The influence of nursing care integration services on nurses' work satisfaction and quality of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeong-Im; Kim, Kisook

    2018-06-20

    To investigate differences in work satisfaction and quality of nursing services between nurses from the nursing care integration service and general nursing units in Korea. The nursing care integration service was recently introduced in Korea to improve patient health outcomes through the provision of high quality nursing services and to relieve the caregiving burden of patients' families. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from a convenience sample of 116 and 156 nurses working in nursing care integration service and general units, respectively. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, t tests and one-way analysis of variance. Regarding work satisfaction, nursing care integration service nurses scored higher than general unit nurses on professional status, autonomy and task requirements, but the overall scores showed no significant differences. Scores on overall quality of nursing services, responsiveness and assurance were higher for nursing care integration service nurses than for general unit nurses. Nursing care integration service nurses scored higher than general unit nurses on some aspects of work satisfaction and quality of nursing services. Further studies with larger sample sizes will contribute to improving the quality of nursing care integration service units. These findings can help to establish strategies for the implementation and efficient operation of the nursing care integration service system, for the improvement of the quality of nursing services, and for successfully implementing and expanding nursing care integration service services in other countries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. New Graduate Nurses' Professional Commitment: Antecedents and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Sylvie; Chênevert, Denis; Kilroy, Steven

    2017-09-01

    This study examines the factors that increase new graduate nurses' professional commitment and how this professional commitment in turn affects professional turnover intentions, anxiety, and physical health symptoms. The study was carried out in association with the nursing undergraduate's affiliation of Quebec, Canada. A three-wave longitudinal design was employed among nursing students. Nurses were surveyed before they entered the labor market, and then twice after they started working. Participants were contacted by post at their home address. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Professional commitment explains why good work characteristics and the provision of organizational resources related to patient care reduce nurses' anxiety and physical symptoms, and increase their professional turnover intentions. Pre-entry professional perceptions moderate the effects of work characteristics on professional commitment such that when participants hold positive pre-entry perceptions about the profession, the propensity to develop professional commitment is higher. There is a worldwide shortage of nurses. From a nurse training perspective, it is important to create realistic perceptions of the nursing role. In hospitals, providing a good work environment and resources conducive to their professional ethos is critical for ensuring nurses do not leave the profession early on in their careers. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Professional Values Among Female Nursing Students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allari, Rabia S; Ismaile, Samantha; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Professional values are essential to nursing practice because they guide standards for working, provide a structure for evaluating behavior, and influence decisions making. The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of Saudi female nursing students on professional values and to assess the correlation between their perception of professional values in relation to their year of academic studies. We used a cross-sectional descriptive study where a survey was administered to 150 Saudi female nurses living in Riyadh. Results show that Saudi female nurses have a high perception of professional values relating to confidentiality, privacy, moral and legal rights, health and safety, and the work environment. Whereas Saudi nursing students have a low perception for participating in professional nursing activities, utilizing research in practice, peer review, public policy, and engaging in on-going self-evaluation. There was positive correlation between different professional values and academic years. The highest correlations were for the items related to caring and trust more than activism because nursing students at higher academic levels viewed the relationship with patients as more important than advancing health care systems through public policy, research, and professional organizations. In conclusion, nursing program administrators should put emphasis on improving the development of professional values through a role modeling approach to promote activism and professional values through the arrangement of meetings, exchange forums, and conferences with other nurses, managers, policy makers, innovators, and researchers within the nursing field.

  13. Professional caregivers' work with the dying in nursing homes--a Foucault-inspired analysis of discourses in the last decade in a Danish context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karen T; Glasdam, Stinne

    2013-12-01

    International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade. A discourse analysis inspired by Foucault was constructed. The material consists of different source documents: research articles, newspaper articles, theses, books, websites - 35 sources in total. There are constructed six positions of speech, five discourses and three themes: (1) 'the work of the professional caregivers - a complex low-status work'; (2) 'the education of the professionals - the way to ensure a good death or possessing the right qualifications' and (3) 'the vulnerable professionals'. The study concludes that an economical/political discourse is dominating and sets up the frames within which the professionals care for dying residents, although the medical, the social/critical and the religious discourses attempt to speak against it. All positions articulate that the professional caregivers' job has a low status and that it is not possible to provide an optimal care due to lack of time, resources and education. Psychical or mental demands make the professionals vulnerable. The meaning of optimal care varies according to the positions of speech. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Conflict and professionalism: perceptions among nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakari, N M; Al Khamis, N I; Hamadi, H Y

    2010-09-01

    To examine the relationship between nurses' perceptions of conflict and professionalism. In Saudi Arabia, health-care sectors are constantly undergoing major changes because of social, consumer-related, governmental, technological and economic pressures. These changes will influence the nature of health-care organizations, such as hospitals' work environment. The ability of nurses to practise in a professional manner may be influenced by their work environment and conflict level. A cross-sectional design was conducted in this study. A simple random selection of three health-care sectors in Saudi Arabia was performed and 346 nurse managers, as well as bedside nurses participated to provide information about conflict levels and professionalism. The Perceived Conflict Scale was used to assess the level of conflict, and the Valiga Concept of Nursing Scale was used to assess the professionalism perception among nurses. The intragroup/other department type of conflict had a statistically significant correlation with the perception of professionalism. In addition, the findings point to a low perception among the participating nurses regarding their professionalism. A number of factors might explain the low level of perception of professionalism. These relate to the workplace itself, as well as to the personal background of the nurses, which includes the personal interest in the nursing profession, as well as the family's, society's and the consumers' views of the profession. Given the findings of this study, nurse managers are encouraged to create a work environment that supports professionalism and minimizes conflict.

  15. School Nurse Perspectives of Challenges and How They Perceive Success in Their Professional Nursing Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shirley G.; Firmin, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    This is a phenomenological study of 25 school nurses employed in a large, urban school district in the midwestern section of the United States. In addition to school nursing, the participants also had professional work experience in other nursing specialties. Thematic analysis of the data focused on the challenges faced by the school nurses, their…

  16. The development of the Professional Values Model in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ayla; Boz, İlkay

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important criteria for professionalism is accumulation of knowledge that is usable in professional practice. Nursing models and theories are important elements of accumulating nursing knowledge and have a chance to guarantee the ethical professional practice. In recent years, there has been an increase in the use of models in nursing research and newly created terminology has started to be used in nursing. In this study, a new model, termed as the Professional Values Model, developed by the authors was described. Concepts comprising the conceptual framework of the model and relations between the concepts were explained. It is assumed that awareness about concepts of the model will increase not only the patients' satisfaction with nursing care, but also the nurses' job satisfaction and quality of nursing care. Contemporary literature has been reviewed and synthesized to develop this theoretical paper on the Professional Values Model in nursing. Having high values in nursing increases job satisfaction, which results in the improvement of patient care and satisfaction. Also, individual characteristics are effective in the determination of individual needs, priorities, and values. This relation, proved through research about the Professional Values Model, has been explained. With development of these concepts, individuals' satisfaction with care and nurses' job satisfaction will be enhanced, which will increase the quality of nursing care. Most importantly, nurses can take proper decisions about ethical dilemmas and take ethical action when they take these values into consideration when giving care. The Professional Values Model seems suitable for nurse managers and it is expected that testing will improve it. Implementation of the Professional Values Model by nurse managers may increase motivation of nurses they work with. It is suggested that guidance by the Professional Values Model may help in enhancement of motivation efforts of the nurse managers

  17. Feelings about Nursing Assistants that Enhance the Work Motivation of Japanese Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Kono, Keiko; Kume, Ryuko; Matsuhashi, Ayako; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses have received professional education, but to enhance their work motivation it is necessary to create work environments in which they can concentrate on their jobs as specialists. One of the methods to develop such work environments is to use nursing assistants effectively. We investigated professional nurses' feelings toward nursing assistants and then examined the associations between those feelings and their work motivation. The analyzed subjects were 2,170 female nurses working in 25 hospitals with from 55 to 458 beds. The average age of the respondents was 38.0 (standard deviation, 10.6 years). Factor analyses extracted four factors of professional nurses' feelings toward nursing assistants: 1. knowledge related to healthcare, 2. nursing assistants' attitudes toward work, 3. human relations, and 4. distinguishing between professional nurses' work and nursing assistants' work. Using multiple linear regression analysis, our results revealed that scores of maintaining a high motivation to work thanks to nursing assistants became lower as the ages of the respondents increased. Scores of maintaining a high motivation to work thanks to nursing assistants became higher as professional nurses gained satisfaction from: knowledge related to healthcare, nursing assistants' attitudes toward work, and human relations. Hospital managers should consider these findings to improve working environments in which professional nurses can feel motivated to work.

  18. Nurses' visibility according to the perceptions of the communication professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmer, Ligia Fahl; Paes da Silva, Maria Júlia

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to further our understanding of the social representations of nurses and the nursing profession by communication professionals, since they are intermediates in the decoding of imaging and written representations about society. this is a qualitative study, based on the social representation theory of Moscovici. Five communication professionals working on radio, television, written press, advertising and events were interviewed. Results suggest 1) ignorance about the nurse's field of work, job market and nursing profession categorization. 2) nurses' invisibility before the media and society and 3) nurse's own responsibility to obtain professional recognition and visibility. Participants in this study pointed two essential processes for building a more coherent image of nursing and nurses: 1) exposing the profession primarily before the media, which ignores its potentialities, and 2) through the media in order to reach the population in general.

  19. [Nursing work and ergonomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziale, M H; Robazzi, M L

    2000-12-01

    This text articulates empirical evidence resulting from scientific work with the intention of providing a reflection about the application of ergonomics as a methodological instrument to support improvement of the labor conditions of nursing personnel in hospitals.

  20. Korean nurses' ethical dilemmas, professional values and professional quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Han, Yonghee; Kim, Ji-su

    2015-06-01

    In the changing medical environment, professional stress continuously increases as the individual's quality of life suffers. Of all the healthcare professions, nursing is especially prone to burnout, compassion fatigue and reduced compassion satisfaction, due to the tensions resulting from the physical and psychological stress of caring for extremely ill patients. This study examined the professional quality of life of clinical nurses in Korea and the relationship between their experiences in ethical dilemmas and professional values. This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample consisting of 488 clinical nurses. We used four questionnaires to measure the participants' demographic characteristics, experiences in ethical dilemmas, professional nursing values and professional quality of life (ProQOL assessment, Version 5). Ethical considerations: This study received approval from the Institutional Review Board of Bronco Memorial Hospital. Written informed consent was given by all participants. The nurses' professional quality of life was affected by ethical dilemmas and professional nursing values. The factors influencing compassion satisfaction were age, client domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness, professionalism of nursing and the roles of nursing services in professional values. The factors influencing burnout were marital status (married), religion (yes), human life domain, professional work domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness and the role of nursing services in nursing professional values. The factors influencing secondary traumatic stress were human life domain, client domain and the professional work domain of ethical dilemmas. Intervention to help nurses increase their professional quality of life will have a greater chance of success if they are based on the nurses' values and beliefs about the ethical dilemmas they face and foster the establishment of positive professional values. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalene H. Awases

    2013-04-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Method: A quantitative, descriptive survey was used to collect data by means of a questionnaire. A random sample of 180 professional nurses was selected from six hospitals in three regions of Namibia. Results: Factors affecting the performance of nurses negatively were identified such as: lack of recognition of employees who are performing well, quality performance outcomes and an absence of a formal performance appraisal system and poor working conditions. Various factors contribute to both the positive and negative performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Strategies were developed for addressing the negative factors that could positively affect the performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Conclusions: This study emphasises the importance of developing strategies to promote the performance of nurses; build knowledge and expertise; develop mechanisms for improving the performance of nurses; expand leadership and management capacity; and generate information and knowledge through research.

  2. Retaining professional nurses in South Africa: Nurse managers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mokoka

    2010-11-01

    An exploratory, descriptive, contextual and qualitative design was used to describe nurse managers’views on factors which could influence professional nurse retention, as well as their views regarding attributes that were required to enable them to contribute towards enhancing professional nurse retention. A purposive sample of nurse managers employed in public and private hospitals in the Gauteng province was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 nurse managers.The results were analysed qualitatively and contextualised within Vogt, Cox, Velthouse and Thames’s Cork-Top (Bottleneck Theory of Nurse Retention (1983 and Lewin’s Force-Field Analysis Theory (1952. Factors pertaining to individual nurses, the organisation and nurse managers could influence the retention of professional nurses. Poor working conditions, long and inconvenient working hours,uncompetitive salaries and professional development of nurses have to be addressed to enhance professional nurses’ retention. Unsafe working environments and a lack of resources threaten the safety and well-being of nurses and patients and contribute to high turnover rates. Nurse managers have to address shortcomings in their managerial and leadership skills and implement changes within a multigenerational nursing workforce and challenging working environments. Opsomming Suid-Afrika ervaar ’n ernstige tekort aan verpleegkundiges wat aangespreek moet word ten einde krisisse in gesondheidsorgdienste te voorkom. Vorige studies (Fletcher 2001:324; Oosthuizen 2005:117 het bevind dat verpleegkundiges hulle werksomgewing verander as gevolg van ontevredenheid met hulle werksituasies. Dit impliseer dat die daarstelling van ’n gunstige omgewing in die werkpleksituasie, kan help om professionele verpleegkundiges in hulle poste te behou, wat beteken dat retensiestrategieë doeltreffend moet wees. ’n Verkennende, beskrywende, kontekstuele, kwalitatiewe ontwerp was gebruik om verpleegbestuurders se

  3. [Work satisfaction among Spanish nurses working in English hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Madrigal-Torres, Manuel; Velandrino-Nicolás, Antonio; López-Iborra, Lidón

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate work satisfaction among Spanish nurses employed by English hospitals, as well as the influence of several social and work-related variables associated with satisfaction. We performed a cross-sectional study. All Spanish nurses (n=360) with a contract with any English hospital in April 2003 were included in the study. The self-administered and validated Font Roja work satisfaction questionnaire was used. The response rate was 78.6%. Overall work satisfaction among Spanish nurses was medium. The dimensions with higher work satisfaction were relationships with colleagues and superiors. The dimensions showing lowest work satisfaction were job satisfaction and professional competence. Statistically significant and positive associations were obtained between level of English, professional grade, shift pattern, working in the intensive care unit or accident and emergency department, time worked in English hospitals and degree of work satisfaction. Employers of Spanish nurses should try to increase job satisfaction and professional competence among these workers. Incentivation and professional promotion systems might help achieve this aim. Employers could also try to improve Spanish nurses' English level before contracts are signed and pay special attention to their needs during the first working year. Spanish nurses job satisfaction would also increase if they were allowed to choose their working shift and the unit or ward where they are going to work.

  4. Hospital infection: vision of professional nursing staff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarciane da Silva Monteiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The hospital-acquired infection (HAI is defined as a serious public health problem, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. The role of nursing staff on this issue is essential in ensuring solving and quality care, minimizing damages that may arise as a result of the care offered to patients. From this discussion, this study aimed to understand the vision of the nursing team professionals about HAI. Method: This is a qualitative, descriptive study. The data collection was performed using a semi-structured interview. We used the Bardin Content Analysis. Results: The categories that emerged were: Definition of HAI; Implemented prevention measures; Difficulties in controlling the HAI, and coping strategies. The study found a clear understanding of what is a HAI for nurses, however, for practical nurses that understanding appeared wrongly. Hand washing and the use of PPE were the main measures mentioned in prevention. The low uptake of the above measures and the problems of working in teams were listed challenges. Conclusion: Therefore, lifelong learning is an important instrument to promote changes in practice. It is essential that HIC act with professionals raising their awareness about the importance of play in the prevention and control of potential complications, ensuring the safety and quality of care directed to the patient. KEYWORDS: Cross Infection. Nursing. Qualitative research.

  5. Working with doctors and nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with doctors and nurses Working with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting poked and ... to pay? What questions will the doctor or nurse ask? top It’s a good idea to know ...

  6. Nurses' extended work hours: Patient, nurse and organizational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunaviktikul, W; Wichaikhum, O; Nantsupawat, A; Nantsupawat, R; Chontawan, R; Klunklin, A; Roongruangsri, S; Nantachaipan, P; Supamanee, T; Chitpakdee, B; Akkadechanunt, T; Sirakamon, S

    2015-09-01

    Nursing shortages have been associated with increased nurse workloads that may result in work errors, thus impacting patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. To examine for the first time in Thailand nurses' extended work hours (working more than 40 h per week) and its relationship to patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. Using multistage sampling, 1524 registered nurses working in 90 hospitals across Thailand completed demographic forms: the Nurses' Extended Work Hours Form; the Patient, Nurse, Organizational Outcomes Form; the Organizational Productivity Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Spearman's rank correlation and logistic regression. The average extended work hour of respondents was 18.82 h per week. About 80% worked two consecutive shifts. The extended work hours had a positive correlation with patient outcomes, such as patient identification errors, pressure ulcers, communication errors and patient complaints and with nurse outcomes of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Furthermore, we found a negative correlation between extended work hours and job satisfaction as a whole, intent to stay and organizational productivity. Nurses who had extended work hours of >16 h per week were significantly more likely to perceive all four adverse patient outcomes than participants working an extended ≤8 h per week. Patient outcomes were measured by respondents' self-reports. This may not always reflect the real occurrence of adverse events. Associations between extended work hours and outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization were found. The findings demonstrate that working two shifts (16 h) more than the regular work hours lead to negative outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization. Our findings add to increasing international evidence that nurses' poor working conditions result in negative outcomes for professionals, patients and health systems

  7. The influence of Masters education on the professional lives of British and German nurses and the further professionalization of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Dianne

    2011-12-01

     This article reports on findings from a qualitative study which explored the influence of a Masters in Nursing on the professional lives of British and German nurses and its role in further professionalizing nursing. A collaborative Masters programme was delivered in the United Kingdom and Germany. This provided an opportunity to study the influence of the programme on the professionalization of nursing in different country contexts. Continuing education is thought to contribute to furthering professionalization. Evidence to support this in the field of nursing is limited. An interpretive research design was used and data were collected via semi-structured interviews with ten German nurses and nine British nurses. Data were collected in the United Kingdom and Germany from August 2006 to February 2007. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and data were analysed using a template approach with further immersion and crystalization of the data. Nurses' personal and professional confidence improved; research-based evidence was used to underpin changes made to practice; new roles and careers emerged; multi-professional working was enhanced; and nurses rediscovered nursing and championed the profession. A diagram is presented based on the findings. Masters education is at the centre as the catalyst with four interconnecting circles, which depict elements that contribute to professionalization. The diagram highlights overlap and interplay between nurses' increased personal confidence, improved cognitive functioning, evidence-based practice development and enhanced professionalism. Findings support the theory that this Masters in Nursing programme enhanced practice and further professionalization of nursing in both countries. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Professional values of Turkish nurses: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkaya-Uslusoy, Esin; Paslı-Gürdogan, Eylem; Aydınlı, Ayse

    2017-06-01

    Professional values improve the quality of nurses' professional lives, reduce emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, increase personal success, and help to make collaborations with the members of the healthcare team more frequent. The purpose of this study was to describe the professional values of Turkish nurses and to explore the relationships between nurses' characteristics. This was a descriptive study of a convenience sample consisting of 269 clinical nurses. A questionnaire was used to identify socio-demographic characteristics, and the Nurses' Professional Values Scale was applied. Ethical considerations: Permission to conduct the study was received from the hospital and the Institutional Review Boards of the Süleyman Demirel University ethic committee. The mean scale score of the participant nurses was 165.41 ± 20.79. The results of this study revealed that human dignity was the most important professional value for nurses, and the importance attached to these values showed statistically significant differences by age, length of service, educational level, marital status, position at work, and receiving relevant in-service training. Nurses' Professional Values Scale scores showed that nurses give above average and attached importance to professional values.

  9. Priorities for the professional development of registered nurses in nursing homes: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Emily; Spilsbury, Karen; McCaughan, Dorothy; Thompson, Carl; Butterworth, Tony; Hanratty, Barbara

    2017-01-08

    To establish a consensus on the care and professional development needs of registered nurses (RNs) employed by UK care homes. Two-stage, online modified Delphi study. A panel (n = 352) of individuals with experience, expertise or interest in care home nursing: (i) care home nurses and managers; (ii) community healthcare professionals (including general practitioners, geriatricians, specialist and district nurses); and (iii) nurse educators in higher education. RNs employed by nursing homes require particular skills, knowledge, competence and experience to provide high-quality care for older residents. The most important responsibilities for the nursing home nurse were: promoting dignity, personhood and wellbeing, ensuring resident safety and enhancing quality of life. Continuing professional development priorities included personal care, dementia care and managing long-term conditions. The main barrier to professional development was staff shortages. Nursing degree programmes were perceived as inadequately preparing nurses for a nursing home role. Nursing homes could improve by providing supportive learning opportunities for students and fostering challenging and rewarding careers for newly RNs. If nurses employed by nursing homes are not fit for purpose, the consequences for the wider health and social-care system are significant. Nursing homes, the NHS, educational and local authorities need to work together to provide challenging and rewarding career paths for RNs and evaluate them. Without well-trained, motivated staff, a high-quality care sector will remain merely an aspiration.

  10. Professional development needs of nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltner, Rebecca S; Jukkala, Angela; Dawson, Martha A; Patrician, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    Nurse managers have a key role in creating positive work environments where safe, high-quality care is consistently provided. This requires a broad range of skills to be successful within today's complex health care environment; however, managers are frequently selected based on their clinical expertise and are offered little formal preparation for this leadership role. We conducted three focus groups with 20 nurse managers to understand their professional development needs. Transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Three themes emerged: Managing Versus Leading, Gaining a Voice, and Garnering Support. Managers focused on daily tasks, such as matching staffing to patient needs. However, the data suggested gaps in foundational management skills, such as understanding organizational behavior, use of data to make decisions, and refined problem-solving skills. Professional development activities focusing on higher level leadership competencies could assist managers to be more successful in this challenging, but critical, role. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. "I'm not sure I'm a nurse": A hermeneutic phenomenological study of nursing home nurses' work identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Juliana; Cook, Glenda; Duschinsky, Robbie

    2018-03-01

    To explore nursing home nurses' experiences and views of work identity. Nursing home nurses are in a unique position as they work at the interface of health and social care. Little is known about nursing home nurses' perceptions and experiences of working within this context. Evidence suggests that using the concept of work identity can support understanding of how workers make sense of their work. Hermeneutic phenomenological study. The study was carried out in seven nursing homes in North East England. Findings are based upon literary analysis of multiple episodic interviews with 13 nursing home nurses. Participants' responses suggested that nursing "residents" is different to nursing "patients," and nursing home nurses are required to modify their care activities to account for these differences. Participants also proposed that they are isolated and excluded from the rest of the healthcare workforce group. These issues led participants to feel uncertain about work identity. Many participants attempted to strengthen their work identity by aligning their role with what they perceived the "nurse identity" to be. Nurses' work activities and professional group identity influence their work identity. When work activities and professional group identity do not align with role expectations, as can be the case for nursing home nurses, work identity may be compromised. These nurses may attempt to change work practices to strengthen their work identity. Health- and social care providers need to account for work identity factors in the organisation of care, and planning and implementation of integrated health- and social care initiatives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. "We inform the experience of health": perspectives on professionalism in nursing self-employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-07-01

    Nursing work has evolved tremendously over the last century, raising ongoing questions about nursing's professional status. Through various strategies, professionalization in nursing has to some extent been accomplished, although autonomy over nursing practice has been elusive. This is especially so in the contemporary health care system, in which managerial control is emphasized and physician dominance continues. In response to professional constraints in traditional work settings, nursing self-employment is growing. In this study I used focused ethnography to explore the professional experiences of Canadian self-employed nurses and to reconsider nursing knowledge, ethics, and professionalism in this unique context. Despite the barriers they faced, these nurses offered a perspective on nursing professionalism that transcends classic professional traits, showing how the concept of professionalism can be invoked not as a way to "prove" status but as a way to describe a sense of commitment and the contribution to societal well-being.

  13. Professional ethics in nursing: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Pakkanen, Piiku; Korhonen, Anne

    2015-08-01

    To conduct an integrative review and synthesize current primary studies of professional ethics in nursing. Professional ethics is a familiar concept in nursing and provides an ethical code for nursing practice. However, little is known about how professional ethics has been defined and studied in nursing science. Systematic literature searches from 1948-February 2013, using the CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus electronic databases to look at previously published peer-reviewed studies. A modified version of Cooper's five-stage integrative review was used to review and synthesize current knowledge. Fourteen papers were included in this research. According to our synthesis, professional ethics is described as an intra-professional approach to care ethics and professionals commit to it voluntarily. Professional ethics consist of values, duties, rights and responsibilities, regulated by national legislation and international agreements and detailed in professional codes. Professional ethics is well established in nursing, but is constantly changing due to internal and external factors affecting the profession. Despite the obvious importance of professional ethics, it has not been studied much in nursing science. Greater knowledge of professional ethics is needed to understand and support nurses' moral decision-making and to respond to the challenges of current changes in health care and society. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Fania R; Ketelaar, Sarah M; Smeets, Odile; Bolier, Linda; Fischer, Eva; van Dijk, Frank J H; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-05-10

    Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group) with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in both intervention arms will be assessed, and

  15. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Frank JH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in

  16. Supporting students in professional socialisation: Guidelines for professional nurses and educators

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    Hester Cathrina (Rina de Swardt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional socialisation of nursing students involves learning skills, attitudes, behaviour and professional roles, largely in the clinical area. During clinical accompaniment and reflective discussions with a group of undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing students in South Africa, students reported negative professional socialisation experiences, primarily in the clinical area. Such experiences could influence the quality of patient care. The objective of this study was to develop and validate guidelines to support professional nurses and educators in the professional socialisation of student nurses. Evidence was generated from an exploration and description of the perceptions of professional nurses regarding their role in the professional socialisation of students, the perceptions of nurse educators regarding the teaching and facilitation of professional socialisation of students, and the socialisation experiences of students. Following a sequential mixed-methods design, qualitative data guided the collection of quantitative data. All data and literature directed the development of these guidelines, which experts reviewed and validated according to a set of criteria. These guidelines focus on the clinical, nursing educational institution environment and values and beliefs of the nursing profession. Facilitation of sound work ethics, professional behaviour, cultural and gender awareness, role modelling and the application of a range of teaching strategies is proposed.

  17. REFLECTIONS ABOUT NURSES WORK IN PUBLIC HEALTH

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    Maria Alves Barbosa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This research is a part of CIPESC (Classification of Nursing Practice in Public Health project, with national coordination by ABEn (Brazilian Nursing Association witch purpose was to elaborate an inventory of activities developed by Public Health Nurses. It sough to analyze the contribution of the nurses in public health in the South Sanitary District in the city of Goiânia (GO – Brazil, and to identify the meaning of nurses work contribution at Public Health Services, by users and managers. The study was developed by a descriptive-analytical investigation in a qualitative approach. The subjects were managers and users of the Public Health System. Data was collected by individual semi-structured interview directed to the managers and controlling and the Technique of Focal Group. The results had been grouped in three categories: "Performance of the professional", "Education Perspective of Nurses Work”, and "Health-care attendance". As conclusion was found that the nurses give great contribution in the implantation and maintenance of the health politics; that it has concern with the professional formation, that many times is responsible for the incompatibility between the service and the expected potential; it is stand out performance of the nurse as health education professional in the inserted activities in the public health, being intense its contact with the community. KEY WORDS: Public Health; Nursing; Public Health Nursing.

  18. Professional nursing values: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bonnie J; McArthur, Erin C

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this concept analysis is to clarify the meaning of professional nursing values. In a time of increasing ethical dilemmas, it is essential that nurses internalize professional values to develop and maintain a professional identity. However, nursing organizations and researchers provide different conceptions of professional nursing values, leading to a lack of clarity as to the meaning and attributes of this construct. Walker and Avant's (2011) method was used to guide an analysis of this concept. Resources published from 1973 to 2016 were identified via electronic databases and hand-searching of reference lists. A review of the literature was completed and the data were analyzed to identify uses of the concept; the defining attributes of the concept; borderline, related, contrary, and illegitimate examples; antecedents and consequences; and empirical referents. Professional nursing values were defined as important professional nursing principles of human dignity, integrity, altruism, and justice that serve as a framework for standards, professional practice, and evaluation. Further research is needed in the development and testing of professional nursing values theory, and the reassessment of values instruments. Core professional values that are articulated may help unify the profession and demonstrate the value of nursing to the public. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Self-sacrifice, self-transcendence and nurses' professional self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pask, Elizabeth J

    2005-10-01

    In this paper I elaborate a notion of nurses' professional self as one who is attracted towards intrinsic value. My previous work in 2003 has shown how nurses, who see intrinsic value in their work, experience self-affirmation when they believe that they have made a difference to that which they see to have value. The aim of this work is to reveal a further aspect of nurses' professional self. I argue that nurses' desire towards that which they see to have intrinsic value, is a necessary and self-transcending aspect of a nurses' professional self. I argue further that nurses' desire towards intrinsic value inevitably involves their vulnerability. Nurses who see intrinsic value are shown to be vulnerable to self-sacrifice in their inclination to work for the good of their patients, at the expense of themselves. Yet an ability to transcend their self in this way remains a necessary aspect of a nurse's professional self, which requires nurture and support through nurse education.

  20. General and professional values of student nurses and nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Karosas, Laima; Kaseliene, Snieguole

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and compare the self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators in Lithuania. Contemporary nursing requires strong moral motivation and clear values as nurses confront many ethical dilemas in their practice. Students acquire essential values of the nursing profession through the appropriate role modelling of their educators. Nursing students seek to become capable in providing ethical and professional patient care while their educators attempt to model desired behaviours. A national cross-sectional comparative study was carried out in March 2011. Four-hundred eight respondents participated: 316 undergraduate nursing students and 92 nurse educators. A 57-item questionnaire was delivered to nursing programs at three universities and six colleges. Permission to conduct the study was granted by The Center on Bioethics. Student nurses and their educators rated the general value of altruism equally. Educators, in comparison with students, ranked honesty and intellectualism significantly higher and more often admired truth-telling in any circumstance. Students were more likely to avoid intellectual challenges in reading and placed lower importance on academic qualifications for career advancement. The professional nursing values of honesty, intellectualism and authority were ranked significantly higher by nurse educators than student nurses. The study revealed differences in self-reported general and professional values in undergraduate student nurses and nurse educators. The values of nurse educators were not always stronger than those of students. Positive relationships between particular general and professional values in both students and educators confirmed the link between professional and personal values. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Trabalho das enfermeiras-gerentes e a sua formação profissional The work of manager nurses and their professional training

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    Ludmila Mourão Xavier-Gomes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetiva compreender a contribuição do 'ser enfermeira' no cotidiano de trabalho do 'ser gerente' no contexto hospitalar. Trata-se de um trabalho descritivo e exploratório de natureza qualitativa. Os sujeitos da pesquisa foram nove enfermeiras que ocupavam o cargo de gerentes de três instituições hospitalares. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista semiestruturada e submetidos à análise de conteúdo. Evidenciou-se que a formação acadêmica de enfermagem conferiu às enfermeiras o conhecimento e as habilidades para o exercício profissional e para a adoção de uma visão administrativa. A vivência do 'ser enfermeira' é descrita como facilitadora das funções gerenciais. Observaram-se deficiências na formação acadêmica relacionadas às funções administrativas. Dessa forma, percebe-se que o ensino de graduação na enfermagem necessita ser reordenado, buscando a formação de profissionais que estejam em sintonia com as rápidas transformações da sociedade contemporânea.The purpose of this study was to understand the contributions made by the 'nurse being' in the daily life of the 'manager being' in the hospital context. This is a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study. The subjects of the study were nine nurses holding managerial positions in three hospitals. The data were collected through semistructured interviews and submitted to content analyses. It was shown that the academic background in nursing gave the nurses the knowledge and the skills for the professional role they were to play and for the adoption of an administrative vision of their work. The 'nurse being' experience is described as one that facilitates the managerial roles. Deficiencies were noted in the educational background relating to the administrative roles. It can thus be concluded that undergraduate nursing courses must be reoriented, seeking to train professionals who are in tune with the quick pace of change in modern

  2. The relationship experiences of professional nurses with nurse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This qualitative study was undertaken to explore and describe the experiences of professional nurses in their relationships with nurse managers. Concerns about declining nursing care standards have been expressed in radio newsbulletins, television interviews and newspapers. This decline is thought to come from the ...

  3. Professional Stereotypes of Interprofessional Education Naive Pharmacy and Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Maria Miller; Chesson, Melissa M; Harris, Elaine C; Ryan, Gina J

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To assess and compare interprofessional education (IPE) naive pharmacy and nursing student stereotypes prior to completion of an IPE activity. Methods. Three hundred and twenty-three pharmacy students and 275 nursing students at Mercer University completed the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire. Responses from pharmacy and nursing students were compared, and responses from different level learners within the same profession also were compared. Results. Three hundred and fifty-six (59.5%) students completed the survey. Pharmacy students viewed pharmacists more favorably than nursing students viewed pharmacists for all attributes except the ability to work independently. Additionally, nursing students viewed nurses less favorably than pharmacy students viewed nurses for academic ability and practical skills. There was some variability in stereotypes between professional years. Conclusion. This study confirms the existence of professional stereotypes, although overall student perceptions of their own profession and the other were generally positive.

  4. Professional Stereotypes of Interprofessional Education Naive Pharmacy and Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Maria Miller; Harris, Elaine C.; Ryan, Gina J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To assess and compare interprofessional education (IPE) naive pharmacy and nursing student stereotypes prior to completion of an IPE activity. Methods. Three hundred and twenty-three pharmacy students and 275 nursing students at Mercer University completed the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire. Responses from pharmacy and nursing students were compared, and responses from different level learners within the same profession also were compared. Results. Three hundred and fifty-six (59.5%) students completed the survey. Pharmacy students viewed pharmacists more favorably than nursing students viewed pharmacists for all attributes except the ability to work independently. Additionally, nursing students viewed nurses less favorably than pharmacy students viewed nurses for academic ability and practical skills. There was some variability in stereotypes between professional years. Conclusion. This study confirms the existence of professional stereotypes, although overall student perceptions of their own profession and the other were generally positive. PMID:28720912

  5. Identifying emotional intelligence in professional nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooker, Barbara Molina; Shoultz, Jan; Codier, Estelle E

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the shortage of registered nurses in the United States will double by 2010 and will nearly quadruple to 20% by 2015 (Bureau of Health Professionals Health Resources and Services Administration. [2002]. Projected supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses, 2000-2020 [On-line]. Available: http:bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/rnprojects/report.htm). The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of emotional intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice to identify factors that could be related to improved nurse retention and patient/client outcomes. The stories reflected evidence of the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence and were related to nurse retention and improved outcomes. Nurses recognized their own strengths and limitations, displayed empathy and recognized client needs, nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and acted as change agents. Nurses were frustrated when organizational barriers conflicted with their knowledge/intuition about nursing practice, their communications were disregarded, or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Elements of professional nursing practice, such as autonomy, nurse satisfaction, respect, and the professional practice environment, were identified in the excerpts of the stories. The shortage of practicing nurses continues to be a national issue. The use of emotional intelligence concepts may provide fresh insights into ways to keep nurses engaged in practice and to improve nurse retention and patient/client outcomes.

  6. Assessing the professional development needs of experienced nurse executive leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda Searle; McFarland, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the professional development topics that senior nurse leaders believe are important to their advancement and success. Senior/experienced nurse leaders at the executive level are able to influence the work environment of nurses and institutional and health policy. Their development needs are likely to reflect this and other contemporary healthcare issues and may be different from middle and frontline managers. A systematic way of assessing professional development needs for these nurse leaders is needed. A descriptive study using an online survey was distributed to a convenience sample of nurse leaders who were members of the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL) or have participated in an ACNL program. Visionary leadership, leading complexity, and effective teams were the highest ranked leadership topics. Leading change, advancing health: The future of nursing, healthy work environments, and healthcare reform were also highly ranked topics. Executive-level nurse leaders are important to nurse retention, effective work environments, and leading change. Regular assessment and attention to the distinct professional development needs of executive-level nurse leaders are a valuable human capital investment.

  7. Problems experienced by professional nurses providing care for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nurses reported feelings of frustrations, treatment delay, lack of knowledge on HIV and AIDS, lack of support systems and work overload as challenges faced in caring for HIV/AIDS patients. The need for in-service education for professional nurses on treatment of HIV positive patients was discussed and recommended.

  8. Hallmarks of the Professional Nursing Practice Environment. AACN White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Professional Nursing, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This white paper from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing depicts the current environment of nursing practice, including supply and demand. It describes work environments that support professional practice and outlines eight indicators for the practice environment. Contains 48 references and an appendix with suggested questions for…

  9. Prison Nursing: Formation of a Stable Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Khurshid; Armstrong, David; Dregan, Alexandru

    The aim of this study was to analyze how working within prison environments can influence the self-identity and professional identity of nurses. The prison environment can be a difficult environment for nurses to deliver care within, with nurses having to carry out activities that seem to go against their professional role, while at the same time providing care to prisoners who have greater health needs than the general population. There is a lack of theoretical consideration of how prison nurses carry out their role in the face of such challenges. This study used a review of literature published over the last 11 years exploring nurses' beliefs, thoughts, and feelings toward delivering care within prison environment. With time, nurses working within prison environments develop specific skills to be able to deliver appropriate care to their patients. These skills include adapting to both the prison environment and the prison culture. Ultimately, adaptations lead to a change in identity allowing nurses to work effectively within prison. Providers of prison healthcare should ensure that induction (orientation) processes for new nurses are designed to address specific challenges that nurses face including the potential for cognitive dissonance. They should ensure that nurses receive training to develop and acquire the skills highlighted in this review. Ensuring that this training is in place may increase nurse retention.

  10. Military to civilian nurse: Personal and professional reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brenda; Chargualaf, Katie A; Patterson, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    To examine and describe the transition process of military nurses from military nursing practice to civilian nursing practice. A second aim was to identify challenges and facilitators to this transition. Serving in the military, and embodying its values, can have a major impact on a person's worldview. These individuals serve not only as nurses but also as part of a larger military culture with a mission to protect. The decision to separate from the military and transition into the civilian workforce carries many challenges capable of influencing nurses' personal and professional identities. Qualitative descriptive. Semi-structured interviews of 10 nurse veterans were conducted in 2015-2016. Data were collected until saturation was reached. The transition includes four major phases from military to civilian nurse: Separating from Military Life, Conflict and Chaos, Shifting Sands and Personal and Professional Reconstruction. Duration and progress through each phase varied slightly for individual nurses. Both work-role and personal identity transition occur when a nurse leaves the military and enters civilian practice. Military and civilian organisations, in both the USA and other countries, can implement supports to aid these nurses during this personal and professional change. Recommendations from the study group are provided. The global nursing profession, as well as healthcare organisations that employ nurse veterans, has a commitment and obligation to understand the transition process of nurses who practise within the scope of military nursing and later in civilian nursing environments so that they may be supported and used to the extent of their prior experience. Lessons learned and advice from this group of nurses may positively aid others in their transition experience. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Professional Ethical Competence in nursing: the role of nursing instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhani, Fariba; Alhani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Easa; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Teaching ethics to nurses leads to their involvement in providing high quality care, enable them to duly encounter ethical issues. One of the key elements of educational systems is nursing instructors. Even though lots of studies show the role of instructors in students' learning, their role in promotion of professional ethics has been attended to less. The objective of this study is surveying the experience of nursing students with respect to the role of instructors in promotion of professional ethics. This qualitative study enrolled 15 undergraduate nursing students from three nursing schools in Teheran whom depth interview was performed. The interview was semi-structured with open ended questions. The analysis was accomplished by use of qualitative content-analysis method. Data analysis demonstrated 2 main themes and 7 subcategories in regard to the role of instructors in promotion of professional ethics in nursing students including: 1) the effective professional role model 2) facilitating creative learning. The effective professional role model encompasses individual characteristics and beliefs, clinical skills and professional commitment of role model. Creative learning facilitates by encouraging critical thinking and decision-making, Providing supportive learning conditions, providing proper space for sharing knowledge followed by evaluation and creative feedback. The findings of this study provides a background for strengthening the role of instructors in promotion of professional ethics with more emphasis on research which increase capability of instructors at nursing education centers.

  12. [Reactions and feelings of nursing professionals facing their patients' death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Marina Soares; Gomes, Giovana Calcagno; Coelho, Monique Farias; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; de Sousa, Lenice Dutra

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to know the reactions and feelings of nursing professionals facing their patients' death. This qualitative research was developed at the Medical Clinic Unit of a university hospital in Southern Brazil. The population of the study was composed of four nurses and five nursing technicians that work at this unit. Data were collected in the second semester of 2006 through semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the use of thematic analysis. The analysisproduced three categories reactions of nursing professionals facing death in daily work, feelings towards facing death in daily work; and nursing team members facing the care of the body after death. Results indicate that there is a need for discussing this issue in the workplace in order to prepare these healthcare workers to deal with their patients' death.

  13. [Nursing audit as a professional marketing strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Suêuda; Forte, Benedita Pessoa; Alves, Maria Dalva Santos; Viana, Jamille Forte; Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista

    2004-01-01

    This study relates an audit experience with an interdisciplinary team in public health services at Fortaleza-CE and aims to describe the functional dimension of these audit actions and the its importance for nursing; to define a model with a professional marketing strategy for the nurse. Theoretical bases of contemporary Administration were used to converge with the audit practice experiences. One proposes a new audit nursing strategy in favor of the professional significance, because the nurse currently conducts actions with a scientific marketing identity, but at the unconscious level.

  14. [Profile and professional expectations for nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonín, M; Ballester, D; Esteve, J; Guilera, A; Pérez, I; Ortega, O; Tarruella, M; Peya, M; Guitard, M L; Ricomà, R; Teixidor, M; Ubiergo, I; Valls, M; Zabalegui, A

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the profile corresponding to students enrolled in first, second and third year courses to become registered nurses in Catalonia, along with their professional and job expectations; the authors examine students' perceptions of the university environment. This information will be a great aid to, on the one hand, update the performances and initiatives taken by those responsible for nursing schools, and on the other hand, to obtain a preliminary view on future nursing professionals. At the same time, this information will provide useful elements for students themselves to reflect on their studies and their future as professionals.

  15. Latent tuberculosis in nursing professionals of a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valim Andréia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tuberculosis (TB is considered an occupational disease among health-care workers (HCWs. Direct contact with TB patients leads to an increased risk to become latently infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of latent M. tuberculosis minfection among nursing professionals of a hospital in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, assessed by tuberculin skin test (TST. From November 2009 to May 2010, latent M. tuberculosis infection was assessed by TST in 55 nursing professionals. Epidemiological information was collected using a standardized questionnaire. A positive TST result (> or = 10 mm was observed in 47.3% of the HCWs tested. There was no significant difference in TST positivity when duration of employment or professional category (technician or nurse was evaluated. The results of this work reinforce the need for control measures to prevent latent M. tuberculosis infection among nursing professionals at the hospital where the study was conducted.

  16. Medicalising disability? Regulation and practice around fitness assessment of disabled students and professionals in nursing, social work and teaching professions in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Chih Hoong

    2009-01-01

    The reliance on medical information and on occupational health (OH) professionals in ascertaining fitness of applicants and registrants within the educational and employment contexts may lead to the medicalisation of disability. The Disability Rights Commission's Formal Investigation into the regulation of three public sector professions of nursing, social work and teaching in Britain sheds light on the nature of regulatory fitness requirements and how these are implemented in practice. The multi-pronged investigation included a review of relevant statutory and regulatory frameworks, formal written and oral evidence submitted by key stakeholder organisations and research into formal and informal fitness assessments within the education and employment contexts. There are varied and vague fitness requirements in all three professions. OH professionals figure prominently in formal and informal decision-making around fitness within education and employment settings, regardless of regulatory prescriptions. There is a multitude of approaches. There are, however, particular issues in the deployment of OH expertise within the employment setting. The determination of fitness should not rely solely on medical information. Blanket fitness requirements that are not contextualized against specific competencies for particular jobs are inappropriate. More collaborative and integrated working is necessary, particularly in exploring how reasonable adjustments may be provided to enable safe and effective practice. The positive spirit of the disability equality duty should be embraced.

  17. Depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlan dos Santos Damásio Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Discussing the factors associated with major depression and suicide risk among nursing professionals. METHOD An integrative review in PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and BDENF databases, between 2003 and 2015. RESULTS 20 published articles were selected, mostly from between 2012 and 2014, with significant production in Brazil. Nursing professionals are vulnerable to depression when young, married, performing night work and having several jobs, and when they have a high level of education, low family income, work overload, high stress, insufficient autonomy and a sense of professional insecurity and conflict in the family and workrelationship. Suicide risk was correlated with the presence of symptoms of depression, high levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment; characteristics of Burnout Syndrome. CONCLUSION Suicide risk among nursing professionals is associated with symptoms of depression and correlated with Burnout Syndrome, which can affect work performance.

  18. Nursing leadership and management effects work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomey, Ann Marriner

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this literature search was to identify recent research related to nursing leadership and management effects on work environment using the 14 forces of magnetism. This article gives some historical perspective from the original 1983 American Academy of Nursing study through to the 2002 McClure and Hinshaw update to 2009 publications. Research publications were given a priority for references. The 14 forces of magnetism as identified by Unden and Monarch were: '1. Quality of leadership..., 2. Organizational structure..., 3. Management style..., 4. Personnel policies and programs..., 5. Professional models of care..., 6. Quality of care..., 7 Quality improvement..., 8. Consultation and resources..., 9. Autonomy..., 10. Community and the hospital..., 11. Nurse as teacher..., 12. Image of nursing..., 13. Interdisciplinary relationships... and 14. Professional development....'. Correlations have been found among positive workplace management initiatives, style of transformational leadership and participative management; patient-to-nurse ratios; education levels of nurses; quality of patient care, patient satisfaction, employee health and well-being programmes; nurse satisfaction and retention of nurses; healthy workplace environments and healthy patients and personnel. This article identifies some of the research that provides evidence for evidence-based nursing management and leadership practice.

  19. RETAINING PROFESSIONAL NURSES IN SOUTH AFRICA: NURSE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... were vacant throughout South Africa (Health Systems Trust 2008). The provinces with the highest ... monetary rewards), the manager or supervisor (enhancing ... theory is one of nurse retention and not motivation. The shape.

  20. Teamwork in nursing: restricted to nursing professionals or an interprofessional collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisa Colebrusco de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To understand the nursing professionals' conceptions of teamwork and their elements. METHOD A qualitative study conducted in an oncological hospital using a semi-structured interview with 21 nursing professionals. RESULTS Two conceptions emerged from the accounts: teamwork restricted to nursing professionals and teamwork with interprofessional collaboration with particular importance for interactive dimensions: communication, trust and professional bonds, mutual respect and recognition of the other's work, collaboration, and conflict, with this last subcategory considered as an obstacle to teamwork. CONCLUSION Nursing conceives teamwork as an interprofessional practice, which is a result of the quality of interaction among professionals from different areas and involves the recognition and handling of conflicts.

  1. Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Erin J; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Click, Elizabeth R; Krouse, Helene J; Clavelle, Joanne T

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership (TL) practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations (PNAs). Professional nursing associations are vehicles to provide educational opportunities for nurses as well as leadership opportunities for members. Little has been published about the leadership practices of PNA members. E-mail surveys of 448 nurse leaders in PNAs were conducted in 2013 using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The top 2 TL practices of these nurse leaders were enabling others to act and encouraging the heart. Respondents with more leadership training reported higher TL practices. This is the 1st study to describe TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs. Results of this study show that nurse leaders of PNAs emulate practices of TL. Transformational leaders can mobilize and direct association members in reaching shared values, objectives, and outcomes. Understanding TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs are important to the future of nursing in order to enable nurses to lead change and advance health through these organizations.

  2. [The professional mobility of hospital nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schingen, Édith; Ladegaillerie, Geneviève; Lefebvre, Hélène; Challier, Marie-Pierre; Rothan-Tondeur, Monique

    2015-09-01

    For several decades, hospitals have been faced with the voluntary departures of nurses. In parallel to this external mobility, internal mobility is also on the rise and is not always initiated by the nurse. This new mode of management has repercussions for professionals, patients as well as for the quality of care. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. [Professionals' training and refusal of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    A patient's refusal of nursing care concerns the caregivers. Future professionals must be prepared for it and student nurses are trained to deal with such situations. It is also important to empower patients and support them in their choice. This article presents the example of the Haute École Robert Schuman in Libramont, Belgium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Working Environment In Nursing: Needs Improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Hanzeliková Pogrányivá

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowing the quality of life of professionals is important because it is related to job performance, better results, and greater productivity, which results in better patient care. Objective: To know the Professional Quality of Life perceived by the nurses at the Geriatric Hospital of Toledo (Spain. Method: A descriptive cross-section study was employed to measure the Professional Quality of Life of all healthcare nurses (69 in total at the Geriatric Hospital of Toledo. The questionnaire used as a measuring instrument was the Professional Quality of Life - 35. The data obtained was analyzed by means of: descriptive statistics, single-factor ANOVA variance analysis, T Student tests, and simple and multiple regression analysis. The study was approved by both the research commission and the ethics commission at the Hospital Complex of Toledo. Participation in the study on behalf of the nursing staff was voluntary. Results: In total, 45 responses were obtained (65.2%. The overall mean score measured the perceived Professional Quality of Life to be low. In relation to the three dimensions evaluated in the study, the highest average found was in “intrinsic motivation,” followed by “workload”, and then “management support.” In the multivariate analysis, “management support” was shown as the most influential factor in the Professional Quality of Life with a 23% influence (P<0.001, followed by workload with 9% (P = 0.01. Conclusions: The professionals at the participating center perceive their workplace as having an elevated degree of responsibility, a large quantity of work, a high occurrence of rushes and fatigue, and all this with little support on behalf of management. Promotions are scarce or the policies for receiving a promotion are inadequate. The perception of Professional Quality of Life in nursing is low. The obtained results indicate a need for an organizing cultural change based on participation, motivation, and

  5. Turnover of professional nurses at Mokopane Hospital in the Limpopo Province, South Africa: Experiences of nursing unit managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmamma, Mogale L; Mothiba, Tebogo M; Nancy, Malema R

    2015-12-17

    Staff turnover of professional nurses remains a concern for public and private hospitals management because it has an impact on the morale of nurses and it may also lead to poor patient care. The objectives of this study were to explore and describe the experiences of nursing unit managers with regard to the turnover of professional nurses who were under their supervision. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive research design was used to determine the experiences of nursing unit managers related to the turnover of professional nurses. Data collection was done by using semi-structured one-to-one interviews with professional nurses .Two groups of participants were interviewed: Those working day duty (n = 9) and those working night duty (n = 3) who were at work on the anticipated days for data collection. The findings revealed that every unit was experiencing a shortage of professional nurses, which caused other nurses to work overtime with an inevitable increase in workload. That led to tiredness, conflict amongst professional nurses, job dissatisfaction, and absenteeism which compromised nursing care. This resulted in patient dissatisfaction and sometimes led to deaths that could have been prevented. It is recommended that staff turnover should be addressed by the hospital top management implementing several strategies. For example, top management could ensure that staff members work in a healthy environment with resources that they need during the provision of care, address the effects of the staff turnover, support the staff members and refrain from putting pressure on nursing unit managers whilst they are attending to problems.

  6. THE WORK PROCESS IN RADIOLOGICAL NURSING: INVISIBILITY OFIONIZING RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Melo,Juliana Almeida Coelho de; Gelbcke,Francine Lima; Huhn,Andrea; Vargas,Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Qualitative descriptive and exploratory research, performed with 20 nursing professionals working in a general radiology unit and surgery center with the "C-arm" equipment, and the hemodynamics unit of a southern Brazilian teaching hospital. Aim was to analyze the dimensions of the work process for radiological technology nurse professionals. This paper made clear that radiological technologies are outside nursing, which leads to the invisibility of ionizing radiation, leading to ina...

  7. Work engagement in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagliotti, L Antoinette

    2012-06-01

      This article is a report of an analysis of the concept of work engagement. Background.  Work engagement is the central issue for 21st century professionals and specifically for registered nurses. Conceptual clarity about work engagement gives empirical direction for future research and a theoretical underpinning for the myriad studies about nurses and their work environment.   Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis was used. Nursing, business, psychology and health sciences databases were searched using Science Direct, CINAHL, OVID, Academic One File, ABI INFORM and PsycINFO for publications that were: written in English, published between 1990 and 2010, and described or studied work engagement in any setting with any population.   Work engagement is a positive, fulfilling state of mind about work that is characterized by vigour, dedication and absorption. Trust (organizationally, managerially and collegially) and autonomy are the antecedents of work engagement. The outcomes of nurses' work engagement are higher levels of personal initiative that are contagious, decreased hospital mortality rates and significantly higher financial profitability of organizations.   When work engagement is conceptually removed from a transactional job demands-resources model, the relational antecedents of trust and autonomy have greater explanatory power for work engagement in nurses. Untangling the antecedents, attributes and outcomes of work engagement is important to future research efforts. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Facilitators and inhibitors in developing professional values in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafakhah, Mahnaz; Molazem, Zahra; Khademi, Mojgan; Sharif, Farkhondeh

    2018-03-01

    Values are the basis of nursing practice, especially in making decisions about complicated ethical issues. Despite their key role in nursing, little information exists on the factors affecting their development and manifestation in nursing students. This study identifies and describes the facilitators and inhibitors of the development and manifestation of professional values based on the experiences of nursing students and instructors and nurses. Data were collected through 29 semi-structured interviews and two focus group interviews in 2013-2015 and were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method of Elo and Kyngäs. Participants and research context: In total, 18 nursing undergraduates, five nursing instructors, and five nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and one of the teaching hospitals in Shiraz were selected through purposive sampling. Ethical considerations: The research was approved by the Ethics Committee of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and the teaching hospital examined. The findings consisted of two categories: personal and environmental factors. Personal factors consisted of the two subcategories of personal stimuli (work experience and past relationships, inner beliefs and acting on values, belief in God and a divine worldview) and personal inhibitors (the lack of professional motivation and enthusiasm, negative emotions). Environmental factors consisted of the two subcategories of environmental stimuli (cooperation, order and discipline) and environmental inhibitors (unfavorable work environment, society's negative attitude toward nursing, the violation of rights). Given the impact of personal and environmental factors on the development and manifestation of professional values in nursing students, it is upon the education authorities to take account of them in their planning, and nursing managers are also recommended to further address these factors in their development of a proper work environment, provision of

  9. Between Licensed and Unlicense:The Professionalization of Nurse and a Postwar History of Unlicensed Nurses in Akita

    OpenAIRE

    和泉, 浩; 菊地, よしこ; IZUMI, Hiroshi; KIKUCHI, Yoshiko

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the postwar history of unlicensed nurses in Akita Prefecture.After World War n, under the control of GHQ (General Headquarters of the Allied Powers), the Public Health Nurse, Midwife and Nurse Law was enacted in 1948. Since then the professionalization of nurse and the improvement of their social status have been fostered in Japan, by law, educational system, administrative system, professional organization, amelioration of working conditions and ...

  10. Nurse experiences as cancer survivors: part II--professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Carol; Agretelis, Joan; DeMarco, Rosanna F

    2004-05-01

    To uncover dimensions of nurses' professional experiences of cancer survivorship. Interpretive, phenomenologic. Metropolitan area in the northeastern United States. 25 RNs diagnosed with cancer. Average age was 50 years, and 20 participants were less than five years from initial diagnosis. Interviews. Data were analyzed using the methodology of Newman (1994, 1999) and VanManen (1990). Nurses' professional experiences of cancer survivorship. Professional experiences of cancer survivorship fell into five themes: (a) role ambiguity, (b) a deepening level of compassion for patients and others, (c) self-disclosure as a therapeutic intervention, (d) becoming an advocate for change, and (e) volunteerism. Cancer survivorship was a factor in reshaping participants' clinical practice. Experiencing the role of the patient affirmed the necessity of compassionate care for these participants. Nurses experienced a deepening level of compassion for patients and used self-disclosure as a therapeutic intervention. During and shortly after treatment, role ambiguity (being both patient and nurse) could cause difficulties. Nurses took action to change their clinical environment through their influence on colleagues and the healthcare system and by working through other organizations to improve patient care. Nurse cancer survivors can benefit from the support of colleagues and healthcare providers and an appreciation of the challenge of being both a professional and a patient. The invitation for dialogue as they return to work may help with the challenges of role ambiguity as nurse cancer survivors. Based on this study, nurses value the opportunity to enhance care environments with their two-world knowledge through compassionate care, disclosure, advocacy, and volunteering, and coworkers need to appreciate each nurse's unique response to this potentially life-changing process. Nurses in all settings can learn from their cancer survivor colleagues who have been the recipients of care to

  11. Nursing work hours: individual needs versus working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Aparecida; Rotenberg, Lúcia; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2011-12-01

    To assess factors associated with professional and total hours of work (work + home) among nursing staff. Cross-sectional study conducted in a university hospital in the city of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil, between 2004 and 2005. A total of 696 workers (nurses, nurse technicians and aids), mostly women (87.8%) working day and/or night shifts, participated in the study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collected information on demographic characteristics, and working and life conditions. Translated and adapted into Portuguese versions of the Job Stress Scale, Effort-reward imbalance, Short-Form-Health-related quality of life and the Work Ability Index were also administered. Logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Sole breadwinner, working night shifts and effort-reward imbalance were the variables associated with both professional (OR = 3.38, OR = 10.43, OR = 2.07, respectively) and total hours of work (OR = 1.57, OR = 3.37, OR = 2.75, respectively). There was no significant association between the variables related to hours of work and low Work Ability Index. Inadequate rest at home was statistically associated with professional (OR = 2.47) and total hours of work (OR = 1.48). Inadequate leisure time was significantly associated with professional hours of work (OR = 1.58) and barely associated with total hours of work (OR = 1.43). The sole breadwinner, working night shifts and effort-reward imbalance are variables that need to be further investigated in studies on work hours among nursing staff. These studies should explore workers' income and the relationship between effort and reward, taking into consideration gender issues.

  12. Professional nurses' understanding of clinical judgement: A contextual inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. van Graan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher cognitive skills are essential competencies for nurses joining the technologically and increasingly complex health care environment to provide safe and effective nursing care. Educators and clinical facilitators have recognised that newly qualified nurses do not meet the expectations for entry level clinical judgement and are held accountable for finding adequate learning experiences as preparation for such practice demands. An explorative and descriptive qualitative design was followed in this study to reach an understanding of clinical judgement in the clinical nursing environment from the perspective of professional nurses. Eleven professional nurses (n = 11 working at primary health care clinics, public and private hospitals participated voluntarily. Data was collected by means of the “World Café” method, incorporating a combination of techniques such as interviewing, discussions, drawings, narratives and reflection. The focus was on professional nurses' knowledge of the meaning of clinical judgement and factors influencing the development of clinical judgement in the clinical environment. Qualitative thematic content analysis principles were applied during data analysis. The findings were integrated with the relevant literature to culminate in conclusions that should add to the knowledge base of clinical judgement as an essential skill for improving autonomous and accountable nursing care.

  13. Professional nurses' understanding of clinical judgement: A contextual inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. van Graan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher cognitive skills are essential competencies for nurses joining the technologically and increasingly complex health care environment to provide safe and effective nursing care. Educators and clinical facilitators have recognised that newly qualified nurses do not meet the expectations for entry level clinical judgement and are held accountable for finding adequate learning experiences as preparation for such practice demands. An explorative and descriptive qualitative design was followed in this study to reach an understanding of clinical judgement in the clinical nursing environment from the perspective of professional nurses. Eleven professional nurses (n = 11 working at primary health care clinics, public and private hospitals participated voluntarily. Data was collected by means of the “World Cafe” method, incorporating a combination of techniques such as interviewing, discussions, drawings, narratives and reflection. The focus was on professional nurses' knowledge of the meaning of clinical judgement and factors influencing the development of clinical judgement in the clinical environment. Qualitative thematic content analysis principles were applied during data analysis. The findings were integrated with the relevant literature to culminate in conclusions that should add to the knowledge base of clinical judgement as an essential skill for improving autonomous and accountable nursing care.

  14. Nursing leadership in professional organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Karen S

    2011-04-01

    This department highlights nursing leaders who have demonstrated the ability to inspire and lead change. This competency is seen in the ability to create, structure, and implement organizational change through strategic vision, risk taking, and effective communication. Each article showcases a project of a nurse leader who demonstrates change in a variety of environments, ranging from acute care hospitals to home care and alternative practice settings. Included are several "lessons learned" applicable to multiple settings that provide insight for other nurses in executive practice.

  15. New nurses' perceptions of professional practice behaviours, quality of care, job satisfaction and career retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Zhu, Junhong; Read, Emily

    2016-07-01

    To test a model examining the effects of structural empowerment and support for professional practice on new graduate nurses' perceived professional practice behaviours, perceptions of care quality and subsequent job satisfaction and career turnover intentions. The nursing worklife model describes relationships between supportive nursing work environments and nurse and patient outcomes. The influence of support for professional practice on new nurses' perceptions of professional nursing behaviours within this model has not been tested. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to analyse data from a national survey of new nurses across Canada (n = 393). The hypothesised model was supported: χ²(122) = 346.726, P = 0.000; CFI = 0.917; TLI = 0.896; RMSEA = 0.069. Professional practice behaviour was an important mechanism through which empowerment and supportive professional practice environments influenced nurse-assessed quality of care, which was related to job satisfaction and lower intentions to leave nursing. Job satisfaction and career retention of new nurses are related to perceptions of work environment factors that support their professional practice behaviours and high-quality patient care. Nurse managers can support new graduate nurses' professional practice behaviour by providing empowering supportive professional practice environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The development of Canadian nursing: professionalization and proletarianization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, D

    1988-01-01

    In this article, the development of nursing in Canada is described in terms of three major time periods: the emergence of lay nursing, including organization and registration, 1870-1930; the move to the hospital, 1930-1950; and unionization and the routinization of health care, 1950 to the present. This development is viewed in the light of the orienting concepts of professionalization, proletarianization, and medical dominance (and gender analysis). This historical trajectory of nursing shows an increasing occupational autonomy but continuing struggles over control of the labor process. Nursing is now using theory, organizational changes in health care, and credentialism to help make nursing "separate from but equal to" medicine and to gain control over the day-to-day work of the nurse. Nursing can thus be viewed as undergoing processes of both professionalization and proletarianization. As nursing seeks to control the labor process, its occupational conflicts are joined to the class struggle of white-collar workers in general. Analysis of nursing indicates the problems involved in sorting out the meaning of concepts that are relevant to occupational or class analysis but which focus on the same empirical phenomenon.

  17. Nursing Professional Development Organizational Value Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mary G; Aucoin, Julia; Warren, Joan I

    2016-01-01

    A common question nursing professional development (NPD) practitioners ask is, "How many NPD practitioners should my organization have?" This study examined correlations among facility size and structure, NPD practitioner characteristics and time in service, and organizational outcomes. Organizations with a higher rate of NPD full-time equivalents per bed had higher patient satisfaction with nurses' communication and provision of discharge instruction on their HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Provider and Systems) scores.

  18. Professional Burnout and Concurrent Health Complaints in Neonatal Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobogatova, Natalija; Žemaitienė, Nida; Šmigelskas, Kastytis; Tamelienė, Rasa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze nurses' professional burnout and health complaints and the relationship between the two components. The anonymous survey included 94 neonatal intensive care nurses from two centers of perinatology. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) was used to evaluate professional burnout; it consisted of 3 components, Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishments, with 22 items in total. Health complaints were evaluated by 21 items, where nurses were asked to report the occurrence of symptoms within the last year. Scale means were presented with standard deviations (SD). Inferential analysis was conducted with multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for age, residence, and work experience. The mean score of professional burnout on the Emotional Exhaustion subscale was 14.4 (SD=7.91), Depersonalization 3.8 (SD=4.75), and Personal Accomplishment 29.1 (SD=10.12). The health assessment revealed that sleeplessness, lack of rest, nervousness, and tiredness were the most common complaints. The regression analysis revealed that tiredness was independently associated with significantly increased odds of professional burnout (OR=4.1). In our study, more than half of the nurses in neonatal intensive care had moderate or high levels of emotional exhaustion, while levels of depersonalization were significantly lower. In contrast, the level of personal accomplishment was low in more than half of the nurses. The most common health complaints were sleep disturbances, nervousness, and tiredness. Tiredness was most strongly associated with professional burnout.

  19. The use of electronic devices for communication with colleagues and other healthcare professionals - nursing professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Niemi, Anne; Hupli, Maija

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study is to describe nursing professionals' experiences of the use of electronic devices for communication with colleagues and other healthcare professionals. Information and communication technology applications in health care are rapidly expanding, thanks to the fast-growing penetration of the Internet and mobile technology. Communication between professionals in health care is essential for patient safety and quality of care. Implementing new methods for communication among healthcare professionals is important. A cross-sectional survey was used in the study. The data were collected in spring 2012 using an electronic questionnaire with structured and open-ended questions. The target group comprised the nursing professionals (N = 567, n = 123) in one healthcare district who worked in outpatient clinics in publically funded health care in Finland. Nursing professionals use different electronic devices for communication with each other. The most often used method was email, while the least used methods were question-answer programmes and synchronous communication channels on the Internet. Communication using electronic devices was used for practical nursing, improving personnel competences, organizing daily operations and administrative tasks. Electronic devices may speed up the management of patient data, improve staff cooperation and competence and make more effective use of working time. The obstacles were concern about information security, lack of technical skills, unworkable technology and decreasing social interaction. According to our findings, despite the obstacles related to use of information technology, the use of electronic devices to support communication among healthcare professionals appears to be useful. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always value the skills and competences nurses have acquired through education and innovation. Discussion paper. We identified 1216 relevant studies by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases in the period 1997-2010. Finally, 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. The included studies show that the actual public image of nursing is diverse and incongruous. This image is partly self-created by nurses due to their invisibility and their lack of public discourse. Nurses derive their self-concept and professional identity from their public image, work environment, work values, education and traditional social and cultural values. Nurses should work harder to communicate their professionalism to the public. Social media like the Internet and YouTube can be used to show the public what they really do. To improve their public image and to obtain a stronger position in healthcare organizations, nurses need to increase their visibility. This could be realized by ongoing education and a challenging work environment that encourages nurses to stand up for themselves. Furthermore, nurses should make better use of strategic positions, such as case manager, nurse educator or clinical nurse specialist and use their professionalism to show the public what their work really entails. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [The process of professional qualification for the critical care nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Neuranides; Fernandes, Josicélia Dumêt

    2008-01-01

    Study of qualitative approach based on the dialectic historical materialism, that aimed at analizing the conformation of professional credentialing process of the critical care nurse of a hospital in Salvador, BA, Brazil. The subjects were 29 nurses. The analysis was based on the Analysis of Content, with the technique of Thematic Analysis, directed by the dialectic method. Three categories correlated to credentialing were generated: technological sophistication; individual and the collective organizational and as product and instrument of the work process. The results demonstrated that the institution estimulates the credentialing process; however the administrative politicies make it difficult the effectuation of the process of credentialing of the nurses.

  2. Japanese professional nurses spend unnecessarily long time doing nursing assistants' tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasushi; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    In environments in which professional nurses do simple tasks, e.g., laundry, cleaning, and waste disposal, they cannot concentrate on technical jobs by utilizing their expertise to its fullest benefit. Particularly, in Japan, the nursing shortage is a serious problem. If professional nurses take their time to do any of these simple tasks, the tasks should be preferentially allocated to nursing assistants. Because there has been no descriptive study to investigate the amount of time Japanese professional nurses spent doing such simple tasks during their working time, their actual conditions remain unclear. Professional nurses recorded their total working time and the time they spent doing such simple tasks during the week of the survey period. The time an individual respondent spent doing one or more simple tasks during that week was summed up, as was their working time. Subsequently, the percentage of the summed time he or she spent doing any of those tasks in his or her summed working time was calculated. A total of 1,086 respondents in 19 hospitals that had 87 to 376 beds were analyzed (response rate: 53.3%). The average time (SD) that respondents spent doing those simple tasks and their total working time were 2.24 (3.35) hours and 37.48 (10.88) hours, respectively. The average percentage (SD) of the time they spent doing the simple tasks in their working time was 6.00% (8.39). Hospital administrators must decrease this percentage. Proper working environments in which professional nurses can concentrate more on their technical jobs must be created.

  3. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Esther; Derksen, Els; Prevoo, Mathieu; Laan, Roland; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Koopmans, Raymond

    Objectives The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an

  4. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, E.; Derksen, E.; Prevoo, M.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Bolhuis, S.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an

  5. Work motivation among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellström, Sofia; Avby, Gunilla; Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Andersson Bäck, Monica

    2017-06-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore work motivation among professionals at well-functioning primary healthcare centers subject to a national healthcare reform which include financial incentives. Design/methodology/approach Five primary healthcare centers in Sweden were purposively selected for being well-operated and representing public/private and small/large units. In total, 43 interviews were completed with different medical professions and qualitative deductive content analysis was conducted. Findings Work motivation exists for professionals when their individual goals are aligned with the organizational goals and the design of the reform. The centers' positive management was due to a unique combination of factors, such as clear direction of goals, a culture of non-hierarchical collaboration, and systematic quality improvement work. The financial incentives need to be translated in terms of quality patient care to provide clear direction for the professionals. Social processes where professionals work together as cohesive groups, and provided space for quality improvement work is pivotal in addressing how alignment is created. Practical implications Leaders need to consistently translate and integrate reforms with the professionals' drives and values. This is done by encouraging participation through teamwork, time for structured reflection, and quality improvement work. Social implications The design of the reforms and leadership are essential preconditions for work motivation. Originality/value The study offers a more complete picture of how reforms are managed at primary healthcare centers, as different medical professionals are included. The value also consists of showing how a range of aspects combine for primary healthcare professionals to successfully manage external reforms.

  6. Professional values in Korean undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kyung Sook; Kang, Jeong Hee; Jun, Myung Hee; Kim, Hyun Sook; Son, Haeng Mi; Yu, Su Jeong; Kwon, Mi Kyung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Developing professional values among undergraduate nursing students is important since such values are a significant predictor of quality care, clients' recognition, and therefore nurses' job satisfaction. This study explored South Korean nursing students' perception of nursing professional values (NPV) and compared the NPV scores between groups according to participants' demographic characteristics. The study participants comprised of 529 students, mostly female (96.4%), with a mean age of 22.29years, sampled from six universities throughout the country. The NPV scores, measured with the 29-item Likert scale developed by Yeun et al. (2005), were significantly higher in students who entered nursing schools following their aptitude or desire for professional job than in those who entered the schools just because their entrance exam scores were sufficient. The NPV scores were also higher in students who were planning to pursue graduate study than in those who had not yet decided. The NPV scores were significantly different between the six regions, suggesting needs of in-depth studies to understand the underlying reasons. The NPV scores were not correlated, at the .05 level of significance, with academic year, gender, or academic performance. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Professional Consequences of Whistleblowing by Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sally; Ahern, Kathy

    2000-01-01

    A study of 70 nurses self-described as whistleblowers and 25 who did not repot misconduct showed that whistleblowers experienced severe reprisals (demotion, reprimand, threats, rejection, pressure to resign). There were few professional consequences for those who remained silent. (SK)

  8. Professional nurses' understanding of clinical judgement: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anna C. van Graan

    explorative and descriptive qualitative design was followed in this study to reach ... tent analysis principles were applied during data analysis. ... journal homepage: http://ees.elsevier.com/hsag/default.asp .... perspective of professional nurses within a specific contex- ... method was appropriate and effective to collect a large.

  9. Researching Gender Professions: Nurses as Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufiaurre, Benjamin; de Villarreal, Maider Pérez

    2018-01-01

    Nurses as professionals of health, childhood education teachers, social workers and caregivers, join a group of "feminine professions" which grew through policies of a welfare state in postwar constructive period, or in times of postwar accords (Jones, 1983). These professions are under challenge because of neoliberal policies and…

  10. Mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' perceptions of the role of the Occupational Health Service in the management of work-related stress: how do they self-care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, J; Cameron, I M; Hamilton, R; Murphy, E; Naji, S

    2010-11-01

    Higher rates of stress-related sickness are found in health care professionals when compared with other sectors. The annual direct cost of absence to the National Health Service is £1.7 billion. Increased clinical demand, long hours, low staffing and a lack of support from colleagues and management are contributing to absenteeism, somatic complaints and mental health problems. Mental health work is inherently stressful and levels of work stress experienced by mental health nurses are especially high. The study investigated mental health nurses' and allied health professionals' (AHPs) awareness and knowledge of the service provided by the Occupational Health Service (OHS) and identified work-related stress and self-care strategies within these two groups. Nurses and AHP staff employed in mental health services in a Scottish healthboard area were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Results demonstrated that staff found their contact with the OHS to be a positive experience. They considered direct patient care to be less stressful than the organizational constraints they work under, and they reported a lack of support from both their peer groups and management. There should be recognition of the increased stress that hospital-based nurses and AHPs experience. These areas should be scrutinized and reviewed further to support staff within these environments in accordance with organizational objectives. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  11. Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Derksen, Els; Prevoo, Mathieu; Laan, Roland; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Koopmans, Raymond

    2010-07-01

    The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an assistant nurse while training to be a doctor may offer valuable learning experiences, but may also present the student with difficulties with respect to identity and identification issues. The aim of the present study was to describe first-year medical students' perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors before and after a nursing attachment. A questionnaire containing open questions concerning students' perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors was administered to all Year 1 medical students (n=347) before and directly after a 4-week nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes. We carried out two confirmatory focus group interviews. We analysed the data using qualitative and quantitative content analyses. The questionnaire was completed by 316 students (response rate 91%). Before starting the attachment students regarded nurses as empathic, communicative and responsible. After the attachment students reported nurses had more competencies and responsibilities than they had expected. Students' views of doctors were ambivalent. Before and after the attachment, doctors were seen as interested and reliable, but also as arrogant, detached and insensible. However, students maintained positive views of their own future roles as doctors. Students' perceptions were influenced by age, gender and place of attachment. An early nursing attachment engenders more respect for the nursing profession. The ambivalent view of doctors needs to be explored further in relation to students' professional development. It would seem relevant to attune supervision to the age and gender differences revealed in this study.

  12. Ethical principles in the work of nurse educator-A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Leena; Stolt, Minna; Metsämäki, Riikka; Rinne, Jenni; Kasen, Anne; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The application of ethical principles within the teaching profession and nursing practice forms the core of the nurse educator's professional ethics. However, research focusing on the professional ethics of nurse educators is scarce. To describe ethical principles and issues relating to the work of nurse educators from the perspectives of both nurse educators themselves and nursing students. A descriptive study using cross-sectional data and content analysis. Nursing education program involving students from nine polytechnics in Finland. Nursing students (n=202) and nurse educators (n=342). Data were derived from an online survey, with two open-ended questions: Nursing students and nurse educators were asked to name the three main ethical principles that guide the work of nurse educators and also to describe ethical issues involved in the work. Students most often named professionalism, justice, and equality as the main ethical principles for a nurse educator. Nurse educators considered justice, equality, and honesty as the main ethical principles. The content analysis showed that professionalism and the relationship between educator and student were the key categories for ethical issues as perceived by nursing students. Nursing students most often identified inequality between the nurse educator and nursing student as the ethical issue faced by the nurse educator. Nursing students and nurse educators differed somewhat both in their views of the ethical principles guiding an educator's work and in the ethical issues arising in the work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of compassion competence among clinical nurses in professional quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y; Seomun, G

    2016-09-01

    The study aimed to explore measurable compassion competence among nurses and to examine the relationships between nurses' compassion competence and levels of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress. Compassion is a vital asset in the nursing profession. It is necessary to explore whether compassion competence is a factor influencing professional quality of life. This study utilized a multicenter descriptive cross-sectional survey. Data were collected from 680 nurses. Professional quality of life based on nurses' general characteristics showed a significant difference in the subjects' age, marital status, education, and total clinical experience. In addition, compassion competence had a significant positive correlation with compassion satisfaction and STS, whereas it had a significant negative correlation with burnout. Compassion competence was a factor influencing compassion satisfaction and burnout in professional quality of life. Our study included nurses with at least 1 year of clinical experience in a single cultural area, which limits its widespread applicability. To improve generalizability, future studies should include clinical nurses of various races, working in diverse cultural areas and with various levels of experience (including entry-level nurses and nursing students). Compassion competence of clinical nurses was a predictive factor for professional quality of life. Hospital administrators, nurse leaders and policy makers should develop and adopt nurse-retaining strategies that focus on improving nurses' compassion competence in order to reduce their burnout. We recommend the development of educational programmes to improve nurses' compassion competence and thereby enhance their professional quality of life. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Efficacy of mulligan's self-sustained natural apophyseal glides in decreasing pain, disability, and improving neck mobility among the nursing professional suffering from work-related neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagun Aggarwal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Prevalence of neck pain in nursing professionals (NPs is much higher than in the general population. However, concrete evidence is not available regarding the efficacy of the therapeutic intervention for treating neck pain among them. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of Mulligan's self-sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs and conventional physiotherapy in the management of work-related neck pain (WRNP among the NPs. Materials and Methods: A total of 38 NPs with WRNP were recruited using the simple random sampling (lottery method to participate in this two group such as pretest–posttest and single-blinded randomized controlled study from recognized tertiary care teaching hospital. Recruited NPs were randomly allocated into two groups such as Group A and Group B. NP in Group A taught self-SNAGs with a towel and instructed to perform 10 repetitions ×1 set/two hour ×4 times/day for 5 days/week ×2 weeks. Whereas in Group B, NPs received conventional physiotherapy treatment, consist of neck isometrics, and performed for 10 s ×10 repetitions ×1 set/day ×5 days/week ×2 weeks. Both groups were asked to use the hot pack for 15 min, before their intervention. Visual Analog Scale (VAS score, neck disability index (NDI, and cervical range of motion (ROM were documented at baseline, 2nd-week postintervention, and 4th-week follow-up period and analyzed. Results: Group A revealed statistical significance difference (P < 0.05 in VAS, NDI, and neck ROM when compared to Group B. Conclusion: Mulligan's self-SNAGs have proved to be more beneficial over the conventional physiotherapy in the management of WRNP among the NPs.

  15. Comparison of professional values of Taiwanese and United States nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred, Danita; Yarbrough, Susan; Martin, Pam; Mink, Janice; Lin, Yu-Hua; Wang, Liching S

    2013-12-01

    Globalization is a part of modern life. Sharing a common set of professional nursing values is critical in this global environment. The purpose of this research was to examine the professional values of nursing students from two distinct cultural perspectives. Nurse educators in Taiwan partnered with nurse educators in the United States to compare professional values of their respective graduating nursing students. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics served as the philosophical framework for this examination. The convenience sample comprised 94 Taiwanese students and 168 US students. Both groups reported high scores on an overall measure of values. They did differ substantially on the relative importance of individual items related to advocacy, competence, education, self-evaluation, professional advancement, and professional associations. Global implications for the collaborative practice of nurses from different cultures working together can be improved by first recognizing and then attending to these differences in value priorities.

  16. Towards Legitimate Nursing Work? Historical Discursive Constructions of Abortion in The Canadian Nurse, 1950-1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    To the detriment of women's health, the abortion work of nurses in Canada has gone largely unexamined and is not well understood. This historical discourse analysis examines discursive constructions of nurses' abortion work and ongoing renegotiations of professional identity in The Canadian Nurse from 1950 to 1965. By investigating what has shaped and continues to inform nurses' understandings and enactment of abortion work over time, I hope to contribute to a foundation from which to evaluate contemporary abortion services and to foster conditions that support nurses in providing safe abortion care.

  17. The evolution and development of an instrument to measure essential professional nursing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Marlene; Brewer, Barbara B; Halfer, Diana; Hnatiuk, Cynthia Nowicki; MacPhee, Maura; Schmalenberg, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Nursing continues to evolve from a task-oriented occupation to a holistic professional practice. Increased professionalism requires accurate measurement of care processes and practice. Nursing studies often omit measurement of the relationship between structures in the work environment and processes of care or between processes of care and patient outcomes. Process measurement is integral to understanding and improving nursing practice. This article describes the development of an updated Essentials of Magnetism process measurement instrument for clinical nurses (CNs) practicing on inpatient units in hospitals. It has been renamed Essential Professional Nursing Practices: CN.

  18. The development of professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the current role of general practice nurses and the scope of nursing practice to inform the development of national professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses. Increasing numbers of nurses have been employed in Australian general practice to meet the growing demand for primary care services. This has brought significant changes to the nursing role. Competency standards for nurses working in general practice were first developed in Australia in 2005, but limited attention has been placed on articulating the contemporary scope of practice for nurses in this setting. Concurrent mixed methods design. Data collection was conducted during 2013-2014 and involved two online surveys of Registered and Enrolled Nurses currently working in general practice, a series of 14 focus groups across Australia and a series of consultations with key experts. Data collection enabled the development of 22 Practice Standards separated into four domains: (i) Professional Practice; (ii) Nursing Care; (iii) General Practice Environment and (iv) Collaborative Practice. To differentiate the variations in enacting these Standards, performance indicators for the Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse and Registered Nurse Advanced Practice are provided under each Standard. The development of national professional practice standards for nurses working in Australian general practice will support ongoing workforce development. These Standards are also an important means of articulating the role and scope of the nurses' practice for both consumers and other health professionals, as well as being a guide for curriculum development and measurement of performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nursing's Boundary Work: Theory Development and the Making of Nursing Science, ca. 1950-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobbell, Dominique A

    Beginning in the late 1950s and intensifying through the 1960s and 1970s, nurse educators, researchers, and scholars worked to establish nursing as an academic discipline. These nursing leaders argued that the development of nursing theory was not only critical to nursing's academic project but also to improving nursing practice and patient care. The purpose of the article is to examine the context for the development of nursing theory and the characteristics of early theory development from the 1950s through the early 1980s. The methods used were historical research and analysis of the social, cultural, and political context of nursing theory development from the 1950s through the early 1980s. How this context influenced the work of nurse theorists and researchers in these decades was addressed. The development of nursing theory was influenced by a context that included the increasing complexity of patient care, the relocation of nursing education from hospital-based diploma schools to colleges and universities, and the ongoing efforts of nurses to secure more professional autonomy and authority in the decades after World War II. In particular, from the 1960s through the early 1980s, nurse theorists, researchers, and educators viewed the establishment of nursing science, underpinned by nursing theory, as critical to establishing nursing as an academic discipline. To define nursing science, nurse theorists and researchers engaged in critical boundary work in order to draw epistemic boundaries between nursing science and the existing biomedical and behavioral sciences. By the early 1980s, the boundary work of nurse theorists and researchers was incomplete. Their efforts to define nursing science and establish nursing as an academic discipline were constrained by generational and intraprofessional politics, limited resources, the gendered and hierarchical politics, and the complexity of drawing disciplinary boundaries for a discipline that is inherently

  20. Professionalism: the major factor influencing job satisfaction among Korean and Chinese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J-I; Lou, F; Han, S S; Cao, F; Kim, W O; Li, P

    2009-09-01

    The nursing shortage has become an internationally important issue. Nurses' professionalism and job satisfaction have been recognized as strong factors influencing their turnover. As international interchanges in nursing education are growing between Korea and China, understanding the commonalities and differences in factors associated with job satisfaction is critical to improving nurses' job retention. To compare the factors influencing job satisfaction among Korean and Chinese nurses. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. The participants were comprised of 693 nurses at three general hospitals in Jinan, People's Republic of China and 593 nurses at two general hospitals in Seoul, Korea. A questionnaire was designed to measure the nurses' professionalism and job satisfaction. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to job satisfaction. Professionalism was the common factor influencing job satisfaction in Korean and Chinese nurses. Professionalism was positively related to job satisfaction in both groups. Additional factors associated with job satisfaction were demographics and job characteristics such as age, job position and department of work, which were significant only in Korean nurses. Professionalism was the most important factor influencing job satisfaction in both Korean and Chinese nurses. Enhancing nursing professionalism is recommended as a common strategy to improve nurses' job retention across different healthcare systems.

  1. [About the turning point in a nurse's life when giving up the profession. A qualitative-empirical study on the willingness to continue to work and on the conditions for continuing to work in the post-professional phase of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöbel, Jacqueline; Rester, David; Them, Christa; Seeberger, Bernd

    2010-10-01

    Due to the increasing life expectancy and population ageing, the post-professional phase of life is becoming more and more important to the individual and to society as a whole. The perception of the potentials of elderly people and, hence, the call for self-directed and independent activities in the post-professional phase are becoming more intense. The relation between retirement and work in nurses has not been of scientific importance so far. This is primarily due to the assumption that nurses cannot or do not stay in their profession until retirement. However, nurses do manage to pursue their profession continuously and permanently until they reach the age of retirement. The aim of this qualitative research study is to investigate the post-professional phase of life of former nurses within the context of the profession pursued. The guiding research questions in this regard were: How do former nurses spend their retirement period? How do nurses use their nursing-related abilities and experiences in their postprofessional phase of life? What do nurses associate with their former profession in the post-professional phase of life? In one-to-one interviews, these questions were posed to eight retired nurses who had pursued their profession for many years. The assessment instruments used were a socio-demographic questionnaire, a guideline and a record from memory. All data were summarized and evaluated analytically with regard to their content according to Mayring (2008). The present article shows the partial results of the study on retirement and work in the post-professional life of nurses. The results indicate that the transition to retirement is often accompanied by problems, that retired nurses do not fundamentally refuse to continue to work and that the willingness to continue to work is subject to certain conditions. Reasons and conditions for and against profession-based post-professional activities were revealed. Consequentially, concepts for the systematic

  2. Teamwork in nursing: restricted to nursing professionals or an interprofessional collaboration?

    OpenAIRE

    Souza,Geisa Colebrusco de; Peduzzi,Marina; Silva,Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Carvalho,Brígida Gimenez

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To understand the nursing professionals' conceptions of teamwork and their elements. METHOD A qualitative study conducted in an oncological hospital using a semi-structured interview with 21 nursing professionals. RESULTS Two conceptions emerged from the accounts: teamwork restricted to nursing professionals and teamwork with interprofessional collaboration with particular importance for interactive dimensions: communication, trust and professional bonds, mutual respect ...

  3. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Kareshki, Hossein; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses' competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses' competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses' competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses' competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients.

  4. [Quality of work life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klijn, Tatiana Maria Paravic

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with aspects that are related to work, quality of life, and its relationship with the nursing staff within the Mexican context. Professionals in health areas present alterations that are commonly overlooked and barely dealt with, especially when the person is a woman and, the care they give to patients, families, and/or friends, or community members, precede their own self care. In the case of institutions or work areas, even when the job provides human beings with several benefits, it usually lacks the proper conditions to perform the job, carries negatives aspects or pathological conditions, all which can relate to poor levels of Quality of Life at Work. Members of the nursing team need to perform their work in the best possible conditions in order to maintain their physical and mental health.

  5. [Nursing workloads and working conditions: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoeller, Roseli; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Neis, Márcia Binder; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires

    2011-06-01

    This study reviews theoretical production concerning workloads and working conditions for nurses. For that, an integrative review was carried out using scientific articles, theses and dissertations indexed in two Brazilian databases, Virtual Health Care Library (Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde) and Digital Database of Dissertations (Banco Digital de Teses), over the last ten years. From 132 identified studies, 27 were selected. Results indicate workloads as responsible for professional weariness, affecting the occurrence of work accidents and health problems. In order to adequate workloads studies indicate some strategies, such as having an adequate numbers of employees, continuing education, and better working conditions. The challenge is to continue research that reveal more precisely the relationships between workloads, working conditions, and health of the nursing team.

  6. Boundary violations, gender and the nature of nursing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, Mary; Adrian, Amanda

    2014-05-01

    Complaints against nurses can be made on several grounds and orders, including removal from the registry of nurses, can be made as a result of these complaints. Boundary violations generally relate to complaints around criminal charges, unsatisfactory professional conduct or professional misconduct or a lack of good character. This article explores the spectrum of boundary violations in the nurse-patient relationship by reviewing disciplinary cases from the New South Wales Nurses and Midwives Tribunal and Professional Standards Committees. The complaints spanned a spectrum of behaviours, from minor infringements such as inappropriate compliments to intimate touching and sexual intercourse. Furthermore, the majority of respondents were men, although men comprise a minority of the nursing profession. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of gender stereotyping and nursing work. In addition, the possibility that improved supervision may have gone some way to preventing the violations is explored.

  7. Iranian nurses' professional competence in spiritual care in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zehtabchi, Samira; Fini, Ismail Azizi

    2017-06-01

    The holistic approach views the human as a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual being. Evidence suggests that among these dimensions, the spiritual one is largely ignored in healthcare settings. This study aimed to evaluate Iranian nurses' perceived professional competence in spiritual care, the relationship between perceived competence and nurses' personal characteristics, and barriers to provide spiritual care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2014. Participants and research context: The study population consisted of nurses working in teaching hospitals in Kashan city. Using a stratified, systematic random method, 250 samples were selected from a total of 1400 nurses. An indigenous instrument was used to assess the nurses' competencies in spiritual care. Ethical considerations: A research ethics committee approved the study. All the participants were briefed on the study aims, were assured of the confidentiality of their personal information, and signed a written informed consent. Among a total of 250 nurses, 239 answered the questionnaire completely, and in total, 23%, 51%, and 26% had poor, moderate, and favorable competence in spiritual care, respectively. No significant differences were found between the mean competence scores of spiritual care in terms of gender, marital status, employment status, and level of qualification. Significant difference was found between nurses' overall score of competence in spiritual care and receiving training on spiritual care, nurses' position, and the ward they worked in. Confirming the findings of the international literature, this study puts light on the situation of nurses' perceived competence and barriers to providing spiritual care in Iran as an eastern and Islamic context. Three-quarters of the nurses had moderate or unfavorable competence in spiritual care. Due to the crucial role of spiritual care in quality of care and patient satisfaction, nurses should be trained and supported to provide spiritual care.

  8. Community mental health nurses speak out: the critical relationship between emotional wellbeing and satisfying professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

    2006-10-01

    The article reports on selected findings of a research study concerning emotional wellbeing and professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). It highlights the relationship between community mental health nurses' and emotional wellbeing, and their capacity to provide satisfying professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). The notion of emotional wellbeing, factors that impacted upon the participants' emotional wellbeing, and the relationship of emotional wellbeing to professional practice were revealed in the study. These findings were based on a qualitative critical feminist research inquiry and specifically, interviews with five women community mental health nurses in Australia. Whilst complex, emotional wellbeing was found to be both implicitly and explicitly linked to the participants intertwined personal and professional experiences. Four key components were identified: the nebulous notion; the stress relationship; the mind, body, spirit connection; and, inner sense of balance. In terms of emotional wellbeing and professional practice, three themes were revealed. These were: being able to speak out (or not); being autonomous (or not) and being satisfied (or not). The authors argue that the emotional wellbeing of nurses working in community mental health settings is critical to satisfying professional practice. Furthermore nursing work involves emotional work which impacts on one's emotional wellbeing and emotional wellbeing is integrally linked to professional practice. It is recommended that health organisations must be pro-active in addressing the emotional needs of nurses to ensure the delivery of health care that is aligned to professional practice. This approach will ensure nurses will feel more recognised and validated in terms of their nursing practice.

  9. The ethical component of professional competence in nursing: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Maria Cristina; Yoshikawa Egry, Emiko

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to initiate a philosophical discussion about the ethical component of professional competence in nursing from the perspective of Brazilian nurses. Specifically, this article discusses professional competence in nursing practice in the Brazilian health context, based on two different conceptual frameworks. The first framework is derived from the idealistic and traditional approach while the second views professional competence through the lens of historical and dialectical materialism theory. The philosophical analyses show that the idealistic view of professional competence differs greatly from practice. Combining nursing professional competence with philosophical perspectives becomes a challenge when ideals are opposed by the reality and implications of everyday nursing practice.

  10. Shared Governance and Work Engagement in Emergency Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Jennifer; Dolansky, Mary A; Clavelle, Joanne T; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-07-01

    Lack of work engagement in emergency nurses has been linked to increased job turnover, burnout, and lack of job satisfaction. Shared governance is a vehicle that can be used by emergency nursing leaders to increase work engagement among emergency nurses. Research is lacking about the relationship between perceptions of shared governance and work engagement in emergency nurses. In this study we examined the relationship between ED nurses' perceptions of shared governance and work engagement. A descriptive correlation design was used with a convenience sample of 43 emergency nurses recruited through the ENA Web site. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Index of Professional Nursing Governance Tool, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The mean total work engagement score indicated average engagement (M = 4.4, standard deviation = 1.2). A significant positive relationship was found between shared governance and work engagement, indicating that as perceptions of shared governance increase, work engagement increases (r (41) = 0.62, P emergency nurses. Understanding the relationship between perceptions of shared governance and work engagement in emergency nurses may assist emergency nursing leaders in developing and testing interventions to enhance it. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Turnover of professional nurses at Mokopane Hospital in the Limpopo Province, South Africa: Experiences of nursing unit managers

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    Mogale L. Mmamma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staff turnover of professional nurses remains a concern for public and private hospitals management because it has an impact on the morale of nurses and it may also lead to poor patient care. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to explore and describe the experiences of nursing unit managers with regard to the turnover of professional nurses who were under their supervision. Method: A qualitative, explorative, descriptive research design was used to determine the experiences of nursing unit managers related to the turnover of professional nurses. Data collection was done by using semi-structured one-to-one interviews with professional nurses .Two groups of participants were interviewed: Those working day duty (n = 9 and those working night duty (n = 3 who were at work on the anticipated days for data collection. Results: The findings revealed that every unit was experiencing a shortage of professional nurses, which caused other nurses to work overtime with an inevitable increase in workload. That led to tiredness, conflict amongst professional nurses, job dissatisfaction, and absenteeism which compromised nursing care. This resulted in patient dissatisfaction and sometimes led to deaths that could have been prevented. Conclusion: It is recommended that staff turnover should be addressed by the hospital top management implementing several strategies. For example, top management could ensure that staff members work in a healthy environment with resources that they need during the provision of care, address the effects of the staff turnover, support the staff members and refrain from putting pressure on nursing unit managers whilst they are attending to problems.

  12. Hospital nurses' wellbeing at work: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utriainen, Kati; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2015-09-01

    To develop a theoretical model of hospital nurses' wellbeing at work. The concept of wellbeing at work is presented without an exact definition and without considering different contents. A model was developed in a deductive manner and empirical data collected from nurses (n = 233) working in a university hospital. Explorative factor analysis was used. The main concepts were: patients' experience of high-quality care; assistance and support among nurses; nurses' togetherness and cooperation; fluent practical organisation of work; challenging and meaningful work; freedom to express diverse feelings in the work community; well-conducted everyday nursing; status related to the work itself; fair and supportive leadership; opportunities for professional development; fluent communication with other professionals; and being together with other nurses in an informal way. Themes included: collegial relationships; enhancing high-quality patient care; supportive and fair leadership; challenging, meaningful and well organised work; and opportunities for professional development. Object-dependent wellbeing was supported. Managers should focus on strengthening the positive aspect of wellbeing at work, focusing on providing fluently organised work practices, fair and supportive leadership and togetherness while allowing nurses to implement their own ideas and promote the experience of meaningfulness. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The effect of nursing internship program on burnout and professional commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz-Alkaya, Sultan; Yaman-Sözbir, Şengül; Bayrak-Kahraman, Burcu

    2018-05-26

    Professional commitment is defined as a belief in and acceptance of the values of the profession which is chosen, effort to actualize these values, desire to improve him/herself. Nurses' professional and organizational commitment are influenced by factors such as job stress, job satisfaction and burnout. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nursing internship program on professional commitment and burnout of senior nursing students. A quasi-experimental study with a pretest and posttest without control group design was used. Students who were attending nursing internship program and agreed to participate were included in the study. Sample consisted of 101 students. Data were collected with a questionnaire, the burnout measure short version and nursing professional commitment scale. After the nursing internship, 77.2% were pleased to study nursing, 83.2% were pleased to be a senior student, 55.4% did not have any intention to change their profession, 81.2% wanted to work as nurses, and 82.2% were planning career advancement in nursing of the students, 34.7% and 43.6% were found to experience burnout, before and after the nursing internship, respectively (p nursing professional commitment scale were compared, a significant difference was found between mean scores on the total score and "maintaining membership" subscale (p nursing internship, burnout and professional commitment levels of the students increased. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of [corrected] expanded nursing practice on professional identify in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piil, Karin; Kolbæk, Raymond; Ottmann, Goetz; Rasmussen, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the concept of professional identity of Danish nurses working in an expanded practice. The case study explores the experiences of a small group of Danish nurses with a new professional category that reaches into a domain that customarily belonged to physicians. The aim of this case study was to explore the impact of "nurse consultations," representing an expanded nursing role, of 5 nurses focusing on their perception of autonomy, self-esteem, and confidence. The case study used semistructured interviews with 5 participants triangulated and validated with participant observations, a focus group interview, and theoretically derived insights. This study indicates that nurses working within a new expanded professional practice see themselves as still engaged in nursing and not as substitute physicians. The study also suggests that the involved nurses gained a higher sense of autonomy, self-esteem, and confidence in their practice. These elements have a positive impact on their professional identity. The research demonstrates that for the nurses involved in expanded professional practice, the boundaries of professional practice have shifted significantly. The research indicates that an expanded practice generates a new domain within the professional identity of nurses.

  15. Social Media Training for Professional Identity Development in Undergraduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Nichols, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The growth of social media use has led to tension affecting the perception of professionalism of nurses in healthcare environments. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore first and final year undergraduate student use of social media to understand how it was utilised by them during their course. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken to compare differences between first and final year student use. No difference indicated there was a lack of development in the use of social media, particularly concerning in relation to expanding their professional networks. There is a need for the curriculum to include opportunities to teach student nurses methods to ensure the appropriate and safe use of social media. Overt teaching and modelling of desired behaviour to guide and support the use of social media to positively promote professional identity formation, which is essential for work-readiness at graduation, is necessary.

  16. Discourses of social justice: examining the ethics of democratic professionalism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    This essay provides a critical exploration of discourses of social justice in nursing. It examines commitments to social justice in the work of international nursing scholars and in professional codes of ethics in international nursing organizations. The analysis touches on salient conversations in philosophy, relating these ways of knowing to social justice as an ethical pattern in nursing practice. On the basis of this analysis, the discussion explores questions of professional formation in nursing, noticing when commitments to social justice are taken up or evaded in different models of professionalism. In concluding comments, implications of democratic professionalism are explored for professional formation in nursing, arguing for teaching, learning, and knowledge projects that contribute to social justice in our democracy.

  17. Relationship between incivility experiences and nursing professional values among nursing students: Moderating effects of coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Soo

    2018-06-01

    During clinical practice, nursing students develop their professional role and internalize the values of the nursing profession. Unfortunately, it also often exposes them uncivil behaviors from nurses. To identify the relationship between incivility experiences and nursing professional values, and investigate the potential moderating effects of coping strategies in this relationship. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Data were collected from 203 nursing students using questionnaires. The questionnaire comprised sections assessing participant characteristics, incivility experiences, coping strategies, and nursing professional values. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the relationship between incivility experiences and nursing professional values, as well as the interaction effect of incivility experiences and coping strategies on nursing professional values. Incivility experiences were negatively related to nursing professional values. Furthermore, seeking support moderated the relationship between incivility experiences and nursing professional values. In other words, as incivility experiences increased, nursing students who used more seeking social support tended to have stronger nursing professional values than did those who used this coping strategy less. To improve the nursing professional values of nursing students, educators must inform nursing managers when nurses direct uncivil behaviors towards students. Educators should also listen to students' experiences, support them emotionally, and encourage students to engage in seeking social support. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Ethical issues linked to the professional practice of nurses in a hospital infection control committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Débora Cristina Ignácio; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative work was developed according to Bardin's method of content analysis. It aimed at finding out the perceptions of nurses that are members of a Hospital Infection Control Commission about ethical issues that are inherent to their professional practice as well as understanding the clinical nurses opinion regarding the professional practice of the nurses that are members of the Hospital Infection Control Commission, considering the ethical aspects. In order to achieve an ethical, efficient and effective professional practice, there is a need for governmental changes and professional recognition through autonomy, respect and exclusivity in the Service of Hospital Infection Control, as well as improvements regarding information, the care provided to the patient and professional secret. The predominance of bureaucratic activities and team work were mentioned by the clinical nurses as differentiating factors of the activities performed by nurses that are members of the Commission.

  19. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Hospital nurses' individual priorities, internal psychological states and work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, K; Routasalo, P; Helminen, M; Suominen, T

    2014-09-01

    This study looks to describe the relationships between hospital nurses' individual priorities, internal psychological states and their work motivation. Connections between hospital nurses' work-related needs, values and work motivation are essential for providing safe and high quality health care. However, there is insufficient empirical knowledge concerning these connections for the practice development. A cross-sectional empirical research study was undertaken. A total of 201 registered nurses from all types of Estonian hospitals filled out an electronic self-reported questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's correlation were used for data analysis. In individual priorities, higher order needs strength were negatively correlated with age and duration of service. Regarding nurses' internal psychological states, central hospital nurses had less sense of meaningfulness of work. Nurses' individual priorities (i.e. their higher order needs strength and shared values with the organization) correlated with their work motivation. Their internal psychological states (i.e. their experienced meaningfulness of work, experienced responsibility for work outcomes and their knowledge of results) correlated with intrinsic work motivation. Nurses who prioritize their higher order needs are more motivated to work. The more their own values are compatible with those of the organization, the more intrinsically motivated they are likely to be. Nurses' individual achievements, autonomy and training are key factors which influence their motivation to work. The small sample size and low response rate of the study limit the direct transferability of the findings to the wider nurse population, so further research is needed. This study highlights the need and importance to support nurses' professional development and self-determination, in order to develop and retain motivated nurses. It also indicates a need to value both nurses and nursing in

  1. Expectation of fairness: a turning point in the professional satisfaction of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Forooshani, Zahra Sadat Dibaji

    2016-06-01

    The professional satisfaction of staff is one of the most challenging organizational concepts that can enhance the efficiency level of organizations. In a similar vein, the professional satisfaction of nurses is of considerable importance, in that, professional dissatisfaction among nurses could result in emotional detachment, depression, anger, evasion from work, and inefficacy and would negatively impact the organization's work rate. The aim of this study was to understand Iranian nurses' experiences of the concept of professional satisfaction. This was a qualitative study conducted with a targeted sampling of 10 nurses (4 men and 6 women) in 2015. The data were collected through conducting in-depth interviews, and textual data were analyzed subsequently using the Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) method. The findings of this study pointed to "fair conduct," which was comprised of three sub-categories, i.e., expectation of fairness in social-professional settings, expectation of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and expectation of fairness in the area of professional interactions. There are various ups and downs in nursing due to the challenging nature of the profession, from the initial education at the university until retirement. According to the findings of this study, a lack of fairness in social-professional settings, a lack of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and a lack of fairness in the area of professional interactions were among the factors that have great impacts on the degree of professional dissatisfaction among nurses.

  2. Nurses' Work Environment and Spirituality: A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zastrow Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of care is a major health concern in the hospital setting. A work environment thatsupports professional nursing as well as the spirituality of nurses, or the meaning/purpose nurses find intheir work may contribute to quality of patient care. Yet, little is known about the nursing workenvironment and even less about the spirituality of nurses. Thus, the aims of this study were to measuremedical-surgical nurses’ perceived professional work environment score and perceived spiritual well-beingscore and determine if the two instruments are related. This cross-sectional survey consisted of aconvenience sample of 68 nurses who completed the Professional Practice Environment Scale (PPE andSpiritual Well-Being Scale (SWB on the hospital website during working hours. Several PPE subscalescores differed significantly among the various clinical units. As the nurse’s age, and years of clinicalexperience increased, specific PPE subscale scores also increased. The nurses’ mean SWB scores were allwithin the moderate range and did not differ significantly among the clinical units. The overall PPE andSWB scores were not significantly correlated. Nursing administrators can use the PPE scores from thisstudy to address the specific needs of individual clinical units. Older and more experienced nurses mayserve as resources for younger, less experienced nurses. Both instruments can be administered repeatedlyover time to monitor trends. Based on the SWB data, nurses in this study reported average levels ofspiritual well-being. However, there is a need to learn more about the specific spiritual needs of nurses.Spirituality of nurses as well as the nurse’s work environment are separate concepts that each merit furtherinvestigation and may add to the knowledge base for increased quality patient care.

  3. Standard Operational Protocols in professional nursing practice: use, weaknesses and potentialities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Camila Balsero; Bernardes, Andrea; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Brito, Maria de Fátima Paiva; Moura, André Almeida de; Zanetti, Ariane Cristina Barboza

    2018-01-01

    to evaluate the use of Standard Operational Protocols (SOPs) in the professional practice of the nursing team based on the theoretical framework of Donabedian, as well as to identify the weaknesses and potentialities from its implementation. Evaluative research, with quantitative approach performed with nursing professionals working in the Health Units of a city of São Paulo, composed of two stages: document analysis and subsequent application of a questionnaire to nursing professionals. A total of 247 nursing professionals participated and reported changes in the way the interventions were performed. The main weaknesses were the small number of professionals, inadequate physical structure and lack of materials. Among the potentialities were: the standardization of materials and concern of the manager and professional related to patient safety. The reassessment of SOPs is necessary, as well as the adoption of a strategy of permanent education of professionals aiming at improving the quality of care provided.

  4. Standard Operational Protocols in professional nursing practice: use, weaknesses and potentialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Balsero Sales

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the use of Standard Operational Protocols (SOPs in the professional practice of the nursing team based on the theoretical framework of Donabedian, as well as to identify the weaknesses and potentialities from its implementation. Method: Evaluative research, with quantitative approach performed with nursing professionals working in the Health Units of a city of São Paulo, composed of two stages: document analysis and subsequent application of a questionnaire to nursing professionals. Results: A total of 247 nursing professionals participated and reported changes in the way the interventions were performed. The main weaknesses were the small number of professionals, inadequate physical structure and lack of materials. Among the potentialities were: the standardization of materials and concern of the manager and professional related to patient safety. Conclusion: The reassessment of SOPs is necessary, as well as the adoption of a strategy of permanent education of professionals aiming at improving the quality of care provided.

  5. Registered nurse job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Karen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the initial assessment of job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment of registered nurses working on units where a professional practice model was implemented and the relationship between these two variables. The nursing shortage has been linked to overall job satisfaction and specifically to nurses' satisfaction with the professional practice environment. Initiatives to increase retention and recruitment and decrease turnover have been linked to work satisfaction among nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used with participants (N = 101) from four patient care units; this represented a 55% response rate. The nurses were moderately satisfied with the professional practice environment but had overall low job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between overall work satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment (P job satisfaction that were not being met. Thus, the nurses may have become more knowledgeable about the potential needs in these areas. Nurse managers and leaders must recognize that job satisfaction consists of many dimensions, and each of these dimensions is important to nurse retention. Implementation of a professional practice model may heighten awareness of the missing components within a practice environment and lead to decreased overall satisfaction. A broader understanding of characteristics associated with increased satisfaction may aid in development of organizational change necessary to retain and attract nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Teaching Professionalism in Nursing: A Quantitative Survey of Beginning Student Nurse Perceptions of Professional Values Interpreted within a Leadership Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Jocelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    The researcher designed this quantitative dissertation research to explore the perceptions of beginning nursing students toward professionalism in nursing, specific to professional values within the context of curriculum delivery for a leadership and management course in one baccalaureate nursing program. In addition, the researcher reviewed the…

  7. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses: a biographical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Inge A; Poell, Rob F; Berings, Marjolein G M C; ten Cate, Olle

    2015-05-01

    A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age, leading to the expectation that motives for continuing professional development also change. Nevertheless, little is known about nurses' continuing professional development strategies in different age groups. To explore continuing professional development strategies among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, from a biographical perspective. Data were analysed using a vertical process aimed at creating individual learning biographies, and a horizontal process directed at discovering differences and similarities between age groups. Twenty-one nurses in three age groups from general and academic hospitals in the Netherlands. In all age groups, daily work was an important trigger for professional development on the ward. Performing extra or new tasks appeared to be an additional trigger for undertaking learning activities external to the ward. Learning experiences in nurses' private lives also contributed to their continuing professional development. Besides these similarities, the data revealed differences in career stages and private lives, which appeared to be related to differences in continuing professional development strategy; 'gaining experience and building a career' held particularly true among younger nurses, 'work-life balance' and 'keeping work interesting and varied' to middle-aged nurses, and 'consistency at work' to older nurses. Professional development strategies can aim at performing daily patient care, extra tasks and other roles. Age differences in these strategies appear to relate to tenure, perspectives on the future, and situations at home. These insights could help hospitals to orientate continuing

  8. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  9. Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Gardulf, Ann; Johansson, Eva; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Nilsson, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported. To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented. A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university. In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded. Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students. Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors relating to professional self-concept among nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Şimşek, Belkıs

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the self-concept in nurse managers in Turkey and the effects of certain variables on professional self-concept. Professional self-concept plays a significant role in improving certain professional behaviours. Nursing managers have the potential to influence other members of the profession with their attitudes and behaviours. The study was designed as a cross-sectional descriptive study. This study was conducted with 159 nurse managers in nine different hospitals. The study data were collected with a Personal Information Form and Professional Self-concept Nursing Inventory, and the data analysis was accomplished with descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha coefficients and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector analyses. The professional self-concept score of nurse managers was 3·33 (SD = 0·308). Professional competence subdimension had the highest scores, while professional satisfaction subdimension had the lowest. The types of hospital were found to be influential on professional self-concept. The types of hospital were reported to influence the professional self-concept of nurses. Nursing managers are visionaries who can potentially influence nursing practices and decisions. Nursing leaders must monitor and administer strategies to improve their professional self-concept. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Burnout and job satisfaction among nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Ferraz, Hugo; Grau-Alberola, Ester; Gil-Monte, Pedro R; García-Juesas, Juan A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between burnout and job satisfaction among nursing professionals. The sample consisted of 316 staff nurses. The study was longitudinal, and not randomized. The gap between Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2) was one year. Hierarchical regression analysis showed empirical evidence of the significant and negative effect of burnout (i.e., Emotional exhaustion and Depersonalization dimensions) at T1 on job satisfaction in T2. Significant results were also obtained that showed the influence of job satisfaction at T1 on burnout at T2 (i.e., Depersonalization dimension). The study concludes that there is a bidirectional and longitudinal relationship between burnout and job satisfaction. However, longitudinal effects of burnout at T1 on job satisfaction on T2 (i.e., burnout as antecedent of job satisfaction) are stronger than vice-versa (i.e., job satisfaction as antecedent of burnout).

  12. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  13. The global Filipino nurse: An integrative review of Filipino nurses' work experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montayre, Jed; Montayre, Jasmine; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2018-05-01

    To understand the work-related experiences of Philippine-trained nurses working globally. The Philippines is a major source country of foreign-trained nurses located globally. However, there is paucity of research on professional factors and career related issues affecting foreign-trained nurses' work experiences. An integrative review through a comprehensive search of literature was undertaken from November 2015 and was repeated in August 2016. Seven articles satisfied the selection criteria. Filipino nurses experienced differences in the practice of nursing in terms of work process, roles and autonomy. Moreover, they encountered challenges such as work-related discrimination and technical difficulties within the organisation. A clear understanding of Filipino nurses' work experiences and the challenges they have encountered suggests identification of important constructs influencing effective translation of nursing practice across cultures and health systems, which then form the basis for support strategies. It is critical to recognize foreign-trained nurses' experience of work-related differences and challenges as these foster favorable conditions for the management team to plan and continually evaluate policies around recruitment, retention and support offered to these nurses. Furthermore, findings suggest internationalization of nursing framework and standards integrating a transcultural paradigm among staff members within a work organisation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Contract learning: effects of professionalization on the student nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubin, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    The reengineering of nurse training implies the implementation of self-development, empowering tools and a reshaping of the function of accompaniment during training which becomes a shared function. This work is part of a psycho-socio-educational approach of the accompaniment to self-directed learning and also in the field of practices of health and social work. This study contributes to the identification of the conditions of efficiency of contracting between student nurses, tutors and instructors. It aims to explore the interest of a triangular steering of the learning contract centered on the student's individual project and also the interest of meetings during training as triggers to a process of self-construction of competences. Moreover, the study aims to identify the effects of contract on professionalization. Our study reverts to the basic question of learning by contract as a pillar for the self-directed learning in an alternating training context. The empirical approach takes into account a qualitative study carried out with 15 people (tutors, managers, student nurses and instructors) in 3 health care structures and a quantitative study based on 78 first year students, 106 second year students, and 47 third year students at the same nursing education institute. The study shows that learning by contract is empowering and professionalizing, if the student is placed in favorable conditions of learning and contractual relationship.

  15. Sentimentos vivenciados pelos profissionais de enfermagem que atuam em unidade de emergência Sentimientos de profesionales de enfermería que trabajam en unidad de urgencia Feelings of nursing professionals who work in emergency units

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    Geraldo Magela Salomé

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: conhecer o significado do trabalho em uma unidade de emergência para os profissionais de enfermagem. MÉTODO: tratou-se de pesquisa qualitativa com abordagem fenomenológica. A coleta de dados foi obtida por meio de 14 entrevistas com profissionais de enfermagem. RESULTADOS: os profissionais de enfermagem convivem com sentimentos díspares, como cansaço, esgotamento, angústia e revolta pela sobrecarga e limitações dos recursos frente às situações que envolvem risco de morte. CONCLUSÃO: apesar do estresse que esses profissionais enfrentam durante o cotidiano de trabalho, eles mantêm o compromisso de prestar uma assistência com qualidade e humanização, havendo tendência para exaustão emocional, desânimo e sentimentos de angústia, o que reafirma a importância da prevenção de saúde no ambiente de trabalho.OBJETIVO: conocer el significado del trabajo en una unidade de urgencia para los profesionales de enfermería. MÉTODO: se trató de una investigación cualitativa con abordaje fenomenologica. La recogida de datos fue por medio de 14 entrevistas con profesionales de enfermería. RESULTADOS: los profesionales de enfermería tienen los sentimientos de fatiga, agotamiento, angustia y rebelión para la sobrecarga de trabajo y las limitaciones de recursos frente a las situaciones que implican riesgo de muerte. CONCLUSIÓN: a pesar del estrés que los profesionales pasan en el dia al dia de trabajo ellos mantienen el compromiso en asistir con calida y humanización, existindo una tendencia para el agotamiento emocional, desaliento emocional y angustia lo qué reafirma la importancia de la prevención en salud en el ambiente de trabajo.OBJECTIVE: to know the meanings fo the work in an emergency unit for nursing professionals. METHOD: qualitative research with phenomenological approach. Data collection was obtained by means of 14 interviews with nursing professionals. RESULTS: coexisting feelings of nursing professionals are

  16. Moral distress: challenges for an autonomous nursing professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Luiz Devos Barlem

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Constantly experiencing limiting situations that hinder a professional practice coherent with its principles - of autonomy and advocacy of users' interests -, and often conditioned to experience moral distress, the nursing profession plays a prominent role in the current health model because it has the characteristic of managing the care rendered to users in a perspective of social inclusion, both in the basic health network and in hospitals. Aiming at carrying out a reflection on the nursing practice and the difficulties present in its work routine, and considering its characteristics as a profession, this article sought to make a reflection between the practice of nursing and the numerous moral challenges imposed by the routine, resulting, in many cases, in a value crisis that can reverberate directly on the quality of the service rendered, and in abandonment of the ideals of advocacy for users.

  17. Moral distress: challenges for an autonomous nursing professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Luiz Devos Barlem

    Full Text Available Constantly experiencing limiting situations that hinder a professional practice coherent with its principles - of autonomy and advocacy of users' interests -, and often conditioned to experience moral distress, the nursing profession plays a prominent role in the current health model because it has the characteristic of managing the care rendered to users in a perspective of social inclusion, both in the basic health network and in hospitals. Aiming at carrying out a reflection on the nursing practice and the difficulties present in its work routine, and considering its characteristics as a profession, this article sought to make a reflection between the practice of nursing and the numerous moral challenges imposed by the routine, resulting, in many cases, in a value crisis that can reverberate directly on the quality of the service rendered, and in abandonment of the ideals of advocacy for users.

  18. The professional profile of UFBA nursing management graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Mirian Santos; Coelho, Edméia de Almeida Cardoso; Nascimento, Enilda Rosendo do; Melo, Cristina Maria Meira de; Fernandes, Josicelia Dumêt; Santos, Ninalva de Andrade

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the professional profile of the nursing graduate students of Federal University of Bahia, more specifically of the nursing management area. This descriptive, exploratory study was performed using documental research. The data was collected from the graduates' curriculum on the Lattes Platform and from the graduate program documents, using a form. The study population consisted of graduates enrolled under the line of research The Organization and Evaluation of Health Care Systems, who developed dissertations/theses addressing Nursing/Health Management. The data were stored using Microsoft Excel, and then transferred to the STATA 9.0 statistical software. Results showed that most graduates are women, originally from the State of Bahia, and had completed the course between 2000 and 2011; faculty of public institutions who continued involved in academic work after completing the course. These results point at the program as an academic environment committed to preparing researchers.

  19. Strategies Utilized by Professional Nurses in the Primary Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategies Utilized by Professional Nurses in the Primary Health Care Facilities Regarding Adherence of Patients to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) in Capricorn District, Limpopo Province, South Africa.

  20. Exploring the Relationship Between Professional Commitment and Job Satisfaction Among Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Chin; Wang, Pao-Yu; Lin, Li-Hui; Shih, Whei-Mei; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study explored the relationship between professional commitment and job satisfaction among nurses. A total of 132 registered nurses were recruited from a hospital in northern Taiwan. A self-reported structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings revealed significant differences among nurses in willingness to make an effort and their marital status, appraisal in continuing their careers, job level, and goals and values related to working shifts. Significant differences were found between inner satisfaction and work sector and marital status. Nurses' professional commitment was strongly related to job satisfaction; aspects of professional commitment explained 32% of the variance in job satisfaction. Study results may inform health care institutions about the importance of nurses' job satisfaction and professional commitment so hospital administration can improve these aspects of organizational environment. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. 'A very valuable fusion of classes': British professional and volunteer nurses of the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Christine E

    2014-06-01

    Public perceptions of the work of nurses and VAD-volunteers in the First World War have been heavily influenced by a small number of VAD-writings. The work of trained, professional nurses in supporting and supervised the work of VADs has been largely overlooked. This paper examines several of the writings of both volunteers and professionals, and emphasises the overlooked supervisory, managerial and clinical work of trained nurses. In this centenary year of the First World War's opening months, the paper also explores the ways in which the British mass-media--notably the BBC--have chosen to cling to a romantic image of the untrained nurse, whilst at the same time acknowledging the significance of trained, professional nursing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Occupational and environmental health nursing: ethics and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie

    2012-04-01

    This article provides an overview of ethical issues related to the practice of occupational and environmental health nursing and possible strategies for resolution. Also, professionalism related to professional growth and advancing the specialty is discussed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Is Nurses' Professional Competence Related to Their Personality and Emotional Intelligence? A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Abbas Heydari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nurses' professional competence is a crucial factor in clinical practice. Systematic evaluation of nurses’ competence and its related factors are essential for enhancing the quality of nursing care. This study aimed to assess the nurses’ competence level and its possible relationship with their personality and emotional intelligence. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design, three instruments including Nurse Competence Scale, short form of Schutte Self Report Emotional Intelligence Test, and the short 10-item version of Big Five Factor Inventory, were administered simultaneously to a randomized stratified sample of 220 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11.5. Results: Majority of nurses rated themselves as "good" and "very good", with the highest scores in "managing situations" and "work role" dimensions of nurse competence. A relatively similar pattern of scores was seen in competence dimensions, personality and emotional intelligence, among male and female nurses. Emotional intelligence and personality scores showed a significant relationship with nurses’ competence, explaining almost 20% of variations in nurse competence scores. Conclusion: Iranian nurses evaluated their overall professional competence at similar level of the nurses in other countries. Knowledge about the nurses’ competence level and its related factors, including personality and emotional intelligence, may help nurse managers in enhancing nurses' professional competence through appropriate task assignments and conducting in-service educational programs, thus improving the health status of patients.

  4. Measuring professional satisfaction and nursing workload among nursing staff at a Greek Coronary Care Unit

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    Maria Gouzou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To explore potential associations between nursing workload and professional satisfaction among nursing personnel (NP in Greek Coronary Care Units (CCUs. Method A cross-sectional study was performed involving 66 members of the NP employed in 6 randomly selected Greek CCUs. Job satisfaction was assessed by the IWS and nursing workload by NAS, CNIS and TISS-28. Results The response rate was 77.6%. The reliability of the IWS was α=0.78 and the mean score 10.7 (±2.1, scale range: 0.5-39.7. The most highly valued component of satisfaction was “Pay”, followed by “Task requirements”, “Interaction”, “Professional status”, “Organizational policies” and “Autonomy”. NAS, CNIS and TISS-28 were negatively correlated (p≤0.04 with the following work components: “Autonomy”, “Professional status”, “Interaction” and “Task requirements”. Night shift work independently predicted the score of IWS. Conclusion The findings show low levels of job satisfaction, which are related with nursing workload and influenced by rotating shifts.

  5. Predicting quality of work life on nurses' intention to leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Wen; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Park, Chang-Gi; McCreary, Linda L

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between quality of work life (QWL) and nurses' intention to leave their organization (ITLorg). A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was conducted using purposive sampling of 1,283 nurses at seven hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected from March to June 2012. Three questionnaires, including the Chinese version of the Quality of Nursing Work Life scale (C-QNWL), a questionnaire of intention to leave the organization, and a demographic questionnaire, with two informed consent forms were delivered to the nurses at their workplaces. Descriptive data, Pearson's correlations, and the ordinal regression model were analyzed. Over half (52.5%) of nurses had ITLorg. Seven QWL dimensions were significantly negatively correlated with ITLorg (r = -0.17 to -0.37, p working in a nonteaching hospital. Four of the QWL dimensions--supportive milieu with job security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work or home life balance, and nursing staffing and patient care--were also predictors of ITLorg. Three QWL dimensions were not predictors of ITLorg. This study showed that individual-related variables (being single, having a diploma or lower educational level), a work-related variable (working at a nonteaching hospital), and the four QWL dimensions play a significant role in nurses' ITLorg. After the QWL dimensions were added to the regression, the variance explained by the model more than doubled. To reduce nurses' ITLorg, nursing administrators may offer more focused interventions to improve the supportive milieu with job security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work or home life balance, and nursing staffing and patient care. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Nurses' work environment: indicators of satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Mohammad; Aljezawi, Maen

    2018-01-10

    This study aimed to investigate nurses' perceptions of the nursing work environment in Jordanian hospitals. Previous research has indicated a strong relationship between nurses' work environment and their satisfaction at work. However, little is known about the situation in Jordan. A cross-sectional and descriptive design was used. A sample of 500 nurses was recruited. The study was conducted using the Individual Workload Perception Revised scale (IWPS-R). A sum of 382 out of 500 nurses from three health care sectors in Jordan responded to the questionnaires (response rate = 76.4%). The results indicate that nurses working in the public hospitals had significantly better perceptions about their work environment than nurses working in private and university hospitals. Older nurses with lower academic qualifications are more likely to be satisfied with their work. Furthermore, nurses who have good perceptions of support from their manager and peers, and a manageable workload are more likely to stay in their jobs. The public hospitals are currently considered a more suitable milieu for nurses in Jordan. Other health care sectors should work to enhance nurses' working conditions. Providing a supportive work environment with a manageable workload will encourage nurses to stay in their hospitals. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Motivation factors of surgical profile nurses work

    OpenAIRE

    Namajuškaitė, Vaida

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study – investigate the motivation factors of surgical profile nurses work. The objectives of the study: 1. To investigate of satisfaction with work, to identify the motivation positive factors, emotional exhaustion of nurses, which are working in the surgical profile departments and operating-theaters. 2. To investigate negative factors (emotional exhaustion, salary, nursing load). 3. To give the offers for the main problems solutions. Hypothesis – the nurses m...

  8. Stabilizing and destabilizing forces in the nursing work environment: a qualitative study on turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sandy Pin-Pin; Pang, Samantha Mei-Che; Cheung, Kin; Wong, Thomas Kwok-Shing

    2011-10-01

    The nursing work environment, which provides the context of care delivery, has been gaining increasing attention in recent years. A growing body of evidence points to an inseparable link between attributes of the nursing work environment and nurse and patient outcomes. While most studies have adopted a survey design to examine the workforce and work environment issues, this study employed a phenomenological approach to provide empirical evidence regarding nurses' perceptions of their work and work environment. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of the phenomenon of increasing nurse turnover through exploring frontline registered nurses' lived experiences of working in Hong Kong public hospitals. A modified version of Van Kaam's controlled explication method was adopted. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 frontline nurses recruited from ten acute regional, district and non-acute public hospitals in Hong Kong. Their perspectives in regard to their work and work environment, such as workload, manpower demand and professional values, were extensively examined, and a hypothetical description relating the nursing work environment with nurses' turnover intention was posited. Contemplation of nurses' experiences revealed the vulnerable aspects of nursing work and six essential constituents of the nursing work environment, namely staffing level, work responsibility, management, co-worker relationships, job, and professional incentives. These essential constituents have contributed to two sets of forces, stabilizing and destabilizing forces, which originate from the attributes of the nursing work environment. Nurses viewed harmonious co-worker relationships, recognition and professional development as the crucial retaining factors. However, nurses working in an unfavorable environment were overwhelmed by destabilizing forces; they expressed frustration and demonstrated an intention to leave their work environment. The nursing

  9. Professional autonomy and job satisfaction: survey of critical care nurses in mainland Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulou, Katerina K; While, Alison E

    2010-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to describe Greek critical care nurses' views on professional autonomy and its relationship with job satisfaction and other work-related variables. Professional autonomy is generally considered a highly desirable nursing attribute and a major factor in nurse job satisfaction. In the critical care environment, a high level of accountability, responsibility and autonomy are required to optimize outcomes of critically unstable patients. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of Greek critical care nurses (n = 431; response rate 70%) in 2007. Data were collected on professional autonomy, job satisfaction, role conflict and role ambiguity. Overall, nurses reported acting moderately autonomously. Younger nurses reported statistically significant lower levels of autonomy. Higher levels of autonomy were reported by female nurses. Multiple logistic regression revealed that appointment level, type of critical care unit and registration with a professional organization were independently associated with autonomy. A positive moderate association was found between reported autonomy, job satisfaction, role conflict and role ambiguity, but there was no relationship between job satisfaction and reported role conflict and role ambiguity. Further education, role enhancement and support are required for nurses working in critical care in Greece if they are to achieve the maximum potential of their professional role. Failure to address the perceptions of professional autonomy may have an impact on staff retention, because of job dissatisfaction. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The role of inter-professional relationships and support for nurse prescribing in acute and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Karen; Courtenay, Molly

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore nurse prescribers' views on the role of inter-professional relationships and other means of support for nurse prescribing for patients in acute and chronic pain. Research indicates that good team relationships are important for supporting nurse prescribing but that poor understanding of the role by other healthcare professionals can act as a barrier. While collaborative working is central to the role of pain nurses, there is a lack of research on the impact of nurse prescribing on inter-professional working or the support needs of these nurses. A qualitative approach was adopted using thematic analysis of semi-structured interview data collected during 2006 and 2007. Participants were 26 nurses who prescribed medicines for patients with acute and/or chronic pain. Nurses' believed that prescribing encouraged collaborative working and sharing of knowledge across professional boundaries and that this helped to broaden understanding of the wider remit of pain management. Collaboration with doctors served a number of functions, including support and continuous learning. Barriers to effective nurse prescribing were a lack of understanding of its role amongst healthcare professionals and inadequate support. Formal support structures, such as regular clinical supervision, were seen as crucial to meeting nurses' ongoing learning. Factors that promote understanding of nurse prescribing and support inter-professional relationships are likely to have a positive impact on the effectiveness of nurse prescribing. A more consistent approach is required within organisations to support nurse prescribing.

  11. Nurses' Lived Experience of Working with Nursing Students in Clinical Wards: a Phenomenological Study

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    Kobra Parvan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite being aware of the importance of nurses’ role in providing clinical training to nursing students, studies show that sufficient research has not yet been conducted on the experience of clinical nurses who are engaged in training nursing students outside their normal working hours. The present study aim to describe the experience of these nurses who are training outside their routine working hours. Methods: This study was conducted using descriptive-phenomenology method. Twelve nurses was participated in this research. Data were collected using purposive sampling method and face to face interviews based on nurses’ real life experience of students’ learning in clinical settings through answering open-ended questions. Spiegel burg analysis method was used to analyze the data. Results: The result of data analysis was the derivation of four themes and eight sub-themes. Themes included "nurses as teaching sources", "changes in the balance of doing routine tasks", "professional enthusiasm", and "nurses as students' professional socialization source of inspiration". Sub-themes included "efficient education", "poor education", "support", "interference in the role," "self-efficacy development", "inner satisfaction", "positive imaging" and "being a model". Conclusion: It is necessary that academic centers plan for teaching nurses working on a contractual basis in the field of the evaluation method and various methods of teaching. The findings also suggested the development of individual self-efficacy in clinical nurses who train students.

  12. Concept analysis of professional commitment in Iranian nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafaragaee, Fateme; Parvizy, Soroor; Mehrdad, Neda; Rafii, Forough

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Professional commitment has been widely discussed during the last decade. There is no comprehensive definition about “professional commitment in Iranian nurses.” Hence, this study was conducted with the aim of analyzing the concept of professional commitment in Iranian nurses. Materials and Methods: Hybrid model was used in three phases. Firstly, in the theoretical phase, data were retrieved from the CINHAl, MEDLINE, PubMed, OVID, Google scholar, and SID databases. The literature search used the keywords “professional commitment” and “nursing.” The final sample included 27 papers published in English between 2001 and 2011.Secondly, in the fieldwork phase, deep interviews with five clinical nurses were carried out, and thirdly, in the final analytical phase, the obtained data from theoretical and fieldwork phases were combined and a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Results: Loyalty and tendency to remain in the profession and responsibility to the professional issues were extracted in theoretical phase. Commitment to promote caring abilities, satisfying of being a nurse, and belonging to the nursing profession were obtained in fieldwork phase. Finally, two main themes including “commitment to offering the best nursing care” and “commitment to promotion of the nursing profession” were extracted. Conclusion: Nursing is a humanistic profession; it has some particular characteristics due to the profession’s nature. In this paper, a definition composed of two main dimensions of professional commitment in nursing has been introduced. PMID:23922592

  13. [Burnout and perceived health in Critical Care nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Risquez, M I; Peñalver Hernández, F; Godoy Fernández, C

    2008-01-01

    To assess the level of burnout syndrome in a sample of critical care nursing professionals and analyze its relation with the perception of general health and other sociodemographic and work characteristics. Cross-sectional descriptive study. SITE: Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia-Spain. Three evaluation tools were used. These included a sociodemographic and work survey, the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) questionnaires and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) in order to assess professional burnout and the general health condition perceived, respectively. Only 42 out of the 56 questionnaires included in the study were valid. This means an answering rate of 75%. The mean score obtained on the emotional tiredness dimension (25.45 6 11.15) stands out. About 42.9% of the sample presented psychological or psychosomatic symptoms that could require specialized care. Correlation between burnout and general health perception was statistically significant (r = 0.536; p burnout found was moderate to high among critical care nursing professionals. A total of 11.9% of the studied sample had a high score in the 3 dimensions of the burnout syndrome: emotional tiredness, depersonalization, and lack of personal job performance. Burnout and health levels found indicate high vulnerability in the sample studied and the need to establish prevention/intervention programs in this work context.

  14. Perceived Calling and Work Engagement Among Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziedelis, Arunas

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of perceived calling and work engagement in nursing over and above major work environment factors. In all, 351 nurses from various health care institutions completed the survey. Data were collected about the most demanding aspects of nursing, major job resources, the degree to which nursing is perceived as a meaningful calling, work engagement, and main demographic information. Hierarchical linear regression was applied to assess the relation between perceived calling and work engagement, while controlling for demographic and work environment factors, and perceived calling was significantly related to two out of three components of nurses' work engagement. The highest association was found with dedication component, and vigor component was related insignificantly. Results have shown that perceived calling might motivate nurses to engage in their work even in burdensome environment, although possible implications for the occupational well-being of nurses themselves remains unclear.

  15. The perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The purpose of the study was to explore the perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in clinical areas. A qualitative hermeneutic phenomenological research was conducted to determine the meaning of mentoring as perceived by professional nurses and to identify the successes and challenges ...

  16. Pre-Licensed Nursing Students Rate Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garee, Denise L.

    2016-01-01

    Ethical decision making of new nurses relies on professional values and moral development obtained during training. This descriptive, comparative study demonstrated the importance values attributed to the items of the Nurses' Professional Values Scale-Revised (Weis & Schank, 2009), by a sample of senior ADN and BSN students from across the…

  17. Professional Quality of Life and Clinical Competencies among Korean Nurses

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    Kyunghee Kim, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that it is possible to directly examine the relationship between professional quality of life level and clinical competence among nurses. Thus, interventions to increase nurses' compassion satisfaction and relieve compassion fatigue are needed, as professional quality of life may affect clinical competence.

  18. Organizational impact of nurse supply and workload on nurses continuing professional development opportunities: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, Tracey H; Maslin-Prothero, Sian E; Smith, Gilly

    2015-12-01

    To identify the best evidence on the impact of healthcare organizations' supply of nurses and nursing workload on the continuing professional development opportunities of Registered Nurses in the acute care hospital. To maintain registration and professional competence nurses are expected to participate in continuing professional development. One challenge of recruitment and retention is the Registered Nurse's ability to participate in continuing professional development opportunities. The integrative review method was used to present Registered Nurses perspectives on this area of professional concern. The review was conducted for the period of 2001-February 2015. Keywords were: nurs*, continuing professional development, continuing education, professional development, supply, shortage, staffing, workload, nurse: patient ratio, barrier and deterrent. The integrative review used a structured approach for literature search and data evaluation, analysis and presentation. Eleven international studies met the inclusion criteria. Nurses are reluctant or prevented from leaving clinical settings to attend continuing professional development due to lack of relief cover, obtaining paid or unpaid study leave, use of personal time to undertake mandatory training and organizational culture and leadership issues constraining the implementation of learning to benefit patients. Culture, leadership and workload issues impact nurses' ability to attend continuing professional development. The consequences affect competence to practice, the provision of safe, quality patient care, maintenance of professional registration, job satisfaction, recruitment and retention. Organizational leadership plays an important role in supporting attendance at continuing professional development as an investment for the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Professional comportment: the missing element in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clickner, Deborah A; Shirey, Maria R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this concept analysis of professional comportment is to elucidate the dimension of nursing practice that fosters cooperation, collaboration, effective communication, and team cohesion among nurses. Professional comportment is a concept that has not been developed or analyzed, and its integration into nursing practice is unclear and not specified. The body of knowledge concentrating on the spectrum of professional comportment, civility, and lateral violence is presently incomplete. Analyzing and developing the concept of professional comportment will satisfy a gap in the literature. A concept analysis of professional comportment will clarify for the nurse the power of words, behaviors, and communication needed to achieve effective communication and civility. The Walker and Avant framework for concept analysis was used to analyze the concept of professional comportment. An electronic review of the literature through the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Health Sources, Medical Complete, and ProQuest was conducted. This review rendered approximately 300 articles, of which 85 were reviewed. Eighteen articles informed comportment as a definition and are utilized in this analysis. The individual nurse is the level of focus in the analysis, not the organizational culture. Comportment is defined as a dignified manner or conduct. Professional comportment is critical in determining a nurse's effectiveness in relating, communicating, and collaborating with colleagues and members of the healthcare team. In the absence of professional comportment, a culture of incivility, nurse aggression, and compromised patient safety will emerge. Self-regulation and individual accountability are sequelae to professional comportment. The personal assimilation of professional comportment promotes mutual respect, harmony, commitment, and collaboration. The nurse, patient, and healthcare team are the beneficiaries of a nurse who demonstrates professional

  20. [The meaning of accidents with biological material to nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magagnini, Maristela Aparecida Magri; Rocha, Suelen Alves; Ayres, Jairo Aparecido

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study is to understand what meaning work accidents with exposure to biological material has to nurses. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach, and it used Bardin's content analysis. 87 accidents with biological material occurred in the period between 2001 and 2006; among them, eight were seropositive for Hepatitis B and C and HIV/AIDS. An interview with guiding questions was used to collect data. When inquiring these professionals about the meaning of these accidents, four categories emerged: risk situation, danger perception, fatality, and feelings. Although it is not a strategy of clarification, it is a fact that work organization and educative actions have considerable impact in reducing this type of accident, also reducing damage to the life of nurses involved in these accidents.

  1. Finding Florence: Shedding Light on Nurse Practitioners' Professional Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. ter Maten-Speksnijder (Ada)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe new professional role ‘nurse practitioner’ (in Dutch: verpleegkundig specialist) challenges nurses to distuinguish themselves from nurses educated at the Bacher level by the criteria: independency, expertise, and an active attitude to role development. A crucial aspect of their

  2. The Trajectory of Professional Education of the Nursing Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Ulian Manzato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the technical courses offered in Brazil, the field of nursing corresponds to 49.6% of the healthcare sector. From this total, 57% are Nursing Assistant courses. The formation of mid-level human resources has been discussed by nursing teachers and by the institutions that offer nursing-professional training, with special emphasis on the issues related to the quality of technical courses. In this context, a brief historical review of Brazilian legislation on the education and practice of these professionals, including regulations related to this education and to professional nursing practice, is presented chronologically in this paper, examining the laws and the political factors that contributed to guide the trajectory and evolution of professional Nursing Assistant Education. A comparison of the offer of mid-level courses in the field of healthcare and the quantitative of workers reveals the dimensions of Education Institutions' challenge for health sector.

  3. The work setting of diabetes nursing specialists in the Netherlands: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Tilja I J; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Tummers, Gladys; Landeweerd, Jan A; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore whether the work organisation of diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) differs significantly from nurses working in hospital and nursing home and if so, does this difference result in positive or negative consequences regarding work and health. In traditional health care settings, nurses exhibit a high level of environmental uncertainty and low decision-making authority, which has a negative effect on psychological reactions towards work. In professional nursing, specialisation, e.g. diabetic nursing, is a current trend in many countries. Therefore, insight into the determinants of the work situation of nursing specialists is becoming increasingly relevant. Comparisons were made between 3 different samples: 1204 nurses employed by 15 hospitals, 1058 nurses employed by 14 nursing homes, and 350 diabetes nurses working in other health care settings throughout the Netherlands. Data concerning organisation, work aspects, and psychological reactions were measured via questionnaires. Variances between the groups were analysed with ANCOVA, besides hierarchical multiple regression analysis was applied. Environmental uncertainty scored lower amongst diabetes nurses when compared to nurses working in the other two types of health care settings. Social support and role conflict scored low for diabetes nursing specialists who simultaneously perceived autonomy and role ambiguity highest. Diabetes nursing specialists also scored highest on intrinsic work motivation and job satisfaction and lowest for psychosomatic health. Except for social support and role ambiguity, diabetic nurses rate their [work] organisation, [work] aspects and psychological [work] reactions more positively than nurses employed in other health care settings.

  4. School nurse summer institute: a model for professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and spring. Coalition building is an important tool to enhance the influence of the school nurse in improving the health of individuals, families, and communities. School nurses and nursing educators with expertise in the specialty of school nursing could replicate this model in their own regions.

  5. Constructing nurses' professional identity through social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willetts, Georgina; Clarke, David

    2014-04-01

    The profession of nursing continues to struggle with defining and clarifying its professional identity. The definitive recognition of nursing as a profession was the moving of training from the hospital apprentice model to the tertiary sector. However, this is only part of the story of professional identity in nursing. Once training finishes and enculturation into the workplace commences, professional identity becomes a complicated social activity. This paper proposes social identity theory as a valuable research framework to assist with clarifying and describing the professional identity of nurses. The paper outlines the key elements of a profession and then goes on to describe the main concepts of social identity theory. Lastly, a connection is made between the usefulness of using social identity theory in researching professional identity in nursing, recognizing the contextual nature of the social activity of the profession within its workplace environment. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the organ donor process: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Käthe; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Eide, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study that explored Norwegian intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence to identify educational needs in the organ donor process. Intensive care professionals are requested to consider organ donation each time they care for patients with severe cerebral lesion to ensure donor organs for transplantation. The donor process challenges intensive care nurses' professional competence. Nurses' knowledge and experience may influence their professional competence in caring for organ donors and their relatives. METHODS.: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in all 28 Norwegian donor hospitals between October 2008 and January 2009. Intensive care nurses (N = 801) were invited to participate and the response rate was 71·4%. Dimensions of professional competence, learning needs and contextual and demographic variables were explored. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Few intensive care nurses had extensive experience of or competence and training in organ donation. Nurses working at university hospitals had more experience, but lesser training than nurses in local hospitals. Experience of donor acquisition had an impact on intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the donor process. Discussions on the ward and educational input were seen as important for the further development of professional competence. Training provided by experienced colleagues and a culture that encourages discussion about aspects of the donor process can develop nurses' professional competence and communally defined professional practice. Educational input that cultivates various types of knowledge can be beneficial in organ donation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Rural nurses' safeguarding work: reembodying patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Practice-based evidence includes research that is grounded in the everyshift experiences of rural nurses. This study utilized institutional ethnography to reembody the work of rural nurses and to explore how nurses' work experiences are socially organized. Registered nurses who work in small acute care hospitals were observed and interviewed about their work with the focus on their experiences of providing maternity care. The safeguarding work of rural nurses included anticipating problems and emergencies and being prepared; careful watching, surveillance, and vigilance; negotiating safety; being able to act in emergency situations; and mobilizing emergency transport systems. Increased attention to inquiry about safeguarding as an embodied nursing practice and the textual organization of the work of rural nurses is warranted.

  8. Factors Influencing Registered Nurses' Perceptions of Their Professional Identity: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Philippa; Henderson, Ann; Andrew, Nicky; Conroy, Tiffany

    2018-05-01

    This review synthesizes contemporary research investigating the factors influencing RNs' perceptions of their professional identity. The method used was an integrative literature review. Factors influencing RNs' perceptions of their professional identity were synthesized into three categories: the self, the role, and the context. The self is the nurse who enacts the role in practice, and the context is the practice setting. Poor alignment of these categories leads to stress, tension, and uncertainty affecting work-force retention. Strong alignment leads to satisfaction with the nursing role, increased staff retention, and improved quality of care and patient outcomes. These three categories should be considered when planning nursing professional development activities. This integrative review identified a lack of research addressing how nurses' perceptions of their professional identity change over time. A deeper understanding of their perspective is needed to establish whether career longevity and continued professional development are influences. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(5):225-232. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice-theory gap. A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses' fitness for practice. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Professional problems: the burden of producing the "global" Filipino nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiga, Yasmin Y

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates the challenges faced by nursing schools within migrant-sending nations, where teachers and school administrators face the task of producing nurse labor, not only for domestic health needs but employers beyond national borders. I situate my research in the Philippines, one of the leading sources of migrant nurse labor in the world. Based on 58 interviews with nursing school instructors and administrators, conducted from 2010 to 2013, I argue that Philippine nursing schools are embedded within a global nursing care chain, where nations lower down the chain must supply nurse labor to wealthier countries higher up the chain. This paper shows how this process forces Filipino nurse educators to negotiate an overloaded curriculum, the influx of aspiring migrants into nursing programs, and erratic labor demand cycles overseas. These issues create problems in defining the professional knowledge needed by Filipino nurses; instilling professional values and standards; and maintaining proper job security. As such, these findings demonstrate how countries like the Philippines bear the burden of ensuring nurses' employability, where educational institutions constantly adjust curriculum and instruction for the benefit of employers within wealthier societies. My interviews reveal how such adjustments undermine the professional values and standards that define the nursing profession within the country. Such inequality is an outcome of nurse migration that current research has not fully explored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Portero de la Cruz; Manuel Vaquero Abellán

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andaluc?a, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other. METHOD: descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of ...

  12. [Analysis of the intensity of professional collaboration among nurses in a critical care area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea Calpe, L; Marín Fernández, B; Regaira Martínez, E

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the intensity of professional collaboration (IPC) between the nurses in a multidisciplinary critical area (CA) and the relationship with the workplace "intensive care unit (ICU) and special hospitalisation area (SHA)", educational level, age, and years of professional activity in CA. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with 57 nurses from CA, recording socio-demographic data: age, educational level, speciality titles, years of professional activity and workday type, years of professional activity in the CA, and involvement in scientific works. Tool: Intensity of Inter-professional Collaboration Questionnaire. SPSS 20.0. The study included a total of 47 nurses (ICU/SHA), with a mean age of 35.91 (9.59) years. Almost three-quarters (74.46%) were nursing graduates with a posgraduate in ICU. Median and interquartile range of professional experience was 14 and 14.50 years, respectively, and years working in CA was 8.50 and 16 years, respectively. Just over half of them (51.10%) worked part-time, and 61.70% participated in scientific works. The mean IPC score was 61.68 (6.84), with 57.40% providing values of high IPC. The relationship between the workplace (ICU/SHA) and educational level with IPC was not statistically significant (p>.05). There are statistical significant differences between IPC with age and years of professional activity in CA (p<.05). The present study demonstrates the existence of good IPC in the CA. Younger nurses obtain a better IPC score, as well as nurses who have been working for less time in CA. Nurses with a Degree or Masters have a higher level of IPC than the rest, as well as nurses who perform professional activity combining ICU and SHA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Nurses' and managers' perceptions of continuing professional development for older and younger nurses : A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Ten Cate, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuing professional development of nurses is increasingly necessary to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Therefore, future strategies for continuing professional development should be directed at both younger and older

  14. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses : A biographical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Inge A.; Poell, Rob F.; Berings, Marjolein G. M. C.; ten Cate, Olle

    Background: A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age,

  15. Strategies for continuing professional development among younger, middle-aged, and older nurses : A biographical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, I.A.; Poell, R.F.; Berings, M.G.M.C.; Ten Cate, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background A nursing career can last for more than 40 years, during which continuing professional development is essential. Nurses participate in a variety of learning activities that correspond with their developmental motives. Lifespan psychology shows that work-related motives change with age,

  16. WORK STRESS LEVEL AND CARING BEHAVIOUR OF NURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Lestari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A nurse who experience burnout feelings will influence their motivation, and quality performance. This situation is probably affecting a decline in work quality towards the caring behaviour demonstrated by nurses to their patiens, particularly for a nurse who are working in the long-stay installation room facing directly to patient's problems. The purpose of this research is to identify the work stress level of nurse towards the nurse's caring behaviour in the long-stay installation room (IRNA in general hospital in Malang. Method: This research used descriptive – correlational, the sampling was Non Probability Purposive Sampling with 93 nurses as the corresponds. The data was analyzed by operating Correlation Pearson, with a significance of p < 0.05. Result: The result found that there was a substantial correlation between the work stress level and the nurse's caring behaviour with p = 0.008 and r = -0.274, and it was a negative correlation. Discussion: It means that when the stress level of nurses will declined, the nurse's caring behavior automatically will beamplified. Conversely, if the stess level of nurses intensively increased, the nurse's caring behaviour become decreased. Thus, this research is needed to be analyzed further in order to asses the quality of caring behaviour by expanding the connected indicator and variable. It is aimed to improve the professionalism and quality of nurses in giving the best service to patients this research need to be continued further in order to asses the quality of nurse's caring behavior by expanding the variable, which is related to internal factors, such as knowledge, perception, emotion, ect and also connected to external factors, such as environment, both physically and non physically like: climate, human being, social economic, culture and ect.

  17. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Guedes dos Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. Method: a mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Results: based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. Conclusion: it is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses.

  18. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    To elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. A mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. It is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses.

  19. Designing Professional Development That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Beatrice F.; Desimone, Laura; Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    By studying survey data from 1,000 teachers participating in a Title II workshop, researchers identified three structural features (form, duration, and collective participation) that set a proper context for professional development. Three core features of professional-development learning experience include content focus, active learning, and…

  20. Personal and professional values held by baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hülya; Işik, Burçin; Şenyuva, Emine; Kaya, Nurten

    2017-09-01

    Values are ideals and beliefs that individuals and groups uphold and lie at the core of the diverse world of human behaviour and are expressed in every human decision and action, both consciously and unconsciously. They represent basic beliefs of what is right, good or desirable and motivate both personal and professional behaviour. In the context of nursing profession, values are essential in order to maintain high standards of the nursing care. This study was planned to examine changes in nursing students' personal and professional values between entering and graduating from an undergraduate nursing programme. Ethical considerations: Measures to protect participants included obtaining Deaconship of Nursing Faculty approval, obtaining signed informed consent and maintaining confidentiality. This study was designed as longitudinal quality. The research population included 143 students registered at a first grade of a nursing faculty for the 2009-2010 academic year. Data were collected with a Questionnaire Form, the Value Preferences Scale, the Professional Values Precedence Scale and the Nursing Professional Values Scale. According to the results, social values have statistical differences in 4-year nursing education. Nursing students in second class have higher score in terms of social values than those in third class. Also, majority of students ranked human dignity as first and justice as second and third from first to fourth classes, and they have very high scores on Nursing Professional Values Scale and its subscales and stated that all items of Nursing Professional Values Scale are very important. As a result, nursing education has vital role in acquiring and maintaining professional values.

  1. Perceptions of the Impact of Online Learning as a Distance-Based Learning Model on the Professional Practices of Working Nurses in Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine; Hanna, Mary; Warry, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Nurses in Canada face diverse challenges to their ongoing educational pursuits. As a result, they have been early adopters of courses and programs based on distance education principles and, in particular, online learning models. In the study described in this paper, nurses studying at two northern universities, in programs involving online…

  2. Attitudes towards suicidal behaviour and associated factors among nursing professionals: A quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacchero Vedana, K G; Magrini, D F; Zanetti, A C G; Miasso, A I; Borges, T L; Dos Santos, M A

    2017-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Self-confident health professionals with positive and understanding attitudes can take better care of people with suicidal behaviour, but the factors associated with these attitudes are not known. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The majority of nursing professionals had no experience or training in mental health or suicide. They were less self-confident and had more negative attitudes. Nurses and nursing assistants who worked before in mental health services were more understanding with people with suicidal behaviour. Nurses and nursing assistants who were working in prehospital services were less self-confident to taking care of people with suicidal behaviour. Some members of the nursing team had already seriously considered committing suicide. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The practicing, support and training in mental health may improve the nurses' attitudes and emotional competencies. It is important to know why few nurses had suicide-related training, despite the relevance of this issue. Training in mental health or suicide need to include attitudinal and emotional competencies. It is important to offer emotional support to emergency nursing professionals. Background The attitudes towards suicide of emergency nurses may affect the care provided. However, the factors associated with these attitudes remain unclear. Objective To investigate attitudes towards suicidal behaviour and associated factors among nursing professionals working in emergency settings. Methods A cross-sectional observational study including 28 nurses and 118 who were nursing assistants employed at two emergency services in Brazil was conducted. Data were collected in 2015 using a self-administered sociodemographic questionnaire and the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire (SBAQ). Results The majority of participants reported having no experience or training in mental health or suicide. They reported more negative feelings towards the

  3. Nurse teachers' working lives: a questionnaire survey of nursing schools in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, L; While, A E; Chen, G; Barriball, K L; Gu, S

    2011-12-01

    The study aimed to explore Chinese nurse teachers' views and experience regarding different components of their working lives. A cross-sectional survey of 18 schools of nursing offering nationally accredited baccalaureate nursing programmes across Mainland China was conducted. A total of 227 nurse teachers completed questionnaires yielding a response rate of 72%. The sample comprised mainly female, married lecturers younger than 44 years with an average teaching experience of about 10 years. The respondents were satisfied with their overall job, work, supervision and co-workers, but dissatisfied with their pay and promotion opportunities. There were statistically significant differences in several facets of job satisfaction across the respondents of different age groups, education levels, job titles and those working in the schools of different sizes. The respondents perceived their work environment to be only somewhat empowering. Their average level of professional identification was relatively high, but their overall role conflict, role ambiguity and sense of coherence were relatively low. Chinese nurse teachers had a positive feeling towards their working lives, but strategies should be developed to enhance their sense of coherence and professional commitment. It is worth noting that there is still much adjustment to be made towards the new higher education roles, but the findings may only be generalizable to similar settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Teamwork in nursing: restricted to nursing professionals or an interprofessional collaboration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Geisa Colebrusco de; Peduzzi, Marina; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez

    2016-01-01

    To understand the nursing professionals' conceptions of teamwork and their elements. A qualitative study conducted in an oncological hospital using a semi-structured interview with 21 nursing professionals. Two conceptions emerged from the accounts: teamwork restricted to nursing professionals and teamwork with interprofessional collaboration with particular importance for interactive dimensions: communication, trust and professional bonds, mutual respect and recognition of the other's work, collaboration, and conflict, with this last subcategory considered as an obstacle to teamwork. Nursing conceives teamwork as an interprofessional practice, which is a result of the quality of interaction among professionals from different areas and involves the recognition and handling of conflicts. Compreender as concepções dos profissionais de enfermagem sobre trabalho em equipe e seus elementos constituintes. Pesquisa qualitativa, realizada em hospital oncológico, por meio de entrevista semiestruturada com 21 profissionais de enfermagem. Duas concepções emergiram dos relatos, trabalho em equipe circunscrito à enfermagem e trabalho em equipe com colaboração interprofissional, com destaque para dimensão interativa: comunicação, confiança e vínculo, respeito mútuo e reconhecimento do trabalho do outro, colaboração e conflito. Esta última subcategoria foi apontada como obstáculo para o trabalho em equipe. A enfermagem concebe majoritariamente o trabalho em equipe como ação interprofissional, e isto decorre da qualidade da interação entre os profissionais das diferentes áreas e o reconhecimento e manejo de conflitos.

  5. Stress among nurses working in an acute hospital in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Stress among nurses leads to absenteeism, reduced efficiency, long-term health problems and a decrease in the quality of patient care delivered. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted. The study\\'s aim was to identify perceived stressors and influencing factors among nurses working in the critical and non-critical care practice areas. A convenience sample of 200 nurses were invited to complete the Bianchi Stress Questionnaire. Information was collected on demographics and daily nursing practice. Findings indicated that perceived stressors were similar in both groups. The most severe stressors included redeployment to work in other areas and staffing levels. Results from this study suggest that age, job title, professional experience and formal post-registration qualifications had no influence on stress perception. These results will increase awareness of nurses\\' occupational stress in Ireland.

  6. (Destabilizing Self-Identities in Professional Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Buch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is characteristic of much professional work that it is performed in ambiguous contexts. Thus, uncertainty, unpredictability, indeterminacy, and recurrent organizational transformations are an integral part of modern work for, e.g., engineers, lawyers, business consultants, and other professionals. Although key performance indicators and other knowledge management systems are used to set standards of excellence for professionals, the character of professional work is still flexible, open to interpretation and heterarchical. The very successfulness (or unsuccessfulness of the work is established in a complex work context where various goals, interests, and perspectives are mediated, altered, contested, mangled, and negotiated in a process of sense-making. The work context is heterogeneously populated by various actors (e.g., the customer, the manager, the colleagues and actants (e.g., quality systems and technical equipment that give “voice” to (conflicting interpretations of what constitutes successful work. Thus, the professionals must navigate in a very complex environment where the locus of governance is far from stable. These characteristics of professional work seem to have implications for the way professionals make sense of their work and their own identities. The identity work of professionals is interwoven with their professional training and career background. With an academic training and a professional career, the individual typically identifies with the profession’s values and adopts a certain way of seeing and approaching the world. This professional outlook typically will constitute the basis of the individual’s appraisal of the work and lay out a horizon of expectations in relation to fulfillment, self-realization, and job satisfaction. In this way, the construction of self-identity becomes the yardstick for the individual’s sense-making and, a fortiori, for the individual’s sense of meaningful work. In this paper

  7. Perceived nursing work environment of acute care pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzer, Anne Marie; Koepping, Dianne M; LeDuc, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Nurse job satisfaction is a complex phenomenon and includes elements of the work environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nurses' perception of their real (current) and ideal (preferred) work environment in a pediatric tertiary care setting. Using a descriptive survey design, a convenience sample of staff nurses from three inpatient units was surveyed using the Work Environment Scale (WES) by Moos (1994). The WES consists of 10 subscales characterizing three dimensions: Relationship, Personal Growth, and System Maintenance and Change. Overall, nurses affirmed a highly positive and supportive work environment on their units. Non-significant findings between the real and ideal scores for the Involvement and Managerial Control subscales suggest that staff are concerned about and committed to their work, and satisfied with their managers' use of rules and procedures. Statistically significant differences between selected real and ideal subscale scores will help target intervention strategies to enhance the nursing work environment.

  8. Nurses' bodywork: is there a body of work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Pam

    2003-03-01

    The work that many nurses do involves the use of their own body as one of the tools of their occupation. Being a nurse, in many cases, means controlled, purposeful use of her or his own body oriented to the patient. This paper discusses some of the ways in which nurses' bodies and the work that those bodies do are represented in professional and academic research accounts and made relevant in literature. Using instances of bodies and bodily activity mentioned in a variety of literature, the paper discusses three categories of accounts of nursing bodywork: those which are problematised and where the nurse's body is seen as a topic for investigation, and those which are unproblematised either explicitly discussing bodily activity (for example, touch) or implicitly dealing with bodywork (for example, taking blood pressure). Four ways in which nurses' bodies are made relevant in accounts are proposed: relational, corporate, instrumental and human. The paper discusses the prominence (or not) nurses' bodies are given in professional and academic accounts, as a contribution to preliminary work of generating a topic for investigation and concludes with some suggestions as to how this investigative project might be taken forward, focusing primarily on an examination of methodic practices, or how bodywork is brought off and executed as a skilled but taken-for-granted activity.

  9. Working With Arts in Danish Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2011-01-01

    The article outlines ideas and a number of results of a design-for-learning experiment, involving nurse students working with arts in the nurse education in Denmark. The findings show that learning in practice in nurse education can involve creativity as a dimension of building personal knowledge...

  10. Professional identity of Korean nurse practitioners in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kumsook; Kim, Miyoung

    2017-04-01

    Despite nurse practitioners' (NPs) professional identity having important implications for the confirmation of nursing practice characteristics, few studies have examined the professional identity of NPs overlaid with the immigrant experience. The aim of this study was to explore the career characteristics of Korean nurse immigrants who became NPs in the United States. Seven Korean NPs in the United States underwent in-depth interviews from August 2013 to May 2015. Content analysis was employed for data analysis. Five themes were identified regarding their professional identity as NPs: patient-centered thinking, responsibility for patient care, dedicated life, diligence, and feelings of achievement. Of these, patient-centered thinking appeared to be the overriding theme. The findings add to nursing knowledge about immigrant nurses and their abilities and striving to develop into new roles in nursing. The participants focused on listening, interpersonal relationships, and education in patient care, which helped differentiate their roles from those of other healthcare professionals. Nurse managers should consider the study findings when making policies to assist immigrant nurses to acculturate into practice, and there is a need for the development of educational materials to guide and promote the NPs' professional role. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice–theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Methods Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Main outcome measures Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses′ fitness for practice. PMID:24512685

  12. [A case study on duty of care in professional nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Man; Liao, Chi-Chun

    2013-08-01

    Nurses are expected to discharge their duty of care effectively and professionally to prevent medical negligence. Only three articles have previously focused on medical negligence. Duty of care and medical negligence in nursing are topics that have been neglected in Taiwan. (1) Classify the duty of care of professional nurses; (2) Investigate the facts and disputes in the current case; (3) Clarify the legal issues involved with regard to duty-of-care violations in the current case; (4) Explore the causal relationships in a legal context between nurses' duty-of-care violations and patient harm / injury. Literature analysis and a case study are used to analyze Supreme Court Verdict No.5550 (2010). Duty of care for nursing professionals may be classified into seven broad categories. Each category has its distinct correlatives. In nursing practice, every nursing behavior has a corresponding duty. In this case, the case study nurse did not discharge her obstetric professional duty and failed to inform the doctor in a timely manner. Negligence resulted in prenatal death and the case study nurse was found guilty. In order to prevent committing a crime, nurses should gain a better understanding of their duty of care and adequately discharge these duties in daily practice.

  13. Professional socialization in nursing: A qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarshenas, Ladan; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Khayyer, Mohammad; Zare, Najaf; Ebadi, Abbas

    2014-07-01

    Being a nurse is more than just a series of business activities and skills. In fact, it is a part of the process of socialization, which is internalization and development of professional identity. Professional socialization is necessary for involving the students in professional practices. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative research was to increase the understanding of professional socialization in nursing and explore the related factors from the perspective of registered nurses and nursing students. In this qualitative design, data were collected on 43 nurses with a variety of experiences using semi-structured interviews and focus groups in the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Data were analyzed through inductive content analysis. THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED TWO MAIN CATEGORIES: (1) sense of belonging with three sub-categories of theory-practice incongruence, educational experiences and tacit knowledge and (2) forming professional identity consisting of three sub-categories of relatedness, internal motivation and role model. This study demonstrates that in nursing, sense of belonging and professional identity contributes to professional socialization; it is suggested that these factors, which improve socialization in nurses, be taken into account by authorities.

  14. Newly graduated nurses' job satisfaction: comparison with allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mihyun; Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2012-09-01

    The purposes of this study are to examine differences in job satisfaction among professional groups including nurses, allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers, and to identify specific characteristics of job satisfaction of nurses. The study design was a cross-sectional exploratory study using secondary data analysis with the 2009 Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey. The sample was female new graduates. The differences in job satisfaction among professional groups were analyzed using logistic regression (satisfied vs. not satisfied). Overall, 41.5% of nurses, 50.1% of allied hospital professionals, 58.2% of social workers, and 89% of elementary school teachers were satisfied with their job. Nurses were significantly less satisfied than the other professionals in 5 of the 11 job characteristics and had the lowest odds ratio (OR) when compared with elementary school teachers: work content (OR = 0.197, 95% CI [0.128, 0.304]), physical work environment (OR = 0.353, 95% CI [0.236, 0.529]), working hours (OR = 0.054, 95% CI [0.033, 0.088]), personal growth (OR = 0.242, 95% CI [0.160, 0.366]), and autonomy (OR = 0.188, 95% CI [0.123, 0.288]). Work content, physical work environment, interpersonal relationship, advancement system, and autonomy were significantly associated with the overall job satisfaction of nurses. Relatively dissatisfying job characteristics in nursing work environment that were significant predictors for nurses' job satisfaction should be improved. Newly graduated nurses are at risk for job dissatisfaction. This can result in high turnover rates and can exacerbate the nursing shortage. Efforts to improve the work environment are needed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The mediating role of nurses' professional commitment in the relationship between core self-evaluation and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barać, Ivana; Prlić, Nada; Plužarić, Jadranka; Farčić, Nikolina; Kovačević, Suzana

    2018-05-11

    The aim of this study was to examine the degree to which it is possible to predict job satisfaction in hospital nurses based on core self-evaluation and the nurses' professional commitment. Psychological constructs of nurses' professional commitment could predict a level of job satisfaction. A cross-sectional design was applied. Data were collected between April 2016 and November 2016 from 584 nurses of the University Hospital Osijek. Core Self-Evaluation Scale (CSES), Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and Nurses' professional commitment scale (NPCS) were administrated to the study participants. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test the validity of each questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to test the prediction of nurses' professional commitment and core self-evaluation on job satisfaction. Nurses' professional commitment is variable, which functions as a mediator between predictor (CSE) and criterion variable (JS). As a mediator, it explains what the effect is, provided that correlations between all variables are significant. The correlation analyses reveal significant positive correlations between job satisfaction and core self evaluation (r = 0.441, p > 0.001) and also between job satisfaction and nurses' professional commitment (r = 0.464, p > 0.001). Furthermore, core self evaluation significantly and positively correlates with nurses' professional commitment (r = 0.402, p > 0.001). The results showed that nurses' professional commitment mediates the relationship between core self evaluation and job satisfaction. Bootstrap analysis showed that core self evaluation partially mediated the relationship between nurses' professional commitment and job satisfaction ( β = 0.78, p core self evaluation on job satisfaction through nurses' professional commitment was also significant (β = 0.17, p < 0.001**). Nurses who are more committed to their work, regardless of the structure of personality, have greater satisfaction in their work. This

  16. A Discussion of Professional Identity Development in Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Maginnis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Becoming a nurse requires development of professional capabilities, specifically socialisation into the profession and developing a professional identity (PI. A search of the literature highlights a lack of empirical research in PI development during pre-registration nursing education. A range of factors will be explored that relate to PI, including identity, professional socialisation, a sense of belonging to the profession and clinical placement. Exploring the development of a PI in nursing students can assist with identifying drivers and inhibitors. The aim of this paper is to describe PI development in pre-registration nursing students’ education and the relationship between development of a PI and the tertiary provided education. There are a multitude of factors that impact on developing a PI such as identity, professional socialisation, belonging, clinical placements and educators. Nursing students predominantly develop a nursing PI in the pre-registration program with professional socialisation through exposure to academia, clinical practice and role models. The onus of responsibility for developing a PI in nursing students is attributed to educational institutions. An expected outcome of the pre-registration program is that nursing students will have formed a PI. A greater depth of understanding PI is important in supporting the education of the nurses of the future. There may not be one simple explanation for what PI is, or how it is developed, but a greater depth of understanding of PI by both the tertiary sector and the nursing profession is important in supporting the education of the nurses of the future. Further research will enable a dialogue describing the development of a PI in nursing students and an understanding of the attributes and conceptions attributed to a nursing PI.

  17. The emotional labour of nursing -- Defining and managing emotions in nursing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Emotions in health organisations tend to remain tacit and in need of clarification. Often, emotions are made invisible in nursing and reduced to part and parcel of 'women's work' in the domestic sphere. Smith (1992) applied the notion of emotional labour to the study of student nursing, concluding that further research was required. This means investigating what is often seen as a tacit and uncodified skill. A follow-up qualitative study was conducted over a period of twelve months to re-examine the role of the emotional labour of nursing. Data were collected primarily from 16 in-depth and semi-structured interviews with nurses. Key themes elicited at interviews touch upon diverse topics in the emotional labour of nursing. In particular, this article will address nurse definitions of emotional labour; the routine aspects of emotional labour in nursing; traditional and modern images of nursing; and gender and professional barriers that involve emotional labour in health work. This is important in improving nurse training and best practice; investigating clinical settings of nurses' emotional labour; looking at changing techniques of patient consultation; and beginning to explore the potential therapeutic value of emotional labour.

  18. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana da Costa Fernandes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279. RESULTS: men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. CONCLUSION: both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  19. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Juliana da Costa; Portela, Luciana Fernandes; Rotenberg, Lúcia; Griep, Rosane Harter

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. This is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279). Men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. Both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  20. Professional self-concept and professional values of senior students of the nursing department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çöplü, Mehtap; Tekinsoy Kartın, Pınar

    2018-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine professional self-concept and professional values in the students, who were studying in the final year of the nursing department in schools providing undergraduate education in the Inner Anatolia Region. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 619 senior students of nursing departments in the Inner Anatolia Region. Data were collected using a Student Information Form, Professional Self-Concept Scale for the Student Nurses, and The Nurses' Professional Values Scale. Descriptive statistics, the Shapiro-Wilk test, the t-test, analysis of variance, and the Bonferroni tests were used for data analysis. Ethical Considerations: A written consent was obtained from Ethics Board of Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine and from nursing schools participating in the study. Prior to data collection, students were informed about the purpose of the study and gave written and verbal consents. Participation in the study was on voluntary basis. In the study, students' total and sub-dimension scores from the Professional Self-Concept Scale for the Student Nurses and total scores from the Nurses' Professional Values Scale were moderately high. It was detected that women received higher scores than men from the sub-dimension of professional attributes; the students who had positive perception of the nursing image and voluntarily selected their department received high scores from professional satisfaction, professional competence, and professional attributes sub-dimensions of the Professional Self-Concept Scale for the Student Nurses ( p concept and professional values, it is thought that students' awareness should be increased on these topics.

  1. Learning Nursing in the Workplace Community: The Generation of Professional Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Mary

    This chapter explores the connections between learning, working and professional communities in nursing. It draws on experiences and research in nursing practice and education, where not only do isolated professionals learn as a result of their actions for patients and others, but those professionals are part of a community whose associated networks enable learning to occur. Several characteristics of this professional community are shared with those found in Communities of Practice (CoPs) (Lave and Wenger, 1991; Wenger, 1998), but the balance and importance of many elements can differ. For instance, whilst Lave and Wenger (1991) describe many aspects of situated learning in CoPs that apply to nurses, their model is of little help in understanding the ways in which other professions as well as patients/clients and carers influence the development of nursing practice. Therefore, I shall argue that it is not just the Community of Practice that we need to consider

  2. Values in nursing students and professionals: An exploratory comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-López, F Rosa; Roales-Nieto, Jesus Gil; Seco, Guillermo Vallejo; Preciado, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have explored personal values in nursing, but none has assessed whether the predictions made by the theory of intergenerational value change are true for the different generations of nursing professionals and students. This theory predicts a shift in those personal values held by younger generations towards ones focussed on self-expression. The purpose of the study was to identify intergenerational differences in personal values among nursing professionals and nursing students and to determine whether generational value profiles fit the predictions made by the theory. An exploratory comparative design with a cross-sectional survey method was used. Participants were recruited from four public hospitals and 10 Primary Care Centres in medium-size cities in Spain. A sample of 589 nurses and 2295 nursing students participated in the study. An open survey method was used to collect data that were classified grouping reported values into categories following a method of value lexicon construction and analysed by contingency tables with Pearson's χ (2) and standardized residuals. Approval to conduct the study was obtained from the Deans of the nursing schools and the Directors of Nursing of the institutions. Anonymity was guaranteed, participation was voluntary and participants were informed of the purpose of the study. The results can be synthesized in two age-related trends in the reporting of values among three groups of participants. First, among younger nurses and students, some nursing core values (e.g. ethical and professional) decreased in importance, while other values centred on social relationships and personal well-being increased. This study shows intergenerational change in personal values among both nursing students and young nursing professionals. Findings suggest the need to pay more attention to value training and professional socialization during the schooling period. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Seeking Connectivity in Nurses' Work Environments: Advancing Nurse Empowerment Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udod, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how staff nurses and their managers exercise power in a hospital setting in order to better understand what fosters or constrains staff nurses' empowerment and to extend nurse empowerment theory. Power is integral to empowerment, and attention to the challenges in nurses' work environment and nurse outcomes by administrators, researchers, and policy-makers has created an imperative to advance a theoretical understanding of power in the nurse-manager relationship. A sample of 26 staff nurses on 3 units of a tertiary hospital in western Canada were observed and interviewed about how the manager affected their ability to do their work. Grounded theory methodology was used. The process of seeking connectivity was the basic social process, indicating that the manager plays a critical role in the work environment and nurses need the manager to share power with them in the provision of safe, quality patient care. Copyright© by Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

  4. A comprehensive literature review of guidelines facilitating transition of newly graduated nurses to professional nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, Dalena R M; Jordan, Portia J; Ten Ham-Baloyi, Wilma; Caka, Ernestina M

    2018-05-01

    Literature shows that successful transition of newly graduate nurses to professional nurses is imperative but does not always take place, resulting in difficulty in performance, cognizance or behaviour of a role as a nurse, affecting the quality of patient care negatively. No integrative literature review could be found to summarize available guidelines facilitating transition of final year nursing students to professional nurses. An extensive search of the literature by means of an integrative literature review was conducted in 2014 and updated in June 2017, following a five-step process. All relevant studies were subsequently appraised for rigour and quality using the AGREE II tool by two independent reviewers. Eight (n = 8) guidelines on transitions were independently extracted. After thematic analysis was done, three factors to facilitate transition of final year nursing students to professional nurses were found: 1) support for new graduates, 2) the graduate's need for socialization and belonging, and 3) a positive clinical learning environment. The availability and implementation of guidelines on transition of final year nursing students by educational institutions and healthcare facilities could ease the transition from being final year nursing students to becoming professional nurses as well as improve retention of newly qualified professional nurses. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. [Higher professional education as a means for development in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi Castell, R

    2000-02-01

    The author reflects on how higher training contributes to development in Nursing, understanding by this term the discipline but also the set of professionals which exercise it. Therefore, the author analyzes those elements which are part of professional development; be this intrinsic, professional discourse, excellent professional exercise, market dominance, syndical capacity or representation. The author ends her article with a very simple proposal: make a world full of care, with a recognition of successes, a correction of errors and a deepening of attitudes.

  6. Supporting students in professional socialisation: Guidelines for professional nurses and educators

    OpenAIRE

    Hester Cathrina (Rina) de Swardt; Gisela H. van Rensburg; M.J. Oosthuizen

    2017-01-01

    Professional socialisation of nursing students involves learning skills, attitudes, behaviour and professional roles, largely in the clinical area. During clinical accompaniment and reflective discussions with a group of undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing students in South Africa, students reported negative professional socialisation experiences, primarily in the clinical area. Such experiences could influence the quality of patient care. The objective of this study was to develop and valida...

  7. The perceptions of professional nurses on student mentorship in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chokwe M. Setati

    Department of Health Studies, University of South Africa, Theo Van Wyk ... The purpose of the study was to explore the perceptions of professional nurses on ... development of the protégé' by providing information, assis- ..... opportunities.

  8. Counterbalancing work-related stress? Work engagement among intensive care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mol, Margo M C; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Bakker, Jan; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Kompanje, Erwin J O

    2018-07-01

    Working in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is increasingly complex and is also physically, cognitively and emotionally demanding. Although the negative emotions of work-related stress have been well studied, the opposite perspective of work engagement might also provide valuable insight into how these emotional demands may be countered. This study focused on the work engagement of ICU professionals and explored the complex relationship between work engagement, job demands and advantageous personal resources. This was a cross-sectional survey study among ICU professionals in a single-centre university hospital. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, which included items about opinions related to the respondent's work environment. Additionally, 14 items based on the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy were included to measure empathic ability. A digital link to the questionnaire was sent in October 2015 to a population of 262 ICU nurses and 53 intensivists. The overall response rate was 61% (n=193). Work engagement was negatively related both to cognitive demands among intensivists and to emotional demands among ICU nurses. No significant relationship was found between work engagement and empathic ability; however, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability were highly correlated with work engagement. Only the number of hours worked per week remained as a confounding factor, with a negative effect of workload on work engagement after controlling for the effect of weekly working hours. Work engagement counterbalances work-related stress reactions. The relatively high workload in ICUs, coupled with an especially heavy emotional burden, may be acknowledged as an integral part of ICU work. This workload does not affect the level of work engagement, which was high for both intensivists and nurses despite the known high job demands. Specific factors that contribute to a healthy and successful work life among ICU professionals need

  9. Adoption of innovations by specialised nurses: personal, work and organisational characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, M.J.A. van der; Smits, J.P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To gain insight in the factors that influence the adoption of professional information by specialised nurses, we studied the effects of individual, work and organisational characteristics on the extent to which continence nurses gained knowledge and made use of a book on nursing

  10. Working time intervals and total work time on nursing positions in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Kunecka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the last few years a topic of overwork on nursing posts has given rise to strong discussions. The author has set herself a goal of answering the question if it is a result of real overwork of this particular profession or rather commonly assumed frustration of this professional group. The aim of this paper is to conduct the analysis of working time on chosen nursing positions in relation to measures of time being used as intervals in the course of conducting standard professional activities during one working day. Material and Methods: Research material consisted of documentation of work time on chosen nursing workplaces, compiled between 2007–2012 within the framework of a nursing course at the Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin. As a method of measurement a photograph of a working day has been used. Measurements were performed in institutions located in 6 voivodeships in Poland. Results: Results suggest that only 6.5% of total of surveyed representatives of nurse profession spends proper amount of time (meaning: a time set by the applicable standards on work intervals during a working day. Conclusions: The scale of the phenomenon indicates excessive workload for nursing positions, which along with a longer period of time, longer working hours may cause decrease in efficiency of work and cause a drop in quality of provided services. Med Pr 2015;66,(2:165–172

  11. Five generations in the nursing workforce: implications for nursing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Positive patient outcomes require effective teamwork, communication, and technological literacy. These skills vary among the unprecedented five generations in the nursing workforce, spanning the "Silent Generation" nurses deferring retirement to the newest "iGeneration." Nursing professional development educators must understand generational differences; address communication, information technology, and team-building competencies across generations; and promote integration of learner-centered strategies into professional development activities.

  12. Association between work ability and fatigue in Brazilian nursing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fabio José; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Ratier, Ana Paula Pelegrini

    2015-01-01

    Impaired work ability is associated with work-related illnesses, early retirement and rising pension costs. To investigate the association between work ability and fatigue in nursing workers. Cross-sectional study conducted with 100 nursing workers from two inpatient units at a public teaching hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The data were collected by means of a socio-demographic profile questionnaire, Work Ability Index (WAI) and Chalder Fatigue Scale. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive and analytical statistical methods, tests of association and multiple linear regression. The study population was mainly composed of women (88% ), exhibited a high educational level (76% ), average age 39.4 years old (SD = 9.5) and 15 years of professional experience, on average. The average score on WAI was good (39.4 points, SD = 6.0) but surprisingly, 35% of the participants exhibited moderate to poor work ability. Fatigue was found in 52% of the participants. The score on WAI decreased in association with fatigue (p work in the same workplace (p = 0.001), as well as among nursing technicians compared to nurses (p = 0.040). Fatigue, longer length of work in the same workplace and work category nursing technician were associated with decreased work ability, which emphasizes the need for investment in health and quality of work life.

  13. "To be a nurse": a professional choice and the construction of identity processes in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodosio, Sheila Saint-Clair; Padilha, Maria Itayra

    2016-06-01

    to analyze the factors that influenced the choice for nursing made by graduates from the first class of the Undergraduate Nursing and Obstetrics Course of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte in the 1970s and to understand the senses and meanings of being a nurse when choosing this profession. a qualitative socio-historical study was performed, using oral history to collect data. the analysis generated the following categories: "To be a nurse: a professional choice" and "The ideal of being a nurse: senses and meanings". The senses of "being a nurse" are associated with graduates' perspective of this profession and the meanings included the traditional conceptions that have historically affected it. professional choice was influenced by family and work expectations and the nursing course had an effect on the construction of nurses' professional identity.

  14. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Work process of nursing professors 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Giordano, Denisse; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the work process of nursing professors. Method: descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, developed with a focus on critical epidemiology, carried out at a School of Nursing in Chile. The research subjects consist of 17 nursing professors, with whom individual semi-structured interviews were carried out and nine participated in a focus group. The Ethics Committee approved this study. Results: 88.2% were female, mean age of 42 years, 47% were married, 94% were Chilean, average length of service in the institution of 2.8 years, and 23.5% had a master’s degree. Regarding the work process, the students were the work object, the tools used were the knowledge and the experience as a nurse, and the work environment was considered good. Regarding the form of work organization, 76% have a 44-hour workweek, the wage was considered inadequate and the workload was higher than foreseen in the contract. The dialectic of the nursing work process is evidenced, demonstrating the contradiction between the low wages and labor overload and the narratives reporting a good work environment, personal fulfillment and transcendence that goes far beyond work. Conclusions: the work process allows describing the work components of the nursing professors, which are consistent with the results of the literature and show the dialectic of the nursing work process. PMID:29211193

  16. The facilitation of professional values amongst student nurses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to formulate guidelines to facilitate the internalisation of professional values in student nurses in order to enable them to become caring registered nurses. To realise this goal, the researcher followed a quantitative, qualitative, descriptive, exploratory and contextual approach. In Phase One of ...

  17. Indian nurses in Italy: a qualitative study of their professional and social integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievano, Alessandro; Olsen, Douglas; Tolentino Diaz, Ymelda; Sabatino, Laura; Rocco, Gennaro

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the lived subjective experiences of immigrant Indian nurses in Italy and specifically their professional and social integration. To study the worldwide, nursing flux is a health priority in the globalised world. The growth in migration trends among nurses, not only from Philippines or India, has proliferated in recent years. The research on nurses' mobility for Southern European countries is underexplored, and in Italy, the out-migration flows of Indian nurses were never analysed. Qualitative methodological approach. Semi-structured interviews (n = 20) were completed with Indian clinical nurses working in Italy for more than one year mainly in private organisations. A purposive sampling technique was used for recruitment. The data were then content-analysed using an inductive method. The findings were categorised into four themes: (1) aspects of professional integration and working experience, (2) intra- and interprofessional relationships and perceptions of the IPASVI Regulatory Nursing Board, (3) initial nursing education and continuous professional development and (4) perceptions of social integration. The results show that for Indian nurses in Italy emigration is important to gain opportunities to expand economic and social privileges as well as escape from historical assumptions of stigma associated with nursing work, especially for women. However, these conclusions have to be seen in wider socio-cultural complexities that are at the basis of transnational fluxes (Prescott & Nichter ). The research offers an insight into the complicated reasons for Indian nurses out-migration to Italy. Without comprehending the interwoven textures of the political and social relations that are continually constructed and re-constructed among different nations, it is difficult to understand nurses out-migration and consequently have a better and safer collaborative teamwork in the host countries. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Correlation between self-differentiation and professional adaptability among undergraduate nursing students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-wei Liu

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The level of self-differentiation of undergraduate nursing studentsaffects their professional adaptability. Nursing educators should consider the characteristics of self-differentiation of undergraduate nursing students in developing measures to improve their professional adaptability.

  19. Community nurses working in piloted primary care teams: Irish Republic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Triona

    2010-08-01

    Primary care health services in the Irish Republic have undergone fundamental transformation with the establishment of multidisciplinary primary care teams nationwide. Primary care teams provide a community-based health service delivered through a range of health professionals in an integrated way. As part of this initiative ten pilot teams were established in 2003. This research was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of nurse\\'s experiences of working in a piloted primary care team. The methodology used was a focus group approach. The findings from this study illustrated how community nurse\\'s roles and responsibilities have expanded within the team. The findings also highlighted the benefits and challenges of working as a team with various other community-based health-care disciplines.

  20. A new contribution to the classification of stressors affecting nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cremades Puerto

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify and classify the most important occupational stressors affecting nursing professionals in the medical units within a hospital. Method: quantitative-qualitative, descriptive and prospective study performed with Delphi technique in the medical units of a general university hospital, with a sample of 30 nursing professionals. Results: the stressors were work overload, frequent interruptions in the accomplishment of their tasks, night working, simultaneity of performing different tasks, not having enough time to give emotional support to the patient or lack of time for some patients who need it, among others. Conclusion: the most consensual stressors were ranked as work overload, frequent interruptions in the accomplishment of their tasks, night working and, finally, simultaneity of performing different tasks. These results can be used as a tool in the clinical management of hospital units, aiming to improve the quality of life of nursing professionals, organizational models and, in addition, continuous improvement in clinical treatment.

  1. Shift work a reality in life and health nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Mercedes Gago López

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The need to provide care 24 hours of the day, 365 days of the year, means for nurses, compulsory work in a system of rotating shifts, including the realization of nights. This system has repercussions on the life, health and well-being of nurses.In order to identify evidence on the relationship between the work to shift and/or night the health and well-being of nurses and develop recommendations to improve the adaptation to the system of rotating shifts and/or night, have carried out a review of the literature.After detailed analysis of the literature, we can conclude that the quality of the care provided is in direct relation to the health and well-being of the nursing professional. Implement measures to reduce the physical, psychic, social and family wear must be priority, being necessary to educate professionals, families, society and business. Among the recommendations highlight, those directed to the company; set realistic goals, to reduce workloads in the night shift adapting them to the actual number of nurses, flexible schedules and recommendations addressed to the professional related: diet, sleep, exercise, family life and social hygiene. The implementation of these measures will mean: increase satisfaction, reduce absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce the number of errors and decrease spending.

  2. Professional nursing in Iran: an overview of its historical and sociocultural framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Lipson, Juliene G; Emami, Azita

    2004-01-01

    Nursing in Iran has progressed from the apprenticeship style of nurse training to the higher education sector, with the baccalaureate degree required for registered nurses. Despite these many changes since the Islamic Revolution, nursing is still striving for acceptance and recognition as a profession. This article describes how nursing is conceptualized and practiced in Iran and provides insight into underlying sociocultural forces that have affected the profession in recent years. Nursing education and research, the current status of nursing in the health care system, and the public image of nursing are described based on combining information from several sources: clinical experience, academic experience, and selected qualitative research findings on Iranian nurses' experiences and perceptions of their work. Because knowledge of modern Iranian nursing was inaccessible in English until very recently, this description adds to the literature on the nursing profession cross-nationally. It shows that in Iran, as in other West and East Asian countries, the image of nurses has not changed despite advances in nursing practice, education, and research, necessitating professional socialization and policy changes.

  3. Stories appreciating both sides of the generation gap: baby boomer and Generation X nurses working together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheimer, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    With nurses from the baby boomer and Generation X providing the majority of bedside nursing care, multigenerational differences are present in the workplace. The key to improved job satisfaction is the development of understanding and talking through differences between nurses of these age groups. From the perspective of a Generation X nurse, this paper addresses the differences in work ethic and values between these age groups and shows how such differences affect satisfaction with professional nursing. Improved job fulfillment can increase nursing retention and lessen the effects of the nursing shortage.

  4. Quality of work life: experiences of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl; Vanaki, Zohreh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of Iranian nurses concerning their quality of work life. A purposive sample of nurses (n = 14) was recruited from two university hospitals. The data were collected through unstructured interviews and were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The results indicated that the participants discerned their quality of work life by assessing how favorable were their working conditions, the level of fulfilment of their personal needs, and the impact of their working conditions on their private life and their social life. Three main themes were identified: quality of work life, as experienced from a personal perspective; quality of work life, as experienced from a sociocultural perspective; and quality of work life, as experienced from an organizational-professional perspective. The results of the present study will help Iranian nurse administrators to adopt effective strategies in order to improve nurses' quality of work life. Future research can broaden the scope of the current results and offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' quality of work life. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Work motivation of nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Suominen, Tarja

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this review is to describe nurses' work motivation from the perspective of staff nurses. This information would be useful for the development of motivation strategies and further research into nurses' work motivation. A thorough review of the research literature. The literature search was performed using four databases: CINAHL, PubMed, PsychINFO, and SocINDEX. Only studies that met the following criteria were selected for review: (1) were published between 1990 and 2009, (2) were written in English, (3) dealt with work motivation, (4) concerned working staff nurses, (5) involved empirical research, (6) clearly and explicitly provided the research results about the factors affecting nurses' work motivation. Altogether 24 studies met these criteria and were included in this review. Inductive content analysis was carried out to analyse and categorise the data. Nursing research has neither clear understanding nor consensus about the concept of work motivation; nor has a universal definition been adopted. Despite limited empirical evidence it may be concluded that staff nurses appear to be motivated. Five categories of factors affecting their work motivation were identified: (1) work-place characteristics, (2) working conditions, (3) personal characteristics, (4) individual priorities, and (5) internal psychological states. Further research is needed to gain a more comprehensive insight into nurses' work motivation and the factors affecting it. This can be achieved by defining the concept of work motivation as precisely as possible, working out a pertinent research methodology, and subsequently developing and testing a theoretical model of nurses' work motivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hospital nurses' work environment, quality of care provided and career plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinno, S; Partanen, P; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, K

    2011-06-01

    In several European countries, the availability of qualified nurses is insufficient to meet current healthcare requirements. Nurses are highly dissatisfied with the rising demands of the healthcare environment and increasingly considering leaving their jobs. The study aims to investigate the relationships between the characteristics of hospital nurses' work environment and the quality of care provided, and furthermore to examine Dutch nurses' career plans. A cross-sectional, questionnaire survey of registered nurses (n = 334) working in the academic and district hospitals was conducted in 2005/2006. Previously validated questionnaires translated into the participants' language were used. Factor and regression analysis were used for data analysis. Overall, nurses rated their work environment rather favourably. Five work environment characteristics were identified: support for professional development, adequate staffing, nursing competence, supportive management and teamwork. Significant relationships were found between nurses' perceptions of their work environment characteristics and quality of care provided and nurses' career plans. When work environment characteristics were evaluated to be better, nurse-assessed quality of care also increased and intentions to leave current job decreased linearly. Study findings suggest that nurses' perceptions of their work environment are important for nurse outcomes in hospital settings. Further research is needed to explore the predictive ability of the work environment for nurse, patient and organizational outcomes in hospitals. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Iranian Physicians' Perspectives Regarding Nurse-Physician Professional Communication: Implications for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilpour-Bandboni, Mohammad; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Salsali, Mahvash; Snelgrove, Sherrill; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2017-08-01

    Nurse-physician professional communication affects the effectiveness and performance of the health care team and the quality of care delivered to the patient. This study aimed to explore the perspectives and experiences of physicians on nurse-physician professional communication in an urban area of Iran. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 physicians selected using a purposive sampling method. Physicians from different medical specialties were chosen from 4 teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. The data were analyzed with content analysis and themes developed. Three themes developed during data analysis: "seeking the formal methods of communication to ensure patient care," "nurses' professional attributes for professional communication," and "patients' health conditions as the mediators of professional communication." Nurses need to be informed of the perspectives and experiences of physicians on professional communication. Our findings can improve nurses' understandings of professional communication that could inform the development of educational and training programs for nurses and physicians. There is a need to incorporate communication courses during degree education and design interprofessional training regarding communication in clinical settings to improve teamwork and patient care. Open discussions between nurses and physicians, training sessions about how to improve their knowledge about barriers to and facilitators of effective professional communication, and key terms and phrases commonly used in patient care are suggested.

  8. Meaning of work in nursing professionals at the general hospital Significado del trabajo de los profesionales de enfermería en el hospital general Significado do trabalho dos profissionais de enfermagem no hospital geral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTOS ALVES MARIA DALVA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: analyze how nursing professionals express their feelings and reactions at work.

    Methods: descriptive study of qualitative approach. The research was conducted from July to September 2008 in a public hospital located at the city of Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil. 22 nursing professional, 10 nurses and 12 technicians, participated in the study. The study was approved by the institution’s Ethics Research Committee. Data collection was made using semi-structured scripts in face-to-face interviews.

    Results: answers were categorized as follows: meaning of work at the recovery room and post-operatory therapy unit; factors that affect the physical and psychical health of nursing professional, and factors that affect professional performance.

    Discussion: day-to-day work at intensive care units was assessed as stressful but highly pleasant. Physical suffering, as an expression of workload, became evident as corporal pains. The workplace factors affecting professional performance were the following: lack of materials, noise of equipment and ergonomic factors.

    Conclusions: Working, at intensive care units, raises a debate that is everything but new, however, it is a warning for the implementation of stress defensive strategies. The study allowed for creating spaces to embrace and listen to nursing professionals with a view to reduce the physical and psychical suffering at work.

    Objetivo: analizar como los profesionales de enfermería expresan sus sentimientos y reacciones en el trabajo.

    Métodos: estudio descriptivo de enfoque cualitativo. Se realizó en el período comprendido entre julio y septiembre de 2008 en un hospital público en la ciudad de Fortaleza, Ceará (Brasil. Los

  9. Analysis of the moral habitability of the nursing work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Elizabeth H; Macfarlane, Amy V; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda L

    2004-08-01

    Following health reform, nurses have experienced the tremendous stress of heavy workloads, long hours and difficult professional responsibilities. In recognition of these problems, a study was conducted that examined the impact of the working environment on the health of nurses. After conducting focus groups across Canada with nurses and others well acquainted with nursing issues, it became clear that the difficult work environments described had significant ethical implications. The aim of this paper is to report the findings of research that examined the moral habitability of the nursing working environment. A secondary analysis was conducted using the theoretical work of Margaret Urban Walker. Moral practices and responsibilities from Walker's perspective cannot be extricated from other social roles, practices and divisions of labour. Moral-social orders, such as work environments in this research, must be made transparent to examine their moral habitability. Morally habitable environments are those in which differently situated people experience their responsibilities as intelligible and coherent. They also foster recognition, cooperation and shared benefits. Four overarching categories were developed through the analysis of the data: (1) oppressive work environments; (2) incoherent moral understandings; (3) moral suffering and (4) moral influence and resistance. The findings clearly indicate that participants perceived the work environment to be morally uninhabitable. The social and spatial positioning of nurses left them vulnerable to being overburdened by and unsure of their responsibilities. Nevertheless, nurses found meaningful ways to resist and to influence the moral environment. We recommend that nurses develop strong moral identities, make visible the inseparability of their proximity to patients and moral accountability, and further identify what forms of collective action are most effective in improving the moral habitability of their work

  10. Knowledge management, health information technology and nurses' work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Paul H J; Ligthart, Paul E M; Schouteten, Roel L J

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge management (KM) extends the health information technology (HIT) literature by addressing its impact on creating knowledge by sharing and using the knowledge of health care professionals in hospitals. The aim of the study was to provide insight into how HIT affects nurses' explicit and tacit knowledge of their ongoing work processes and work engagement. Data were collected from 74 nurses in four wards of a Dutch hospital via a paper-and-pencil survey using validated measurement instruments. In a quasiexperimental research design, HIT was introduced in the two experimental wards in contrast to the two control wards. At the time of the HIT introduction, a pretest was administered in all four wards and was followed by a posttest after 3 months. Data were analyzed via partial least squares modeling. Generally, nurses' tacit knowledge (i.e., their insight into and their capacity to make sense of the work processes) appears to be a significant and strong predictor of their work engagement. In contrast, nurses' explicit knowledge (i.e., information feedback about patients and tasks) only indirectly affects work engagement via its effect on tacit knowledge. Its effect on work engagement therefore depends on the mediating role of tacit knowledge. Interestingly, introducing HIT significantly affects only nurses' explicit knowledge, not their tacit knowledge or work engagement. Nurses' tacit and explicit knowledge needs to be systematically distinguished when implementing HIT/KM programs to increase work engagement in the workplace. Tacit knowledge (insight into work processes) appears to be pivotal, whereas efforts aimed only at improving available information will not lead to a higher level of work engagement in nurses' work environments.

  11. The Professional Doctorate in Nursing: A Position Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Margaret A.

    1975-01-01

    The need for family-centered health care could be met by nurses now if they had a professional doctorate and the recognition and authority that go with it. The author distinguishes between an academic doctorate (Preparation for scholars) and a professional doctorate (a practice degree). (Author/BP)

  12. Professional development needs of nurse educators. An Australian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprescu, Florin; McAllister, Margaret; Duncan, David; Jones, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Because there is a global shortage of nurse educators, highly productive and committed nurse educators are needed to supply a rapidly expanding and changing health landscape. To support the aforementioned effort professional development needs of nurse educators must be systematically identified. This study explores practical issues around professional development needs of nurse educators. One hundred and thirty eight Australian nurse educators based in Queensland answered an online survey around professional development needs. Results indicate that 83% (n = 115) of the respondents were enthusiastic about nurse education yet only 45% (n = 62) were confident in their skills and less than 10% (n = 13) saw themselves as expert nurse educators. The most desired areas of future development in teaching were information technology skills, assessment and technical knowledge. There seems to be a shared need for developing global online and offline support resources and communities of practice to support nurse educators in their teaching and research endeavours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Evolution of Professional Nursing Culture in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Gennaro; Affonso, Dyanne D.; Mayberry, Linda J.; Stievano, Alessandro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Sabatino, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We explored the perceptions of Italian nurses regarding their developing culture as a health profession. We sought to understand the ongoing evolution of the nursing profession and the changes that were central to it becoming an intellectual discipline on par with the other health professions in Italy. In 2010, the Regulatory Board of Nursing established a center of excellence to build evidence-based practice, advocate for interdisciplinary health care, and champion health profession reforms for nursing. In this study, focus groups—involving 66 nurse participants from various educational, clinical, and administrative backgrounds—were utilized to better ascertain how the profession has changed. Six themes, three of them metaphors—“vortex,” “leopard spots,” and “deductive jungle”—explain nurses’ experiences of professional change in Italy between 2001 and 2011 and the multiple dimensions that characterize their professional identity and autonomy. PMID:28462290

  14. The Evolution of Professional Nursing Culture in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Rocco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the perceptions of Italian nurses regarding their developing culture as a health profession. We sought to understand the ongoing evolution of the nursing profession and the changes that were central to it becoming an intellectual discipline on par with the other health professions in Italy. In 2010, the Regulatory Board of Nursing established a center of excellence to build evidence-based practice, advocate for interdisciplinary health care, and champion health profession reforms for nursing. In this study, focus groups—involving 66 nurse participants from various educational, clinical, and administrative backgrounds—were utilized to better ascertain how the profession has changed. Six themes, three of them metaphors—“vortex,” “leopard spots,” and “deductive jungle”—explain nurses’ experiences of professional change in Italy between 2001 and 2011 and the multiple dimensions that characterize their professional identity and autonomy.

  15. An exploration of role model influence on adult nursing students' professional development: A phenomenological research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felstead, Ian S; Springett, Kate

    2016-02-01

    Patients' expectations of being cared for by a nurse who is caring, competent, and professional are particularly pertinent in current health and social care practice. The current drive for NHS values-based recruitment serves to strengthen this. How nursing students' development of professionalism is shaped is not fully known, though it is acknowledged that their practice experience strongly shapes behaviour. This study (in 2013-14) explored twelve adult nursing students' lived experiences of role modelling through an interpretive phenomenological analysis approach, aiming to understand the impact on their development as professional practitioners. Clinical nurses influenced student development consistently. Some students reported that their experiences allowed them to learn how not to behave in practice; a productive learning experience despite content. Students also felt senior staff influence on their development to be strong, citing 'leading by example.' The impact of patients on student professional development was also a key finding. Through analysing information gained, identifying and educating practice-based mentors who are ready, willing, and able to role model professional attributes appear crucial to developing professionalism in nursing students. Those involved in nurse education, whether service providers or universities, may wish to acknowledge the influence of clinical nurse behaviour observed by students both independent of and in direct relation to care delivery and the impact on student nurse professional development. A corollary relates to how students should be guided and briefed/debriefed to work with a staff to ensure their exposure to a variety of practice behaviours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TOLERANCE AS A PROFESSIONALIZATION FACTOR OF NURSES IN PSYCHIATRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vyacheslavovna Klimentova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nurses in psychiatric service are a special group of nursing professionals. Their individualization is due to the specific needs of their patients who have increased level of aggressiveness, behavioral and communicative deviations and problems in self-service. These patients’ quality factors increase the risks of medical staff intolerance. As mechanisms of intolerance decrease some specific mechanisms of tolerance are developed in professional nursing practices. These include specific corporative standards, religious practices and forms of group action.Staff members can approve, ignore or condemn intolerance towards patients, the regulatory basis for this position at the level of subcultural organizational standards meaning the application of moral sanctions to an offender. Active inclusion of religious affiliations in the life of psychiatric healthcare institutions allows external moral arbitrator to enter professional space influencing both the behavior of professionals and the system of moral standards. Specificity of nursing profession in psychiatry requires additional means of inprofessionalization and professional improvement which are spontaneous practices of mentoring (guidance in psychiatric hospital. All the mechanisms of tolerance increase hold professional community of nurses in psychiatry together.

  17. Nurse burnout and the working environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Nuria

    2011-09-01

    This article examines levels of burnout experienced by emergency nurses and the characteristics of their work environment to determine if there is a relationship between the two. A literature review of recent articles on emergency nurses' burnout and contributing factors was undertaken. A quantitative study, in which nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with a series of statements on burnout and the working environment, was then undertaken, and the results were analysed to ascertain the extent to which the two topic are related. The results indicate that 52 per cent of nurses in an emergency department in Ireland experience high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, which are significantly related to the nature of their work environment. Improvements to the environment and to education are required to reduce the risk of nurses developing burnout in the future.

  18. Work ability in nursing: relationship with psychological demands and control over the work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Andrea; Magnago, Tânia Solange Bosi de Souza; Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Lima, Suzinara Beatriz Soares de; Greco, Patrícia Bitencourt Toscani

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate the association between psychological demands, control over the work and the reduction of work ability of nursing professionals. this cross-sectional study involved 498 nursing professionals of a university hospital in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data collection was carried out in 2009 using the Brazilian versions of the Work Ability Index and Job Stress Scale, with logistic regression models used for the data analysis. the prevalence of 43.3% for reduced work ability and 29.7% for high-strain in the job (high psychological demand and low control) were observed. The chances for professionals presenting reduced work ability under high-strain were higher and significant when compared to those classified as being under low-strain, even after adjusting for potential confounders, except for age and gender. a high prevalence of reduced work ability was observed. This evidence indicates the need for investigation and detailed analysis of the psychosocial aspects of the professionals with regard to the health/disease process of nursing professionals.

  19. Impact of states' nurse work hour regulations on overtime practices and work hours among registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Yoon, Jangho

    2014-10-01

    To examine the degree to which states' work hour regulations for nurses-policies regarding mandatory overtime and consecutive work hours-decrease mandatory overtime practice and hours of work among registered nurses. We analyzed a nationally representative sample of registered nurses from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses for years 2004 and 2008. We obtained difference-in-differences estimates of the effect of the nurse work hour policies on the likelihood of working mandatory overtime, working more than 40 hours per week, and working more than 60 hours per week for all staff nurses working in hospitals and nursing homes. The mandatory overtime and consecutive work hour regulations were significantly associated with 3.9 percentage-point decreases in the likelihood of working overtime mandatorily and 11.5 percentage-point decreases in the likelihood of working more than 40 hours per week, respectively. State mandatory overtime and consecutive work hour policies are effective in reducing nurse work hours. The consecutive work hour policy appears to be a better regulatory tool for reducing long work hours for nurses. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  20. Healthcare professionals' work engagement in Finnish university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepistö, Sari; Alanen, Seija; Aalto, Pirjo; Järvinen, Päivi; Leino, Kaija; Mattila, Elina; Kaunonen, Marja

    2017-10-10

    Concerns about the sufficiency and dedication of the healthcare workforce have arisen as the baby boomer generation is retiring and the generation Y might have different working environment demands. To describe the association between work engagement of healthcare professionals' and its background factors at five Finnish university hospitals. Survey data were collected from nurses, physicians and administrative staff (n = 561) at all five university hospitals in Finland. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire that comprised the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (9 items) and 13 questions regarding the respondents' backgrounds. Descriptive and correlational analyses were used to examine the data. Most respondents were female (85%) and nursing staff (72%). Baby boomers (49%) were the largest generational cohort. The work engagement composite mean for the total sample was 5.0, indicating high work engagement. Significant differences in work engagement existed only among sex and age groups. The highest work engagement scores were among administrative staff. Work engagement among healthcare professionals in Finnish university hospitals is high. High work engagement might be explained by suitable job resources and challenges, as well as opportunities provided by a frontline care environment. Attention should especially be paid to meeting the needs of young people entering the workforce to strengthen their dedication and absorption. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. The professionalization of Brazilian nursing in the written media of the end of the nineteenth century: a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Tiago Braga do Espírito; Oguisso, Taka; da Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa

    2011-01-01

    The object is the relationship between the professionalization of Brazilian nursing and women, in the broadcasting of news about the creation of the Professional School of Nurses, in the light of gender. to discuss the linkage of women to the beginning of the professionalization of Brazilian nursing following the circumstances and evidence of the creation of the Professional School of Nurses analyzed from the perspective of gender. The news articles were analyzed from the viewpoint of Cultural History, founded in the gender concept of Joan Scott and in the History of Women. The creation of the School and the priority given in the media to women consolidate the vocational ideal of the woman for nursing in a profession subjugated to the physician but also representing the conquest of a space in the world of education and work, reconfiguring the social position of nursing and of woman in Brazil.

  2. Boundaries of Professionalization at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg Jensen, Maya Christiane

    work in the west tend to privilege some workers (i.e., white, white-collar, heterosexual males) and marginalize others, especially female workers who perform “dirty”, private household services for the aging or disabled, such as home care workers. Following these studies I take a critical stance...

  3. [Quality of professional life and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodarte-Cuevas, Lilia; Araujo-Espino, Roxana; Trejo-Ortiz, Perla María; González-Tovar, José

    To characterize the conditions of quality of working life, the presence of muscle- skeletal disorders and the association between these variables in nursing staff of a public hospital in Zacatecas, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with descriptive-correlational scope was designed. A stratified random sampling per shift was used in 107 cases. The Questionnaire Professional Quality of Life (CVP-35) was applied as well as the Nordic Questionnaire Standardized for musculoskeletal pain and work-related risk factors questionnaire. The quality of working life gained an average of 55.62 (SD=13.57), the intrinsic motivation was the best rated component with (M=75.06, SD=18.44), contrary to managerial support that got the lowest scores with (M=43.74, SD=21.71). The presence of risk factors in the development work of musculoskeletal problems obtained a mean of 50.10 (SD=26.69). The main musculoskeletal disorders occurred in the neck region, lumbar spine and knees with 42.1% for each one. The quality of working life decreased in the presence of muscle-skeletal problems in the lumbar region with (-0.188, p≤.050), dorsal (-0.206, p≤.050), neck (-0.175, p≤.050) and knees (-0.220, p≤.010). It is necessary to improve the working conditions of nurses to reduce the presence of musculoskeletal problems and improve their quality of working life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Advancing Work Practices Through Online Professional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    The natural expectation for professional development courses is that they will improve a participant’s work performance, but do they? This PhD research challenges several assumptions underlying the design of online professional development courses, revealing that it is after such interventions...... was not effective and subsequently terminate change that could have advanced their practices. This underlines the need to think beyond the course format to make online professional development interventions continuous, committing, and contextual. The research suggests rethinking online professional development...... as adaptive “just-in-time” technologies and proposes a design theory called “situated online professional development,” entailing six design principles for advancing work practices....

  5. Nursing's orphans: how the system of nursing education in Australia is undermining professional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Wendy; McAllister, Margaret; Godden, Judith; Greenhill, Jennene; Reed, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws on the results of a national study of approaches to teaching nursing's history in Australia. We argue that the neglect of history learning within undergraduate nursing and midwifery education is undermining the development in students of a strong professional nursing identity. The data in our study shows that instead of proud, informed professionals, we are at risk of producing a generation of professional orphans -- unaware of who they are and where they've come from, unaware of reasons underlying cultural practices within the profession, lacking in vision for the future, insecure about their capacity to contribute to future directions, and not feeling part of something bigger and more enduring.

  6. Nurses' work role in the context of gender and Chinese culture: an online forum study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi

    2010-06-01

    Nurses in Taiwan are seen as "angels in white." This image conveys that nurses are caring, kind, patient, and full of love. Another popular image of nurses is that of a candle, which implies that nurses bring light to others by sacrificing their "self." These images also reflect accurately the traditional role of women in the Chinese patriarchal society. Hence, gender and culture effects on nurses' perceptions of their work role cannot be ignored. The purpose of this article was to explore nurses' perceptions of their work role on the basis of the perspectives of Chinese gender role and culture. This study was conducted using a Web-based online forum for 4 weeks. Twenty nurses completed discussions of questions in four topic areas. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. Three themes were identified: (a) gendered work, (b) low social status, and (c) tensions among nurses. Findings indicate that certain stereotypes regarding gender roles in Taiwanese society constrained the professional growth of nurses and nursing. The social status of nurses was found to be relatively low, and nurses were at a relatively high risk of developing powerless behaviors. Nursing leaders and administrators should understand the impact of gender and Chinese culture on nursing and pay attention to the situation of nurses to provide more gender-sensitive and positive work environments for nurses.

  7. Factors Affecting Professional Autonomy of Japanese Nurses Caring for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Patients in a Hospital Setting in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Noriko; Fukuda, Hiromi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to analyze the professional autonomy of Japanese nurses when caring for non-Japanese patients and to identify its contributing factors. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Participants included 238 clinical nurses working at 27 hospitals in Japan. The Intercultural Sensitivity Scale (Chen and Starosta), and the Scale for Professional Autonomy in Nursing (Kikuchi and Harada) were used to measure intercultural sensitivity and professional autonomy. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to identify the most significant factors affecting professional autonomy. Professional autonomy of Japanese nurses caring for non-Japanese patients was significantly lower than when caring for Japanese patients (142.84 vs. 172.85; p autonomy of Japanese nurses by promoting intercultural sensitivity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Personal and professional challenges of nurse prescribing in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrien, Barry

    This article presents the challenges regarding the development of a collaborative practice agreement in order to undertake nurse prescribing in an emergency department in a large teaching hospital. Nurse prescribing has been introduced quite recently in Ireland. Although there is a plethora of knowledge regarding the topic, there are many personal and professional challenges in relation to this emerging role. The nurse prescribing initiative in Ireland is continually developing and many nurses now have the authority to prescribe from almost the same range of medicines as doctors. Prescribing has the potential to improve job satisfaction, autonomy and ultimately improves patient outcomes. However, nurses need to be cognisant of the impact it can have on the dynamics of the healthcare team. An analysis of some complexities of nurse prescribing is given, in conjunction with reflective thoughts on a clinical incident in the area of morphine prescribing.

  9. Doing more with less in nursing work: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, C

    1999-09-01

    The paper explores the literature on changes in nursing work. It examines the suggestion that changes in work practices are management responses to cost cutting imperatives. Nursing labour force issues such as staffing roles and staffing mix, the push for flexibility in the workforce and casualisation are discussed. The paper concludes that given the rise of casual work in the general Australian workforce, research needs to be conducted on the extent of casualisation of nursing, and the implications this may have for nursing practice, professional development and on the nursing labour market.

  10. The evolving professional nursing self-image of students in baccalaureate programs: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisen, Koen; De Busser, Tinne; Kayaert, Annelore; Abraham, Ivo; de Casterlé, Bernadette Dierckx

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the professional self-image of practicing nurses in Belgium and its association with various professional decisions, however there is limited knowledge about the professional self-image of nurses-to-be. Despite prior research on nursing students' perceptions of nursing or their self-esteem, students' professional image, defined as "the way students perceive themselves in their clinical practice environment and their anticipated work environment", has not been described nor compared to that of practicing nurses. To describe the professional nursing self-image among students in their final year of baccalaureate education. Cross-sectional survey. Nine geographically spread baccalaureate programs in the Flemish region of Belgium. 427 evaluable students from 455 recruited from 663 potential. Data collected in each school during regular hours using an adapted version of the BELIMAGE (Belgian professional self-image instrument for hospital nurses) including questions on personal demographics, education and competence, nursing care, team and practice environment. Voluntary participation with returned questionnaire deemed informed consent. Respondents identified several curricular components as contributing to their perceived competence. They also identified several skills deemed important to professional nursing, however did not feel competent in all of these. Important nursing care aspects included individualizing patient care, detecting care problems and potential complications, and promoting patient well-being; within a care environment with open interdisciplinary communication, where care problems could be discussed with nursing colleagues, where one cares for the same patient regularly, and led by a team leader with vision. Society's view of nursing was generally more negative than students'. Most students planned on working in nursing after their studies and many had thought about additional education at some point. Most were proud of

  11. Professional autonomy in 21st century healthcare: Nurses' accounts of clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Autonomy in decision-making has traditionally been described as a feature of professional work, however the work of healthcare professionals has been seen as steadily encroached upon by State and managerialist forces. Nursing has faced particular problems in establishing itself as a credible....... The study uses accounts of decision-making to gain insight into contemporary professional nursing. The study also aims to explore the usefulness of a theory of professional work set out by Jamous and Peloille (1970). The analysis draws on notions of interpretive repertoires and elements of narrative...... analysis. We identified two interpretive repertoires: 'clinical judgement' which was used to describe the different grounds for making judgements; and 'decision-making' which was used to describe organisational circumstances influencing decision-making. Jamous and Peloille's theory proved useful...

  12. Nursing work environment in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the work environment as perceived by nurses in a large tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia. The quality of patient care services has been associated with the quality of work environment of nurses. It is therefore important to assess the work environment in order to acquire baseline data and enable the institution to benchmark their status from established quality standards. This study used a descriptive survey with 1007 staff nurses across service units of a 1000-bed government-operated hospital. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Healthy Work Environment Assessment Questionnaire was used for data collection. Scores were aggregated and interpreted. Effective decision making, authentic leadership, appropriate staffing, true collaboration, skilled communication and meaningful recognition were rated as good (mean range 3.53-3.76). Healthy work environments mutually benefit patients, nurses, nurse managers, health care providers, the health team, administration, the institution and the community at large. Valuable baseline data on the status of the work environment in this setting were generated. This should allow administrators and staff to work together in improving weaknesses and strengthening further whatever gains that are attained to ensure consistent provision of safe and quality patient care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Different Kinds of Overview in Nurses' information work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle; Hansen, Linda M; Dolva, Julia

    2007-01-01

    Nurses search for different kinds of overview in their use of data for clinical care. This study of nurses’ shift of duties on a internal medical ward points to three kinds of overview: i. an overview in the beginning of their duty in order to plan and distribute the coming work tasks of their day......, evening or night shift, ii an individual, professional overview in order to envi-sion the course of care events within their hours of duty, and iii. an overview of the situation of each individual patient. The nurses gather information from numerous sources, verbally as well as written on paper...

  14. Identifying emotional intelligence skills of Turkish clinical nurses according to sociodemographic and professional variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Nilgün; Hiçdurmaz, Duygu

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the emotional intelligence skills of Turkish clinical nurses according to sociodemographic and professional variables. Emotional intelligence is "the ability of a person to comprehend self-emotions, to show empathy towards the feelings of others, and to control self-emotions in a way that enriches life." Nurses with a higher emotional intelligence level offer more efficient and professional care, and they accomplish more in their social and professional lives. We designed a descriptive cross-sectional study. The Introductory Information Form and the Bar-On emotional intelligence Inventory were used to collect data between 20th June and 20th August 2012. The study was conducted with 312 nurses from 37 hospitals located within the borders of the metropolitan municipality in Ankara. There were no significant differences between emotional intelligence scores of the nurses according to demographic variables such as age, gender, marital status, having children. Thus, sociodemographic factors did not appear to be key factors, but some professional variables did. Higher total emotional intelligence scores were observed in those who had 10 years or longer experience, who found oneself successful in professional life, who stated that emotional intelligence is an improvable skill and who previously received self-improvement training. Interpersonal skills were higher in those with a graduate degree and in nurses working in polyclinics and paediatric units. These findings indicate which groups require improvement in emotional intelligence skills and which skills need improvement. Additionally, these results provide knowledge and create awareness about emotional intelligence skills of nurses and the distribution of these skills according to sociodemographic and professional variables. Implementation of emotional intelligence improvement programmes targeting the determined clinical nursing groups by nursing administrations can help the increase in

  15. Professional autonomy in 21st century healthcare: nurses' accounts of clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-10-01

    Autonomy in decision-making has traditionally been described as a feature of professional work, however the work of healthcare professionals has been seen as steadily encroached upon by State and managerialist forces. Nursing has faced particular problems in establishing itself as a credible profession for reasons including history, gender and a traditional subservience to medicine. This paper reports on a focus group study of UK nurses participating in post-qualifying professional development in 2008. Three groups of nurses in different specialist areas comprised a total of 26 participants. The study uses accounts of decision-making to gain insight into contemporary professional nursing. The study also aims to explore the usefulness of a theory of professional work set out by Jamous and Peloille (1970). The analysis draws on notions of interpretive repertoires and elements of narrative analysis. We identified two interpretive repertoires: 'clinical judgement' which was used to describe the different grounds for making judgements; and 'decision-making' which was used to describe organisational circumstances influencing decision-making. Jamous and Peloille's theory proved useful for interpreting instances where the nurses collectively withdrew from the potential dangers of too extreme claims for technicality or indeterminacy in their work. However, their theory did not explain the full range of accounts of decision-making that were given. Taken at face value, the accounts from the participants depict nurses as sometimes practising in indirect ways in order to have influence in the clinical and bureaucratic setting. However, a focus on language use and in particular, interpretive repertoires, has enabled us to suggest that despite an overall picture of severely limited autonomy, nurses in the groups reproduced stories of the successful accomplishment of moral and influential action. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Associations of professional quality of life and social support with health in clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chia-Yun; Yang, Mei-Sang; Leung, Wan; Liu, Yea-Ying; Huang, Hui-Wen; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2018-03-01

    To explore the associations of the professional quality of life and social support with health in nurses. Physical and mental health may be associated with absence from work among nurses. Few studies have explored the associations of professional quality of life and social support on the physical and mental health of nurses. This was a cross-sectional study. In total, 294 nurses were recruited from a hospital in Southern Taiwan. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect data. Burnout, secondary traumatic stress and social support from relatives or friends were important factors of physical and mental health. Interactions between support from relatives or friends and secondary traumatic stress are important factors in physical health. Reducing burnout and secondary traumatic stress is important for physical and mental health of nurses. Increasing social support from relatives or friends may be useful to reduce the negative effects of secondary traumatic stress on the physical health of nurses. Nurse managers could design interventions to reduce and prevent nurses from being influenced by burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Educating nurses to build effective social networks with relatives or friends and to seek support when experiencing secondary traumatic stress may also be needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Professional regulation, public protection and nurse migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David C; González-Jurado, Máximo Antonio; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Nurse mobility, developments such as health tourism and the rapid expansion of health systems have increased the need for regulatory bodies to reach beyond their normal stakeholder groups so as to familiarize themselves with the legislation of other jurisdictions. A systematic examination of a cross-section of nursing legislation, to ascertain the degree of consistency in the number of definitions specified as well as their underlying structure, was conducted to identify opportunities to strengthen public protection and reduce barriers to freedom of movement. A purposeful sample of legislation, drawn to maximize differences, was subjected to documentary analysis to identify possible relationships between the variables of interest and the way terms and processes were defined in fourteen nurse practice acts. Potential relationships were identified between factors such as geographic region, legal tradition, administrative approach, regulatory model and economic status and the number and approaches used to specify definitions. A major weakness in the precision of definitions was discovered. Several international organizations have started to develop lexicons but all have weaknesses. By drawing upon these lexicons a more comprehensive and precise dictionary could be formulated to support the development of next-generation nurse practice acts. Current legislation lacks precision and, within the context of increased mobility of nurses, there is an urgent need to develop an authoritative source of definitions that can contribute to increasing public safety as well as reducing delays in the freedom of movement of nurses from one jurisdiction to another.

  18. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. The personal and professional: nurses' lived experiences of adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foli, Karen J; Schweitzer, Roberta; Wells, Courtenay

    2013-03-01

    Nurses provide healthcare services to members of the adoption triad (AT; birth parents, adoptive parents, and the child) in a number of settings. However, nurses' perceptions of and interactions with members of the AT have not been investigated. This study describes the lived experiences of nurses and the care rendered to the AT using a descriptive phenomenological approach. In response to an invitation published in a national electronic newsletter, nurses were asked to submit narratives about their experiences in caring for members of the AT. Researchers coded 17 narratives using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Four themes emerged from the texts: (1) Where the personal and professional selves meet ("I see so many issues from both sides"); (2) The paradox of adoption ("...an emotional rollercoaster"); (3) Unique contexts of adoptive families ("We all have a story"); and (4) Reframing nurses' perceptions surrounding adoption ("There are several areas we could improve"). Nurses often have a personal connection to adoption and this potentiates the care delivered to AT members. Serving as role models for their peers and advocates for a better understanding of the dynamics of relinquishment and placement, nurses can improve clinical practices for these patients. Themes reflected insights gained from both personal and professional roles and offer specific interventions that enhance care of the AT. Nursing education and practice guidelines should include care rendered to the AT.

  20. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  1. Developing nurse leaders: a program enhancing staff nurse leadership skills and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Pauline J

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether participation in the Nursing Leadership Perspectives Program (NLPP) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, produced a change in leadership skills, increased professional activities, leadership promotion, and retention rates of participants. The NLPP is an educational program designed to enhance leadership skills and promote professionalism of registered nurses. The 6-month program provides participants with theoretical knowledge, core competencies, and opportunities to practice application of leadership skills. Outcome metrics were collected from registered nurses who completed the program (n = 15). Data analysis included descriptive and nonparametric methods. Participants reported statistically significant changes in their leadership skills after participation in the program (P = .007) on the Leadership Practices Inventory. Changes in professional behavior were also statistically significant as rated by the Nursing Activity Scale (P = .001). Participants demonstrated a change in leadership skills and professional behavior following the program.

  2. Challenges for nursing education in Angola: the perception of nurse leaders affiliated with professional education institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria; Ventura, Carla A Arena; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mazzo, Alessandra; de Godoy, Simone; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2013-07-17

    Angola is one of the African countries with the highest morbidity and mortality rates and a devastating lack of human resources for health, including nursing. The World Health Organization stimulates and takes technical cooperation initiatives for human resource education and training in health and education, with a view to the development of countries in the region. The aim in this study was to identify how nurses affiliated with nursing education institutions perceive the challenges nursing education is facing in Angola. After consulting the National Directory of Human Resources in Angola, the nurse leaders affiliated with professional nursing education institutions in Angola were invited to participate in the study by email. Data were collected in February 2009 through the focus group technique. The group of participants was focused on the central question: what are the challenges faced for nursing education in your country? To register and understand the information, besides the use of a recorder, the reporters elaborated an interpretative report. Data were coded using content analysis. Fourteen nurses participated in the meeting, most of whom were affiliated with technical nursing education institutions. It was verified that the nurse leaders at technical and higher nursing education institutions in Angola face many challenges, mainly related to the lack of infrastructure, absence of trained human resources,bureaucratic problems to regularize the schools and lack of material resources. On the opposite, the solutions they present are predominantly centered on the valuation of nursing professionals, which implies cultural and attitude changes. Public health education policies need to be established in Angola, including action guidelines that permit effective nursing activities. Professional education institutions need further regularizations and nurses need to be acknowledged as key elements for the qualitative enhancement of health services in the country.

  3. Nurse managers and budgeting: professional/bureaucratic conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, M A; Stoelwinder, J U

    1988-01-01

    Professional/bureaucratic conflict theory suggests that the extent to which nurse managers use management control systems will depend on whether their goal orientation is to system rather than output or derived goals. This article examines the use of budgeting as a management control strategy, in relation to the goal orientation of nurse managers, in four large teaching hospitals. The goal orientations and use of budgeting by nurse managers is also compared with those of physician managers and other sub-unit managers. The results indicate that nurse managers appear to be developing their goals of professionalization without a diminution of their organizational focus or their orientation towards providing a high standard of patient care.

  4. Who cares? Offering emotion work as a 'gift' in the nursing labour process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S C

    2000-09-01

    Who cares? Offering emotion work as a 'gift' in the nursing labour process The emotional elements of the nursing labour process are being recognized increasingly. Many commentators stress that nurses' 'emotional labour' is hard and productive work and should be valued in the same way as physical or technical labour. However, the term 'emotional labour' fails to conceptualize the many occasions when nurses not only work hard on their emotions in order to present the detached face of a professional carer, but also to offer authentic caring behaviour to patients in their care. Using qualitative data collected from a group of gynaecology nurses in an English National Health Service (NHS) Trust hospital, this paper argues that nursing work is emotionally complex and may be better understood by utilizing a combination of Hochschild's concepts: emotion work as a 'gift' in addition to 'emotional labour'. The gynaecology nurses in this study describe their work as 'emotionful' and therefore it could be said that this particular group of nurses represent a distinct example. Nevertheless, though it is impossible to generalize from limited data, the research presented in this paper does highlight the emotional complexity of the nursing labour process, expands the current conceptual analysis, and offers a path for future research. The examination further emphasizes the need to understand and value the motivations behind nurses' emotion work and their wish to maintain caring as a central value in professional nursing.

  5. Nurses' professional competency and organizational commitment: Is it important for human resource management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Abbas; Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Foroughameri, Golnaz

    2017-01-01

    Professional competency is a fundamental concept in nursing, which has a direct relationship with quality improvement of patient care and public health. Organizational commitment as a kind of affective attachment or sense of loyalty to the organization is an effective factor for professional competency. This study was conducted to evaluate the nurses´ professional competency and their organizational commitment as well as the relationship between these two concepts. This descriptive-analytic study was conducted at the hospitals affiliated with a University of Medical Sciences, in the southeast of Iran in 2016. The sample included 230 nurses who were selected using stratified random sampling. Data were gathered by three questionnaires including socio-demographic information, competency inventory for registered nurse (CIRN) and Allen Meyer's organizational commitment. Results showed that professional competency (Mean±SD: 2.82±0.53, range: 1.56-4.00) and organizational commitment (Mean±SD: 72.80±4.95, range: 58-81) of the nurses were at moderate levels. There was no statistically significant correlation between professional competency and organizational commitment (ρ = 0.02; p = 0.74). There were significant differences in professional competency based on marital status (p = 0.03) and work experience (pcommitted to their organizations. Developing professional competency and organizational commitment is vital, but not easy. This study suggests that human resource managers should pursue appropriate strategies to enhance the professional competency and organizational commitment of their nursing staff. It is necessary to conduct more comprehensive studies for exploring the status and gaps in the human resource management of healthcare in different cultures and contexts.

  6. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Gärtner, Fania R; Ketelaar, Sarah M; Smeets, Odile; Bolier, Linda; Fischer, Eva; van Dijk, Frank JH; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective o...

  7. The relationship between professional communication competences and nursing performance of critical care nurses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyo-Suk; Choi, JiYeon; Son, Youn-Jung

    2017-10-01

    Ineffective communication of critical care nurses can lead to higher levels of burnout and negatively affect quality of patient care and patient outcomes such as higher mortality. The purpose of this study is to describe the relationship between professional communication competences and nursing performance of critical care nurses in South Korea. This cross-sectional study collected data on 197 intensive care unit staff nurses in 3 tertiary academic medical centres in South Korea from July to November 2014. In the hierarchical regression analysis, the professional communication competences were the only significant predictors of nursing performance after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. In addition, the greater professional communication competences of nurses were associated with being older and having a higher education level, more years of overall clinical and intensive care unit experience, and a higher monthly salary. Our findings indicate that communication skills-related training should be included in the practical education to improve nursing performance for the quality of intensive care. Further research is needed to identify the comprehensive factors on professional communication competences of nurses in intensive care units. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Leader Influence, the Professional Practice Environment, and Nurse Engagement in Essential Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Maria P; Bernhardt, Jean M; Padula, Cynthia A; Adams, Jeffrey M

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between leaders' perceived influence over professional practice environments (PPEs) and clinical nurses' reported engagement in essential professional nursing practice. There is little empirical evidence identifying impact of nurse leader influence or why nursing leaders are not perceived, nor do they perceive themselves, as influential in healthcare decision making. A nonexperimental method of prediction was used to examine relationships between engagement in professional practice, measured by Essentials of Magnetism II (EOMII) tool, and nurse leaders' perceived influence, measured by Leadership Influence over Professional Practice Environment Scale (LIPPES). A convenience sample of 30 nurse leaders and 169 clinical nurses, employed in a 247-bed acute care Magnet® hospital, participated. Findings indicated that leaders perceived their influence presence from "often" to "always," with mean scores of 3.02 to 3.70 on a 4-point Likert scale, with the lowest subscale as "access to resources" for which a significant relationship was found with clinical nurses' reported presence of adequate staffing (P influence links structures necessary for an environment that supports outcomes.

  9. The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardulf, Ann; Nilsson, Jan; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Marianne; Johansson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients. To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors. The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1 [20-56]years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated. NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (93.2% vs 87.5% of NSPGs). Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure

  10. [Evaluation of the nurse working environment in health and social care intermediate care units in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullich-Marín, Ingrid; Miralles Basseda, Ramón; Torres Egea, Pilar; Planas-Campmany, Carme; Juvé-Udina, María Eulalia

    A favourable work environment contributes to greater job satisfaction and improved working conditions for nurses, a fact that could influence the quality of patient outcomes. The aim of the study is two-fold: Identifying types of centres, according to the working environment assessment made by nurses in intermediate care units, and describing the individual characteristics of nurses related to this assessment. An observational, descriptive, prospective, cross-sectional, and multicentre study was conducted in the last quarter of 2014. Nurses in intermediate care units were given a questionnaire containing the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) which assesses five factors of the work environment using 31 items. Sociodemographic, employment conditions, professional and educational variables were also collected. From a sample of 501 nurses from 14 centres, 388 nurses participated (77% response). The mean score on the PES-NWI was 84.75. Nine centres scored a "favourable" working environment and five "mixed". The best valued factor was "work relations" and the worst was "resource provision/adaptation". Rotating shift work, working in several units at the same time, having management responsibilities, and having a master degree were the characteristics related to a better perception of the nursing work environment. In most centres, the working environment was perceived as favourable. Some employment conditions, professional, and educational characteristics of nurses were related to the work environment assessment. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceptions of professional nurses regarding introduction of the Batho Pele principles in State hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sindiwe; Miza, Thenjiwe M

    2015-03-09

    The South African health care delivery system has shifted focus to primary health care since 1994. For this purpose the Batho Pele principles were introduced. Nurses claim, however, that since the introduction of these principles patients and their families have been making unnecessary and sometimes impossible demands of nursing staff. This article presents the perceptions of the professional nurses regarding the introduction of the Batho Pele principles in their workplace. To describe the perceptions of professional nurses regarding introduction of the Batho Pele principles and to recommend guidelines to facilitate measures to realise the objects of these principles. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contexual research design was used. Six audio-taped focus group discussions and field notes were used to collect data from purposively sampled participants who have worked in the outpatient departments of hospitals in the Port Elizabeth Hospital Complex. Guba's model of trustworthiness was used to confirm integrity of the study, whilst the participants were kept anonymous, protected from harm and participated voluntarily. Data analysis was done using Tesch's data analysis spiral and with the involvement of an independent-coder. Three themes emerged, revealing that the professional nurses perceived the objectives of the Batho Pele principles as difficult to uphold due to the inadequate planning prior to their implementation. Inadequacy of human and material resources aggravated this perception. Professional nurses are not happy with how things are in terms of introduction of the Batho Pele principles, but are optimistic of a positive change in the near future.

  12. Review: the legal duty of care for nurses and other health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2009-11-01

    To explore the nature and extent of the legal duty of care in relation to contemporary healthcare practice. The paper seeks to re-frame and update the legal duty of care for clinical nursing practice in the 21st century, taking into account collaborative and partnership working in healthcare practice. Doctrinal legal 'approach'. 'Black letter' legal research methodology used for data collection and analysis. Literature search using Westlaw and LexisNexis database(s) to identify recent common law decisions. There has been a perceptible doctrinal shift away from paternalism and toward patient empowerment and autonomy in the last decade. This has implications for nurses and other healthcare professionals in terms of consenting patients and acting reasonably to ensure quality patient care. A number of experienced nurses are currently assuming extended roles and some are completing medical tasks, traditionally allocated to doctors. These specialist practitioners must remember that additional responsibility invariably means increased professional risk and accountability. Therefore, it is essential that those engaging in advanced nursing practice, fully understand the nature and reach of their professional duty of care and the significance of statutory and common law developments. Nurses and other healthcare professionals must update their clinical skills and practice within a legal framework and to certain standards. The cases cited and discussed are relevant to all branches of nursing and indeed to all health professions.

  13. Online professional development for digitally differentiated nurses: An action research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J K; Huntington, A D

    2017-01-01

    Professional development opportunities for nurses are increasingly being offered in the online environment and therefore it is imperative that learning designers, nurse educators and healthcare organisations consider how best to support staff to enable Registered Nurses to capitalise on the resources available. Research participants explored educational strategies to support digitally differentiated nurses' engagement with professional development activities in an online environment through a participatory action research project that collected data over a 16 month period through six focus groups before being analysed thematically. The reality of work-based, e-learning while managing clinical workloads can be problematic however specific measures, such as having a quiet space and computer away from the clinical floor, access to professional development resources from anywhere and at any time, can be effective. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to resources offered will not meet the needs of diverse staffing groups whereas heutagogical learning offers tangible benefits to Registered Nurses seeking professional development opportunities in this context. Apparent proficiency with technological skills may not reflect a Registered Nurse's actual ability in this environment and face-to-face support offered regularly, rather than remedially, can be beneficial for some staff. Implementing specific strategies can result in successful transition to the online environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Work-Family Interference: Nurses in Norway and Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Bente; Holte, Kari Anne; Laine, Marjukka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to investigate the level of work–family inter-ference (WFI) for part-time nurses in Norway and Finland. Part-time work is usually cited as a desirable way in which to facilitate work and family harmony. However, the opportunity to work part-time in professions may be associated with greater difficulties and challenges than commonly presumed. Part-time professionals are often stigmatized as being less committed to work and report fewer job rewards than colleagu...

  15. Role of nursing professionals in the Colombian health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oneys del Carmen De Arco-Canoles

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nursing professional is able to provide care to people and communities from the different roles he or she assumes in the health system and that affect the quality of life of society. Objective: To identify in the scientific evidence published between 2011 and 2017 the role of nursing in the health system. Materials and methods: The bibliographic search was carried out in the data bases SciELO, PubMed, LILACS and Science Direct. Complete articles were selected in Spanish and English that presented in their titles the descriptors: nursing, role of nursing, health systems, advanced professional practice. Results: Fifty published studies were selected, which studied the health systems in Latin America, seeking to orient the role of nursing between 2011 and 2017. Three categories of interest could be found: Internships in the field of hospitality, community-based practices and teaching and research management. Conclusion: Despite the importance of the role played by nursing professionals in Colombia, there is no differentiation of profiles and functions within the health team; therefore, it is necessary to delimit some functions, to recover fields of action, strengthen leadership, autonomy and humanization in the provision of services.

  16. Respect for nursing professional: Silence must be heard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Mishra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The value of care giving seems to be at an all-time low. whether it is clinical (bedside or for children and elderly at home (homemakers. Currently, individuals who pass away any opportunity (for themselves to care for another individual instead are considered weak and/or unmotivated. Thus, it is not surprising that modern society often fails to respect the nursing professionals to the extent of underplaying their strengths, skills, and even clinical abilities. While qualities such as kindness, team spirit, and willingness to get their hands dirty are the core of this profession, nursing professionals have a complex variety of set duties, involving drug dosage, trouble-shooting, ongoing patient monitoring, and providing holistic comfort and support to the sick and needy. Beyond classical role, the nursing professional has currently ventured into other roles as well, as a nurse practitioner, administrator, researcher, or even an educator. Thus, considering the wide spectrum of duties performed by nursing professionals, they do deserve more status and power rather than be treated like “ward housewives.”

  17. The professional competence profile of Finnish nurses practising in a forensic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, L; Likitalo, H; Aho, J; Vuorio, O; Meretoja, R

    2014-05-01

    Forensic nurses in Finland work in the two state-maintained forensic hospitals. The main function of these hospitals is to perform forensic psychiatric evaluation and provide treatment for two groups of patients: violent offenders found not guilty by reason of insanity, and those too dangerous or difficult to be treated in regional hospitals. Although the forensic nurses work with the most challenging psychiatric patients, they do not have any preparatory special education for the work. This paper describes the development of nurses who participated in a 1-year further education programme that was tailored to them. The nurses experienced that the 1-year education had a significant impact on their overall competence level. They found that their skills for observing, helping, teaching and caring for their patients had increased during the education. Conversely, it was found that the nurses collaborated little with their patients' family members. They were also not familiar with utilizing research findings in improving their care of patients. Forensic nursing is a global and relatively young profession that combines nursing care and juridical processes. There are, however, significant differences in the qualifications of forensic nurses internationally. The aim of the study was to describe the professional competence profile of practising forensic nurses in Finland and to explore the effects of a 1-year further education programme on that competence profile. The data were collected in 2011-2012 using the Nurse Competence Scale comprising seven competence categories, and analysed using the software package SPSS version 19.0 (SPSS, Inc., Armonk, NY, USA). The participants were 19 forensic nurses and their 15 head nurses. The assessed overall scores from both informant groups indicated a high level of competence across the seven categories. The nurses felt that the overall competence level had increased during the education programme. The increase seen by the head nurses

  18. Magnet status and registered nurse views of the work environment and nursing as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; Norman, Linda; Dittus, Robert

    2009-01-01

    To compare how registered nurses view the work environment and the nursing shortage based on the Magnet status of their organizations. The upsurge in organizations pursuing and obtaining Magnet recognition provides increased opportunities to investigate whether and how registered nurses who are employed in Magnet organizations and organizations pursuing Magnet status perceive differences in the nursing shortage, hospitals' responses to the shortage, characteristics of the work environment, and professional relationships. A nationally representative sample of registered nurses licensed to practice in the United States was surveyed. The views of registered nurses who worked in Magnet organizations, organizations in the process of applying for Magnet status, and non-Magnet organizations were analyzed as independent groups. Significant differences were found. Although there is a clear Magnet difference, there are also identifiable differences that occur during the pursuit of Magnet recognition. Many organizations in the process of applying for Magnet status rated higher than Magnet organizations, indicating that there is much to do to maintain the comparative advantages for Magnet hospitals.

  19. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gärtner, F.R.; Ketelaar, S.M.; Smeets, O.; Bolier, L.; Fischer, E.; van Dijk, F.J.H.; Nieuwenhuijsen, K.; Sluiter, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions

  20. Nursing home nurses' experiences of resident transfers to the emergency department: no empathy for our work environment difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Li

    2016-03-01

    To explore the experiences of nursing home nurses when they transfer residents from nursing homes to the emergency department in Taiwan. The transfer of residents between nursing homes and emergency departments challenges continuity of care. Understanding nursing home nurses' experiences during these transfers may help to improve residents' continuity of care. However, few empirical data are available on these nurses' transfer experiences worldwide, and none could be found in Asian countries. Qualitative descriptive study. Data were collected from August 2012-June 2013 in audiotaped, individual, in-depth interviews with 25 nurses at five nursing homes in Taiwan. Interview transcripts were analysed by constant comparative analysis. Analysis of interview transcripts revealed that the core theme of nursing home nurses' transfer experience was discontinuity in nursing home to emergency department transitions. This core theme comprised three themes: discontinuity in family involvement, discontinuity in medical resources and expectations, and discontinuity in nurses' professional role. Nursing home nurses need a working environment that is better connected to residents' family members and more immediate and/or easier access to acute care for residents. Communication between nurses and residents' family could be improved by using text messages or social media by mobile phones, which are widely used in Taiwan and worldwide. To improve access to acute care, we suggest developing a real-time telehealth transfer system tailored to the medical culture and policies of each country. This system should facilitate communication among nursing home staff, family members and hospital staff. Our findings on nurses' experiences during transfer of nursing home residents to the emergency department can be used to design more effective transfer policies such as telemedicine systems in Taiwan and other Asian countries or in those with large populations of Chinese immigrants. © 2016 John

  1. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossey, Barbara M; Hess, Darlene

    2013-07-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)-the foundational philosopher of modern nursing-to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.(1) (,) (2) The Institute of Medicine report(3) and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing.

  2. Mental health nursing in Jordan: an investigation into experience, work stress and organizational support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Puskar, Kathryn; Yacoub, Mohammad; Marini, Anita

    2011-04-01

    Changes in mental health services have an impact on the role and practice of mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' experiences of providing mental health care, their work-related stress, and organizational support received. A descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. The result of this study revealed that mental health nurses shared a high level of agreement on the importance of most nursing tasks. Mental health nurses reported a moderate level of stress, with a lack of resources and relationship and conflict with other professionals being the most frequent stressors. Nurses perceived a low level of support for their work from their supervisors. Work stress and conflict with other professionals had a significant, negative correlation with the perception the nurses had of their immediate supervisors (r = -0.29, P work stress, organizational support, and the nurses' age, sex, or level of education. This study has clinical implications in terms of developing strategies for reducing stress and improving organizational support among mental health nurses, and it should help in future research. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. User violence towards nursing professionals in mental health services and emergency units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé Llor-Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is present in many work sectors, but in the area of mental health, nurses have a higher risk due to the close relationship they have with users. This study analyzed hostile user statements against nursing professionals of Mental Health Services and Emergency Units in Health Service (MHS hospitals in Murcia, Spain, and determined the frequency of exposure to the different violent user behaviors. The study was carried out with a sample of 518 nursing professionals from four hospital services: Mental Health, Emergency Units, Medical Hospitalization, and Maternal-and-Child. The nursing staff of Mental Health and Emergency Units was the most exposed to violence. Non-physical violence was more frequent in Emergency Units, whereas physical violence was more frequent in Mental Health. Among the consequences of exposure to non-physical violence are workers’ emotional exhaustion and the presence of psychological distress.

  4. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Chan Chong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562 of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6% and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%. The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses’ (RNs needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  5. Health information needs of professional nurses required at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Esmeralda; ten Ham, Wilma

    2015-06-11

    Professional nurses work in dynamic environments and need to keep up to date with relevant information for practice in nursing to render quality patient care. Keeping up to date with current information is often challenging because of heavy workload, diverse information needs and the accessibility of the required information at the point of care. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the information needs of professional nurses at the point of care in order to make recommendations to stakeholders to develop a mobile library accessible by means of smart phones when needed. The researcher utilised a quantitative, descriptive survey design to conduct this study. The target population comprised 757 professional nurses employed at a state hospital. Simple random sampling was used to select a sample of the wards, units and departments for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample of 250 participants was selected. Two hundred and fifty structured self-administered questionnaires were distributed amongst the participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. A total of 136 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings highlighted the types and accessible sources of information. Information needs of professional nurses were identified such as: extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis, multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, HIV, antiretrovirals and all chronic lifestyle diseases. This study has enabled the researcher to identify the information needs required by professional nurses at the point of care to enhance the delivery of patient care. The research results were used to develop a mobile library that could be accessed by professional nurses.

  6. [Profile, competencies and digital fluency of nurses in the Professional Improvement Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Lyvia Pini; Kobayashi, Rika Miyahara

    2013-08-01

    A descriptive exploratory study conducted in the city of São Paulo, which aimed to identify the profile, competencies and digital fluency of nurses in the Professional Improvement Program in handling technology at work. The population, composed by 60 nurses in the program, answered a questionnaire with data about profile, digital fluency and professional competencies. The participants were found to be: 95.0% female, 61.7% between 23 and 25 years old, 75.0% from public schools, 58.3% enrolled in cardiovascular nursing, 98.3% had contact with computing resources during graduation, 100.0% had a computer at home, 86.7% accessed the internet daily, 96.7% used Messenger and 58.3% had an intermediate level of knowledge and skill in computing. Professional competencies required for technology management referred to knowing how to be innovative, creative, and updated to identify and manage software and to use technological resources.

  7. Occupational closure in nursing work reconsidered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traynor, Michael; Nissen, Nina; Lincoln, Carol

    2015-01-01

    In healthcare, occupational groups have adopted tactics to maintain autonomy and control over their areas of work. Witz described a credentialist approach to occupational closure adopted by nursing in the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the recent advancement...... boundaries and a usurpatory stance towards these boundaries. Participants had usually been handpicked by managers and some were ambitious and confident in their abilities. Many aspired to train to be nurses claiming that they will gain recognition that they do not currently get but which they deserve....... Their scope of practice is based upon their managers' or supervisors' perception of their individual aptitude rather than on a credentialist claim. They 'usurp' nurses claim to be the healthcare worker with privileged access to patients, saying they have taken over what nursing has considered its core work...

  8. Developing practical knowledge content of emergency nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-06-01

    There is a paucity of published research on clinical or practical nursing knowledge. The ways that nurses acquire, develop, and maintain emergency room (ER) nursing care skills is a research area, in particular, that deserves further investigation. This study examined clinical setting learning processes to better understand the practical knowledge content of ER nurses. This study used a phenomenological approach and in-depth interviews of 10 nurses. Each participant had at least 3 years of ER experience. Researchers used Moustakas' method to analyze interview data. Findings were checked for credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability. The authors identified four major practical knowledge themes for ER professionals. These were (a) basic emergency treatment procedure routines and symptom management; (b) disease mechanisms, pharmacodynamics, and treatment responses; (c) newly identified diseases, updated emergency treatments and techniques, and medical treatment discussions; and (d) identifying nursing values including nursing attitudes and continuing patient care. Participants in this study had experience with the first three themes and successfully combined various types of nursing knowledge in their nursing care duties. Only few participants indicated experience with the fourth theme. Findings clarify that clinical or practical knowledge in ER nurses evolves first from declarative knowledge (e.g., basic emergency treatment routines and operating procedures) to procedural knowledge (e.g., instructions from supervisors, actual practice, and drills) to conditional knowledge (e.g., observation and treatment involving direct interactions with patients). Nurses should combine and apply the various knowledge types in their nursing practice to assess comprehensively each patient's condition and administer effective treatment and service.

  9. A profile of professional nursing practice in the private sector in the R.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pera

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of professional nursing practice in private enterprise health care services in the Republic of South Africa. In the light of the future health care needs and the relationship between the private and public sector health care establishments, information about the role and task of the I professional nurse was needed. Information would provide a data base about the registered nurse and so facilitate future health care planning. An exploratory field study was undertaken to locate the various work environments of the registered nurse in four statistical urban regions. Questionnaires were handed out and collected from a proportional stratified sample of professional nurses who were working in thirteen types of health care environments in the period between I June 1983 and 30 September 1983. A return rate of 68 percent yielded 340 completed questionnaires from 501 registered nurses. The study revealed that the majority of nurses in the private sector were relatively young. White, female, English-speaking professionals who were practising in four broad areas of health care: • Custodial care environments such as residential homes for the aged, institutions for the chronic sick and frail aged, homes for children and homes for the adult handicapped. • Hospitals and related special health centres catering for drug addicts, alcoholics and patients suffering from psychiatric/nervous disorders. • Institutions for child and adult education which included crèches/nursery schools, primary and secondary hoarding schools, special schools for the handicapped, and university based student health centres. • Medical and dental consulting room practices. • Other entrepreneurial employment settings such as business and industrial occupational health care services, nursing service agencies, and mobile emergency care units.

  10. Defining quality of nursing work life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Beth A; Anderson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    As the largest single employee component of hospitals, nurses are critical to the functioning of the organization, and improving employee productivity continues to be a common theme in the health care literature. However, any increased productivity will be transitory if achieved at the expense of the quality of nurses' work life (QNWL), since improvement in the QNWL is prerequisite to improved productivity. The conceptual components of the concept of QNWL that differentiate QNWL from the concept job satisfaction are explored.

  11. A humanização do trabalho para os profissionais de enfermagem La humanización del trabajo para los profesionales de enfermería Humanization of the work of nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Coelho Amestoy

    2006-12-01

    humanización de los sujetos-trabajadores de las instituciones de salud.OBJECTIVE: To describe the perceptions of nursing professionals about humanization of their work process. METHODS: A qualitative research approach was used to conduct the study. Data were collected from seven nursing professionals of a Critical Care Unit of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Pelotas-RS, through semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed, through successive readings and content analysis. Two themes have emerged: Humanization of the work process and gaps of the humanization of the work process. RESULTS: In the hospital, the humanization of the work process continues to place emphasis in the person-customer, yet little attention to the care and humanization of the person-worker. CONCLUSION: Humanization of the work process is widely discussed in literature; however, in practice, it depends on behavioral change and internalization of the need of humanization by the person-worker of health institutions.

  12. Professional values and career choice of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaya, Sultan Ayaz; Yaman, Şengül; Simones, Joyce

    2018-03-01

    Professional values are abstract and general behavioral principles that provide basic standards to judge aims and actions, and these principles are formed by strong emotional loyalty of members of the profession. Research was conducted to compare the career choice and professional values of nursing students at two universities in the upper Midwest of the United States and in the middle of Turkey. A descriptive and comparative design was used. The participants of the study were comprised nursing students from a university in the upper Midwest of United States and a university in the middle of Turkey. The sample consisted of 728 students in all grades. Data were collected by a questionnaire, The Nurses Professional Values Scale-Revised and Vocational Choices in Entering Nursing Scale. Number, percentage distribution, mean, standard deviation, t test, and one-way variance analysis were used in the analysis of data. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Commission. Informed consent was received from the students. The students' mean age for American students was 24.3 ± 5.6 years, while the mean age for Turkish students was 19.8 ± 1.7 years. Mean score of American students on The Vocational Congruency (a subgroup of the Vocational Choices in Entering Nursing Scale) was 38.5 ± 5.9 and Turkish students was 29.6 ± 8.9 (p Values Scale-Revised was 109.2 ± 12.3 and that of Turkish students was 101.6 ± 17.0. This study concluded that the majority of nursing students had high professional values, and when students' scores were compared, American students had higher professional values, and in career choice, they considered primarily fitness of the profession to themselves and their goals, while Turkish students primarily thought of their living conditions.

  13. Practice nurses' workload, career intentions and the impact of professional isolation: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Graham CM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice nurses have a key role within UK general practice, especially since the 2004 GMS contract. This study aimed to describe that role, identify how professionally supported they felt and their career intentions. An additional aim was to explore whether they felt isolated and identify contributory factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey in one large urban Scottish Health Board, targeted all practice nurses (n = 329. Domains included demographics, workload, training and professional support. Following univariate descriptive statistics, associations between categorical variables were tested using the chi-square test or chi-square test for trend; associations between dichotomous variables were tested using Fisher's Exact test. Variables significantly associated with isolation were entered into a binary logistic regression model using backwards elimination. Results There were 200 responses (61.0% response rate. Most respondents were aged 40 or over and were practice nurses for a median of 10 years. Commonest clinical activities were coronary heart disease management, cervical cytology, diabetes and the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although most had a Personal Development Plan and a recent appraisal, 103 (52.3% felt isolated at least sometimes; 30 (15.5% intended leaving practice nursing within 5 years. Isolated nurses worked in practices with smaller list sizes (p = 0.024 and nursing teams (p = 0.003; were less likely to have someone they could discuss a clinical/professional (p = 0.002 or personal (p Conclusions A significant proportion of practice nurses reported feeling isolated, at least some of the time. They were more likely to be in small practices and more likely to be considering leaving practice nursing. Factors contributing to their isolation were generally located within the practice environment. Providing support to these nurses within their practice setting may help

  14. Career advancement and professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Rita K; Smith-Glasgow, Mary Ellen; Bhattacharya, Anand; Xu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Excellence underscores the need for nurses to keep their skills and competencies current through participation in professional development and career advancement. Evidence suggests that internationally educated nurses (IENs) progress relatively slowly through the career ladder and participate less in professional development compared with nurses educated in the United States (UENs). Mentorship and self-efficacy are considered major determinants of career advancement. The aim of the study was to understand the differences in levels of mentorship function and self-efficacy as well as the differences in participation in professional development and career advancement between UENs and IENs. A descriptive survey design was implemented using a Web-based survey. Significant disparities were noted in the role model function of mentoring and some professional development and career advancement measures between UENs and IENs. Mentorship is essential for professional growth. Sociodemographic characteristics of mentors are important because mentors are role models. Standardized career advancement structures are needed to promote professional growth. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

    2013-06-01

    Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses.

  16. Job satisfaction and attitudes towards nursing care among nurses working at Mzuzu Central Hospital in Mzuzu, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Maloni; Mukwato, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Job satisfaction is a major determinant of performance at the workplace. Studies have shown that job dissatisfaction can intensify emotional exhaustion, and this can influence nurses to perceive their work as tiresome and repetitive, leading to frustration and discouragement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction and attitude towards nursing care at Mzuzu Central Hospital in Mzuzu, Malawi. This was a descriptive correlational study. Eighty-nine nurses were selected using simple random sampling. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were analysed using Stata (version 12). Frequencies, means, and standard deviations were used to summarise sociodemographic data and also to determine job satisfaction and attitudes towards nursing care among the participants. Independent t-tests were used to determine if differences in professional qualifications, job title, work experience, or the clinical setting in which the nurses worked were associated with differences in job satisfaction and attitude. Pearson's product-moment correlation was used to determine the relationship between job satisfaction and attitude in the study sample. The nurses who participated in this study generally had positive attitudes towards nursing care and were moderately satisfied with their jobs. There was a significant variation in attitude depending on the amount of time a nurse worked at a particular post (P = 0.0308), as well as the amount of time a nurse had worked at the hospital (P = 0.0012). There was a significant positive relationship between job satisfaction and attitude (r = 0.226, P = 0.033). The nurses in the study sample were moderately satisified with their work and generally had positive attitudes towards nursing care. There was a positive correlation between attitude towards nursing care and job satisfaction. Addressing factors which dissatisfy nurses can promote nurses' attitudes and likely improve performance

  17. An Australian investigation of emotional work, emotional well-being and professional practice: an emancipatory inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

    2010-05-01

    This study set out to explore the relationship between emotional work, emotional well-being and professional practice of generalist community health nurses who provided palliative care to clients living at home. Research suggests that palliative care practice is emotionally demanding and at times challenging. Whilst nurses find their palliative practice a source of job satisfaction the associated stresses can impact on nurses emotional well-being. A qualitative emancipatory methodology informed this study. Semi-structured interviews/storytelling and reflective journaling were the two methods applied. Sixteen community health nurses including the researcher participated. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The concept of emotional well-being is associated with nurses' feelings of being balanced or out of balance. There is a pervasive interconnectedness between emotional work, emotional well-being and professional practice that is influenced by factors such as organisational and workplace issues; communication with health professionals, professional boundaries; education and professional development. Three major interwoven themes emerged highlighting that palliative care provision was demanding and rewarding, yet dependent on the nurse's comfortability within practice. Self-care is also important to the generalist nurses and strategies to enhance well-being include healthy lifestyle choices, debriefing, self-validation, assertiveness and emotional support. Emotional well-being is complex and multifaceted. The value of emotional well-being to professional practice is important. Palliative care provision is associated with demands, rewards and comfortability. It is essential that attention be given to the experiences of generalist community health nurses who engage in palliative care provision. As the demand for community palliative care increases, the issues that limit and enhance the emotional well-being of generalist palliative care nurses' become critical

  18. Professional development utilizing an oncology summer nursing internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle; Hyman, Zena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an oncology student nursing internship on role socialization and professional self-concept. This mixed-methods study utilized a convergent parallel approach that incorporated a quasi-experimental and qualitative design. Data was collected through pre and post-survey and open-ended questions. Participants were 11 baccalaureate nursing students participating in a summer oncology student nursing internship between their junior and senior years. Investigators completed a content analysis of qualitative questionnaires resulted in categories of meaning, while the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to compare pre and post internship scores. Aggregated mean scores from all instruments showed an increase in professionalism, role socialization, and sense of belonging from pre to post-internship, although no differences were significant. Qualitative data showed participants refined their personal philosophy of nursing and solidified their commitment to the profession. Participants did indicate, however, that the internship, combined with weekly debriefing forums and conferences, proved to have a positive impact on the students' role socialization and sense of belonging. Despite quantitative results, there is a need for longitudinal research to confirm the effect of nursing student internships on the transition from student to professional. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Occupational stressors among nurses working in urgent and emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denyson Santana PEREIRA

    Full Text Available The study aimed to assess occupational stressors among nurses working in urgent and emergency care facilities. It is a descriptive research developed in two public hospitals of different complexity degrees, with 49 nurses. Data were collected from June to September 2011. The Bianchi's Stress Scale, which is composed of six domains: Relationship, Unit functioning, Staff management, Nursing care, Unit coordination, and Work conditions was used to assess occupational stressors based on the regular activities performed by nurses. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and Mann Whitney-U test. For the nurses working in the high complexity healthcare facility - hospital A the most stressful domain was Nursing care, while for those professionals working in the medium complexity healthcare facility - hospital B, Staff management was the most stressful domain. The nurses from hospital A perceived care-related activities as more stressful, while for those in hospital B administrative activities were considered more stressful.

  20. Professional nurses' views regarding stigma and discrimination in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to determine the views of professional nurses on the manifestations of HIV and AIDS stigma and discrimination and their influence on the quality of care rendered to people living with HIV and AIDS in three rural hospitals of Limpopo province, South Africa. The study was qualitative, exploratory, ...

  1. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  2. "Drop dead … I need your job": An exploratory study of intra-professional conflict amongst nurses in two Ontario cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Godfred O; Adams, Tracey L

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have focused on inter-professional conflict and its implication for professional status and work. However, there is a dearth of research on intra-professional conflict and its implications for professions. This study explores intra-professional conflicts among nurses in Ontario, using a qualitative research design, drawing on in-depth interviews with 66 nurses. The study identifies conflicts along race and age: Visible minority and younger nurses report more conflict, with visible minority nurses particularly vulnerable and racially marginalized. Members of Visible minorities and young nurses responded to workplace conflict by demonstrating competence, seeking support from colleagues, and either ignoring the abuse or standing up for themselves. These strategies do nothing to challenge professional unity. Nonetheless, intra-professional conflict has negative consequences for professionals and their work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [A pilot study of the professional autonomy, job satisfaction, and related factors of nurses at a regional hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin-Chu; Maa, Suh-Hwa; Chung, Tieh-Chi; Huang, Kuei-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ming-Chu; Chen, Chiung-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Professional autonomy often causes confusion in nursing staffs that limit their ability to perform to the best of their professional capabilities. Moreover, heavy and busy workloads reduce the energy available for work resulting in lower working efficiency and lower job satisfaction. This study explores the status and factors related to professional autonomy and job satisfaction in nurses. A cross-sectional design was used to target the nurses employed at a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. Data on locus of control, professional autonomy, and job satisfaction were collected for analysis. Data were collected from 207 nurses, with 196 valid responses (response rate: 94.69%). One hundred and forty-six subjects (74.5%) were found to have an internal locus of control personality type. Scores for both professional autonomy and job satisfaction were above the "moderate" level (averages: 3.37 and 3.32, respectively, on a maximum scale of 5). Social demographic differences contributed to the variance in professional autonomy and job satisfaction among participants. Professional autonomy was found to be positively associated with job satisfaction. The findings of this study indicate that nurses with an internal locus of control personality exhibit higher professional autonomy and job satisfaction and that higher professional autonomy is associated with higher job satisfaction.

  4. Learning Strategies at Work and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemer, Hannah Deborah; Borges-Andrade, Jairo Eduardo; Cassiano, Simone Kelli

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the prediction of current and evolutionary perceptions of professional development through five learning strategies at work and through training and how individual and job characteristics predict those strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Variables were measured in a cross-sectional survey, with 962…

  5. Nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingjuan; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Salamonson, Yenna; Li, Ye; Huai, Baosha; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-12-01

    To describe nurses' perceptions concerning their professional practice environment in mainland China and identify factors associated with these views. Globally, the environments in which nurses work influence the quality of nursing practice and health care. A cross-sectional descriptive survey using both paper- and online-based delivery modes was used. A convenience sampling method was used. The survey questionnaire was composed of sociodemographic items and the 38-item Chinese version of Professional Practice Environment survey. The content of the paper-based questionnaire was identical to the online survey. Pearson's chi-square test was conducted to compare the demographic characteristics of these two data sets. Descriptive statistics analysis included frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation. Multiple linear regression analysis using the Backwards method was applied to identify independent predictors of each subscale of the 38-item Chinese version of Professional Practice Environment. A total of 573 questionnaires were analysed. The mean score of each subscale of the 38-item Chinese version of Professional Practice Environment in this study ranged from 2·66-3·05. All subscales except work motivation (3·05, standard deviation: 0·44) scored less than 3·0. Areas rated as most in need of improvement included control over practice, interpersonal interaction, supportive leadership and handling conflict, and staff relationships with physicians and autonomy. This study has identified nurses' perspectives regarding their workplaces in contemporary China. These data have provided an important baseline for developing and implementing culturally appropriate strategies to improve the working environment of Chinese nurses. A supportive and enabling work environment promotes professional development and the safety and quality of health care. Addressing these factors is important in optimising work place environments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Improvement in self-reported confidence in nurses' professional skills in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautava, Veli-Pekka; Palomäki, Erika; Innamaa, Tapio; Perttu, Mika; Lehto, Päivi; Palomäki, Ari

    2013-03-05

    The aim of this study was to assess nurses' self-reported confidence in their professional skills before and after an extensive Emergency Department (ED) reform in Kanta-Häme Central Hospital. Emergency nurses participated in transitional training commencing two years before the establishment of the new organization in 2007. Training was followed by weekly practical educational sessions in the new ED. During this process nurses improved their transition skills, defined house rules for the new clinic and improved their knowledge of new technology and instruments. The main processes involving critically ill ED patients were described and modelled with an electronic flow chart software.During the transitional training nurses compiled lists of practical skills and measures needed in the ED. These were updated after feedback from physicians in primary and secondary care and head physicians in Kanta-Häme Central Hospital. The final 189-item list comprised 15 different categories, each containing from 4 to 35 items. Based on the work described above, a questionnaire was developed to reflect ED nurses' skills in clinical measures but also to estimate the need for professional education and practical training. Nurses working in the ED were asked to fill the questionnaire in January 2007 (response rate 97%) and in January 2011 (response rate 98%). Nurses' self-reported confidence in their professional skills improved significally in eight classes out of fifteen. These classes were cannulations, urinary catheterizations, patient monitoring, cardiac patients, equipment, triage and nurse practising, psychiatric patients as well as infection risk. Best results were noted in urinary catheterizations, patient monitoring and infection risk. When studying the group of nurses participating in both surveys in 2007 and 2011, improvements were observed in all fifteen categories. All but two of these changes were significant (pskills of nurses. This improvement was especially

  7. Managing boundaries between professional and lay nursing following the influenza pandemic, 1918-1919: insights for professional resilience today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela J

    2017-03-01

    To examine lay-professional nursing boundaries, using challenges to the New Zealand nursing profession following the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic as the example. The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 had an overwhelming international impact on communities and the nursing profession. After the pandemic, the expectation for communities to be able to nurse the sick reflects today's increasing reliance on families to care for people at home. It similarly raised questions about the profession's role and professional boundaries in relation to volunteer or lay nursing. In New Zealand, the postpandemic challenge to build community lay nursing capacity tested these boundaries. Historical research. Analysis of historical primary sources of official reports, newspaper accounts, articles in New Zealand's professional nursing journal Kai Tiaki and the memoir of Hester Maclean, the country's chief nurse. Interpretation of findings in relation to secondary sources examining similar historical tensions between professional and lay nursing, and to the more recent notion of professional resilience. Maclean guarded nursing's professional boundaries by maintaining considerable control over community instruction in nursing and by strenuously resisting the suggestion that this should be done in hospitals where professional nurses trained. This historical example shows how the nursing profession faced the perceived threat to its professional boundaries. It also shows how competing goals of building community lay nursing capacity and protecting professional boundaries can be effectively managed. In the context of a global nursing shortage, limited healthcare budgets and a consequently increasing reliance on households to provide care for family members, this historical research shows nurses today that similar issues have been faced and effectively managed in the past. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Menstrual characteristics and night work among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Bente E; Baste, Valborg; Morken, Tone; Alsaker, Kjersti; Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Night work has been associated with adverse effects in terms of reproductive health. Specifically, menstruation has been suggested to be negatively impacted by night work, which again may influence fertility. This study investigated whether working nights is related to menstrual characteristics and if there is a relationship between shift work disorder (SWD) and menstruation. The study was cross-sectional, response rate 38%. The sample comprised female nurses who were members of the Norwegian Nurses Association; below 50 yr of age, who were not pregnant, did not use hormonal pills or intrauterine devices and who had not reached menopause (n=766). The nurses answered a postal survey including questions about night work and menstrual characteristics. Fifteen per cent reported to have irregular menstruations. Thirty-nine per cent of the nurses were classified as having SWD. Logistic regression analyses concerning the relationship between irregular menstruations and night work did not show any associations. Furthermore, no associations were found between cycle length or bleeding period and night work parameters. No associations were found between menstrual characteristics and SWD.

  9. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care

  10. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portero de la Cruz, Silvia; Vaquero Abellán, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other. descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of 258 baccalaureate and auxiliary nurses. As research instruments, an original and specific questionnaire was used to collect social and employment variables, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nursing Stress Scale and the Font-Roja questionnaire. Descriptive, inferential statistics and multivariate analysis were applied. average scores were found for professional stress and satisfaction, corresponding to 44,23 and 65,46 points, respectively. As regards professional burnout, an average score was found on the emotional exhaustion subscale; a high score for depersonalization and a low score for professional accomplishment. Studies are needed to identify the scores on these subscales in health organizations and to produce knowledge on their interrelations.

  11. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Portero de la Cruz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other.METHOD: descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of 258 baccalaureate and auxiliary nurses. As research instruments, an original and specific questionnaire was used to collect social and employment variables, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nursing Stress Scale and the Font-Roja questionnaire. Descriptive, inferential statistics and multivariate analysis were applied.RESULTS: average scores were found for professional stress and satisfaction, corresponding to 44,23 and 65,46 points, respectively. As regards professional burnout, an average score was found on the emotional exhaustion subscale; a high score for depersonalization and a low score for professional accomplishment. Studies are needed to identify the scores on these subscales in health organizations and to produce knowledge on their interrelations.

  12. Nurses' perceptions of their professional growth on completion of two years of postgraduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, D; Donoghue, J; Duffield, C; Adams, A

    In a climate of diminishing financial resources in service industries such as health care and education, it is not surprising that a focus on measuring and ensuring appropriate outcomes is widespread. Graduate education has the potential to make a significant difference to the professional behaviour of graduates. Postgraduate nursing coursework programs have been developed and offered in such a climate, many now charging full course fees, which no doubt stimulates participants and employers to look for value for money in terms of outcomes. A ten year longitudinal study began in 1992 and was designed to determine the impact of postgraduate coursework nursing education on the careers and the professional and personal development of graduates. This paper reports graduates' perception of their personal and professional growth in terms of professional activities such as writing for publication, research, mentoring, and involvement in professional organisations at the completion of their university course. Respondents indicated the course had contributed to increased professional behaviours in all aspects and to a marked improvement in their clinical confidence. Improved self esteem and increased participation in professional activities reflects changing attitudes towards nursing work that have important implications for improved quality of patient care.

  13. Professional conduct among registered nurses in the use of online social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levati, Sara

    2014-10-01

    To explore the use of Facebook by Registered Nurses (RNs) in Italy and the United Kingdom (UK), focusing on the disclosure of personal and professional information. The use of online social network sites among medical students and doctors is posing new ethical challenges to the profession. To date, little research has explored the use of online social networking sites among nurses. A cross-national survey. Data were assessed on 124 nurses' profile pages, readily available without viewing restrictions. Content analysis and inferential statistics were undertaken to describe usage and identify similarities and differences between the two country-groups of nurses. Data were collected between December 2011-January 2012. Overall, UK and Italian RNs showed a similar use of the online platform, tending to disclose personal pictures, home town and current home location, as well as updates and comments related to personal and work-related activities. A statistically significant higher proportion of nurses in Italy disclosed their sexual orientation. In both groups, a few cases were observed of potentially unprofessional content in relation to the use of alcohol, nudity and material of a salacious nature. Although most of the UK and Italy RNs appear to be aware of the risks posed by their online exposure, their online activity indicates the blurring of their personal and professional lives; this is posing new ethical, legal and professional challenges to members of the nursing profession. Further research and debate is encouraged at national and international level. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Influencing factors on professional commitment in Iranian nurses: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafaraghaee, Fateme; Mehrdad, Neda; Parvizy, Soroor

    2014-05-01

    Dissatisfaction and tending to leave are some of the major nursing problems around the world. Professional commitment is a key factor in attracting and keeping the nurses in their profession. Commitment is a cultural dependent variable. Some organizational and socio-cultural factors are counted as the drivers of professional commitment. This study aimed to explore factors influencing the professional commitment in Iranian nurses. A qualitative content analysis was used to obtain rich data. We performed 21 in-depth face-to-face semi-structured interviews. The sampling was based on the maximum variation with the staff nurses and managers in 5 university affiliated hospitals. Constant comparative method used for data analysis. TWO MAIN CATEGORIES WERE EMERGED: "Challenging with different feelings" and "Managers' role". Challenging with different feelings had two subcategories: "Burnout" and "sense of valuing". The other theme was composed of three subcategories: "Gratitude or punishment climate", "manager's view of caring" and "knowledge-based vs. routine-based nursing". Findings revealed the burnout as a common sense in nurses. They also sensed being valued because of having a chance to help others. Impediments in the health care system such as work overload and having more concern in the benefits of organization rather than patient's care and wellbeing lead to a sense of humiliation and frustration. Congruence between the managers and nurses' perceived values of the profession would be a main driver to the professional commitment. Making a sense of support and gratitude, valuing the care and promoting the knowledge-based practice were among the other important factors for making the professional commitment.

  15. Relationship of nurses' intrapersonal characteristics with work performance and caring behaviors: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Nelouise-Marié; Coetzee, Siedine K; Ellis, Suria M; Uys, Leana R

    2018-02-28

    This study aimed to describe intrapersonal characteristics (professional values, personality, empathy, and job involvement), work performance as perceived by nurses, and caring behaviors as perceived by patients, and to examine the relationships among these variables. A cross-sectional design was employed. A sample was recruited of 218 nurses and 116 patients in four private hospitals and four public hospitals. Data were collected using self-report measures. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, hierarchical linear modelling, correlations, and structural equation modeling. Nurses perceived their work performance to be of high quality. Among the intrapersonal characteristics, nurses had high scores for professional values, and moderately high scores for personality, empathy and job involvement. Patients perceived nurses' caring behaviors as moderately high. Professional values of nurses were the only selected intrapersonal characteristic with a statistically significant positive relationship, of practical importance, with work performance as perceived by nurses and with caring behaviors as perceived by patients at ward level. Managers can enhance nurses' work performance and caring behaviors through provision of in-service training that focuses on development of professional values. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. [Perception of professional identity in nursing amongst undergraduate students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albar, María-Jesús; Sivianes-Fernández, María

    2016-01-01

    To identify the perception of the nursing professional identity between first and fourth grade students. A descriptive study using a questionnaire. A random sample of 50 and 51 students were selected from the first and fourth grade, respectively. The questionnaire was prepared by expert consensus, and it included a sociodemographic data register, 14 items, and two open questions. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed on the data, using the Chi-squared test to determine the possible differences between both grades. SPSS 22.0 statistics software was employed. The open questions were submitted to a content analysis. Statistically significant differences were found between the items related to the diversity of roles that the nursing professionals can develop within the health care system (professional and academic), and between the autonomous nature of their practices. These data were confirmed by the information obtained with the open questions. Academic training is of great importance in the process of acquiring the professional identity of future professionals in nursing, but changing the public image of the profession is the responsibility of all the social agents involved in its development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The work engagement of nurses in multiple hospital sectors in Saudi Arabia: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E; Hamadi, Hanadi Y; Salem, Olfat A; Zakari, Nazik M A

    2016-05-01

    To examine the differences in work engagement among nurses in Saudi Arabia and its relationship with personal characteristics across different hospital affiliations. Quality care requires an adequate supply of engaged nurses who are dedicated, energised and absorbed in their work. In the nursing profession, work engagement is of considerable importance, owing to the shortage of nurses and the continuing reduction in healthcare costs. An analytic comparative cross-sectional design was used. Eight hospitals from three provinces and different affiliation types participated in the study. The Utrecht work engagement scale (UWES) was used to measure 980 nurses' work engagement. The findings indicate that nurses' total engagement scores were closer to the higher end of the Likert scale. The findings indicate generally high levels of work engagement, particularly regarding the element of dedication. Furthermore, the study shows significant differences in nurses' engagement among the various work settings and in nurses' age and experience. A number of nurses' personal characteristics have independent influences on their work engagement. Nurse leaders should acknowledge that a statement of professional nursing scope of practice is a necessity to encourage and fulfil engagement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  19. The Disturbance of Sleep Disorders in Nursing Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Conceição de Souza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To map and discuss scientific articles relating to grievances of sleep disturbance among nursing. Methods: A descriptive analytical type bibliometric databases held in the VHL. Results: In the 13-year period were conducted 13 studies, most used the quantitative method, the apex of the papers in 2009, in public institutions, and the Journal of School Nursing - USP with the largest number of published articles, various instruments were used to approach the subject. Conclusion: Disorders of insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness cause diseases that affect worker health nursing, emphasizes the need for actions and practices that improve the quality of life of nursing and mitigate the grievances of sleep disorders in these professional.

  20. Implementing a Process to Measure Return on Investment for Nursing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Elisabeth; Beverage, Jodie

    Return on investment (ROI) is one way to quantify the value that nursing professional development brings to the organization. This article describes a process to begin tracking ROI for nursing professional development. Implementing a process of tracking nursing professional development practitioners' ROI increased awareness of the financial impact and effectiveness of the department.

  1. Learnt and perceived professional roles of a new type of nurse specialized in Gerontology and Geriatrics, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizenga, Petra; Finnema, Evelyn; Roodbol, Petrie

    2016-07-01

    To gain insight into a new type of nurse specialized in gerontology and geriatrics, how they find meaning in the care of older persons and how this relates to the seven professional roles derived from the CanMEDS theoretical framework. To promote the quality of care for older persons in the Netherlands, one of the measures taken is the training and deployment of Registered Nurses specialized in Gerontology and Geriatrics. We focus on their professional roles in this study, to gain insight into the extent to which they fulfil their professional standards. A qualitative study, consisting of seven focus group interviews. The study population included 67 Registered Nurses. Data were collected between October 2011-May 2013. Nurses work in all seven CanMEDS roles, but not with all competences associated with these seven roles. The more distant the role is from patient activities, the less frequently competences such as social networks; design; research; innovation of care; legal, financial and organizational frameworks; professional ethics and professional innovation are mentioned. Nurses engage in activities consistent with nursing care for older people; however, despite their training, they are mainly focused on direct-patient care. Their limited awareness of the complete range of professional competences risks the stagnation of their development in professional roles such as health advocate, scholar and professional, which will not lead to an improvement in the care for older persons. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Qualidade de Vida no Trabalho dos Profissionais de Enfermagem que atuam no Período Noturno em um Hospital Escola do Sul de Minas Gerais / Quality of Life at Work of the Nursing Professionals who work on the night shift in a Teaching Hospital in the Sout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Aparecida dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo conhecer as características pessoais e profissionais da equipe de enfermagem que atua no período noturno Hospital Escola, bem como identificar a sua Qualidade de Vida no trabalho. Materiais e Métodos: Trata-se de uma pesquisa de campo de natureza quantitativa, descritiva e transversal. A amostra foi constituída por 74 profissionais da equipe de enfermagem que concordaram de participar do estudo. Foi utilizado um questionário para Caracterização Pessoal e Profissional e um Instrumento de Qualidade de Vida no Trabalho da Equipe de Enfermagem. Resultados: os resultados demonstraram a prevalência do gênero feminino (83,78%; com faixa etária dos 21 a 30 anos de idade (35% e estado civil, na metade da amostra, casada (50%, com o escore total de 11,7 (média = 10 pontos na escala de Qualidade de Vida. Conclusão: A equipe de enfermagem que atua no período noturno no Hospital pesquisado é constituída, por jovens, na sua maioria, do gênero feminino e com Qualidade de Vida no Trabalho. Objective: This research aimed to know the personal characteristics and nursing staff of professionals working at night at the Teaching Hospital, as well as identifying its quality of life at work. Materials and Methods: It is a quantitative, descriptive, cross sectional research. The sample consisted of 74 professionals of the nursing staff who agreed to participate. A questionnaire for characterization and Career and Life Quality at Work Instrument of Nursing Team was used. Results: the results showed the prevalence of females (83.78%, with ages from 21 to 30 years old (35% and marital status, in half of the sample, married (50%, with the total score of 11, 7 (mean = 10 points in the Quality of Life scale. Conclusion: The nursing staff that works at night in mentioned hospital is made of young, mostly female people that have Quality of Life at Work.

  3. Professional values and competencies as explanatory factors for the use of evidence-based practice in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skela-Savič, Brigita; Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Pesjak, Katja

    2017-08-01

    To establish the connection between values, competencies, selected job characteristics and evidence-based practice use. Nurses rarely apply evidence-based practice in everyday work. A recent body of research has looked at various variables explaining the use of evidence-based practice, but not values and competencies. A cross-sectional, non-experimental quantitative explorative research design. Standardized instruments were used (Nurse Professional Values Scale-R, Nurse Competence Scale, Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation Scale). The sample included 780 nurses from 20 Slovenian hospitals. The data were collected in 2015. The study identifies two new variables contributing to a better understanding of beliefs on and implementation of evidence-based practice, thus broadening the existing research evidence. These are the values of activism and professionalism and competencies aimed at the development and professionalization of nursing. Values of caring, trust and justice and competencies expected in everyday practice do not influence the beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice. Respondents ascribed less importance to values connected with activism and professionalism and competencies connected with the development of professionalism. Nurses agree that evidence-based practice is useful in their clinical work, but they lack the knowledge to implement it in practice. Evidence-based practice implementation in nursing practice is low. Study results stress the importance of increasing the knowledge and skills on professional values of activism and professionalism and competencies connected to nursing development. The study expands the current understanding of evidence-based practice use and provides invaluable insight for nursing managers, higher education managers and the national nursing association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Confused Professionals? : Capacities to Cope with Pressures in Professional Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schott, Carina; Van Kleef, Daphne; Noordegraaf, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Public professionalism is increasingly subject to organizational and societal pressures, which has led to ambiguity concerning its nature. Professionals face conflicting situations due to potential clashes between multifaceted professional, organizational, and societal factors. This raises questions

  5. Factors affecting performance and productivity of nurses: professional attitude, organisational justice, organisational culture and mobbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun; Temel, Safiye; Uslu Sahan, Fatma

    2016-09-01

    To identify relationships among variables affecting nurses' performance and productivity, namely professional attitudes, organisational culture, organisational justice and exposure to mobbing. The determination of the factors affecting performance and productivity is important for providing efficient nursing services. These factors have been investigated in the literature independently, but the relationship among them has not been clearly identified. This cross-sectional questionnaire study included 772 nurses working in a University Hospital accredited by Joint Commission International. The professional attitude score of the nurses was high (4.35 ± 0.63). However, their organisational justice (2.22 ± 1.26) and organisational culture (2.47 ± 0.71) scores were low. Nurses were subjected to mobbing at a high level (0.82 ± 0.78). As the organisational justice increased, the organisational culture increased and the mobbing decreased. As the organisation culture decreased, the mobbing increased. There was a positive correlation between organisation culture and organisational justice of the nurses and a negative correlation with mobbing. The results of the study are essential for improving nurses' performance and productivity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Association of the nurse work environment with nurse incivility in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica G; Morin, Karen H; Lake, Eileen T

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether nurse coworker incivility is associated with the nurse work environment, defined as organisational characteristics that promote nurse autonomy. Workplace incivility can negatively affect nurses, hospitals and patients. Plentiful evidence documents that nurses working in better nurse work environments have improved job and health outcomes. There is minimal knowledge about how nurse coworker incivility relates to the United States nurse work environment. Quantitative, cross-sectional. Data were collected through online surveys of registered nurses in a southwestern United States health system. The survey content included the National Quality Forum-endorsed Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and the Workplace Incivility Scale. Data analyses were descriptive and correlational. Mean levels of incivility were low in this sample of 233 staff nurses. Incivility occurred 'sporadically' (mean = 0.58; range 0.00-5.29). The nurse work environment was rated highly (mean = 3.10; range of 1.00-4.00). The nurse work environment was significantly inversely associated with coworker incivility. The nurse manager qualities were the principal factor of the nurse work environment associated with incivility. Supportive nurse managers reduce coworker incivility. Nurse managers can shape nurse work environments to prevent nurse incivility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The impact of nursing work environments on patient safety outcomes: the mediating role of burnout/engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Leiter, Michael P

    2006-05-01

    To test a theoretical model of professional nurse work environments linking conditions for professional nursing practice to burnout and, subsequently, patient safety outcomes. The 2004 Institute of Medicine report raised serious concerns about the impact of hospital restructuring on nursing work environments and patient safety outcomes. Few studies have used a theoretical framework to study the nature of the relationships between nursing work environments and patient safety outcomes. Hospital-based nurses in Canada (N = 8,597) completed measures of worklife (Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index), burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Scale), and their report of frequency of adverse patient events. Structural equation modeling analysis supported an extension of Leiter and Laschinger's Nursing Worklife Model. Nursing leadership played a fundamental role in the quality of worklife regarding policy involvement, staffing levels, support for a nursing model of care (vs medical), and nurse/physician relationships. Staffing adequacy directly affected emotional exhaustion, and use of a nursing model of care had a direct effect on nurses' personal accomplishment. Both directly affected patient safety outcomes. The results suggest that patient safety outcomes are related to the quality of the nursing practice work environment and nursing leadership's role in changing the work environment to decrease nurse burnout.

  8. What is the impact of professional nursing on patients' outcomes globally? An overview of research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, Samantha; Watkins, Mary; Norman, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    provided by nurses and doctors; and task shifting to invasive procedures. There is evidence that adequate numbers of well-educated nurses working in acute care areas can reduce the risk of patient mortality, although the evidence for this is confined to studies in high income countries and the evidence is not sufficiently robust to draw up definitive nurse: patient ratios. There is also moderate evidence that well trained nurses can produce health outcomes that are equivalent to those of doctors for patients with a range of chronic health problems, particularly for those patients managed in primary care, and that nurse-led care may be more effective than medical care in promoting patient adherence to treatment and patient satisfaction. There is low to moderate evidence for the benefits of parenting support programmes delivered by nurses on a range of health outcomes; and for the impact of home visiting on improving function and other health service outcomes for older people. The wider societal benefits of home visiting by nurses and the impact of this on long term outcomes and related cost-effectiveness of home visiting has not been established. There is limited available information regarding the wider global impact of increasing the numbers of nurses and their contribution to healthcare through improved education. Moreover there is very little evidence for the cost-effectiveness of changing care providers from doctors to nurses and as the majority of cost data available has tended to come from studies based in higher income countries, their external validity in terms of applicability to settings in low and middle income countries is questionable. In addition to effectiveness, cost and safety, future research needs to address how implementing expanded nursing roles and task shifting impacts on the morale, retention, and professional development of nurses and the other workforces, and the longer term implications of these developments both locally and internationally

  9. Burnout in Oncology: a study of Nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kitze

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify if licensed practical nurses and Nursing technicians working at an Oncology department present burnout syndrome. Methods: Data of 21 licensed practical nurses and Nursing technicians who had worked for, at least, one year at the Oncology department of a large hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were collected. The burnout inventory developed by Maslach and Jackson was used. Rresults: The studied population presented burnout based on scores in each of its three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of personal accomplishment. As to burnout symptoms, this study showed that 28.6% of the sample presented high scores in “emotional exhaustion”; 28.6% had high scores in “depersonalization” and 19.1% in lack of “personal accomplishment”. Cconclusions: When compared to other studies with nurses, this sample presented greater burnout.

  10. Effects of the professional identity development programme on the professional identity, job satisfaction and burnout levels of nurses: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabancıogullari, Selma; Dogan, Selma

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Professional Identity Development Program on the professional identity, job satisfaction and burnout levels of registered nurses. This study was conducted as a quasi-experimental one with 63 nurses working in a university hospital. Data were gathered using the Personal Information Questionnaire, the Professional Self Concept Inventory, Minnesota Job Satisfaction Inventory and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The Professional Identity Development Program which consists of ten sessions was implemented to the study group once a week. The Program significantly improved the professional identity of the nurses in the study group compared to that of the control group. During the research period, burnout levels significantly decreased in the study group while those of the control group increased. The programme did not create any significant differences in the job satisfaction levels of the nurses. The programme had a positive impact on the professional identity of the nurses. It is recommended that the programme should be implemented in different hospitals with different samples of nurses, and that its effectiveness should be evaluated. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Nurses’ professionalism as a component of evaluation of parents/caregivers satisfaction with nursing care

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    Ewa Smoleń

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professionalism in nursing means the provision of medical and nursing services based on the best knowledge and skills, as well as on great responsibility for the undertaken actions. The opinions of patients and their families concerning professionalism, reflected in the level of satisfaction, contribute to the improvement of the quality of services offered. Material and Methods: The study covered 120 parents/caregivers of children hospitalized in a pediatric ward. Diagnostic survey method was applied in the research. The standardized questionnaire for evaluation of the level of parents/caregivers satisfaction with nursing care (Latour et al. adjusted to the conditions of Polish pediatric hospital services and subjected to validation was adopted as a research tool. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. A value of p ≤ 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The respondents were selected at random. The parents/caregivers received the questionnaire the day before the child’s discharge. Results: The parents/caregivers generally evaluated the professionalism of nursing care in positive terms (4.3. They expressed higher satisfaction with respect showed by nurses for patients (4.7, while lower satisfaction with nurses introducing themselves (3.2. A high level of satisfaction was obtained with respect to the parents/caregivers’ opinions pertaining to cooperation within a therapeutic team (4.6, organization of nurses’ work (4.6, and quality of nursing care (4.6. Conclusions: Parents/caregivers expressed their satisfaction with the professionalism of nursing care. Education of respondents, frequency and reasons for hospitalization among children proved to be the variables that significantly differed the opinions of parents/caregivers concerning the selected criteria for professionalism of nursing care. No correlation was found between the duration of hospitalization

  12. Nurse Knowledge, Work Environment, and Turnover in Highly Specialized Pediatric End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa C; Cozad, Melanie J

    2017-07-01

    To examine the relationship between nurse knowledge, work environment, and registered nurse (RN) turnover in perinatal hospice and palliative care organizations. Using nurse intellectual capital theory, a multivariate analysis was conducted with 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey data. Perinatal hospice and palliative care organizations experienced a 5% turnover rate. The professional experience of advanced practice nurses (APNs) was significantly related to turnover among RNs (β = -.032, P < .05). Compared to organizations with no APNs professional experience, clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners significantly reduced RN turnover by 3 percentage points. No other nurse knowledge or work environment variables were associated with RN turnover. Several of the control variables were also associated with RN turnover in the study; Organizations serving micropolitan (β = -.041, P < .05) and rural areas (β = -.037, P < .05) had lower RN turnover compared to urban areas. Organizations with a technology climate where nurses used electronic medical records had a higher turnover rate than those without (β = .036, P < .05). The findings revealed that advanced professional experience in the form of APNs was associated with reductions in RN turnover. This suggests that having a clinical nurse specialist or nurse practitioner on staff may provide knowledge and experience to other RNs, creating stability within the organization.

  13. Risk factors for burnout among caregivers working in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelman, Nadia; Mazars, Thierry; Levy, Antonin

    2018-01-01

    (i) To assess the level of burnout in nursing home caregivers within a unique healthcare network in France and (ii) to evaluate potential risk factors in this population. Burnout syndrome occurs frequently among nursing home caregivers and has strong detrimental effects on the quality of health care for residents. We used an observational survey to study burnout in nursing home caregivers. The survey was used to quantify burnout level (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and potential risk factors and was implemented from October 2013-April 2014. A logistic regression was used to explore the association between burnout and its risk factors. Three hundred and sixty questionnaires were delivered to caregivers in 14 nursing homes within a unique healthcare network. The response rate was 37% (132/360), and 124/132 (94%) surveys were analysed. Caregiver burnout rate was 40% (49/124). Median age was 41 years (range, 20-70) and most caregivers were female. The most common profession (n = 54; 44%) was nurse caregiver and 90% (n = 112) had an antecedent of bullying by a resident. Risk factors identified were as follows: the presence of institutional protocols (death announcement [OR: 3.7] and pain assessment [OR: 2.8]), working in a profit-making establishment (OR: 2.6) and the antecedent of bullying by a resident (OR: 6.2). Factors most negatively associated with burnout included: practising pastimes (OR: 0.4) and working as a nurse (OR: 0.3). The only significant risk factor in the multivariate analysis was the antecedent of bullying by a resident (OR: 5.3). Several specific risk factors for burnout in nursing home caregivers were identified. In high-risk populations of healthcare professionals, screening and management of risk factors is crucial for preventing burnout. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Slavery and jouissance: analysing complaints of suffering in UK and Australian nurses' talk about their work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Evans, Alicia

    2014-07-01

    Nursing has a gendered and religious history where ideas of duty and servitude are present and shape its professional identity. The profession also promotes idealized notions of relationships with patients and of professional autonomy both of which are, in practice, highly constrained or even impossible. This paper draws on psychoanalytic concepts in order to reconsider nursing's professional identity. It does this by presenting an analysis of data from two focus group studies involving nurses in England and Australia held between 2010 and 2012. The studies gave rise to data where extremely negative talk about nursing work seemed to produce, or to be expressed with, a high degree of energy, and a particular kind of enjoyment. In our analysis, we focus on the nurses' apparent enjoyment derived from their expression of a position of powerlessness in which they describe themselves as 'slaves' or 'martyrs' in the health care system. We interpret this as jouissance and suggest that the positions of slave or martyr provide a possible response to what we argue is the impossibility of the nurse's role. We argue that a remnant of a quasi-religious ethic within the profession makes it acceptable for nurses to talk about self-sacrifice and powerlessness as part of their working subjectivity. We further argue that this analysis offers a new consideration of the issue of power and professional identity in nursing that goes beyond seeing nurses as simply overpowered by, or engaged in, a gendered power struggle with other professional groups. We suggest that powerlessness and victimhood hold particular attractions and advantages for nurses and are positions that are more available to nurses than to other occupational groups. This research shows how psychoanalytic theory can help produce new insights into the problems and complexity of nursing and extend existing study of the professions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A concept analysis of professional commitment in nursing.

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    García-Moyano, Loreto; Altisent, Rogelio; Pellicer-García, Begoña; Guerrero-Portillo, Sandra; Arrazola-Alberdi, Oihana; Delgado-Marroquín, María Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The concept of professional commitment is being widely studied at present. However, although it is considered an indicator for the most human part of nursing care, there is no clear definition for it, and different descriptors are being used indiscriminately to reference it. The aim of this study is to clarify the concept of professional commitment in nursing through the Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis process. Systematic search using English and Spanish descriptors and concept analysis. Studies published between 2009 and June 2015, front-to-back analysis of the Nursing Ethics journal and manual check of articles cited in studies related to the Nijmegen Professionalism Scale. The procedure of concept analysis developed by Rodgers was used. Ethical considerations: Although the topic was not labeled as sensitive and subject to ethical approval, its realization was approved by the Ethical Committee of Clinical Research of Aragon (CEICA) approved the study on 18 March 2015 and also careful procedures have been followed according to ethics expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki. A total of 17 published studies. A clear definition of the concept was made, and surrogate terms, concept dimension, differential factors related to the concept, sociocultural variations and consequences for nursing practice were identified. There is a need for continuous advancement in the development of the concept, specific actions to encourage this and the improvement of evaluation methods for its study.

  16. Putting Safety in the Frame: Nurses' Sensemaking at Work.

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    O'Keeffe, Valerie Jean; Thompson, Kirrilly Rebecca; Tuckey, Michelle Rae; Blewett, Verna Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Current patient safety policy focuses nursing on patient care goals, often overriding nurses' safety. Without understanding how nurses construct work health and safety (WHS), patient and nurse safety cannot be reconciled. Using ethnography, we examine social contexts of safety, studying 72 nurses across five Australian hospitals making decisions during patient encounters. In enacting safe practice, nurses used "frames" built from their contextual experiences to guide their behavior. Frames are produced by nurses, and they structure how nurses make sense of their work. Using thematic analysis, we identify four frames that inform nurses' decisions about WHS: (a) communicating builds knowledge, (b) experiencing situations guides decisions, (c) adapting procedures streamlines work, and (d) team working promotes safe working. Nurses' frames question current policy and practice by challenging how nurses' safety is positioned relative to patient safety. Recognizing these frames can assist the design and implementation of effective WHS management.

  17. Task conflicts and exclusive professionalism in nursing in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2014-01-01

    Task conflicts among medical professions are essential problems to be solved in health care organizations. This study examined job conflicts between practical nurses (PNs) and registered nurses (RNs) in their duties and tasks with representative panelists from South Korea. This qualitative study used the Dacum Task Analysis process. Subject-matter experts in practical nursing were recruited utilizing stratified sampling: Ten experts developed job descriptions of PNs, and 20 validated the descriptions. The on-site tasks and duties of the PNs were measured by means of Dacum, and the results were reviewed by RNs using 3 focus-group interviews. The job description of PNs consisted of 10 duties and 117 tasks, overlapping with some tasks of RNs. Core tasks performed by PNs, such as invasive activities, led to task conflicts between the 2 groups, as these activities were regarded as the inherent duty of nursing professions. Thus, the RNs did not concede the expanded job scope of the PNs in terms of exclusive professionalism. To reduce task conflict, there is a need for the balanced development of nursing professionalism.

  18. Developing a professional poster: four "ps" for advanced practice nurses to consider.

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    Bindon, Susan L; Davenport, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Professional posters play an important role in the dissemination of knowledge and the professional development of advanced practice nurses, graduate students, and clinical faculty. Posters should be considered an integral component in communication of professional work in practice, research, and education. The invitation to submit a poster abstract is an important opportunity for clinicians and faculty alike to consider. Though sometimes misperceived as less prestigious than a podium presentation, posters add a unique element to professional and academic events. The argument is made for posters as an equal among scholarly presentation formats. The poster serves as a tremendous opportunity for collaboration between partners and a way to communicate important findings and advertise the presenters' work. For the advanced practice nurse who is a novice in presenting best practice or evidence from research trials, the poster format may be less intimidating while allowing the invaluable sharing of results. Four critical elements of professional poster development are deciding on a clear Purpose, targeting the right People, outlining key steps in the Process, and delivering a memorable Presentation. Using the "4 Ps" as cornerstones for the work of developing, preparing, and delivering the poster to an audience, the authors aim to help organize the entire process into these essential considerations. The poster, as a means of scholarly work, is a viable and essential activity, as interdisciplinary collaboration and sharing of best practice becomes the expectation for all professional development.

  19. Nursing leadership style and psychosocial work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Terry; Penprase, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between leadership style and the psychosocial work environment of registered nurses. Research consistently supports the positive relationship between transformational leadership style and job satisfaction. There is less evidence, which identifies the relationship between leadership style and psychosocial work environment. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire 5× was used to identify the leadership style. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used to measure psychosocial work environment dimensions. Statistical analysis included Pearson's r correlation between leadership style and psychosocial work environment and anova to analyse group means. There is a significant correlation between leadership style and 22 out of the 37 dimensions of the psychosocial work environment. This correlation was significant ranging from r = 0.88, P leadership scores of the immediate supervisor report significant differences in their psychosocial work environment. This study supports the significant correlation between leadership style and psychosocial work environment for registered nurses. The results of this study suggest that there would be an improvement in the nursing psychosocial work environment by implementation of transformational and contingent reward leadership behaviours. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Exploring generational cohort work satisfaction in hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Pamela Ann

    2017-07-03

    Purpose Although extensive research exists regarding job satisfaction, many previous studies used a more restrictive, quantitative methodology. The purpose of this qualitative study is to capture the perceptions of hospital nurses within generational cohorts regarding their work satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach A preliminary qualitative, phenomenological study design explored hospital nurses' work satisfaction within generational cohorts - Baby Boomers (1946-1964), Generation X (1965-1980) and Millennials (1981-2000). A South Florida hospital provided the venue for the research. In all, 15 full-time staff nurses, segmented into generational cohorts, participated in personal interviews to determine themes related to seven established factors of work satisfaction: pay, autonomy, task requirements, administration, doctor-nurse relationship, interaction and professional status. Findings An analysis of the transcribed interviews confirmed the importance of the seven factors of job satisfaction. Similarities and differences between the generational cohorts related to a combination of stages of life and generational attributes. Practical implications The results of any qualitative research relate only to the specific venue studied and are not generalizable. However, the information gleaned from this study is transferable and other organizations are encouraged to conduct their own research and compare the results. Originality/value This study is unique, as the seven factors from an extensively used and highly respected quantitative research instrument were applied as the basis for this qualitative inquiry into generational cohort job satisfaction in a hospital setting.

  1. Task Performance induced Work Load in Nursing

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    Shirazeh Arghami

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objective: High workload may lead to increase human errors, compromise quality and safety of care, and reduce the nurses’ quality of working life. The aim of this study is to determine the task-induced workload in nursing. Methods: This is a descriptive analytical study. All of 214 nurses of one of the educational hospital took part in. After obtaining informed consent from participants, data were collected based on NASA-TLX questionnaire and the desired level assumed less than 50%. Analysis of data was performed by descriptive statistics and Anova in SPSS software (version 11. 0 at significant level of 0.05. Results: The results showed that perceived mental pressure for nurses is more than other NASA-TLX subscales (P< .001. Also, the mean perceived workload was more than 50%. However, mean workload score of NASA-TLX showed significant correlation with age (P< .001, work experience (P< .001, shift work (P< .02, and department (P< .001. Conclusion: The results show that effective programs will be required to reduce the work load, and to enhance nurses' performance

  2. Work and personal well-being of nurses in Queensland: Does rurality make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley; Eley, Robert; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Francis, Karen

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to ascertain if differences exist in the perception of the professional practice environment and personal well-being of nurses across different geographical areas in Queensland. This paper was performed on a prospective, self-report cross-sectional on-line survey. The study was conducted among the nurses employed in public and private health care settings: acute hospitals, community health and aged care in Queensland, Australia. Participants of this study were 1608 registered and enrolled nurses and assistants in nursing, current members of the Queensland Nurses Union in 2013 and who provided a workplace postcode. One thousand eight of these participants worked in major cities, while 382 in rural locations and 238 in remote areas. None. Scores of well-being as determined by the following scales: the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, the Professional Quality of Life Scale version 5, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and of the Professional Practice Environment using the Practice Environment Scale - Nursing Work Index Revised. Nurses employed in major cities perceived 'nursing foundations for quality care' more favourably than those from other settings. Remote area nurses had lower levels of secondary traumatic stress than nurses in major cities and rural areas. There was no difference between nurses across their geographical locations for stress, anxiety, depression, compassion satisfaction, burnout, resilience and the four other measures of the Practice Environment Scale. The study findings provide new data suggesting that, with the exception of secondary traumatic stress, the personal well-being of nurses does not differ across geographical settings. Similarly, with the exception of the subscale of 'nursing foundations for quality care' there was no difference in perceptions of the professional practice environment. As secondary traumatic stress is associated with burnout, this finding needs to be investigated further. © 2015 National Rural

  3. Managing the professional nurse. Part I. The organizational theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, M L

    1984-02-01

    How do employment organizations outside the hospital field deal with issues such as staff productivity, motivation, burnout, and high turnover? In Part I of this two-part article, the author presents an overview of modern management theory and practice, drawn from the literature on organizational behavior. She shows how nursing administrators can use this scholarly foundation to better understand the organizing principles and problems of their departments. In Part II (to be published in March 1984), the author applies these classic and relevant theories to the specific challenges that face the manager of professional nurses.

  4. Iranian nursing students' perspectives on transition to professional identity: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neishabouri, M; Ahmadi, F; Kazemnejad, A

    2017-09-01

    To explore Iranian nursing students' transition to professional identity. Professional identity is an important outcome of nursing education that has not been fully explored in the Iranian nursing education system. Professional identity is a significant factor influencing the development of nursing education and practice. The transition of nursing students to professional identity is the main concern of nursing education and fundamental prerequisite for policymaking and planning in the field of nursing education. This was a qualitative content analysis study. In-depth unstructured interviews were held with 35 Iranian bachelor's degree nursing students recruited through purposive sampling. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. The data analysis led to the development of four themes and 15 categories: 'satisfaction with professional practice (attending clinical settings and communicating with patients, the feeling of being beneficial)'; 'personal development (growing interest in nursing, feeling competent in helping others, changing character and attitude shift towards patients)'; 'professional development (realizing the importance of nursing knowledge, appreciating professional roles, a changing their understanding of nursing and the meaning it)'; and 'attaining professional commitment (a tendency to present oneself as a nurse, attempting to change oneself, other students and the public image of nursing)'. Development of professional identity is a continual process of transition. The greatest transition occurred in the last year of the programme. Nursing students experienced transition to PI through gaining satisfaction with professional practice, undergoing personal and professional development and developing a professional commitment. Educational policymakers can use our findings for developing strategies that facilitate and support nursing students' transition to professional identity. © 2016 International Council of

  5. Development and validation of a new tool measuring nurses self-reported professional competence--the nurse professional competence (NPC) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jan; Johansson, Eva; Egmar, Ann-Charlotte; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Marianne; Gardulf, Ann

    2014-04-01

    To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formal competence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHO guidelines. A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometric properties. 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges. The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88 items and covering eight factors: "Nursing care", "Value-based nursing care", "Medical/technical care", "Teaching/learning and support", "Documentation and information technology", "Legislation in nursing and safety planning", "Leadership in and development of nursing care" and "Education and supervision of staff/students". All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted in two main themes: "Patient-related nursing" and "Nursing care organisation and development". In addition, evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained. The NPC Scale, which is based on national and international professional competence requirements for nurses, was comprehensively tested and showed satisfactory psychometrical properties. It can e.g. be used to evaluate the outcomes of nursing education programmes, to assess nurses' professional competences in relation to the needs in healthcare organisations, and to tailor introduction programmes for newly employed nurses. © 2013.

  6. Working with local nurses to promote hospital-nursing care during humanitarian assignments overseas: experiences from the perspectives of nurses.

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    Tjoflåt, Ingrid; Karlsen, Bjørg; Saetre Hansen, Britt

    2016-06-01

    To describe how Norwegian expatriate nurses engaged in humanitarian assignments overseas experience working with the local nurses promoting nursing care in the hospital ward. Western countries have a long tradition of providing nurses with expert knowledge in nursing care for humanitarian projects and international work overseas. Studies from humanitarian mission revealed that health workers rarely acknowledge or use the local knowledge. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting expatriate nurses' experiences working with local nurses to promote nursing care in the hospital ward. This study applies a descriptive explorative qualitative design. The data were collected in 2013 by means of seven semi-structured interviews and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The data analyses revealed three themes related to the expatriate nurses' experiences of working with the local nurses to promote nursing care in the hospital ward: (1) Breaking the code, (2) Colliding worlds and (3) Challenges in sharing knowledge. The findings reflect different challenges when working with the local nurses. Findings indicate valuable knowledge gained about local nursing care and the local health and educational system. They also demonstrate challenges for the expatriate nurses related to the local nursing standard in the wards and using the local nurses' experiences and knowledge when working together. The findings can inform nurses, humanitarian organisations and institutions working overseas regarding the recruitment and the preparation of nurses who want to work cross- culturally or in humanitarian missions overseas. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Innovative teaching methods in the professional training of nurses – simulation education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Miertová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article is aimed to highlight usage of innovative teaching methods within simulation education in the professional training of nurses abroad and to present our experience based on passing intensive study programme at School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Salford (United Kingdom, UK within Intensive EU Lifelong Learning Programme (LPP Erasmus EU RADAR 2013. Methods: Implementation of simulation methods such as role-play, case studies, simulation scenarios, practical workshops and clinical skills workstation within structured ABCDE approach (AIM© Assessment and Management Tool was aimed to promote the development of theoretical knowledge and skills to recognize and manage acutely deteriorated patients. Structured SBAR approach (Acute SBAR Communication Tool was used for the training of communication and information sharing among the members of multidisciplinary health care team. OSCE approach (Objective Structured Clinical Examination was used for student’s individual formative assessment. Results: Simulation education is proved to have lots of benefits in the professional training of nurses. It is held in safe, controlled and realistic conditions (in simulation laboratories reflecting real hospital and community care environment with no risk of harming real patients accompanied by debriefing, discussion and analysis of all activities students have performed within simulated scenario. Such learning environment is supportive, challenging, constructive, motivated, engaging, skilled, flexible, inspiring and respectful. Thus the simulation education is effective, interactive, interesting, efficient and modern way of nursing education. Conclusion: Critical thinking and clinical competences of nurses are crucial for early recognition and appropriate response to acute deterioration of patient’s condition. These competences are important to ensure the provision of high quality nursing care. Methods of

  8. A qualitative study of Iranian nurses' understanding and experiences of professional power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Fazlollah

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nurses are expected to empower their clients, but they cannot do so if they themselves feel powerless. They must become empowered before they can empower others. Some researchers have emphasized that understanding the concept of power is an important prerequisite of any empowerment program. While many authors have tried to define the concept of power, there is no comprehensive definition. This paper is an attempt to clarify the concept of power in nursing. It also would present a model describing the factors affecting nurse empowerment. Methods We chose the grounded-theory approach for analysis of the participants' experiences and their viewpoints regarding the concept of professional power in nursing. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation methods were used to gather the data. Forty-four participants were interviewed and 12 sessions of observation were carried out. The constant comparative analysis method was used. Results Six main themes emerged from the data: "Application of knowledge and skills", "Having authority", "Being self-confident", "Unification and solidarity", "Being supported" and "Organizational culture and structure". According to the participants, nurses' power is influenced by these six variables. A theoretical model was designed to represent the interrelationships between these six variables. Conclusions Nurses' power depends on gaining and applying professional knowledge and skills. Delegating authority and enhancing self-confidence of the nurses also help them to apply their knowledge in practice. Unification of the nurses and their mutual support play the key roles in development of their collective power and provide a base for better working conditions, professional independence and self-regulation.

  9. A qualitative study of Iranian nurses' understanding and experiences of professional power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib Hagbaghery, Mohsen; Salsali, Mahvash; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2004-06-24

    BACKGROUND: Nurses are expected to empower their clients, but they cannot do so if they themselves feel powerless. They must become empowered before they can empower others. Some researchers have emphasized that understanding the concept of power is an important prerequisite of any empowerment program. While many authors have tried to define the concept of power, there is no comprehensive definition. This paper is an attempt to clarify the concept of power in nursing. It also would present a model describing the factors affecting nurse empowerment. METHODS: We chose the grounded-theory approach for analysis of the participants' experiences and their viewpoints regarding the concept of professional power in nursing. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation methods were used to gather the data. Forty-four participants were interviewed and 12 sessions of observation were carried out. The constant comparative analysis method was used. RESULTS: Six main themes emerged from the data: "Application of knowledge and skills", "Having authority", "Being self-confident", "Unification and solidarity", "Being supported" and "Organizational culture and structure". According to the participants, nurses' power is influenced by these six variables. A theoretical model was designed to represent the interrelationships between these six variables. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses' power depends on gaining and applying professional knowledge and skills. Delegating authority and enhancing self-confidence of the nurses also help them to apply their knowledge in practice. Unification of the nurses and their mutual support play the key roles in development of their collective power and provide a base for better working conditions, professional independence and self-regulation.

  10. Merely a stepping stone? Professional identity and career prospects following postgraduate mental health nurse training.

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    McCrae, N; Askey-Jones, S; Laker, C

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated mental health nurse training attracts talented graduates, many with a psychology degree. Our study shows that such trainees feel incompatible with the nursing culture. Consequently, professional identification is inhibited, and on qualifying these nurses may choose to develop their careers elsewhere. Nurse educators and mentors should pay greater attention to nurturing a positive professional identity in trainees. Alongside their attainment of knowledge and skills, nursing trainees are moulded by a professional culture and inculcated to norms of beliefs and behaviour. The process of professional identification may be inhibited by accelerated nurse training and an influx of psychology graduates potentially using mental health nursing qualification as a springboard to other career opportunities. This study explored facilitators and barriers to professional identification in newly qualified nurses of accelerated postgraduate training. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 nurses who had recently completed a postgraduate diploma in mental health nursing at King's College London. Participants identified more with the mental health field than with the broader profession of nursing. They defined their practice in terms of values rather than skills and found difficulty in articulating a distinct role for mental health nursing. Although participants had found experience in training and as a registered practitioner rewarding, they were concerned that nursing may not fulfil their aspirations. Professional identity is likely to be a major factor in satisfaction and retention of nurses. Training and continuing professional development should promote career advancement within clinical nursing practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinical supervision of nurses working with patients with borderline personality disorder.

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    Bland, Ann R; Rossen, Eileen K

    2005-06-01

    Some nurses describe individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) as among the most challenging and difficult patients encountered in their practice. As a result, the argument has been made for nursing staff to receive clinical supervision to enhance therapeutic effectiveness and treatment outcomes for individuals with BPD. Formal clinical supervision can focus on the stresses of working in a demanding environment within the work place and enable nurses to accept accountability for their own practice and development (Pesut & Herman, 1999). A psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialist can provide individual and/or group supervision for the nursing staff, including education about patient dynamics, staff responses, and treatment team decisions. A clinical nurse specialist also can provide emotional support to nursing staff, which enhances job satisfaction, as they struggle to maintain professional therapeutic behavior with these individuals.

  12. Context and the leadership experiences and perceptions of professionals: a review of the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Therese; Klass, Des; Lord, Linley; Nowak, Margaret; Thomas, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Leadership studies which focus on categorising leadership styles have been critiqued for failure to consider the lived experience of leadership. The purpose of this paper is to use the framework of Jepson's model of contextual dynamics to explore whether this framework assists understanding of the "how and why" of lived leadership experience within the nursing profession. Themes for a purposeful literature search and review, having regard to the Jepson model, are drawn from the contemporary and dynamic context of nursing. Government reports, coupled with preliminary interviews with a nurseleadership team, guided selection of contextual issues. The contextual interactions arising from managerialism, existing hierarchical models of leadership and increasing knowledge work provided insights into leadership experience in nursing, in the contexts of professional identity and changing educational and generational profiles of nurses. The authors conclude that employing a contextual frame provides insights in studying leadership experience. The author propose additions to the cultural and institutional dimensions of Jepson's model. The findings have implications for structuring and communicating key roles and policies relevant to nursing leadership. These include the need to: address perceptions around the legitimacy of current nursing leaders to provide clinical leadership; modify hierarchical models of nursing leadership; address implications of the role of the knowledge workers. Observing nursing leadership through the lens of Jepson's model of contextual dynamics confirms that this is an important way of exploring how leadership is enacted. The authors found, however, the model also provided a useful frame for considering the experience and understanding of leadership by those to be led.

  13. Factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life - A scoping literature review.

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    Järvinen, Tiina; Eklöf, Niina; Salminen, Leena

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this scoping literature review was to identify the factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life. The literature search was carried out in autumn 2017 in PubMed and CINAHL databases. The studies selected for this review (n = 17) were analyzed thematically with inductive content analysis. Four subthemes that were combined into two main factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life were found. The main factors found were 1) educational factors and 2) personal factors. Educational factors consisted of professional competence and clinical practice, while personal factors consisted of nursing students' background and feelings. Some nursing students tend to feel insecure about entering working life as a newly graduated nurse. This literature review also supports the importance of clinical practice periods in nursing education and for readiness for working life. Nurse education needs to ensure clinical practice periods which support nursing students' professional growth. Further research is needed on how the factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life correlate with each other. Particularly, the association between competence, readiness and positive feelings towards graduation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. THE FORMATION OF THE PROFESSIONAL NURSE AND THE LABOR MARKET TODAY.

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    José Milton Barros Neto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The professional nursing practice has been constantly targeted for discussion, especially regarding the conditions of their work . The aim of this study was to understand the formation of this professional and the job market today, considering the changes in the curriculum of nursing, trends in the labor market , the demand and supply of labor this professional. It is a study of the literature review, based on a historical - critical perspective , using the databases SCIELO , VHL , BIREME , plus titles available in the library of the Centro Universitário de Maceió - CESMAC.O study was guiding question : how has initally vocational nurses face the determinations of the job market today ? It was felt that the training of nurses throughout their history, had fundamental influence of the labor market , whereas the changes in curricular courses were predetermined in the market trends that pointed according to each season . In recent decades , there has been a considerable increase in jobs , but disproportionate to the number of institutions of higher education in nursing in the country . Consequently , highlighted the growth of the informal labor relations , resulting in precarious jobs and the stagnation in labor income.

  15. Work-Family Conflict, Sleep, and Mental Health of Nursing Assistants Working in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Nannini, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Work-family conflict is challenging for workers and may lead to depression, anxiety, and overall poor health. Sleep plays an important role in the maintenance of mental health; however, the role of sleep in the association between work-family conflict and mental health is not well-studied. Questionnaires were collected from 650 nursing assistants in 15 nursing homes. Multivariate linear regression modeling demonstrated that increased work-family conflict was associated with lower mental health scores (β = -2.56, p work-family conflict was correlated with more job demands, less job control, less social support, and longer work hours. Poor sleep quality, but not short sleep duration, mediated the association between work-family conflict and mental health. Workplace interventions to improve nursing assistants' mental health should increase their control over work schedules and responsibilities, provide support to meet their work and family needs, and address healthy sleep practices.

  16. Fostering Professional Nursing Careers in Hospitals: The Role of Staff Development, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovie, Margaret D.

    1983-01-01

    Building on the model of professional nursing careers presented in Part 1, the author discusses the aspects of professional maturation and professional mastery, focusing on the vital role of staff development for career advancement. (SK)

  17. Towards an Uncertain Politics of Professionalism: Teacher and Nurse Identifies in Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronach, Ian; Corbin, Brian; Stark, Sheila; McNamara, Olwen; Warne, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Discusses nature of professional identity, focusing on teachers and nurses, and articulates view of "professional" as "caught between an 'economy of performance' and various 'ecologies of practice'." Rejects over-simplified understanding of "professional" identity and advocates embracing "ambivalence and…

  18. [A preliminary study of the work values of male nurses in Taiwan and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Ying; Tang, Woung-Ru; Chang, Yue-Cune; Maa, Suh-Hwa

    2013-04-01

    Male nurses account for 1.08% of Taiwan's total professional nursing workforce. While work values are known to impact the practice of female nurses, the work values of male nurses have never been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to explore the work values of male nurses in Taiwan and related factors. We applied a cross-sectional design that targeted all male nurses nationwide and used a structured questionnaire distributed by mail to collect data. Data were collected from 1,087 Taiwan-based male nurses with 745 valid responses. Mean score for overall work value was 2.78 (on a maximum scale of 4). Socio-demographic differences contributed to work value variance among respondents. Major factors of influence on work value included education, work unit, work position, work rank, salary, hospital classification, and reason for choosing a nursing career. This study found personal characteristics, occupational roles, job performance, and reason for choosing a career in nursing to all correlate strongly with work value.

  19. Attention to nurses' rewarding - an interview study of registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitovirta, Jaana; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Mitronen, Lasse; De Gieter, Sara; Kvist, Tarja

    2017-04-01

    To identify meaningful types of rewards and the consequences of rewards as expressed by Finnish registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare. Previous studies have found significant associations between nurses' rewards and both their commitment and job satisfaction. Furthermore, appropriate rewards can have beneficial effects on factors including workforce stability and occupational satisfaction that are highly important in times of nurse shortages. A cross-sectional, qualitative interview study. Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews (n = 20) with registered nurses working in Finland's primary and private healthcare, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Six meaningful types of rewards were identified by the registered nurses: Financial compensation and benefits, Work-Life balance, Work content, Professional development, Recognition, and Supportive leadership. Rewards encouraged respondents to perform their work correctly and reinforced occupational satisfaction, but also caused feelings of envy and stress. It is essential to pay attention to nurses' preferences for particular rewards and to reward management. When designing effective reward systems for registered nurses, it is not sufficient to provide financial rewards alone, as various kinds of non-financial rewards are both meaningful and necessary. When trying to improve registered nurses' commitment and job satisfaction through reward management, it is important to listen to nurses' opinions to create a reward system that integrates financial and non-financial rewards and is fair from their perspective. Healthcare organisations that offer registered nurses a holistic reward system are more likely to retain satisfied and committed nurses at a time of increasing nursing shortages. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [The profile and professional practice of nurses in a psychosocial care services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Cristiane Bergues; Aranha e Silva, Ana Luisa

    2010-06-01

    This qualitative study was performed with fourteen nurses of eleven psychosocial care services. The objectives of the study were the following: to characterize the professional profile of the nurses who work in community psychiatric services and to verify those nurses' practice according to the current model of mental health care. there was a prevalence of females; most had over 10 years since their graduation; their entrance in the mental health area is late and is associated with the lack of job opportunities and the fact that the service is close to their home. One part of the nurses found it difficult to define their work at an extra-hospital environment. On the other hand, another group of nurses believes that the nursing work in mental health services is flexible and it is shared with other workers of the multidisciplinary team. Low salaries, poor infrastructure and the lack of team member acknowledgement generate dissatisfaction at work. The Brazilian Psychiatric Reform is associated with dehospitalization.

  1. Fatigue, Work Schedules, and Perceived Performance in Bedside Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagherian, Knar; Clinton, Michael E; Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne

    2017-07-01

    Hospital nurses are expected to maintain optimal work performance; yet, fatigue can threaten safe practice and result in unfavorable patient outcomes. This descriptive cross-sectional study explored the association between fatigue, work schedules, and perceived work performance among nurses. The study sample included 77 bedside nurses who were mostly female, single, and between 20 and 29 years of age. The majority worked 8-hour shifts and overtime. Nurses who worked during off days reported significantly higher chronic fatigue compared with those nurses who took time off. Nurses who reported feeling refreshed after sleep had significantly less chronic and acute fatigue and more intershift recovery. Nurses with acute and chronic fatigue perceived poorer physical performance. Also, nurses who reported chronic fatigue perceived they were less alert and less able to concentrate when providing patient care. Less effective communication was also associated with acute and chronic fatigue. In conclusion, fatigue has safety implications for nurses' practice that should be monitored by nursing management.

  2. Public Health Nurses in Israel: A Case Study on a Quality Improvement Project of Nurse's Work Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Shachaf, Sara; Rapaport, Zofia; Livne, Tzipi; Madjar, Batya

    2017-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) working in Well Baby Clinic in Israel's Haifa district were voicing great distress to inspectors-the impossibility of meeting their workload, feeling overwhelmed, poor physical, and technological conditions. They were feeling tired and frustrated and burn-out was rising. The district's nursing management took the decision, together with Tel Aviv University's nursing research unit, to conduct a quality improvement project based on issues that arose from meetings with focus groups on the nurses' difficulties. This paper is a case study of a quality improvement project targeting nurses daily working life. One of its chief contributions is as a study of meeting PHNs' frustration by integrating focus groups and round-table brainstorming (involving nurses, clinic managers and nursing inspectors) in order to identify targets for practical intervention. This strategy has been very successful. It has provided the district's nursing management a battery of forcefully argued and realistically grounded proposals for making the work of Well Baby clinics more relevant to their communities and giving nurses (a) the conditions to meet their assignments and (b) greater professional self-respect. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Chang, Ying; Fu, Jialiang; Wang, Lie

    2012-10-29

    Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse' burnout is important to improve nurses' health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24) scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35%) became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses' burnout.

  4. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function

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    Martha Adiela Lopera Betancur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. Methodology. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Results. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Conclusion. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  5. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera Betancur, Martha Adiela

    2015-01-01

    This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  6. Strategies of Iranian nurses to overcome professional discrimination: An explorative qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohani, Masoumeh

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination is a situation in which individuals receive unequal social benefits in return for equal roles they play. They react to such a situation in different ways. This study aims at identifying the strategies used by Iranian nurses to overcome professional discrimination. This qualitative study was conducted with the participation of 23 nurses who worked in hospitals in the cities of Tehran, Tabriz, and Ilam. They were selected based on purposive sampling. Data were collected using deep and unstructured interviews in a period of time between May 2013 and June 2014. Interviews were simultaneously analyzed using conventional content analysis method after being transcribed. Ethical consideration: This study was approved by the Regional Committee of Medical Research Ethics. Also, voluntary participation, anonymity, and confidentiality were considered. "Presenting a positive image of oneself," "objection," and "expectation" were three themes extracted through data analysis. Organizational discrimination puts nurses under stress and pressure. Nurses react to unfair behavior in different ways. These reactions are harmful to an organization and lead to negative consequences. Professional discrimination has made nurses adopt strategies which would lead to such consequences, which in turn influences their performance as nurses.

  7. Direct cost of monitoring conventional hemodialysis conducted by nursing professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the mean direct cost of conventional hemodialysis monitored by nursing professionals in three public teaching and research hospitals in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Method: this was a quantitative, explorative and descriptive investigation, based on a multiple case study approach. The mean direct cost was calculated by multiplying (clocked) time spent per procedure by the unit cost of direct labor. Values were calculated in Brazilian real (BRL). Results: H...

  8. Social media in nurse education: Utilization and E-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Valda J A; Anstey, Allan; Carter, Sandra; Gosse, Natalie; Hutchens, Karen M; Marsh, Janice A

    2017-10-01

    To explore faculty and student utilization of social media and its professional implications in nurse education. A descriptive study. Five hundred six Bachelor of Nursing students, 112 Practical Nursing students and 74 faculty members were invited to complete a questionnaire of 28 questions relating to social media. Three hundred thirty-seven students and 29 faculty responded. Students spent significantly more time using social media compared to faculty and both groups used it mainly for personal use. However, almost twice as many students used social media for educational purposes than did faculty (58.5% vs 27.6%, psocial media to talk about academic related problems, only 28% of faculty did so (psocial media to discuss academic related problems. YouTube and text messaging were popular platforms for educational purposes. While Facebook was also a popular educational site for students (95% used it for informal learning; 67% for formal learning), it was much less commonly used by faculty (45% used it for informal learning; 17% for formal learning). More students than faculty felt that they were aware of privacy features, and of the professional behavior expected when using social media. In addition, more students (90.7%) than faculty (71.43%) used these privacy features (psocial media among students and faculty. Utilization of public platforms, while potentially beneficial, can have professional implications if not used appropriately with both personal and academic use. Developing best practice approaches for using social media in nurse education is essential to ensure that faculty and students are informed of e-professionalism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The ideas of nurses about the reflection of ethic education in their professional life

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    Şenay Gül

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION[|]This research was prepared as a qualitative study for the contribution to the ethics education studied during nursery education and reflections on nurses' practices by researching nurse's experiences.[¤]METHODS[|]In this study, data were obtained by focus group discussion method used in qualitative research. This study was completed during December 2015 – January 2016 with nurses working at University Hospitals', Training and Research Hospitals', Local Hospitals' Internal Medicine, Surgery and Intensive Care Unit Departments. Inclusion Criteria was obtained in ethics class during education and at least 1 year experience. 21 nurses included in this study. Participants were divided into 3 groups and focus group interview was made. The obtained data were analyzed by thematic analysis method.[¤]RESULTS[|]Participant nurses remarked that in general they cannot remember the knowledge which they learned during ethical classes but case debates are more memorable. Nurses expressed that the most ethical problems are related to ethical principles, malpractice, lack of professional boundaries, managerial problems, systemic problems. They claimed that in most cases there is a contradiction between their learnings and situations that they encounter in clinics and they stated that they are insufficient to represent ethical behavior due to factors like work load, supply and personal deficiency, inadequate professional definition. Nurses stated that ethical education is important but practical education is more efficient than theory and education should be continuous.[¤]DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION[|]As a result, nurses declared that ethical education is important but it should be continuous; they cannot reflect their knowledge on their practical life due to many factors that they encounter on the clinics. In this manner, ethical education at the nursery university program should be clinical oriented, multi-disciplinary and continuous after the

  10. STRESSORS IN NURSING WITH DOUBLE OR MORE WORKING HOURS

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    Marlinir Bezerra de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Objetivo: investigar os principais agentes estressores nos trabalhadores de enfermagem com dupla ou mais jornada de trabalho; verificar os principais sinais e sintomas indicadores de estresse. Métodos: estudo descritivo, com abordagem quantitativa. Desenvolvido em um hospital público da região metropolitana de Fortaleza-CE. A amostra constitui-se de 30 profissionais, sendo 46,7% auxiliares de enfermagem, 33,3% enfermeiros e 20% técnicos. A coleta ocorreu de novembro a dezembro de 2008, por meio de questionário semi-estruturado. Resultados: 93,3% dos profissionais são do sexo feminino na faixa etária de 31-40 anos. O estudo revelou vários fatores levando ao estresse, com destaque para insatisfação salarial (83%, falta de lazer (73% e sobrecarga de trabalho (60%, potencialmente prejudiciais à qualidade da assistência. Conclusão: percebeu-se a escassez de tempo que os trabalhadores de enfermagem dedicam ao descanso, ao lazer, ao convívio em família e à sua qualificação profissional. Descritores: Saúde mental, Estresse Ocupacional, Enfermagem, Ambiente de trabalho.   Abstract Objective: To investigate the main stressors in nursing workers double or more working hours, check the main signs and symptoms indicative of stress. Methods: A descriptive study with quantitative approach. It was developed in a public hospital in the metropolitan region of Fortaleza. The sample consisted of 30 professionals, and 46.7% nursing auxiliaries, 33.3% nurses and 20% technical. The data was collected during November-December 2008, through semi-structured questionnaire. Results: 93.3% of professionals are women aged 31-40 years. The study revealed several factors leading to stress, especially wage dissatisfaction (83%, lack of leisure (73% and workload (60%, potentially damaging the quality of care. Conclusion: it was perceived scarcity of time that the nursing staff dedicated to rest, leisure, living with the family and their professional

  11. Working conditions that contribute to absenteeism among nurses in a provincial hospital in the Limpopo Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, M; Jooste, K

    2008-03-01

    Absenteeism results in an increased workload for nurses who stand in for colleagues and can lead to situations in which a lack of motivation among nurses and a lowering of the quality of patient care may occur. The researcher observed that certain conditions, such as inflexible working schedules, were given as reasons for the absenteeism in units in a provincial hospital. A non-experimental, descriptive, quantitative study was undertaken. The purpose of the article was to describe the working conditions that contribute to absenteeism among the professional and sub-professional nurses at a provincial hospital in the Limpopo province of South Africa. The sample included 107 professional nurses and 163 sub-professional nurses who voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to collect data, which was analysed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings of this study indicated that personal and managerial characteristics, and organisational and working conditions may lead to absenteeism in the workplace. This article focuses on the working conditions that are constraints, namely inadequate group cohesion, inadequate delegation of autonomy, role ambiguity, ineffective routinisation and the effect of the workload in the workplace. Recommendations are made for improving working conditions to combat absenteeism among nurses. The limitations of this study are highlighted.

  12. [Occupational risks perception in professional nursing practitioners at health care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Povedano, Miguel; Santacruz-Hamer, Virginia; Oliva-Reina, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study aim is to describe the perception of occupational risks by nursing professionals in health care center. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on a total population of 122 registered nurses (RNs) and 89 certified nurse aides (CNAs). A convenience sample of nursing professionals was recruited with 72 RNs (27 males and 45 females), and 45 CNAs (1 male and 44 females). They were asked about their perception of occupational risks during their everyday work practice. Sex and age variables were considered, as well as work-related accidents and occupational risk prevention training that had been registered in the last five years. The sample mean age was 47.29 ± 7.98 years (RNs, 45.11; and CNAs, 50.77). Main sources of risks as perceived by RNs were those accidents due to biological materials exposure (52.78%), carrying and moving weight (19.44%), and to occupational stress (19.44%); amongst CNAs, those accidents due to carrying and moving weight (44.44%), biological materials exposure (26.67%) and other infections (15.56%) were also mentioned. As regards the overall risks identified by these professionals, 23.08% of them had perceived no risk at all during their work; 35.04% only identified one risk, and 29.06% perceived two risks in their day to day activity, whereas 12.82% identified three or more occupational risks. As a general rule, the nursing professionals tend to underestimate the occupational risks they are exposed to, with biological, musculoskeletal, and occupational-related stress are perceived as the main sources of risks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Work-engaged nurses for a better clinical learning environment: a ward-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomietto, Marco; Comparcini, Dania; Simonetti, Valentina; Pelusi, Gilda; Troiani, Silvano; Saarikoski, Mikko; Cicolini, Giancarlo

    2016-05-01

    To correlate workgroup engagement in nursing teams and the clinical learning experience of nursing students. Work engagement plays a pivotal role in explaining motivational dynamics. Nursing education is workplace-based and, through their clinical placements, nursing students develop both their clinical competences and their professional identity. However, there is currently a lack of evidence on the role of work engagement related to students' learning experiences. A total of 519 nurses and 519 nursing students were enrolled in hospital settings. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) was used to assess work engagement, and the Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision plus nurse Teacher (CLES+T) scale was used to assess students' learning experience. A multilevel linear regression analysis was performed. Group-level work engagement of nurses correlated with students' clinical learning experience (β = 0.11, P learning (respectively, β = 0.37, P education. Nursing education institutions and health-care settings need to conjointly work to build effective organisational climates. The results highlighted the importance of considering the group-level analysis to understand the most effective strategies of intervention for both organisations and nursing education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Among nurses, how does education level impact professional values? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibandze, B T; Scafide, K N

    2018-03-01

    Professional nursing values have been acknowledged globally as the foundation of daily nursing care practice. Understanding how nurses identify, comprehend and apply their professional nursing values is an important step towards improving nursing practice and patient care quality. Research has demonstrated that nurses' professional values are cultivated during prelicensure academic education. The aim of this systematic review was to determine how level of education affects professional nursing values of clinical practising nurses. A systematic search of quantitative research published through December 2015 was performed in the following five electronic databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Web of Science and Religion and Philosophy Collection. The search was not limited to country of origin. The studies were assessed for methodological quality using established criteria. Of 1501 articles identified through the literature search, only seven studies met the inclusion criteria with the majority being of good to high quality. Most of the studies found registered nurses pursuing a bachelor of science in nursing or higher had a greater awareness and application of professional values than nurses with lower levels of academic or non-academic education. Nurses with higher education also embraced professional values as fundamental for quality nursing care practice. Health and academic institutions should support nurses through quality continuing and higher education that reinforces professional values, thus improving the quality of patient care. The level of nurses' education appears to play an important role in developing both an awareness and an integration of professional values into practice. More research is needed to discover methods that may be used to promote nurses' professional values among nurses already practising clinically. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Home care nurses' experience of job stress and considerations for the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Linda W; Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Friedman, Donna Haig; Dick, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Home care nurses report increased stress in their jobs due to work environment characteristics that impact professional practice. Stressors and characteristics of the professional practice environment that moderate nurses' experience of job stress were examined in this embedded multiple case study. Real life experiences within a complex environment were drawn from interviews and observations with 29 participants across two home care agencies from one eastern U.S. state. Findings suggest that role overload, role conflict, and lack of control can be moderated in agencies where there are meaningful opportunities for shared decision making and the nurse-patient relationship is supported.

  16. Work load issues in clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, P; Fitzgerald, D C; McCarthy, P A; McDougal, D

    1997-01-01

    This survey of 22 baccalaureate (BSN) programs was undertaken to describe and analyze work load issues in BSN nursing education. Academic careers of nursing faculty may be at risk because clinical work load policies generally place less value on clinical teaching than on classroom teaching. Research question addressed teaching credit hours received for each clinical contact hour, remaining weekly hours available for clinical faculty to accomplish service and research activities, and student-to-faculty ratios in clinical settings. Seventy per cent of the programs surveyed allocated less than 1 teaching credit hour to 1 clinical contact hour. Nursing faculty who taught clinical courses with 5:1 to .25:1 work load credit for face-to-face contact hour ratios needed to work between 8 and 24 hours more in face-to-face teaching compared with colleagues teaching lecture courses, thus leaving less time for scholarship and service activities. Fifty per cent of the programs reported 10 or more students in some of the clinical courses. Faculty reported concerns about quality of learning experiences and supervisory difficulties as student numbers in clinical courses exceeded 8 students/faculty member.

  17. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  18. Perceived Stress and Professional Quality of Life in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amee A; Vankar, Jagdish R; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G

    2015-11-01

    To study the levels of perceived stress in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses and its association with professional quality of life domains viz. compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary trauma. In this multicenter, cross sectional study, data was collected by surveying 129 nurses from nine NICUs across