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Sample records for professional medical ethics

  1. How virtue ethics informs medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Susan D; Brody, Howard

    2012-12-01

    We argue that a turn toward virtue ethics as a way of understanding medical professionalism represents both a valuable corrective and a missed opportunity. We look at three ways in which a closer appeal to virtue ethics could help address current problems or issues in professionalism education-first, balancing professionalism training with demands for professional virtues as a prerequisite; second, preventing demands for the demonstrable achievement of competencies from working against ideal professionalism education as lifelong learning; and third, avoiding temptations to dismiss moral distress as a mere "hidden curriculum" problem. As a further demonstration of how best to approach a lifelong practice of medical virtue, we will examine altruism as a mean between the extremes of self-sacrifice and selfishness.

  2. The Overlapping Spheres of Medical Professionalism and Medical Ethics: A Conceptual Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W.

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the concepts of "professionalism" and "ethics" as they are used in health professions education and, in particular, medical education. It proposes that, in order to make sense of the construct of "professional ethics," it would be helpful to conceive of professionalism and ethics as overlapping but…

  3. Ethics and professionalism in medical physics: A survey of AAPM members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Naim; Armato, Samuel G.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Serago, Christopher F.; Ross, Lainie F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess current education, practices, attitudes, and perceptions pertaining to ethics and professionalism in medical physics. Methods: A link to a web-based survey was distributed to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) e-mail membership list, with a follow-up e-mail sent two weeks later. The survey included questions about ethics/professionalism education, direct personal knowledge of ethically questionable practices in clinical care, research, education (teaching and mentoring), and professionalism, respondents’ assessment of their ability to address ethical/professional dilemmas, and demographics. For analysis, reports of unethical or ethically questionable practices or behaviors by approximately 40% or more of respondents were classified as “frequent.” Results: Partial or complete responses were received from 18% (1394/7708) of AAPM members. Overall, 60% (827/1377) of the respondents stated that they had not received ethics/professionalism education during their medical physics training. Respondents currently in training were more likely to state that they received instruction in ethics/professionalism (80%, 127/159) versus respondents who were post-training (35%, 401/1159). Respondents’ preferred method of instruction in ethics/professionalism was structured periodic discussions involving both faculty and students/trainees. More than 90% (1271/1384) supported continuing education in ethics/professionalism and 75% (1043/1386) stated they would attend ethics/professionalism sessions at professional/scientific meetings. In the research setting, reports about ethically questionable authorship assignment were frequent (approximately 40%) whereas incidents of ethically questionable practices about human subjects protections were quite infrequent (5%). In the clinical setting, there was frequent recollection of incidents regarding lack of training, resources and skills, and error/incident reporting. In the educational setting

  4. Ethics and professionalism in medical physics: a survey of AAPM members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Naim; Armato, Samuel G; Giger, Maryellen L; Serago, Christopher F; Ross, Lainie F

    2013-04-01

    To assess current education, practices, attitudes, and perceptions pertaining to ethics and professionalism in medical physics. A link to a web-based survey was distributed to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) e-mail membership list, with a follow-up e-mail sent two weeks later. The survey included questions about ethics/professionalism education, direct personal knowledge of ethically questionable practices in clinical care, research, education (teaching and mentoring), and professionalism, respondents' assessment of their ability to address ethical/professional dilemmas, and demographics. For analysis, reports of unethical or ethically questionable practices or behaviors by approximately 40% or more of respondents were classified as "frequent." Partial or complete responses were received from 18% (1394/7708) of AAPM members. Overall, 60% (827/1377) of the respondents stated that they had not received ethics/professionalism education during their medical physics training. Respondents currently in training were more likely to state that they received instruction in ethics/professionalism (80%, 127/159) versus respondents who were post-training (35%, 401/1159). Respondents' preferred method of instruction in ethics/professionalism was structured periodic discussions involving both faculty and students/trainees. More than 90% (1271/1384) supported continuing education in ethics/professionalism and 75% (1043/1386) stated they would attend ethics/professionalism sessions at professional/scientific meetings. In the research setting, reports about ethically questionable authorship assignment were frequent (approximately 40%) whereas incidents of ethically questionable practices about human subjects protections were quite infrequent (5%). In the clinical setting, there was frequent recollection of incidents regarding lack of training, resources and skills, and error/incident reporting. In the educational setting, incidents of unethical or ethically

  5. The challenge of promoting professionalism through medical ethics and humanities education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, David J; McCullough, Laurence B; Wear, Stephen; Lehmann, Lisa S; Nixon, Lois LaCivita; Carrese, Joseph A; Shapiro, Johanna F; Green, Michael J; Kirch, Darrell G

    2013-11-01

    Given recent emphasis on professionalism training in medical schools by accrediting organizations, medical ethics and humanities educators need to develop a comprehensive understanding of this emphasis. To achieve this, the Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education (PRIME) II Workshop (May 2011) enlisted representatives of the three major accreditation organizations to join with a national expert panel of medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. PRIME II faculty engaged in a dialogue on the future of professionalism in medical education. The authors present three overarching themes that resulted from the PRIME II discussions: transformation, question everything, and unity of vision and purpose.The first theme highlights that education toward professionalism requires transformational change, whereby medical ethics and humanities educators would make explicit the centrality of professionalism to the formation of physicians. The second theme emphasizes that the flourishing of professionalism must be based on first addressing the dysfunctional aspects of the current system of health care delivery and financing that undermine the goals of medical education. The third theme focuses on how ethics and humanities educators must have unity of vision and purpose in order to collaborate and identify how their disciplines advance professionalism. These themes should help shape discussions of the future of medical ethics and humanities teaching.The authors argue that improvement of the ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that fosters professionalism should enhance patient care and be evaluated for its distinctive contributions to educational processes aimed at producing this outcome.

  6. SU-E-E-03: Ethics and Professionalism Education in Medical Physics: A Needs Assessment Study.

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    Ozturk, N; Armato, S; Giger, M L; Serago, C; Ross, L F

    2012-06-01

    To perform a needs assessment survey of ethics/professionalism education in medical physics and ethical/professional challenges in clinical,research and educational settings with the intent of supplementing and customizing TG159 recommended ethics curriculum for medical physics trainees. A web-based survey was conducted among AAPM members to assess current practices, attitudes and perceptions pertaining to ethics/professionalism education and ethical/professional misconduct or questionable behavior and practices in the field. The survey was distributed by AAPM to 7708 members via email; 1362 (17.7%) responded. Seventy-five percent of the respondents were male. Sixty percent (805/1345) stated they received no education in ethics/professionalism. Eighty-one percent (126/155) of current trainees received instruction in ethics/professionalism, as opposed to 35% (392/1130) of those who are post-training. There was strong support (>90%) for continuing education in ethics/professionalism; seventy-five percent (1019/1354) supported sessions on ethics and professionalism at national meetings. Most preferred method of ethics instruction was periodic discussion sessions involving faculty and trainees, with the least interest expressed for a separate course. Many reported direct personal knowledge of one or more instances of a variety of professional/ethical misconduct or questionable behavior. Thirty eight percent (458/1192) reported poor mentorship, with women reporting this concern more often than men (129/281,46% versus 316/877, 36%, pmedical physics trainees at our institution. This effort may be useful to other medical physics programs which offer ethics training/education. This work has been funded in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, T32 EB002103-22S1. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Transforming educational accountability in medical ethics and humanities education toward professionalism.

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    Doukas, David J; Kirch, Darrell G; Brigham, Timothy P; Barzansky, Barbara M; Wear, Stephen; Carrese, Joseph A; Fins, Joseph J; Lederer, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Effectively developing professionalism requires a programmatic view on how medical ethics and humanities should be incorporated into an educational continuum that begins in premedical studies, stretches across medical school and residency, and is sustained throughout one's practice. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education National Conference on Medical Ethics and Humanities in Medical Education (May 2012) invited representatives from the three major medical education and accreditation organizations to engage with an expert panel of nationally known medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This article, based on the views of these representatives and their respondents, offers a future-tense account of how professionalism can be incorporated into medical education.The themes that are emphasized herein include the need to respond to four issues. The first theme highlights how ethics and humanities can provide a response to the dissonance that occurs in current health care delivery. The second theme focuses on how to facilitate preprofessional readiness for applicants through reform of the medical school admission process. The third theme emphasizes the importance of integrating ethics and humanities into the medical school administrative structure. The fourth theme underscores how outcomes-based assessment should reflect developmental milestones for professional attributes and conduct. The participants emphasized that ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that promote professionalism should be taught with accountability, flexibility, and the premise that all these traits are essential to the formation of a modern professional physician.

  8. Professional medical organizations and commercial conflicts of interest: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard

    2010-01-01

    The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) has recently been criticized for accepting a large corporate donation from Coca-Cola to fund patient education on obesity prevention. Conflicts of interest, whether individual or organizational, occur when one enters into arrangements that reasonably tempt one to put aside one's primary obligations in favor of secondary interests, such as financial self-interest. Accepting funds from commercial sources that seek to influence physician organizational behavior in a direction that could run counter to the public health represents one of those circumstances and so constitutes a conflict of interest. Most of the defenses offered by AAFP are rationalizations rather than ethical counterarguments. Medical organizations, as the public face of medicine and as formulator of codes of ethics for their physician members, have special obligations to adhere to high ethical standards.

  9. Ethical and professional conduct of medical students: review of current assessment measures and controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Boon, K; Turner, J

    2004-01-01

    As medical education increasingly acknowledges the importance of the ethical and professional conduct of practitioners, and moves towards more formal assessment of these issues, it is important to consider the evidence base which exists in this area. This article discusses literature about the health needs and problems experienced by medical practitioners as a background to a review of the current efforts in medical education to promote ethical conduct and develop mechanisms for the detection...

  10. A medical curriculum in transition: audit and student perspective of undergraduate teaching of ethics and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Toni C; Riley, Stephen; Hain, Richard

    2017-11-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) stipulates that doctors must be competent professionals, not merely scholars and practitioners. Medical school curricula should enable students to develop professional values and competencies. Additionally, medical schools are moving towards integrated undergraduate curricula, Cardiff's C21 being one such example. We carried out an audit to determine the extent to which C21 delivers GMC professionalism competencies, and a student questionnaire to explore student perspective on ethics and professionalism. C21 delivers explicit or implicit teaching for all major GMC competencies, though some missed opportunities remain. The questionnaire responses showed that most students value ethics and professionalism teaching, and that it is most well received when delivered in a variety of ways and contexts throughout the curriculum. We also note that some respondents confuse ethics and professionalism with the policing of student behaviour. C21 and curricula like it offer many opportunities for nurturing ethically and professionally competent physicians. Students appear to value this, though there remains confusion between medical school discipline and ethics and professionalism which needs further explication. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Professional Ethics and Organizational Commitment Among the Education Department Staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

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    Ali Imani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concepts such as organizational commitment and employees’ and managers’ ethics provide decision-makers and policy makers with potentially useful information which can result in increasing organizational efficiency and effectiveness. This study aimed to explore the relationship between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the staff working in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. The study population consisted of all staff working as educational experts in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (N = 65. Data collection instruments used in this study were two standard questionnaires on professional ethics and organizational commitment. SPSS software version 21 was used to analyze the data. Results: According to the results, mean scores obtained for professional ethics and organizational commitment were (91.57± 9.13 (95% CI, 89.23-93.91 and (64.89 ± 10.37 (95% CI, 62.2367.54, respectively. A significant relationship was observed between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the educational experts working in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (correlation coefficient = 0.405 (P = 0.001 (at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between professional ethics and work experience (P = 0.043. The highest level of professional ethics observed was associated with those participants having a work experience of ranging from 6 to 10 years. Individuals with fulltime employment scored the highest in organizational commitment. Conclusion: Educational experts possessed a high level of professional ethics. The finding provides the grounds for promoting organizational commitment, which will lead to higher levels of organizational effectiveness.

  12. Relevance of the rationalist-intuitionist debate for ethics and professionalism in medical education.

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    Leffel, G Michael; Oakes Mueller, Ross A; Curlin, Farr A; Yoon, John D

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread pedagogical efforts to modify discrete behaviors in developing physicians, the professionalism movement has generally shied away from essential questions such as what virtues characterize the good physician, and how are those virtues formed? Although there is widespread adoption of medical ethics curricula, there is still no consensus about the primary goals of ethics education. Two prevailing perspectives dominate the literature, constituting what is sometimes referred to as the "virtue/skill dichotomy". The first perspective argues that teaching ethics is a means of providing physicians with a skill set for analyzing and resolving ethical dilemmas. The second perspective suggests that teaching ethics is a means of creating virtuous physicians. The authors argue that this debate about medical ethics education mirrors the Rationalist-Intuitionist debate in contemporary moral psychology. In the following essay, the authors sketch the relevance of the Rationalist-Intuitionist debate to medical ethics and professionalism. They then outline a moral intuitionist model of virtuous caring that derives from but also extends the "social intuitionist model" of moral action and virtue. This moral intuitionist model suggests several practical implications specifically for medical character education but also for health science education in general. This approach proposes that character development is best accomplished by tuning-up (activating) moral intuitions, amplifying (intensifying) moral emotions related to intuitions, and strengthening (expanding) intuition-expressive, emotion-related moral virtues, more than by "learning" explicit ethical rules or principles.

  13. A Code of Professional Ethical Conduct for the American Medical Informatics Association

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    Hurdle, John F.; Adams, Samantha; Brokel, Jane; Chang, Betty; Embi, Peter; Petersen, Carolyn; Terrazas, Enrique; Winkelstein, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The AMIA Board of Directors has decided to periodically publish AMIA’s Code of Professional Ethical Conduct for its members in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. The Code also will be available on the AMIA Web site at www.amia.org as it continues to evolve in response to feedback from the AMIA membership. The AMIA Board acknowledges the continuing work and dedication of the AMIA Ethics Committee. AMIA is the copyright holder of this work. PMID:17460125

  14. Levels of empathy and professional ethics in candidates to Medical Graduate School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Jiménez-López

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The current perception of a dehumanized medical attention and its low quality has questioned the empathic capacity and ethics of the health professionals. The research in this field reports variations in this attributes along the doctors’ education. Objective: to explore the global levels of empathy and professional ethics, as well as the levels of each component of both attributes in a sample of applicants to a medical graduate program. Methodology: 65 residents that applied for graduation studies in a very specialized medical unit were included. As part of the application process, they answered the Cognitive and Affective Empathy Test and the Professional Ethical Attitudes Scale. Results: The average scores of the sample got Average in empathy and Optimal in professional ethics. The comparison by gender, specialty and competences showed less affective and better ethical competence in women, more cognitive empathy in surgical specialties, and in general an absence of correlation between the two variables and specifically by competence. Conclusions: The importance of measuring the specific competences of each attribute is highlighted given that the variation in specific competences impact in different aspects the doctor’s education, as the specialty choice, the student selection, the development of academic programs and the adequate learning about the construction of an effective relation doctor-patient. © Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Sociales

  15. Medical ethics and ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyalomhe, G B S

    2009-01-01

    Ethical problems routinely arise in the hospital and outpatient practice settings and times of dilemma do occur such that practitioners and patients are at cross-roads where choice and decision making become difficult in terms of ethics. This paper attempts a synopsis of the basic principles of medical ethics, identifies some ethical dilemmas that doctors often encounter and discusses some strategies to address them as well as emphasizes the need for enhanced ethics education both for physicians and patients particularly in Nigeria. Literature and computer programmes (Medline and PsychoInfo databases) were searched for relevant information. The search showed that the fundamental principles suggested by ethicists to assist doctors to evaluate the ethics of a situation while making a decision include respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. Although the above principles do not give answers as to how to handle a particular situation, they serve as a guide to doctors on what principles ought to apply to actual circumstances. The principles sometimes conflict with each other leading to ethical dilemmas when applied to issues such as abortion, contraception, euthanasia, professional misconduct, confidentiality truth telling, professional relationship with relatives, religion, traditional medicine and business concerns. Resolution of dilemmas demand the best of the doctor's knowledge of relevant laws and ethics, his training and experience, his religious conviction and moral principles as well as his readiness to benefit from ethics consultation and the advice of his colleagues. Ethics education should begin from the impressionable age in homes, continued in the medical schools and after graduation to ensure that doctors develop good ethical practices and acquire the ability to effectively handle ethical dilemmas. Also, education of patients and sanction of unethical behaviour will reduce ethical dilemmas.

  16. Same Principles, Different Worlds: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Medical Ethics and Nursing Ethics in Finnish Professional Texts.

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    Saxén, Salla

    2017-05-26

    This qualitative social scientific study explores professional texts of healthcare ethics to understand the ways in which ethical professionalism in medicine and nursing are culturally constructed in Finland. Two books in ethics, published by Finnish national professional organizations-one for nurses and one for physicians-were analyzed with the method of critical discourse analysis. Codes of ethics for each profession were also scrutinized. Analysis of the texts sought to reveal what is taken for granted in the texts as well as to speculate what appeared to be relegated to the margins of the texts or left entirely invisible. Physicians' ethics was discovered to emphasize objectivity and strong group membership as a basis for ethical professionalism. The discourses identified in the physicians' ethics guidebook were universal ethics, reductionism, non-subjectivity, and threat. Nursing ethics was discovered to highlight reflectivity as its central focus. This idea of reflectivity was echoed in the identified discourses: local ethics, enlightenment, and moral agency. The analysis exposes a cultural gap between the ethics discourses of medicine and nursing. More work is needed to bridge ethics discourses in Finland in a way that can support healthcare professionals to find common ground and to foster inclusivity in ethical dialogue. Further development of bioethical practices is suggested as a potential way forward.

  17. Between professional values, social regulations and patient preferences: medical doctors' perceptions of ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringedal, Berit; Isaksson Rø, Karin; Magelssen, Morten; Førde, Reidun; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløv

    2017-11-18

    We present and discuss the results of a Norwegian survey of medical doctors' views on potential ethical dilemmas in professional practice. The study was conducted in 2015 as a postal questionnaire to a representative sample of 1612 doctors, among which 1261 responded (78%). We provided a list of 41 potential ethical dilemmas and asked whether each was considered a dilemma, and whether the doctor would perform the task, if in a position to do so. Conceptually, dilemmas arise because of tensions between two or more of four doctor roles: the patient's advocate, a steward of societal interests, a member of a profession and a private individual. 27 of the potential dilemmas were considered dilemmas by at least 50% of the respondents. For more than half of the dilemmas, the anticipated course of action varied substantially within the professional group, with at least 20% choosing a different course than their colleagues, indicating low consensus in the profession. Doctors experience a large range of ethical dilemmas, of which many have been given little attention by academic medical ethics. The less-discussed dilemmas are characterised by a low degree of consensus in the profession about how to handle them. There is a need for medical ethicists, medical education, postgraduate courses and clinical ethics support to address common dilemmas in clinical practice. Viewing dilemmas as role conflicts can be a fruitful approach to these discussions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. A Study of the Relationship Between Nurses' Professional Self-Concept and Professional Ethics in Hospitals Affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandavar, Nehleh; Rahmanian, Afifeh; Badiyepeymaie Jahromi, Zohreh

    2015-07-31

    Commitment to ethics usually results in nurses' better professional performance and advancement. Professional self-concept of nurses refers to their information and beliefs about their roles, values, and behaviors. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between nurses' professional self-concept and professional ethics in hospitals affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences. This cross sectional-analytical study was conducted in 2014. The 270 participants were practicing nurses and head-nurses at the teaching hospitals of Peimanieh and Motahari in Jahrom University of Medical Science. Sampling was based on sencus method. Data was collected using Cowin's Nurses' self-concept questionnaire (NSCQ) and the researcher-made questionnaire of professional ethics. The average of the sample's professional self-concept score was 6.48±0.03 out of 8. The average of the sample's commitment to professional ethics score was 4.08±0.08 out of 5. Based on Pearson's correlation test, there is a significant relationship between professional ethics and professional self-concept (P=0.01, r=0.16). In view of the correlation between professional self-concept and professional ethics, it is recommended that nurses' self-concept, which can boost their commitment to ethics, be given more consideration.

  19. A Study of the Relationship Between Nurses’ Professional Self-Concept and Professional Ethics in Hospitals Affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandavar, Nehleh; Rahmanian, Afifeh; Jahromi, Zohreh Badiyepeymaie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Commitment to ethics usually results in nurses’ better professional performance and advancement. Professional self-concept of nurses refers to their information and beliefs about their roles, values, and behaviors. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between nurses’ professional self-concept and professional ethics in hospitals affiliated to Jahrom University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross sectional-analytical study was conducted in 2014. The 270 participants were practicing nurses and head-nurses at the teaching hospitals of Peimanieh and Motahari in Jahrom University of Medical Science. Sampling was based on sencus method. Data was collected using Cowin's Nurses’ self-concept questionnaire (NSCQ) and the researcher-made questionnaire of professional ethics. Results: The average of the sample's professional self-concept score was 6.48±0.03 out of 8. The average of the sample's commitment to professional ethics score was 4.08±0.08 out of 5. Based on Pearson's correlation test, there is a significant relationship between professional ethics and professional self-concept (P=0.01, r=0.16). Conclusion: In view of the correlation between professional self-concept and professional ethics, it is recommended that nurses’ self-concept, which can boost their commitment to ethics, be given more consideration. PMID:26573035

  20. Machine medical ethics

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    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  1. Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Allison; Green, Rochelle; Cunningham, Thomas V; Eisenberg, Leah R; Hester, D Micah

    2016-01-01

    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests that current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students' ethical reasoning. This article discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical students that we have devised: the Medical Ethics Bowl (MEB). Finally, we suggest the pedagogical advantages of the MEB when compared to other ethics curricula.

  2. Comparative analysis of the Code of Professional Ethics in Bulgaria and the Hippocratic Oath, Declaration of Geneva and International Code of Medical Ethics.

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    Aleksandrova, Silviya

    2005-09-01

    In this paper I aim at making a comparative analysis of The Code of Professional Ethics in Bulgaria (CPEB), The Hippocratic Oath, The Declaration of Geneva, and The World Medical Association International Code of Medical Ethics. Two problems of special interest are explored: whether the leading principles of fundamental ethical codes are presented in CPEB and whether the code itself is relevant to the current medical professional and social situation in the country. The conclusion reached after a step-by-step analysis is that CPEB attempts to cover a wide range of principles and problems in medical practice and corresponds with the fundamental ethical codes. Although the code is criticized in some points, it could be very useful, provided that it is well publicized in the profession.

  3. Management of medical confidentiality in English professional football clubs: some ethical problems and issues.

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    Waddington, I; Roderick, M

    2002-04-01

    To examine the ways in which confidential matters are dealt with in the context of the relationship between the club doctor (or physiotherapist) and the player as patient in English professional football clubs. Semistructured tape recorded interviews with 12 club doctors, 10 club physiotherapists, and 27 current and former players. A questionnaire was also sent to 90 club doctors; 58 were returned. There is among club doctors and physiotherapists no commonly held code of ethics governing how much and what kind of information about players may properly be passed on to managers; associated with this, there is considerable variation from one club to another in terms of the amount and kind of information passed on to managers. In some clubs, medical staff attempt to operate more or less on the basis of the rules governing confidentiality that apply in general practice, but in other clubs, medical staff are more ready to pass on personal information about players. In some situations, this raises serious ethical questions. Guidelines dealing with confidentiality in practitioner-patient relationships in medical practice have long been available and have recently been restated, specifically in relation to the practice of sports medicine, by the British Olympic Association, the British Medical Association, and the Football Association. This is a welcome first step. However, if the guidelines are to have an impact on practice, detailed consideration needs to be given to ensuring their effective implementation; if this is to be achieved, consideration also needs to be given to identifying those aspects of the culture and organisation of professional football clubs that may hinder the full and effective implementation of those guidelines.

  4. [Ethics in medical education].

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    Neitzke, Gerald

    2008-08-01

    Ethics education is a topic of growing importance in the medical curriculum. Medical ethics can be defined as the skilled professional discourse on moral issues in patient care, medical research and the health-care system. Ethical competence comprises conscientiousness and the ability to give reasons for intuitive moral convictions. In the curriculum, course content and didactic approaches should be aimed at all levels (cognitive, affective, practical), as discussed in this paper. Case based seminars are the gold standard of ethics education. The teacher's responsibility is rooted in their character as role models during case discussions. Ethics education should continue throughout the curriculum. In Germany the compulsory subject "history, theory, ethics of medicine" is predominant in the curriculum, but courses vary greatly between different universities. Further research is needed in the fields of adequate assessment formats and evaluation of final outcomes of ethics education. Interprofessional ethics education (undergraduate and postgraduate) is a major challenge for the future, especially since services for clinical ethics consultation and moral case deliberation are becoming more established in German hospitals.

  5. Professional Ethics: Caught and Taught.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, Sharon Y.; Belliston, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    Compares codes of professional ethics of several professional associations in light of rapidly changing technology. Explores the relation between academic honesty and ethical practice and provides a summary of approaches to teaching ethics. (Contains 34 references.) (JOW)

  6. [Ethics and medical simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloucif, Sadek; Mignon, Alexandre

    2017-03-01

    Simulation in health care helps to raise health professionals' awareness of medical ethics and to understand the mechanisms involved in a difficult situation. They can thereby adopt a suitable form of behaviour and communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Resources and constraints for addressing ethical issues in medical humanitarian work: experiences of expatriate healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    International nongovernmental organizations frequently provide emergency assistance in settings where armed conflict or natural disaster overwhelm the capacity of local and national agencies to respond to health and related needs of affected communities. Healthcare practice in humanitarian settings presents distinct clinical, logistical, and ethical challenges for clinicians and differs in important ways from clinical practice in the home countries of expatriate healthcare professionals. The aim of this research was to examine the moral experience of healthcare professionals who participate in humanitarian relief work. I conducted a qualitative research study using interpretive description methodology. Fifteen Canadian healthcare professionals and three human resource or field coordination officers for nongovernmental organizations were interviewed. In this article, I present findings related to expatriate healthcare professionals' experiences of resources and constraints for addressing ethical issues in humanitarian crises. Resources for ethics deliberation and reflection include the following: opportunities for discussion; accessing and understanding local perspectives; access to outside perspectives; attitudes, such as humility, open-mindedness, and reflexivity; and development of good moral "reflexes." Constraints for deliberation and reflection relate to three domains: individual considerations, contextual features of humanitarian relief work, and local team and project factors. These findings illuminate the complex nature of ethical reflection, deliberation, and decision-making in humanitarian healthcare practice. Healthcare professionals and relief organizations should seek to build upon resources for addressing ethical issues. When possible, they should minimize the impact of features that function as constraints.

  8. Seeing through Medical Ethics: A Request for Professional Transparency and Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, J. T. H.

    2016-01-01

    This essay is a critique of medical/clinical ethics from the personal perspective of a medical historian in an academic health science centre who has interacted with ethicists. It calls for greater transparency and accountability of ethicists involved in "bedside consulting"; it questions the wisdom of the four principles of biomedical…

  9. Professional Ethics in Academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Ethical issues in the professional life of faculty are discussed briefly: conduct of research, intellectual property rights, bias in instruction, student-teacher relationships, student assessment, responsibility to the institution and to colleagues, and responsibility to the community outside the institution. (MSE)

  10. [Ethics in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The title of this reflection evokes several contents that may encompass from ethics in research; fraud in science; ethics in medical advertising and relations between sponsors and science; and, finally, papers related to ethic content. This paper is limited to the ethic responsibilities of the medical writers or "scriptwriters."

  11. Teaching medical ethics and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Malcolm

    2012-03-01

    The teaching of medical ethics is not yet characterised by recognised, standard requirements for formal qualifications, training and experience; this is not surprising as the field is still relatively young and maturing. Under the broad issue of the requirements for teaching medical ethics are numerous more specific questions, one of which concerns whether medical ethics can be taught in isolation from considerations of the law, and vice versa. Ethics and law are cognate, though distinguishable, disciplines. In a practical, professional enterprise such as medicine, they cannot and should not be taught as separate subjects. One way of introducing students to the links and tensions between medical ethics and law is to consider the history of law via its natural and positive traditions. This encourages understanding of how medical practice is placed within the contexts of ethics and law in the pluralist societies in which most students will practise. Four examples of topics from medical ethics teaching are described to support this claim. Australasian medical ethics teachers have paid less attention to the role of law in their curricula than their United Kingdom counterparts. Questions like the one addressed here will help inform future deliberations concerning minimal requirements for teaching medical ethics.

  12. Aequilibrium prudentis: on the necessity for ethics and policy studies in the scientific and technological education of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Misti Ault; Giordano, James

    2013-04-23

    The importance of strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education continues to grow as society, medicine, and the economy become increasingly focused and dependent upon bioscientific and technological innovation. New advances in frontier sciences (e.g., genetics, neuroscience, bio-engineering, nanoscience, cyberscience) generate ethical issues and questions regarding the use of novel technologies in medicine and public life. In light of current emphasis upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education (at the pre-collegiate, undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels), the pace and extent of advancements in science and biotechnology, the increasingly technological orientation and capabilities of medicine, and the ways that medicine - as profession and practice - can engage such scientific and technological power upon the multi-cultural world-stage to affect the human predicament, human condition, and perhaps nature of the human being, we argue that it is critical that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education go beyond technical understanding and directly address ethical, legal, social, and public policy implications of new innovations. Toward this end, we propose a paradigm of integrative science, technology, ethics, and policy studies that meets these needs through early and continued educational exposure that expands extant curricula of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs from the high school through collegiate, graduate, medical, and post-graduate medical education. We posit a synthetic approach that elucidates the historical, current, and potential interaction of scientific and biotechnological development in addition to the ethico-legal and social issues that are important to educate and sustain the next generation of medical and biomedical professionals who can appreciate, articulate, and address the realities of scientific and biotechnological progress given the shifting

  13. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcioğlu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed.

  14. Inter-professional cooperation as collective ethics work: A contribution to inter-professional ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Ed de Jonge

    2016-01-01

    Thesis: Ethics work (Banks 2012, 2016) is a stimulating concept for the ethical improvement of inter-professional cooperation. Outline: Starting point: ideal-typical professionalism Introduction to ethics work Professionalism requires inter-professional cooperation Inter-professional expansion

  15. Design elements of professional ethics courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, M M; Strong, G

    1995-10-01

    Optometrists face ethical dilemmas daily in the practice of their profession. Students training to become optometrists also face ethical dilemmas, some of which are unique in their role as students. The focus on ethical practice has been heightened by the increasing scope of optometric practice, the greater demand of society for professional accountability, the greater diversity of membership and viewpoints, the decrease in available dollars for health care delivery, and the conflicting roles of ophthalmology and opticianry with optometry. These factors have led to the addition or expansion of professional ethics courses in optometry programs. This paper examines the difficulties inherent in defining professional ethics and designing ethics courses. Curricular issues are examined, including course objectives, instructors, content, evaluation, timetabling, teaching strategies, student assessment, and resource implications. Much of the research in this area has been done in medical education. Although the content of ethical dilemmas encountered by medical students and physicians may not be applicable to optometry, the process by which they learn to approach the dilemmas is the same.

  16. Medical Professionals and Smartphone Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunagiri, Varun; Parimala, M; Ragumani, P; Anbalagan, Kothai

    2017-06-01

    Ever since the advent of Smartphones, Smartphone applications (SAs) are revolutionizing the contemporary medicine. Smartphone application which was created in view of swift communications among the general public has now intruded the medical fraternity. But the ethics for using these applications to transfer patients' medical records through SA is bewildering among the medical professionals (MPs).

  17. Faculty and students' self-assessment of client communication skills and professional ethics in three veterinary medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelberg, Katherine; Farnsworth, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Client communication skills and professional ethics are areas that have received much attention in veterinary education in recent years. The objectives of this study were to: i) establish the confidence level of faculty teaching in three veterinary schools with regard to their client communication skills, ii) establish a baseline of professional ethics indicators in the same faculty, and iii) compare veterinary students of all levels to faculty in both areas. Students and faculty received identical questionnaires, including statements addressing client communication skills and professional ethics. The results indicate that students are generally comfortable with their communication skills, except in the areas of visual and/or audio aid use, handling emotional clients, and discussing costs of care and payment. Faculty were more comfortable than students in all areas of client communication, although they also had low confidence when dealing with costs of care and payment. Ethically, students and faculty answered similarly. Faculty showed a stronger belief that people are basically honest and ethical, but both cohorts responded similarly when asked about reporting an ethical violation admitted to them by their best friend. Further research is needed to determine whether students are communicating as effectively as they believe they are, with particular attention paid to improving communications with emotional clients and the business aspects of veterinary medicine. Additional work is needed to ensure that veterinary students are learning how to cope with ethical issues objectively. This may begin by ensuring that faculty are teaching and, more importantly, modeling these behaviors during the clinical year(s).

  18. The doctor and the market: about the influence of market reforms on the professional medical ethics of surgeons and general practitioners in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, J.; Hilhorst, M.; Trappenburg, M.

    2011-01-01

    To explore whether market reforms in a health care system affect medical professional ethics of hospital-based specialists on the one hand and physicians in independent practices on the other. Qualitative interviews with 27 surgeons and 28 general practitioners in The Netherlands, held 2-3 years

  19. Identifying and Addressing Potential Conflict of Interest: A Professional Medical Organization’s Code of Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, Lori

    2010-01-01

    The new Consumer Alliance agreement between the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and The Coca-Cola Company provides a valuable opportunity to illustrate AAFP’s adherence to its ethical foundation, demonstrate the AAFP’s commitment to serving physicians and the public, and maintain the trust Americans put in their family physicians and the organization that represents them. Throughout the development of this program, as well as in all business interactions, the AAFP consistently ad...

  20. The Professional Military Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    see Isak Applbaum, Ethics for Adversaries. 40As others have noted, the etymology of “profession” clearly implies that one is “professing” certain...relationship with its clientele. The very etymology of the term “profession” indicates that there are standards or commitments which the profession “professes

  1. Identifying and Addressing Potential Conflict of Interest: A Professional Medical Organization’s Code of Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Lori

    2010-01-01

    The new Consumer Alliance agreement between the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and The Coca-Cola Company provides a valuable opportunity to illustrate AAFP’s adherence to its ethical foundation, demonstrate the AAFP’s commitment to serving physicians and the public, and maintain the trust Americans put in their family physicians and the organization that represents them. Throughout the development of this program, as well as in all business interactions, the AAFP consistently addresses possible conflict of interest openly and directly, sharing with our members and the public exactly what measures we take to ensure that, in fact, no unethical conduct or breach of trust would—or will in the future—occur. In this case, the AAFP saw a public health and education need that was both unmet and undermined by the barrage of marketing messages and confusing information, and acted to fill that need. In so doing, the AAFP hewed to its high ethical standards, its core values, and its mission in the decisions made and the actions that followed. PMID:20644192

  2. Identifying and addressing potential conflict of interest: a professional medical organization's code of ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Lori

    2010-01-01

    The new Consumer Alliance agreement between the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and The Coca-Cola Company provides a valuable opportunity to illustrate AAFP's adherence to its ethical foundation, demonstrate the AAFP's commitment to serving physicians and the public, and maintain the trust Americans put in their family physicians and the organization that represents them. Throughout the development of this program, as well as in all business interactions, the AAFP consistently addresses possible conflict of interest openly and directly, sharing with our members and the public exactly what measures we take to ensure that, in fact, no unethical conduct or breach of trust would--or will in the future--occur. In this case, the AAFP saw a public health and education need that was both unmet and undermined by the barrage of marketing messages and confusing information, and acted to fill that need. In so doing, the AAFP hewed to its high ethical standards, its core values, and its mission in the decisions made and the actions that followed.

  3. Metaphysics and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, C

    1995-01-01

    I take issue with Frank Leavitt's sketch of a pragmatic criterion for the relevance of metaphysics to medical ethics. I argue that appeal to the potential for confusion generated by metaphysical subtlety establishes a need for better communication rather than shows philosophical insight beside the point. I demonstrate that the proposed Criterion of Relevance has absurd consequences, and I claim that the relevance of philosophical doctrines, whether ethical or metaphysical, is best accounted for in terms of improved understanding. PMID:7608933

  4. Inter-professional cooperation as collective ethics work: A contribution to inter-professional ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Jonge, de, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Thesis: Ethics work (Banks 2012, 2016) is a stimulating concept for the ethical improvement of inter-professional cooperation. Outline: Starting point: ideal-typical professionalism Introduction to ethics work Professionalism requires inter-professional cooperation Inter-professional expansion of ethics work Final remarks and further challenges

  5. Professional Ethics for Climate Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, K.; Mann, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Several authors have warned that climate scientists sometimes exhibit a tendency to "err on the side of least drama" in reporting the risks associated with fossil fuel emissions. Scientists are often reluctant to comment on the implications of their work for public policy, despite the fact that because of their expertise they may be among those best placed to make recommendations about such matters as mitigation and preparedness. Scientists often have little or no training in ethics or philosophy, and consequently they may feel that they lack clear guidelines for balancing the imperative to avoid error against the need to speak out when it may be ethically required to do so. This dilemma becomes acute in cases such as abrupt ice sheet collapse where it is easier to identify a risk than to assess its probability. We will argue that long-established codes of ethics in the learned professions such as medicine and engineering offer a model that can guide research scientists in cases like this, and we suggest that ethical training could be regularly incorporated into graduate curricula in fields such as climate science and geology. We recognize that there are disanalogies between professional and scientific ethics, the most important of which is that codes of ethics are typically written into the laws that govern licensed professions such as engineering. Presently, no one can legally compel a research scientist to be ethical, although legal precedent may evolve such that scientists are increasingly expected to communicate their knowledge of risks. We will show that the principles of professional ethics can be readily adapted to define an ethical code that could be voluntarily adopted by scientists who seek clearer guidelines in an era of rapid climate change.

  6. Codes of Ethics and Teachers' Professional Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimmer, Marina; Maxwell, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    This article considers the value of adopting a code of professional ethics for teachers. After having underlined how a code of ethics stands to benefits a community of educators--namely, by providing a mechanism for regulating autonomy and promoting a shared professional ethic--the article examines the principal arguments against codes of ethics.…

  7. Conflicts Between Parents and Health Professionals About a Child's Medical Treatment: Using Clinical Ethics Records to Find Gaps in the Bioethics Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Rosalind; Notini, Lauren; Phillips, Jessica

    2015-09-01

    Clinical ethics records offer bioethics researchers a rich source of cases that clinicians have identified as ethically complex. In this paper, we suggest that clinical ethics records can be used to point to types of cases that lack attention in the current bioethics literature, identifying new areas in need of more detailed bioethical work. We conducted an analysis of the clinical ethics records of one paediatric hospital in Australia, focusing specifically on conflicts between parents and health professionals about a child's medical treatment. We identified, analysed, and compared cases of this type from the clinical ethics records with cases of this type discussed in bioethics journals. While the cases from journals tended to describe situations involving imminent risk to the child's life, a significant proportion of the clinical ethics records cases involved different stakes for the child involved. These included distress, poorer functional outcome, poorer psychosocial outcome, or increased risk of surgical complications. Our analysis suggests that one type of case that warrants more detailed ethics research is parental refusal of recommended treatment, where the refusal does not endanger the child's life but rather some other aspect of the child's well-being.

  8. Professional Ethics of Software Engineers: An Ethical Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Yotam; Mark, Shlomo

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose an ethical framework for software engineers that connects software developers' ethical responsibilities directly to their professional standards. The implementation of such an ethical framework can overcome the traditional dichotomy between professional skills and ethical skills, which plagues the engineering professions, by proposing an approach to the fundamental tasks of the practitioner, i.e., software development, in which the professional standards are intrinsically connected to the ethical responsibilities. In so doing, the ethical framework improves the practitioner's professionalism and ethics. We call this approach Ethical-Driven Software Development (EDSD), as an approach to software development. EDSD manifests the advantages of an ethical framework as an alternative to the all too familiar approach in professional ethics that advocates "stand-alone codes of ethics". We believe that one outcome of this synergy between professional and ethical skills is simply better engineers. Moreover, since there are often different software solutions, which the engineer can provide to an issue at stake, the ethical framework provides a guiding principle, within the process of software development, that helps the engineer evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different software solutions. It does not and cannot affect the end-product in and of-itself. However, it can and should, make the software engineer more conscious and aware of the ethical ramifications of certain engineering decisions within the process.

  9. Research Ethics Consultation: Ethical and Professional Practice Challenges and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Richard R.; Taylor, Holly A.; Brinich, Margaret A.; Boyle, Mary M.; Cho, Mildred; Coors, Marilyn; Danis, Marion; Havard, Molly; Magnus, David; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of biomedical research has increased considerably in the last decade, as has the pace of translational research. This complexity has generated a number of novel ethical issues for clinical investigators, institutional review boards (IRBs), and other oversight committees. In response, many academic medical centers have created formal research ethics consultation (REC) services to help clinical investigators and IRBs navigate ethical issues in biomedical research. Key functions of a REC service include: assisting with research design and implementation, providing a forum for deliberative exploration of ethical issues, and supplementing regulatory oversight. As increasing numbers of academic research institutions establish REC services, there is a pressing need for consensus about the primary aims and policies that should guide these activities. Establishing clear expectations about the aims and policies of REC services is important if REC programs are to achieve their full potential. Drawing on the experiences of a Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Research Ethics Consultation Working Group, this article describes three major ethical and professional practice challenges associated with the provision of REC: 1) managing multiple institutional roles and responsibilities, 2) managing sensitive information, and 3) communicating with consultation requestors about how these issues are managed. The paper also presents several practical strategies for addressing these challenges and enhancing the quality of REC services. PMID:25607942

  10. Ethical, legal and professional issues arising from social media coverage by UK Helicopter Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sarah; Adcock, Christopher; Steel, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    Social media (SoMe) are gaining increasing acceptance among, and use by, healthcare service deliverers and workers. UK Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) use SoMe to deliver service information and to fundraise, among other purposes. This article examines UK HEMS use of SoMe between January and February 2014 to determine the extent of adoption and to highlight trends in use. The database of the Association of Air Ambulances, crosschecked with UK Emergency Aviation, was used to identify flying, charitable UK HEMS. This search identified 28 UK HEMS, of which 24 services met the criteria for selection for review. Using information harvested from the public domain, we then systematically documented SoMe use by the services. SoMe use by UK HEMS is extensive but not uniform. All selected UK HEMS maintained websites with blogs, as well as Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and JustGiving profiles, with the majority of services using Ebay for Charity, LinkedIn and YouTube. Some HEMS also held a presence on Pinterest, Google+, Instagram and Flickr, with a minority of services maintaining their own Rich Site Summary (RSS) feed. The SoMe adopted, while varied, allowed for increased, and different forms of, information delivery by HEMS to the public, often in real time. Such use, though, risks breaching patient confidentiality and data protection requirements, especially when information is viewed cumulatively across platforms. There is an urgent need for the continued development of guidance in this unique setting to protect patients while UK HEMS promote and fundraise for their charitable activities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Corruption or professional dignity: An ethical examination of the phenomenon of "red envelopes" (monetary gifts) in medical practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Lijie; Yang, Chengshang

    2017-05-21

    In the medical practice in China, giving and taking "red envelopes" (monetary gifts) is a common phenomenon although few openly admit it. This paper, based on our empirical study including data collected from interviews and questionnaires with medical professionals and patients, attempts to explore why "red envelopes" have become a serious problem in the physician-patient relationship and how the situation can be improved. Previous studies show that scholars tend to correlate the spread of "red envelopes" in health care sector to the commercialization trend, the general erosion of traditional values, and the lowering of the moral level in the medical field. However, in this paper, the authors argue that medical professionals' choice of taking "red envelopes" is actually more a way to compensate for their problematic self-image and marred dignity in real practice. Medical professionals in China as a whole are in an embarrassing situation where the work pressure and income, and the sense of pride that used to be part of their profession are not comparable to each other. Under this circumstance, we believe that the effective way to deal with the "red envelopes" issue does not lie solely in introducing more stringent regulations or granting medical professionals higher payments, but rather in protecting and enhancing the professional dignity of all those working in healthcare. And on top of that, there must also be effort to cultivate a more favorable moral environment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. ECONOMIC ETHICS: APPLIED AND PROFESSIONAL CHARACTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Gordova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In given article economic ethics are considered as set of norms of behavior of the businessman, the requirements shown by a cultural society to its style of work, to character of dialogue between participants of business, to their social shape. The conclusion becomes that economic ethics have applied character in relation to theoretical, to obschenormativnoy ethics, hence, represent section of applied ethics. On the other hand, the specific standard maintenance characterizes economic ethics as ethics professional.

  13. Justice and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-07-20

    Justice, in the sense of fair adjudication between conflicting claims, is held to be relevant to a wide range of issues in medical ethics. Several differing concepts of justice are briefly described, including Aristotle's formal principle of justice, libertarian theories, utilitarian theories, Marxist theories, the theory of John Rawls, and the view--held, for example, by W.D. Ross--that justice is essentially a matter of reward for individual merit.

  14. Professional ethics in nursing: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Pakkanen, Piiku; Korhonen, Anne

    2015-08-01

    To conduct an integrative review and synthesize current primary studies of professional ethics in nursing. Professional ethics is a familiar concept in nursing and provides an ethical code for nursing practice. However, little is known about how professional ethics has been defined and studied in nursing science. Systematic literature searches from 1948-February 2013, using the CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus electronic databases to look at previously published peer-reviewed studies. A modified version of Cooper's five-stage integrative review was used to review and synthesize current knowledge. Fourteen papers were included in this research. According to our synthesis, professional ethics is described as an intra-professional approach to care ethics and professionals commit to it voluntarily. Professional ethics consist of values, duties, rights and responsibilities, regulated by national legislation and international agreements and detailed in professional codes. Professional ethics is well established in nursing, but is constantly changing due to internal and external factors affecting the profession. Despite the obvious importance of professional ethics, it has not been studied much in nursing science. Greater knowledge of professional ethics is needed to understand and support nurses' moral decision-making and to respond to the challenges of current changes in health care and society. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Medical internet ethics: a field in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, K A; Thompson, C D

    2001-01-01

    As in any new field, the merger of medicine, e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions pertaining to ethical conduct. Key issues include defining the essence of the patient-provider relationship, establishing guidelines and training for practicing online medicine and therapy, setting standards for ethical online research, determining guidelines for providing quality healthcare information and requiring ethical conduct for medical and health websites. Physicians who follow their professional code of ethics are obligated not to exploit the relationship they have with patients, nor allow anyone else working with them to do so. Physicians and therapists are obligated to serve those who place trust in them for treatment, whether in face-to-face or online Internet encounters with patients or clients. This ethical responsibility to patients and clients is often in direct conflict with the business model of generating profits. Healthcare professionals involved in Medical Internet Ethics need to define the scope of competent medical and healthcare on the Internet. The emerging ethical issues facing medicine on the Internet, the current state of medical ethics on the Internet and questions for future directions of study in this evolving field are reviewed in this paper.

  16. The doctor and the market: about the influence of market reforms on the professional medical ethics of surgeons and general practitioners in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarswaard, Jolanda; Hilhorst, Medard; Trappenburg, Margo

    2011-12-01

    To explore whether market reforms in a health care system affect medical professional ethics of hospital-based specialists on the one hand and physicians in independent practices on the other. Qualitative interviews with 27 surgeons and 28 general practitioners in The Netherlands, held 2-3 years after a major overhaul of the Dutch health care system involving several market reforms. Surgeons now regularly advertise their work (while this was forbidden in the past) and pay more attention to patients with relatively minor afflictions, thus deviating from codes of ethics that oblige physicians to treat each other as brothers and to treat patients according to medical need. Dutch GPs have abandoned their traditional reticence and their fear of medicalization. They now seem to treat more in accordance with patients' preferences and less in accordance with medical need. Market reforms do affect medical professional principles, and it is doubtful whether these changes were intended when Dutch policy makers decided to introduce market elements in the health care system. Policy makers in other countries considering similar reforms should pay attention to these results.

  17. Professional ethics and esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, D A

    1988-09-01

    Esthetic dentistry has assumed an integral position in the provision of oral health care for society. Esthetics is a branch of philosophy dealing with beauty. Beauty is both enjoyable (subjective and cosmetic), and admirable (objective and definable). Ethics is a branch of philosophy dealing with morality. Morality relates humans to one another in a responsible way using rationality. Dentists assume unique moral duties in presenting themselves to society as being uniquely qualified to care for their oral health. Three principles of ethics relate directly to professional duties in esthetic dentistry: beneficence, autonomy, and justice. These principles have moral force in committing dentists to gain informed consent and to execute therapy in keeping with professional standards of care. Practical application of issues deriving from esthetics and ethics suggests that dentists must be sensitive to esthetics in their diagnosis and treatment planning and that a structured, formal consultation with a patient must be conducted to educate the patient regarding the goals of treatment, alternative therapies, prognosis, and costs. Only through such an effort can dentists gain informed consent. The goal of esthetic dentistry is the achievement of admirable (objective) and enjoyable (subjective) beauty, which is possible only through patient participation in decision making and excellence in technical performance.

  18. Should teachers of medical ethics and health professionals remain value neutral in order to respect the autonomy of students and patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøgeskov, Benjamín Olivares

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the pedagogical and ethical problems that ensue when ethical neutrality is mandated as the sole acceptable stance for teachers of ethics and health professionals (especially in public institutions). This paper argues that such a mandate can (1) violate public employees' own ethical integrity by forcing them to adopt the current legal order as their own ethical code; (2) erode trust, by requiring that the professional or teacher betray the honesty that patients and students commonly expect; and, finally, (3) undermine--by affirming that all opinions are equally acceptable--he pedagogical aim of generating critical thinking. Nevertheless, the article warns teachers and professionals against defending their own convictions by appealing to authority or the power of public office. The correct way to avoid ethical neutrality, this article asserts, is by distinguishing "opinion" from "argument": by not merely articulating, but providing convincing arguments for, one's own professional ethical opinions.

  19. Toward an Ethics of Professional Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanchuk, Nicolas; Scramstad, Carly; Kruse, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we advance a novel conception of normative ethics and draw out its implications within the domain of professional ethics. We argue that all moral agents, and thus professionals, share a fundamental and constitutive normative interest in correctly conceiving of their ends. All professionals, we claim, by virtue of their positions of…

  20. [Ethics and medical genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Didier

    2012-06-01

    Medical genetics may be distinguished from other medical specialities by its family dimension. Genetics raises many questions in the field of ethics concerning the potential applications in clinical medicine, in particular because of the technological evolution of human genetics in the medical field and the genetic research on the charting of the human genome. Human genetics involves filiation and questions the foundation of our society and the potential standardisation of human beings. The prescription of genetic tests is a tool for doctors but its use should be measured and carefully thought out according to the questions asked and the results expected. Examination of this issue within the context of the bioethics laws in France has made it possible to establish a framework for a certain number of practices so as to answer certain questions in human genetics. This article attempts to review the situation as it stands today with regard to the ethical issues raised by genetic tests, presymptomatic diagnosis, prenatal and pre-implantation diagnosis, and bio-collections.

  1. Ethical and professional standards compliance among practicing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated ethical and professional standards compliance among practicing librariansin university libraries in Benue State. The purpose of the study was todetermine the extent to which librarians in university libraries comply with ethics and professional standards in librarianship. The study adopted a descriptive ...

  2. [Medical publications between law and ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadly, Ali

    2004-03-01

    Medical publications are the result of an intellectual inventive effort, yielding legal and ethical questions related to medicine. Copyright's problems in cases of disputed innovation or plagiary are frequent. The Tunisian law has stipulated rules for the original scientific production. Medical publications are also involved in professional liability questions through the reported medical standards. Ethical guidelines recommend that medical research and publications must respect moral rules such as scientific integrity and independence. Respect of such rules must be more guaranteed by ethic committees assessment of the submitted papers. Each medical journal is under obligation towards its readers and must consecrate columns for them to allow exchanges. Transparency must be respected in the field of advertising and supplement issues edition.

  3. Restoring medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity.

  4. Ethics: Personal and Professional Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Tahira K.

    1996-01-01

    Ethics are often taught in higher education. but research shows that family environment and early childhood are most influential in developing ethical behavior. The importance of ethics to work and family life suggests that ethical training should not be limited to vocational/business courses and it should start early. (SK)

  5. Ethics Training and Workplace Ethical Decisions of MBA Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romious, Tamar S.; Thompson, Randall; Thompson, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    We recruited 15 MBA professionals in the St. Louis, Missouri metropolitan area to explore experiences and perceptions of classroom ethics training and ethical experiences in the workplace. Telephone interviews were conducted using open-ended questions to collect data that were uploaded to NVivo 10 for qualitative analysis. As a result of the data…

  6. Korean nurses' ethical dilemmas, professional values and professional quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Han, Yonghee; Kim, Ji-su

    2015-06-01

    In the changing medical environment, professional stress continuously increases as the individual's quality of life suffers. Of all the healthcare professions, nursing is especially prone to burnout, compassion fatigue and reduced compassion satisfaction, due to the tensions resulting from the physical and psychological stress of caring for extremely ill patients. This study examined the professional quality of life of clinical nurses in Korea and the relationship between their experiences in ethical dilemmas and professional values. This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample consisting of 488 clinical nurses. We used four questionnaires to measure the participants' demographic characteristics, experiences in ethical dilemmas, professional nursing values and professional quality of life (ProQOL assessment, Version 5). Ethical considerations: This study received approval from the Institutional Review Board of Bronco Memorial Hospital. Written informed consent was given by all participants. The nurses' professional quality of life was affected by ethical dilemmas and professional nursing values. The factors influencing compassion satisfaction were age, client domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness, professionalism of nursing and the roles of nursing services in professional values. The factors influencing burnout were marital status (married), religion (yes), human life domain, professional work domain of ethical dilemmas, social awareness and the role of nursing services in nursing professional values. The factors influencing secondary traumatic stress were human life domain, client domain and the professional work domain of ethical dilemmas. Intervention to help nurses increase their professional quality of life will have a greater chance of success if they are based on the nurses' values and beliefs about the ethical dilemmas they face and foster the establishment of positive professional values. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Assessment of Ethical and Other Professional Standards in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance of 21 private medical laboratories in Osun State with ethical and other professional was assessed by the authors' pre and post inspection by the Medical Laboratory Science Council of Nigeria (MLSCN). Laboratory environment, personnel, equipment and adherence to Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) ...

  8. The Professional Will: An Ethical Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret; Kabell, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is directed to the ethical responsibility for the counselor to develop a professional will. Essentially the professional will is a roadmap for what the counselor directs to happen in the event that the counselor becomes incapacitated due to sudden death or illness. A model of a professional will is provided.

  9. Ethics and Medical Toxicology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Optimizing care in medical toxicology necessitates designing and conducting ethical research. Nevertheless, the context of medical toxicology can make clinical research ethically challenging for a variety of reasons: medical toxicology is typified by relative rare conditions; making precise and rapid diagnoses is often fraught with uncertainty; emergent and urgent clinical exigencies make consent difficult or impossible; and some exposures are stigmatized or related to illegal activities that can compromise collecting accurate data from patients. In this paper, we examine some of the ethical issues in medical toxicology research that are especially salient in effort to promote optimal research in the field. The particular issues to be addressed are as follows: (1) rare conditions and orphan agents, (2) randomization and control arms, (3) inclusion and exclusion criteria, (4) outcome measures, (5) consent, (6) confidentiality, (7) registries, (8) oversight, and (9) transparency and reporting. Thinking about these ethical issues prospectively will help researchers and clinicians appropriately navigate them.

  10. A 'good' ethical review: audit and professionalism in research ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas-Jones, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    How does one conduct, measure and record a ‘good’ ethical review of biomedical research? To what extent do ethics committees invoke professionalism in researchers and in themselves, and to what extent do they see competence as adherence to a set of standard operating procedures for ethical review......? Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork with the Forum of Ethics Review Committees of Asia and the Pacific (FERCAP), a capacity-building NGO that runs ethics committee trainings and reviews in the Asia Pacific region, I develop an analysis of ethical review and its effects. I focus on a ‘second-order audit’ run...... by FERCAP, which recognises committees according to a set of standards that are designed to render ‘local’ committees internationally legible. The article adds to a growing comparative literature that expands studies of audit-like measuring and disciplining activities beyond western contexts and enriches...

  11. Ethical Issues in Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Patricia Ann

    2000-01-01

    Continuing professional education practitioners often face ethical dilemmas regarding their obligations to multiple stakeholders and issues arising in new arenas such as the workplace, distance education, and collaboration with business. Codes of ethics can guide practice, but practitioners should also identify their personal core values system…

  12. Exploration of Values: Israeli Teachers' Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Yael

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore Israeli teachers' professional ethics and values using the Facet Theory (Guttman in Psychmetrika 33:469-506, 1968). Since Israel does not have a teachers' code of ethics, such exploration can be a basis for constructing one. The study is mainly exploratory, and the main hypotheses that guided the study…

  13. Ethics Education for Professionals in Japan: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yasushi; Ueno, Tetsu

    2010-01-01

    Ethics education for professionals has become popular in Japan over the last two decades. Many professional schools now require students to take an applied ethics or professional ethics course. In contrast, very few courses of professional ethics for teaching exist or have been taught in Japan. In order to obtain suggestions for teacher education,…

  14. Ethics for medical educators: an overview and fallacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun

    2010-07-01

    Ethics is the rule of right conduct or practice in a profession. The basic principles of ethics are beneficence, justice and autonomy or individual freedom. There is very minor demarcation between ethics and the law. The ethics is promulgated by the professional bodies. All are expected to guide the medical professional in their practice. Medical educators have dual ethical obligations: firstly, to the society at large which expects us to produce competent health professionals, and secondly, to the students under our care. The students observe and copy what their teacher does and his/her role modelling can be a gateway to a student's character building. Due to rapid increase in the number of medical colleges, privatization, and capitalism, ethical issue has become much more relevant and needs to discuss in detail. The present paper discusses the ethics for medical educators in detail with, basic principles, common breaches of ethics and fallacies due to wrong application of ethical principles, and the approach to ethics and methods by which we can prevent and avoid breach of ethics.

  15. Perception of Medical Professionalism among Clinical Students at Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohd Dzulkhairi Mohd Rani; Jamilah Jamaludin; Ahmad Najib Azmi; Shalinawati Ramli; Mohd Irwan Subri; Ariff Osman; Nik Mohd Nasri Nik Ismail

    2017-01-01

    .... In Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia, medical professionalism is integrated throughout the 6-year medical programme through courses in Fundamental Islamic knowledge, Medical ethics, clinical teaching...

  16. Medical Physics Professional Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Herbert W.

    2008-03-01

    In the United States, two professional organizations provide support and educational activities for the medical physicist: the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American College of Medical Physics. The questions to be answered are: (1) what services are provided by each group; (2) how do they differ; and what are the benefits of membership?

  17. What is good medical ethics? A clinician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wing May

    2015-01-01

    Speaking from the perspective of a clinician and teacher, good medical ethics needs to make medicine better. Over the past 50 years medical ethics has helped shape the culture in medicine and medical practice for the better. However, recent healthcare scandals in the UK suggest more needs to be done to translate ethical reasoning into ethical practice. Focusing on clinical practice and individual patient care, I will argue that, to be good, medical ethics needs to become integral to the activities of health professionals and healthcare organisations. Ethics is like a language which brings a way of thinking and responding to the world. For ethics to become embedded in clinical practice, health professionals need to progress from classroom learners to fluent social speakers through ethical dialogue, ethical reflection and ethical actions. I will end by discussing three areas that need to be addressed to enable medical ethics to flourish and bring about change in everyday clinical care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Ethical issues related to professional exposure of pregnant women in the medical field: monitoring and limiting effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J A M; Nunes, R

    2011-03-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations for occupational exposed pregnant women do not imply necessarily the complete avoidance of work with radiation or radioactive materials. Instead, a careful review of the exposure conditions, once the pregnancy is declared, as part of the exercise of the ICRP optimisation principle (based in a teleological ethics point of view) is suggested. The dose limitation (following a deontological ethics point of view) of the fetus/embryo is, however, not clearly well established as happens in the case of workers or members of the public. Also, the justification of practices (to continue to work or not with radiation or radioactive materials) is not clearly addressed in most national or international recommendations. An analysis of this justification (bearing in mind both teleological and deontological ethics) is examined in this work having in mind the best interest of the child-to-be as well as other existing social and economical factors.

  19. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional....

  20. Ethics and professionalism in public relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of this paper are ethics and professionalism, topics closely linked in contemporary theory, and especially in practice of public relations, whose significance is increasingly coming to the spotlight of experts from this area. Several definitions, classification, the historical development and principles of theories of ethics most frequently used in ethical decision-making within a business environment, have been presented in the first chapter in the endeavor to ascertain the concept of ethics. The next chapter concerns the duties a public relations expert must pay attention to while carrying out his or her activities. Those are: duty towards oneself, towards the organization, society and profession, within which, in the case of a conflict of interest, the duty towards society (so-called social responsibility, or professional duty, must prevail. The chapter that follows concerns ethical problems in the contemporary practice of public relations: the competence of practitioners, possible conflicts of interest and the very sensitive area of media relations. The chapter on models of ethical decision-making involves concrete experts' advice on decision making which are firmly based on ethical principles. Next section concerns professionalism and professional education in public relations. Recommendations concerning topics which should be included in the university education in this area are also presented. The focus is on the following: the absence of standards that would establish who can work in public relations and under which conditions; the lack of a specified educational minimum and expertise which a practitioner should possess; the need for practitioners to be the members of professional associations, as well as to adhere to a required ethical codex. Some of the most significant world public relations associations are mentioned and at the end, and a review of the state of public relations in Serbia is given.

  1. Ethics at Israeli universities: unlearned lessons from professional ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    2011-03-01

    At the practical level, sustained attention to ethical issues in academia in Israel is inadequate. This paper suggests that professional models of ethics education and training present constructive alternatives. The author views this topic from the dual perspective of a professional clinical psychologist and a committed faculty member. After a brief introduction, the paper opens with a case vignette of ethical violations of trust in academia, its handling, and how a similar case 25 years later illustrates the lack of progress in preparing the academic community for such things. A discussion of normative actions and behavioral norms in academia follows. Three lessons from the professions are offered: 1) the importance of involving members in the process of identifying ethical violations; 2) the value of adopting for academia current practices preparing persons for work in research, (for example the standardization of online modules for training in ethics); and c) the significance of addressing self-interest and its limits. If silence around a code of ethics is being practiced, that silence should be broken.

  2. Ethics in medical information and advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, G I; Dickens, B M

    2004-05-01

    This article presents findings and recommendations of an international conference held in Cairo, Egypt in 2003 concerning issues of ethical practice in how information is provided to and by medical practitioners. Professional advertising to practitioners and the public is necessary, but should exclude misrepresentation of qualifications, resources, and authorship of research papers. Medical institutions are responsible for how staff members present themselves, and their institutions. Medical associations, both governmental licensing authorities and voluntary societies, have powers and responsibilities to monitor professional advertisement to defend the public interest against deception. Medical journals bear duties to ensure authenticity of authorship and integrity in published papers, and the scientific basis of commercial advertisers' claims. A mounting concern is authors' conflict of interest. Mass newsmedia must ensure accuracy and proportionality in reporting scientific developments, and product manufacturers must observe truth in advertising, particularly in Direct-to-Consumer advertising. Consumer protection by government agencies is a continuing responsibility.

  3. Los valores ético profesionales del médico. Su diagnóstico Diagnosing Ethical -Professional values in medical doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca M Seijo Echevarría

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de diagnosticar la interiorización de los valores éticos profesionales a los alumnos de medicina seleccionados, se realiza esta investigación descriptiva causal. Para ello se determina el Sistema de Valores Éticos de la profesión médica en Camagüey, luego de un estudio profundo de los Códigos de Ética Médica Internacionales y Nacionales y la utilización de diferentes métodos y procedimientos propios de las investigaciones psicológicas y pedagógicas, éstos últimos apoyaron también la realización del diagnóstico de la situación actual de los estudiantes, donde se evidencia una diferencia notoria entre la auto evaluación y la co-evaluación siendo necesario acercar estos criterios. Valores como responsabilidad, profesionalidad, ser culto, internacionalismo y honestidad tienen dificultades en su asimilación. Queda demostrado que la metodología empleada es factible de ser utilizada para el diagnóstico al responder los resultados con las expectativasWith the purpose of diagnostic the ins and outs of the ethical professional values to the selected medicine students this descriptive investigation was carried out. With that purpose the System of Ethical Values of the medical profession in Camaguey was set after a deep study of the International and National Codes of medical Ethics and the use of different methods and procedures of psychological and pedagogic investigations, these also supported the doing of the diagnosis of the current situation of the students, where a notorius difference is evidenced between the self evaluation and the coevaluation being necessary to bring near these approaches. Values as responsability, internacionalism and honesty have difficulties to be cultivated. It is demostrated that the used methodology is feasible of being used for the diagnosis when responding the resultswith expectations

  4. Code of Medical Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . SZD-SZZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Te Code was approved on December 12, 1992, at the 3rd regular meeting of the General Assembly of the Medical Chamber of Slovenia and revised on April 24, 1997, at the 27th regular meeting of the General Assembly of the Medical Chamber of Slovenia. The Code was updated and harmonized with the Medical Association of Slovenia and approved on October 6, 2016, at the regular meeting of the General Assembly of the Medical Chamber of Slovenia.

  5. Ethical Conflicts Experienced by Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Mendes Menezes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The current study aimed to identify and analyze the prevalence of ethical conflicts experienced by medical students. This study is a cross-sectional and analytical research that was conducted in a public school in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The instrument used for the data collection was a self-administered questionnaire. The data collected were presented in absolute and percentage values. For the analytical statistical treatment of the data, the level of significance was considered p <0.05. The outcome variables were: Experiences of ethical conflicts in interpersonal relations within the medical course and Ethical conduct in health care. The identification of the prevalence of ethical conflicts in the undergraduate program adopted the perspective of different interpersonal relations (academic-teaching, academic-academic, academic-employee, academic-patient, teacher-teacher, teacher-patient, teacher-employee and employee-patient. (Importance of identifying themselves to the health services user and requesting consent to perform the physical examination, assistance without the supervision of the teacher, issuance of health documents without the signature of the professional responsible and use of social networks to share data Of patient. It was verified the association of the outcome variables with sex, year of graduation and course evaluation. A total of 281 undergraduate students enrolled in all undergraduate courses in Medicine of both sexes, with a predominance of female (52.7%. The students reported having experienced conflicting situations in interpersonal relations with teachers (59.6%, provided assistance without proper supervision of a teacher (62.6%, reported having issued health documents without the accompaniment of teachers (18, 5%. The highest frequency was observed among those enrolled in the most advanced years of the undergraduate program (p <0.05. The use of social networks for the purpose of sharing patient

  6. Development of Teaching Objectives in Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimes, Rudolf E.

    1978-01-01

    Described is the process involved in the development of teaching objectives for a university graduate course in professional ethics, limited to the human service professions of education, business administration, social work, and the ministry. A model of the five-step process is presented, and a bibliography is provided. (JMD)

  7. Teachers' Professional Ethics from Avicenna's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Hossein; Heshi, Kamal Nosrati; Mottagi, Zohre; Amini, Mehrnosh; Shiri, Ali Shiravani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to express Avicenna's standpoints in the area of teachers' professional ethics. Making use of a qualitative approach and a descriptive-analytic method, this study attempted to describe and analyze Avicenna's viewpoints on prerequisites of teaching profession by the help of the available resources. In general, the…

  8. Medical employee ethics: a staff training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2009-01-01

    Ethics is a critical part of medical employee education and is a subject that requires frequent and regular consideration and attention. This article defines ethics particularly as it applies to an individual who works in a medical practice and explores five core ethical values for all medical practice personnel. It suggests the benefits of basing management practices and decisions on ethical core values and explores specific ways that ethics can affect an individual's emotional and physical well being. This article also offers ethical guidelines specifically for medical practice employees regarding the use of their time at work and their workplace communications. Finally, this article offers a set of questions a medical practice employee can use when working through an ethical dilemma and dispels six common myths about medical practice ethics.

  9. Analysis of medical confidentiality from the islamic ethics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavaokkoli, Saeid Nazari; Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Confidentiality is one of the old rules of the medical profession. While emphasizing the necessity of confidentiality in religious teachings, disclosure of other's secrets to commit sin deserves punishment hereafter known. Today, progress in medical science and invention of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, as well as the extent of information and disclosure of the secrets of the patients, have provided more than ever. After explaining the concepts and principles of confidentiality in medical ethics, the Islamic-oriented Virtue Ethics, in a comparative review, share the differences in these two sets of ethical review and explain the issue of confidentiality. In professional medical ethics, only the behaviors of health staff are evaluated and moral evaluation of the features cannot be evaluated, but in Islamic ethics, the moral evaluation of the features that are sensual, confidentiality is more stable, without any external supervision will maintain its efficiency.

  10. Teaching business ethics to professional engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauser, William I

    2004-04-01

    Without question "business ethics" is one of the hot topics of the day. Over the past months we have seen business after business charged with improper practices that violate commonly-accepted ethical norms. This has led to a loss of confidence in corporate management, and has had severe economic consequences. From many quarters business educators have heard the call to put more emphasis on ethical practices in their business courses and curricula. Engineering educators are also heeding this call, since the practice of engineering usually involves working for (or leading) a business and/or engaging in business transactions. In the summer of 2002, Auburn University's Engineering Professional Development program made the decision to produce--based on the author's Executive MBA course in Business Ethics--a distance-delivered continuing education program for professional engineers and surveyors. Participants across the USA now may use the course to satisfy continuing education requirements with respect to professional licensing and certification. This paper outlines the purpose and content of the course and describes its production, distribution, application, and evaluation.

  11. Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Developments in Communication Ethics: The Ethics Commission, Code of Professional Responsibilities, Credo for Ethical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    Traces aspects of the evolution of interest in ethical issues by the National Communication Association (NCA), the effort to develop a Professional Code, and the development of the Credo for Ethical Communication adopted by the NCA Legislative Council November 6, 1999. Includes a copy of the Credo. (NH)

  13. Medical ethics education in China: Lessons from three schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow; Dong, Hongmei; Cong, Yali; Wan, Jing; Chen, Hua; Wang, Yanxia; Ma, Zhiying; Cooper, Brian; Jiang, Ivy; Roth, Hannah; Siegler, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Ethics teaching is a relatively new area of medical education in China, with ethics curricula at different levels of development. This study examined ethics education at three medical schools in China to understand their curricular content, teaching and learning methods, forms of assessments, changes over time, and what changes are needed for further improvement. We used student and faculty surveys to obtain information about the ethics courses' content, teaching methods, and revisions over time. The surveys also included five realistic cases and asked participants whether each would be appropriate to use for discussion in ethics courses. Students rated the cases on a scale and gave written comments. Finally, participants were asked to indicate how much they would agree with the statement that medical professionalism is about putting the interests of patients and society above one's own. There were both similarities and differences among these schools with regard to course topics, teaching and assessment methods, and course faculty compositions, suggesting their courses are at different levels of development. Areas of improvement for the schools' courses were identified based on this study's findings and available literature. A model of the evolution of medical ethics education in China was proposed to guide reform in medical ethics instruction in China. Analysis identified characteristics of appropriate cases and participants' attitudes toward the ideal of professionalism. We conclude that the development of medical ethics education in China is promising while much improvement is needed. In addition, ethics education is not confined to the walls of medical schools; the society at large can have significant influence on the formation of students' professional values.

  14. Deontological foundations for medical ethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-05-04

    Gillon outlines the principles of the deontological, or duty-based, group of moral theories in one of a series of British Medical Journal articles on the philosophical foundations of medical ethics. He differentiates between monistic theories, such as Immanuel Kant's, which rely on a single moral principle, and pluralistic theories, such as that of W.D. Ross, which rely on several principles that potentially could conflict. He summarizes the contributions of Kant and Ross to the development of deontological thought, then concludes his essay with brief paragraphs on other deontological approaches to the resolution of conflicting moral principles.

  15. Integration of business ethics and professional ethics auditor: dimensions of juridisation and codification

    OpenAIRE

    Mikolaj Turzynski

    2011-01-01

    This article is about the integration issues of business ethics and professional conduct in relation to audit services rendered by auditors. Characterized in the selection of contemporary approaches to business ethics and professional ethics. The article poses the thesis that the integrative dimension of business ethics and the auditing profession is reflected in the processes of juridisation and codification.

  16. Research on the professional ethics issues of CPA in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, auditing collusion cases have occured frequently, reducing the integrity degree of CPA. Of all reasons, we should pay attention to professional ethics issues most. Because of professional ethics issues, the public have lost confidence in the industry of CPA. The industry of CPA is faced with serious crisis. In the circumstance, this paper researched professional ethics issues of CPA. Firstly, it explained the connotation of professional ethics, emphasized the importance. Secondly, through real cases, this paper analyzed the present situation of professional ethics of CPA, explained the lack of professional ethics. Finally, for solving the problem, this paper proposed the countermeasures to enhance the standards of professional ethics of CPA from the external and internal practice environment.

  17. The Medical Ethics Curriculum in Medical Schools: Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubilini, Alberto; Milnes, Sharyn; Savulescu, Julian

    2016-01-01

    In this review article we describe the current scope, methods, and contents of medical ethics education in medical schools in Western English speaking countries (mainly the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia). We assess the strengths and weaknesses of current medical ethics curricula, and students' levels of satisfaction with different teaching approaches and their reported difficulties in learning medical ethics concepts and applying them in clinical practice. We identify three main challenges for medical ethics education: counteracting the bad effects of the "hidden curriculum," teaching students how to apply ethical knowledge and critical thinking to real cases in clinical practice, and shaping future doctors' right character through ethics education. We suggest ways in which these challenges could be addressed. On the basis of this analysis, we propose practical guidelines for designing, implementing, teaching, and assessing a medical ethics program within a four-year medical course. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  18. Specific Ethical Codes for Mental Health Care Professionals: Do We Need to Annotate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman-Levy, Tal; Asman, Oren; Dahan, Eyal; Greenberg, Binyamin; Hirshmann, Shmuel; Strous, Rael

    2016-08-01

    In Israel a general code of ethics exists for physicians, drafted by the Israel Medical Association. The question arises whether psychiatrists require a separate set of ethical guidelines. To examine the positions of Israeli psychiatrists with regard to ethics in general and professional ethics in particular, and to explore opinions regarding a code of ethics or ethical guidelines for psychiatry.  Methods: A specially designed questionnaire was compiled and completed by psychiatrists recruited for the study. A specially designed questionnaire was compiled and completed by psychiatrists recruited for the study. Most participants reported low levels of perceived knowledge regarding ethics, professional ethics, and the general code of ethics. Older and more experienced professionals reported a higher level of knowledge. Most psychiatrists agreed or strongly agreed with the need for a distinct code of ethics/ethical guidelines for psychiatrists. This support was significantly higher among both psychiatrists under 50 years and residents. Our findings suggest that the existing code of ethics and position papers may not be sufficient, indicating a potential need to develop and implement a process to create the ethical code itself. In addition, the findings highlight the importance of ethics education, suggesting that the need for a code of ethics is more urgent in the early stages of professional training, as younger professionals may be more exposed to advanced media technology. While some may fear that a distinct code of ethics will distance psychiatry from modern medicine, others assert that the profession combines aspects from the humanities and social sciences that require a unique sort of management and thus this profession requires a distinct code of ethics.

  19. Professionalism: a framework to guide medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard; Doukas, David

    2014-10-01

    Despite considerable advances in the incorporation of professionalism into the formal curriculum, medical students and residents are too often presented with a mechanical, unreflective version of the topic that fails to convey deeper ethical and humanistic aspirations. Some misunderstandings of professionalism are exacerbated by commonly used assessment tools that focus only on superficially observable behaviour and not on moral values and attitudes. Following a selective literature review, we engaged in philosophical ethical analysis to identify the key precepts associated with professionalism that could best guide the development of an appropriately reflective curriculum. The key precepts needed for a robust presentation of professionalism can be grouped under two headings: 'Professionalism as a trust-generating promise' (representing commitment to patients' interests, more than a mere business, a social contract, a public and collective promise, and hard work), and 'Professionalism as application of virtue to practice' (based on virtue, deeper attitudes rather than mere behaviour, and requiring of practical wisdom). These key precepts help students to avoid many common, unreflective misunderstandings of professionalism, and guide faculty staff and students jointly to address the deeper issues required for successful professional identity formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Framework for Professional Ethics Courses in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Silverman, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that professional ethics is currently a neglected topic in teacher education programs. In this article, the authors revisit the question of ethics education for teachers. The authors propose an approach to the professional ethics of teaching that employs a case-analysis framework specifically tailored to address the practice of…

  1. Ethical concerns and dilemmas of Finnish and Dutch health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanna Hopia; Ilsa Lottes; Mariël Kanne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Healthcare professionals encounter ethical dilemmas and concerns in their practice. More research is needed to understand these ethical problems and to know how to educate professionals to respond to them. Research objective: To describe ethical dilemmas and concerns at work

  2. Adding Professional Ethics to an Introductory Course on Sustainable Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Gary W.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the details and evaluation of a laboratory exercise that introduces professional and agricultural ethics into a course on sustainable agriculture. Concludes that including material on ethics in existing courses appears to be an effective way to increase the ethical content of a curriculum and emphasizes ethical decision making as an…

  3. The historic and national aspects of medical ethics and deontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prikhoda Igor' Viktorovich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches of problems of medical ethics and deontology in activity of the medical worker presented. Historical and national aspects of the delivered problem are considered. They open diversity and complexity of realization of problems of formation of the person of the medical worker. The humanism in medicine makes its ethical basis and morals. The humanism serves moral development of the person of the medical worker. Without humanism the medicine loses the right on existence. Its scientific and professional principles conflict to its basic purpose - to serve the person.

  4. Professional ethics: beyond the clinical competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaki, Zohreh; Memarian, Robabeh

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of clinical competency in professional roles especially in crucial situations can improve the nursing profession. This qualitative research was conducted to determine the process of acquiring clinical competency by nurses in its cultural context and within the health care delivery system in Iran. This study, using grounded theory methodology, took place in universities and hospitals in Tehran. Nurses (36) included nurse managers, tutors, practitioners, and members of the Iranian Nursing Organization. Simultaneous data collection and analysis took place using participant semistructured interviews. Three categories emerged: (a) personal characteristics such as philanthropy, strong conscience, being attentive, accepting responsibility, being committed to and respecting self and others; (b) care environment including appropriate management systems, in-service training provision, employment laws, and control mechanisms, suitable and adequate equipment; and (c) provision of productive work practices including love of the profession, critical thinking, nursing knowledge, and professional expertise. Professional ethics has emerged as the core variable that embodies concepts such as commitment, responsibility, and accountability. Professional ethics guarantees clinical competency and leads to the application of specialized knowledge and skill by nurses. The results can be used to form the basis of guiding the process of acquiring clinical competency by nurses using a systematic process.

  5. Professional ethics and professional etiquette in dentistry: are they compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbrun, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    In keeping with the theme of this colloquium, two aspects of ethics in dentistry are addressed: its evolution and its future. With respect to its evolution, two examples of changes in the design of clinical trials in dentistry are discussed. These concern the current requirement of informed consent from the subjects in the trial, now taken for granted, but not necessarily observed before 1964. The Vipeholm dental caries study is one example of pre-Helsinki Declaration experimentation. The second example, also drawn from caries research design, concerns the stricture on the use of placebo-controlled trials in the face of a proven drug. For example, the design of clinical trials of fluoride dentifrices has evolved since the mid 1970s. The use of a placebo-inactive control group is no longer acceptable as it would deprive its subjects of a proven caries-preventive agent and would expose its subjects to increased caries risk. While definitions of professional ethics in dentistry may vary, the ADA Code of Ethics includes five principles: patient autonomy ("self-governance"), non-maleficence ("do no harm"), beneficence ("do good"), justice ("fairness") and veracity ("truthfulness"). Professional etiquette refers to the way dentists relate to one another and is governed by the ADA Code of Professional Conduct which expresses specific types of conduct that are either required or prohibited. Sometimes, ethics and etiquette may conflict. The problem of financial issues that conflict with ethical ones is discussed along with the problem of commercialism in the practice of dentistry. Debts from dental school may adversely affect the professional behavior of young dentists, while general dentists might succumb to "goodies" provided by specialists. These often include continuing education courses, gifts, trips, and kickbacks. Specialists may fail to inform patients of improper or poor quality treatment by the referring general practitioner, fearing loss of referrals. Of course

  6. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  7. Knowledge of medical ethics among Nigerian medical doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The questionnaire, apart from the bio‑data, also sought information on undergraduate and postgraduate training in medical ethics, knowledge about the principles of biomedical ethics and the ethical dilemmas encountered in daily medical practice. Results: One hundred and ninety (190) respondents returned the filled ...

  8. Medical Ethics and Law in Radiologic Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Eric P; Matthews, Tracy M

    2015-01-01

    At every stage of their careers, radiologic technologists and student technologists must adhere to high ethical standards, obey the law, and consistently conduct themselves with professionalism. This article explains how modern health care ethics evolved, focusing on 8 important theorists. It also describes the ethical responsibilities of health care providers and the rights of patients. Important civil rights laws are discussed, focusing on the rights of health care workers as employees. A brief overview of the U.S. legal system follows, including the causes of action that most commonly involve health care professionals. Finally, this article discusses professionalism and its implications for radiologic technologists.

  9. Current trends in medical ethics education in Japanese medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Mitsuyasu

    2012-09-01

    The Japanese medical education program has radically improved during the last 10 years. In 1999, the Task Force Committee on Innovation of Medical Education for the 21st Century proposed a tutorial education system, a core curriculum, and a medical student evaluation system for clinical clerkship. In 2001, the Model Core Curriculum of medical education was instituted, in which medical ethics became part of the core material. Since 2005, a nationwide medical student evaluation system has been applied for entrance to clinical clerkship. Within the Japan Society for Medical Education, the Working Group of Medical Ethics proposed a medical ethics education curriculum in 2001. In line with this, the Japanese Association for Philosophical and Ethical Research in Medicine has begun to address the standardization of the curriculum of medical ethics. A medical philosophy curriculum should also be included in considering illness, health, life, death, the body, and human welfare.

  10. The healing philosopher: John Locke's medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Bradford William

    2004-01-01

    This article examines a heretofore unexplored facet of John Locke's philosophy. Locke was a medical doctor and he also wrote about medical issues that are controversial today. Despite this, Locke's medical ethics has yet to be studied. An analysis of Locke's education and his teachers and colleagues in the medical profession, of the 17th century Hippocratic Oath, and of the reaction to the last recorded outbreak of the bubonic plague in London, shines some light on the subject of Locke's medical ethics. The study of Locke's medical ethics confirms that he was a deontologist who opposed all suicide and abortion through much of pregnancy.

  11. Medical professionalism and the social contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    Conceptions of professionalism in medicine draw on social contract theory; its strengths and weaknesses play out in how we reason about professionalism. The social contract metaphor may be a heuristic device prompting reflection on social responsibility, and as such is appealing: it encourages reasoning about privilege and responsibility, the broader context and consequences of action, and diverse perspectives on medical practice. However, when this metaphor is elevated to the status of a theory, it has well-known limits: the assumed subject position of contractors engenders blind spots about privilege, not critical reflection; its tendency to dress up the status quo in the trappings of a theoretical agreement may limit social negotiation; its attempted reconciliation of social obligation and self-interest fosters the view that ethics and self-interest should coincide; it sets up false expectations by identifying appearance and reality in morality; and its construal of prima facie duties as conditional misdirects ethical attention in particular situations from current needs to supposed past agreements or reciprocities. Using philosophical ideas as heuristic devices in medical ethics is inevitable, but we should be conscious of their limitations. When they limit the ethical scope of debate, we should seek new metaphors.

  12. Percived ethical misconduct: a survey of Neuropsychology professionals in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the frequency of perceived ethical misconduct in the practice of neuropsychology in Mexico. Method: One hundred fourteen psychologists answered a survey which assessed perceptions of ethical misconduct in four areas of professional practice in the field of neuropsychology. Results: The area of professional training contained the highest percentage of perception of ethical misconduct, followed by research and publications, clinical care, and professional relationships. Conclusion: The high frequency of ethical misconduct perceived by neuropsychology professionals in Mexico is a cause for concern. The results suggest the need to create and implement a system to make sure that professionals follow the ethics standards required by the profession, and to provide consequences for those who fail to do so. The profession of neuropsychology and training of professionals in the field must be regularized in the country, to reduce the frequency of future ethical misconducts.

  13. Regulating professional behavior: codes of ethics or law? Suggested criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libman, Liron A

    2013-09-01

    This paper suggests considering a few parameters when making policy decisions as to the proper "tool" to regulate professional behavior: law or professional ethics. This is done on the background of understanding the place of codes of professional ethics between "pure" ethics and law. Suggested criteria are then illustrated using a few examples. Further discourse may reveal additional factors to support a more rational process of decision-making in this field.

  14. Medical Ethics in Nephrology: A Jewish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allon J. Friedman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jewish medical ethics is arguably the oldest recorded system of bioethics still in use. It should be of interest to practicing nephrologists because of its influence on the ethical systems of Christianity, Islam, and Western secular society; because of the extensive written documentation of rabbinical response in addressing a broad range of bioethical dilemmas; and in understanding the values of patients who choose to adhere to religious Jewish law. The goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of the basic principles underlying mainstream traditional Jewish medical ethics, apply them to common clinical scenarios experienced in nephrology practice, and contrast them with that of secular medical ethics.

  15. Ethical analysis of non-medical fetal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John Lai Yin; Pang, Samantha Mei Che

    2009-09-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is the well-recognized prenatal test used to visualize and determine the condition of a pregnant woman and her fetus. Apart from the clinical application, some businesses have started promoting the use of fetal ultrasound machines for nonmedical reasons. Non-medical fetal ultrasound (also known as 'keepsake' ultrasound) is defined as using ultrasound to view, take a picture, or determine the sex of a fetus without a medical indication. Notwithstanding the guidelines and warnings regarding ultrasound safety issued by governments and professional bodies, the absence of scientifically proven physical harm to fetuses from this procedure seems to provide these businesses with grounds for rapid expansion. However, this argument is too simplistic because current epidemiological evidence is not synchronous with advancing ultrasound technology. As non-medical fetal ultrasound has aroused very significant public attention, a thorough ethical analysis of this topic is essential. Using a multifaceted approach, we analyse the ethical perspective of non-medical fetal ultrasound in terms of the expectant mother, the fetus and health professionals. After applying four major theories of ethics and principles (the precautionary principle; theories of consequentialism and impartiality; duty-based theory; and rights-based theories), we conclude that obstetric ultrasound practice is ethically justifiable only if the indication for its use is based on medical evidence. Non-medical fetal ultrasound can be considered ethically unjustifiable. Nevertheless, the ethical analysis of this issue is time dependent owing to rapid advancements in ultrasound technology and the safety issue. The role of health professionals in ensuring that obstetric ultrasound is an ethically justifiable practice is also discussed.

  16. The development of computer ethics: contributions from business ethics and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K; Steinke, G

    2000-04-01

    In this essay, we demonstrate that the field of computer ethics shares many core similarities with two other areas of applied ethics. Academicians writing and teaching in the area of computer ethics, along with practitioners, must address ethical issues that are qualitatively similar in nature to those raised in medicine and business. In addition, as academic disciplines, these three fields also share some similar concerns. For example, all face the difficult challenge of maintaining a credible dialogue with diverse constituents such as academicians of various disciplines, professionals, policymakers, and the general public. Given these similarities, the fields of bioethics and business ethics can serve as useful models for the development of computer ethics.

  17. Medical ethics course for undergraduate medical students: a needs assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Fariba; Samadi, Aniseh; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Education needs assessment is one of the essential components of curriculum development. In this study, we aimed to assess the educational needs of general physicians for medical ethics. We conducted a three-stage Delphi study of general physicians' views on important ethical issues in their practice. In the item generation stage we retrieved 45 important educational items from a survey of general physicians, patients, well known ethical clinicians, and a review of other universities' curricula and international literature. The questionnaire was designed to ask the importance of each generated item. We then sent the questionnaire to general physicians. Items scored as highly important by more than 80% of the respondents in the first or second consensus development surveys were considered as educational priorities. Four academic medical ethics teachers reviewed and commented on the findings. The response rate to the first consensus development survey was 38%, of whom 77% also responded to the second survey. We developed consensus on 24 medical ethics items for inclusion in medical ethics curriculum. All items were also considered important by medical ethics teachers, and they added four further items to the list. Despite the attention given to ethical issues originating from technological advances, the most important educational needs of general physicians in medical ethics are still the traditional issues concerning the doctor-patient relationship and professionalism.

  18. Towards a European code of medical ethics. Ethical and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patuzzo, Sara; Pulice, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of a common European code of medical ethics is discussed, with consideration and evaluation of the difficulties such a project is going to face, from both the legal and ethical points of view. On the one hand, the analysis will underline the limits of a common European code of medical ethics as an instrument for harmonising national professional rules in the European context; on the other hand, we will highlight some of the potentials of this project, which could be increased and strengthened through a proper rulemaking process and through adequate and careful choice of content. We will also stress specific elements and devices that should be taken into consideration during the establishment of the code, from both procedural and content perspectives. Regarding methodological issues, the limits and potentialities of a common European code of medical ethics will be analysed from an ethical point of view and then from a legal perspective. The aim of this paper is to clarify the framework for the potential but controversial role of the code in the European context, showing the difficulties in enforcing and harmonising national ethical rules into a European code of medical ethics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. The relationship between medical law and good medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Emily

    2015-01-01

    In the UK, medical ethics and law are often thought of and taught together, but while 'good medical ethics' is often reflected in law-the need to obtain a patient's adequately informed consent, for example-this is not necessarily the case. Sometimes medical ethics is more demanding than law; at other times, perhaps counterintuitively, the law appears to ask more of doctors than does good medical ethics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. A call for responsibility in ethical issues for IS professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiter, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of persons in the business world. Public abhorrence of questionable behavior of politicians, the savings and loan scandal and insider trading violations are just a few examples of many problems in business and professional life. A 1992 study by the Josephson Institute of Ethics involving 9,000 young people and adults revealed alarmingly low ethical characteristics in American institutions. Ferrell and Fraedrick have concluded that {open_quotes}business ethics is one of the most important concerns in today`s business world.{close_quote} A few professional organizations have tried to comprehend the ethical values, beliefs and behavior of their constituents. Vittrell has studied the frequency of ethical behavior for management information specialists. Martin and Peterson have examined the ethical issues of insider trading. Fimbel and Burstein have investigated the ethical values of technology professionals. Thornburg made use of a survey concerning the ethical beliefs and practices of human resources professionals. On a preliminary basis, these studies indicate the various ethical issues and uncertainties which are problematic for members of the various professions. Most business people are ethical segregationists, that is they tend to segregate their ethical values into one type of behavior for business and another type of behavior away from business. Managers accused of unethical behavior respond with, III am not that type of person. I am active in my church, in community affairs, a good family man, and so on.

  1. Research Integrity and Research Ethics in Professional Codes of Ethics: Survey of Terminology Used by Professional Organizations across Research Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komić, Dubravka; Marušić, Stjepan Ljudevit; Marušić, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Professional codes of ethics are social contracts among members of a professional group, which aim to instigate, encourage and nurture ethical behaviour and prevent professional misconduct, including research and publication. Despite the existence of codes of ethics, research misconduct remains a serious problem. A survey of codes of ethics from 795 professional organizations from the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Codes of Ethics Collection showed that 182 of them (23%) used research integrity and research ethics terminology in their codes, with differences across disciplines: while the terminology was common in professional organizations in social sciences (82%), mental health (71%), sciences (61%), other organizations had no statements (construction trades, fraternal social organizations, real estate) or a few of them (management, media, engineering). A subsample of 158 professional organizations we judged to be directly involved in research significantly more often had statements on research integrity/ethics terminology than the whole sample: an average of 10.4% of organizations with a statement (95% CI = 10.4-23-5%) on any of the 27 research integrity/ethics terms compared to 3.3% (95% CI = 2.1–4.6%), respectively (Pethics concepts used prescriptive language in describing the standard of practice. Professional organizations should define research integrity and research ethics issues in their ethics codes and collaborate within and across disciplines to adequately address responsible conduct of research and meet contemporary needs of their communities. PMID:26192805

  2. Interns' perceptions on medical ethics education and ethical issues at the Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, S; Timbil, S; Semin, S; Musal, B

    2010-11-01

    In Turkey and its neighboring countries, few studies have investigated medical students' reactions to ethics education and ethical issues they encounter. The aim of this study was to investigate interns' perceptions of medical ethics education and ethical issues. In students' first three years at the Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine, various teaching methods are used in ethics education, including problem-based learning, interactive lectures and movies. During the clinical years, the curriculum helps students consider the ethical dimension of their clinical work, and during the internship period a discussion on ethical issues is held. Data were collected through a questionnaire distributed to interns in the 2005-2006 academic year. Its questions asked about interns' perceived adequacy of their ethics education, any interpersonal ethical problems they had witnessed, their approaches to ethical problems, obstacles they believe prevented them from resolving ethical problems and whether they felt themselves ready to deal with ethical problems. 67.2 % of interns were reached and all of them responded. In the assessment of the adequacy of ethics education, the most favorable score was given to educators. Students' most often mentioned ethical problems encountered were between physicians and students and between physicians and patients. Interns believed that difficult personalities on the team and team hierarchy were important obstacles to resolving ethical problems. There were significant differences between the approaches students currently used in dealing with ethical problems and how they anticipated they would approach these problems in their future professional lives. We obtained information about students' perceptions about ethics education and ethical problems which helped us to plan other educational activities. This study may assist other medical schools in preparing an ethics curriculum or help evaluate an existing curriculum.

  3. International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) position statement: the role of the professional medical writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Robert; Bowman, Aly; Fagan, Jean M; Gallagher, Eileen R; Geraci, Anna B; Gertel, Art; Hirsch, Laurence; Ross, Philip D; Stossel, Thomas P; Veitch, Keith; Woods, David

    2007-08-01

    The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) is an independent, nonprofit professional association with members from the pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotechnology industries; publication planning and medical communications companies; academia; and medical journal staffs, including editors and publishers. ISMPP's mission is to support the educational needs of medical publication professionals by providing a forum to facilitate awareness and development of best practices in publication planning and implementation, and fostering consensus policies related to medical publishing. This position statement reflects our concern about the current climate of mistrust regarding the use of professional medical writers in the preparation of manuscripts. We acknowledge the skills and training of medical writing professionals and support their role in working with research teams to develop clear and concise manuscripts in a timely fashion. Further, we support complete and transparent disclosure of the role of the medical writer and the source of funding for the writing initiative in order to build awareness of, and trust in, the appropriate use of medical writing professionals. ISMPP endorses use of the contributorship model, which offers detailed information on the roles of all who participated in planning, conducting, developing, and publishing medical research. Further, we propose that this model be integrated into the standard operating procedures of the diverse organizations that comprise our membership because the responsibility for authorship disclosure is shared by sponsors, authors, study investigators, and medical writers. Finally, we commend the many organizations that have worked to increase recognition and understanding of the legitimate role of the medical writer, and are eager to work in concert with them to ensure the rigorous maintenance of all ethical standards for reporting the results of medical research.

  4. Corporate Governance Debate on Professional Ethics in Accounting Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Giorgiana Bonaci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paper focuses on the particular case of professional ethics in the context of the accounting profession. After briefly discussing recent events that made us reconsider our understanding of corporate governance, accountancy and ethics, we try to delimit the state of the art by looking at ethics from the accounting professions’ perspective. When aiming to clarify professional ethics, we closely analyze integrity based on the latest developments undertaken by European professional bodies. Findings are used in identifying ways to contribute to the endeavor of aligning the profession’s performance with society’s reasonable expectations.

  5. Sensing as an Ethical Dimension of Teacher Professionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edling, Silvia; Frelin, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to theoretically discuss how teacher professionality, as an aspect of teacher professionalism, can be understood in relation to the notion of sensing within the "ethics of alterity" and the "ethics of dissensus," both of which express a desire to contest the various forms of violence in society.…

  6. Ethics in Engineering: Student Perceptions and Their Professional Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappenbelt, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Professional ethics instruction in engineering is commonly conducted by examining case studies in light of the code of conduct of a suitable professional body. Although graphical presentations of spectacular failures, sobering stories of the repercussions and the solid framework provided by the tenets of a code of ethics may leave a lasting…

  7. Translational ethics? The theory-practice gap in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Translational research is now a critically important current in academic medicine. Researchers in all health-related fields are being encouraged not only to demonstrate the potential benefits of their research but also to help identify the steps through which their research might be 'made practical'. This paper considers the prospects of a corresponding movement of 'translational ethics'. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of focusing upon the translation of ethical scholarship are reviewed. While emphasising the difficulties of crossing the gap between scholarship and practice, the paper concludes that a debate about the business of translation would be useful for medical ethics.

  8. ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDICAL PUBLISHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Zwitter

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medical publishing has a key role in guidance of medical practice and research. It is essential to avoid systematic biases on all steps from formulating a research proposal to the editorial evaluation of a submitted manuscript. With this in mind, we will attempt to assess the responsibilities of the five key persons: sponsor, clinical investigator, author, editor, and reviewer.Sponsor. To an increasing degree, pharmaceutical companies and other commercial sponsors initiate, support, and define priorities of clinical research. To avoid a systematic bias, a substantial proportion of medical research should be supported through public resources.Clinical investigator. Since patients’ autonomy is rarely complete, formal adherence to ethical codes is not enough. In addition to patients in research who are often offered substantial benefits, attention should be paid also to patients not included in research who may be discriminated.Author. The author is the one who is most often responsible for delayed or missing publication of results of a negative trial. The author should respect rules for co-authorship, be honest presentation of results, and retain an appropriate degree of scientific scepticism.Editor. The editorial work is time-consuming and should be paid. In order to avoid bias against publication of negative trials, we propose a special category of short reports not included in the assessment of impact factor of a journal.Reviewer. Due to annonymity, reviewers have little interest and do not feel responsible for their work. For the accepted papers, we propose to publish the name of the reviewer, along with an optional short comment.

  9. Chinese Confucian culture and the medical ethical tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z

    1995-01-01

    The Confucian culture, rich in its contents and great in its significance, exerted on the thinking, culture and political life of ancient China immense influences, unparalleled by any other school of thought or culture. Confucian theories on morality and ethics, with 'goodness' as the core and 'rites' as the norm, served as the 'key notes' of the traditional medical ethics of China. The viewpoints of Confucianism on benevolence and material interests, on good and evil, on kindheartedness, and on character cultivation were all inherited by the medical workers and thus became prominent in Chinese traditional medical ethics. Hence, it is clear that the medical profession and Confucianism have long shared common goals in terms of ethics. Influenced by the excellent Confucian thinking and culture, a rather highly-developed system of Chinese traditional medical ethics emerged with a well-defined basic content, and the system has been followed and amended by medical professionals of all generations throughout Chinese history. This system, just to mention briefly, contains concepts such as the need: to attach great importance to the value of life; to do one's best to rescue the dying and to heal the wounded; to show concern to those who suffer from diseases; to practise medicine with honesty; to study medical skills painstakingly; to oppose a careless style of work; to comfort oneself in a dignified manner; to respect local customs and to be polite; to treat patients, noble or humble, equally, and to respect the academic achievements of others, etc. Of course, at the same time, Confucian culture has its own historical and class limitations, which exerted negative influences on traditional medical ethics. Now, if we are to keep up with the development of modern medicine, a serious topic must be addressed. That is how to retain the essence of our traditional medical ethics so as to maintain historic continuity and yet, at the same time, add on the new contents of medical

  10. [Hippocratic Oath: professional or ethic code?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Milos

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the historical relationship of early medical professional codex and contemporary demands and challenges, which are currently being placed before physicians, the first such text, known as Hippocratic Oath has been re-translated. According to the source, it is clear that this is a Code of professional conduct, primarily for the welfare of patients, and in order to maintain and preserve medical authority. All parts of the Oath have been discussed and presented, as well as the historical data from which one can see how the system in ancient Greece and Rome worked. The study includes historical data from that time on two controversial issues: the liability of medical awards, and addressing medical services. These are mistakenly considered to belong to the text of the Oath. Examples of the amount of medical awards are stated, as well as the examples of selflessness and dedication of the physicians in that time. A physician was obliged to help by law, only in the case of accidents and injuries. It is obvious that "medical doctrine" existed also in this time. Requirements set to a doctor were realistic, modest and appropriate to the call, with the main purpose of protecting the reputation and dignity of the profession. Despite the historical distance, classical text of the Oath is still up to date. In this context, ambiguities and errors result from not being familiar with the both, the basic text, and the circumstances prevailing at the time and society, in which the Oath was made.

  11. Teaching and Maintaining Ethical Behavior in a Professional Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Brodhead, Matthew T.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to continuing education mandates by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), behavior-analytic professional organizations may adopt systems that teach and maintain ethical behavior in its employees. Systems of ethical supervision and management may allow for an organization to customize training that prevents ethical misconduct by employees. These systems may also allow supervisors to identify ethical problems in their infancy, allowing the organization to mitigate concern...

  12. Moral crisis, professionals and ethical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G

    1997-01-01

    Western civilization has probably reached an impasse, expressed as a crisis on all fronts: economic, technological, environmental and political. This is experienced on the cultural level as a moral crisis or an ethical deficit. Somehow, the means we have always assumed as being adequate to the task of achieving human welfare, health and peace, are failing us. Have we lost sight of the primacy of human ends? Governments still push for economic growth and technological advances, but many are now asking: economic growth for what, technology for what? Health care and nursing are caught up in the same inversion of human priorities. Professionals, such as nurses and midwives, need to take on social responsibilities and a collective civic voice, and play their part in a moral regeneration of society. This involves carrying civic rights and duties into the workplace.

  13. Lectures on Inhumanity: Teaching Medical Ethics in German Medical Schools Under Nazism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Florian; Chelouche, Tessa

    2017-04-18

    Nazi medicine and its atrocities have been explored in depth over the past few decades, but scholars have started to examine medical ethics under Nazism only in recent years. Given the medical crimes and immoral conduct of physicians during the Third Reich, it is often assumed that Nazi medical authorities spurned ethics. However, in 1939, Germany introduced mandatory lectures on ethics as part of the medical curriculum. Course catalogs and archival sources show that lectures on ethics were an integral part of the medical curriculum in Germany between 1939 and 1945. Nazi officials established lecturer positions for the new subject area, named Medical Law and Professional Studies, at every medical school. The appointed lecturers were mostly early members of the Nazi Party and imparted Nazi political and moral values in their teaching. These values included the unequal worth of human beings, the moral imperative of preserving a pure Aryan people, the authoritarian role of the physician, the individual's obligation to stay healthy, and the priority of public health over individual-patient care. This article shows that there existed not only a Nazi version of medical ethics but also a systematic teaching of such ethics to students in Nazi Germany. The findings illustrate that, from a historical point of view, the notion of "eternal values" that are inherent to the medical profession is questionable. Rather, the prevailing medical ethos can be strongly determined by politics and the zeitgeist and therefore has to be repeatedly negotiated.

  14. Distributive justice and the harm to medical professionals fighting epidemics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Andreas; Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2017-01-01

    The exposure of doctors, nurses and other medical professionals to risks in the context of epidemics is significant. While traditional medical ethics offers the thought that these dangers may limit the extent to which a duty to care is applicable in such situations, it has less to say about what ...

  15. Ethical concerns and dilemmas of Finnish and Dutch health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopia, Hanna; Lottes, Ilsa; Kanne, Mariël

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare professionals encounter ethical dilemmas and concerns in their practice. More research is needed to understand these ethical problems and to know how to educate professionals to respond to them. To describe ethical dilemmas and concerns at work from the perspectives of Finnish and Dutch healthcare professionals studying at the master's level. Exploratory, qualitative study that used the text of student online discussions of ethical dilemmas at work as data. Participants' online discussions were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The sample consisted of 49 students at master's level enrolled in professional ethics courses at universities in Finland and the Netherlands. Permission for conducting the study was granted from both universities of applied sciences. All students provided their informed consent for the use of their assignments as research data. Participants described 51 problematic work situations. Among these, 16 were found to be ethical dilemmas, and the remaining were work issues with an ethical concern and did not meet criteria of a dilemma. The most common problems resulted from concerns about quality care, safety of healthcare professionals, patients' rights, and working with too few staff and inadequate resources. The results indicated that participants were concerned about providing quality of care and raised numerous questions about how to provide it in challenging situations. The results show that it was difficult for students to differentiate ethical dilemmas from other ethical work concerns. Online discussions among healthcare providers give them an opportunity to relate ethical principles to real ethical dilemmas and problems in their work as well as to critically analyze ethical issues. We found that discussions with descriptions of ethical dilemmas and concerns by health professionals provide important information and recommendations not only for education and practice but also for health policy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Professional ethics in postgraduate students from two Mexican universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Navia Antezana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of research on professional ethics in two Mexican universities: the National Autonomous University of Mexico, with the research project Professional Ethics, and the Autonomous University of the State of Morelos with the project Professional Ethics in Teacher Training. Both research projects shared significant elements: objectives, theoretical framework, use of postgraduate students as study subjects, an instrument for data collection and methodology of analysis. We found a strong presence of cognitive and ethical skills, although one of the ethical skills, “Providing the best service to society”, received a low percentage. Significant contradictions with regard to the ethical values “Continuing Education”, “Hardworking” and “Respect” were found.

  17. On the Relationship between Medical Ethics and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain

    2018-01-17

    In his comments on Bland, Lord Justice Hoffmann stated that 'I would expect medical ethics to be formed by the law rather than the reverse'. But what judges expect, and what they have a right to expect, are different things; I shall use Hoffmann LJ's statement as a way into looking at the relationship between ethics and law, and argue that it is partially correct insofar as that it makes a prediction about that relationship. Professional ethics and codes of ethics are shaped by law; but law is shaped by those codes to some extent, and both are influenced by 'philosophical ethics'. As a normative claim, Hoffmann LJ's statement is more compelling; but he also distinguished between 'medical ethics' and 'morality', and this merits exploration. There remains a question about the proper relationship between law, ethics, and morality that I shall address. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Professional ethics in occupational health--Western European perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerholm, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the foundations of professional ethics in occupational health care is described and discussed. After an introduction reminding of the global developments of world economy, communications and trade and reference to cultural and social developments, reference is given the four basic ethical criteria of biomedical ethics of beneficence ("doing good"), non-malfeasance (avoidance of harm), autonomy (integrity) and Justice/Equity-The "Appletown consensus" of 1989. These criteria provide the basis for current thinking and practice in health professions of Western Europe. The principles of ethical analysis, as currently practiced is described using a practical case scenario drawn from experience of challenging tasks for Occupational Health Services in Western Europe. Specific challenges to professional ethics are discussed-the growth of knowledge in subjects and academic disciplines relevant to occupational health and the multiple loyalties of occupational health professionals. The principles of ethical codes and their implementation are touched on. In conclusion, the universality of professional ethical principles of bioethics-including occupational health-is discussed in observing global inter-cultural commonalities and convergence on ethical criteria of central importance. Emphatic recommendation is given to continue inter-cultural exchanges with a view to improve understanding of impact of contextual and cultural factors on ethics in professional occupational health practice.

  19. Does medical education erode medical trainees' ethical attitude and behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Neda

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, medical education policy makers have expressed concern about changes in the ethical attitude and behavior of medical trainees during the course of their education. They claim that newly graduated physicians (MDs) are entering residency years with inappropriate habits and attitudes earned during their education. This allegation has been supported by numerous research on the changes in the attitude and morality of medical trainees. The aim of this paper was to investigate ethical erosion among medical trainees as a serious universal problem, and to urge the authorities to take urgent preventive and corrective action. A comparison with the course of moral development in ordinary people from Kohlberg's and Gilligan's points of view reveals that the growth of ethical attitudes and behaviors in medical students is stunted or even degraded in many medical schools. In the end, the article examines the feasibility of teaching ethics in medical schools and the best approach for this purpose. It concludes that there is considerable controversy among ethicists on whether teaching ethical virtues is plausible at all. Virtue-based ethics, principle-based ethics and ethics of care are approaches that have been considered as most applicable in this regard.

  20. Qualifications and ethics education: the views of ICT professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeslam Al-Saggaf

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Do information and communications technology (ICT professionals who have ICT qualifications believe that the ethics education they received as part of their ICT degrees helped them recognise ethical problems in the workplace and address them? If they do, are they also influenced by their personal ethics? What else helps them recognise ethical problems in the workplace and address them? And what are their views in relation to the impact of ethics education on professionalism in the ICT workplace? A quantitative survey of 2,315 Australian ICT professionals revealed that participants who reported having various levels of qualifications found ethics education or training, to a small degree, helpful for recognising ethical problems and addressing them; although it is those with Non-ICT qualifications, not those with ICT degrees, who were influenced more by ethics education or training. This suggests that educators need to consider how to better prepare ICT graduates for the workplace challenges and the types of situations they subsequently experience. The survey also found that participants who reported having various levels of qualifications were not influenced by their personal ethics or indeed any other factor making ethics education or training important for developing professionalism. The quantitative survey was followed by qualitative interviews with 43 Australian ICT professionals in six Australian capital cities. These interviews provided further empirical evidence that ethics education is crucial for enabling ICT professionals to recognise ethical problems and resolve them and that educators need to consider how to better prepare ICT graduates for the types of moral dilemmas that they are likely going to face in the workforce.

  1. Ethics interventions for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Ruokonen, Minka; Repo, Hanna; Suhonen, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    The ethics and value bases in healthcare are widely acknowledged. There is a need to improve and raise awareness of ethics in complex systems and in line with competing needs, different stakeholders and patients' rights. Evidence-based strategies and interventions for the development of procedures and practice have been used to improve care and services. However, it is not known whether and to what extent ethics can be developed using interventions. To examine ethics interventions conducted on healthcare professionals and healthcare students to achieve ethics-related outcomes. A systematic review. Five electronic databases were searched: CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Philosopher's Index, PubMed and PsycINFO. We searched for published articles written in English without a time limit using the keywords: ethic* OR moral* AND intervention OR program OR pre-post OR quasi-experimental OR rct OR experimental AND nurse OR nursing OR health care. In the four-phased retrieval process, 23 full texts out of 4675 citations were included in the review. Data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Ethical consideration: This systematic review was conducted following good scientific practice in every phase. It is possible to affect the ethics of healthcare practices through professionals and students. All the interventions were educational in type. Many of the interventions were related to the ethical or moral sensitivity of the professionals, such as moral courage and empowerment. A few of the interventions focused on identifying ethical problems or research ethics. Patient-related outcomes followed by organisational outcomes can be improved by ethics interventions targeting professionals. Such outcomes are promising in developing ethical safety for healthcare patients and professionals.

  2. Professional ambivalence: accounts of ethical practice in childhood genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas-Ayllon, Michael; Sarangi, Srikant; Clarke, Angus

    2009-04-01

    Childhood genetic testing raises complex ethical and moral dilemmas for both families and professionals. In the family sphere, the role of communication is a key aspect in the transmission of 'genetic responsibility' between adults and children. In the professional sphere, genetic responsibility is an interactional accomplishment emerging from the sometimes competing views over what constitutes the 'best interests' of the child in relation to parental preferences on the one hand, and professional judgements on the other. In the present paper we extend our previous research into parental accounts of childhood genetic testing and explore the ethical accounts of professionals in research interviews. Interviews (n = 20) were conducted with professional practitioners involved in the genetic diagnosis and management of children and their families. We first identify four inter-related themes-juxtaposition of parental rights vis-à-vis child's autonomy, elicitation of the child's autonomy, avoidance of parental responsibility and recognition of professional uncertainty. Then, using Rhetorical Discourse Analysis, we examine the range of discourse devices through which ethical accounts are situationally illustrated: contrast, reported speech, constructed dialogue, character and event work. An overarching device in these ethical accounts is the use of extreme case scenarios, which reconstruct dilemmas as justifications of professional conduct. While acknowledging ambivalence, our analysis suggests that professional judgement is not a simple matter of implementing ethical principles but rather of managing the practical conditions and consequences of interactions with parents and children. We conclude that more attention is needed to understand the way professional practitioners formulate judgements about ethical practice.

  3. Medical ethics education: coming of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, S H; Lane, L W; Bickel, J; Walker, R M; Cassel, C K

    1989-12-01

    Medical ethics education is instruction that endeavors to teach the examination of the role of values in the doctor's relationship with patients, colleagues, and society. It is one front of a broad curricular effort to develop physicians' values, social perspectives, and interpersonal skills for the practice of medicine. The authors define medical ethics education as more clinically centered than human values education and more inclusive of philosophical, social, and legal issues than is interpersonal skills training. The authors review the history of the emergence of medical ethics education over the last 20 years, examine the areas of consensus that have emerged concerning the general objectives and premises for designing medical ethics programs, and describe teaching objectives and methods, course content, and program evaluation used in such programs on both preclinical and clinical levels. The four interrelated requirements for successful institutionalization of medical ethics education programs are defined and discussed, and the paper ends with an overview of the uncertain future of medical ethics education, an accepted but still not fully mature part of physician training in the United States. An extensive reference list accompanies the article.

  4. A Proposed Code Of Ethics For Infrared Thermographic Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Charles C.

    1987-05-01

    The American Heritage Dictionary defines ethics as "The general study of morals and of specific moral choices to be made by the individual in his relationship with others". A code of ethics defines these moral relationships to encourage integrity throughout a profession. A defined code of ethics often yields credibility to an organization or association of professionals. This paper outlines a proposed code of ethics for practitioners in the infrared thermographic field. The proposed code covers relationships with the public, clients, other professionals and employers. The proposed code covers credentials, capabilities, thermograms, compensation and safety.

  5. The ethical dimension of the systematization of professional exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Isabela Sarmet de Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the systematization of the professional social worker. The objectives of the study were to analyze the unity between theory and practice and the ethical dimensions of professional practice; discuss the importance of the systematization of the professional practice for all fields of professional activity; and articulate systematization of professional exercise, with the working conditions and the demands of users of social policies. Comprised a review of the literature ...

  6. Same same but different: why we should care about the distinction between professionalism and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloch, Sabine

    2016-07-22

    Medical professionalism forms a belief system which is used to defend physicians' ethos against counterforces which might threaten the integrity of medical practice. The current debates on professionalism, however, are characterized by the lack of a clear distinction between professional and ethical aspects of physicians' conduct. This article argues that a differentiation between professionalism and ethics is not of mere academic interest. Instead, it is of great practical importance with regard to morally contentious issues in medicine.A short analysis of the discussions in history and social sciences reveals that professionalism is more than a catchphrase of modern medical debates but has a complex theoretical background which is still not conclusively understood. Whereas professionalism is clearly linked to the honorable aims of providing services to the individual and the society, it potentially entails problematic aspects, such as elitism, monopoly or the maintaining of power and privileges. With regard to morally contentious topics, the professional ethos of physicians must be differentiated from the perspective of ethics which can take a universal standpoint and has the potential to critically assess context-specific moral norms. The example of the current regulation on suicide assistance in German professional law is taken as an example to demonstrate how professional bodies tend to overstep the limits of their expertise and regulatory power with regard to issues which need an ethical evaluation.The article concludes that the narrowing of ethics and professionalism in public discussions and in medical education should be seen as problematic and that morally contentious topics in modern societies should be open to a participatory and inclusive discussion and democratic decision procedures.

  7. Ethics: The Stepchild of Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFeely, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the subject index for "School Business Affairs" during 1990-94 reveals that only two articles have been published over the past five years exclusively on the subject of ethics. Lists the ASBO International's Code of Ethics and how organizations can move from a code of ethics to incorporating them into daily professional…

  8. Codes of Professional Conduct and Ethics Education for Future Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    This paper argues that the way future teachers are being initiated into the ethical dimensions of their future profession is largely out of step with the movement to professionalize teaching. After recalling the role that codes of professional conduct play in the ecology of professional self-regulation, and arguing that familiarizing students with…

  9. Professional competence and palliative care: an ethical perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthuis, G.J.; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore an ethical view of professional competence by examining the professional competence of physicians in the context of palliative care. A discussion of the four dimensions of professional competence--knowledge, technical skills, relationships, and affective and

  10. Perceptions and attitudes of community pharmacists toward professional ethics and ethical dilemmas in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković Rodríguez, Jadranka; Juričić, Živka

    2017-05-22

    Formal training in pharmacy ethics is relatively new in Croatia, and the professional code of ethics is more than 20 years old. Very little is known about how practicing pharmacists implement ethical considerations and relevant professional guidelines in their work. This study aimed to provide the first description of the perceptions and attitudes of Croatian community pharmacists toward ethics in pharmacy practice, how often they face certain ethical dilemmas and how they resolve them. A cross-sectional survey of 252 community pharmacists, including community pharmacists and pre-licensing trainees, was conducted in Zagreb, Croatia. This group accounts for 18% of licensed pharmacists in Croatia. The survey questions included four sections: general sociodemographic information, multiple-choice questions, pre-defined ethical scenarios, and ethical scenarios filled in by respondents. More than half of pharmacists (62.7%) face ethical dilemmas in everyday work. Nearly all (94.4%) are familiar with the current professional code of ethics in Croatia, but only 47.6% think that the code reflects the changes that the pharmacy profession faces today. Most pharmacists (83.3%) solve ethical dilemmas on their own, while nearly the same proportion (75.4%) think that they are not adequately trained to deal with ethical dilemmas. The pre-defined ethical scenarios experienced by the largest proportion of pharmacists are being asked to dispense a drug to someone other than the patient (93.3%), an unnecessary over-the-counter medicine (84.3%), a generic medicine clinically equivalent to the prescribed one (79.4%), or hormonal contraception over the counter (70.4%). The results demonstrate a need to improve formal pharmacy ethics education and training in how to assess ethical issues and make appropriate decisions, which implies the need for stronger collaboration between pharmacists and their professional association. Our results also highlight an urgent need to revise and update the

  11. Occupational therapy, professional development and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Morten

    2009-01-01

    The article's aim is to reflect on and contribute to developing occupational therapy as a profession. I propose an ethical interpretation of health and helping professions in general and occupational therapy in particular. According to this ethical interpretation, the essential function and mission...... of classical health and helping professions are defined by certain ethical values: the basic elements of a good human life. I argue that the central concepts of occupational therapy, activity and participation, can plausibly be understood in this light. However, this seems to imply a rather substantial...... conception of well-being which I try to spell out. In addition, I specify the basic principles of biomedical ethics in the context of occupational therapy according to an ethical interpretation. In conclusion, I point at four advantages of the ethical interpretation: It adds precision and content to ethical...

  12. Teaching medical ethics to meet the realities of a changing health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millstone, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The changing context of medical practice--bureaucratic, political, or economic--demands that doctors have the knowledge and skills to face these new realities. Such changes impose obstacles on doctors delivering ethical care to vulnerable patient populations. Modern medical ethics education requires a focus upon the knowledge and skills necessary to close the gap between the theory and practice of ethical care. Physicians and doctors-in-training must learn to be morally sensitive to ethical dilemmas on the wards, learn how to make professionally grounded decisions with their patients and other medical providers, and develop the leadership, dedication, and courage to fulfill ethical values in the face of disincentives and bureaucratic challenges. A new core focus of medical ethics education must turn to learning how to put ethics into practice by teaching physicians to realistically negotiate the new institutional maze of 21st-century medicine.

  13. Focus: current issues in medical ethics: Medical ethics and child psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Dora; Subotsky, Fiona

    1982-01-01

    The authors, both child psychiatrists, discuss some of the ethical problems that arise in their practice, in relation to advice given in the British Medical Association's Handbook of Medical Ethics. They find that the main problems occur when multidisciplinary cooperation is needed.

  14. Ethics of translational medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Jharna; Ponnambath, Dinoop Korol; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Translational research is the science of application of basic research knowledge to develop novel methods of improving public health outcome. This review briefly discusses the various phases involved and the hurdles faced in the translational pathway, how translational science originated, and the infrastructures consigned for translational research. Translational research also faces numerous diverse ethical issues similar to those observed in biomedical research. The various types of ethical issues faced whereas conducting translational research are discussed briefly in this review to help researchers identify and prevent unethical practices while conducting or regulating translational research.

  15. Developing an informational tool for ethical engagement in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Krystyna; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2017-08-25

    Medical tourism, the practice of persons intentionally travelling across international boundaries to access medical care, has drawn increasing attention from researchers, particularly in relation to potential ethical concerns of this practice. Researchers have expressed concern for potential negative impacts to individual safety, public health within both countries of origin for medical tourists and destination countries, and global health equity. However, these ethical concerns are not discussed within the sources of information commonly provided to medical tourists, and as such, medical tourists may not be aware of these concerns when engaging in medical tourism. This paper describes the methodology utilized to develop an information sheet intended to be disseminated to Canadian medical tourists to encourage contemplation and further public discussion of the ethical concerns in medical tourism. The methodology for developing the information sheet drew on an iterative process to consider stakeholder feedback on the content and use of the information sheet as it might inform prospective medical tourists' decision making. This methodology includes a literature review as well as formative research with Canadian public health professionals and former medical tourists. The final information sheet underwent numerous revisions throughout the formative research process according to feedback from medical tourism stakeholders. These revisions focused primarily on making the information sheet concise with points that encourage individuals considering travelling for medical tourism to do further research regarding their safety both within the destination country, while travelling, and once returning to Canada, and the potential impacts of their trip on third parties. This methodology may be replicated for the development of information sheets intending to communicate ethical concerns of other practices to providers or consumers of a certain service.

  16. Ethical Knowledge in Teaching: A Moral Imperative of Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly, literature from both the academic and the professional fields has focused attention on the moral dimensions of teaching and the ethical demands they place on the daily practice of teachers. On one hand, consideration of ethical intent and behaviour seems quite simple and self-evident. In teaching, as in life more generally, core…

  17. Professionalism in Advertising: The Origin of Ethical Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Quentin J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines attempts to establish a code of ethics in the advertising profession. Contends that advertising ethical codes and self-regulatory mechanisms are designed to present the impression of professionalism and to combat perceptions of the need for outside interference, and thus serve as superficial public relations tools. (JMF)

  18. Ethical and Professional Issues in Computer-Assisted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, B. Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Discusses ethical and professional issues in psychology regarding computer-assisted therapy (CAT). Topics addressed include an explanation of CAT; whether CAT is psychotherapy; software, including independent use, validation of effectiveness, and restricted access; clinician resistance; client acceptance; the impact on ethical standards; and a…

  19. Bridging the Gap: Contextualizing Professional Ethics in Collaborative Writing Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Many business and technical writing students find classroom discussions of professional ethics interesting and enjoyable. However, when trying to incorporate the content of discussions directly into their writing practices, they often experience difficulties linking ethical concepts to writing process. This article discusses how instructors can…

  20. Professional Ethics in the College and University Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Develops the internal codes of scientific practice and the relationships between professional science and society that are the basis of scientific ethics from both an historical and a philosophical perspective. Makes suggestions for how the teaching of scientific ethics can be integrated into the undergraduate curriculum. Contains 49 references.…

  1. Medical performance : Ethical and conceptual issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J

    1996-01-01

    Following an introductory criticism of the Hippocratic Oath and a health-maximizing principle as ethical basis for health care, an evaluation of medical performance is presented according to 3 underlying concepts, namely 1) the act of performing medical procedures itself, 2) effectiveness and 3)

  2. Institutional initiatives in professional scientific ethics: three case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickless, Edmund; Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Learned and professional scientific bodies can play a vital role in promoting ethical behaviours, giving practical substance to theoretical consideration of geoethical principles and complementing the efforts of individual scientists and practitioners to behave in a professional and ethical manner. Institutions may do this through mandatory professional codes of conduct, by developing guidelines and initiatives to codify and stimulate the uptake of best practice, and through wider initiatives to engender a culture conducive to such behaviours. This presentation will outline three current institutional initiatives which directly or indirectly address scientific ethics: i. The UK Science Council's Declaration on Diversity, Equality and Inclusion. ii. Development and promulgation of the American Geosciences Institute's (AGI) Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct. iii. The American Geophysical Union's (AGU) Scientific Code of Conduct and Professional Ethics. The focus of the Science Council and its member bodies (including the Geological Society of London) on diversity is of central importance when considering ethical behaviours in science. First, improving equality and diversity in the science workforce is at the heart of ethical practice, as well as being essential to meeting current and future skills needs. Second, in addition to demographic diversity (whether in terms of gender, race, economic status, sexuality or gender identity, etc), an important dimension of diversity in science is to allow space for a plurality of scientific views, and to nurture dissenting voices - essential both to the development of scientific knowledge and to its effective communication to non-technical audiences.

  3. Suffering, compassion and 'doing good medical ethics'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zulueta, Paquita C

    2015-01-01

    'Doing good medical ethics' involves attending to both the biomedical and existential aspects of illness. For this, we need to bring in a phenomenological perspective to the clinical encounter, adopt a virtue-based ethic and resolve to re-evaluate the goals of medicine, in particular the alleviation of suffering and the role of compassion in everyday ethics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Auditor professional commitment and performance: An ethical issue role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Kusumastuti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores to what extent the auditor’s idealism and relativism ethical orientation influences the professional commitment and the auditor’s performance. This study uses questionnaire’s survey from the auditors who work for Public Accountant Office in Indonesia. The data is analyzed by using the Structural Equation Model. The study reveals that the idealism and relativism ethical orientation have a significant influence to the professional commitment and the auditors’ performance

  5. Sexual harassment in the medical profession: legal and ethical responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Ben; Bismark, Marie M

    2015-08-17

    Sexual harassment of women in medicine has become a subject of national debate after a senior female surgeon stated that if a woman complained of unwanted advances her career would be jeopardised, and subsequent reports suggest that sexual harassment is a serious problem in the medical profession. Sexual harassment of women in the medical profession by their colleagues presents substantial legal, ethical and cultural questions for the profession. Women have enforceable legal rights to gender equality and freedom from sexual harassment in the workplace. Both individual offenders and employers face significant legal consequences for sexual harassment in every Australian state and territory, and individual medical practitioners and employers need to understand their legal and ethical rights and responsibilities in this context. An individual offender may be personally liable for criminal offences, and for breaching anti-discrimination legislation, duties owed in civil law, professional standards and codes of conduct. An employer may be liable for breaching anti-discrimination legislation, workplace safety laws, duties owed in contract law, and a duty of care owed to the employee. Employers, professional colleges and associations, and regulators should use this national debate as an opportunity to improve gender equality and professional culture in medicine; individuals and employers have clear legal and ethical obligations to minimise sexual harassment to the greatest extent possible.

  6. How to introduce medical ethics at the bedside - Factors influencing the implementation of an ethical decision-making model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Zehnder, Barbara; Albisser Schleger, Heidi; Tanner, Sabine; Schnurrer, Valentin; Vogt, Deborah R; Reiter-Theil, Stella; Pargger, Hans

    2017-02-23

    As the implementation of new approaches and procedures of medical ethics is as complex and resource-consuming as in other fields, strategies and activities must be carefully planned to use the available means and funds responsibly. Which facilitators and barriers influence the implementation of a medical ethics decision-making model in daily routine? Up to now, there has been little examination of these factors in this field. A medical ethics decision-making model called METAP was introduced on three intensive care units and two geriatric wards. An evaluation study was performed from 7 months after deployment of the project until two and a half years. Quantitative and qualitative methods including a questionnaire, semi-structured face-to-face and group-interviews were used. Sixty-three participants from different professional groups took part in 33 face-to-face and 9 group interviews, and 122 questionnaires could be analysed. The facilitating factors most frequently mentioned were: acceptance and presence of the model, support given by the medical and nursing management, an existing or developing (explicit) ethics culture, perception of a need for a medical ethics decision-making model, and engaged staff members. Lack of presence and acceptance, insufficient time resources and staff, poor inter-professional collaboration, absence of ethical competence, and not recognizing ethical problems were identified as inhibiting the implementation of the METAP model. However, the results of the questionnaire as well as of explicit inquiry showed that the respondents stated to have had enough time and staff available to use METAP if necessary. Facilitators and barriers of the implementation of a medical ethics decision-making model are quite similar to that of medical guidelines. The planning for implementing an ethics model or guideline can, therefore, benefit from the extensive literature and experience concerning the implementation of medical guidelines. Lack of time and

  7. Genetic Counseling: Ethical and Professional Role Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, J. Melvin; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Genetic counseling assists people in identifying potential or manifest genetic problems, understanding their implications, making decisions about what course to follow, and working through psychological and social aspects as they affect individuals or couples. Four ethical principles and related ethical issues pertaining to autonomy, beneficence…

  8. Teaching Business IT Ethics: A Professional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark; Moynihan, Eddie; McWilliam, Jennie; Gresty, David

    2004-01-01

    In UK higher education a primary aim of business IT-related qualifications is the preparation of students for a relevant career. In this article we discuss an approach to teaching business IT ethics in a university context that prepares students for the ethical problems that they may meet in their future IT careers, and we demonstrate how this…

  9. Is professional ethics a luxury we can do without?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Chiva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In today’s society where the recovery and education of values is being reclaimed, professional ethics is gaining an essential importance, and the education of future professionals is becoming one of the key questions. First of all, this project analyses the content of ethics based on Spanish universities where the Human Nutrition and Dietetics Undergraduate Degree is taught, as well as the content of ethics of dual undergraduate programmes. In second place, the results of an online survey have been analysed. This survey, carried out between 1 and 11 September 2014, included a question on professional ethics and, finally, the Spanish Code of Ethics for Dieticians and Nutritionists was used as an example to solve doubts that were raised regarding our profession related to the patronage of the industry. To conclude, it would be recommendable for the ethics/bioethics subject to be given in the fourth year of the undergraduate degree and for universities where there is a dual undergraduate programme to include content from both human nutrition and dietetics. We should promote the creation of our own ethical culture specifically for human nutrition and dietetics that starts at the university education stage and continues in training throughout the whole professional life.

  10. A Preliminary Survey of Professionalism Teaching Practices in Anatomy Education among Indian Medical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Ilavenil; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, Ponniah; Nalinakumari, Sheela Das

    2017-01-01

    Professionalism and ethics have gained widespread recognition as competencies to be fulfilled, taught, and assessed within medical education. The role of the anatomy course in developed nations has evolved over time and now encompasses multiple domains, including knowledge, skills, and the inculcation of professionalism and ethics. The Medical…

  11. Medical ethics, bioethics and research ethics education perspectives in South East Europe in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijaljica, Goran

    2014-03-01

    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Macedonia and Montenegro were acquired and a total of 14 were analyzed. Teaching hours for medical ethics and/or bioethics and year of study in which the course is taught were also analyzed. The average number of teaching hours in medical ethics and bioethics is 27.1 h per year. The highest national average number of teaching hours was in Croatia (47.5 h per year), and the lowest was in Serbia (14.8). In the countries of the European Union the mean number of hours given to ethics teaching throughout the complete curriculum was 44. In South East Europe, the maximum number of teaching hours is 60, while the minimum number is 10 teaching hours. Research ethics topics also show a considerable variance within the regional medical schools. Approaches to teaching research ethics vary, even within the same country. The proposed model for education in this area is based on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Bioethics Core Curriculum. The model curriculum consists of topics in medical ethics, bioethics and research ethics, as a single course, over 30 teaching hours.

  12. Ethics and policy of medical brain drain: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollar, Eszter; Buyx, Alena

    2013-10-25

    Health-worker migration, commonly called "medical brain drain", refers to the mass migration of trained and skilled health professionals (doctors, nurses, midwives) from low-income to high-income countries. This is currently leaving a significant number of poor countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, with critical staff shortages in the healthcare sector. A broad consensus exists that, where medical brain drain exacerbates such shortages, it is unethical, and this review presents the main arguments underpinning this view. Notwithstanding the general agreement, which policies are justifiable on ethical grounds to tackle brain drain and how best to go about implementing them remains controversial. The review offers a discussion of the specific ethical issues that have to be taken into account when deciding which policy measures to prioritise and suggests a strategy of policy implementation to address medical brain drain as a matter of urgency.

  13. Modeling Medical Ethics through Intelligent Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, José; Miranda, Miguel; Abelha, António; Neves, José; Neves, João

    The amount of research using health information has increased dramatically over the last past years. Indeed, a significative number of healthcare institutions have extensive Electronic Health Records (EHR), collected over several years for clinical and teaching purposes, but are uncertain as to the proper circumstances in which to use them to improve the delivery of care to the ones in need. Research Ethics Boards in Portugal and elsewhere in the world are grappling with these issues, but lack clear guidance regarding their role in the creation of and access to EHRs. However, we feel we have an effective way to handle Medical Ethics if we look to the problem under a structured and more rational way. Indeed, we felt that physicians were not aware of the relevance of the subject in their pre-clinical years, but their interest increase when they were exposed to patients. On the other hand, once EHRs are stored in machines, we also felt that we had to find a way to ensure that the behavior of machines toward human users, and perhaps other machines as well, is ethically acceptable. Therefore, in this article we discuss the importance of machine ethics and the need for machines that represent ethical principles explicitly. It is also shown how a machine may abstract an ethical principle from a logical representation of ethical judgments and use that principle to guide its own behavior.

  14. [Bioethics is dead. Long live medical ethics!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio Maestre, José María

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show a paradigmatic crisis in academic bioethics. Since an important part of bioethicists began to relativize the ethical prohibition of killing an innocent human being, one way or another they began to ally with the death industry: the business of abortion, and then that of euthanasia. The thesis of this paper is that by crossing that Rubicon bioethics has been corrupted and has lost its connection to the ethical, political and legal discourse. One can only hope that it will revive from its ashes if it retakes the ″taboo″ of the sacredness of human life, something for which medical ethics could provide invaluable help, because it still keeps the notion that ″a doctor should not kill″, although in an excessively ″discreet″ and somehow ″ashamed″ way. However, conscientious doctors know more about ethics than most bioethicists.

  15. Shiraz medical students’ perceptions of their colleagues’ professional behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHRDAD ASKARIAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, development of professionalism is a critical aim of medical schools. Studies have demonstrated that medical students’ perceived level of professionalism is inadequate worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the medical students’ perceptions of their colleagues’ professional behavior. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study with 280 medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in their fifth to seventh year of study as the sample. The study was performed during one month in 2013, using stratified random sampling method. The instrument of the study was the Persian version of the questionnaire of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM.The questionnaire includes demographic information, questions about the meaning of the professionalism, history of medical ethics education programs and 12 behavioral questions. The data were analyzed using student t-test and Pearson correlation test. The significance level was set as 0.05. Results: Forty percent of respondents did not know the meaning of professionalism. The mean±SD score of behavioral questions was 5.91±1.2 on a scale from 0 to 10. The mean±SD score of excellence questions was 4.94±1.7. It was 7.05±1.9 for ‘honor/integrity’, and 6.07±2.1 for ‘altruism/respect’ questions. There was a significant association between gender and excellence score (p=0.007. Conclusion: Medical students assessed their colleagues’ professional behavior as poor. They did not have proper information about professionalism. Medical students are future general practitioners and respecting medical ethics by them is very important in a perfect health system. Universities should emphasize the importance of teaching professionalism to medical students and faculty members, using innovative education methods.

  16. On Change of Concepts: From Teacher's Occupational Ethics to Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuan-bao

    2006-01-01

    The transition from experience-based teachers to expertise-based ones has marked a significant phase in the history of human education. The conceptive transition from the general "occupational ethics" of teachers to "professional ethics" is actually an important aspect of the transition from experience-based to expertise-based…

  17. Medical confidentiality versus disclosure: Ethical and legal dilemmas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, V I O

    2009-02-01

    A case is described of a fifty year old single man who made disclosures about criminal sexual practices during a psychiatric assessment. In common practice with other professional men, a doctor is under a duty not to disclose, without the consent of his patient, information which he has gained in his professional capacity other than in exceptional circumstances. We discuss the ethical and legal considerations surrounding issues of medical confidentiality and the dilemma that sometimes face clinicians, when they feel obliged, in the public interest, to disclose information they have gained in confidence. Breach of confidences can have deleterious consequences; particularly for the doctor-patient relationship, but failure to disclose in some situations could have serious implications for the well-being of the wider society. Doctors should be aware of the basic principles of confidentiality and the ethical and legal framework around which they are built.

  18. Professional liability insurance and medical error disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Stuart; Shaw, David; Leu, Agnes; Elger, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    To examine medicolegal stakeholders' views about the impact of professional liability insurance in Switzerland on medical error disclosure. Purposive sample of 23 key medicolegal stakeholders in Switzerland from a range of fields between October 2012 and February 2013. Data were collected via individual, face-to-face interviews using a researcher-developed semi-structured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using conventional content analysis. Participants, particularly those with a legal or quality background, reported that concerns relating to professional liability insurance often inhibited communication with patients after a medical error. Healthcare providers were reported to be particularly concerned about losing their liability insurance cover for apologising to harmed patients. It was reported that the attempt to limit the exchange of information and communication could lead to a conflict with patient rights law. Participants reported that hospitals could, and in some case are, moving towards self-insurance approaches, which could increase flexibility regarding error communication The reported current practice of at least some liability insurance companies in Switzerland of inhibiting communication with harmed patients after an error is concerning and requires further investigation. With a new ethic of transparency regarding medical errors now prevailing internationally, this approach is increasingly being perceived to be misguided. A move away from hospitals relying solely on liability insurance may allow greater transparency after errors. Legalisation preventing the loss of liability insurance coverage for apologising to harmed patients should also be considered.

  19. The effects of professional ethics and commitment on audit quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Nasrabadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effects of professional ethics and commitments on audit quality. The population of this survey includes all audit managers who were active in auditing official statements of different firms listed in Tehran Stock Exchange in 2014. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and distributes it among 152 randomly selected managers. In our survey, professional ethics consists of four items including confidentiality and impartiality, professional competence, accountability and individual values while organizational commitment consists of three items including emotional commitment, continues commitment and fundamental commitment. Using Pearson correlation as well as regression models, the study has determined a positive and meaningful relationship between professional ethics as well as commitment and audit quality.

  20. Professionalism and Ethics Education on Relationships and Boundaries: Psychiatric Residents' Training Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, Maria; Moutier, Christine; Dunn, Laura; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Awareness of the privileges and limits of one's role as physician, as well as recognition and respect for the patient as a human being, are central to ethical medical practice. The authors were particularly interested in examining the attitudes and perceived needs of psychiatric residents toward education on professional boundaries and…

  1. Ethics and epidemiological research | Cullinan | Malawi Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawi Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 2 (1992) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Ethics and epidemiological research. T Cullinan. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  2. Bio-ethical principles of medical law with an emphasis on the law of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Mahdavi Sabet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been many talks about the necessity of ethics in all affairs, especially medical affairs which deal with the lives of individuals and the society expects Medical Group to be abide by morals more than laws. This matter indicates on the fact that the society considers ethics as a stronger enforcement of the law and deplores a doctor who has ignored ethics in the medical profession. Thus, they blamed the doctor from ethical aspect more than deploring him from a legal aspect (civil or criminal liability. The legislator is also influenced by public in anticipation of responsibility (both criminal and civil for doctors and imposes legal rules on this basis. The concept of this article has an extremely close relationship with three concepts of morality, professional ethics and law. Initially first two concepts will be defined and separated and then the relation between professional ethics and medical laws will be expressed. Then, the relation between two concepts of medical ethics and bioethics ethics will be evaluated. Two religion or secularism basis have been taken for medical rights and strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed and the approach of the Iranian legal system will also be mentioned with evaluation of controversial medical samples.

  3. Perception of Ethical Misconduct by Neuropsychology Professionals in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyavin, Ivan S; Goldberg-Looney, Lisa D; Rivera, Diego; Perrin, Paul B; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-01

    To date, extremely limited research has focused on the ethical aspects of clinical neuropsychology practice in Latin America. The current study aimed to identify the frequency of perceived ethical misconduct in a sample of 465 self-identified neuropsychology professionals from Latin America in order to better guide policies for training and begin to establish standards for practitioners in the region. Frequencies of neuropsychologists who knew another professional engaging in ethical misconduct ranged from 1.1% to 60.4% in the areas of research, clinical care, training, and professional relationships. The most frequently reported perceived misconduct was in the domain of professional training and expertise, with nearly two thirds of participants knowing other professionals who do not possess adequate training to be working as neuropsychologists. The least frequently reported perceived misconduct was in the domain of professional relationships. Nearly one third of participants indicated that they had never received formal training in professional ethics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ethics and the Military Profession. The Professional Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    the military profession. Essays by Everett Hughes and Samuel Huntington are the best. Parsons , Talcott . "Professions." International...concern- ing current and forecasted efforts to enhance the moral- ethical environment through curriculum charges and overall approaches to education at...from the others—to which they should direct their attention at the start of their military education . Highly-motivated instructors are encouraged to

  5. Students' medical ethics rounds: a combinatorial program for medical ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigy, Maani; Pishgahi, Ghasem; Moghaddas, Fateme; Maghbouli, Nastaran; Shirbache, Kamran; Asghari, Fariba; Abolfat-H Zadeh, Navid

    2016-01-01

    It has long been a common goal for both medical educators and ethicists to develop effective methods or programs for medical ethics education. The current lecture-based courses of medical ethics programs in medical schools are demonstrated as insufficient models for training "good doctors''. In this study, we introduce an innovative program for medical ethics education in an extra-curricular student-based design named Students' Medical Ethics Rounds (SMER). In SMER, a combination of educational methods, including theater-based case presentation, large group discussion, expert opinions, role playing and role modeling were employed. The pretest-posttest experimental design was used to assess the impact of interventions on the participants' knowledge and attitude regarding selected ethical topics. A total of 335 students participated in this study and 86.57% of them filled the pretest and posttest forms. We observed significant improvements in the knowledge (P effective method of teaching medical ethics. We highly recommend the investigation of the advantages of SMER in larger studies and interdisciplinary settings.

  6. Professional Ethics for Digital Age Psychiatry: Boundaries, Privacy, and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, James E; Harland, Jonathan Clark

    2017-09-01

    Internet and social media use continue to expand rapidly. Many patients and psychiatrists are bringing digital technologies into the treatment process, but relatively little attention has been paid to the ethical challenges in doing this. This review presents ethical guidelines for psychiatry in the digital age. Surveys demonstrate that patients are eager to make digital technologies part of their treatment. Substantial numbers search for professional and personal information about their therapists. Attitudes among psychiatrists about using digital technologies with patients range from dread to enthusiastic adoption. Digital technologies create four major ethical challenges for psychiatry: managing clinical boundaries; maintaining privacy and confidentiality; establishing realistic expectations regarding digital communications; and upholding professional ideals. Traditional ethical expectations are valid for the evolving digital arena, but guidance must be adapted for actual application in practice.

  7. Increasing bioethics education in preclinical medical curricula: what ethical dilemmas do clinical clerks experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Emily; Nisker, Jeff

    2009-04-01

    The increase in bioethics education in preclinical curricula enables medical students to recognize ethical issues and determine right action. The authors sought to explore the ethical dilemmas medical students experience during clinical clerkships. Following an e-mail invitation, 100 of 104 graduating medical students allowed their final ethics assignment, a written description of an ethical dilemma experienced during clinical clerkship, to be analyzed. After all identifiers were removed, the narratives underwent qualitative analysis and were then reanalyzed using Jameton's determinants of moral action. Four themes emerged: the clinical service rotation, target, source, and nature of the ethical dilemma. For many clinical clerks, the ethical dilemma arose because they recognized an ethical issue but neither brought it to their supervisors nor resolved it themselves for fear of incurring disfavor. The source of the ethical dilemma was most frequently the student's supervisor (46%), which may explain why, although all narratives demonstrated the Jameton criteria of "moral sensitivity" and 76% demonstrated "moral judgment," only 24% indicated "moral motivation" and only 4% suggested "moral courage." Patients were the most frequent target (76%), followed by students (14%). Students reported informed consent (18%) and inadequate care (17%) as the most common types of dilemmas under the nature theme. Clinical clerks' experiences of ethical dilemmas might be mitigated if residency education and professional development mirrored the increase in preclinical ethics education, if ethics training included encouraging students to discuss ethical issues as they arise, and if educators developed innovative models of student evaluation.

  8. [Ethics in articles published in medical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto; Palma, Joaquín; Andresen, Max

    2007-04-01

    Authors of clinical articles have similar motivations and rules than authors in other scientific fields. In addition, medical research must obey specific ethical rules that apply to studies involving human subjects, including biological samples, tissues, cellular or sub cellular samples obtained from them. When submitting their reports for publication, authors must declare that they have followed such ethical rules and also should declare any possible conflict of interest that may have arisen. External peer reviewers and the editors should also conform to limitations by eventual conflicts of interest. Authors should respect specific ethical norms that apply to the process of submitting, publishing and reproducing their manuscripts. In recent years, the editors of Revista Médica de Chile have become aware of five instances of misconduct committed by authors of articles submitted or already published. Four correspond to redundant publications and one exhibits overt plagiarism in the text and syntax. Appropriate actions have been taken following recommendations published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, the World Association of Medical Editors and other groups. The present article stresses that authors and their sponsoring institutions must be aware of the importance of following ethical rules when reporting scientific work.

  9. Burnout syndrome: understanding of medical teaching professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Brito Vidal Batista

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the understanding of medical teaching professionals about Burnout Syndrome. This is a qualitative, exploratory study, consisting of ten teaching physicians, who work at the hospital of a higher education institution. The data were collected from May to June 2013, through a form with questions pertinent to the proposed research objective, after approval by the Research Ethics Committee (Protocol No. 84022, and analyzed qualitatively, through the content analysis technique (Bardin. Among the 10 participants in the study, eight had adequate knowledge about Burnout Syndrome, while others showed insufficient knowledge. From the empirical material analysis, five thematic categories emerged: Syndrome characterized by physical and psychological exhaustion due to work stress; Physical and psychological signs and symptoms of Burnout Syndrome; Burnout syndrome and its implications for the worker’s health; The most vulnerable workers who develop Burnout Syndrome and Relation of Burnout Syndrome to the work of the teaching physician. The study showed that most participants in the research adequately understand Burnout Syndrome, but the subject is still little explored in academia. Therefore, intervention measures are necessary with the professionals of the risk group and new studies that contribute to expand the knowledge about that syndrome, aiming to improve the quality of life of the workers. Keywords: Worker’s Health; Professional Exhaustion; Doctors; Professors; Work Conditions.   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3823/2397

  10. An Ethical Issue in Medical Education of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Choi, Seung Do; Woo, Su-Hyeon

    2015-12-01

    There are four principles of medical ethics; Beneficence, Respect for autonomy, Non-maleficence, and Justice. It is not easy to apply to principles of medical ethics in the special circumstances of obstetrics and gynecology. Student doctors must learn to be familiar with principles of medical ethics tailored to the special circumstances while the obstetrics and gynecology practice.

  11. A Theoretical Framework for Human and Veterinary Medical Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In their practice, physicians and veterinarians need to resort to an array of ethical competences. As a teaching topic, however, there is no accepted gold standard for human medical ethics, and veterinary medical ethics is not yet well established. This paper provides a reflection on the underlying aims of human and veterinary medical ethics…

  12. Medical ethics and law for doctors of tomorrow: the 1998 Consensus Statement updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirrat, G M; Johnston, C; Gillon, R; Boyd, K

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the ethical and legal basis of medicine is as essential to clinical practice as an understanding of basic medical sciences. In the UK, the General Medical Council (GMC) requires that medical graduates behave according to ethical and legal principles and must know about and comply with the GMC's ethical guidance and standards. We suggest that these standards can only be achieved when the teaching and learning of medical ethics, law and professionalism are fundamental to, and thoroughly integrated both vertically and horizontally throughout, the curricula of all medical schools as a shared obligation of all teachers. The GMC also requires that each medical school provides adequate teaching time and resources to achieve the above. We reiterate that the adequate provision and coordination of teaching and learning of ethics and law requires at least one full-time senior academic in ethics and law with relevant professional and academic expertise. In this paper we set out an updated indicative core content of learning for medical ethics and law in UK medical schools and describe its origins and the consultative process by which it was achieved.

  13. Must we remain blind to undergraduate medical ethics education in Africa? A cross-sectional study of Nigerian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Onochie; Nwachukwu, Daniel; Maduka-Okafor, Ferdinand C

    2017-12-08

    As the practice of medicine inevitably raises both ethical and legal issues, it had been recommended since 1999 that medical ethics and human rights be taught at every medical school. Most Nigerian medical schools still lack a formal undergraduate medical ethics curriculum. Medical education remains largely focused on traditional medical science components, leaving the medical students to develop medical ethical decision-making skills and moral attitudes passively within institutions noted for relatively strong paternalistic traditions. In conducting a needs assessment for developing a curriculum germane to the Nigerian society, and by extension most of Sub-Saharan Africa, this study determined the views of Nigerian medical students on medical ethics education, ethical issues related to the doctor-patient relationship and the ethical/professional dilemmas they are confronted with. Using self-administered 63-item structured questionnaires, a cross-sectional survey of the final year medical students of the University of Nigeria was conducted in July 2015.Using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS Version 17), frequency counts and percentages were generated. The sample included 100 males (71.4%) and 40 females (28.6%), with the respective mean (SD) age being 24.6(5.61) and 21.8 (6.38) years. Only 35.7% were satisfied with their medical ethics knowledge, and 97.9% indicated that medical ethics should be taught formally. Only 8.6% had never witnessed a medical teacher act unethically. The dilemmas of poor communication between physicians and patients, and the provision of sub-standard care were reported highest for being encountered 'often'. A majority (60.7%) indicated that "a doctor should do his best always, irrespective of the patient's wishes". No significant difference in responses across gender was noted. There is a strong desire by the contemporary Nigerian medical student for medical ethics education. Their lack of exposure in medical

  14. The ethics of applying new medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserson, Kenneth V; Chiasson, Patrick M

    2002-12-01

    Medical technology itself, including minimally invasive surgery, has no morals; our morality revolves around when and how we use technology. This often involves the individual clinician's assessment of their own abilities and an awareness of two aspects of the technology: its proven efficacy and its safety. Is technology outpacing knowledge? Or do physicians adopt new technologies in a responsible way with good motives? No one knows for sure. Technological progress in medicine has been a mixed blessing. The only ethical element involved in the use of new technologies over which individual medical practitioners have control, is that of user proficiency with the device, procedure, or drug, and the related information they provide to their patients when obtaining their consent for its use. New technologies fall into two broad categories: evolutionary, the most common, and revolutionary, which occur sporadically and may completely change the face of medical care. The learning curve for all new technologies can be steep. So, when should physicians be permitted to use these new technologies without supervision? Who is responsible for setting and monitoring standards for new technologies? With the moving target of medical technological innovation, individual practitioners are primarily responsible for the ethical use of new (to them) technologies. It is physicians' ethics that govern their use of new technologies, being certain that they have the requisite training and experience to use the modality, and that the intervention is safe for their patients. Institutional practitioner credentialing at the local level, despite its faults, will often be the primary control over a technology's use. What will ultimately govern the use of new technologies is the ethics (if they exist) of healthcare institutions and individual practitioners, as well as patient need. This is simply another reason why ethics education is vital for physicians-and other health practitioners and

  15. Distributive justice and the harm to medical professionals fighting epidemics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Andreas Brøgger; Thaysen, Jens Damgaard

    2017-01-01

    , cure and care for the vulnerable, luck egalitarianism seems to imply that their claim of justice to medical attention in case of infection is weak or non-existent. The article demonstrates how a recent interpretation of luck egalitarianism offers a solution to this problem. Redefining luck......The exposure of doctors, nurses and other medical professionals to risks in the context of epidemics is significant. While traditional medical ethics offers the thought that these dangers may limit the extent to which a duty to care is applicable in such situations, it has less to say about what we...... might owe to medical professionals who are disadvantaged in these contexts. Luck egalitarianism, a responsibility-sensitive theory of distributive justice, appears to fare particularly badly in that regard. If we want to maintain that medical professionals are responsible for their decisions to help...

  16. Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Catarina Fischer; Dahlqvist, Vera; Zingmark, Karin; Sandlund, Mikael; Söderberg, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support (CES) inspired by Habermas' theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim of this study was to describe the communication of value conflicts during a series of inter-professional CES sessions. Ten audio- and video-recorded CES sessions were conducted over eight months and were analyzed by using the video analysis tool Transana and qualitative content analysis. The results showed that during the CES sessions the professionals as a group moved through the following five phases: a value conflict expressed as feelings of frustration, sharing disempowerment and helplessness, the revelation of the value conflict, enhancing realistic expectations, seeing opportunities to change the situation instead of obstacles. In the course of CES, the professionals moved from an individual interpretation of the situation to a common, new understanding and then to a change in approach. An open and permissive communication climate meant that the professionals dared to expose themselves, share their feelings, face their own emotions, and eventually arrive at a mutual shared reality. The value conflict was not only revealed but also resolved.

  17. The business of health promotion: ethical issues and professional responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeroy, K R; Gottlieb, N H; Burdine, J N

    1987-01-01

    In the nine years since an entire issue of Health Education Quarterly (then Health Education Monographs) was devoted to considering ethical issues in health education, several important social changes have occurred which have substantially influenced the practice of that discipline. New practice contexts and ethical issues have resulted, which require a fresh look at both these new issues as well as those addressed in the earlier monograph. The importance of understanding the principles underlying the ethical dilemmas raised by the authors is emphasized as a concern for both the individual practitioner as well as the profession of health education itself. Recommendations for personal and professional action are made by the authors.

  18. Professional Ethics for School Business Officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel, Frank M.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a "Code of Ethics for School Administrators" and "Standards of Conduct for the Association of School Business Officials." These codes, combined with school regulations and adherence to various statutes, can provide school business officials with a sound philosophical basis for fulfilling their responsibilities. (MLF)

  19. Ethics teaching in a medical education environment: preferences for diversity of learning and assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMahmoud, Tahra; Hashim, M Jawad; Elzubeir, Margaret Ann; Branicki, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Ethics and professionalism are an integral part of medical school curricula; however, medical students' views on these topics have not been assessed in many countries.  The study aimed to examine medical students' perceptions toward ethics and professionalism teaching, and its learning and assessment methods. A self-administered questionnaire eliciting views on professionalism and ethics education was distributed to a total of 128 final-year medical students. A total of 108 students completed the survey, with an 84% response rate. Medical students reported frequently encountering ethical conflicts during training but stated only a moderate level of ethics training at medical school (mean = 5.14 ± 1.8). They noted that their education had helped somewhat to deal with ethical conflicts (mean = 5.39 ± 2.0). Students strongly affirmed the importance of ethics education (mean = 7.63 ± 1.03) and endorsed the value of positive role models (mean = 7.45 ± 1.5) as the preferred learning method. The cohort voiced interest in direct faculty supervision as an approach to assessment of knowledge and skills (mean = 7.62 ± 1.26). Female students perceived greater need for more ethics education compared to males (p = < 0.05). Students who claimed that they had experienced some unprofessional treatment had a more limited view of the importance of ethics as a subject (P = 0.001). Medical students viewed ethics education positively and preferred clinically attuned methods for learning.

  20. Medical genetic ethics, Islamic view and considerations in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Zahedi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid progress of science and technology, including genetic research and technology has been led to new hopes in the treatment of some genetic conditions and diseases. But these developments have also raised ethical and societal concerns in different communities. Certainly, medical genetics knowledge should be applied so, we have to maximize its benefits and minimize any harm. In recent decades, many attempts have been performed by scientists, ethicists, jurisprudents and lawyers for compiling international and national guidelines for regulation and legislation in this field. "nFor compilation of this article, we searched some comprehensive electronic databases and some valid English and Farsi books and journals. In this intensive review, we intend to provide a basic knowledge about genetic ethics for health care professionals in order to facilitate their decision-making in clinical practice."nThere are various ethical issues related to medical genetics that we reviewed in this paper in brief. These key issues do need attention and urgent resolution universally. We also reviewed Islamic view of points in this regards and finally we addressed the status of genetic ethics in our country, containing new national guidelines in this field.

  1. The commerce of professional psychology and the new ethics code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koocher, G P

    1994-11-01

    The 1992 version of the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct brings some changes in requirements and new specificity to the practice of psychology. The impact of the new code on therapeutic contracts, informed consent to psychological services, advertising, financial aspects of psychological practice, and other topics related to the commerce of professional psychology are discussed. The genesis of many new thrusts in the code is reviewed from the perspective of psychological service provider. Specific recommendations for improved attention to ethical matters in professional practice are made.

  2. Flexner's ethical oversight reprised? Contemporary medical education and the health impacts of corporate globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas A; Gatenby, Paul

    2005-10-01

    Abraham Flexner's famous reports of 1910 and 1912, Medical Education in the United States and Canada and Medical Education in Europe, were written to assist the development of a positive response in university curricula to a revolution in understanding about the scientific foundations of clinical medicine. Flexner pointed out many deficiencies in medical education that retain contemporary resonance. Generally underemphasised in Flexner's reports, however, were recommendations promoting a firm understanding of and commitment to medical ethics as a basis of medical professionalism. Indeed, Flexner's praise for the scholastic basic of German medical education appeared somewhat ironic when the ethical inadequacies of prominent Nazi doctors were revealed at the Nuremberg Trials. This article suggests that contemporary medical educators, like Flexner, may be at risk of inadequately addressing a major challenge to evolving medical professionalism. Medical ethics, health law and even the international right to health are now increasingly emphasised in medical curricula. The same cannot be said, however, of lobbying principles arising from the structures of corporate globalisation, although these are rapidly becoming an even more dominant force in shaping medical practice around the globe. Conclusion Today it is the normative tension between medical ethics, health law and international human rights on the one hand and the lobbying principles and strategies of corporate globalisation that must urgently become the focus of major recommendations for reshaping the teaching of medical professionalism. Suggestions are made as to how this might practically be achieved.

  3. [Current aspects and problems relating to medical ethics in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joss, R; Schüpfer, M; Schefer, H

    1998-01-07

    A case history of a breast cancer patient is used to exemplify ethical dilemmas in medical oncology: information of a cancer patient and his family, ethical problems with genetic testing, ethical issues with do-not-resuscitate-orders, ethical dilemmas with limited resources, problems with insurance companies, ethical issues in clinical trials and questions in dying patients including physician-assisted suicide and active euthanasia. Medical oncologists have to develop skills in recognizing ethical dilemmas in patient care and must prepare to cope with the many and complex ethical issues in the care of oncology patients.

  4. How do we learn professional ethics? Professional competences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultimately, we argue that while physiotherapy education should embrace the unique nature of skills training as an opportunity to stimulate students to develop their ethical sensibility, at the same time, the curriculum must also emphasise hyperreflection (critical thinking). We also discuss how educators can organise their ...

  5. From the Teachers Professional Ethics to the Personal Professional Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghedin, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Following the idea of civic responsibility of all adults for the new generation, we have tried, in different previous studies, to demonstrate that teaching is involving a lot of moral principles and values. Our present article aim is to present a part of our research about the teaching ethics under the idea of being a stable dimension of teaching…

  6. The eroding principle of justice in teaching medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason E

    2012-12-01

    This article examines the difficulties encountered in teaching professionalism to medical students in the current social and political climate where economic considerations take top priority in health care decision making. The conflict between the commitment to advocate at all times the interests of one's patients over one's own interests is discussed. With personal, institutional, tech industry, pharmaceutical industry, and third-party payer financial imperatives that stand between patients and the delivery of health care, this article investigates how medical ethics instructors are to teach professionalism in a responsible way that does not avoid dealing with the principle of justice.

  7. Ethics of caring and professional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jens Erik

    2011-03-01

    Normative discussions about modern health care often revolve around principles stating what must not be done or how to ration scarce resources in the name of justice. These are important discussions. However, in order to have an impact on clinical roles, ethical reflection must be able to describe and address the complexities and challenges of modern nursing and doctoring, and maybe even the patient role. A multi-principled approach, such as the one suggested by Beauchamp and Childress, can obviously address almost any such issue, but a great deal of translation is often required in order to address role-related issues. I shall here argue that an ethics of caring is better suited to grasping the big picture when the question is how to create value-informed clinical roles in an era of rapid development.

  8. Ethics vs. Prejudice: a challenge for professionals in leisure area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Laudares Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research investigated the perception of prejudice against lesbianism in leisure activities, the motives for such individuals not to make public their sexual orientation and the leisure professional role as ethic posture disseminator during the inclusion process in leisure activities. A sample of 70 lesbians was interviewed via Internet and the data showed the existence of prejudice, fear of loosing social and familiar status and the professional fundamental participation for changing values in the inclusion process.

  9. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.). Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.). Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts. PMID:25973263

  10. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Mueller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement, good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.. Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.. Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts.

  11. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia-industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.

  12. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one’s fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia–industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process. PMID:22570569

  13. A Study of Ethics and Professionalism in Zimbabwe's Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been a marked decline in the character, moral values and general behaviour of students coming out of the Zimbabwean education system. Accordingly, this study sought to investigate issues of ethics and professionalism in the Zimbabwean education system, and examine how the trend of the gradual erosion of ...

  14. Ethical and Professional Norms in Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Welch, Bethany J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article Gerald Campano, María Paula Ghiso, and Bethany J. Welch explore the role of ethical and professional norms in community-based research, especially in fostering trust within contexts of cultural diversity, systemic inequity, and power asymmetry. The authors present and describe a set of guidelines for community-based research that…

  15. Thinking Ethically about Professional Practice in Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Donna L.; Rossow-Kimball, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    There has been little critical exploration of the ethical issues that arise in professional practice common to adapted physical activity. We cannot avoid moral issues as we inevitably will act in ways that will negatively affect the well-being of others. We will make choices, which in our efforts to support others, may hurt by violating dignity or…

  16. Physicians’ Professionally Responsible Power: A Core Concept of Clinical Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B.

    2016-01-01

    The gathering of power unto themselves by physicians, a process supported by evidence-based practice, clinical guidelines, licensure, organizational culture, and other social factors, makes the ethics of power—the legitimation of physicians’ power—a core concept of clinical ethics. In the absence of legitimation, the physician’s power over patients becomes problematic, even predatory. As has occurred in previous issues of the Journal, the papers in the 2016 clinical ethics issue bear on the professionally responsible deployment of power by physicians. This introduction explores themes of physicians’ power in papers from an international group of authors who address autonomy and trust, the virtues of perinatal hospice, conjoined twins in ethics and law, addiction and autonomy in clinical research on addicting substances, euthanasia of patients with dementia in Belgium, and a pragmatic approach to clinical futility. PMID:26671961

  17. Ethical and medical dilemmas of space tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Melinda

    Space tourism is an important new venture, however it raises several issues that must be addressed; namely, the medical implications associated with space flight and potential for ethical problems surrounding the safety of such travel. It seems highly likely that businesses involved in space tourism could find themselves liable for any passenger deaths or injuries, if they are found to have been negligent. This paper, therefore, discusses such issues as the medical facilities that need to be made available on board a space facility, and the companies' duty to disclose to potential passengers the risks associated with microgravity and the likelihood of space sickness, loss of bone density, disease, and pregnancy.

  18. [The Hippocratic Oath: source of medical ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, E P

    2002-01-19

    The Hippocratic Oath is twenty-five centuries old. Probably drawn-up by Hippocrates himself, it intervenes in a particular cultural, political and religious context: that of Greece at the time of Pericles. It guaranteed the Asclepiad doctors of the continuity of their knowledge within their community. Medicine was highly esteemed because of it. The Oath, more than any other work of the Hippocratic collection, has outlived the centuries. It still remains one of the symbols of the medical profession. Despite its age, it provides insight into some of the questions of medical ethics even today. Its topicality is, without doubt, due to the transcendent nature of the values it proclaimed.

  19. Professional and Ethical Conduct in the Public Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thozamile Richard Mle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic values and principles governing public administration enshrined in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Chapter 10 is that “a high standard of professional ethics must be promoted and maintained. Ethics is a process by which we clarify right and wrong and act on what we take to be right, that is, a set or system of moral principles that are generally accepted. Ethics simply means  what is right and wrong, what is acceptable or unacceptable and is intertwined with the value system of people. Ethics can also be seen as being relative, not absolute, as ethical behaviour is in the eyes of the beholder. Be that as it may, however, ethical conduct and behaviour normally refer to conforming with generally accepted social norms. Relative to ethics is professionalism, which entails a high standard of work and adherence to certain standards and principles pertaining to specific work to be done. Professionalism embodies skills, competence, efficiency and effectiveness. Public institutions exist for the public good and employ public servants to render services to ensure a better life for all. The public sector is characterised by unprofessional and unethical conduct. The article unearths these and suggests strategies/mechanisms to address this ‘ill’. Can an unethical,  unprofessional public servant be trusted to deliver services? Can, for example, a debt-trapped public servant who survives on borrowing money from micro-lenders, who cannot manage personal finances, be trusted to efficiently manage public funds and thus enhance service delivery? Can an incompetent, corrupt, disloyal, unaccountable, shoddy public servant who flouts the principles of Batho Pele and the code of conduct be entrusted with the  responsibilities of ensuring a better life for all? The answers to these questions constitute the core of this article.

  20. [Learning objectives achievement in ethics education for medical school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sujin; Lim, Kiyoung

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the necessity for research ethics and learning objectives in ethics education at the undergraduate level. A total of 393 fourth-year students, selected from nine medical schools, participated in a survey about learning achievement and the necessity for it. It was found that the students had very few chances to receive systematic education in research ethics and that they assumed that research ethics education was provided during graduate school or residency programs. Moreover, the students showed a relatively high learning performance in life ethics, while learning achievement was low in research ethics. Medical school students revealed low interest in and expectations of research ethics in general; therefore, it is necessary to develop guidelines for research ethics in the present situation, in which medical education mainly focuses on life ethics.

  1. Professional and Institutional Morality: Building Ethics Programmes on the Dual Loyalty of Academic Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Andre; Wilderom, Celeste; Oost, Marlies

    2012-01-01

    Most professionals have the arduous task of managing their own dual loyalty: in one contextual relationship, they are members of a profession while simultaneously they are employed as members of a locally established organisation. This sense of a dual loyalty has to be taken into account when professional bureaucracies develop ethics programmes.…

  2. Ethics Education in Professional Psychology: A Survey of American Psychological Association Accredited Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie M.; Erickson Cornish, Jennifer A; Thomas, Janet T; Forrest, Linda; Anderson, Austin; Bow, James N

    2014-01-01

    Professional psychologists are expected to know ethical standards and engage in proactive analysis of ethical considerations across professional roles (e.g., practice, research, teaching). Yet, little is known about the current state of doctoral ethics education in professional psychology, including the content covered and pedagogical strategies used to ensure developing this core component of professional competency (de las Fuentes, Willmuth, & Yarrow, 2005). A survey of ethics educators fro...

  3. Evaluation of Viewpoints of Health Care Professionals on the Role of Ethics Committees and Hospitals in the Resolution of Clinical Ethical Dilemmas Based on Practice Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Brian S; Carlson, Jestin N; Hegde, Gajanan G; Shang, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind

    2016-03-01

    We sought to evaluate whether health care professionals' viewpoints differed on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas based on practice location. We conducted a survey study from December 21, 2013 to March 15, 2014 of health care professionals at six hospitals (one tertiary care academic medical center, three large community hospitals and two small community hospitals). The survey consisted of eight clinical ethics cases followed by statements on whether there was a role for the ethics committee or hospital in their resolution, what that role might be and case specific queries. Respondents used a 5-point Likert scale to express their degree of agreement with the premises posed. We used the ANOVA test to evaluate whether respondent views significantly varied based on practice location. 240 health care professionals (108-tertiary care center, 92-large community hospitals, 40-small community hospitals) completed the survey (response rate: 63.6 %). Only three individual queries of 32 showed any significant response variations across practice locations. Overall, viewpoints did not vary across practice locations within question categories on whether the ethics committee or hospital had a role in case resolution, what that role might be and case specific queries. In this multicenter survey study, the viewpoints of health care professionals on the role of ethics committees or hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethics cases varied little based on practice location.

  4. The ethical dimension of the systematization of professional exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Sarmet de Azevedo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the systematization of the professional social worker. The objectives of the study were to analyze the unity between theory and practice and the ethical dimensions of professional practice; discuss the importance of the systematization of the professional practice for all fields of professional activity; and articulate systematization of professional exercise, with the working conditions and the demands of users of social policies. Comprised a review of the literature on the topic of systematization in Social Service, where it was identified that the set of specific knowledge that surround “professional” and that could qualify the actions of social workers has not been addressed in dept. The proposed analysis is to establish procedures for systematization to accomplish it in line with the Code of Professional ethics and Law to regulate the profession (Law nº 8.662/ 93. As regards the difficulties pointed out by the authors for the practice of systematic stand out the time factor, the poor working conditions and the limitations posed by their vocational training. Even considering all the advances, the systematization of professional practice in Social Service is still scarce, disjointed and less expressive.

  5. Graduate Ethics Curricula for Future Geospatial Technology Professionals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. J.; Dibiase, D.; Harvey, F.; Solem, M.

    2009-12-01

    Professionalism in today's rapidly-growing, multidisciplinary geographic information science field (e.g., geographic information systems or GIS, remote sensing, cartography, quantitative spatial analysis), now involves a commitment to ethical practice as informed by a more sophisticated understanding of the ethical implications of geographic technologies. The lack of privacy introduced by mobile mapping devices, the use of GIS for military and surveillance purposes, the appropriate use of data collected using these technologies for policy decisions (especially for conservation and sustainability) and general consequences of inequities that arise through biased access to geospatial tools and derived data all continue to be challenging issues and topics of deep concern for many. Students and professionals working with GIS and related technologies should develop a sound grasp of these issues and a thorough comprehension of the concerns impacting their use and development in today's world. However, while most people agree that ethics matters for GIS, we often have difficulty putting ethical issues into practice. An ongoing project supported by NSF seeks to bridge this gap by providing a sound basis for future ethical consideration of a variety of issues. A model seminar curriculum is under development by a team of geographic information science and technology (GIS&T) researchers and professional ethicists, along with protocols for course evaluations. In the curricula students first investigate the nature of professions in general and the characteristics of a GIS&T profession in particular. They hone moral reasoning skills through methodical analyses of case studies in relation to various GIS Code of Ethics and Rules of Conduct. They learn to unveil the "moral ecologies" of a profession through actual interviews with real practitioners in the field. Assignments thus far include readings, class discussions, practitioner interviews, and preparations of original case

  6. Dermatoethics: a curriculum in bioethics and professionalism for dermatology residents at Brown Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2007-04-01

    Both American and Canadian residency accreditation bodies have formal requirements in core competencies that include training in ethics and professionalism without prescribing content. A structured seminar series in medical ethics and professionalism relating to dermatology practice was started at Brown Medical School's dermatology residency in 2001. Methods of instruction include discussion groups, review of medical and lay literature, book review, didactic teaching, case presentation, and informal e-mail exchange. Some of the topics that have been covered include basic medical ethics, research ethics, physician-industry relationships, truth telling, privacy and confidentiality, duty to treat, and ethical and legal issues in cosmetic dermatology, dermatologic surgery, dermatologic genetics, occupational dermatology, and pediatric dermatology. The main goals of the curriculum are to fulfill the core competency requirement in professionalism of the specialty certifying boards, introduce trainees to the cross-disciplinary literature of biomedical ethics and current ethical controversies, and encourage dialogue on ethics and professionalism among faculty, colleagues in other specialties, and dermatology trainees.

  7. Medical Ethics in Plastic Surgery: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Azin; Hashem-Zade, Haleh

    2016-09-01

    Currently, cosmetic surgery is spread around the world. Several factors are involved in this rapidly evolving field such as socio-economic development, changes in cultural norms, globalization and the effects of Western culture, advertising, media, and mental disorders. Nowadays the cosmetic surgery is becoming a profitable business, which deals exclusively with human appearance and less from the perspective of beauty based on physical protests and considering factors such as sex, age, and race. The morality of plastic surgery subspecialty has undergone many moral dilemmas in the past few years. The role of the patient regardless of his unrealistic dreams has questionable ethical dimension. The problem is the loss of human values and replacing them with false values, of pride and glory to a charismatic person of higher status, that may underlie some of the posed ethical dilemmas. Cosmetic surgery has huge difference with the general principle of legal liability in professional orientation, because the objective for cosmetic surgeries is different from common therapeutic purposes. To observe excellence in the medical profession, we should always keep in mind that these service providers, often as a therapist (healer) must maintain a commitment and priority for patient safety and prior to any action, a real apply for this service recipient should be present. Also, patient-physician confidentiality is the cornerstone of medical ethics. In this review, we study the issues addressed and the ways that they can be resolved.

  8. Penetration Testing Professional Ethics: a conceptual model and taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Pierce

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In an environment where commercial software is continually patched to correct security flaws, penetration testing can provide organisations with a realistic assessment of their security posture. Penetration testing uses the same principles as criminal hackers to penetrate corporate networks and thereby verify the presence of software vulnerabilities. Network administrators can use the results of a penetration test to correct flaws and improve overall security. The use of hacking techniques, however, raises several ethical questions that centre on the integrity of the tester to maintain professional distance and uphold the profession. This paper discusses the ethics of penetration testing and presents our conceptual model and revised taxonomy.

  9. Ethics and medical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, G

    1980-12-01

    There is a tendency for physicians to approach ethical problems in a manner similar to that in which they approach medical problems. Instead of disease categories (such as congestive heart failure or diarrhea), the physician substitutes moral quandaries (such as euthanasia or abortion). The goal is to learn what the "right" rules are for this particular problem at this particular moment. Although this method has important practical and instructive value, it can produce an empirical attitude toward ethics akin to that found in students who strive to learn medicine solely by algorithms. Using theoretical models as a center for discussion, this article has attempted to approach medical ethics as a decision-making process derived from the physician-patient relationship model in use. What is the type of physician-patient relationship that forms the soundest base for making ethical decisions? It must be realized that the contractual relationship cannot be ignored, for in our consumer-oriented society it will surely remain as a protection for the patient against the incompetent or immoral physician. It should not become the sole guide of physician behavior, however, lest we be satisfied with mediocre behavior as the maximal standard. Likewise, although technical competence is required for one to make the right and good decision, it is insufficient alone as a guide for moral behavior. Given the medically correct facts, a multitude of responses are available which necessitate a moral choice. Physicians need a guiding principle that goes beyond any aesthetic code of behavior, or protection of self-interest, and which enables them to deal with all the unexpected ethical questions faced in providing care to patients. Moral principles such as truth-telling, promise-keeping, and protecting the patient when he is vulnerable, help the physician to act in a moral manner, but lack the encompassing nature of the covenantal promise. The covenantal model includes a donative element

  10. The relationship between moral philosophy and medical ethics reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert B; McCullough, Laurence B

    2007-09-01

    Medical ethics often is treated as applied ethics, that is, the application of moral philosophy to ethical issues in medicine. In an earlier paper, we examined instances of moral philosophy's influence on medical ethics. We found the applied ethics model inadequate and sketched an alternative model. On this model, practitioners seeking to change morality "appropriate" concepts and theory fragments from moral philosophy to valorize and justify their innovations. Goldilocks-like, five commentators tasted our offerings. Some found them too cold, since they had already abandoned applied ethics; others too hot, since they still find the applied ethics model to their taste. We reply that the appropriation model offers an empirically testable account of the historical relationship between moral philosophy and medical ethics that explains why practitioners appropriate concepts and fragments from moral philosophy. In contrast, the now fashionable common morality theory neither explains moral change nor why practitioners turn to moral philosophy.

  11. Curricular priorities for business ethics in medical practice and research: recommendations from Delphi consensus panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, James M; Kraus, Elena M; Gursahani, Kamal; Mikulec, Anthony; Bakanas, Erin

    2014-11-15

    No published curricula in the area of medical business ethics exist. This is surprising given that physicians wrestle daily with business decisions and that professional associations, the Institute of Medicine, Health and Human Services, Congress, and industry have issued related guidelines over the past 5 years. To fill this gap, the authors aimed (1) to identify the full range of medical business ethics topics that experts consider important to teach, and (2) to establish curricular priorities through expert consensus. In spring 2012, the authors conducted an online Delphi survey with two heterogeneous panels of experts recruited in the United States. One panel focused on business ethics in medical practice (n = 14), and 1 focused on business ethics in medical research (n = 12). Panel 1 generated an initial list of 14 major topics related to business ethics in medical practice, and subsequently rated 6 topics as very important or essential to teach. Panel 2 generated an initial list of 10 major topics related to business ethics in medical research, and subsequently rated 5 as very important or essential. In both domains, the panel strongly recommended addressing problems that conflicts of interest can cause, legal guidelines, and the goals or ideals of the profession. The Bander Center for Medical Business Ethics at Saint Louis University will use the results of the Delphi panel to develop online curricular resources for each of the highest rated topics.

  12. The business of ethics: gender, medicine, and the professional codification of the American Physiotherapy Association, 1918-1935.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Beth

    2005-07-01

    The history of codes of ethics in health care has almost exclusively been told as a story of how medical doctors developed their own professional principles of conduct. Yet telling the history of medical ethics solely from the physicians' perspective neglects not only the numerous allied health care workers who developed their own codes of ethics in tandem with the medical profession, but also the role that gender played in the writing of such professional creeds. By focusing on the predominantly female organization of the American Physiotherapy Association (APA) and its 1935 "Code of Ethics and Discipline," I demonstrate how these women used their creed to at once curry favor from and challenge the authority of the medical profession. Through their Code, APA therapists engaged in a dynamic dialogue with the male physicians of the American Medical Association (AMA) in the name of professional survival. I conclude that, contrary to historians and philosophers who contend that professional women have historically operated under a gender-specific ethic of care, the physiotherapists avoided rhetoric construed as feminine and instead created a "business-like" creed in which they spoke solely about their relationship with physicians and remained silent on the matter of patient care.

  13. Care-managers' professional choices: ethical dilemmas and conflicting expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Siri; Ursin, Gøril; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2017-09-07

    Care-managers are responsible for the public administration of individual healthcare decisions and decide on the volume and content of community healthcare services given to a population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conflicting expectations and ethical dilemmas these professionals encounter in their daily work with patients and to discuss the clinical implications of this. The study had a qualitative design. The data consisted of verbatim transcripts from 12 ethical reflection group meetings held in 2012 at a purchaser unit in a Norwegian city. The participants consist of healthcare professionals such as nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and social workers. The analyses and interpretation were conducted according to a hermeneutic methodology. This study is part of a larger research project. Two main themes emerged through the analyses: 1. Professional autonomy and loyalty, and related subthemes: loyalty to whom/what, overruling of decisions, trust and obligation to report. 2. Boundaries of involvement and subthemes: private or professional, care-manager or provider and accessibility. Underlying values and a model illustrating the dimensions of professional responsibility in the care-manager role are suggested. The study implies that when allocating services, healthcare professionals need to find a balance between responsibility and accountability in their role as care-managers.

  14. How do healthcare professionals manage ethical challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-01

    Dec 1, 2017 ... or compromise a patient's recovery process, for example, telling a hypertensive ..... World J Surg. Gold[58]. 2004. Concept/argument-based article. Intern Med J. Gutman[25]. 2005. Concept/argument-based article. J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. Kipnis[39] ..... Fine RL, Whitfield JM, Carr BL, et al. Medical futility in ...

  15. Medical Professional and Usage of Social Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabeya Yousuf; Sheikh Muhammad Abu Bakar; Mainul Haque; Md Nurul Islam; Abdus Salam

    2017-01-01

    ... and health care decisions contradict with the openness of the usage of social media. Member of the medical profession can use social media but need to abide by the code of conduct of medical ethics in order to render the best possible services...

  16. Developing Professional Ethics for Social Educators and Early Childhood Educators in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribers, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Danish labour unions have been working continuously on developing professional ethical codes and guidelines for social educators and early childhood and youth educators in Denmark. The majority of empirical research projects studying ethical dimensions of social work...... empirical research results on ethical issues in the professional practice and in the education of welfare professionals. The paper discusses the current state of professional ethics in childhood and youth work and debates the constellation between educational policies, the political process of developing...... professional ethical codes and the continuing changes in the organisation of the Danish welfare state, which vehemently influence the welfare professions....

  17. An Analysis of Student Choices in Medical Ethical Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloshin, Phyllis Lerman

    This report describes a study undertaken to assess student choices in medical ethical dilemmas. Medical ethical dilemmas are interpreted to include problems such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, experimentation on humans, allocation of scarce medical resources, and physician and health personnel training. The major purpose of the study was…

  18. There Is More to Ethics Than Codes of Professional Ethics: Social Ethics, Theoretical Ethics, and Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjeltveit, Alan C.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a reaction to Cooper and Gottlieb's (this issue) article titled, "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Examines the ethical problems giving rise to managed care, the ethical character of therapy goals, and the social ethical question of balancing the good of individuals with the good of society.…

  19. Dyshormonia Iatrogenica: crossroads of medicine, malpractice law, and professional ethics in clinical endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Philip A; Varriale, David J; Mercurio, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    To present 2 challenging cases of patients who request endocrine therapies that their physician considers to be outside of the standard of care. With these complex cases as a backdrop, we explore the constructs of medicine, malpractice law, and professional ethics that guide physicians' medical decision-making processes. These cases illustrate a common conundrum for clinical endocrinologists, who often find themselves struggling to balance patient satisfaction and well-being with generally accepted standards of medical care. From the perspective of a malpractice lawyer, we review the keys to limiting medicolegal liability, with emphasis on thorough documentation, informed consent, and effective doctor-patient communication. We then review the constructs of professional ethics that guide patient care, with emphasis on virtues of the "good physician," patients' right to self-determination, and paternalism. Finally, we explore some justifications for a compassionate physician to refuse a patient's desired treatment plan. In the end, we hope that this manuscript helps to facilitate best medical, legal, professional, and ethical practices of clinical endocrinology.

  20. PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANT IN ETHICAL CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelariu Alin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the psychological profile of the professional accountant in an ethical context through the speciality literature. The starting point of this paper was Carl Gustav Jung’s book, Psychological Types. In the book, Jung presented the idea of personality type. As methodology, relevant articles of speciality literature from international databases have been used. According to literature, the most used methods for realizing a psychological profile are the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test (MBTI test and the Keirsey Temperament Sorter II (KTS test. The MBTI test focuses on way of thinking and perception while focuses on behaviour. Through this article we propose the improvement of the speciality literature regarding the multidisciplinary aspect or research in Accounting-Psychology. We also highlight the need to improve ethical behaviour in the Accounting profession. Currently the general public perceives a lack of transparency regarding the professional accountants’ activity worldwide.

  1. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

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    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  2. An international survey of medical ethics curricula in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, M; Akabayashi, A; Kai, I; Ohi, G

    1999-12-01

    Medical ethics education has become common, and the integrated ethics curriculum has been recommended in Western countries. It should be questioned whether there is one, universal method of teaching ethics applicable worldwide to medical schools, especially those in non-Western developing countries. To characterise the medical ethics curricula at Asian medical schools. Mailed survey of 206 medical schools in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Australia and New Zealand. A total of 100 medical schools responded, a response rate of 49%, ranging from 23%-100% by country. The degree of integration of the ethics programme into the formal medical curriculum was measured by lecture time; whether compulsory or elective; whether separate courses or unit of other courses; number of courses; schedule; total length, and diversity of teachers' specialties. A total of 89 medical schools (89%) reported offering some courses in which ethical topics were taught. Separate medical ethics courses were mostly offered in all countries, and the structure of vertical integration was divided into four patterns. Most deans reported that physicians' obligations and patients' rights were the most important topics for their students. However, the evaluation was diverse for more concrete topics. Offering formal medical ethics education is a widespread feature of medical curricula throughout the study area. However, the kinds of programmes, especially with regard to integration into clinical teaching, were greatly diverse.

  3. Case-based seminars in medical ethics education: how medical students define and discuss moral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Thomas M; Fistein, Elizabeth; Dunn, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Discussion of real cases encountered by medical students has been advocated as a component of medical ethics education. Suggested benefits include: a focus on the actual problems that medical students confront; active learner involvement; and facilitation of an exploration of the meaning of their own values in relation to professional behaviour. However, the approach may also carry risks: students may focus too narrowly on particular clinical topics or show a preference for discussing legal problems that may appear to have clearer solutions. Teaching may therefore omit areas generally considered to be important components of the curriculum. In this paper, the authors present an analysis of the moral problems raised by medical students in response to a request to describe ethically problematic cases they had encountered during two clinical attachments, for the purpose of educational discussion at case-based seminars. We discuss the problems raised and compare the content of the cases to the UK Consensus Statement on core content of learning. The authors also describe the approaches that the students used to undertake an initial analysis of the problems raised, and consider possible implications for the development of medical ethics education.

  4. On-the-Job Ethics – Proximity Morality Forming in Medical School: A grounded theory analysis using survey data

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    Hans O. Thulesius, MD, Ph.D.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available On-the-job-ethics exist in all businesses and can also be called proximity morality forming. In this paper we propose that medical students take a proximity morality stance towards ethics education at medical school. This means that they want to form physician morality “on the job” instead of being taught ethics like any other subject. On-the-job-ethics for medical students involves learning ethics that is used when practicing ethics. Learning ethics includes comprehensive ethics courses in which quality lectures provide ethics grammar useful for the ethics practicing in attitude exercises and vignette reflections in tutored group discussions. On-the-job-ethics develops professional identity, handles diversity of religious and existential worldviews, trains students described as ethically naive, processes difficult clinical experiences, and desists negative role modeling from physicians in clinical or teaching situations. This grounded theory analysis was made from a questionnaire survey on attitudes to ethics education with 409 Swedish medical students participating. We analyzed over 8000 words of open-ended responses and multiplechoice questions using classic grounded theory procedures, but also compared questionnaire data using statistics such as multiple regression models. The paper gives an example of how grounded theory can be used with a limited amount of survey data.

  5. The Construction of an Attitude Scale About Professional Ethics

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    Ana Hirsch Adler

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an attitude scale about professional ethics and the process of its construction. We also describe its application in two samples of groups of graduate students, the first one of 15 programs in different knowledge areas in the University of Valencia, and the other one in the 40 graduate programs of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM. The article includes the types of results obtained.

  6. Acclimating international graduate students to professional engineering ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Byron; Austin, Katherine; Lawson, William; Gorsuch, Greta; Darwin, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    This article describes the education portion of an ongoing grant-sponsored education and research project designed to help graduate students in all engineering disciplines learn about the basic ethical principles, rules, and obligations associated with engineering practice in the United States. While the curriculum developed for this project is used for both domestic and international students, the educational materials were designed to be sensitive to the specific needs of international graduate students. In recent years, engineering programs in the United States have sought to develop a larger role for professional ethics education in the curriculum. Accreditation requirements, as well as pressures from the private sector, have helped facilitate this shift in focus. Almost half of all engineering graduate students in the U.S. are international students. Further, research indicates that the majority of these students will remain in the U.S. to work post-graduation. It is therefore in the interest of the profession that these students, coming from diverse backgrounds, receive some formal exposure to the professional and ethical expectations and norms of the engineering profession in the United States to help ensure that they have the knowledge and skills--non-technical as well as technical--required in today's engineering profession. In becoming acculturated to professional norms in a host country, international students face challenges that domestic students do not encounter; such as cultural competency, language proficiency, and acculturation stress. Mitigating these challenges must be a consideration in the development of any effective education materials. The present article discusses the project rationale and describes the development of on-line instructional materials aimed at helping international engineering graduate students acclimate to professional engineering ethics standards in the United States. Finally, a brief data summary of students' perceptions

  7. [How do first codes of medical ethics inspire contemporary physicians?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paprocka-Lipińska, Anna; Basińska, Krystyna

    2014-02-01

    First codes of medical ethics appeared between 18th and 19th century. Their formation was inspired by changes that happened in medicine, positive in general but with some negative setbacks. Those negative consequences revealed the need to codify all those ethical duties, which were formerly passed from generation to generation by the word of mouth and individual example by master physicians. 210 years has passed since the publication of "Medical Ethics" by Thomas Percival, yet essential ethical guidelines remain the same. Similarly, ethical codes published in Poland in 19 century can still be an inspiration to modem physicians.

  8. Medical Students’ and Interns’ Attitudes toward Medical Ethics Education in a Thai Medical School

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    Sakda Sathirareuangchai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical ethics has been accepted as part of every accredited medical curriculum for the past 40 years. Medical students’ attitudes have an important role for development and improvement of the curriculum. Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital is the oldest and largest medical school in Thailand, and has been teaching medical ethics since 1907. Objective: To determine attitudes among medical students and interns toward medical ethics education and understand the factors influencing their attitudes. Methods: Mixed quantitative and qualitative research was conducted with early 6th year medical students and interns. A questionnaire was adapted from previous studies and included some original items. Results: Of the 550 questionnaires distributed, 386 were returned (70.2% response rate. Males (n=180 made up 46.63 % of the sample. Interns (n=219, 56.74 % tended to have more positive attitudes toward ethics learning than did medical students (n = 167, 43.26 %. Male participants tended to agree more with negative statements about ethics learning than did females. There was no statistically significant effect of hometown (Bangkok versus elsewhere or grade point average on attitudes. The main problem cited with medical ethics education was lack of engaging methods. Conclusion: Because clinical experience has an effect on learners’ attitudes towards ethics education, medical ethics should be taught at the appropriate time and with proper techniques, such as drawing explicit ties between ethical principles and real-life situations. Attention to the more detailed aspects of these data should also facilitate improvements to curriculum content, thereby ensuring better educational outcomes.

  9. Professional identity in medical students: pedagogical challenges to medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ian; Cowin, Leanne S; Johnson, Maree; Young, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Professional identity, or how a doctor thinks of himself or herself as a doctor, is considered to be as critical to medical education as the acquisition of skills and knowledge relevant to patient care. This article examines contemporary literature on the development of professional identity within medicine. Relevant theories of identity construction are explored and their application to medical education and pedagogical approaches to enhancing students' professional identity are proposed. The influence of communities of practice, role models, and narrative reflection within curricula are examined. Medical education needs to be responsive to changes in professional identity being generated from factors within medical student experiences and within contemporary society.

  10. A study to enhance medical students’ professional decision-making, using teaching interventions on common medications

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    Jane Wilcock

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To create sustained improvements in medical students’ critical thinking skills through short teaching interventions in pharmacology. Method: The ability to make professional decisions was assessed by providing year-4 medical students at a UK medical school with a novel medical scenario (antenatal pertussis vaccination. Forty-seven students in the 2012 cohort acted as a pretest group, answering a questionnaire on this novel scenario. To improve professional decision-making skills, 48 students from the 2013 cohort were introduced to three commonly used medications, through tutor-led 40-min teaching interventions, among six small groups using a structured presentation of evidence-based medicine and ethical considerations. Student members then volunteered to peer-teach on a further three medications. After a gap of 8 weeks, this cohort (post-test group was assessed for professional decision-making skills using the pretest questionnaire, and differences in the 2-year groups analysed. Results: Students enjoyed presenting on medications to their peers but had difficulty interpreting studies and discussing ethical dimensions; this was improved by contextualising information via patient scenarios. After 8 weeks, most students did not show enhanced clinical curiosity, a desire to understand evidence, or ethical questioning when presented with a novel medical scenario compared to the previous year group who had not had the intervention. Students expressed a high degree of trust in guidelines and expert tutors and felt that responsibility for their own actions lay with these bodies. Conclusion: Short teaching interventions in pharmacology did not lead to sustained improvements in their critical thinking skills in enhancing professional practice. It appears that students require earlier and more frequent exposure to these skills in their medical training.

  11. Understanding ethical dilemmas in the emergency department: views from medical students' essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Joseph B; Theyyunni, Nikhil; Barnosky, Andrew R; Fuhrel-Forbis, Andrea; Seeyave, Desiree M; Ambs, Dawn; Fischer, Jonathan P; Santen, Sally A

    2015-04-01

    For medical students, the emergency department (ED) often presents ethical problems not encountered in other settings. In many medical schools there is little ethics training during the clinical years. The benefits of reflective essay writing in ethics and professionalism education are well established. The purpose of this study was to determine and categorize the types of ethical dilemmas and scenarios encountered by medical students in the ED through reflective essays. During a 4(th)-year emergency medicine rotation, all medical students wrote brief essays on an ethical situation encountered in the ED, and participated in an hour debriefing session about these essays. Qualitative analysis was performed to determine common themes from the essays. The frequency of themes was calculated. The research team coded 173 essays. The most common ethical themes were autonomy (41%), social justice (32.4%), nonmaleficence (31.8%), beneficence (26.6%), fidelity (12%), and respect (8.7%). Many of the essays contained multiple ethical principles that were often in conflict with each other. In one essay, a student grappled with the decision to intubate a patient despite a preexisting do-not-resuscitate order. This patient encounter was coded with autonomy, beneficence, and nonmaleficence. Common scenarios included ethical concerns when caring for critical patients, treatment of pain, homeless or alcoholic patients, access to care, resource utilization, and appropriateness of care. Medical students encounter patients with numerous ethically based issues. Frequently, they note conflicts between ethical principles. Such essays constitute an important resource for faculty, resident, and student ethics training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riis P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Povl Riis Age Forum, State Board for Research and Age Policies, Odense, DenmarkAbstract: Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia–industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.Keywords: ethics, collaboration, academia, biomedical industry

  13. Zolpidem Overdose: A Medical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaib, Waqas; Beatrice, Cristina; Abazid, Ahmad G

    Acute altered mental status can be caused by a broad range of etiologies, including cerebrovascular, neurologic, traumatic, metabolic, infectious, psychiatric, medications, etc. We present a case of a 53-year-old healthcare professional with an acute altered mental status after a trip to Africa. The patient was extensively worked up for infectious, cardiovascular, and neurologic etiologies, and all results were within normal limits. Further history revealed an overdose of a self-medicated hypnotic (zolpidem) for insomnia. The patient was conservatively managed and discharged on trazadone for insomnia.

  14. Hunger strikers: ethical and legal dimensions of medical complicity in torture at Guantanamo Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Sarah M; Leaning, Jennifer; Greenough, P Gregg; Burkle, Frederick M

    2013-12-01

    Physicians and other licensed health professionals are involved in force-feeding prisoners on hunger strike at the US Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay (GTMO), Cuba, the detention center established to hold individuals captured and suspected of being terrorists in the wake of September 11, 2001. The force-feeding of competent hunger strikers violates medical ethics and constitutes medical complicity in torture. Given the failure of civilian and military law to end the practice, the medical profession must exert policy and regulatory pressure to bring the policy and operations of the US Department of Defense into compliance with established ethical standards. Physicians, other health professionals, and organized medicine must appeal to civilian state oversight bodies and federal regulators of medical science to revoke the licenses of health professionals who have committed prisoner abuses at GTMO.

  15. Using the American Board of Internal Medicine's "Elements of Professionalism" for undergraduate ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lynne S; Braddock, Clarence H; Fryer-Edwards, Kelly A

    2002-06-01

    To examine the feasibility of using the taxonomy of professional and unprofessional behaviors presented in the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM's) Project Professionalism to categorize ethical issues that undergraduate medical students perceive to be salient. Beginning second-year medical students at the University of Washington School of Medicine (n = 120) were asked to respond to three open-ended questions about professional standards of conduct and peer evaluation. Two of the authors read and coded the students' responses according to the ABIM's elements of professionalism (altruism, accountability, excellence, duty, honor and integrity, and respect for others) and the challenges to those elements (abuse of power, arrogance, greed, misrepresentation, impairment, lack of conscientiousness, and conflict of interest). Coding disagreements were solved using review and revision of the category definitions. New categories were created for students' responses that described behaviors or issues that were not captured in the ABIM's categories. A total of 114 students responded. The ABIM's professional code was adapted for students and teachers, making it context- and learning-stage-specific. One new category of challenges, conflicts of conscience, was added, and one category (abuse of power) was expanded to include abuse of power/negotiating power asymmetries. Using the ABIM's taxonomy to name professional and unprofessional behaviors was particularly useful for examining undergraduate medical students' perceptions of the ethical climate for learning during the first year of medical school, and it holds promise for research into changes in students' perceptions as they move into clinical experiences. Using the framework, students can build a unified professional knowledge-and-skills base.

  16. Military Personnel: Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics and Professionalism Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    importance of ethics and professionalism to departmental personnel. A timeline of key ethics and professionalism events and communications since 2007 is...MILITARY PERSONNEL Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics and Professionalism Issues...MILITARY PERSONNEL Additional Steps Are Needed to Strengthen DOD’s Oversight of Ethics and Professionalism Issues Why GAO Did This Study

  17. [Comparison of medical ethical competencies of pregraduate third and sixth year students during their internal medical hospital rotations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier, J H; Brazeau-Lamontagne, L; Pottier, P; Boutoille, D

    2005-02-01

    The study looks for medical students ethical understanding during their internal medicine hospital rotations. As a secondary purpose, the study screens if internal medicine ward provides an environment appropriate for pregraduate medical students ethical training. Retrospective analysis and comparison of logbook writings from 2 different pregraduate groups of students : Group A = 29, third year medical students and Group B = 28, sixth year medical students, (that is last year pre-graduation). The task instructions were the same for the two groups : to identify and to analyse an ethical problem personally witnessed on the ward and to propose a solution either local or personal. Cognitive semantic units (CSU) were first drawn from the writings then subsequently analysed through two grids 1* according to fundamental principles (P) and 2* according to professional responsibilities (R). Students from group A produced a mean of 13,7 CSU per writing (total of 396 CSU) and those from Group B, 7,3. (total of 205 CSU) ; significant difference with P ethical dilemma itself and outbreaking it in (P) and (R) items and articulating solutions were significantly different between the 2 groups(P ethical issues. There is an erosion of clinical ethical sensitivity during pregraduate training. This study shows that internal medicine hospital rotation provides enough opportunities (both in number and in variety) to promote keen clinical ethical learning.

  18. Ethical Considerations on Disclosure When Medical Error Is Discovered During Medicolegal Death Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dwayne A; Drake, Stacy A; Snow, Francine K

    2017-12-01

    In the course of fulfilling their statutory role, physicians performing medicolegal investigations may recognize clinical colleagues' medical errors. If the error is found to have led directly to the patient's death (missed diagnosis or incorrect diagnosis, for example), then the forensic pathologist has a professional responsibility to include the information in the autopsy report and make sure that the family is appropriately informed. When the error is significant but did not lead directly to the patient's demise, ethical questions may arise regarding the obligations of the medical examiner to disclose the error to the clinicians or to the family. This case depicts the discovery of medical error likely unrelated to the cause of death and describes one possible ethical approach to disclosure derived from an ethical reasoning model addressing ethical principles of respect for persons/autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice.

  19. The Code of Professional Conduct: Instructional Impact on Accounting Students' Ethical Perceptions and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Suzanne Pinac; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Using the Code of Professional Conduct, 53 accounting students evaluated the ethical acceptability of accountants in case studies. Ethics instruction appeared to alter student perceptions of ethical behavior. Because time after instruction was an important factor, increased professional socialization was recommended. (SK)

  20. Professionalism and the role of medical colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, David J; Grigg, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There has been substantial interest and emphasis on medical professionalism over the past twenty years. This speaks to the history of the medical profession, but increasingly to a broader understanding of the importance of socialisation and professional identity formation. A literature review was undertaken of professionalism and the role of professions and medical professional organisations. A key outcome has been the recognition that medical professionalism must be actively taught and assessed. Substantial effort is required to improve the educational environment, so that it nurtures the development of professionalism within the work-place. Although medical colleges have been prominent in identifying and progressing the recent developments within professionalism there is still much to be done to deliver fully on the societal contract between the public and the profession. There are key gaps to address, particularly with regards to self-regulation, civil behaviour and effective leadership and advocacy. Medical colleges need to take direct responsibility for the professionalism of their members. The expectations of the community are increasingly clear in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cultural context in medical ethics: lessons from Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Tia

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This paper examines two topics in Japanese medical ethics: non-disclosure of medical information by Japanese physicians, and the history of human rights abuses by Japanese physicians during World War II. These contrasting issues show how culture shapes our view of ethically appropriate behavior in medicine. An understanding of cultural context reveals that certain practices, such as withholding diagnostic information from patients, may represent ethical behavior in that context. In c...

  2. A survey of medical ethics education at U.S. and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Kasoff, Willard S; Koch, Phoebe; Federman, Daniel D

    2004-07-01

    To assess the format, content, method, and placement of medical ethics education in medical schools; the faculty and curricular resources and institutional structure and support of medical ethics; and the perceptions of ethics education among deans of medical education and medical ethics course directors at U.S. and Canadian medical schools. Two questionnaires were mailed to 125 U.S. medical schools and 16 Canadian schools: one to be completed by the deans of medical education and one to be completed by the medical ethics course director. Descriptive statistics were used to compare responses. In all, 123 (87%) deans and 91 (64%) course directors responded, providing information about 91 schools (six Canadian). All responding institutions offered some formal instruction in medical ethics, and among these, 71 (78%) incorporated ethics into required preclinical courses. The primary pedagogic course structure was small-group discussion and the primary pedagogic method was case discussions. One-fifth of schools provided no funding for ethics teaching, and 47 (52%) did not fund curricular development in ethics. Institutions with a dedicated ethics faculty member were twice as likely to have a mandatory introductory ethics course (64% versus 32%, p ethics education were thought to be a lack of time in the curriculum, a lack of qualified teachers, and a lack of time in faculty schedules. Within a few decades the number of U.S. and Canadian medical schools requiring medical ethics has increased. Nevertheless, significant variation in the content, method, and timing of ethics education suggests consensus about curricular content and pedagogic methods remains lacking. Further progress in ethics education may depend on institutions' willingness to devote more curricular time and funding to medical ethics.

  3. Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard; Moe, Jeffrey L; Sevier, Catherine Harvey; Sevier, David; Waitzkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Duke University initiated a research project, funded by an unrestricted research grant from Millennium Laboratories, a drug testing company. The project focused on assessing the frequency and nature of questionable, unethical, and illegal business practices in the clinical drug testing industry and assessing the potential for establishing a business code of ethics. Laboratory leaders, clinicians, industry attorneys, ethicists, and consultants participated in the survey, were interviewed, and attended two face-to-face meetings to discuss a way forward. The study demonstrated broad acknowledgment of variations in the legal and regulatory environment, resulting in inconsistent enforcement of industry practices. Study participants expressed agreement that overtly illegal practices sometimes exist, particularly when laboratory representatives and clinicians discuss reimbursement, extent of testing, and potential business incentives with medical practitioners. Most respondents reported directly observing probable violations involving marketing materials, contracts, or, in the case of some individuals, directly soliciting people with offers of clinical supplies and other "freebies." While many study respondents were skeptical that voluntary standards alone would eliminate questionable business practices, most viewed ethics codes and credentialing as an important first step that could potentially mitigate uneven enforcement, while improving quality of care and facilitating preferred payment options for credentialed parties. Many were willing to participate in future discussions and industry-wide initiatives to improve the environment.

  4. Medical ethics, moral philosophy and moral tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, T H

    1987-01-01

    Medical ethics is commonly assumed to be a form of 'applied moral philosophy' in which practical moral judgments are deduced from moral theories. This account of the relationship between moral theory and moral judgment is inadequate in several reports. The deductivist approach often results in inadequate attention being given to social, historical and developmental contexts. It also fails to explain some common phenomena in practical moral reasoning. In contrast to the emphasis in deductivism, a case-centered or casuistic practical ethics insists on immersion in the particularities of cases and on interpretation of details in light of moral maxims and other mid-level forms of moral reasoning. Two features of casuistics that ought to be distinguished but frequently are not, are: (1) the emphasis on immersion and interpretation, and (2) a claim about the relation between moral judgment and moral theory as sources of moral knowledge. Once we consider case-centered moral judgments as sources of moral knowledge, we must also begin to look critically but open-mindedly to moral traditions which, upon examination, appear to be more dynamic and to have more reformist potential than is commonly assumed.

  5. Establishment of medical education upon internalization of virtue ethics: bridging the gap between theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Madani, Mansoureh; Larijani, Bagher; Madani, Ensieh; Ghasemzadeh, Nazafarin

    2017-01-01

    During medical training, students obtain enough skills and knowledge. However, medical ethics accomplishes its goals when, together with training medical courses, it guides students behavior towards morality so that ethics-oriented medical practice is internalized. Medical ethics is a branch of applied ethics which tries to introduce ethics into physicians’ practice and ethical decisions; thus, it necessitates the behavior to be ethical. Therefore, when students are being trained, they need t...

  6. Ethics beyond borders: how health professionals experience ethics in humanitarian assistance and development work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R

    2008-08-01

    Health professionals are involved in humanitarian assistance and development work in many regions of the world. They participate in primary health care, immunization campaigns, clinic- and hospital-based care, rehabilitation and feeding programs. In the course of this work, clinicians are frequently exposed to complex ethical issues. This paper examines how health workers experience ethics in the course of humanitarian assistance and development work. A qualitative study was conducted to consider this question. Five core themes emerged from the data, including: tension between respecting local customs and imposing values; obstacles to providing adequate care; differing understandings of health and illness; questions of identity for health workers; and issues of trust and distrust. Recommendations are made for organizational strategies that could help aid agencies support and equip their staff as they respond to ethical issues.

  7. Physicians' Professionally Responsible Power: A Core Concept of Clinical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-02-01

    The gathering of power unto themselves by physicians, a process supported by evidence-based practice, clinical guidelines, licensure, organizational culture, and other social factors, makes the ethics of power--the legitimation of physicians' power--a core concept of clinical ethics. In the absence of legitimation, the physician's power over patients becomes problematic, even predatory. As has occurred in previous issues of the Journal, the papers in the 2016 clinical ethics issue bear on the professionally responsible deployment of power by physicians. This introduction explores themes of physicians' power in papers from an international group of authors who address autonomy and trust, the virtues of perinatal hospice, conjoined twins in ethics and law, addiction and autonomy in clinical research on addicting substances, euthanasia of patients with dementia in Belgium, and a pragmatic approach to clinical futility. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Professional deontology and medical practice in prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Guerrero

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the knowledge on professional deontology amongst doctors in prisons. Materials and Method: Descriptive, transversal and multi-centre study. Labour, collegiate, social, demographic and deontological variables were collected. A descriptive analysis of the variables was performed. A bivariate analysis was made by binary logistic regression models, attending to the odds ratio, and assuming a 95% confidence interval. Data was processed by SPSS v.20 software. Results: 118 doctors replied. 68 men (57.6%, with an average age of 51 years (50-53. 100 know about the Deontology Committee (84.7%, but just 77 (65.3% know its functions properly. 42 (35.6% know about the existence of the Deontological Code, and 37 (31.3% have read and apply it. Those who made a correct definition of deontology do find more deontological issues in their daily work [23(46.9% vs. 18(26.1%; OR: 2.506; IC95%: 1.153-5.451; p=0.020] and would denounce a colleague more often to the Medical Association [40(81.6% vs. 42 (60.9%; OR: 2.857; IC95%: 1.197-6.819; p=0.018]. Older ones know more about the deontology commissions' functions [54(73% vs. 23(52.3%; OR: 2.465; IC95%: 1.127-5.394; p=0.024] and have already denounced situations to the Medical Association [27(36.5% vs. 5(11.4%; OR: 4.481; IC95%: 1.577-12.733; p=0.005], but think that a different Care Ethics Committee is unnecessary [57(77% vs. 42(95.5%; OR: 0.160; IC95%: 0.035- 0.729; p=0.018]. Conclusions: Prison doctors know little about what professional deontology really is. This knowledge increases with age in the profession and is associated with an increased perception of deontological issues in daily practice.

  9. Developing an Ethical Framework for All Geoscientists: AGI Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Leahy, P. Patrick; Keane, Christopher M.

    2016-04-01

    In 1997, a group of geoscientists and others recognized the need for a broad-based set of ethical standards for the geosciences that would be an expression of the highest common denominator of values for the profession. The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) coordinated the development of the 1999 AGI Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct and their subsequent revision in 2015. AGI is a nonprofit federation of 51 geoscientific and professional organizations that span the geosciences and have approximately 250,000 members. AGI serves as a voice for shared interests in the geoscience community and one of its roles is to facilitate collaboration and discussion among its member societies on matters of common or overarching concern. In this capacity, AGI convened a working group to create the 1999 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct and a further working group to revise the Guidelines in 2015 through a consensus process involving all member societies. The Guidelines are an aspirational document, setting out ideals and high levels of achievement for the profession. They have no provision for disciplinary of enforcement action and they do not supersede the ethics statements or codes of any member society. The 1999 Guidelines pay considerable attention to the professional behavior of geoscientists. The 2015 Guidelines place greater emphasis on the societal context of the geosciences and the responsibilities of geoscientists in areas such as communication, education, and the challenges of understanding complex natural systems. The 2015 Guidelines have been endorsed by 29 member societies to date. To translate the aspirations in the Guidelines into specific actions, AGI has facilitated discussions on the practical implications of aspects of the Guidelines. One outcome of these discussions has been a Consensus Statement Regarding Access and Inclusion of Individuals Living with Disabilities in the Geosciences.

  10. Awareness of ethical issues in medical education: an interactive teach-the-teacher course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Özgül, Gülümser; Siebeck, Robert G; Siebeck, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an international, interdisciplinary teach-the-teacher course to sensitize physicians from different countries to ethical issues in medical education. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of this course. Before and after participating in a short session on ethical issues in medical education, 97 physicians from different countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe completed a self-assessment questionnaire on their competence and interest in this field. The short session consisted of working in small groups to identify, analyze and discuss ethical dilemmas described in case vignettes adapted from published examples or written by medical students. In addition to the questionnaire, we conducted a large-group experience to explore four basic orientations of participants in ethical thinking: relativism, intentionalism, consequentialism, and absolutism. We found a significant self-perceived increase in the participants' ability to identify and describe ethical issues and students' dilemmas, in their knowledge about these issues and teaching professionalism, and in their ability to describe both students' perspectives and teachers' and students' behaviors. In addition, participants' feeling of understanding their own culturally learned patterns of determining what is right and wrong increased after taking part in the course. The four contrasting basic ethical orientations showed no significant differences between participants regarding nationality, age, or gender. Ethics of education is an important issue for medical teachers. Teachers' self-perceived competence can be increased by working on case vignettes in small groups.

  11. Awareness of ethical issues in medical education: an interactive teach-the-teacher course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiapponi, Costanza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We conducted an international, interdisciplinary teach-the-teacher course to sensitize physicians from different countries to ethical issues in medical education. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of this course.Method: Before and after participating in a short session on ethical issues in medical education, 97 physicians from different countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe completed a self-assessment questionnaire on their competence and interest in this field. The short session consisted of working in small groups to identify, analyze and discuss ethical dilemmas described in case vignettes adapted from published examples or written by medical students. In addition to the questionnaire, we conducted a large-group experience to explore four basic orientations of participants in ethical thinking: relativism, intentionalism, consequentialism, and absolutism.Results: We found a significant self-perceived increase in the participants’ ability to identify and describe ethical issues and students’ dilemmas, in their knowledge about these issues and teaching professionalism, and in their ability to describe both students’ perspectives and teachers’ and students’ behaviors. In addition, participants’ feeling of understanding their own culturally learned patterns of determining what is right and wrong increased after taking part in the course. The four contrasting basic ethical orientations showed no significant differences between participants regarding nationality, age, or gender. Conclusion: Ethics of education is an important issue for medical teachers. Teachers’ self-perceived competence can be increased by working on case vignettes in small groups.

  12. Principles of medical ethics in supportive care: a reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Daniel G

    2004-02-01

    The possibility of medical-moral controversy in contemporary health care delivery is occasioned by the interfacing of expanding technology with both professional and personal value systems, frequent and significant knowledge deficits on the part of health care consumers, and increased circumspection of and economic constraints experienced by health care providers. Particularly in an era of increasing regulatory mandates and the frequent and lamentable decrease in the availability of human, natural, and institutional resources, an understanding of the function of ethical analysis is indigenous to care, which is simultaneously medically appropriate and morally indicated. But while a familiarity with and an appreciation of the potential contribution of ethical reasoning is essential in all health care delivery, it assumes critical importance in supportive care. In that venue, where the rigors and demands of aggressively therapeutic interventions have ceased and the goal and the demeanor of care have shifted to the palliative mode, heightened attention to the principles of medical ethics is necessary for the balancing of rights and responsibilities for health care consumers and providers alike. This issue ultimately can be singularly salient in providing care that is patient centered and directed. Individuals acting as moral agents, suggesting what "ought" to be done in a given situation, either for themselves or as they are involved in rendering or supporting decisions proffered for or by other moral agents, particularly those in extremis, those in the throes of terminal illness following the collapse of the curative mode, need recourse to principles to facilitate their reasoning. Although the employment of each principle of medical ethics offers guidelines for reflection on the most comprehensive and appropriate care, it is attention to autonomy, informed consent, and beneficence that promotes the most effective supportive care. For even as the question of medical

  13. Effects of Ethical Climate on Organizational Commitment, Professional Commitment, and Job Satisfaction of Auditor in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaiza Ismail

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of the ethical climate on the organizational commitment, professional commitment and job satisfaction of Malaysian auditors. Using a survey questionnaire comprising instruments about the ethical climate, organizational commitment, professional commitment and job satisfaction, 263 usable responses were received. To achieve the objectives, mean scores, standard deviations, correlations and multiple regressions were performed. The study revealed that a significant positive influence of a caring ethical climate on professional and organizational commitment as well as job satisfaction existed. There was also a positive significant association between the law and code ethical climate and professional commitment. On the other hand, the study discovered that the instrumental ethical climate type had a significant negative relationship with organizational commitment and job satisfaction. A significant negative relationship was also revealed between the independent ethical climate type and organizational and professional commitment. A significant negative relationship between the rules ethical climate and job satisfaction was also discovered.

  14. Medical ethics at Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib: the problem of dual loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Although knowledge of torture and physical and psychological abuse was widespread at both the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, and known to medical personnel, there was no official report before the January 2004 Army investigation of military health personnel reporting abuse, degradation or signs of torture. Military medical personnel are placed in a position of a "dual loyalty" conflict. They have to balance the medical needs of their patients, who happen to be detainees, with their military duty to their employer. The United States military medical system failed to protect detainee's human rights, violated the basic principles of medical ethics and ignored the basic tenets of medical professionalism.

  15. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  16. Teaching medical ethics: what is the impact of role models? Some experiences from Swedish medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynoe, N; Löfmark, R; Thulesius, H O

    2008-04-01

    The goal of the present study was to elucidate what influences medical students' attitudes and interests in medical ethics. At the end of their first, fifth and last terms, 409 medical students from all six medical schools in Sweden participated in an attitude survey. The questions focused on the students' experience of good and poor role models, attitudes towards medical ethics in general and perceived effects of the teaching of medical ethics. Despite a low response rate at some schools, this study indicates that increased interest in medical ethics was related to encountering good physician role models, and decreased interest, to encountering poor role models. Physicians involved in the education of medical students seem to teach medical ethics as role models even when ethics is not on the schedule. The low response rate prevents us from drawing definite conclusions, but the results could be used as hypotheses to be further scrutinised.

  17. From the inside out: a new approach to teaching professional identity formation and professional ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy; Godfrey, Nelda

    2014-01-01

    Professional identity formation is a dynamic process that begins in undergraduate nursing education and continues to develop throughout one's professional career. In recent decades, nursing educators emphasized the social dimension of professional identity formation in which professionalization is achieved through following rules, codes, and standards set by the profession. Character or psychological development and the proper use of virtues like integrity, compassion, or courage are often part of the hidden curriculum. The purpose of this article is to introduce a recently developed conception of professionalism that is grounded in virtue ethics and integrates both social and character development into a professional identity that is dynamic, situated, and lifelong. The conception is operationalized through the Framework for Nurse Professionals (FrNP) and the Stair-Step Model of Professional Transformation. The FrNP and the Stair-Step Model promote a robust and morally resilient professional nursing identity that will foster professional growth throughout one's career. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Teaching professionalism to first year medical students using video clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, Allison Haley; Thomas, Aliki; Fuks, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Medical schools are confronted with the challenge of teaching professionalism during medical training. The aim of this study was to examine medical students' perceptions of using video clips as a beneficial teaching tool to learn professionalism and other aspects of physicianship. As part of the longitudinal Physician Apprenticeship course at McGill University, first year medical students viewed video clips from the television series ER. The study used qualitative description and thematic analysis to interpret responses to questionnaires, which explored the educational merits of this exercise. Completed questionnaires were submitted by 112 students from 21 small groups. A major theme concerned the students' perceptions of the utility of video clips as a teaching tool, and consisted of comments organized into 10 categories: "authenticity and believability", "thought provoking", "skills and approaches", "setting", "medium", "level of training", "mentorship", "experiential learning", "effectiveness" and "relevance to practice". Another major theme reflected the qualities of physicianship portrayed in video clips, and included seven categories: "patient-centeredness", "communication", "physician-patient relationship", "professionalism", "ethical behavior", "interprofessional practice" and "mentorship". This study demonstrated that students perceived the value of using video clips from a television series as a means of teaching professionalism and other aspects of physicianship.

  19. Content analysis of ethical codes written by medical students compared with other codes of medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Jotkowitz, Alan B

    2009-09-01

    Swearing to a medical oath is a common practice in medical schools today. Students at the Medical School for International Health (MSIH) participate in an elaborate physician's oath ceremony held in the first year of studies. At this ceremony, students read a code of ethics written by their class, the content of which includes the ethical principles the class as a whole deems significant. 9 codes of ethics, written by students at the MSIH between 1998 and 2006, as well as the oaths of Hippocrates and Maimonides, were collected and the principles contained within them were analyzed and compared. The oaths were broken up into preamble, covenant, code, and peroration sections, each encompassing various content domains. Principles discussed in both the oaths of Hippocrates and Maimonides, as well in two-thirds or more of the student-written codes, included loyalty to one's colleagues, the profession, and one's teachers, as well as acting with beneficence. Attributes including compassion, integrity, and honesty, were mentioned in two-thirds or more of the student-written codes but neither the oath of Hippocrates nor Maimonides. Controversial issues, such as abortion and discussing God were not included in codes written by students. Ethical codes written by students at the MSIH contained some similar principles to those contained within the traditional oaths; however, there was more emphasis on attributes that establish a good physician-patient relationship in the codes written by students. Future studies need to examine the content of other student-written codes. 2008 European Federation of Internal Medicine.

  20. [Medical ethics in terminal stage viewed from emergency and critical care in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruga, Tohru

    2011-04-01

    In Japan, several types of the proposal for terminal care have been published by Medical Association, Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, etc. Among them, the guidelines proposed by Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) are appreciated as most concretely expressed ethically as well as practically regarding the judgment of terminal stages, the medical ethics needed through the processes thereafter and the methods on withdrawal or withholding in terminal care. The author explained and considered the terminal care provided by medical professionals for the absolutely desperate including the brain dead following post-cardiac arrest syndrome for instance, according to the guidelines by JAAM. The best practice selected for the terminally ill ought to be reasonable and suitable from the aspects of both medical science and ethics.

  1. [Complementary medicine--Jewish medical ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Yisrae; Schiff, Elad

    2011-08-01

    In Israel, as in the Western world, the use of different methods of complementary and alternative medicine ICAM) is spreading. CAM raises ethical questions of concern to healthcare providers and to the public: Can physicians recommend a treatment that has no scientific evidence? Should the government include such therapies in the health budget? Can complementary therapists receive protection against lawsuits if their treatment is recognized? The purpose of this article is to present a Jewish perspective on these issues. The fundamental sources that deal with the subject are based on the approach of rabbinic authorities toward unproven medicine, as expressed in the "Mishnah" and "Talmud" (200-500 C.E). The great Jewish scholar who discusses the subject in detail is Maimonides (1135-1204), who defines what "medicine" is and claims that medicine has to rely on reason or experience. Contemporary Jewish commentators present their position based on the interpretation of Maimonides' texts. In this article we claim that treatments can be divided into four groups, each group having a different halachic status: (1) Treatment that might be dangerous--should not be used. (2) Treatment that is safe--can be used, but has no other special status. (3) Treatment recognized by alternative therapists--has consequences for the observant Jew, such as laws of Kashrut and Shabbat. (4) Treatment that was tested and proven using modern medical methods has public significance--the therapist is entitled to legal defense if he made a reasonable mistake; the government can consider funding such treatment using public money. This article presents the Jewish halachic sources upon which we propose an ethical-practical approach to CAM.

  2. Pay for performance and medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Marissa A

    2008-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are widely studying and implementing physician pay for performance (P4P) initiatives to improve quality and control costs. However, the increasing focus on quality-driven financial incentives has some troubling implications for medical professionalism. This article examines the P4P concept in light of a notion of medical fiduciary professionalism that dates back to the 18th-century Scottish physician John Gregory. Gregory's principles serve as a framework to assess the appropriateness of P4P initiatives in disseminating the principles of high-quality care without damage to professionalism, the patient-physician relationship, and access to care for all patients.

  3. A comparative pilot study of the professional ethical thinking of Quebec pharmacy residents and French pharmacy interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharr, Karin; Bussières, Jean-François; Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Bourdon, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this pilot study is to compare the professional ethical thinking of Quebec pharmacy residents and French pharmacy interns. The secondary objective is to compare the professional ethical thinking of Quebec pharmacy residents and first year French pharmacy interns. Hospital pharmacy residents from Quebec, Canada and pharmacy interns from France. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, web-based survey. For this study, professional ethical thinking was defined as the level of agreement/disagreement with statements about pharmacy ethics/dilemmas. A total of 208 usable questionnaires were completed (response rate 91% in Quebec and 11% in France). There were no significant differences between Quebec residents and French interns for 29/43 items (67%). However, there were significant differences in their level of agreement with 14/43 items (33%) surveyed by our questionnaire. The differences related to the following themes: economic aspects (four statements), pharmaceutical care, code of ethics, evaluation, clinical research (two statements each) and training and education, dispensing medications (one statement each). There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of exposure to ethics during academic training and experiential practice. There were significant statistical differences between the two groups of first year pharmacy respondents for 11 statements (26%), with only two out of 11 statements being different from those reported in the overall comparison. Published data on the professional ethical thinking of pharmacy residents and interns remain limited. We believe the higher exposure of Quebec residents to ethics during academic courses and experiential/practical training may have contributed to a higher level of agreement with some ethical statements.

  4. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed.

  5. Professional values, self-esteem, and ethical confidence of baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobucci, Trisha A; Daly, Barbara J; Lindell, Debbie; Griffin, Mary Quinn

    2013-06-01

    Professional identity and competent ethical behaviors of nursing students are commonly developed through curricular inclusion of professional nursing values education. Despite the enactment of this approach, nursing students continue to express difficulty in managing ethical conflicts encountered in their practice. This descriptive correlational study explores the relationships between professional nursing values, self-esteem, and ethical decision making among senior baccalaureate nursing students. A convenience sample of 47 senior nursing students from the United States were surveyed for their level of internalized professional nursing values (Revised Professional Nursing Values Scale), level of self-esteem (Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale), and perceived level of confidence in ethical decision making. A significant positive relationship (p nursing students' professional nursing values and levels of self-esteem. The results of this study can be useful to nursing educators whose efforts are focused on promoting professional identity development and competent ethical behaviors of future nurses.

  6. A preliminary survey of professionalism teaching practices in anatomy education among Indian Medical Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Ilavenil; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, Ponniah; Nalinakumari, Sheela Das

    2017-09-01

    Professionalism and ethics have gained widespread recognition as competencies to be fulfilled, taught, and assessed within medical education. The role of the anatomy course in developed nations has evolved over time and now encompasses multiple domains, including knowledge, skills, and the inculcation of professionalism and ethics. The Medical Council of India recently recommended the integration of professionalism teaching in undergraduate medical curricula. The authors investigated whether the initial orientation lectures and instructions given by faculty at the outset of undergraduate medical anatomy courses throughout India served a "hidden curriculum" regarding professionalism practices, and whether these orientation messages could serve as an early exposure to medical professionalism and ethics for medical students. An online survey was carried out among 102 anatomy faculty members across India requesting details about specific professionalism protocols and instructions regarding behavior in the dissection hall that are routinely given to preclinical students, as well as the importance that they placed on professional behavior. It was found that most faculty members regularly instruct students regarding expected behavior during the anatomy course, including dissection practices. These instructions stress attributes of professionalism like humanism, accountability, and honesty. However, there needs to be a more concentrated effort by educators to prohibit such unprofessional practices like dissection hall photography, and better information is required regarding biomedical waste disposal. Despite the absence of clear guidelines for professionalism teaching in medical education in India, the existing framework of anatomy education provides an opportunity to introduce the concept of professionalism to the first-year medical student. This opportunity may provide an early foundation for designing a professionalism-integrated curriculum. Anat Sci Educ 10: 433

  7. A syllabus for Jewish medical ethics in the context of general bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Shaham, Dorith

    2008-05-01

    Since the beginning of medical history, ethics has interested medical practitioners. The subject has become particularly important in recent years due to the huge advancements in medicine and medical technology and has elicited much public interest. While international ethical principles and guidelines have been established, classical Jewish tradition has always placed great emphasis on bioethics. Prof. Avraham Steinberg's monumental Encyclopedia of Jewish Medical Ethics presents the subject comprehensively and in depth. We propose a bioethics syllabus, to be integrated into the medical curriculum in three stages: i) preclinical - covering basic ethical concepts and principles, relevant history, and ethical codes; ii) clinical - covering bioethical topics relating to the human life cycle; iii) prior to students' final examinations and further specialization - covering bioethical topics relating to their personal interests. Steinberg's Encyclopedia is an ideal basis for the development of a professional course, including Jewish traditional aspects. Such a course would provide future physicians with a varied cultural and intercultural background, help shape their image, and improve the quality of medical care.

  8. The Development Study of a Medical Ethics Education Program by Using Simple ISD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jon; Yoo, Hyoo Hyun; Joo, Chan Uhng

    2011-09-01

    Simple instructional systems design (ISD) model is based on a fast development, usability test, and continuos feedback, which are necessary for educational program development in medical school. This study aims to figure out the usability of Simple ISD model for a medical ethics education program by describing a developmental details of each phase and its evaluation results. Research has been conducted in two steps. First, while researchers participated in the program development by using Simple ISD model, we collected empirical data of each development activities. Second, the developed program was evaluated by students' web-based usability test, a 8-students' focus group interview and 5 faculty members' individual interviews in 4 domains; learning contents, instructional methods and strategies, achievement evaluation, and self-evaluation. Following the circular process of analysis, design, development, and usability test of Simple ISD model, a 10-week medical ethics program covering 9 instructional topics was developed. The average points of response on the developed medical ethics program in 2008 and 2009 are increased from 3.96 to 4.59 and 4.41, respectively. The prospects and limitations of the program are discussed. From a development study of the medical ethics program by using Simple ISD model, we could implement a more usable medical ethics program, and found 4 different usability of the Simple ISD model; the rapid development of educational program, program improvement by continuous feedback, faculty members' engagement in instructional design, and professional development of the faculty members.

  9. A blended-learning programme regarding professional ethics in physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, Marta; Marques-Sule, Elena; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Dueñas-Moscardó, Lirios; Pérez-Alenda, Sofía

    2018-01-01

    In the university context, assessing students' attitude, knowledge and opinions when applying an innovative methodological approach to teach professional ethics becomes fundamental to know if the used approach is enough motivating for students. To assess the effect of a blended-learning model, based on professional ethics and related to clinical practices, on physiotherapy students' attitude, knowledge and opinions towards learning professional ethics. Research design and participants: A simple-blind clinical trial was performed (NLM identifier NCT03241693) (control group, n = 64; experimental group, n = 65). Both groups followed clinical practices for 8 months. Control group performed a public exposition of a clinical case about professional ethics. By contrast, an 8-month blended-learning programme regarding professional ethics was worked out for experimental group. An online syllabus and online activities were elaborated, while face-to-face active participation techniques were performed to discuss ethical issues. Students' attitudes, knowledge and opinions towards learning professional ethics were assessed. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the University Ethic Committee of Human Research and followed the ethical principles according to the Declaration of Helsinki. After the programme, attitudes and knowledge towards learning professional ethics of experimental group students significantly improved, while no differences were observed in control group. Moreover, opinions reported an adequate extension of themes and temporization, importance of clinical practices and interest of topics. Case study method and role playing were considered as the most helpful techniques. The blended-learning programme proposed, based on professional ethics and related to clinical practices, improves physiotherapy students' attitudes, knowledge and opinions towards learning professional ethics.

  10. Medical ethics in sub-Sahara Africa: closing the gaps.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    be familiar with the ethical and legal expectations that arise out of the ... The questionnaire comprised of detailed questions regarding day-to-day aspects of Medical ... Ethics is the application of values and moral rules to ... tion to help their patients and the society. ... Descriptive analysis was carried out using SPSS version.

  11. Good medical ethics, justice and provincial globalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prah Ruger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The summer 2014 Ebola virus outbreak in Western Africa illustrates global health's striking inequalities. Globalisation has also increased pandemics, and disparate health system conditions mean that where one falls ill or is injured in the world can mean the difference between quality care, substandard care or no care at all, between full recovery, permanent ill effects and death. Yet attention to the normative underpinnings of global health justice and distribution remains, despite some important exceptions, inadequate in medical ethics, bioethics and political philosophy. We need a theoretical foundation on which to build a more just world. Provincial globalism (PG), grounded in capability theory, offers a foundation; it provides the components of a global health justice framework that can guide implementation. Under PG, all persons possess certain health entitlements. Global health justice requires progressively securing this health capabilities threshold for every person. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTING ETHICS: A VISUAL ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ferreira Leitão Azevedo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The decline in both the number and quality of students choosing accounting programs has been a worldwide source of concern to scholars and practitioners. According to Albrecht and Sack (2000, that decline is a consequence of several factors, such as changes in business environment, decrease in salary levels and development of alternative careers perceived as more attractive by students and lack of information and/or misunderstanding related to accounting careers. For Carnegie and Napier (2010, comprehension of such external images related to accounting careers and accountants is important for assessing the roles of these professionals in a wider social context. The success of the accounting profession, according to Belski et al. (2004, largely depends on how it is viewed by the public, considering that the image of the accounting profession has been damaged in the recent past by the widely publicized accounting frauds, scandals and failures involving accounting firms and accountants. To support a better understanding of this phenomenon, the objective of this study is to identify and analyze whether the accounting profession is negatively stereotyped by public perception according to ethics. Based on an adapted photo-survey, with 1,034 randomly selected respondents, and tests of differences between means, the central hypothesis of this study was rejected: it is not possible to state that accounting professionals are negatively stereotyped for professional ethics. Also, there were no significant differences based on gender, academic background or education levels of the respondents, but on the other hand is possible to confirm a positive perception based on confidence interval analysis. Implications for practice and recommendations for future studies are both presented in the last section.

  13. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Joshua; Gatewood, Medley O; Ilgen, Jonathan S; Schaninger, Caitlin; Strote, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM) trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees' perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine's "Project Professionalism" and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88%) completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the "respect for others" and "honor and integrity" valued significantly higher (pprofessional attributes and this may be useful to educators. Explanations for these differences are hypothesized, as are the potential implications for professionalism education. Because teaching professional behavior is taught most effectively via behavior modeling, faculty awareness of resident values and faculty development to address potential gaps may improve professionalism education.

  14. Ethical Aspects of Professional Dilemmas in the First Year of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvik, Marit; Smith, Kari; Helleve, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Education is described as a moral enterprise and many of the professional dilemmas teachers encounter have an ethical aspect. Research on ethical situations that novice teachers experience, however, seems to be limited, and we know little about how teacher education can prepare student-teachers for dealing with ethical issues. In this article a…

  15. Medical ethics in the developing world: a liberation theology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, M F

    1996-12-01

    Standard medical ethical analyses typically focus on the physician/patient relationship, patient autonomy, and the clinical encounter. For Liberation Theology this amounts to neglecting the larger context of social injustice. Medicine is a social institution. Any medical ethics which purports to provide an ethics of medicine and medical practice must necessarily address the larger social issues of class structure, poverty and access to adequate health care. Liberation Theology provides a very specific perspective that draws on the needs of the poverty stricken, assesses the relationship among social classes, and focuses on societal conditions. Given such an analysis, medical ethics is reconfigured as concerned not only with clinical encounters but also with background cultural conditions and social justice.

  16. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupan

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in the study. The results show some problematic issues such as: record keeping, exceptions of confidentiality, access to personal data, the content of informed consent, incompetence, copying of literature and diagnostic instruments – even not standardised ones, psychology students as subjects in psychological research, and lack of information on ethical aspects of students' practical work. Psychologists and students reported inadequate knowledge of professional ethics and suggested various kinds of ethical education. Institutions mostly enable psychologists to work within the Code of ethics. There are, however, conflicts regarding access to data and professional autonomy. Psychologists report conflicts between law and ethics, incorrect reports in media and lack of control over professional ethics. In the case of ethical violation psychologists do less than they should. They emphasise the problem of incompetence. The frequency and seriousness of certain violation were estimated. Ways of verifying knowledge, stimulating ethical conduct and taking different measures in the case of violations were suggested. The state of affairs in different working environments of psychologists was also described. Results show that psychologist who have worked in the field for a shorter period answer more frequently contrary to the Code of Ethics. Students' knowledge of ethics is mostly very satisfactory. The study emphasises the ethical aspects of psychological practice in Slovenia. It

  17. [What a surgeon needs to know of the work of a medical ethics committee/institutional review board].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, N

    2015-02-01

    Ethical committees or institutional review boards are interdisciplinary committees to assess the ethical, social, legal and medical aspects of research involving human subjects. The ethics commission is to protect both the patient as well as the investigators and other personnel involved in the implementation of scientific projects. According to the professional code (Berufsordnung) every physician is obliged to consult an ethics committee to get a an approval before carrying out a research project. Concerning the Declaration of Helsinki, the advice of physicians is an international standard before carrying out a research project. In addition to the advisory function the ethics committee has an authorisation function within the pharmaceutical and medical device law. In the present publication the advisory and authorisation functions of an German ethics committee are briefly explained. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Mind Your Steps : Medical ethical decision-making in the neonatal intensive care unit and impact of emotional burden on nurses and physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Coby)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis assesses the effectiveness of structured multi-professional medical ethical decision-making in diminishing problems experienced around medical ethical decisionmaking in the Erasmus MC NICU. Besides, it gives an overview of the patients discussed from 2009 to

  19. Establishing moral bearings: ethics and expatriate health care professionals in humanitarian work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R

    2011-07-01

    Expatriate health care professionals frequently participate in international responses to natural disasters and humanitarian emergencies. This field of practice presents important clinical, logistical and ethical challenges for clinicians. This paper considers the ethics of health care practice in humanitarian contexts. It examines features that contribute to forming the moral landscape of humanitarian work, and discusses normative guidelines and approaches that are relevant for this work. These tools and frameworks provide important ethics resources for humanitarian settings. Finally, it elaborates a set of questions that can aid health care professionals as they analyse ethical issues that they experience in the field. The proposed process can assist clinicians as they seek to establish their moral bearings in situations of ethical complexity and uncertainty. Identifying and developing ethics resources and vocabulary for clinical practice in humanitarian work will help health care professionals provide ethically sound care to patients and communities. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  20. Professionalism among multicultural medical students in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Alsalehi, Shahd; Husain, Zahra S M; Nair, Satish C; Carrick, Frederick Robert

    2017-01-01

    Moral competencies and ethical practices of medical professionals are among the desired outcomes of academic training. Unfortunately, academic dishonesty and misconduct are reported from medical colleges across the world. This study investigates the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. Validated and customized version of Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory-1 detailing lapses of professionalism in undergraduate health professions education was used to determine the perceived prevalence and self-reported lapses of academic integrity in this study. This study shows that the majority (458/554, 83%) of medical students have admitted to acts of academic dishonesty mentioned in the questionnaire. Approximately 42% (231/554) of the students have given proxy for attendance and 71% of them considered this as an offense. Similarly, 12% (66/554) have copied from the record books of others, and 86% (477/554) have considered it unethical. In addition, 5% (28/554) of the students revealed forging a teacher's signature in their record or logbooks, with 16% (91/554) of them reporting that they have seen others forge signatures. This is the first multi-center, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic study involving a large number of participants that addresses academic professionalism among medical students in the Middle East. Certainly, the paucity of data limits definitive conclusions about the best approach to prevent academic misconduct in the UAE medical schools. Yet, the results of our study are anticipated not only to benefit the UAE but also to find application in the Arab world, with similar medical school programs, values, culture and tradition.

  1. Professionalism among multicultural medical students in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Alsalehi, Shahd; Husain, Zahra S. M.; Nair, Satish C.; Carrick, Frederick Robert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Moral competencies and ethical practices of medical professionals are among the desired outcomes of academic training. Unfortunately, academic dishonesty and misconduct are reported from medical colleges across the world. This study investigates the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the level of academic dishonesty/misconduct among multicultural medical students. Design: Validated and customized version of Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory-1 detailing lapses of professionalism in undergraduate health professions education was used to determine the perceived prevalence and self-reported lapses of academic integrity in this study. Results: This study shows that the majority (458/554, 83%) of medical students have admitted to acts of academic dishonesty mentioned in the questionnaire. Approximately 42% (231/554) of the students have given proxy for attendance and 71% of them considered this as an offense. Similarly, 12% (66/554) have copied from the record books of others, and 86% (477/554) have considered it unethical. In addition, 5% (28/554) of the students revealed forging a teacher’s signature in their record or logbooks, with 16% (91/554) of them reporting that they have seen others forge signatures. Conclusion: This is the first multi-center, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic study involving a large number of participants that addresses academic professionalism among medical students in the Middle East. Certainly, the paucity of data limits definitive conclusions about the best approach to prevent academic misconduct in the UAE medical schools. Yet, the results of our study are anticipated not only to benefit the UAE but also to find application in the Arab world, with similar medical school programs, values, culture and tradition. PMID:28918704

  2. The ethics and safety of medical student global health electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Evelyn M; Varpio, Lara; Petrosoniak, Andrew; Gajaria, Amy; McMcarthy, Anne E

    2014-04-10

    To explore and characterize the ethical and safety challenges of global health experiences as they affect medical students in order to better prepare trainees to face them. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 Canadian medical trainees who had participated in global health experiences during medical school. Convenience and snowball sampling were utilized. Using Moustakas's transcendental phenomenological approach, participant descriptions of ethical dilemmas and patient/trainee safety problems were analyzed. This generated an aggregate that illustrates the essential meanings of global health experience ethical and safety issues faced. We interviewed 23 participants who had completed 38 electives (71%, n=27, during pre-clinical years) spending a mean 6.9 weeks abroad, and having visited 23 countries. Sixty percent (n=23) had pre-departure training while 36% (n=14) had post-experience debriefing. Three macro-level themes were identified: resource disparities and provision of care; navigating clinical ethical dilemmas; and threats to trainee safety. Medical schools have a responsibility to ensure ethical and safe global health experiences. However, our findings suggest that medical students are often poorly prepared for the ethical and safety dilemmas they encounter during these electives. Medical students require intensive pre-departure training that will prepare them emotionally to deal with these dilemmas. Such training should include discussions of how to comply with clinical limitations.

  3. Practising Ethics: Bildungsroman and Community of Practice in Occupational Therapists' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisbrooke, Jani

    2013-01-01

    Professional ethics has currently raised its public profile in the UK as part of social anxiety around governance of health and social care, fuelled by catastrophically bad practice identified in particular healthcare facilities. Professional ethics is regulated by compliance with abstracted, normative codes but experienced as contextualised…

  4. Universality and Cultural Diversity in Professional Ethical Development: From Kohlberg to Dynamic Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkang

    2012-01-01

    Upholding ethical standards is part of what it means to be a professional and therefore part of professional education, but to what extent is the development of ethical reasoning universal across cultures, or is it highly dependent on culture? If universal, how can we explain the unique patterns of moral reasoning and behaviour in Asia, which…

  5. A Review of Contemporary Ethical Decision-Making Models for Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Perry C.

    2015-01-01

    Mental health professionals are faced with increasingly complex ethical decisions that are impacted by culture, personal and professional values, and the contexts in which they and their clients inhabit. This article presents the reasons for developing and implementing multiple ethical decision making models and reviews four models that address…

  6. Using Professional Ethics to Strengthen Family/School Partnerships: Practical Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Doris J.

    Professional ethics are designed to set minimum standards of practice and service for school psychologists. Ways in which professional ethics standards of school psychology can be used to build and strengthen work relationships with parents, legal guardians, and other family members are described here. Suggestions for how school psychologists can…

  7. Distance, Dialogue and Reflection: Interpersonal Reflective Equilibrium as Method for Professional Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoven, Mariëtte; Kole, Jos

    2015-01-01

    The method of reflective equilibrium (RE) is well known within the domain of moral philosophy, but hardly discussed as a method in professional ethics education. We argue that an interpersonal version of RE is very promising for professional ethics education. We offer several arguments to support this claim. The first group of arguments focus on a…

  8. Distance, dialogue and reflection : Interpersonal reflective equilibrium as method for professional ethics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoven, Mariëtte; Kole, Jos

    2015-01-01

    The method of reflective equilibrium (RE) is well known within the domain of moral philosophy, but hardly discussed as a method in professional ethics education. We argue that an interpersonal version of RE is very promising for professional ethics education. We offer several arguments to support

  9. Ethical issues in nutrition support of severely disabled elderly persons: a guide for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monod, Stéfanie; Chiolero, René; Büla, Christophe; Benaroyo, Lazare

    2011-05-01

    Providing or withholding nutrition in severely disabled elderly persons is a challenging dilemma for families, health professionals, and institutions. Despite limited evidence that nutrition support improves functional status in vulnerable older persons, especially those suffering from dementia, the issue of nutrition support in this population is strongly debated. Nutrition might be considered a basic need that not only sustains life but provides comfort as well by patients and their families. Consequently, the decision to provide or withhold nutrition support during medical care is often complex and involves clinical, legal, and ethical considerations. This article proposes a guide for health professionals to appraise ethical issues related to nutrition support in severely disabled older persons. This guide is based on an 8-step process to identify the components of a situation, analyze conflicting values that result in the ethical dilemma, and eventually reach a consensus for the most relevant plan of care to implement in a specific clinical situation. A vignette is presented to illustrate the use of this guide when analyzing a clinical situation.

  10. [Professionalism: Values and competences in specialized medical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, N; Alcaraz, J; Gavagnach, M; Kazan, R; Arévalo, A; Rodríguez-Carballeira, M

    To determine the perception of healthcare professionals (tutors, residents and teaching collaborators) involved in specialist medical training on the core values and skills to develop their tasks. A tailor-made questionnaire aimed at healthcare professionals in 9health care centres and a referral hospital. Questionnaire: 4 sections and 51 variables (scale 1-10). A total of 287 professionals participated, which included 97% tutors (n=59), 38% residents (n=61), and 56% others (97 teaching collaborators and 70 not associated with teaching). The alfa Cronbach coefficient was 0.945. Best rated values were work compliance (8.7 points), ethics in professional practice (8.6 points), and respect for their team (8.3 points). The best rated competence was communication with patients and families (8.1 points), followed by self-motivating leadership (7.9 points), and the practical application of medical and healthcare theoretical knowledge (7.8 points). The values received, on average, 0.7 points above competences (95% CI: 0.5-0.9). There were no differences between tutors and residents, although differences were found between doctors and nurses, and between males and females. Most of the professionals (tutors, residents, and teaching collaborators) share the same perception of the values and competencies that influence their professional development. This perception was influenced by the professional category and gender, but not age or working in a hospital or primary health care. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Ethics and the professional practice of psychologists: the role of virtues and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A E; Meara, N M

    1990-04-01

    We evaluate the potential relevance of virtue ethics to the training and practice of professional psychologists, and we contrast them with principle ethics. Typically, principles are used to facilitate the selection of socially and historically acceptable answers to the question "What shall I do?" when confronted by ethical dilemmas. Virtue ethics, however, generally focus on the question "Who shall I be?" Strengths and weaknesses of each approach are presented. The impact of each is discussed with respect to informed consent and the therapeutic construct "genuineness." We conclude that virtue ethics are an essential component of responsible ethical training and practice.

  12. Ethical issues in the professional work of psychologists: state of affairs in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Tina Zupan; Valentin Bucik

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the state of affairs regarding professional ethics of Slovene psychologists, particularly regarding the implementation of ethical principles and psychologists' and students' knowledge of ethics and procedures in the cases of ethical dilemmas and violations. Two dedicated questionnaires were designed by the authors. 800 Slovene psychologists received the questionnaire and 150 of them responded. There were also 56 psychology students involved in ...

  13. ETHICAL ISSUE AND NURSING STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS IN NURSING EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Idongesit I. Akpabio

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper aimed at presenting in-depth information on strategies of implementing ethical decision making in nursing practice and education in the contemporary society. The complex issues in nursing education and practice have ethical implications for the attainment of professional standard. The ability of nurses to engage in ethical practice in everyday work and to deal with ethical situations, problems and concerns could be the result of decisions made at a variety of levels. So...

  14. Metaphysics and medical ethics: a reply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, G

    1994-01-01

    The total longitudinal form view of human beings is a metaphysical view which aims to locate our moral judgements about human embryos in a broader set of attitudes and characterisations. On this basis it has explanatory power and a real function in that it grounds our ethical discussion of embryos in other discourses. Contra Leavitt, this grounding suggests a broader criterion of relevance for metaphysical discussion than asking 'what comes out of' such a discussion for a particular ethical dilemma. PMID:8035442

  15. Ethical aspects of medical age assessment in the asylum process: a Swedish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Erik; Furberg, Elisabeth; Sandman, Lars

    2017-11-11

    According to European regulations and the legislations of individual member states, children who seek asylum have a different set of rights than adults in a similar position. To protect these rights and ensure rule of law, migration authorities are commonly required to assess the age of asylum seekers who lack reliable documentation, including through various medical methods. However, many healthcare professionals and other commentators consider medical age assessment to be ethically problematic. This paper presents a simplified and amended account of the main findings of a recent ethical analysis of medical age assessment in the asylum process commissioned by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. A number of ethical challenges related to conflicting goals, equality and fairness, autonomy and informed consent, privacy and integrity, and professional values and roles are identified and analysed. It is concluded that most of these challenges can be met, but that this requires a system where the assessment is sufficiently accurate and where adequate safeguards are in place. Two important ethical questions are found to warrant further analysis. The first is whether asylum seekers' consent to the procedure can be considered genuinely voluntary. The second is whether and how medical age assessments could affect negative public attitudes towards asylum seekers or discriminatory societal views more generally.

  16. Teaching Medical Ethics in Graduate and Undergraduate Medical Education: A Systematic Review of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Santiago; Phuoc, Vania; Throneberry, Steven; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer; McCullough, Laurence; Coverdale, John

    2017-08-01

    One objective was to identify and review studies on teaching medical ethics to psychiatry residents. In order to gain insights from other disciplines that have published research in this area, a second objective was to identify and review studies on teaching medical ethics to residents across all other specialties of training and on teaching medical students. PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched for controlled trials on teaching medical ethics with quantitative outcomes. Search terms included ethics, bioethics, medical ethics, medical students, residents/registrars, teaching, education, outcomes, and controlled trials. Nine studies were found that met inclusion criteria, including five randomized controlled trails and four controlled non-randomized trials. Subjects included medical students (5 studies), surgical residents (2 studies), internal medicine house officers (1 study), and family medicine preceptors and their medical students (1 study). Teaching methods, course content, and outcome measures varied considerably across studies. Common methodological issues included a lack of concealment of allocation, a lack of blinding, and generally low numbers of subjects as learners. One randomized controlled trial which taught surgical residents using a standardized patient was judged to be especially methodologically rigorous. None of the trials incorporated psychiatry residents. Ethics educators should undertake additional rigorously controlled trials in order to secure a strong evidence base for the design of medical ethics curricula. Psychiatry ethics educators can also benefit from the findings of trials in other disciplines and in undergraduate medical education.

  17. Avoiding evasion: medical ethics education and emotion theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leget, C

    2004-10-01

    Beginning with an exemplary case study, this paper diagnoses and analyses some important strategies of evasion and factors of hindrance that are met in the teaching of medical ethics to undergraduate medical students. Some of these inhibitions are inherent to ethical theories; others are connected with the nature of medicine or cultural trends. It is argued that in order to avoid an attitude of evasion in medical ethics teaching, a philosophical theory of emotions is needed that is able to clarify on a conceptual level the ethical importance of emotions. An approach is proposed with the help of the emotion theory Martha Nussbaum works out in her book Upheavals of thought. The paper ends with some practical recommendations.

  18. Cultural context in medical ethics: lessons from Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powell Tia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines two topics in Japanese medical ethics: non-disclosure of medical information by Japanese physicians, and the history of human rights abuses by Japanese physicians during World War II. These contrasting issues show how culture shapes our view of ethically appropriate behavior in medicine. An understanding of cultural context reveals that certain practices, such as withholding diagnostic information from patients, may represent ethical behavior in that context. In contrast, nonconsensual human experimentation designed to harm the patient is inherently unethical irrespective of cultural context. Attempts to define moral consensus in bioethics, and to distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable variation across different cultural contexts, remain central challenges in articulating international, culturally sensitive norms in medical ethics.

  19. [Civil, criminal and ethical liability of medical doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udelsmann, Artur

    2002-01-01

    In the last years doctors have been the target of a growing number of civil, criminal law suits, as well as ethical procedures. Medicine is a widely targeted career, not only owing to its inherent risks, but also owing to a mistaken approach of the Judiciary Power about the obligations of medical doctors. Decisions of the Medical Board in ethical procedures have an impact in civil and criminal justice and therefore should be followed closely. The purpose of this review is to provide a wide view from a doctor-lawyer perspective of cases involving civil, criminal liability of anesthesiologists as well as ethical procedures against them, in an effort to make them comprehensible to doctors. After a brief historical introduction civil liability foundations and legal articles are examined. Responsibilities of doctors, hospitals and health insurance providers are discussed separately, as well as reparation mechanisms. Crimes possible to occur during medical practice and respective penalties are described; the direct relationship between crime and civil reparation is demonstrated. The administrative nature of ethical procedure is described, emphasizing that the legal character of its penalties often serve as grounds for civil and criminal justice decisions. Prevention is still the best medicine. Good medical practice and a good medical-patient relationship are still the best ways to minimize lawsuits and their repercussions. Doctors should have some knowledge of juridical mechanisms in lawsuits and ethical procedures, but should not take defense initiatives without prior consultation of an attorney. Civil, criminal and ethical liability of physicians.

  20. Medical ethical knowledge and moral attitudes among physicians in Bavaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrowski, Jana; Schuster, Tibor; Strube, Wolfgang; Steger, Florian

    2012-02-01

    Everyday clinical practice requires knowledge of medical ethics and the taking of moral positions. We investigated the ethical knowledge and attitudes of a representative sample of physicians with regard to end-of-life decisions, euthanasia, and the physician-patient relationship. 192 physicians (96 women, 96 men; mean age 50) in a random sample of Bavarian physicians completed our structured questionnaire. Data were collected from September to November 2010. There was much uncertainty among the respondents about the relevant knowledge for end-of-life decisions and the implementation of existing guidelines and laws on euthanasia and advance directives. Attitudes to ethical questions were found to be correlated with the length of time the physicians had been in practice. Physicians' personal values and moral attitudes play a major role in clinical decision-making. We used a questionnaire to examine physicians' opinions about end-of-life issues and to determine the factors that might influence them. We found their knowledge of medical ethics to be inadequate. Competence in medical ethics needs to be strengthened by more ethical teaching in medical school, specialty training, and continuing medical education.

  1. Medical ethics: enhanced or undermined by modes of payment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, Peter; Janus, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    In the medical literature [1, 2, 7], the view prevails that any change away from fee-for-service (FFS) jeopardizes medical ethics, defined as motivational preference in this article. The objective of this contribution is to test this hypothesis by first developing two theoretical models of behavior, building on the pioneering works of Ellis and McGuire [4] and Pauly and Redisch [11]. Medical ethics is reflected by a parameter α, which indicates how much importance the physician attributes to patient well-being relative to his or her own income. Accordingly, a weakening of ethical orientation amounts to a fall in the value of α. While traditional economic theory takes preferences as predetermined, more recent contributions view them as endogenous (see, e.g., Frey and Oberholzer-Gee [5]). The model variant based on Ellis and McGuire [4] depicts the behavior of a physician in private practice, while the one based on Pauly and Redisch [11] applies to providers who share resources such as in hospital or group practice. Two changes in the mode of payment are analyzed, one from FFS to prospective payment (PP), the other to pay-for-performance (P4P). One set of predictions relates physician effort to a change in the mode of payment; another, physician effort to a change in α, the parameter reflecting ethics. Using these two relationships, a change in ethics can observationally be related to a change in the mode of payment. The predictions derived from the models are pitted against several case studies from diverse countries. A shift from FFS to PP is predicted to give rise to a negative observed relationship between the medical ethics of physicians in private practice under a wide variety of circumstances, more so than a shift to P4P, which can even be seen as enhancing medical ethics, provided physician effort has a sufficiently high marginal effectiveness in terms of patient well-being. This prediction is confirmed to a considerable degree by circumstantial evidence

  2. The ethical commitment of Australian radiographers: Does medical dominance create an influence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Sarah [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, East Street, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: s.lewis@fhs.usyd.edu.au; Heard, Robert [School of Behavioural and Community Health Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, East Street, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Robinson, John [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, East Street, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); White, Karolyn [Centre for Values and Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, East Street, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Poulos, Ann [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, East Street, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)

    2008-05-15

    There is a lack of awareness and openness surrounding ethical debate in Diagnostic Radiography literature and culture, perpetuated in part by the historical growth of the technical realm of radiography, radiology and medicine. Hence, the impact of Australian radiographers' current level of professional autonomy, combined with the influence of medical dominance and radiographers' ethical commitment was undocumented. This study investigated the role, importance and attitudes of Australian radiographers towards ethics through a qualitative study following a grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 Australian. A conceptual framework mapping the causal conditions affecting the ethical commitment was developed. This study argues that a number of internal and external variables weave an intricate fabric of poor identity, subservience and negative workplace culture. Australian radiographers, whist attempting to set a standard of ethical commitment, are hindered by difficulties of medical dominance, relatively poor professional autonomy and difficulty in accepting responsibility. The presence of private radiology enterprise and the association between patient referral and money has eroded the radiographer-patient relationship and introduced the potential for unethical practice in the radiographer-radiologist-referring practitioner relationship.

  3. Fostering values: four stages towards developing professional ethics for future accountants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Zaleha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The many accounting scandals occurred in the last three decades have change the perspective of accountant globally. As such, the higher institutions have to play their role in nurturing professional ethics in order to change the misconception towards the profession. Our observation of the literature indicates that incorporating professional ethics in higher institutions is a way forward towards developing future accountants with values. Henceforth, we conducted a generic inquiry study to explore how higher institutions could inculcate accounting graduates with professional ethics. Our findings show a conceptual framework which depicted four stages towards incorporating professional ethics at tertiary level education there are: 1 value development, 2 ethics maturation, 3 professionalism development and 4 ownership through effective implementation and enforcement. Consequently, the findings contribute to expanding the current knowledge in our conceptualisation of the professional ethics concept. In addition, the findings support the development of ethics education for accounting graduates in higher institutions in Malaysia. We consider that this study provides evidence to educators and policy makers that teaching methods and pedagogical policies should ensure professional ethics education in business schools in Malaysia is treated as a pervasive element of curricula rather than an optional choice.

  4. Visible Facebook profiles and e-professionalism in undergraduate medical students in India

    OpenAIRE

    Setu Gupta; Satendra Singh; Upreet Dhaliwal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess medical students’ presence on Facebook and the extent of their visible activity, with particular reference to online professionalism. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including all medical students enrolled in the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, India during the period of the study, which was conducted from 2011 to 2012. After approval by the Institutional Ethical Committee, the full names of all students were obtained ...

  5. Treatment of Deaf Clients: Ethical Considerations for Professionals in Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Boness, Cassandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Providing therapy to deaf clients raises important ethical considerations for psychologists related to competence; multiple relationships and boundary issues; confidentiality; assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; and communication and using interpreters. In evaluating and addressing these, psychologists must consider the APA’s Ethics Code and other relevant issues (e.g., ADA) necessary to provide ethical treatment. The current article provides background, ethical considerations, principles ...

  6. Pedagogy and Purpose: Moral Imagination and the Teaching of Medical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2016-04-01

    This essay is an exploration of the development of moral imagination as an important outcome in the teaching of medial ethics. It is contextualized within the growth of professionalism and pays attention to the formation of character of physicians in their formal training and in the first phase of their careers. Issues around formation as it is understood historically in the vocation of the clergy are also considered. Finally, there is discussion of the place rites of passage as they figure in the lives of those who teach medical ethics.

  7. Does professional autonomy protect medical futility judgments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampel, Eric

    2006-04-01

    Despite substantial controversy, the use of futility judgments in medicine is quite common, and has been backed by the implementation of hospital policies and professional guidelines on medical futility. The controversy arises when health care professionals (HCPs) consider a treatment futile which patients or families believe to be worthwhile: should HCPs be free to refuse treatments in such a case, or be required to provide them? Most physicians seem convinced that professional autonomy protects them from being forced to provide treatments they judge mentally futile, given the lack of patient benefit as well as the waste of medical resources involved. The argument from professional autonomy has been presented in a number of articles, but it has not been subjected to much critical scrutiny. In this paper I distinguish three versions of the argument: 1) that each physician should be free to exercise his or her own medical judgment; 2) that the medical profession as a whole may provide futility standards to govern the practice of its members; and 3) that the moral integrity of each physician serves as a limit to treatment demands. I maintain that none of these versions succeeds in overcoming the standard objection that futility determinations involve value judgments best left to the patients, their designated surrogates, or their families. Nor do resource considerations change this fact, since they should not influence the properly patient-centered judgment about futility.

  8. Algorithm for professional communication in medical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Bezsheiko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a short algorithm for professional communication in specific clinical situations. Recommendations are developed on the basis of the guidelines on objective structured clinical examination. It is an educational material, intended for medical students and physicians, who have just started a clinical practice.  

  9. Ethics and the ethnography of medical research in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Sassy; Geissler, P. Wenzel

    2008-01-01

    The ethics of medical research have grown as an area of expertise and debate in recent years, with two broad approaches emerging in relation to transnational research: (1) the refinement of guidelines and strengthening of review, processes primarily to protect the right of individual research participants and strengthen interpersonal relations at the micro-level; and (2) considering more centrally, as crucial ethical concerns, the wider interests of whole populations, the functioning of research institutions, the processes of collaboration, and the ethics of inequitable international relations. We see the two areas of debate and action as complementary, and believe that social science conducted in and around transnational medical research environments can bring these two perspectives together in a more ‘situated ethics’ of research. To explore this idea for medical research in Africa, we organized a conference in December 2005 in Kilifi, Kenya. In this introduction we outline the two emerging approaches to medical ethics, summarise each of seven papers selected from the conference for inclusion in this special issue on ethics and ethnography, and finally highlight two areas of lively debate at the conference itself: the appropriateness and value of ethics guidelines and review boards for medical research; and the ethical review of social science research. Together, the papers and debates point to the importance of focusing on the ethics of relationships and on justice in both biomedicine and social science research, and on giving greater voice and visibility to the field staff who often play a crucial and under-supported role in ‘doing ethics’ in the field. They also point to the potential value of social science research on the range of relationships operating at different levels and time scales in medical research, including those surrounding community engagement activities, and the role and functioning of ethics review boards. We conclude by highlighting

  10. Duty to speak up in the health care setting a professionalism and ethics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topazian, Rachel J; Hook, C Christopher; Mueller, Paul S

    2013-11-01

    Staff and students working in health care settings are sometimes reluctant to speak up when they perceive patients to be at risk for harm. In this article, we describe four incidents that occurred at our institution (Mayo Clinic). In two of them, health care professionals failed to speak up, which resulted in harm; in the other two, they did speak up, which prevented harm and improved patient care. We analyzed each scenario using the Physician's Charter on Medical Professionalism and prima facie ethics principles to determine whether principles were violated or upheld. We conclude that anyone who works in a health care setting has a duty to speak up when a patient faces harm. We also provide guidance for health care institutions on promoting a culture in which speaking up is encouraged and integrated into routine practice.

  11. The influence factors of medical professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yifei; Yin, Senlin; Lai, Sike; Tang, Ji; Huang, Jin; Du, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As the relationship between physicians and patients deteriorated in China recently, medical conflicts occurred more frequently now. Physicians, to a certain extent, also take some responsibilities. Awareness of medical professionalism and its influence factors can be helpful to take targeted measures and alleviate the contradiction. Through a combination of physicians’ self-assessment and patients’ assessment in ambulatory care clinics in Chengdu, this research aims to evaluate the importance of medical professionalism in hospitals and explore the influence factors, hoping to provide decision-making references to improve this grim situation. From February to March, 2013, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 tier 3 hospitals, 5 tier 2 hospitals, and 10 community hospitals through a stratified-random sampling method on physicians and patients, at a ratio of 1/5. Questionnaires are adopted from a pilot study. A total of 382 physicians and 1910 patients were matched and surveyed. Regarding the medical professionalism, the scores of the self-assessment for physicians were 85.18 ± 7.267 out of 100 and the scores of patient-assessment were 57.66 ± 7.043 out of 70. The influence factors of self-assessment were physicians’ working years (P = 0.003) and patients’ complaints (P = 0.006), whereas the influence factors of patient-assessment were patients’ ages (P = 0.001) and their physicians’ working years (P professionalism was in accordance with physicians of more working years and no complaint history. Higher patient-assessment was in line with elder patients, the physicians’ more working years, and higher satisfaction on the payment mode. Elder patients, encountering with physicians who worked more years in health care services or with higher satisfaction on the payment mode, contribute to higher scores in patient assessment part. The government should strengthen the medical professionalism for young physicians and improve the

  12. Implementing structured, multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jacoba Coby; van Blijderveen, Geja; van Dijk, Gert; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Williams, Monique

    2012-10-01

    In neonatal intensive care, a child's death is often preceded by a medical decision. Nurses, social workers and pastors, however, are often excluded from ethical case deliberation. If multiprofessional ethical case deliberations do take place, participants may not always know how to perform to the fullest. A level-IIID neonatal intensive care unit of a paediatric teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Structured multiprofessional medical ethical decision-making (MEDM) was implemented to help overcome problems experienced. Important features were: all professionals who are directly involved with the patient contribute to MEDM; a five-step procedure is used: exploration, agreement on the ethical dilemma/investigation of solutions, analysis of solutions, decision-making, planning actions; meetings are chaired by an impartial ethicist. A 15-item questionnaire to survey staff perceptions on this intervention just before and 8 months after implementation was developed. Before and after response rates were 91/105 (87%) and 85/113 (75%). Factor analysis on the questionnaire suggested a four-factor structure: participants' role; structure of MEDM; content of ethical deliberation; and documentation of decisions/conclusions. Effect sizes were 1.67 (pethical case deliberation perceived that the process of decision-making had improved; they were more positive about the structure of meetings, their own role and, to some extent, the content of ethical deliberation. Documentation of decisions/conclusions requires further improvement.

  13. Teaching medical students to discern ethical problems in human clinical research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Green Hammond, Katherine A; Brody, Janet L; Kaminsky, Alexis; Roberts, Brian B

    2005-10-01

    Investigators and institutional review boards are entrusted with ensuring the conduct of ethically sound human studies. Assessing ethical aspects of research protocols is a key skill in fulfilling this duty, yet no empirically validated method exists for preparing professionals to attain this skill. The authors performed a randomized controlled educational intervention, comparing a criteria-based learning method, a clinical-research- and experience-based learning method, and a control group. All 300 medical students enrolled at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in 2001 were invited to participate. After a single half-hour educational session, a written posttest of ability to detect ethical problems in hypothetical protocol vignettes was administered. The authors analyzed responses to ten protocol vignettes that had been evaluated independently by experts. For each vignette, a global assessment of the perceived significance of ethical problems and the identification of specific ethical problems were evaluated. Eighty-three medical students (27%) volunteered: 50 (60%) were women and 55 (66%) were first- and second-year students. On global assessments, the criteria-focused group perceived ethical problems as more significant than did the other two groups (p problems, more closely resembling expert assessments. Unexpectedly, the group focused on clinical research participants identified fewer problems than did the control group (p human studies.

  14. Professionalism perspectives among medical students of a novel medical graduate school in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Zulkifli, Zainal; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Salam, Abdus; Bhagat, Vidya; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi; Rahman, Nor Iza A

    2016-01-01

    Defining professionalism in this constantly evolving world is not easy. How do you measure degrees of benevolence and compassion? If it is so obvious to our profession, what professionalism is, then why is it so difficult to teach it to medical students and residents? Today’s definition of medical professionalism is evolving – from autonomy to accountability, from expert opinion to evidence-based medicine, and from self-interest to teamwork and shared responsibility. However, medical professionalism is defined as the basis for the trust in the patient–physician relationship, caring and compassion, insight, openness, respect for patient dignity, confidentiality, autonomy, presence, altruism, and those qualities that lead to trust-competence, integrity, honesty, morality, and ethical conduct. The purpose of this study is to explore professionalism in terms of its fundamental elements among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA). This was a cross-sectional study carried out on medical students of UniSZA. The study population included preclinical and clinical medical students of UniSZA from Year I to Year V of academic session 2014/2015. The simple random sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were collected using a validated instrument. The data were then compiled and analyzed using SPSS Version 21. Out of 165 questionnaires distributed randomly among Year I to Year V medical students of UniSZA, 144 returned, giving a response rate of 87%. Among the study participants, 38% (54) and 62% (90) were males and females, respectively. The grand total score was 170.92±19.08. A total of 166.98±20.15 and 173.49±18.09 were the total professionalism score of male and female study participants, respectively, with no statistically significant (P=0.61) differences. This study found almost similar levels of familiarity with all fundamental issues of professionalism with no statistically (P>0.05) significant differences. Medical faculty

  15. Resources to Support Ethical Practice in Evaluation: An Interview with the Director of the National Center for Research and Professional Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Where do evaluators find resources on ethics and ethical practice? This article highlights a relatively new online resource, a centerpiece project of the National Center for Professional and Research Ethics (NCPRE), which brings together information on best practices in ethics in research, academia, and business in an online portal and center. It…

  16. [History of medical ethics in Korea: focused on analysis of medical codes and covenants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D W

    2000-12-01

    This article deals with the emergence of the codes of medical ethics and their change in Korean history. The modernized medical codes or covenants by the group of medical doctors has been made from the mid-twentieth century, although Korea has a long tradition of medical ethics, so called the Confucian medical ethics, Insul or Uido which were taken on very strong paternalistic characters. The history of the codes of medical ethics in contemporary Korea showed several revisions in 1961, 1965, 1979, and 1997 since the first establishment in 1955. Changes of political circumstances, the cultural level of the people, medical care system, and medical power leaded to the revisions. Throughout the revisions the codes or covenants of medical ethics in Korea has changed from simple translations of the codes by the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association to the reflexes of domestic medical situations; from the ones based on paternalistic doctor-patient relationship to more democratic ones; from the ones that only medical ethics were expressed to the ones that bioethics was expressed too.

  17. Global Ethics Applied: Global Ethics, Economic Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Stückelberger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Global Ethics Applied’ in four volumes is a reader of 88 selected articles from the author on 13 domains: Vol. 1 Global Ethics, Economic Ethics; Vol. 2 Environmental Ethics; Vol. 3 Development Ethics, Political Ethics, Dialogue and Peace Ethics, Innovation and Research Ethics, Information and Communication Ethics; Vol. 4 Bioethics and Medical Ethics, Family Ethics and Sexual Ethics, Leadership Ethics, Theological Ethics and Ecclesiology, Methods of Ethics. It concludes with the extended Bibli...

  18. Ethics by opinion poll? The functions of attitudes research for normative deliberations in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloch, Sabine; Vollmann, Jochen; Schildmann, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Empirical studies on people's moral attitudes regarding ethically challenging topics contribute greatly to research in medical ethics. However, it is not always clear in which ways this research adds to medical ethics as a normative discipline. In this article, we aim to provide a systematic account of the different ways in which attitudinal research can be used for normative reflection. In the first part, we discuss whether ethical judgements can be based on empirical work alone and we develop a sceptical position regarding this point, taking into account theoretical, methodological and pragmatic considerations. As empirical data should not be taken as a direct source for normative justification, we then delineate different ways in which attitudes research can be combined with theoretical accounts of normative justification in the second part of the article. Firstly, the combination of attitudes research with normative-ethical theories is analysed with respect to three different aspects: (a) The extent of empirical data which is needed, (b) the question of which kind of data is required and (c) the ways in which the empirical data are processed within the framework of an ethical theory. Secondly, two further functions of attitudes research are displayed which lie outside the traditional focus of ethical theories: the exploratory function of detecting and characterising new ethical problems, and the field of 'moral pragmatics'. The article concludes with a methodological outlook and suggestions for the concrete practice of attitudinal research in medical ethics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Developing Professional Practice and Ethics Engagement: A Leadership Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Karen M; Jurchak, Martha

    Nurse leaders are responsible for a practice environment that fosters safe, quality patient outcomes through excellence in nursing practice. This article describes a reflective practice intervention in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit of an urban academic medical center led by the unit nursing director and the hospital's nurse ethicist. The twice monthly case-based discussions, called "Nursing Practice and Ethics Rounds," were attended by staff and unit managers (nurse director, assistant nurse director, and clinical educator) and were facilitated by the nurse ethicist. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to identify nurses' perceptions of the rounds on individual practice, unit practice, and the practice of their peers. Two focus groups were conducted with nurses who attended 3 or more sessions. Staff reported that they felt valued; experienced a decrease in moral distress; and improved empathy with patients, families, and other staff members after the intervention. They also reported better understanding of ethical issues and language to better talk about them. The presence of nurse leaders was valued as affirming the importance of practice development and of witnessing the experience of staff nurses. Finally, the process of reflection was valued for the opportunity it provided to process emotional and intellectual aspects of challenging cases.

  20. The globalization of education in medical ethics and humanities: evolving pedagogy at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Pablo Rodríguez; Fins, Joseph J

    2005-02-01

    The authors discuss their experience in implementing a Medical Ethics and Humanities course for premedical students at Weill Cornell Medical College in the Arabian Gulf emirate of Qatar. The course, first offered in 2003, is designed to prepare these students for the medical school curriculum to follow and to make global medical knowledge meaningful for their local context. Pedagogical challenges included the cross-cultural tensions that could emerge when introducing themes from Western medical ethics and humanities into this overwhelmingly Islamic context. The authors outline the response to this challenge and strategies to broaden student inquiry without engaging in indoctrination. This seminar-based course was designed around seven thematic areas of increasing biopsychosocial complexity, from nature and biology, to the patient, the physician, and the family, to broader questions of hospital care, the health care system, and the place of law in modern medicine. Readings from the literature of the Western and Arabic traditions were used, including selections by Hippocrates, Thomas, Kafka, Mahfouz, and Pellegrino. It is too early to know the ultimate impact of the course, but students demonstrated enthusiasm for ethics and the medical humanities and a willingness to consider new and novel ways of knowing. The authors anticipate that this grounding in the humanities will complement the students' work in the sciences and help further develop their nascent professional identities in an increasingly global medical community.

  1. Teaching, learning and assessment of medical ethics at the UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lucy; Bell, Dominic

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the UK undergraduate medical ethics curricula against the Institute of Medical Ethics (IME) recommendations; to identify barriers to teaching and assessment of medical ethics and to evaluate perceptions of ethics faculties on the preparation of tomorrow's doctors for clinical practice. Questionnaire survey of the UK medical schools enquiring about content, structure and location of ethics teaching and learning; teaching and learning processes; assessment; influences over institutional approach to ethics education; barriers to teaching and assessment; perception of student engagement and perception of student preparation for clinical practice. The lead for medical ethics at each medical school was invited to participate (n=33). Completed responses were received from 11/33 schools (33%). 73% (n=8) teach all IME recommended topics within their programme. 64% (n=7) do not include ethics in clinical placement learning objectives. The most frequently cited barrier to teaching was lack of time (64%, n=7), and to assessment was lack of time and suitability of assessments (27%, n=3). All faculty felt students were prepared for clinical practice. IME recommendations are not followed in all cases, and ethics teaching is not universally well integrated into clinical placement. Barriers to assessment lead to inadequacies in this area, and there are few consequences for failing ethics assessments. As such, tomorrow's patients will be treated by doctors who are inadequately prepared for ethical decision making in clinical practice; this needs to be addressed by ethics leads with support from medical school authorities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Teachers' responsibility: a Socratic dialogue about teaching medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzke, Gerald; Fehr, Folkert

    2003-01-01

    Old, wise Socrates (SO) is strolling along the Agora to buy some fruit for his wife Xanthippe. He meets Paidagogos (PA),a teacher of medical ethics in the ancient Polis of Athens. Both engage in a discussion on teachers' responsibility and its implications for the design and structure of learning sessions at medical school.

  3. The ethical concerns of using medical male circumcision in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This position paper seeks to explore the ethical concerns surrounding the use of medical male circumcision as an effective method of preventing HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. The study explores research that looked at the effectiveness of medical male circumcision in clinical trials. While clinical trials reveal that ...

  4. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Jauregui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees’ perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine’s “Project Professionalism” and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Results: Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88% completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the “respect for others” and “honor and integrity” valued significantly higher (p<0.001. Significant differences were found between interns and seniors for five attributes primarily in the “duty and service” domain (p<0.05. Among different residencies, significant differences were found with attributes within the “altruism” and “duty and service” domains (p<0.05. Conclusion: Residents perceive differences in

  5. Six Values Never to Silence: Jewish Perspectives on Nazi Medical Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, Jacob M; Miller, Susan M

    2018-01-29

    An ideological case study based on medical profession norms during the Third Reich will be used to exemplify the importance of diversity in the manifestations of professional ethics. The German professional medical community banned their Jewish colleagues from treating German citizens. This included legally mandated employment discrimination and outright censure which led to a professional ethic devoid of diverse voices. While the escalation to the T-4 program and medicalized genocide was influenced by many causes, the intentional, ethnocentric-based exclusion of voices was an important contributing element to the chronicled degradation of societal mores. For illustration, six core Jewish values-life, peace, justice, mercy, scholarship, and sincerity of intention-will be detailed for their potential to inspire health-care professionals to defend and protect minorities and for readers to think critically about the role of medical professionalism in Third Reich society. The Jewish teachings highlight the inherent professional obligations physicians have toward their patients in contrast to the Third Reich's corruption of patient-centered professionalism. More fundamentally, juxtaposing Jewish and Nazi teachings exposes the loss of perspective when a profession's identity spurns diversity. To ensure respect for persons in all vulnerable minorities, the first step is addressing professional inclusion of minority voices.

  6. Six Values Never to Silence: Jewish Perspectives on Nazi Medical Professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M. Kolman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideological case study based on medical profession norms during the Third Reich will be used to exemplify the importance of diversity in the manifestations of professional ethics. The German professional medical community banned their Jewish colleagues from treating German citizens. This included legally mandated employment discrimination and outright censure which led to a professional ethic devoid of diverse voices. While the escalation to the T-4 program and medicalized genocide was influenced by many causes, the intentional, ethnocentric-based exclusion of voices was an important contributing element to the chronicled degradation of societal mores. For illustration, six core Jewish values—life, peace, justice, mercy, scholarship, and sincerity of intention—will be detailed for their potential to inspire health-care professionals to defend and protect minorities and for readers to think critically about the role of medical professionalism in Third Reich society. The Jewish teachings highlight the inherent professional obligations physicians have toward their patients in contrast to the Third Reich’s corruption of patient-centered professionalism. More fundamentally, juxtaposing Jewish and Nazi teachings exposes the loss of perspective when a profession’s identity spurns diversity. To ensure respect for persons in all vulnerable minorities, the first step is addressing professional inclusion of minority voices.

  7. Screening for depression in medical research: ethical challenges and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehan Aisling M; McGee Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Due to the important role of depression in major illnesses, screening measures for depression are commonly used in medical research. The protocol for managing participants with positive screens is unclear and raises ethical concerns. The aim of this article is to identify and critically discuss the ethical issues that arise when a positive screen for depression is detected, and offer some guidance on managing these issues. Discussion Deciding on whether to report positive ...

  8. Children in Medical Research : Ethical challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Bos (Wendy)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractPaediatric research ethics evolves around a central dilemma. Either one has to accept that many childhood diseases cannot be (properly) treated and that many children receive treatments that are not (properly) tested in children, or one has to accept that children, i.e. vulnerable

  9. Medical ethics education: thoughts on a South African medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been little development of African syllabi in bioethics that reflect the plasticity of African thought, as well as developing the skills of ethical awareness, moral reasoning and ethical practice that are appropriate for the African context. In this article a possible starting point for such a syllabus is proposed in order to ...

  10. The agency problem and medical acting: an example of applying economic theory to medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Andreas; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Brink, Alexander; Eurich, Johannes

    2009-03-01

    In this article, the authors attempt to build a bridge between economic theory and medical ethics to offer a new perspective to tackle ethical challenges in the physician-patient encounter. They apply elements of new institutional economics to the ethically relevant dimensions of the physician-patient relationship in a descriptive heuristic sense. The principal-agent theory can be used to analytically grasp existing action problems in the physician-patient relationship and as a basis for shaping recommendations at the institutional level. Furthermore, the patients' increased self-determination and modern opportunities for the medical laity to inform themselves lead to a less asymmetrical distribution of information between physician and patient and therefore require new interaction models. Based on the analysis presented here, the authors recommend that, apart from the physician's necessary individual ethics, greater consideration should be given to approaches of institutional ethics and hence to incentive systems within medical ethics.

  11. Survey of ethical issues reported by Indian medical students: basis for design of a new curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anuradha; George, Kuryan; T, Arul Dhas; Pulimood, Anna Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Education in ethics is now a formal part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. However, most courses are structured around principles and case studies more appropriate to western countries. The cultures and practices of countries like India differ from those of western countries. It is, therefore, essential that our teaching should address the issues which are the most relevant to our setting. An anonymised, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey of medical students was carried out to get a picture of the ethical problems faced by students in India. The data were categorised into issues related to professional behaviour and ethical dilemmas. Unprofessional behaviour was among the issues reported as a matter of concern by a majority of the medical students. The survey highlights the need to design the curriculum in a way that reflects the structure of medical education in India, where patients are not always considered socio-culturally equal by students or the medical staff. This perspective must underpin any further efforts to address education in ethics in India.

  12. Reflections on learning and teaching medical ethics in UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirrat, Gordon M

    2015-01-01

    The development of learning, teaching and assessment of medical ethics and law over the last 40 years is reflected upon with particular reference to the roles of the London Medical Group, the Society for the Study of Medical Ethics, its successor Institute of Medical Ethics; the Journal of Medical Ethics and the General Medical Council. Several current issues are addressed. Although the situation seems incomparably better than it was 40 years ago, the relatively recent events in Mid Staffordshire National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust show we cannot be complacent. Whatever role we have in the NHS or medical education, we must all strive to make sure it never happens again. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Preclinical medical students' understandings of academic and medical professionalism: visual analysis of mind maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczukowicz, Janusz; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-08-18

    Several studies have begun to explore medical students' understandings of professionalism generally and medical professionalism specifically. Despite espoused relationships between academic (AP) and medical professionalism (MP), previous research has not yet investigated students' conceptualisations of AP and MP and the relationships between the two. The current study, based on innovative visual analysis of mind maps, therefore aims to contribute to the developing literature on how professionalism is understood. We performed a multilayered analysis of 98 mind maps from 262 first-year medical students, including analysing textual and graphical elements of AP, MP and the relationships between AP and MP. The most common textual attributes of AP were learning, lifestyle and personality, while attributes of MP were knowledge, ethics and patient-doctor relations. Images of books, academic caps and teachers were used most often to represent AP, while images of the stethoscope, doctor and red cross were used to symbolise MP. While AP-MP relations were sometimes indicated through co-occurring text, visual connections and higher-order visual metaphors, many students struggled to articulate the relationships between AP and MP. While the mind maps' textual attributes shared similarities with those found in previous research, suggesting the universality of some professionalism attributes, our study provides new insights into students' conceptualisations of AP, MP and AP-MP relationships. We encourage medical educators to help students develop their understandings of AP, MP and AP-MP relationships, plus consider the feasibility and value of mind maps as a source of visual data for medical education research. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Preclinical medical students’ understandings of academic and medical professionalism: visual analysis of mind maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have begun to explore medical students’ understandings of professionalism generally and medical professionalism specifically. Despite espoused relationships between academic (AP) and medical professionalism (MP), previous research has not yet investigated students’ conceptualisations of AP and MP and the relationships between the two. Objectives The current study, based on innovative visual analysis of mind maps, therefore aims to contribute to the developing literature on how professionalism is understood. Methods We performed a multilayered analysis of 98 mind maps from 262 first-year medical students, including analysing textual and graphical elements of AP, MP and the relationships between AP and MP. Results The most common textual attributes of AP were learning, lifestyle and personality, while attributes of MP were knowledge, ethics and patient-doctor relations. Images of books, academic caps and teachers were used most often to represent AP, while images of the stethoscope, doctor and red cross were used to symbolise MP. While AP-MP relations were sometimes indicated through co-occurring text, visual connections and higher-order visual metaphors, many students struggled to articulate the relationships between AP and MP. Conclusions While the mind maps’ textual attributes shared similarities with those found in previous research, suggesting the universality of some professionalism attributes, our study provides new insights into students’ conceptualisations of AP, MP and AP-MP relationships. We encourage medical educators to help students develop their understandings of AP, MP and AP-MP relationships, plus consider the feasibility and value of mind maps as a source of visual data for medical education research. PMID:28821520

  15. Legal, Professional and Ethical Issues: The Use of Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drier, Harry N.

    This monograph deals with normative ethics, or the application of ethical principles in judging the rightness or wrongness of actions. Specifically, the monograph addresses normative ethics in the use of automated systems in the field and practice of counseling and guidance. It is noted that the immense growth planned for computer applications in…

  16. Are Professional Codes of Ethics Relevant for Multicultural Counselling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, Jean L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes progressive developments in the codes of ethics of the Canadian Psychological Association and the Canadian Counselling Association in defining moral and ethical principles and in providing an ethical decision-making process. Argues that new developments within the profession promote increased understanding and sensitivity to cultural…

  17. Awareness and Practice of Professional Ethics amongst Librarians in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbeka, J. U.; Okoroma, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    This study is focused on the awareness and practicability of Librarianship ethics amongst librarians. Survey questionnaire was designed to identify the degree of awareness of librarianship ethics amongst librarians in Nigeria, whether the ethics are feasible and being utilized by librarians in their day to day library management, and to find out…

  18. Ethical issues associated with medical tourism in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogaka, John J. O.; Mupara, Lucia; Tsoka-Gwegweni, Joyce M

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Global disparities in medical technologies, laws, economic inequities, and social–cultural differences drive medical tourism (MT), the practice of travelling to consume healthcare that is either too delayed, unavailable, unaffordable or legally proscribed at home. Africa is simultaneously a source and destination for MT. MT however, presents a new and challenging health ethics frontier, being largely unregulated and characterized by policy contradictions, minority discrimination and conflict of interest among role-players. This article assesses the level of knowledge of MT and its associated ethical issues in Africa; it also identifies critical research gaps on the subject in the region. Exploratory design guided by Arksey and O’Malley’s (2005) framework was used. Key search terms and prior determined exclusion/inclusion criteria were used to identify relevant literature sources. Fifty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Distributive justice, healthcare resource allocation, experimental treatments and organ transplant were the most common ethical issues of medical tourism in Africa. The dearth of robust engagement of MT and healthcare ethics, as identified through this review, calls for more rigorous research on this subject. Although the bulk of the medical tourism industry is driven by global legal disparities based on ethical considerations, little attention has been given to this subject. PMID:28740618

  19. Ethical issues associated with medical tourism in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogaka, John J O; Mupara, Lucia; Tsoka-Gwegweni, Joyce M

    2017-01-01

    Global disparities in medical technologies, laws, economic inequities, and social-cultural differences drive medical tourism (MT), the practice of travelling to consume healthcare that is either too delayed, unavailable, unaffordable or legally proscribed at home. Africa is simultaneously a source and destination for MT. MT however, presents a new and challenging health ethics frontier, being largely unregulated and characterized by policy contradictions, minority discrimination and conflict of interest among role-players. This article assesses the level of knowledge of MT and its associated ethical issues in Africa; it also identifies critical research gaps on the subject in the region. Exploratory design guided by Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) framework was used. Key search terms and prior determined exclusion/inclusion criteria were used to identify relevant literature sources. Fifty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Distributive justice, healthcare resource allocation, experimental treatments and organ transplant were the most common ethical issues of medical tourism in Africa. The dearth of robust engagement of MT and healthcare ethics, as identified through this review, calls for more rigorous research on this subject. Although the bulk of the medical tourism industry is driven by global legal disparities based on ethical considerations, little attention has been given to this subject.

  20. Medical Professionals Designing Hospital Management Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Vibeke

    especially have been reformed due to the high proportion of resources they absorb and the apparent difficulty of prioritizing and coordinating health care within hospitals. There is abundant research literature on the topic of reforming hospital management models. Lacking from the literature, however......, is insight into how we can understand and explain how medical professionals adapt hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models that are global in their influence in hospital organizations. The aim of this dissertation is to understand and explain how medical professionals...... adapt, interpret and negotiate hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models in hospital organizations in the Nordic health system context, illustrated by the Danish health system....

  1. Ethical values in emergency medical services: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Anders; Herrera, María Jiménez; Axelsson, Christer; Martí, Dolors Burjalés; Sandman, Lars; Casali, Gian Luca

    2015-12-01

    Ambulance professionals often address conflicts between ethical values. As individuals' values represent basic convictions of what is right or good and motivate behaviour, research is needed to understand their value profiles. To translate and adapt the Managerial Values Profile to Spanish and Swedish, and measure the presence of utilitarianism, moral rights and/or social justice in ambulance professionals' value profiles in Spain and Sweden. The instrument was translated and culturally adapted. A content validity index was calculated. Pilot tests were carried out with 46 participants. This study conforms to the ethical principles for research involving human subjects and adheres to national laws and regulations concerning informed consent and confidentiality. Spanish professionals favoured justice and Swedish professionals' rights in their ambulance organizations. Both countries favoured utilitarianism least. Gender differences across countries showed that males favoured rights. Spanish female professionals favoured justice most strongly of all. Swedes favour rights while Spaniards favour justice. Both contexts scored low on utilitarianism focusing on total population effect, preferring the opposite, individualized approach of the rights and justice perspectives. Organizational investment in a utilitarian perspective might jeopardize ambulance professionals' moral right to make individual assessments based on the needs of the patient at hand. Utilitarianism and a caring ethos appear as stark opposites. However, a caring ethos in its turn might well involve unreasonable demands on the individual carer's professional role. Since both the justice and rights perspectives portrayed in the survey mainly concern relationship to the organization and peers within the organization, this relationship might at worst be given priority over the equal treatment and moral rights of the patient. A balanced view on ethical perspectives is needed to make professionals observant and

  2. Anatomy research under the knife of medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W M S; Archana, R; Prathibha, K M; Johnson, Priscilla

    2015-04-01

    There is increased awareness and anxiety in conducting research for publication and at the same time ignorance about getting Ethical Committee clearance at least in Anatomy Departments among Basic Medical Sciences. While people are actively presenting papers, collect data, Indian Council for Medical Research guidelines does not cover aspects pertaining to Anatomy oriented research activities. This review article is an eye opener for fraternity in the medical field, especially in anatomy.

  3. Anatomy research under the knife of medical ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. S. Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increased awareness and anxiety in conducting research for publication and at the same time ignorance about getting Ethical Committee clearance at least in Anatomy Departments among Basic Medical Sciences. While people are actively presenting papers, collect data, Indian Council for Medical Research guidelines does not cover aspects pertaining to Anatomy oriented research activities. This review article is an eye opener for fraternity in the medical field, especially in anatomy.

  4. [Medical professionalism-on social responsibilities viewed from historical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang Han

    2015-03-01

    What is medical professionalism and does it matter to the patients? Medical professionals take responsibility for their judgements and the consequences that ensue. Traditionally medical professionalism is defined as a set of values, behaviors, and relationships which support the trust the public has in doctors. The public is well aware that absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is endangered by the political and cultural environment. The values of professionalism have been changed throughout the medical history and the meaning of it was also changed according to social theories. Traditional medical professionalism was based on the virtue of autonomy, self-regulation and competency etc. However, in the new millenium era, the meaning of professionalism has changed under the concept of responsibility which includes the classical virtues. The meaning of professionalism nowadays is only based on the structure and conflicting theories which cannot solve all the issues surrounding professionalism in medical practice. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. The interaction between doctor and patient is central to the medical care, and medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of medical care. I argue that doctors have responsibility to act according to the values which have been determined by the medical profession, history and surrounding society. The new millennium medical professionalism which based on the responsibility could initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a fairer society.

  5. Teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism: in Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Merril A

    2012-12-01

    To document the scope of the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism in Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs, and to identify barriers to the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism. A survey was developed in collaboration with the Committee on Ethics of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. The data are reported descriptively and in aggregate. Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs. Between June and December of 2008, all 17 Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs were invited to participate. The first part of the survey explored the structure, resources, methods, scheduled hours, and barriers to teaching ethics and professionalism. The second section focused on end-of-rotation evaluations, other evaluation strategies, and barriers related to the evaluation of ethics and professionalism. Eighty-eight percent of programs completed the survey. Most respondents (87%) had learning objectives specifically for ethics and professionalism, and 87% had family doctors with training or interest in the area leading their efforts. Two-thirds of responding programs had less than 10 hours of scheduled instruction per year, and the most common barriers to effective teaching were the need for faculty development, competing learning needs, and lack of resident interest. Ninety-three percent of respondents assessed ethics and professionalism on their end-of-rotation evaluations, with 86% assessing specific domains. The most common barriers to evaluation were a lack of suitable tools and a lack of faculty comfort and interest. By far most Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs had learning objectives and designated faculty leads in ethics and professionalism, yet there was little curricular time dedicated to these areas and a perceived lack of resident interest and faculty expertise. Most programs evaluated ethics and professionalism as part of their end-of-rotation evaluations, but

  6. Qualitative analysis of healthcare professionals' viewpoints on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Brian S; Shank, Gary; Carlson, Jestin N; Venkat, Arvind

    2015-03-01

    Ethics consultation is a commonly applied mechanism to address clinical ethical dilemmas. However, there is little information on the viewpoints of health care providers towards the relevance of ethics committees and appropriate application of ethics consultation in clinical practice. We sought to use qualitative methodology to evaluate free-text responses to a case-based survey to identify thematically the views of health care professionals towards the role of ethics committees in resolving clinical ethical dilemmas. Using an iterative and reflexive model we identified themes that health care providers support a role for ethics committees and hospitals in resolving clinical ethical dilemmas, that the role should be one of mediation, rather than prescription, but that ultimately legal exposure was dispositive compared to ethical theory. The identified theme of legal fears suggests that the mediation role of ethics committees is viewed by health care professionals primarily as a practical means to avoid more worrisome medico-legal conflict.

  7. Unwanted pregnancy--medical and ethical dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, J

    2003-03-01

    Globally, abortion mortality accounts for approximately 13% of all maternal mortality. Unsafe abortion procedures, untrained abortion providers, restrictive abortion laws and high maternal mortality and morbidity from abortion tend to occur together. Unplanned and unwanted pregnancies constitute a serious public health responsibility. While fertility has declined by half in developing countries, the motivation to control and space births has risen faster than the rate of contraceptive use. Preventing maternal mortality and morbidity from abortion in countries where these remain high is a matter of good public health policy and medical practice, and constitutes an important part of safe motherhood initiatives. A range of positive steps has been taken to reduce deaths and morbidity from abortion in a growing number of countries over the past 15 years. Making abortion legal is an essential prerequisite in making it safe. In this respect, changing the law does matter and assertions to the contrary are ill conceived and unsupported in practice. Although, in many countries, trends towards safer abortion have often occurred prior to or in the absence of changes in the law, legal changes need to take place if safety is to be sustained for all women. Religious laws may also require attention when legal change is being contemplated. There are three main ways of approaching this problem: liberalizing the existing law within the penal or criminal code; partially or fully legalizing abortion through a positive law or a court ruling; and decriminalising abortion by taking it out of the law. Women's health groups and other advocates, parliamentarians and health professionals, can work together to support the right of women not to die from unsafe abortions and to ensure they receive treatment for complications. Committed doctors can make a difference by providing treatment for abortion complications, interpreting the law in a liberal way and providing safe services where these are

  8. The professional responsibility of lawyers: emotional competence, multiculturalism and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Marjorie A

    2006-05-01

    Traditional legal education and the Socratic method it utilises are by and large successful at training lawyers to think, reason and analyse. The cultivation of lawyers' intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, however, has been, at best, neglected by the profession. All lawyers, like all human beings, are emotional. Emotions affect who they are and how they practise law, whether or not they are conscious of them. As emotions cannot be removed from the practice of law, it is essential that lawyers learn to understand and manage their emotions, as well as learn to be attuned to their clients' emotional lives. Ignorance of concepts such as countertransference, denial and unconscious bias adversely impact the lawyer-client relationship. Lawyers who understand basic psychological principles and behaviours, who are aware of their own psychological makeup, understand their cultural perspective and recognise and credit their clients' differences, will enhance their effectiveness as counsellors. The client whose lawyer has these competencies will enjoy a therapeutically superior counselling or representational experience. The neglect of either the lawyer's or the client's emotional life threatens to sabotage the lawyer's ability, and thus professional responsibility, to render competent and impartial legal advice. Through drawing parallels to the training and practice in other counselling disciplines and relationships, this article argues that psychological-mindedness and multicultural competence are essential elements of ethically responsible legal representation.

  9. The cultural and philosophical foundations of normative medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T P

    1994-11-01

    Thirty years ago, the idea that culture and philosophy could provide a foundation for normative medical ethics was more easily entertained than it is today when the very notion of a norm, whether culturally, philosophically or ethically derived, is in itself a problem. In large measure this comes from our contemporary embrace of cultural and philosophical pluralism and an increasing tendency to exchange the difficult belief in abstract and universally applicable norms for the more accessible notion that ethical values are cultural and relative derivatives. Despite this, in the face of the unprecedented ethical dilemmas presented by modern medicine, we have attempted to apply traditional ethical norms and analysis to modern medicine to establish a consensus for its right practice. Unfortunately, the attempt has not been successful, so that wherever we turn we find that ethical problems in medicine remain intractable and unresolved. That, in turn, has prompted a certain scepticism about the efficacy of ethics in medicine. In order to understand why we have reached this impasse, it is essential to realize that we have seriously underestimated the way science and technology have informed and, as a consequence, transformed the practice of medicine. Contributing to this, our tendency to think of technology simply as a way of doing things has blinded us to the fact that it is more fundamentally a way of thinking, knowing and valuing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. [Development of a code of professional conduct for medical students and residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Young-Mee; Kwon, Hyo Jin

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of a code of professional conduct that should be practiced by medical students and residents. The content of a draft version of a code of professional conduct was generated through extensive literature reviews and the results of surveys that were administered to students and residents. The content validity for the draft version was reviewed by an expert panel: five experts in medical ethics and eight specialists in medical education. The survey was distributed as an email questionnaire and included closed-ended items and open comments. SPSS for Windows version 12.0 (SPSS Inc.) was used for the analysis. After analyzing the experts' reviews and holding a reiterative discussion, we developed the final version of a code of conduct for professional behavior. It consists of nine categories and 44 items for students and 44 items for residents. The nine categories were academic integrity, responsibility during clerkship or hospital work, endeavor to improve clinical competency, respect for patients and keeping confidentiality, honesty in patient care, boundary issues and conflicts of interests, impaired physician behaviors, respect for others, and research ethics. Because our code of conduct for professional behaviors cannot extensively include all aspects of medical professionalism, we focused on behaviors that can be used to monitor and prevent misconduct by medical learners. Further studies and discourse among stakeholders should be performed to develop a national consensus statement or code of conduct to reinforce professionalism for learners in medicine.

  11. Clinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Condell, Sarah L

    2012-11-01

    Gaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early \\'rite of passage\\' in the category of \\'labouring the doctorate\\'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of \\'medicalized\\' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.

  12. [Illness, culture and religion--issues of intercultural medical ethics and nursing ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körtner, Ulrich H J

    2007-01-01

    Should modern medicine be allowed to do what it is capable of? And what role are religious norms and attitudes to play in both the medical course of life and the bioethical discourse of modern societies? Questions like these are subject of current intercultural medical and nursing ethics. Religious attitudes not only influence the cultural and political surroundings of medical research but also exert a practical influence on the health and illness attitudes of the individual. Coming before moral judgement should be the endeavour to understand one's counterpart, namely the patient, and his/her socio-cultural background. The question to be answered is how therapy and nursing can best be applied within the given socio-cultural framework without those responsible denying their own medical premises or their own concepts of nursing. Intercultural medical and nursing ethics provide an important contribution to the current debate on integration.

  13. ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT IN ACCOUNTING – ANALYSIS BASED ON CONCEPTUAL MAPS

    OpenAIRE

    Oana DRĂGAN

    2016-01-01

    Analyzed in the context of global economic, business ethics and professional judgment becomes increasingly complex, with reflection in all economic fields, including also the accounting profession. This study has the objective to identify the perception of the practitioners in financial accounting on the ethics seen from the perspective of their practical activity which they carry as employees in accounting companies, or as entrepreneurs. The results of the study shows that both ethics an...

  14. Religious morality (and secular humanism) in Western civilization as precursors to medical ethics: A historic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    In discussing bioethics and the formulation of neuroethics, the question has arisen as to whether secular humanism should be the sole philosophical guiding light, to the exclusion of any discussion (or even mention) of religious morality, in professional medical ethics. In addition, the question has arisen as to whether freedom or censorship should be part of medical (and neuroscience) journalism. Should independent medical journals abstain from discussing certain issues, or should only the major medical journals — i.e., the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) or Lancet — be heard, speaking with one “consensual,” authoritative voice? This issue is particularly important in controversial topics impacting medical politics — e.g., public health policy, socio-economics, bioethics, and the so-called redistributive justice in health care. Should all sides be heard when those controversial topics are discussed or only a consensual (monolithic) side? This historical review article discusses those issues and opts for freedom in medical and surgical practice as well as freedom in medical journalism, particularly in opinion pieces such as editorials, commentaries, or letters to the editor, as long as they relate to medicine and, in our special case, to neuroscience and neurosurgery. After answering those questions, and in response to a critical letter to the editor, this review article then expounds comprehensively on the historical and philosophical origins of ethics and religious morality. Necessarily, we discuss the Graeco-Roman legacy and the Judeo-Christian inheritance in the development of ethics and religious morality in Western civilization and their impact on moral conduct in general and on medical and neuroscience ethics in particular. PMID:26110085

  15. The use of narrative in Jewish medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotkowitz, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Anne Jones has pointed out that over the last three decades, stories have been important to medical ethics in at least three ways: (1). Stories as cases for teaching principle-based medical ethics (2). Narratives for moral guides on what is considered living a good life (3). Stories as testimonials written by both patients and physicians. A pioneer in this effort, particularly in regard to using narratives as moral guides, has been the ethicist and philosopher Stanley Hauerwas. Heavily influenced by virtue ethics, Hauerwas believes that it is a person's particular narrative tradition that provides one with convictions that form the basis of one's morality. Befitting a Protestant theologian, he is particularly concerned with the Christian narrative. From a Jewish perspective, there has been much less written on the use of narrative in medical ethics. However, it is a mistake to think that narrative has little, if any, role in Rabbinic ethical decision making. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the centrality of narrative in the thought of Orthodox Jewish decisors and the problems inherent in this methodology.

  16. Publication misconduct among medical professionals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Dhulika; Mishra, Devendra

    2014-04-01

    This study was planned as an exploratory study to determine the extent of occurrence of misconduct in publication (gift-authorship,ghost-authorship, falsification of data, fabrication of data,plagiarism, and duplication) amongst biomedical researchers.It was a questionnaire-based study, conducted at 9 institutions;6 medical colleges (4 government-run and 2 private), 7 non teaching government hospital, and 2 corporate hospitals, located in northern, central and southern India. The study was conducted between August 2072 and March 2073. 755 senior residents (information was collected. In addition to personal characteristics, the information collected included their knowledge of publication ethics, their opinions about the prevalence of these practices among their colleagues, and details of any first-hand information on publication misconduct. 7 55 responses were included for analysis. 7 4 7 (9 7 %) respondents agreed that they had some knowledge of publication ethics; but only 29% believed it was adequate. The most commonly observed misconduct was offering gift authorship, reported by 707 (65%); followed by alteration of data reported by 88 (56%). Plagiarism was observed by 83 respondents (53%); while 52 (33.5%) respondents had observed a colleague's name being omitted from a paper to which she/he had significantly contributed. A majority of respondents in the present study reported witnessing publication misconduct,thereby revealing the common occurrence of this problem among Indian biomedical researchers.

  17. HPV, oropharyngeal cancer, and the role of the dentist: a professional ethical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E; Manji, Naila; Piamonte, Romney T; More, Frederick G; Katz, Ralph V

    2012-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an emerging risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer, especially among younger patients, and must be thoughtfully addressed by the dental community. The professional ethical decision-making model first advanced by Ozar and Sokol for use by dentists at chairside (define the dilemma, assess the facts, identify and rank the alternatives, and choose a course of action) was modified to delineate clearly inputs, considerations, and feedback loops based on what is professionally and ethically at stake in advising patients. As the link between HPV and oropharyngeal cancer is established through scientific studies, the role of the dentist in primary and secondary prevention will be crucial. In the absence of definitive evidence, the professional ethical decision-making framework presented here allows dentists to systematically work through available alternatives. Ultimately, the role of the dentist is to use discretion in choosing a professional and ethical course of action for each patient.

  18. Professional Military Ethics and the Laws of War: More Important Now than Ever Before

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harrison, Frank

    2006-01-01

    .... In war, professional military ethics are inextricably woven into the fabric of the decision-making process and, along with other critical elements like desired end state and the laws of war, make...

  19. Drones--ethical considerations and medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Drones enhance military capability and form a potent element of force protection, allowing humans to be removed from hazardous environments and tedious jobs. However, there are moral, legal, and political dangers associated with their use. Although a time may come when it is possible to develop a drone that is able to autonomously and ethically engage a legitimate target with greater reliability than a human, until then military drones demand a crawl-walk-run development methodology, consent by military personnel for weapon use, and continued debate about the complex issues surrounding their deployment.

  20. Training and Performance Improvement Professionals' Perspectives on Ethical Challenges during Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyung, Seung Youn; Winiecki, Donald J.; Downing, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    Ethical concerns are rising in the business world. With this in mind, training and performance improvement practitioners, especially during evaluation projects, should be aware of principles and codes of ethics, and their behaviors and decisions should reflect the standards recognized by members of the professional society. A study was conducted…

  1. Writing about Clients: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon

    2010-01-01

    From the standpoint of a former journal editor and long-time professional, this commentary challenges the direction of the profession as demonstrated in this special section. The ongoing creation of more and more ethical constraints not only harms the profession but also loses sight of fundamental ethical principles.

  2. A Correlational Study: Code of Ethics in Testing and EFL Instructors' Professional Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hamid; Kafi, Zahra; Saeedan, Azaam

    2018-01-01

    The present study has aimed at delving the code of ethics in testing in English language institutions to see how far adhering to these ethical codes will result in EFL teachers' professional behavior. Therefore, 300 EFL instructors teaching at English language schools in Khorasan Razavi Province, Zabansara Language School, as well as Khorasan…

  3. Professional Ethics Education for Future Teachers: A Narrative Review of the Scholarly Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Schwimmer, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a narrative review of the scholarly writings on professional ethics education for future teachers. Against the background of a widespread belief among scholars working in this area that longstanding and sustained research and reflection on the ethics of teaching have had little impact on the teacher education curriculum, the…

  4. Values of financial services professionals and the global financial crisis as a crisis of ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, André van

    2013-01-01

    Many attribute the global financial crisis (GFC) to the ethical values of the people involved, financial services professionals (FSPs) such as stockbrokers or fund managers. The crisis-of-ethics debate is important, concerning one of the main policy challenges of our times, but is based on popular

  5. Infusing Professional Ethics into Counselor Education Programs: A Multicultural/Social Justice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack-Brown, Sherlon P.; Thomas, Tequilla L.; Seymour, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Multiculturalism and social justice counseling issues influence counselors' ethical thinking and behavior. Counselor educators are responsible for facilitating students' understanding of the relevance of multicultural/social justice counseling issues and ethical standards for professional practices. Added insights in these areas aid students to…

  6. A qualitative thematic content analysis of medical students' essays on professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Youn; Shon, Changwoo; Kwon, Oh Young; Yoon, Tai Young; Kwon, Ivo

    2017-05-03

    Physicians in both Western and Eastern countries are being confronted by changes in health care delivery systems and medical professionalism values. The traditional concept of "In-Sul" (benevolent art) and the modern history of South Korea have led to cultural differences between South Korea and other countries in conceptualizing medical professionalism; thus, we studied medical students' perceptions of professionalism as described in essays written on this topic. In 2014, we asked 109 first-year medical students who were enrolled in a compulsory ethics course to anonymously write a description of an instance of medical professionalism that they had witnessed, as well as reflecting on their own professional context. We then processed 105 valid essays using thematic content analysis with computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software. Thematic analysis of the students' essays revealed two core aspects of professionalism in South Korea, one focused on respect for patients and the other on physicians' accountability. The most common theme regarding physician-patient relationships was trust. By contrast, distributive justice was thought to be a non-essential aspect of professionalism. In Western countries, physicians tend to promote justice in the health care system, including fair distribution of medical resources; however, we found that medical students in South Korea were more inclined to emphasize doctors' relationships with patients. Medical educators should develop curricular interventions regarding medical professionalism to meet the legitimate needs of patients in their own culture. Because professionalism is a dynamic construct of culture, medical educators should reaffirm cultural context-specific definitions of professionalism for development of associated curricula.

  7. The Australian Medical Council draft code of professional conduct: good practice or creeping authoritarianism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komesaroff, Paul A; Kerridge, Ian H

    2009-02-16

    In preparation for a national medical registration system, the Australian Medical Council has proposed a code of conduct ("the Code") that provides a comprehensive description of how doctors should behave. While containing much that will be widely acceptable to doctors, the Code has some major weaknesses: Many of its provisions focus on values and aspirations of a very general nature and will be impossible to enforce. It is based on a narrow, culturally specific view of medicine and ethics that does not reflect the multicultural diversity of Australian society. It confuses the roles of ethics and law in medicine, leading to inappropriate and mistaken injunctions about decision making and responsibilities. In place of the existing, effective, democratic and devolved (if imperfect) system of ethical and professional decision making, it threatens to establish a centralised, authoritarian regime. Because of its limited, ideological view of medicine, its implementation would impoverish medical practice and erode the ability to respond to individual circumstances and needs.

  8. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypinazar, Valmae A; Margolis, Stephen A

    2004-07-30

    Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a six-year undergraduate program studying medicine in English, their second language at a medical school in the Arabian Gulf. The ethics teaching was based on the four-principle approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice) and delivered by a non-Muslim native English speaker with no knowledge of the Arabic language. Although the course was respectful of Arabic culture and tradition, the content excluded an analysis of Islamic medical ethics and focused on Western ethical reasoning. Following two 45-minute interactive seminars, students in groups of 3 or 4 visited a primary health care centre for one morning, sitting in with an attending physician seeing his or her patients in Arabic. Each student submitted a personal report for summative assessment detailing the ethical issues they had observed. All 62 students enrolled in these courses participated. Each student acting independently was able to correctly identify a median number of 4 different medical ethical issues (range 2-9) and correctly identify and label accurately a median of 2 different medical ethical issues (range 2-7) There were no significant correlations between their English language skills or general academic ability and the number or accuracy of ethical issues identified. This study has demonstrated that these students could identify medical ethical issues based on Western constructs, despite learning in English, their second language, being in the third week of their medical school experience and with minimal instruction

  9. Western medical ethics taught to junior medical students can cross cultural and linguistic boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about teaching medical ethics across cultural and linguistic boundaries. This study examined two successive cohorts of first year medical students in a six year undergraduate MBBS program. Methods The objective was to investigate whether Arabic speaking students studying medicine in an Arabic country would be able to correctly identify some of the principles of Western medical ethical reasoning. This cohort study was conducted on first year students in a six-year undergraduate program studying medicine in English, their second language at a medical school in the Arabian Gulf. The ethics teaching was based on the four-principle approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice and delivered by a non-Muslim native English speaker with no knowledge of the Arabic language. Although the course was respectful of Arabic culture and tradition, the content excluded an analysis of Islamic medical ethics and focused on Western ethical reasoning. Following two 45-minute interactive seminars, students in groups of 3 or 4 visited a primary health care centre for one morning, sitting in with an attending physician seeing his or her patients in Arabic. Each student submitted a personal report for summative assessment detailing the ethical issues they had observed. Results All 62 students enrolled in these courses participated. Each student acting independently was able to correctly identify a median number of 4 different medical ethical issues (range 2–9 and correctly identify and label accurately a median of 2 different medical ethical issues (range 2–7 There were no significant correlations between their English language skills or general academic ability and the number or accuracy of ethical issues identified. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that these students could identify medical ethical issues based on Western constructs, despite learning in English, their second language, being in the third

  10. The role of professional knowledge in case-based reasoning in practical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, Rosa Lynn; Gloeckner, Claire; Fortunato, Angela

    2015-06-01

    The use of case-based reasoning in teaching professional ethics has come of age. The fields of medicine, engineering, and business all have incorporated ethics case studies into leading textbooks and journal articles, as well as undergraduate and graduate professional ethics courses. The most recent guidelines from the National Institutes of Health recognize case studies and face-to-face discussion as best practices to be included in training programs for the Responsible Conduct of Research. While there is a general consensus that case studies play a central role in the teaching of professional ethics, there is still much to be learned regarding how professionals learn ethics using case-based reasoning. Cases take many forms, and there are a variety of ways to write them and use them in teaching. This paper reports the results of a study designed to investigate one of the issues in teaching case-based ethics: the role of one's professional knowledge in learning methods of moral reasoning. Using a novel assessment instrument, we compared case studies written and analyzed by three groups of students whom we classified as: (1) Experts in a research domain in bioengineering. (2) Novices in a research domain in bioengineering. (3) The non-research group--students using an engineering domain in which they were interested but had no in-depth knowledge. This study demonstrates that a student's level of understanding of a professional knowledge domain plays a significant role in learning moral reasoning skills.

  11. Treatment of Deaf Clients: Ethical Considerations for Professionals in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, Cassandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Providing therapy to deaf clients raises important ethical considerations for psychologists related to competence; multiple relationships and boundary issues; confidentiality; assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; and communication and using interpreters. In evaluating and addressing these, psychologists must consider the APA’s Ethics Code and other relevant issues (e.g., ADA) necessary to provide ethical treatment. The current article provides background, ethical considerations, principles and standards relevant to the treatment of deaf clients, and recommendations to support psychologists, training programs, and the field. Psychologists have the responsibility to guarantee that the benefits of mental health treatment are fairly and justly provided to this traditionally underserved population. PMID:27917030

  12. Medical Business Ethics in the XXI century; Deontologia medica del siglo XXI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya Pueyo, V.

    2009-07-01

    Since ancient times the medical professional practice included moral rules in order to assure a correct approach of capital problems. These rules evolve and are now gathered in the Deontological Codes watching the Constitution and other higher Laws. There has been an increase of interest for none strictly clinical matter since the appearance of the term Bioethics. The book Deontologia medica en el siglo XXI tackles problems of first interest in the present times, thru statistics and analysis, trying to help the medical doctors that have to take ethic decisions. (Author)

  13. Investigating Awareness Amount of Nursing Students of Medical Sciences University of Bushehr about Ethic in Nursing Profession -2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Jahanpour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Nurses' ethical responsibility in practice and care is required to be aware of the principles of professional ethics. The aim of this study was to determine nursing students' knowledge of ethics in nursing of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present analytical-descriptive sectional study, in which the participants are 4-8 semester nursing students of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. The research tools for collecting information were tow-section questionnaires consisting of demographic data and specialized questions about ethic and rules in the nursing profession. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS software by using independent t-tests and chi-square. Results: Total awareness of 4-8 semester nursing students about ethic and rules in nursing profession was intermediate (53.78 percent. There was a considerable relation between sexuality and satisfaction (p.436. A considerable relation between students' educational semester and satisfaction amount was not also not observed (p>.927. Conclusions: Students' awareness about professional ethic wasn't very desirable so it is suggested that by holding moral workshops in nursing or settling moral courses in nursing students curriculum will increase the amount of nursing students' awareness about nursing ethics.

  14. Medical ethics and law: assessing the core curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Angela

    2014-10-01

    The Institute of Medical Ethics (IME) has produced a guide to the assessment of medical ethics and law (MEL) in UK medical schools which is available on-line. It complements the work which was carried out in 2010 to up-date the MEL consensus statement on what should be considered core content. The guide aims to provide practical help for teachers on what, when and how to assess medical students' learning. The briefing paper gives a background introduction to the guide, outlines its purpose and plans for future work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Writing Professional Codes of Ethics to Introduce Ethics in Business Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching ethics in a business writing class. Discusses the use of a fictional case study and the writing of a code of conduct and ethics for the occupation the students hope to join. (SR)

  16. Making sense of assessment in medical ethics and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, Al

    2014-10-01

    Are curricula in medical ethics and law effective in producing ethical doctors? Assessment is central to this question, both in setting the standards that students are expected to meet and in establishing the extent to which learning correlates with these. Medical ethics and law: a practical guide to the assessment of the core content of learning from the Education Steering Group of the Institute of Medical Ethics is an excellent guide for educators in approaching this curriculum task. If the teaching moment is temporally antecedent to assessment, it is not logically prior to assessment decisions as if these were simply retrospective, and we cannot speak meaningfully of assessment without also speaking of intended learning. The IME assessment guide places emphasis on the alignment of learning, teaching and assessment in curriculum design; on specifying in advance the learning opportunities available to students; on delivering these via appropriate forms of learning; and on matching suitable methods for testing this learning in both summative and formative modes. Variety in assessment is essential across the cognitive, the affective and the psychomotor domains of learning, and the IME assessment guide provides illustrative examples of, and templates for, types of assessment that are relevant to these. The practical advice offered is as applicable in schools of nursing and in dental schools as it is in medical education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. An ethical dilemma: coding medical records for reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, L A

    1992-01-01

    Coding accuracy is difficult enough with inconsistent and incomplete medical records adding to the challenge. But since the HCFA implementation of DRGs in 1983 to determine Medicare payments, coding has taken on an ethical dimension. In this article Leslie Ann Fox discusses the causes underlying this dilemma and proposes some solutions.

  18. Medical ethics: a survey of general practitioners' attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, J. W. M.; Shaw, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was used to investigate general practitioners' attitudes to several issues of medical ethics: artificial insemination, contraception, termination of pregnancy, euthanasia and criteria for brain death. The 500 doctors surveyed were all practising in the west of Scotland; 301 forms were returned (60 per cent response).

  19. Medical ethics in sub-Sahara Africa: closing the gaps.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Center, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria. 2. ... is a need for periodic education on clinical ethics in our hospitals. .... Dental technicians. 14. 4.6 .... mental ill health or a minor. In health care practice, respecting people's autonomy ... divulge the highly private and sensitive information that.

  20. Survey of Professional Ethics of Teachers in Institutions of Higher Education: Case Study of an Institution in Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lou; Hui, Song

    2005-01-01

    The standard of professional ethics among teachers directly determines the educational standards of a school; they are an essential component of education. In order to clarify the current situation with regard to the professional ethics of teachers in institutions of higher education, this article analyzes how society evaluates those ethics and…

  1. Chinese physicians' attitudes toward and understanding of medical professionalism: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Linying; Yin, Xiuyun; Bao, Xiaolei; Nie, Jin-Bao

    2014-01-01

    on responses to the survey, Chinese physicians strongly support the majority of the fundamental principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism, including dedication, altruism, social justice, self-regulation, and informed consent. However, their support for the primacy of patients' welfare as a general principle, and the physician's responsibility to report medical errors and incompetent colleagues, is relatively low. To help advance medical professionalism in the People's Republic of China, professional development programs and medical ethics education should not only emphasize the general principles involved, but also formulate guidelines on how these principles can be carried out in practice. Copyright 2014 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  2. Cinemeducation: A pilot student project using movies to help students learn medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumlertgul, Nuttha; Kijpaisalratana, Naruchorn; Pityaratstian, Nuttorn; Wangsaturaka, Danai

    2009-07-01

    Using movies has been accepted worldwide as a tool to help students learn medical professionalism. In the second year, a group of medical students conducted the "Cinemeducation" project to promote professionalism in the "Medical Ethics and Critical Thinking" course. Five movies with professionalism issues were screened with 20-30 students attending each session. After the show, participants then were asked to reflect on what they had learned in terms of professionalism. Two students led group discussion emphasizing questioning and argumentation for 60 min. Additional learning issues emerging from each session were also explored in more depth and arranged into a report. In the Cinemeducation Project, medical students have learned five main ethical issues in each film, which were the doctor-patient relationship, informed consent and clinical trials in patients, management of genetic disorders, patient management, and brain death and organ transplantation. In addition to issues of professionalism, they also developed critical thinking and moral reasoning skills. Using a case-based scenario in movies has proven to be an effective and entertaining method of facilitating students with learning on professionalism.

  3. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    OpenAIRE

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-01-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justic...

  4. Telling the truth: medical students' progress with an ethical skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat Burn, Carine; Hurst, Samia A; Ummel, Marinette; Cerutti, Bernard; Baroffio, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Truth-telling is a complex task requiring multiple skills in communication, understanding, and empathy. Its application in the context of breaking bad news (BBN) is distressing and problematic if conducted with insufficient skills. We investigated the long-term influence of a simulated patient-based teaching intervention integrating the learning of communication skills within an ethical reflection on students' ethical attitudes towards truth-telling, perceived competence and comfort in BBN. We followed two cohorts of medical students from the preclinical third year to their clinical rotations (fifth year). We analysed their ethical attitudes and level of comfort and competence in BBN before, after the intervention, and during clinical rotations. Students' ethical attitudes towards truth-telling remained stable. Students feeling uncomfortable or incompetent improved their level of perceived comfort or competence after the intervention, but those feeling comfortable or competent became more aware of the difficulty of the situation, and consequently decreased their level of comfort and competence. Confronting students with a realistic situation and integrating the practice of communication skills within an ethical reflection may be effective in maintaining ethical attitudes towards truth-telling, in developing new skills and increasing awareness about the difficulty and challenges of a BBN situation.

  5. Professionalism perspectives among medical students of a novel medical graduate school in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque,1 Zainal Zulkifli,2 Seraj Zohurul Haque,3 Zubair M Kamal,4 Abdus Salam,5 Vidya Bhagat,2 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi,2 Nor Iza A Rahman2 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Jalan Sultan Mahmud, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia; 3School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK; 4Sleep Research Unit, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: Defining professionalism in this constantly evolving world is not easy. How do you measure degrees of benevolence and compassion? If it is so obvious to our profession, what professionalism is, then why is it so difficult to teach it to medical students and residents? Today’s definition of medical professionalism is evolving – from autonomy to accountability, from expert opinion to evidence-based medicine, and from self-interest to teamwork and shared responsibility. However, medical professionalism is defined as the basis for the trust in the patient–physician relationship, caring and compassion, insight, openness, respect for patient dignity, confidentiality, autonomy, presence, altruism, and those qualities that lead to trust-competence, integrity, honesty, morality, and ethical conduct. The purpose of this study is to explore professionalism in terms of its fundamental elements among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA. This was a cross-sectional study carried out on medical students of UniSZA. The study population included preclinical and clinical medical students of UniSZA from Year I to Year V of academic session 2014/2015. The simple random sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data were

  6. Antecedents and Consequences of Medical Students' Moral Decision Making during Professionalism Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrouxe, Lynn; Shaw, Malissa; Rees, Charlotte

    2017-06-01

    Medical students often experience professionalism dilemmas (which differ from ethical dilemmas) wherein students sometimes witness and/or participate in patient safety, dignity, and consent lapses. When faced with such dilemmas, students make moral decisions. If students' action (or inaction) runs counter to their perceived moral values-often due to organizational constraints or power hierarchies-they can suffer moral distress, burnout, or a desire to leave the profession. If moral transgressions are rationalized as being for the greater good, moral distress can decrease as dilemmas are experienced more frequently (habituation); if no learner benefit is seen, distress can increase with greater exposure to dilemmas (disturbance). We suggest how medical educators can support students' understandings of ethical dilemmas and facilitate their habits of enacting professionalism: by modeling appropriate resistance behaviors. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  7. AGU Launches Web Site for New Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Randy

    2013-03-01

    AGU's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics policy, approved by the AGU Board of Directors and Council in December 2012, is now available online on a new Web site, http://ethics.agu.org. As the Web site states, the policy embodies a "set of guidelines for scientific integrity and professional ethics for the actions of the members and the governance of the Union in its internal activities; in its public persona; and most importantly, in the research and peer review processes of its scientific publications, its communications and outreach, and its scientific meetings."

  8. ethical reflection on the nature of professionalism in anaesthesiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is ambiguous. Contrast for example two influential post- enlightenment schools of thought supporting opposing views in this respect: rule-based deontological ethics, of which Kant's ideas are perhaps best known14, and outcome-based utilitarian. (consequentialist) ethics15. Immanuel Kant's notions on the validity of moral ...

  9. Virtue ethics - an old answer to a new dilemma? Part 1. Problems with contemporary medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misselbrook, David

    2015-02-01

    The commonest practical model used in contemporary medical ethics is Principlism. Yet, while Principlism is a widely accepted consensus statement for ethics, the moral theory that underpins it faces serious challenges in its attempt to provide a coherent and accepted system of moral analysis. This inevitably challenges the stability of such a consensus statement and makes it vulnerable to attack by competitors such as preference consequentialism. This two-part paper proposes an inclusive version of virtue theory as a more grounded system of moral analysis. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  10. Sustainability as an Ethical Principle: Ensuring Its Systematic Place in Professional Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Alongside the central focus on the persons requiring nursing care in professional nursing practice, the perspective of the sustainability of interventions and the use of materials (for example, nursing aids and hygiene articles) is gaining prominence in nursing decision-making processes. This contribution makes the principle of sustainability concrete and delineates its importance in the context of professional nursing practice and decision-making. It further suggests the development of an ethical policy in order to systematically ensure that sustainability has a place in ethical reflection and decision-making, and describes the elements involved. Finally, a synthesis is made between the importance of the principle of sustainability, suggested ethical policies (system of ethical reflection) as they affect nursing practice and professional reflection, decision-making, and practice. PMID:27417590

  11. Investigation Clinical Competence and Its Relationship with Professional Ethics and Spiritual Health in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Ramezanzade Tabriz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Study of clinical competence in nursing helps determine the quality of health care delivered to patients. Given the priority of observance of principles over caretaking and necessity of spirituality existence at the core of health care provision, this study was conducted to investigate clinical competence and its relationship with professional ethics and spiritual health in nurses. Methods: In this cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational study, 281 nurses were enrolled by consensus sampling. Sampling was conducted from February, 2016 till June, 2016. The data were gathered by a demographics questionnaire, a self-assessment scale of clinical competence, a nursing ethics questionnaire, and a spiritual health questionnaire, and analyzed by descriptive statistics and t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, ANOVA, and linear regression analysis in SPSS 21. Results: The total scores for self-assessment scale of nurses' clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health were moderate. In the light of the results of Spearman's correlation coefficient, there was a significant and positive correlation between clinical competence and spiritual health. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between professional ethics and spiritual health but there was no correlation between professional ethics and clinical competence. Conclusion: Managers' and personnel's Knowledge about the level of nurses clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health in teaching health care centers provides valuable information to develop in-service and efficacious education programs and ultimately to improve the quality of nursing services.

  12. The impact of medical tourism and the code of medical ethics on advertisement in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Brown, Brandon; Olaleye, Olalekan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in management of clinical conditions are being made in several resource poor countries including Nigeria. Yet, the code of medical ethics which bars physician and health practices from advertising the kind of services they render deters these practices. This is worsened by the incursion of medical tourism facilitators (MTF) who continue to market healthcare services across countries over the internet and social media thereby raising ethical questions. A significant review of the advertisement ban in the code of ethics is long overdue. Limited knowledge about advances in medical practice among physicians and the populace, the growing medical tourism industry and its attendant effects, and the possibility of driving brain gain provide evidence to repeal the code. Ethical issues, resistance to change and elitist ideas are mitigating factors working in the opposite direction. The repeal of the code of medical ethics against advertising will undoubtedly favor health facilities in the country that currently cannot advertise the kind of services they render. A repeal or review of this code of medical ethics is necessary with properly laid down guidelines on how advertisements can be and cannot be done.

  13. Ethics in action: Approving and improving medical research with human subjects

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, Jean Philippe de Jong presents a new understanding of ethical oversight on medical research with human subjects and proposes that two philosophies for ethical oversight exist: '(dis)approving' and 'improving'. Systems for ethical oversight on medical research have been in place for many years, with Research Ethics Committees as their cornerstone. Although these oversight systems aim to ensure that the ethical quality of research is in order, they have been criticized for imped...

  14. [The ideal and practice of Greek medical ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Y G

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned not with medical theories, but with practices of Greek physicians, and I have addressed the subject of medical ethics as related to the Hippocratic tradition. And I have attempted a synthetic account of Greek physicians' actual practice and its ideals in the Hippocratic tradition. My understanding of the tradition succeeds the revelations in the first chapter of my doctoral dissertation, one of them is the fact that Hippocratic tradition is amalgamation of ethical code with rational or scientific medical theory. In the first chapter of this paper, I have attempted a social history of Greek physicians by analyzing Hippocratic writings. The Hippocratic collections, Corpus Hippocraticum, throw light not only on the origins and early development of classical medicine, but on its place in Greek Society. In the second chapter, I aim at understanding of the medical morality in its practice by analyzing the Corpus. Particularly the Oath shall be examined. Some questions, above all, such as "Was it ever a reality or merely a 'counsel of perfection'?" can not be answered. But by the way of the examination of the deontological treatises, the characters of the ethics of Greek physicians become clear. It was the result of outward performance in the relation of inner intention. In the result Greek physicians were the first to attempt to establish a code of behavior for the medical profession and to define the doctor's obligations to the society.

  15. [Health care ethics committees in German university clinics. A survey of all medical directors and directors of nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, J; Burchardi, N; Weidtmann, A

    2004-05-28

    Health Care Ethics Committees (HEC) are new ways of implementing clinical ethics in hospitals and nursing homes. In the US all health care institutions must provide some structure to handle ethical conflicts in everyday patients' care. However, in Germany only a minority of hospitals, often members of the Protestant or Catholic Hospital Associations, have founded HEC. No studies exist in regard to the situation at German university hospitals. In November 2002 we posted a questionnaire with 13 items to all medical directors (M) and directors of nursing (N) of the 36 German university hospitals. The response rate was 82 %. Limitation of treatment, informed consent and the conflict between beneficience and autonomy are the most relevant ethical issues in everyday practice. N estimated the need for additional support of their staff in ethical issues higher than M. Improvement of interdisciplinary teamwork, further education in ethics and ethical guidelines have been identified in order to improve ethical professional performance. However, N mentioned the lack of time and the low priority of ethics more often than M as problems in implementing theses measures. Five German university hospitals are planning to establish a HEC and two hospitals want to employ a clinical ethicist. Our data show a high need for information about HEC in German university hospitals. The tasks, working methods and chances for further development of HEC are neither known nor used in the majority of German university hospitals.

  16. Don't We Care?: The Ethics and Emotional Labour of Early Years Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that early childhood education and care (ECEC) has a legitimate aspiration to be a "caring profession" like others such as nursing or social work, defined by a moral purpose. For example, practitioners often draw on an ethic of care as evidence of their professionalism. However, the discourse of professionalism in…

  17. Application of Contemporary Literature to Enhance Interpersonal Skills and Ethical Decision Making in Professional Selling Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Educators and marketing professionals agree that course-work must address interpersonal communication skills and ethical decision making in addition to traditional business functions and skills. This article describes an innovative approach to teaching the professional selling course in which students enhance their competency in these areas…

  18. understanding medical ethics in a contemporary society

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    doctor is not in error if he tells the nurse who is doing daily dressing for the patient that is HIV positive. In fact, it can be considered a gross misconduct where such ..... medico-legal aspects of pre- operative consent. East. African Medical Journal. 2004; 81: 331-335. 14. Weisleder P. Inconsistency among American States on.

  19. Ethics and epidemiological research | Cullinan | Malawi Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawi Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 2 (1992) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here ...

  20. The Medical Ethics of Clinical Therapeutic Trials*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cal investigators of new substances, we have a moral obligation towards patients and humanity to conduct these ... Related to tissue irritation and damage on direct con- tact (topical and parenteral agents only). 11. Controlled ... Experimetlfale that the principle of medical morality consists, then, in never performing in man an ...

  1. Developing personal attributes of professionalism during clinical rotations: views of final year bachelor of clinical medical practice students

    OpenAIRE

    Mapukata-Sondzaba, Nontsikelelo; Dhai, Ames; Tsotsi, Norma; Ross, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical professionalism as a set of behaviours that transcends personal values, beliefs and attitudes to incorporate ethical and moral principles is considered a covenant between society and the practice of medicine. The Bachelor of Clinical Medical Practice (BCMP) a three year professional degree was launched at the University of the Witwatersrand in January 2009 in response to a documented shortage of doctors especially in the rural areas of South Africa. The BCMP programme is un...

  2. Factors affecting professional ethics in nursing practice in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Ali; Mosalanejad, Leili; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid

    2015-09-09

    Professional ethics refers to the use of logical and consistent communication, knowledge, clinical skills, emotions and values in nursing practice. This study aimed to explore and describe factors that affect professional ethics in nursing practice in Iran. This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis approach. Thirty nurses with at least 5 years of experience participated in the study; they were selected using purposive sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis. After encoding and classifying the data, five major categories were identified: individual character and responsibility, communication challenges, organizational preconditions, support systems, educational and cultural development. Awareness of professional ethics and its contributing factors could help nurses and healthcare professionals provide better services for patients. At the same time, such understanding would be valuable for educational administrators for effective planning and management.

  3. Ethical issues when using social media for health outside professional relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Social media have the potential to revolutionize health and healthcare, but fulfilling this potential requires attention to the ethical issues social media may raise. This article reviews the major ethical issues arising when social media are used for research, public health, mobile health applications, and global health. It focuses on social media use outside fiduciary relationships between healthcare professionals and patients. Emphasis is given to the potential of social media in these contexts, the ethical issues relatively unique to each, and where possible how existing ethical principles and frameworks could help navigate these issues. In some cases social media create the circumstance for particular ethical issues but also facilitate managing them, such as in informed consent for research. In other cases, disagreement exists about whether social media - despite their potential - should be used for certain purposes, such as in public health surveillance (where confidentiality represents a significant ethical concern). In still others, ethical uncertainty exists about how social media will affect ethical issues, such as inequality in global health. As social media technologies continue to develop, identifying and managing the ethical issues they raise will be critical to their success in improving health while preserving fundamental ethical values.

  4. Review Article: Medical Laboratory Ethics and Jurisprudence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No abstract. Journal of Medical Laboratory Science Vol.12(2) 2003: 18 - 21. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jmls.v12i2.35281 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  5. Moral erosion: how can medical professionals safeguard against the slippery slope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebowitz, Jason

    2011-06-01

    The extensive participation of German physicians in the atrocities of the Holocaust raises many questions concerning the potential for moral erosion in medicine. What circumstances and methods of rationalisation allowed doctors to turn from healers into accomplices of genocide? Are physicians still vulnerable to corruption of their guiding principles and, if so, what can be done to prevent this process from occurring? With these thoughts in mind, the author reflects on his experiences participating in the Fellowships at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics program and offers a medical student's perspective on the ethical issues encountered in clinical training and the practice of medicine.

  6. The establishment of ethical committees for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlum, Emil; Ruyter, Knut W

    2012-06-26

    In this article we will describe the process that preceded the establishment of regional committees for medical research ethics in 1985. We will also take a look at the difficult initial period experienced by the committees in the eastern and southern regions. We have examined the material that has been submitted to the National Archives by the Research Council of Norway, the Ministry of Social Affairs and the Ministry of Education and Research, as well as the records of the Regional Committees for Medical and Health Research Ethics South-East. From the early 1970s the Norwegian Medical Association played a key role, for example by launching the proposal for "nationally dispersed committees" in 1977. There was widespread consensus that such committees were desirable, but everybody assumed that they would be funded by somebody else. As a result, the simplest model was chosen. The full set of regional committees was not established until 1987, and even more time passed before they were granted the funding that could ensure appropriate processing of cases. This was only achieved after the adoption of the Research Ethics Act in 2006. Unsolved financial issues were the key reason why this process was so prolonged. The organisational model proposed by the Norwegian Medical Association in 1977 is fairly similar to the one that the Health Research Act brought into place in 2009.

  7. Advanced medical students’ experiences and views on professionalism at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Professionalism is a core competency in the medical profession worldwide. Numerous studies investigate how this competency is taught and learned. However, there are few reports on the students’ views and experiences with professionalism especially in the Arab world. Our aim was to explore the experiences and views of Kuwait final-year medical students on professionalism. Methods This was a questionnaire study of final-year medical students at Kuwait University (n = 95). Open- and close-ended questions were used to determine the students’ experiences and views on: definition, teaching, learning, and assessment of professionalism. Results Eighty-five of the students completed the questionnaire (89.5%). A total of 252 attributes defining professionalism were listed by our respondents. The majority (98.0%) of these attributes were categorized under the CanMEDS theme describing professionalism as commitment to patients, profession, and society through ethical practice. The most helpful methods in learning about professionalism for the students were contact with positive role models, patients and families, and with their own families, relatives and peers. The students’ rating of the quality and quantity of teaching professionalism in the institution was quite variable. Despite this, 68.2% of the students felt very or somewhat comfortable explaining the meaning of medical professionalism to junior medical students. Almost half of the students felt that their education had always or sometimes helped them deal with professionally-challenging situations. Majority (77.6%) of the students thought that their academic assessments should include assessment of professionalism and should be used as a selection criterion in their future academic careers (62.3%). Most of the students discussed and sought advice regarding professionally-challenging situations from their fellow medical students and colleagues. Seventy-five (88.2%) students did not know which

  8. Advanced medical students' experiences and views on professionalism at Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia; Al-Fadhli, Amani; Arshad, Andleeb

    2014-07-23

    Professionalism is a core competency in the medical profession worldwide. Numerous studies investigate how this competency is taught and learned. However, there are few reports on the students' views and experiences with professionalism especially in the Arab world. Our aim was to explore the experiences and views of Kuwait final-year medical students on professionalism. This was a questionnaire study of final-year medical students at Kuwait University (n = 95). Open- and close-ended questions were used to determine the students' experiences and views on: definition, teaching, learning, and assessment of professionalism. Eighty-five of the students completed the questionnaire (89.5%). A total of 252 attributes defining professionalism were listed by our respondents. The majority (98.0%) of these attributes were categorized under the CanMEDS theme describing professionalism as commitment to patients, profession, and society through ethical practice. The most helpful methods in learning about professionalism for the students were contact with positive role models, patients and families, and with their own families, relatives and peers. The students' rating of the quality and quantity of teaching professionalism in the institution was quite variable. Despite this, 68.2% of the students felt very or somewhat comfortable explaining the meaning of medical professionalism to junior medical students. Almost half of the students felt that their education had always or sometimes helped them deal with professionally-challenging situations. Majority (77.6%) of the students thought that their academic assessments should include assessment of professionalism and should be used as a selection criterion in their future academic careers (62.3%). Most of the students discussed and sought advice regarding professionally-challenging situations from their fellow medical students and colleagues. Seventy-five (88.2%) students did not know which organizational body in the institution

  9. [Ethical behavioral standards of medical students on examinations and studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkin, Lior; Glick, Shimon

    2007-06-01

    In recent years the medical literature has reflected an increasing interest in the medical ethics of physicians and medical students. Studies have shown that cheating in medical school is frequent enough to cause concern, that there is a positive correlation between students' ethical attitude and their ethical behavior and between cheating in school and cheating in patient care. This study aims to examine student attitudes towards cheating, their self-reported behavior, analyze cultural and sub-cultural differences, and to reach practical conclusions that might be incorporated into the teaching of ethics in medical schools. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 193 first and second year students of the Israeli and American programs at Ben-Gurion University. The questionnaire consisted of fifty three multiple choice questions. The students were asked to state their opinion on various cheating practices at medical school and dishonesty in patient care, to estimate how they would resolve various ethical dilemmas and to provide some demographic information. The results were analyzed using SPSS. T-tests, Chi-Square tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson and Spearman's coefficients, all used as appropriate. Completed questionnaires were returned by 141 students (73%). The majority of the students regard cheating in an exam (93%) or on a final paper (85%) to be morally unacceptable behavior. Copying during an exam is regarded as more morally unacceptable than copying a homework exercise. The majority of the students consider faking a patient's laboratory results to be morally unacceptable behavior (98%). American students regard copying a homework exercise, reconstructing exam questions for the benefit of next year students and giving answers to a fellow student during an exam to be more morally unacceptable in comparison to the Israeli students. Married students consider cheating to be more morally unacceptable than unmarried students. A positive

  10. Medical and ethical dilemma in brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streba, Irina; Damian, Simona; Ioan, Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, death has been defined, medically speaking, as the irreversible cessation of breathing and of nervous and cardiac activity. What radically changed this definition was the introduction of the concept "brain death" in 1968, by the "Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School". According to it, the irreversible coma was associated with brain death and considered to be a criterion for the diagnosis of the deceased individual. The evergrowing need for transplant organs (provided this respects the dead honor rule, stipulating that organs can't be harvested unless someone is deceased) lead to making arbitrary decisions regarding the establishment of the exact time of death during the process of "losing life". What actually triggers the controversy related to the concept of brain death is the dilemma of associating this concept with that of biologic death or death of the person, the difference between the two being made by whether the mental characteristics are accepted or not in defining and individualizing the death of the human being. Given these circumstances, a dilemma appears--that of defining the death of the individual: we define death, as it has been for centuries, as the moment when the cardio-respiratory function no longer exists, which leads to the loss of tens of thousands of lives that might have been saved through transplant. Yet, this may lead to manipulating the border between life and death, with the risk of trespassing each individual's right to life.

  11. Analysis of variable involved in decision-making ethics of professional accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre André Feil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The central objective of this study is to identify and analyze the intervening variables that influence ethical decision making of accounting professionals, in a region in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The methodology is quantitative and descriptive exploratory. The technical procedures include the use of questionnaires with response linked to Likert scale, comprising a sample unit of 122 professional accounting, and analysis occurs through non-parametric statistics, such as logistic regression and Spearman correlation. The results reveal that the accounting professionals who agree fully with the importance of the Counter Code of Professional Ethics (CEPC as a guide to conduct 59% and stick to it in decision making in 63.9%. The logistic regression model predicted that professionals meet the CEPC and do not meet respectively with a certainty of 87.5% and 100%. The attitudes towards CEPC these accounting professionals can be explained by the importance and use this as a guide of conduct, with a 95.5% prediction sure. The intervening variables that were significant at 0.01 and 0.05 in the CEPC compliance relating to religiosity, relevance and assistance that the code provides the professional conduct. It follows that the ethical decision making of the accounting professional is influenced by their religion and relevance and assistance that the CEPC provides for this professional.

  12. Medical professionalism in China and the United States: a transcultural interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Smith, Kirk L; Cong, Yali; Hu, Linying; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    As in other societies, medical professionalism in the Peoples' Republic of China has been rapidly evolving. One of the major events in this process was the endorsement in 2005 of the document, "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," by the Chinese Medical Doctor Association (hereafter, the Charter)(1). More recently, a national survey, the first on such a large scale, was conducted on Chinese physicians' attitudes toward the fundamental principles and core commitments put forward in the Charter. Based on empirical findings from that study and comparing them to the published results of a similar American survey, the authors offer an in-depth interpretation of significant cross-cultural differences and important transcultural commonalities. The broader historical, socio-economic, and ethical issues relating to salient Chinese cultural practices such as family consent, familism (the custom of deferring decisions to family members), and the withholding of medical information, as well as controversial topics such as not respecting patients' autonomy, are examined. The Chinese Survey found that Chinese physicians supported the principles of the Charter in general. Here we argue that Chinese culture and traditional medical ethics are broadly compatible with the moral commitments demanded by modern medical professionalism. Methodologically and theoretically-recognizing the problems inherent in the hoary but still popular habit of dichotomizing cultures and in relativism-a transcultural approach is adopted that gives greater (due) weight to the internal moral diversity present within every culture, the common ground shared by different cultures, and the primacy of morality. Genuine cross-cultural dialogue, including a constructive Chinese-American dialogue in the area of medical professionalism, is not only possible, but necessary. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  13. Between professional duty and ethical confusion: midwives and selective termination of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignacco, Eva

    2002-03-01

    This qualitative study describes midwives' experiences in relation to termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormalities, and their corresponding professional and ethical position. Thirteen midwives working in a university clinic were interviewed about their problems in this respect. The information gathered was evaluated by using qualitative content analysis. The study focused on the emotional experience of the midwives, their professional position, and ethical conflict. In this situation, midwives are faced with a conflict between the woman's right to self-determination on one hand and the right to life of the child on the other. This conflict causes a high level of emotional stress and, subsequently, professional identity problems. Although questions concerning the child's right to life are generally suppressed, the ethical principle of the woman's right to self-determination is rationalized. Although this process of rationalization seems to present a false ethical decision, it enables midwives to continue with their daily professional duties. As far as orientating midwives to the value of these women's right to self-determination is concerned, it must be assumed that they have made an ethical decision to which they have given insufficient thought. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that midwives are largely excluded from the decision-making process of the parents in question. They cannot therefore help in this process in a valuable and responsible way by providing clear information and proposing objective criteria. In relation to the tasks they are expected to fulfill, these midwives revealed that they were in a state of professional confusion.

  14. How philosophy of medicine has changed medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Robert M

    2006-12-01

    The celebration of thirty years of publication of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provides an opportunity to reflect on how medical ethics has evolved over that period. The reshaping of the field has occurred in no small part because of the impact of branches of philosophy other than ethics. These have included influences from Kantian theory of respect for persons, personal identity theory, philosophy of biology, linguistic analysis of the concepts of health and disease, personhood theory, epistemology, and political philosophy. More critically, medicine itself has begun to be reshaped. The most fundamental restructuring of medicine is currently occurring--stemming, in part, from the application of contemporary philosophy of science to the medical field. There is no journal more central to these critical events of the past three decades than The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.

  15. Wanted: role models--medical students' perceptions of professionalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byszewski, Anna; Hendelman, Walter; McGuinty, Caroline; Moineau, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to determine student perception of professionalism at the University of Ottawa and gain insights for improvement in promotion of professionalism in undergraduate medical education...

  16. The specificity of a medical psychologist’s professional identity

    OpenAIRE

    Borysiuk Alla Stepanivna

    2016-01-01

    The article emphasizes that every profession has its own specificity depicted in peculiarities of professional identity formation. The author gives a review of the specificity of a medical psychologist’s professional identity.

  17. Establishment of medical education upon internalization of virtue ethics: bridging the gap between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Mansoureh; Larijani, Bagher; Madani, Ensieh; Ghasemzadeh, Nazafarin

    2017-01-01

    During medical training, students obtain enough skills and knowledge. However, medical ethics accomplishes its goals when, together with training medical courses, it guides students behavior towards morality so that ethics-oriented medical practice is internalized. Medical ethics is a branch of applied ethics which tries to introduce ethics into physicians' practice and ethical decisions; thus, it necessitates the behavior to be ethical. Therefore, when students are being trained, they need to be supplied with those guidelines which turn ethical instructions into practice to the extent possible. The current text discusses the narrowing of the gap between ethical theory and practice, especially in the field of medical education. The current study was composed using analytical review procedures. Thus, classical ethics philosophy, psychology books, and related articles were used to select the relevant pieces of information about internalizing behavior and medical education. The aim of the present study was to propose a theory by analyzing the related articles and books. The attempt to fill the gap between medical theory and practice using external factors such as law has been faced with a great deal of limitations. Accordingly, the present article tries to investigate how and why medical training must take internalizing ethical instructions into consideration, and indicate the importance of influential internal factors. Virtue-centered education, education of moral emotions, changing and strengthening of attitudes through education, and the wise use of administrative regulations can be an effective way of teaching ethical practice in medicine.

  18. Developing a Physician׳s Professional Identity Through Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Kenneth E; Abercrombie, Caroline L

    2017-02-01

    Professionalism represents a fundamental characteristic of physicians. Professional organizations have developed professionalism competencies for physicians and medical students. The aim of teaching medical professionalism is to ensure the development of a professional identity in medical students. Professional identity formation is a process developed through teaching principles and appropriate behavioral responses to the stresses of being a physician. Addressing lapses and critical reflection is an important part of the educational process. The "hidden curriculum" within an institution plays an important role in professional identity formation. Assessment of professionalism involves multiple mechanisms. Steps in remediating professionalism lapses include (1) initial assessment, (2) diagnosis of problems and development of an individualized learning plan, (3) instruction encompassing practice, feedback and reflection and (4) reassessment and certification of competence. No reliable outcomes data exist regarding the effectiveness of different remediation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Dignity and the Medical Ethics in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil Gluchman

    2017-02-01

    qualities of someone or something that deserve esteem and respect. However, what is human dignity of doctors, nurses and patients? Is it a primary value of all human beings without differences in their social status or it depends on abilities of moral agents (including doctors, nurses and patients? How is kept human dignity of doctors, nurses, health care workers and patients by ethical codes of medical professions in Slovakia at all?

  20. An ethical dilemma: clinical psychologists prescribing psychotropic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    The use of psychotropic medication to treat psychiatric disorders has surged in recent years, and while commonly prescribed, the question of who should be allowed to prescribe such medication has become an increasingly important issue to nurses. Psychologists have historically functioned in roles such as psychotherapy and psychological testing, but as standards of care for psychiatric disorders incorporate medication, reimbursement for psychotherapy is declining. Medication prescription and management have not been traditionally seen as the role of the psychologist, however, many clinical psychologists have begun to advocate for prescription authority as a legally sanctioned role for their profession. This article addresses the issues of clinical psychologists seeking prescriptive privilege. It will be argued that the current paradigm of psychology rejects the neurobiological basis of mental illness and that psychologists prescribing medication presents an ethical dilemma for nurses. It is the contention of the author that nurses have an ethical responsibility to advocate against the extension of the psychologist's role into the prescription of medications.

  1. Influence of Course in Medical Ethics and Law on Career Plans of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi-Yann; Lin, Lih-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Han; Chan, Tzu-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: The significant increase in medical disputes and lawsuits in recent years in Taiwan has severely affected behavior and ecology in medical practice. For this reason, we designed integrated courses on ethics and law and conducted a questionnaire-based career plan study to understand whether these issues influence their specialty…

  2. Discourses of social justice: examining the ethics of democratic professionalism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    This essay provides a critical exploration of discourses of social justice in nursing. It examines commitments to social justice in the work of international nursing scholars and in professional codes of ethics in international nursing organizations. The analysis touches on salient conversations in philosophy, relating these ways of knowing to social justice as an ethical pattern in nursing practice. On the basis of this analysis, the discussion explores questions of professional formation in nursing, noticing when commitments to social justice are taken up or evaded in different models of professionalism. In concluding comments, implications of democratic professionalism are explored for professional formation in nursing, arguing for teaching, learning, and knowledge projects that contribute to social justice in our democracy.

  3. Early Introduction to Professional and Ethical Dilemmas in a Pharmaceutical Care Laboratory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Megan G; Dinkins, Melissa M

    2015-12-25

    To study the effects of an early professional development series in a pharmaceutical care laboratory (PCL) course on first-year pharmacy students' perceptions of the importance of professional attitudes and action. Three hundred thirty-four first-year students enrolled in a PCL course participated in a new required learning activity centered on development of professional attitudes and behaviors. Students discussed situational dilemmas in pharmacy practice in small groups, highlighting application of the Oath of a Pharmacist and the Pharmacists' Code of Ethics. Students completed an optional questionnaire at the beginning and end of the semester to assess change in their attitudes and behaviors related to professionalism in pharmacy practice. While students entered their training with a strong appreciation for professionalism, they felt more confident in applying the Oath of a Pharmacist and the Pharmacists Code of Ethics to dilemmas in practice following the new learning activity.

  4. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-01-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia. PMID:6234395

  5. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-06-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia.

  6. Ethics in action: Approving and improving medical research with human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, Jean Philippe de Jong presents a new understanding of ethical oversight on medical research with human subjects and proposes that two philosophies for ethical oversight exist: '(dis)approving' and 'improving'. Systems for ethical oversight on medical research have been in place for

  7. Preaching What We Practice: Teaching Ethical Decision-Making to Computer Security Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Kenneth R.

    The biggest challenge facing computer security researchers and professionals is not learning how to make ethical decisions; rather it is learning how to recognize ethical decisions. All too often, technology development suffers from what Langdon Winner terms technological somnambulism - we sleepwalk through our technology design, following past precedents without a second thought, and fail to consider the perspectives of other stakeholders [1]. Computer security research and practice involves a number of opportunities for ethical decisions. For example, decisions about whether or not to automatically provide security updates involve tradeoffs related to caring versus user autonomy. Decisions about online voting include tradeoffs between convenience and security. Finally, decisions about routinely screening e-mails for spam involve tradeoffs of efficiency and privacy. It is critical that these and other decisions facing computer security researchers and professionals are confronted head on as value-laden design decisions, and that computer security researchers and professionals consider the perspectives of various stakeholders in making these decisions.

  8. Attitudes towards terminal sedation: an empirical survey among experts in the field of medical ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz José

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Terminal sedation" regarded as the use of sedation in (pre-terminal patients with treatment-refractory symptoms is controversially discussed not only within palliative medicine. While supporters consider terminal sedation as an indispensable palliative medical treatment option, opponents disapprove of it as "slow euthanasia". Against this background, we interviewed medical ethics experts by questionnaire on the term and the moral acceptance of terminal sedation in order to find out how they think about this topic. We were especially interested in whether experts with a professional medical and nursing background think differently about the topic than experts without this background. Methods The survey was carried out by questionnaire; beside the provided answering options free text comments were possible. As test persons we chose the 477 members of the German Academy for Ethics in Medicine, an interdisciplinary society for medical ethics. Results 281 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate = 59%. The majority of persons without medical background regarded "terminal sedation" as an intentional elimination of consciousness until the patient's death occurs; persons with a medical background generally had a broader understanding of the term, including light or intermittent forms of sedation. 98% of the respondents regarded terminal sedation in dying patients with treatment-refractory physical symptoms as acceptable. Situations in which the dying process has not yet started, in which untreatable mental symptoms are the indication for terminal sedation or in which life-sustaining measures are withdrawn during sedation were evaluated as morally difficult. Conclusion The survey reveals a great need for research and discussion on the medical indication as well as on the moral evaluation of terminal sedation. Prerequisite for this is a more precise terminology which describes the circumstances of the sedation.

  9. Strategies for Navigating Common Ethical Dilemmas Encountered by Operational Radiation Safety Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Robert J; Rios, Janelle

    2016-02-01

    Because operational radiation safety professionals can encounter ethical dilemmas in the course of their work, codes of ethics and professional standards of conduct are maintained by the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP). While these works provide valuable guidance, they do not operationalize the types of ethical dilemmas radiation safety practitioners might encounter. For example, consider the ethical conundrum of “dual loyalty,” defined as the situation in which an individual holds simultaneous obligations to two or more parties. In the case of radiation safety, practicing professionals hold obligations to the workers being protected and to the leaders of the organization. If these obligations are in conflict, serious difficulties can arise. The conundrum of dual loyalty is described and a strategy for reducing its effect is discussed. Two other common ethical issues; “confidentiality” and “organizational dissent” are similarly presented. A foundation from which to launch an ongoing dialogue about ethical issues within the radiation safety profession is also proposed.

  10. Eating disorder therapists' personal eating disorder history and professional ethics: an interpretive description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Meris; Haverkamp, Beth E

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore and understand eating disorder (ED) therapists' perceptions of whether and how their personal ED histories had professional ethical relevance. Analysis of multiple interviews with 11 therapist-participants indicated that they perceived their personal ED histories as having substantial ethical relevance in their day-to-day practice with ED clients. The major categories of ethics experiences that emerged were: boundaries, therapist wellness, helpfulness of personal ED history, and openness regarding therapists' personal ED histories. The findings have practical utility for the education, training, and continuing education of ED-historied practitioners.

  11. Analysis of the ethical aspects of professional confidentiality in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available From the point of view of deontological ethics, privacy is a moral right that patients are entitled to and it is bound to professional confidentiality. Otherwise, the information given by patients to health professionals would not be reliable and a trustable relationship could not be established. The aim of the present study was to assess, by means of questionnaires with open and closed questions, the awareness and attitudes of 100 dentists working in the city of Andradina, São Paulo State, Brazil, with respect to professional confidentiality in dental practice. Most dentists (91.43% reported to have instructed their assistants on professional confidentiality. However, 44.29% of the interviewees showed to act contradictorily as reported talking about the clinical cases of their patients to their friends or spouses. The great majority of professionals (98.57% believed that it is important to have classes on Ethics and Bioethics during graduation and, when asked about their knowledge of the penalties imposed for breach of professional confidentiality, only 48.57% of them declared to be aware of it. Only 28.57% of the interviewees affirmed to have exclusive access to the files; 67.14% reported that that files were also accessed by their secretary; 1.43% answered that their spouses also had access, and 2.86% did not answer. From the results of the present survey, it could be observed that, although dentists affirmed to be aware of professional confidentiality, their attitudes did not adhere to ethical and legal requirements. This stand of health professionals has contributed to violate professional ethics and the law itself, bringing problems both to the professional and to the patient.

  12. History of evolution of the concept of medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sisir K

    2003-01-01

    "Time present and time past are both perhaps present in time future and time future contained in time past".--Thomas Steams Eliot (1888-1965), Noble Literature Laureate, 1948. History and evolution of the concept of Medical Ethics is the classical example of this poetic expression. Virtually, every human society has some forces of myth to explain the origin of morality. Indian ethics was philosophical from its very birth. In the Vedas (1500 B.C.), ethics was an integral aspect of philosophical and religious speculation about the nature of reality. The Vedas says how people ought to live and is the oldest philosophical literature in the world. It was the first account of philosophical ethics in human history. The old Testament of (c. 200 B.C.) the Hebrew Bible (Greek--ta biblia--"the books") gives account of God giving the Ten Commandments--the oral and written Law engraved on tablets of Stone to Moses around 13th century B.C. on Mount Sinai (Arabic--Gebel Musa) the Mountain near the tip of the Sinai Peninsula in West Asia.

  13. Using Insights from Applied Moral Psychology to Promote Ethical Behavior Among Engineering Students and Professional Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this essay I discuss a novel engineering ethics class that has the potential to significantly decrease the likelihood that students (and professionals) will inadvertently or unintentionally act unethically in the future. This class is different from standard engineering ethics classes in that it focuses on the issue of why people act unethically and how students (and professionals) can avoid a variety of hurdles to ethical behavior. I do not deny that it is important for students to develop cogent moral reasoning and ethical decision-making as taught in traditional college-level ethics classes, but as an educator, I aim to help students apply moral reasoning in specific, real-life situations so they are able to make ethical decisions and act ethically in their academic careers and after they graduate. Research in moral psychology provides evidence that many seemingly irrelevant situational factors affect the moral judgment of most moral agents and frequently lead agents to unintentionally or inadvertently act wrongly. I argue that, in addition to teaching college students moral reasoning and ethical decision-making, it is important to: 1. Teach students about psychological and situational factors that affect people's ethical judgments/behaviors in the sometimes stressful, emotion-laden environment of the workplace; 2. Guide students to engage in critical reflection about the sorts of situations they personally might find ethically challenging before they encounter those situations; and 3. Provide students with strategies to help them avoid future unethical behavior when they encounter these situations in school and in the workplace.

  14. The Need for Authenticity-Based Autonomy in Medical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lucie

    2017-08-11

    The notion of respect for autonomy dominates bioethical discussion, though what qualifies precisely as autonomous action is notoriously elusive. In recent decades, the notion of autonomy in medical contexts has often been defined in opposition to the notion of autonomy favoured by theoretical philosophers. Where many contemporary theoretical accounts of autonomy place emphasis on a condition of "authenticity", the special relation a desire must have to the self, bioethicists often regard such a focus as irrelevant to the concerns of medical ethics, and too stringent for use in practical contexts. I argue, however, that the very condition of authenticity that forms a focus in theoretical philosophy is also essential to autonomy and competence in medical ethics. After tracing the contours of contemporary authenticity-based theories of autonomy, I consider and respond to objections against the incorporation of a notion of authenticity into accounts of autonomy designed for use in medical contexts. By looking at the typical problems that arise when making judgments concerning autonomy or competence in a medical setting, I reveal the need for a condition of authenticity-as a means of protecting choices, particularly high-stakes choices, from being restricted or overridden on the basis of intersubjective disagreement. I then turn to the treatment of false and contestable beliefs, arguing that it is only through reference to authenticity that we can make important distinctions in this domain. Finally, I consider a potential problem with my proposed approach; its ability to deal with anorexic and depressive desires.

  15. The Commission Game: An Ethics Activity for Professional Selling Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Chad

    2012-01-01

    The Commission Game is an experiment-based experiential learning activity designed to elicit students' sincere ethical decision making in an ambiguous sales context. The activity includes multiple relevant stakeholders as well as tangible, shared risk/reward elements. The activity's design encourages students to contemplate their own personal code…

  16. Social Media and Professional School Counselors: Ethical and Legal Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Griffith, Catherine; Greene, Jennifer H.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of social media continues to expand in prevalence and is a medium of communication for individuals of all ages. Schools are using social media to engage their stakeholders at increasing rates. Therefore, school counselors require the knowledge and appreciation of ethical and legal issues regarding the use of such technology. The purpose of…

  17. Professionalism in anaesthesiology practice: ethical reflection on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This requirement relates to personal behaviour and attitudes that can loosely be labelled as moral attributes. The article argues that these moral attributes may best be understood with reference to Aristotle's notion of virtue ethics—the idea that character and virtue are important in ethics. Though this is the central theme of ...

  18. Professional and personal ethics in translation: A survey of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This raises the third context from within which translation ethics may be conceptualised: the personal. Translators are humans, and like all humans, they have a system of beliefs that inform how they choose to .... a rate of pay, an image of immediate reception, a distribution network, and the intercultural space – the overlap.

  19. School Psychology in Rural Contexts: Ethical, Professional, and Legal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lynn M.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Delivering psychological services in rural communities presents a number of unique challenges for practitioners relative to their peers in urban and suburban communities. In this article, the authors describe the current context of rural schools and examine the ethical and legal issues school psychologists may face when practicing in rural…

  20. Nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia in conflict with professional ethical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkamo-Moisio, Anja; Kvist, Tarja; Kangasniemi, Mari; Laitila, Teuvo; Ryynänen, Olli-Pekka; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2017-02-01

    Despite the significant role of nurses in end-of-life care, their attitudes towards euthanasia are under-represented both in the current literature and the controversial debate that is ongoing in several countries. What are the attitudes towards euthanasia among Finnish nurses? Which characteristics are associated with those attitudes? Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants and research context: A total of 1003 nurses recruited via the members' bulletin of the Finnish Nurses Association and social media. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Committee on Research Ethics of the university to which the authors were affiliated. The majority (74.3%) of the participants would accept euthanasia as part of Finnish healthcare, and 61.8% considered that Finland would benefit from a law permitting euthanasia. Most of the nurses (89.9%) thought that a person must have the right to decide on his or her own death; 77.4% of them considered it likely that they would themselves make a request for euthanasia in certain situations. The value of self-determination and the ability to choose the moment and manner of one's death are emphasized in the nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia. A continuous dialogue about euthanasia and nurses' shared values is crucial due to the conflict between nurses' attitudes and current ethical guidelines on nursing.

  1. Professional Military Ethics: Are We on the Right Track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-20

    acknowledged experts or ethical theories. e.g., " Plato says " "Kant would contend . . . 2. Appeal to natural law - - the arguments given are true...34hurting people is terrible." 5. Quest ioning - - use of questions and answers in a logical way; this is called the Socratic method. The reason is

  2. WHO'S IN CHARGE? THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MEDICAL LAW, MEDICAL ETHICS, AND MEDICAL MORALITY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Charles; Miola, José

    2015-01-01

    Medical law inevitably involves decision-making, but the types of decisions that need to be made vary in nature, from those that are purely technical to others that contain an inherent ethical content. In this paper we identify the different types of decisions that need to be made, and explore whether the law, the medical profession, or the individual doctor is best placed to make them. We also argue that the law has failed in its duty to create a coherent foundation from which such decision-making might properly be regulated, and this has resulted in a haphazard legal framework that contains no consistency. We continue by examining various medico-legal topics in relation to these issues before ending by considering the risk of demoralisation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Care at the edge of viability: medical and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haward, Marlyse F; Kirshenbaum, Nancy W; Campbell, Deborah E

    2011-09-01

    Decision-making for extremely immature preterm infants at the margins of viability is ethically, professionally, and emotionally complicated. A standard for prenatal consultation should be developed incorporating assessment of parental decision-making preferences and styles, a communication process involving a reciprocal exchange of information, and effective strategies for decisional deliberation, guided by and consistent with parental moral framework. Professional caregivers providing perinatal consultations or end-of-life counseling for extremely preterm infants should be sensitive to these issues and be taught flexibility in counseling techniques adhering to consistent guidelines. Emphasis must shift away from physician beliefs and behaviors about the boundaries of viability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethical crossroads: A study of factors impeding professional growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collect data from participants. The study found that the socio-affective, factors, namely the dominant social values and expectations, religious beliefs and doctrines, and an inadequate professional support infrastructure constituted the major impediments to the adoption of professional behaviors commensurate with teaching ...

  5. How Christian ethics became medical ethics: the case of Paul Ramsey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauerwas, Stanley

    1995-03-01

    Over the last century Christian ethics has moved from an attempt to Christianize the social order to a quandary over whether being Christian unduly biases how medical ethics is done. This movement can be viewed as the internal development of protestant liberalism to its logical conclusion, and Paul Ramsey can be taken as one of the last great representatives of that tradition. By reducing the Christian message to the 'ethical upshot' of neighbour love, Ramsey did not have the resources to show how Christian practice might make a difference for understanding or forming the practice of medicine. Instead, medicine became the practice that exemplified the moral commitments of Christian civilization, and the goal of the ethicist was to identify the values that were constitutive of medicine. Ramsey thus prepared the way for the Christian ethicist to become a medical ethicist with a difference, and the difference simply involved vague theological presumptions that do no serious intellectual work other than explaining, perhaps, the motivations of the ethicist.

  6. Ethical aspects of using medical social media in healthcare applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The advances in internet and mobile technologies and their increased use in healthcare led to the development of a new research field: health web science. Many research questions are addressed in that field, starting from analysing social-media data, to recruiting participants for clinical studies and monitoring the public health status. The information provided through this channel is unique in a sense that there is no other written source of experiences from patients and health carers. The increased usage and analysis of health web data poses questions on privacy, and ethics. Through a literature review, the current awareness on ethical issues in the context of public health monitoring and research using medical social media data is determined. Further, considerations on the topic were collected from members of the IMIA Social Media Working group.

  7. A 450-Year-Old Turkish Poem on Medical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekiner, Halil

    2017-09-01

    The Ottoman physician-poet Nidai of Ankara (1509 to post-1567) studied medicine in Crimea and served as a court physician in Istanbul during the reign of Sultan Selim II. Nidai marked the classical period of Ottoman medicine particularly with his acclaimed works and translations in Turkish, among which Manafi al-Nas (Benefits of People, 1566) became widely known. The final chapter of Manafi al-Nas also is known independently under the name Vasiyyetname (Last Will), which is a remarkable guide on medical ethics. This didactic, sixty-eight-line poem includes Nidai's moral advice to physicians that they should be well mannered, trustworthy, and competent in their arts and should treat their patients with modesty, honesty, and compassion. Even after 450 years of existence, Vasiyyetname retains its ethical and artistic relevance and still serves as a vehicle for the transmission of humanistic ideals far beyond the time and place it was written.

  8. Study to assess the compensation and skills of medical library professionals relative to information technology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, F O; McMullen, T D

    2001-07-01

    The study seeks to determine how medical library professionals performing information-technology (IT) roles are compensated and how their positions are designed compared to information technology staff in their institutions. 550 medical library directors in hospital and academic medical libraries were surveyed. The data was then compared to survey data from other compensation studies of the IT industry. There is a gap in compensation between medical library professionals and IT professionals performing similar functions using information technology. Technology-intense library jobs are compensated at higher levels than more traditional jobs. To compete with IT salaries, managers of medical library professionals will need to be ever more cognizant of the employment practices of IT professionals in nonmedical library disciplines. It is typically in the medical library's best interest to ensure that IT-related jobs, accountabilities, and capabilities of the medical library are known and understood by others, especially in the human resources and information technology staff departments.

  9. The ethics of drug development and promotion: the need for a wider view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard

    2012-11-01

    Ethical issues at the interface between the medical profession and the pharmaceutical industry have generally been approached from the vantage point of medical professionalism, with a focus on conflict of interest as the key ethical concern. Although conflicts of interest remain important, other ethical issues may be obscured unless a wider perspective is adopted. Besides medical professionalism, the ethics of the clinical therapeutic relationship, ethics of public health, and business ethics all provide additional insights.

  10. Medical ethics for senior medical doctors (episode I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaosavasdi, Sukhit; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Tannirandorn, Yuen; Thamkhantho, Manopchai; Pruksapong, Chumsak; Kanjanapitak, Aurchart

    2005-05-01

    A good leader will never ever forget themselves, or abuse the power or authority, and also not trust only the inner circle voice, nevertheless they have to listen and consider the voice of disagreement from others. Otherwise, they will transform themselves to be a "dictator" unconsciously which is very dangerous and harmful to the democratic ruling system as well as themselves and their family members, as you can see from the past history of foreign countries and even Thailand itself. Thai culture is surrounded and consistes of kindness, mercy and good wishes to each other. The patient is so grateful and appreciates the value of the medical doctor for saving their life. Even although the Western culture is penetrating globally as a business-oriented culture in which medico-legal cases such as patient's rights, the value of the patient's benefit protection and certainly it requires the legal act to get involved eventually. The compromised culture which has been embedded in Thai society for a prolonged period can be changed firmly and gradually because of the usual and regular condition and definitely the good and valued medical doctors is still around. The opportunity of medical doctors to act as a pioneer of the trend and conflicted societies, is responsible to them and it's a great opportunity for Thai medical doctors to reach out to these goals and excellence. The above statements can be found in various media. Is it true that the medical doctors will absolutely be hundred percent good guys and have good luck from time to time? But for sure, even our medical colleagues are very much dedicated and concentrated in their job, as the family members of our medical profession, they have been left out, they have no time to share with or even be responsible to them. Many of our friends in the same profession might feel so sorry or appreciate the term "short-belt situation" or "unexpected" event which might attack us from the society violently and unmercifully.

  11. [Non-medical applications for brain MRI: Ethical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, S; Fagot-Largeault, A; Leboyer, M; Houenou, J

    2015-04-01

    The recent neuroimaging techniques offer the possibility to better understand complex cognitive processes that are involved in mental disorders and thus have become cornerstone tools for research in psychiatry. The performances of functional magnetic resonance imaging are not limited to medical research and are used in non-medical fields. These recent applications represent new challenges for bioethics. In this article we aim at discussing the new ethical issues raised by the applications of the latest neuroimaging technologies to non-medical fields. We included a selection of peer-reviewed English medical articles after a search on NCBI Pubmed database and Google scholar from 2000 to 2013. We screened bibliographical tables for supplementary references. Websites of governmental French institutions implicated in ethical questions were also screened for governmental reports. Findings of brain areas supporting emotional responses and regulation have been used for marketing research, also called neuromarketing. The discovery of different brain activation patterns in antisocial disorder has led to changes in forensic psychiatry with the use of imaging techniques with unproven validity. Automated classification algorithms and multivariate statistical analyses of brain images have been applied to brain-reading techniques, aiming at predicting unconscious neural processes in humans. We finally report the current position of the French legislation recently revised and discuss the technical limits of such techniques. In the near future, brain imaging could find clinical applications in psychiatry as diagnostic or predictive tools. However, the latest advances in brain imaging are also used in non-scientific fields raising key ethical questions. Involvement of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, physicians but also of citizens in neuroethics discussions is crucial to challenge the risk of unregulated uses of brain imaging. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by

  12. Ethical consequences for professionals from the globalization of food, nutrition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Noel W

    2002-01-01

    Globalization is the process of increasing interconnections and linkages, within societies and across geography, due to improved communication and expanded world trade. It limits the differentiation wrought by human cultural evolution, and homogenizes health practices, diet and lifestyle. There are both beneficial and adverse consequences of the globalization process. Globalization also presents a challenge to the development of ethics for practice and advocacy by food and nutrition professionals. Among the related terms, 'morals', 'values' and 'ethics', the latter connotes the basic rules of conduct for interactions within society and with the inanimate environment; rules based on recognized principles (ethical principles). The application of these principles is to resolve ethical dilemmas that arise when more than one interest is at play. Recognized ethical principles include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, justice, utility and stewardship. These can be framed in the context of issues that arise during advocacy for material and behavioural changes to improve the nutritional health of populations. Clearly, at the global level, codes of good conduct and the construction of good food governance can be useful in institutionalizing ethical principles in matters of human diets and eating practices. Ethical dilemmas arise in the context of innate diversity among populations (some individuals benefit, whereas others suffer from the same exposures), and due to the polarity of human physiology and metabolism (practices that prevent some diseases will provoke other maladies). Moreover, the autonomy of one individual to exercise independent will in addressing personal health or treatment of the environment may compromise the health of the individual's neighbours. The challenges for the professional in pursuit of ethical advocacy in a globalized era are to learn the fundamentals of ethical principles; to bear in mind a respect for difference and differentiation that

  13. The ideas of nurses about the reflection of ethic education in their professional life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay Gül

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION[|]This research was prepared as a qualitative study for the contribution to the ethics education studied during nursery education and reflections on nurses' practices by researching nurse's experiences.[¤]METHODS[|]In this study, data were obtained by focus group discussion method used in qualitative research. This study was completed during December 2015 – January 2016 with nurses working at University Hospitals', Training and Research Hospitals', Local Hospitals' Internal Medicine, Surgery and Intensive Care Unit Departments. Inclusion Criteria was obtained in ethics class during education and at least 1 year experience. 21 nurses included in this study. Participants were divided into 3 groups and focus group interview was made. The obtained data were analyzed by thematic analysis method.[¤]RESULTS[|]Participant nurses remarked that in general they cannot remember the knowledge which they learned during ethical classes but case debates are more memorable. Nurses expressed that the most ethical problems are related to ethical principles, malpractice, lack of professional boundaries, managerial problems, systemic problems. They claimed that in most cases there is a contradiction between their learnings and situations that they encounter in clinics and they stated that they are insufficient to represent ethical behavior due to factors like work load, supply and personal deficiency, inadequate professional definition. Nurses stated that ethical education is important but practical education is more efficient than theory and education should be continuous.[¤]DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION[|]As a result, nurses declared that ethical education is important but it should be continuous; they cannot reflect their knowledge on their practical life due to many factors that they encounter on the clinics. In this manner, ethical education at the nursery university program should be clinical oriented, multi-disciplinary and continuous after the

  14. The limits of social justice as an aspect of medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Thomas S

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary accounts of medical ethics and professionalism emphasize the importance of social justice as an ideal for physicians. This ideal is often specified as a commitment to attaining the universal availability of some level of health care, if not of other elements of a "decent minimum" standard of living. I observe that physicians, in general, have not accepted the importance of social justice for professional ethics, and I further argue that social justice does not belong among professional norms. Social justice is a norm of civic rather than professional life; professional groups may demand that their members conform to the requirements of citizenship but ought not to require civic virtues such as social justice. Nor should any such requirements foreclose reasonable disagreement as to the content of civic norms, as requiring adherence to common specifications of social justice would do. Demands for any given form of social justice among physicians are unlikely to bear fruit as medical education is powerless to produce this virtue.

  15. What Next? Translating AGI's 2015 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M. A.; Keane, C.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) published a revised version of the 1999 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct, an aspirational document outlining ethical principles that should inform the professional behavior of all geoscientists. The revised Guidelines reflect a consensus of opinion among AGI's 51 member societies and show an evolution in thinking about geoscience ethics. The Guidelines also represent a foundational document to support the expansion of ethical guidelines by individual societies and organizations. Publishing the Guidelines was a significant milestone but aspirations need to be matched by action. We examine several developments that implement aspects of the Guidelines, including the development of a consensus statement regarding access and inclusion of individuals living with disabilities in the geosciences, a Joint AGI/Geological Society of America Societies meeting on professional conduct, geoethics training initiatives, and efforts to foster international cooperation in recognizing and implementing ethical practice in the geosciences. In addition, we examine the level of success in using these Guidelines as philosophical cornerstones for a number of international projects, such as Resourcing Future Generations and the International Raw Materials Observatory, that bring geoscience directly into contact with large societal issues.

  16. Medical ethics and the clinical curriculum: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyal, L; Hurwitz, B; Yudkin, J S

    1987-09-01

    There are very few medical ethics courses in British medical schools which are a formal part of the clinical curriculum. Such a programme is described in the following, along with the way in which the long-term curriculum committee of the University College and Middlesex Hospital Joint Medical School was persuaded to make it compulsory for first-year students. Pedagogical lessons which have been learned in its planning and implementation are outlined and teaching materials are included concerning student and course assessment which should be useful for others engaged in similar work. Finally, some of the institutional obstacles facing such attempts are discussed, particularly problems concerning timetabling, different types of opposition and the consequent importance of building alliances among clinical teaching staff.

  17. Medical ethics and the clinical curriculum: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyal, L; Hurwitz, B; Yudkin, J S

    1987-01-01

    There are very few medical ethics courses in British medical schools which are a formal part of the clinical curriculum. Such a programme is described in the following, along with the way in which the long-term curriculum committee of the University College and Middlesex Hospital Joint Medical School was persuaded to make it compulsory for first-year students. Pedagogical lessons which have been learned in its planning and implementation are outlined and teaching materials are included concerning student and course assessment which should be useful for others engaged in similar work. Finally, some of the institutional obstacles facing such attempts are discussed, particularly problems concerning timetabling, different types of opposition and the consequent importance of building alliances among clinical teaching staff. PMID:3669044

  18. Knowledge and ethical perception regarding organ donation among medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the knowledge and ethical perception regarding organ donation amongst medical students in Karachi- Pakistan. Methods Data of this cross sectional study was collected by self administered questionnaire from MBBS students of Ziauddin University from 2010 to 2011. Sample size of 158 (83 First years and 75 Fourth years) were selected by convenient sampling and those students who were present and gave consent were included in the study. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results A total of 158 participants from Ziauddin Medical University filled out the questionnaire out of which 83(52.5%) were first years and 75(47.5%) were fourth year medical students. Mean age of sample was 20 ± 1.7. Majority of students were aware about organ donation with print and electronic media as the main source of information. 81.6% agreed that it was ethically correct to donate an organ. In the students’ opinion, most commonly donated organs and tissues were kidney, cornea, blood and platelet. Ideal candidates for donating organ were parents (81%). Regarding list of options for preference to receive an organ, most of the students agreed on young age group patients and persons with family. Willingness to donate was significantly associated with knowledge of allowance of organ donation in religion (P=0.000). Conclusion Both 1st year and 4th year students are aware of Organ Donation, but there is a significant lack of knowledge regarding the topic. PMID:24070261

  19. ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT IN ACCOUNTING – ANALYSIS BASED ON CONCEPTUAL MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana DRĂGAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed in the context of global economic, business ethics and professional judgment becomes increasingly complex, with reflection in all economic fields, including also the accounting profession. This study has the objective to identify the perception of the practitioners in financial accounting on the ethics seen from the perspective of their practical activity which they carry as employees in accounting companies, or as entrepreneurs. The results of the study shows that both ethics and the professional judgment highlighted by the method Concept Maps, represent points of interest in financial-accounting activity of the cabinets, practitioners auditors/accountants paying particular attention to these issues when referring to the quality of the Financial Accounting Statement.

  20. Changing values for nursing and health promotion: exploring the policy context of professional ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, J; Cribb, A

    1999-09-01

    In this article we illustrate, and argue for, the importance of researching the social context of health professionals' ethical agendas and concerns. We draw upon qualitative interview data from 20 nurses working in two occupational health sites, and our discussion focuses mainly upon aspects of the shifting 'ethical context' for those nurses with a health promotion remit who are working in the British National Health Service. Within this discussion we also raise a number of potentially substantive issues, including the risks of colluding in 'double standards', and the tensions between the practitioner and managerial roles in nursing. Overall, we hope to pose questions about the best ways to understand the ethical agency and responsibilities of health professionals.

  1. The Emergence of Ethics and Professionalism in the Early Advertising Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Quentin J.

    In the pre-World War I era, advertising practitioners attempted to make their craft a profession. Generally agreeing that the creation of ethical codes was the most important step toward professionalism, practitioners organized the Associated Advertising Clubs of America (AACA). Early journal articles and AACA proceedings indicate that…

  2. Video Laboratories for the Teaching and Learning of Professional Ethics in Exercise Physiology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchina, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Student researchers in physiology courses often interact with human subjects in classroom research but may be unfamiliar with the professional ethics of experimenter-subject interactions. This communication describes experiences related to an interactive video used in exercise science and general biology courses to help students become aware of,…

  3. Cheating, Ethics and the Student of Professional Psychology: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    Although cheating is reportedly endemic in colleges, the honor system is believed to have reduced its incidence. Cheating in a graduate, clinical psychology training program touches serious fundamental issues with academic, ethical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, and professional implications. The responsibility of the teacher is to respond…

  4. Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Related Ethical and Professional Practice Considerations for Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Anthony L.; Mayton, Michael R.; Yurick, Amanda L.

    2017-01-01

    When rural school districts employ Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) to assist in meeting the needs of students with disabilities, it is important that they be aware of the ethical and professional guidelines to which BCBAs are required to adhere. This article describes the role of these guidelines within the practice of BCBAs and presents…

  5. The ethics of engaged presence: a framework for health professionals in humanitarian assistance and development work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R; Schwartz, Lisa; Sinding, Christina; Elit, Laurie

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we present an ethics framework for health practice in humanitarian and development work: the ethics of engaged presence. The ethics of engaged presence framework aims to articulate in a systematic fashion approaches and orientations that support the engagement of expatriate health care professionals in ways that align with diverse obligations and responsibilities, and promote respectful and effective action and relationships. Drawn from a range of sources, the framework provides a vocabulary and narrative structure for examining the moral dimensions of providing development or humanitarian health assistance to individuals and communities, and working with and alongside local and international actors. The elements also help minimize or avoid certain miscalculations and harms. Emphasis is placed on the shared humanity of those who provide and those who receive assistance, acknowledgement of limits and risks related to the contributions of expatriate health care professionals, and the importance of providing skillful and relevant assistance. These elements articulate a moral posture for expatriate health care professionals that contributes to orienting the practice of clinicians in ways that reflect respect, humility, and solidarity. Health care professionals whose understanding and actions are consistent with the ethics of engaged presence will be oriented toward introspection and reflective practice and toward developing, sustaining and promoting collaborative partnerships. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Moving It Along: A study of healthcare professionals' experience with ethics consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy; Fox, Maria; Rosell, Tarris; Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn

    2017-05-01

    Ethics consultation is the traditional way of resolving challenging ethical questions raised about patient care in the United States. Little research has been published on the resolution process used during ethics consultations and on how this experience affects healthcare professionals who participate in them. The purpose of this qualitative research was to uncover the basic process that occurs in consultation services through study of the perceptions of healthcare professionals. The researchers in this study used a constructivist grounded theory approach that represents how one group of professionals experienced ethics consultations in their hospital in the United States. The results were sufficient to develop an initial theory that has been named after the core concept: Moving It Along. Three process stages emerged from data interpretation: moral questioning, seeing the big picture, and coming together. It is hoped that this initial work stimulates additional research in describing and understanding the complex social process that occurs for healthcare professionals as they address the difficult moral issues that arise in clinical practice.

  7. New Possibilities in Thinking, Speaking and Doing: Early Childhood Teachers' Professional Identity Constructions and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The early childhood sector has in recent times engaged in processes of professionalisation. The expectations associated with engagement in professional relationships is one element of such processes. Another element is an expectation of ethical practice. The paper considers how particular representations of relationships and representations of…

  8. Problems for Social Work in a Strike Situation: Professional, Ethical, and Value Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dena

    1987-01-01

    Discusses potential ethical conflicts social workers face in a strike: whether priority should be given to patient welfare or to the individual's civil rights to participate in union activities. Notes standards of professional behavior conflict with union requirements. Concludes the social work profession should examine labor unions in the 1980s…

  9. Ethical and Moral Courage is Distress among Professional Nurses: A Workplace Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Ethics and moral issues do impact the manner in which professional nurses perform their major duties. Moral distress often conflict with an ethical appropriate course of action that is known, but cannot be implemented. This distress has been associated with job dissatisfaction, burnout, early retirement, withdrawal from the moral dimensions of direct patient care, and others just leaving the profession altogether. In the workplace, institutions must make an assertive effort in providing resources and addressing situations that cause personal anxiety and depression that adversely affects total patient care. The American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) has addressed ethical issues and moral distress in practices that support nurses with moral courage, when encountering ethical conflicts. Ask, Affirm, Assess and Act are the 4 A's that AACN believes should be a part of an organization's strategic plan to create a healthy workplace environment.

  10. Expected ethical competencies of public health professionals and graduate curricula in accredited schools of public health in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lisa M; Wright, Brandy; Semaan, Salaam

    2013-05-01

    We assessed expected ethics competencies of public health professionals in codes and competencies, reviewed ethics instruction at schools of public health, and recommended ways to bridge the gap between them. We reviewed the code of ethics and 3 sets of competencies, separating ethics-related competencies into 3 domains: professional, research, and public health. We reviewed ethics course requirements in 2010-2011 on the Internet sites of 46 graduate schools of public health and categorized courses as required, not required, or undetermined. Half of schools (n = 23) required an ethics course for graduation (master's or doctoral level), 21 did not, and 2 had no information. Sixteen of 23 required courses were 3-credit courses. Course content varied from 1 ethics topic to many topics addressing multiple ethics domains. Consistent ethics education and competency evaluation can be accomplished through a combination of a required course addressing the 3 domains, integration of ethics topics in other courses, and "booster" trainings. Enhancing ethics competence of public health professionals is important to address the ethical questions that arise in public health research, surveillance, practice, and policy.

  11. Ethics education in undergraduate pre-health programs. The contribution of undergraduate colleges and universities to the ethical and moral development of future doctors in the medical and dental professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erratt, Tamie D

    2011-08-01

    There are many barriers to ethics education of students attending medical and dental schools. The question is asked, "Should more attention be given to addressing students' ethics education during their undergraduate years of preparation for professional healthcare programs?" This qualitative study utilizes digitally recorded personal interviews with two undergraduate pre-healthcare students, one medical student, one recently matriculated dental student, one undergraduate pre-healthcare faculty member, three dental school faculty members, and three medical school faculty members. Interview participants discuss areas of personal knowledge and experience concerning: the admissions process and screening of potential medical/dental students for ethical traits and behaviors, influences on student ethical development, undergraduate pre-healthcare ethics training, and preferred college major for pre-healthcare students. The study concludes that undergraduate pre-healthcare programs should take the initiative to be proactive and deliberate in strengthening the positive influences on students. Strategies include: 1) humanities curricula to broaden perspectives and increase non-prejudice; 2) mentoring and modeling by older students, faculty, and community and professional volunteers; 3) ethical case study discussions in class or extracurricular activities; and 4) volunteer/service learning activities. Additionally, curriculum learning is enhanced by the use of reflection and writing, discussions, and media.

  12. Nurses' perception of ethical climate, medical error experience and intent-to-leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jee-In; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2014-02-01

    We examined nurses' perceptions of the ethical climate of their workplace and the relationships among the perceptions, medical error experience and intent to leave through a cross-sectional survey of 1826 nurses in 33 Korean public hospitals. Ethical climate was measured using the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey. Although the sampled nurses perceived their workplace ethical climate positively, 19% reported making at least one medical error during the previous year, and 25% intended to leave their jobs in the near future. Controlling for individual and organizational characteristics, we found that nurses with a more positive perception of the 'patient' dimension of ethical climate were less likely to have made medical errors. Nurses with a more positive perception of the 'patient', 'manager', 'hospital' and 'physician' dimensions of ethical climate were less likely to leave their current job. Enhancing workplace ethical climate could reduce medical errors and improve nurses' retention in public hospitals.

  13. The interface of law and medical ethics in medical intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2009-09-01

    The delivery of medical care in the intensive care setting is subject to various legal principles and processes, as well as important ethical precepts. This article outlines the basic medicine-law interface, explaining the concepts of medical jurisprudence and forensic medicine. It then provides fundamental information about the current American medical malpractice system, including a brief discussion of the elements of a medical malpractice claim, the public policy rationales and goals purportedly undergirding the system, and potential alternatives to the existing medical malpractice system in the United States. Recognizing that the challenge, in the entire range of intensive care as in other medical settings, is adhering in practice to ethical principles while at the same time trying to minimize the providers' possible exposure to legal risks, the article identifies a number of components to the art of delivering care ethically and effectively within a pervasive legal environment, as follows: interfacing positively with the institutional legal counsel and risk management departments; utilizing (as appropriate) clinical practice guidelines or parameters; and pursuing continuing medical-legal education.

  14. Engineer Ethics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae Sik; Kim, Yeong Pil; Kim, Yeong Jin

    2003-03-15

    This book tells of engineer ethics such as basic understanding of engineer ethics with history of engineering as a occupation, definition of engineering and specialized job and engineering, engineer ethics as professional ethics, general principles of ethics and its limitation, ethical theory and application, technique to solve the ethical problems, responsibility, safety and danger, information engineer ethics, biotechnological ethics like artificial insemination, life reproduction, gene therapy and environmental ethics.

  15. Passionate Virtue: Conceptions of Medical Professionalism in Popular Romance Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Medical romance fiction is a subgenre of popular romance fiction that features medical professionals in their work environment. This essay explores the way professionalism is portrayed in popular medical romance fiction written during the early twenty-first century, a period of significant disruption in both the public image and self-understanding of organized medicine. I analyze a selection of contemporary medical romance novels, published between 2008 and 2012, demonstrating that medical romance fiction is a form of public intervention in apparently insular debates over medical professionalism. I conclude that they promote "nostalgic professionalism," a vision of physicians as a select group of highly educated, self-regulated experts who provide, with a caring and altruistic attitude, a vitally important service to society, while at the same time generating implicit critiques of it.

  16. Screening for depression in medical research: ethical challenges and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Aisling M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the important role of depression in major illnesses, screening measures for depression are commonly used in medical research. The protocol for managing participants with positive screens is unclear and raises ethical concerns. The aim of this article is to identify and critically discuss the ethical issues that arise when a positive screen for depression is detected, and offer some guidance on managing these issues. Discussion Deciding on whether to report positive screens to healthcare practitioners is both an ethical and a pragmatic dilemma. Evidence suggests that reporting positive depression screens should only be considered in the context of collaborative care. Possible adverse effects, such as the impact of false-positive results, potentially inappropriate labelling, and potentially inappropriate treatment also need to be considered. If possible, the psychometric properties of the selected screening measure should be determined in the target population, and a threshold for depression that minimises the rate of false-positive results should be chosen. It should be clearly communicated to practitioners that screening scores are not diagnostic for depression, and they should be informed about the diagnostic accuracy of the measure. Research participants need to be made aware of the consequences of the detection of high scores on screening measures, and to be fully informed about the implications of the research protocol. Summary Further research is needed and the experiences of researchers, participants, and practitioners need to be collated before the value of reporting positive screens for depression can be ascertained. In developing research protocols, the ethical challenges highlighted should be considered. Participants must be agreeable to the agreed protocol and efforts should be made to minimise potentially adverse effects.

  17. Screening for depression in medical research: ethical challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Aisling M; McGee, Hannah

    2013-01-08

    Due to the important role of depression in major illnesses, screening measures for depression are commonly used in medical research. The protocol for managing participants with positive screens is unclear and raises ethical concerns. The aim of this article is to identify and critically discuss the ethical issues that arise when a positive screen for depression is detected, and offer some guidance on managing these issues. Deciding on whether to report positive screens to healthcare practitioners is both an ethical and a pragmatic dilemma. Evidence suggests that reporting positive depression screens should only be considered in the context of collaborative care. Possible adverse effects, such as the impact of false-positive results, potentially inappropriate labelling, and potentially inappropriate treatment also need to be considered. If possible, the psychometric properties of the selected screening measure should be determined in the target population, and a threshold for depression that minimises the rate of false-positive results should be chosen. It should be clearly communicated to practitioners that screening scores are not diagnostic for depression, and they should be informed about the diagnostic accuracy of the measure. Research participants need to be made aware of the consequences of the detection of high scores on screening measures, and to be fully informed about the implications of the research protocol. Further research is needed and the experiences of researchers, participants, and practitioners need to be collated before the value of reporting positive screens for depression can be ascertained. In developing research protocols, the ethical challenges highlighted should be considered. Participants must be agreeable to the agreed protocol and efforts should be made to minimise potentially adverse effects.

  18. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. Settings and Design: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: An 18-item survey was designed and comp...

  19. Professional Standards, Teacher Identities and an Ethics of Singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Matthew; Moore, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a critical analysis of the education policy move towards teacher professional standards. Drawing on Lacan's three registers of the psyche (real, imaginary and symbolic), the paper argues that moves towards codification (and domestication) of teachers' work and identities in standardized (and sanitized) forms, such as the…

  20. Cashing In Stars: Does the Professional Ethic Apply in Retirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Congress and the public at large. As Melanie Sloan, executive director of CREW, mentions, the political and public apathy is attributed to the high...begin with the premise of military of- ficers as “professionals.” As students of civil-military relations are aware, Samuel Huntington’s The Soldier and