WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional development communities

  1. Creating Professional Learning Communities: The Work of Professional Development Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Gini; Sudeck, Maria; Rattigan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    If professional learning communities offer opportunities for improving the teaching and learning process, then developing strong professional development school (PDS) partnerships establish an appropriate framework for that purpose. PDS partnerships, however, can be less than effective without proper planning and discussion about the aims of those…

  2. Sustainable school development: professional learning communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof.Dr. E. Verbiest

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution we report about a project about Professional Learning Communities.This project combines development and research. In this contribution we pay attention to the effect of the organisational capacity of a school on the personal and interpersonal capacity and to the impact of a

  3. On Teacher Professional Development: Improving Professional Qualifications and Membership in Professional Teacher Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobkin, V. S.; Adamchuk, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    The article examines issues related to the professional development of teachers. The presented material is structured according to four main themes: teacher self-assessment of their professional competence; their attitude toward traditional forms of training; their participation in events organized by the educational community and associations;…

  4. Developing a Professional Learning Community among Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    This action research study examined the development of a professional learning community (PLC) among 20 preservice secondary teachers as they met regularly during a semester-long, field-based education course to share artifacts of learning from their professional portfolios. The PLC model described by Hord and Tobia (2012) served as a framework…

  5. Factors That Develop Effective Professional Learning Communities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peiying; Lee, Che-Di; Lin, Hongda; Zhang, Chun-Xi

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the key factors of developing effective professional learning communities (PLCs) within the Taiwanese context. Four constructs--supportive and shared leadership, shared visions, collegial trust, and shared practices--were adopted and developed into an instrument for measuring PLC function. A stratified random…

  6. Online Knowledge Communities: Meeting places for continuing professional development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sjoerd A.; van Weert, Tom J.; Munro, Robert K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of Online Knowledge Communities (okc) as meeting places for continuing professional development (cpd). An okc is defined as a social network of members, who are online and are organized by making use of an online knowledge center. The okc has a particular group

  7. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phe...

  8. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phenomenon. The significance of the research includes purposefully facilitating professional learning through informal learning contexts, including social media and online communities beyond technology-centric fields. Discussion and recommendations include using social media and virtual communities as instructional strategies for graduate studies and continued learning beyond formal education.

  9. Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. E.; Cruz, C.

    2014-11-01

    The ingredients for the highly successful, ongoing educator professional development program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" came into place in 2006 when representatives of public and private organizations convened a two-day workshop at the National Science Foundation (NSF) to explore issues around integrating remote sensing with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) instruction at two-year (community and Tribal) colleges. The results of that 2006 workshop informed the shape of a grant proposal, and two phases of iGETT-RS were funded by NSF's Advanced Technological Education Program (NSF DUE #0703185, 2007-2011, and NSF DUE #1205069, 2012-2015). 76 GIS instructors from all over the country have been served. Each of them has spent 18 months on the project, participating in monthly webinars and two Summer Institutes, and creating their own integrated geospatial exercises for the classroom. The project will be completed in June 2015. As the external evaluator for iGETT expressed it, the impact on participating instructors "can only be described as transformative." This paper describes how iGETT came about, how it was designed and implemented, how it affected participants and their programs, and what has been learned by the project staff about delivering professional development in geospatial technologies for workforce preparedness.

  10. Science Professional Learning Communities: Beyond a singular view of teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Robertson, Laura; Robert, Sarah

    2013-07-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) are frequently being used as a vehicle to transform science education. This study explored elementary teachers' perceptions about the impact of participating in a science PLC on their own professional development. With the use of The Science Professional Learning Communities Survey and a semi-structured interview protocol, elementary teachers' perceptions of the goals of science PLCs, the constraints and benefits of participation in PLCs, and reported differences in the impact of PLC participation on novice and experienced teachers were examined. Sixty-five elementary teachers who participated in a science PLC were surveyed about their experiences, and a subsample of 16 teachers was interviewed. Results showed that most of the teachers reported their science PLC emphasized sharing ideas with other teachers as well as working to improve students' science standardized test scores. Teachers noted that the PLCs had impacted their science assessment practices as well as their lesson planning. However, a majority of the participants reported a differential impact of PLCs depending on a teacher's level of experience. PLCs were reported as being more beneficial to new teachers than experienced teachers. The interview results demonstrated that there were often competing goals and in some cases a loss of autonomy in planning science lessons. A significant concern was the impact of problematic interpersonal relationships and communication styles on the group functioning. The role of the PLC in addressing issues related to obtaining science resources and enhancing science content knowledge for elementary science teachers is discussed.

  11. Implementing Action Research and Professional Learning Communities in a Professional Development School Setting to Support Teacher Candidate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews teacher candidates' use of action research and the Professional Learning Community (PLC) concept to support their work in their pre-student teaching field experience. In this research study, teacher candidates are involved in a professional development school relationship that uses action research and PLCs to support candidate…

  12. Supporting Professional Development in Special Education with Web-Based Professional Learning Communities: New Possibilities with Web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the challenges in organizing professional learning communities (PLCs) in special education, identifies the teacher and student benefits of using a PLC approach to professional development, and discusses the promise and pitfalls of organizing web-based PLCs to engage distributed stakeholders in the practice of special…

  13. Professional Development for Teachers of English Language Learners: Discursive Norms, Learning Processes, and Professional Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Daniella

    2010-01-01

    The lack of empirical scholarship on professional development initiatives for teachers of English language learners (ELLs) in US schools has been repeatedly documented in educational research. The present dissertation project examines a professional development course specifically designed for K-12 teachers of ELLs. The course aims to foster the…

  14. Linking University and Teacher Communities: A "Think Tank" Model of Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Sarah K.; Scott, Judith A.; Wells, Jan; Skobel, Bonnie; Jones, Alan; Cross, Susie; Butler, Cynthia; Blackstone, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    Rather than informing the teaching community about good research, five experienced teachers and three university researchers developed a discourse community around vocabulary learning to reflect on practice, engage in shared critiques, and support professional choices. In doing so, they were able to inform the research community about good…

  15. Communities of practice: A means to support occupational therapists’ continuing professional development. A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barry, Margot; Kuijer-Siebelink, Wietske; Nieuwenhuis, Loek; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke

    2018-01-01

    Background: This literature review investigates what research reports about the contribution that communities of practice (CoPs) can make in the continuing professional development (CPD) of qualified occupational therapists. Methods: Academic databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE and ERIC) were searched

  16. Technology Professional Development and Instructional Technology Integration among Part-Time Faculty at Illinois Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohani, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Illinois community college faculty development coordinators' perceptions about how they are implementing faculty technology professional development programs and providing technical support for part-time faculty in the Illinois community college systems. Also examined were part-time faculty perceptions of the degree…

  17. Blended-Format Professional Development and the Emergence of Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Thomas E.; Cady, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we draw on Wenger's (1998) conception of communities of practice to observe the emergence of a community of practice among middle grades mathematics teachers who participated in a two-year blended-format (online synchronous, online asynchronous, and face to face) professional development program designed to increase middle-grades…

  18. Investigating the Development of Professional Learning Communities: Compare Schools in Shanghai and Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Pang, Nicholas Sun-Keung

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated and compared the development of professional learning communities in schools located in two Chinese cities, namely, Shanghai and Mianyang. The two cities have significant differences in terms of educational, economic, social, and cultural development. While Shanghai is a directly controlled municipality in East…

  19. Teacher Professional Development for Technology Integration in a Primary School Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Teacher professional development (TPD) can benefit teachers in classrooms. This study contributes to an understanding of TPD processes where there is sufficient technology integration through teacher participation in a school-based community. It assesses the effectiveness of TPD and its potential problems. Qualitative research methods are used to…

  20. Exploring Differences in Online Professional Development Seminars with the Community of Inquiry Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Judi; Haavind, Sarah; Remold, Julie; Schank, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Four sessions of two professional development seminars were offered to members of an organization. The seminars were voluntary, free of charge, and participants did not receive credit for their attendance. Participation rates and exit survey ratings for the four sessions varied. After the seminars, an analysis using the community of inquiry…

  1. Becoming Music Teacher Educators: Learning from and with Each Other in a Professional Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Kristen; Sweet, Bridget; Derges Kastner, Julie; Russell, Heather A.; Reese, Jill

    2014-01-01

    During this heuristic phenomenological inquiry, we examined our lived experiences as five women (three doctoral students, two early career faculty) in the process of becoming music teacher educators participating in a year-long, online, group-facilitated professional development community (PDC). Data included recorded meetings via Skype, journal…

  2. Professional Development For Community College Faculty: Lessons Learned From Intentional Mentoring Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Geoscience Workforce Development Initiative at UNAVCO supports attracting, training, and professionally developing students, educators, and professionals in the geosciences. For the past 12 years, UNAVCO has managed the highly successful Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) program, with the goal of increasing the diversity of students entering the geosciences. Beginning in 2015, UNAVCO added Geo-Launchpad (GLP), a summer research preparation internship for Colorado community college students to prepare them for independent research opportunities, facilitate career exploration in the geosciences, and provide community college faculty with professional development to facilitate effective mentoring of students. One core element of the Geo-Launchpad program is UNAVCO support for GLP faculty mentors. Each intern applies to the program with a faculty representative (mentor) from his or her home institution. This faculty mentor is engaged with the student throughout the summer via telephone, video chat, text message, or email. At the end of each of the past two summers, UNAVCO has hosted four GLP faculty mentors in Boulder for two days of professional development focused on intentional mentoring of students. Discussions focused on the distinction between mentoring and advising, and the array of career and professional opportunities available to students. Faculty mentors also met with the external evaluator during the mentor training and provided feedback on both their observations of their intern as well as the impact on their own professional experience. Initial outcomes include re-energizing the faculty mentors' commitment to teaching, as well as the opportunity for valuable networking activities. This presentation will focus on the ongoing efforts and outcomes of the novel faculty mentor professional development activities, and the impact these activities have on community college student engagement in the geosciences.

  3. Professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAndrew-Benavidas, E.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation outlines the functions of the North American Young Generation in Nuclear. Activities of the organization include professional development, recruiting, retention, public outreach, leadership, networking, workforce issues, mentoring and communications

  4. Extension Professionals and Community Coalitions: Professional Development Opportunities Related to Leadership and Policy, System, and Environment Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, Carol A.; Lobb, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Community coalitions play an important role in community-wide strategies to promote health and wellbeing, and Extension professionals may provide leadership, technical assistance, and other support to coalitions. Extension professionals across a Midwestern state were invited to participate in an online survey about their coalition involvement and…

  5. An outline of the need for psychology knowledge in health professionals: implications for community development and breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Maryam; Samah, Asnarulkhadi Abu; Saidu, Mohammed Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of health and community psychology in health professionals influences psychosocial and community determinants of health and promoting participation in disease prevention at the community level. This paper appraises the potential of knowledge on psychology in health care professionals and its contribution to community empowerment through individual behavior change and health practice. The authors proposed a schematic model for the use of psychological knowledge in health professionals to promote participation in health interventions/disease prevention programs in developing countries. By implication, the paper provides a vision on policies towards supporting breast cancer secondary prevention efforts for community health development in Asian countries.

  6. Researching the Professional-Development Needs of Community-Engaged Scholars in a New Zealand University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Shephard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We explored the processes adopted by university teachers who engage with communities with a focus on asking how and why they became community-engaged, and an interest in what promotes and limits their engagement and how limitations may be addressed. As part of year-long research project we interviewed 25 community-engaged colleagues and used a general inductive approach to identify recurring themes within interview transcripts. We found three coexisting and re-occurring themes within our interviews. Community-engaged scholars in our institution tended to emphasise the importance of building enduring relationships between our institution and the wider community; have personal ambitions to change aspects of our institution, our communities, or the interactions between them and identified community engagement as a fruitful process to achieve these changes; and identified the powerful nature of the learning that comes from community engagement in comparison with other more traditional means of teaching. Underlying these themes was a sense that community engagement requires those involved to take risks. Our three themes and this underlying sense of risk-taking suggest potential support processes for the professional development of community-engaged colleagues institutionally.

  7. School Teacher Professional Development in Online Communities of Practice:A Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Strange, Majbrit Højland

    2016-01-01

    This study informs researchers of educational technology, teachers, teacher associations and moderators or admins of online platforms who are interested in knowledge sharing among teachers within online communities of practice (CoPs). The continuous professional development of teachers is primarily about improving their teaching practice. It includes both formal and informal learning activities to transform attitudes, behaviour, skills and knowledge. Formal knowledge sharing methods like trai...

  8. Developing professional identity in nursing academics: the role of communities of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nicola; Ferguson, Dorothy; Wilkie, George; Corcoran, Terry; Simpson, Liz

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses the current standing of nursing within the wider United Kingdom (UK) higher education (HE) environment and considers the development of academic identity within the sector, introducing a technology mediated approach to professional learning and development. A community of practice (CoP) is a way of learning based on collaboration among peers. Individuals come together virtually or physically, with a common purpose, defined by knowledge rather than task [Wenger, E., 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity, sixth ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge]. In 2008, a small team of academics at Glasgow Caledonian University, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health created and implemented iCoP, a project undertaken to pilot an international CoP, where novices and expert academics collaborated to debate and discuss the complex transition from clinician to academic. Although not intended as a conventional research project, the developmental journey and emerging online discussion provide an insight into the collective thoughts and opinions of a multi-national group of novice academics. The article also highlights the key challenges, problems and limitations of working in an international online arena with professionals who traditionally work and thrive in a face to face, real time environment.

  9. Professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  10. Rural outreach in Maine: A research-driven professional development teacher community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Michael

    2016-03-01

    In the Maine Physical Sciences Partnership (MainePSP), researchers at the University of Maine have joined together with the state's Department of Education, non-profits, and teachers in multiple school districts to create a dynamic and growing community dedicated to improving K12 education of the physical sciences. Through ongoing efforts to introduce and adapt instructional materials, guided by education research and research-guided professional development, we have built a community responsive to student and teacher needs. This work has fed back into the university setting, where teachers are playing a role in graduate courses taken by our Master of Science in Teaching students. In this talk, I will focus on the role of education research in the partnership, showing how we use research in professional development, the development of assessments, and the analysis of the resulting data. I will describe two projects, one to understand how teachers' content knowledge affects the development of items assessing knowledge of acceleration, the other to see how teachers use their content knowledge of systems and energy to make pedagogical choices based on students' incorrect ideas about conservation of energy. Sponsored in part by NSF Grants MSP-0962805, DRL-1222580, and DUE-1340033.

  11. Beyond Hammers versus Hugs: Leveraging Educator Evaluation and Professional Learning Communities into Job-Embedded Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Rebecca H.; Mazur, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Educational evaluation (Ed Eval) and professional learning communities (PLCs) are two of the nation's most predominant approaches to widespread instructional improvement. Yet key attributes of these reform initiatives are too often experienced by teachers as burdensome, or even detrimental, rather than helpful. The authors of this article contend…

  12. A Professional Learning Community Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Maliszewski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Four teachers (three classroom teachers and a teacher-librarian explain how their school applied a professional learning community framework to its operational practices. They discuss the process, the benefits, and the challenges of professional learning communities.

  13. Analysis of the social network development of a virtual community for Australian intensive care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye Denise; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2014-11-01

    Social media platforms can create virtual communities, enabling healthcare professionals to network with a broad range of colleagues and facilitate knowledge exchange. In 2003, an Australian state health department established an intensive care mailing list to address the professional isolation experienced by senior intensive care nurses. This article describes the social network created within this virtual community by examining how the membership profile evolved from 2003 to 2009. A retrospective descriptive design was used. The data source was a deidentified member database. Since 2003, 1340 healthcare professionals subscribed to the virtual community with 78% of these (n = 1042) still members at the end of 2009. The membership profile has evolved from a single-state nurse-specific network to an Australia-wide multidisciplinary and multiorganizational intensive care network. The uptake and retention of membership by intensive care clinicians indicated that they appeared to value involvement in this virtual community. For healthcare organizations, a virtual community may be a communications option for minimizing professional and organizational barriers and promoting knowledge flow. Further research is, however, required to demonstrate a link between these broader social networks, enabling the exchange of knowledge and improved patient outcomes.

  14. Increasing tsunami preparedness through educator professional development in coastal Cascadia communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Butler, R. F.; Hunter, N.; Lillie, R. J.; Magura, B.; Groom, R.; Johnson, J. A.; Coe, M.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing society's ability to mitigate risks is one of the major goals of geohazard research. Therefore part of tsunami science research must be finding effective ways to communicate scientific findings to the public to be used in community preparedness plans. The "Cascadia EarthScope Earthquake and Tsunami Education Program" (CEETEP; ceetep.oregonstate.edu) has worked to bridge the gap between scientific researchers and the public by providing professional development workshops for educators from coastal communities in Oregon, Washington, and northern California. CEETEP translates cutting edge EarthScope and other geoscience research into educational resources appropriate for K-12 teachers, park and museum interpreters, and emergency management outreach educators and their learners. Local educators have the potential to reach a wide segment of coastal residents. The tsunami generated by the next Great Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake will arrive only 10-30 minutes after shaking, making mitigation and community-wide education an imperative. An essential component of CEETEP is collaboration with experts in science, pedagogy, and emergency preparedness. CEETEP provided two 4-day workshops and a follow-up Share-a-thon each year for three years (2013-2015). 151 educators participated in the program. Results from CEETEP are very encouraging. Participant content knowledge improved from 49% to 82% over the course of the workshop. Similarly, confidence in teaching about workshop topics increased from an average of 3.0 to 5.3 on a 6-point scale. Participant optimism about the efficacy and tractability of community-level planning also increased from 6.1 to 7.8 on a 9-point scale. Nearly 90% of participants continued to be active with the program through their March Share-a-thon and presented on a wide range of activities that they and their learners undertook related to earthquake and tsunami science and preparedness. Participants were also quite favorable about the

  15. Conceptualising the Research-Practice-Professional Development Nexus: Mobilising Schools as "Research-Engaged" Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues the need for coherent, holistic frameworks offering insightful understandings as well as viable, connected and synergistic solutions to schools in addressing pressing problems arising from the acknowledged gaps between research, practice and professional development. There is a need to conceptualise a comprehensive conceptual…

  16. Talk in Blended-Space Speech Communities: An Exploration of Discursive Practices of a Professional Development Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Tabitha Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study is an exploration of alternative teacher professional development. While using symbolic interactionism for a research lens, it characterizes the discursive practices commonly found in formal, informal, and blended-space speech communities based on the talk within a leadership-development program comprised of five female, church-based…

  17. The impact of professional development on classroom teaching for science educators participating in a long term community of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Aaron C.

    Efforts to modify and improve science education in the United States have seen minimal success (Crawford, 2000; Borko & Putman, 1996; Puntambekar, Stylianou & Goldstein, 2007; Lustick, 2011). One important reason for this is the professional development that teachers go through in order to learn about and apply these new ideas is generally of poor quality and structured incorrectly for long-term changes in the classroom (Little, 1993; Fullen, 1996; Porter, 2000; Jeanpierre, Oberhauser, & Freeman, 2005). This grounded theory study explores a science community of practice and how the professional development achieved through participation in that community has effected the instruction of the teachers involved, specifically the incorporation of researched based effective science teaching instructional strategies. This study uses personal reflection papers written by the participants, interviews, and classroom observations to understand the influence that the science community of practice has had on the participants. Results indicate that participation in this science community of practice has significant impact on the teachers involved. Participants gained greater understanding of science content knowledge, incorporated effective science instructional strategies into their classroom, and were able to practice both content knowledge and strategies in a non-threatening environment thus gaining a greater understanding of how to apply them in the classrooms. These findings motivate continued research in the role that communities of practice may play in teacher professional develop and the effectiveness of quality professional development in attaining long-term, sustained improvement in science education.

  18. Teachers' professional development in a community: A study of the central actors, their networks and web-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Lallimo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article was to study teachers' professional development related to web-based learning in the context of the teacher community. The object was to learn in what kind of networks teachers share the knowledge of web-based learning and what are the factors in the community that support or challenge teachers professional development of web-based learning. The findings of the study revealed that there are teachers who are especially active, called the central actors in this study, in the teacher community who collaborate and share knowledge of web-based learning. These central actors share both technical and pedagogical knowledge of web-based learning in networks that include both internal and external relations in the community and involve people, artefacts and a variety of media. Furthermore, the central actors appear to bridge different fields of teaching expertise in their community.According to the central actors' experiences the important factors that support teachers' professional development of web-based learning in the community are; the possibility to learn from colleagues and from everyday working practices, an emotionally safe atmosphere, the leader's personal support and community-level commitment. Also, the flexibility in work planning, challenging pupils, shared lessons with colleagues, training events in an authentic work environment and colleagues' professionalism are considered meaningful for professional development. As challenges, the knowledge sharing of web-based learning in the community needs mutual interests, transactive memory, time and facilities, peer support, a safe atmosphere and meaningful pedagogical practices.On the basis of the findings of the study it is suggested that by intensive collaboration related to web-based learning it may be possible to break the boundaries of individual teachership and create such sociocultural activities which support collaborative professional development in the teacher

  19. Investigating the Building of a WeChat-Based Community of Practice for Language Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Grace Yue; Wang, Yuping

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the process of Community of Practice (CoP) building for language teachers' professional development through the support of a WeChat group. WeChat is an instant messenger app that provides a multimodal platform for one-on-one and group interactions through text, audio and video. In order to support the implementation of flipped…

  20. Statistics Graduate Students' Professional Development for Teaching: A Communities of Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Nicola

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are responsible for instructing approximately 25% of introductory statistics courses in the United States (Blair, Kirkman, & Maxwell, 2013). Most research on GTA professional development focuses on structured activities (e.g., courses, workshops) that have been developed to improve GTAs' pedagogy and content knowledge. Few studies take into account the social contexts of GTAs' professional development. However, GTAs perceive their social interactions with other GTAs to be a vital part of their preparation and support for teaching (e.g., Staton & Darling, 1989). Communities of practice (CoPs) are one way to bring together the study of the social contexts and structured activities of GTA professional development. CoPs are defined as groups of practitioners who deepen their knowledge and expertise by interacting with each other on an ongoing basis (e.g., Lave & Wenger, 1991). Graduate students may participate in CoPs related to teaching in many ways, including attending courses or workshops, participating in weekly meetings, engaging in informal discussions about teaching, or participating in e-mail conversations related to teaching tasks. This study explored the relationship between statistics graduate students' experiences in CoPs and the extent to which they hold student-centered teaching beliefs. A framework for characterizing GTAs' experiences in CoPs was described and a theoretical model relating these characteristics to GTAs' beliefs was developed. To gather data to test the model, the Graduate Students' Experiences Teaching Statistics (GETS) Inventory was created. Items were written to collect information about GTAs' current teaching beliefs, teaching beliefs before entering their degree programs, characteristics of GTAs' experiences in CoPs, and demographic information. Using an online program, the GETS Inventory was administered to N =218 statistics graduate students representing 37 institutions in 24 different U.S. states

  1. Fostering Special Education Certification through Professional Development, Learning Communities and Mentorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahan, Mitzi P.; Olivier, Dianne F.; Wadsworth, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present mixed methodology evaluation data regarding a professional development initiative designed to offer non-certified special education teachers specialized classroom and teacher certification support. The project was grounded in evidence-based strategies that resulted in direct implications for teacher…

  2. Twitter: A Professional Development and Community of Practice Tool for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell-Aguilar, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    This article shows how a group of language teachers use Twitter as a tool for continuous professional development through the #MFLtwitterati hashtag. Based on data collected through a survey (n = 116) and interviews (n = 11), it describes how this collective of teachers use the hashtag and evaluates the impact of their Twitter network on their…

  3. Remedial teaching in Indian under-resourced communities: Professional development of para-teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raval, Harini; McKenney, Susan; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a summative evaluation of a professional development program for para-teachers within an Indian NGO. The program aimed to support para-teachers in well-structured learner-centered enactment by introducing planning and reflection of daily lessons. The study investigated lesson

  4. Undergraduate and Teaching Assistants' Perceptions of Classroom Community in Freshman Biological Sciences Laboratories and Implications for Persistence and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardohely, Andrew

    The American economy hinges on the health and production of science, technology engineering and mathematics workforce (STEM). Although this sector of the American workforce represents a substantially fewer jobs the STEM workforce fuels job growth and sustainability in the other sectors of the American workforce. Unfortunately, over the next decade the U.S. will face an additional deficit of over a million STEM professionals, thus the need is here now to fill this deficit. STEM education should, therefore, dedicated to producing graduates. One strategy to produce more STEM graduates is through retention of student in STEM majors. Retention or persistence is highly related to student sense of belonging in academic environments. This study investigates graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) perceptions of their classrooms and the implications of those perceptions on professional development. Furthermore, correlations between classroom community and student desire to persist, as measured by Rovai's Classroom Community Index (CCI) were established (P=0.0311). The interactions are described and results are discussed. Using a framework of teaching for community, and a qualitative analytic case study with memo writing about codes and themes methodology supported several themes including passion to teach and dedication to student learning, innovation in teaching practices based on evidence, an intrinsic desire to seek a diverse set of feedback, and instructors can foster community in the classroom. Using the same methodology one emergent theme, a tacit rather than explicit understanding of reading the classroom, was also present in the current study. Based on the results and using a lens for professional development, strategies and suggestions are made regarding strategies to enhance instructors' use of feedback and professional development.

  5. A Professional Learning Community Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides insights into how Life Sciences teachers in the Eastern Cape can be supported through professional learning communities (PLCs) as a potential approach to enhancing their biodiversity knowledge. PLCs are communities that provide the setting and necessary support for groups of classroom teachers to ...

  6. Teacher Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nareerat Rakwichitkul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Teacher professional development are the teachers’ learning process throughout their career stages to ensure that teachers have knowledge, skills and needed competencies for teaching among rapid changes in social, economic and technology which have the impact on learning and teaching. This article deals with the topics of the framework for teaching, teacher career stages and teacher professional development. The research findings related to teacher professional development, teacher professional development activities, suggestions for planning the professional development. Those research findings can be applied and implemented by the school principals, educational supervisors and other professional developers.

  7. Probing community nurses' professional basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun

    2017-01-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating...... diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot...... ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers....

  8. Professional Development. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In this professional development research brief, the author sets forth the overarching considerations that should be kept in mind when conceptualizing professional development for educators working with neglected or delinquent youth (N or D). The brief begins by defining professional development and demonstrating why it is a critical support for…

  9. Lessons from Providing Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Two-year colleges and Tribal colleges are important centers for workforce education and training. A professional development program funded by the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education Program, 2007-2011 and 2012-2015, is providing the resources needed by instructors at those colleges to develop courses and programs in remote sensing. The highly successful program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" will complete its currently funded work in May 2015. 76 instructors of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) from all over the country will have been served. Each of them will have spent 18 months on the project, participating in two Summer Institutes at NASA and USGS and in monthly webinars on science and technology of remote sensing. iGETT-RS participants have created their own exercises and "concept modules" for the classroom, and many have created new courses and new programs across the country. As the external evaluator for iGETT-RS expressed it, the impact on project participants can "only be described as transformational." Viewers of this presentation will learn about the iGETT-RS project design and approach; successes, failures and lessons learned by the staff; and how to access the workshop materials and participant-authored classroom resources. Viewers will also learn about the Geospatial Technology Competency Model at the US Department of Labor, and about specifications for the Remote Sensing Model Course recently developed by the National Geospatial Technology Center to provide invaluable frameworks for faculty, students, administrators and employers.

  10. Translating Policy into Practice for Community-Based Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Targeting Professional Development Needs among Physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fary, Robyn E; Slater, Helen; Chua, Jason; Briggs, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Contemporary health policy promotes delivery of community-based health services to people with musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This emphasis requires a skilled workforce to deliver safe, effective care. We aimed to explore physiotherapy workforce readiness to co-manage consumers with RA by determining the RA-specific professional development (PD) needs in relation to work and educational characteristics of physiotherapists in Western Australia (WA). Methods. An e-survey was sent to physiotherapists regarding their confidence in co-managing people with RA and their PD needs. Data including years of clinical experience, current RA clinical caseload, professional qualifications, and primary clinical area of practice were collected. Results. 273 physiotherapists completed the survey. Overall confidence in managing people with RA was low (22.7-58.2%) and need for PD was high (45.1-95.2%). Physiotherapists with greater years of clinical experience, a caseload of consumers with RA, postgraduate qualifications in musculoskeletal physiotherapy, or who worked in the musculoskeletal area were more confident in managing people with RA and less likely to need PD. Online and face-to-face formats were preferred modes of PD delivery. Discussion. To enable community-based RA service delivery to be effectively established, subgroups within the current physiotherapy workforce require upskilling in the evidence-based management of consumers with RA.

  11. Translating Policy into Practice for Community-Based Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Targeting Professional Development Needs among Physiotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn E. Fary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Contemporary health policy promotes delivery of community-based health services to people with musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This emphasis requires a skilled workforce to deliver safe, effective care. We aimed to explore physiotherapy workforce readiness to co-manage consumers with RA by determining the RA-specific professional development (PD needs in relation to work and educational characteristics of physiotherapists in Western Australia (WA. Methods. An e-survey was sent to physiotherapists regarding their confidence in co-managing people with RA and their PD needs. Data including years of clinical experience, current RA clinical caseload, professional qualifications, and primary clinical area of practice were collected. Results. 273 physiotherapists completed the survey. Overall confidence in managing people with RA was low (22.7–58.2% and need for PD was high (45.1–95.2%. Physiotherapists with greater years of clinical experience, a caseload of consumers with RA, postgraduate qualifications in musculoskeletal physiotherapy, or who worked in the musculoskeletal area were more confident in managing people with RA and less likely to need PD. Online and face-to-face formats were preferred modes of PD delivery. Discussion. To enable community-based RA service delivery to be effectively established, subgroups within the current physiotherapy workforce require upskilling in the evidence-based management of consumers with RA.

  12. Community Health Workers in Health-Related Missouri Agencies: Role, Professional Development and Health Information Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visker, Joseph; Rhodes, Darson; Cox, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Community Health Workers (CHWs) serve an indispensable but oftten misunderstood and unrecognized role in public health. These individuals constitute the frontline of health care in many communities and are relied upon to provide an assortment of services. Unfortunately, the full extent to which CHWs are utilized is unknown and there is little…

  13. Promoting teachers' professional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, Pietsje Roelofje

    2008-01-01

    Because teacher quality has a great influence on pupil attainment, teachers’ professional development receives a lot of attention in educational policy. This dissertation contains five studies on how teachers’ professional development, in terms of learning at the workplace, can be explained and

  14. Evaluating professional development

    CERN Document Server

    Guskey, Thomas R

    2000-01-01

    This is a practical guide to evaluating professional development programs at five increasing levels of sophistication: participants' reaction to professional development; how much participants learned; evaluating organizational support and change; how participants use their new knowledge and skills; and improvements in student learning.

  15. Standards and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengler, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the professional development that has taken place in conjunction with Ohio adopting the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards. The professional development (PD) has changed over time to include not only training on the new standards and lesson plans but training on the concepts defined in the…

  16. Planning for Technology Integration in a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Jennifer; Hutchison, Amy; Johnson, Debra; Johnson, Kurt; Stromer, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Barriers to technology integration in instruction include a lack of time, resources, and professional development. One potential approach to overcoming these barriers is through collaborative work, or professional learning communities. This article focuses on one group of teachers who leveraged their professional learning community to focus on…

  17. Opportunities and Challenges for Teacher Professional Development: A Case of Collaborative Learning Community in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjeong; So, Kyunghee

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how characteristics of a collaborative professional learning activity support and hinder teacher learning and growth by examining the experiences of three Korean secondary teachers who participated in a school-initiated collaborative teacher learning project. The findings demonstrated that this learning opportunity…

  18. Determinants of Success for Online Communities: An Analysis of Three Communities in Terms of Members' Perceived Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon

    2009-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence suggests that the updated DeLone and McLean's information systems (D&M IS) model can identify the determinants of success of online communities in terms of member loyalty (Lin and Lee 2006). This study is similarly concerned with the challenge of identifying the determinants of success of online communities, but it…

  19. Partnering for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Duerr, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Literacy specialists are often overlooked when determining the professional development needs within a school, and yet they are arguably the school's best resource to empower teachers with professional growth to meet state mandates. How can literacy specialists be supported to increase their knowledge and skills so that all educators' and…

  20. Evaluating the Impacts of Professional Development: A Mixed Method Study of Adult Education Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Jessica S.

    2010-01-01

    Adult education programs providing classes to students preparing for high school equivalency and learning English that demonstrate characteristics of learning organizations may be better able to thrive when confronted with less-than-ideal circumstances. Many of these programs organize adult educators into learning communities as the context for…

  1. Developing an online learning community for mental health professionals and service users: a discursive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Janet; Jones, Ray B; Ashurst, Emily

    2012-03-21

    There is increasing interest in online collaborative learning tools in health education, to reduce costs, and to offer alternative communication opportunities. Patients and students often have extensive experience of using the Internet for health information and support, and many health organisations are increasingly trying out online tools, while many healthcare professionals are unused to, and have reservations about, online interaction. We ran three week-long collaborative learning courses, in which 19 mental health professionals (MHPs) and 12 mental health service users (MHSUs) participated. Data were analysed using a discursive approach to consider the ways in which participants interacted, and how this contributed to the goal of online learning about using Internet technologies for mental health practice. MHSUs and MHPs were able to discuss issues together, listening to the views of the other stakeholders. Discussions on synchronous format encouraged participation by service users while the MHPs showed a preference for an asynchronous format with longer, reasoned postings. Although participants regularly drew on their MHP or MHSU status in discussions, and participants typically drew on either a medical expert discourse or a "lived experience" discourse, there was a blurred boundary as participants shifted between these positions. The anonymous format was successful in that it produced a "co-constructed asymmetry" which permitted the MHPs and MHSUs to discuss issues online, listening to the views of other stakeholders. Although anonymity was essential for this course to 'work' at all, the recourse to expert or lay discourses demonstrates that it did not eliminate the hierarchies between teacher and learner, or MHP and MHSU. The mix of synchronous and asynchronous formats helped MHSUs to contribute. Moderators might best facilitate service user experience by responding within an experiential discourse rather than an academic one.

  2. Developing an online learning community for mental health professionals and service users: a discursive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smithson Janet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in online collaborative learning tools in health education, to reduce costs, and to offer alternative communication opportunities. Patients and students often have extensive experience of using the Internet for health information and support, and many health organisations are increasingly trying out online tools, while many healthcare professionals are unused to, and have reservations about, online interaction. Methods We ran three week-long collaborative learning courses, in which 19 mental health professionals (MHPs and 12 mental health service users (MHSUs participated. Data were analysed using a discursive approach to consider the ways in which participants interacted, and how this contributed to the goal of online learning about using Internet technologies for mental health practice. Results MHSUs and MHPs were able to discuss issues together, listening to the views of the other stakeholders. Discussions on synchronous format encouraged participation by service users while the MHPs showed a preference for an asynchronous format with longer, reasoned postings. Although participants regularly drew on their MHP or MHSU status in discussions, and participants typically drew on either a medical expert discourse or a "lived experience" discourse, there was a blurred boundary as participants shifted between these positions. Conclusions The anonymous format was successful in that it produced a "co-constructed asymmetry" which permitted the MHPs and MHSUs to discuss issues online, listening to the views of other stakeholders. Although anonymity was essential for this course to 'work' at all, the recourse to expert or lay discourses demonstrates that it did not eliminate the hierarchies between teacher and learner, or MHP and MHSU. The mix of synchronous and asynchronous formats helped MHSUs to contribute. Moderators might best facilitate service user experience by responding within an experiential

  3. Personal professional development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rao, S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Three workshop sessions on personal professional development were held during the Third IUPAP Women in Physics Conference. These were designed to teach participants about planning for career success, "survival skills," negotiation, and ways...

  4. Involving technical professionals in community relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, K.A.; Meyer, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Weldon Spring site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental restoration project, has developed a successful community relations program that differs from the traditional approach and has built a general consensus about the DOE's work at the Weldon Spring site. The WSSRAP has a small, dedicated Community Relations Department that is heavily supported by technical professionals who receive intensive training in preparatory and presentation skills, role-playing, and critiquing of performances. This training allows the public to speak directly with the individuals responsible for remediation activities. The media, in turn, has access to technical individuals with good presentation skills, and WSSRAP managers can be confident that interactions are handled professionally. This approach results in a satisfied client. The WSSRAP's community relations program is a high-quality, cost-effective program that could be easily implemented by other facilities

  5. A professional experience learning community for secondary mathematics: developing pre-service teachers' reflective practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Michael; McMaster, Heather

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the reflective practice of a group of nine secondary mathematics pre-service teachers. The pre-service teachers participated in a year-long, school-based professional experience program which focussed on observing, co-teaching and reflecting on a series of problem-solving lessons in two junior secondary school mathematics classrooms. The study used a mixed methods approach to consider the impact of shared pedagogical conversations on pre-service teachers' written reflections. It also examined whether there were differences in the focus of reflections depending on whether the lesson was taught by an experienced mathematics teacher, or taught by a pair of their peers, or co-taught by themselves with a peer. Results suggest that after participants have observed lessons taught by an experienced teacher and reflected collaboratively on those lessons, they continue to reflect on lessons taught by their peers and on their own lessons when co-teaching, rather than just describe or evaluate them. However, their written reflections across all contexts continued to focus primarily on teacher actions and classroom management rather than on student learning.

  6. Professional Communities of Practice: We Need Them, But How to Develop Them Successfully?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollenbroek, Wouter Bernardus; Wetterling, J.M.; de Vries, Sjoerd A.; Marcus-Quinn, Ann; Hourigan, Triona

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch education system is in a gradual transformation from standardised curriculum driven education to personalised education. Drivers are new media developments, future job transformations, recognizing the relevance of 21st century skills, and more. Dutch teachers increasingly acknowledge the

  7. Community-Based Teacher Professional Development in Remote Areas in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjanto, Ignatius; Lie, Anita; Wihardini, Diah; Pryor, Laura; Wilson, Mark

    2018-01-01

    The Indonesian government has been struggling to improve the quality of teachers in its public and private schools. Several programmes of teacher education and teacher certification have been designed to enhance teacher quality. However, the programmes do not yet develop effective teachers. Supporting the government programmes, the Tanoto…

  8. An Analysis of How Building a Collaborative Community of Professional Social Studies Teachers through Targeted Ambient Professional Development Impacts Social Studies Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Brown, Karen; Shaffer, LaShorage; Werner, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a yearlong ambient professional development (PD) program-The Wayne Schools Global Geography Project (WSGG-project)-that focused on improving teacher quality through PD and classroom observations for in-service social studies teachers. The project targeted middle and high school social studies teachers and used…

  9. Holding the Reins of the Professional Learning Community: Eight Themes from Research on Principals' Perceptions of Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    Using a naturalistic inquiry approach and thematic analysis, this paper outlines the findings of a research study that examined 12 Manitoba principals' conceptions of professional learning communities. The study found that these principals consider the development of professional learning communities to be a normative imperative within the…

  10. #Digitalfaith: Using Social Media for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Sable A.; Cordovés, Janett I.

    2018-01-01

    There is a need to identify and create spaces for professionals in higher education to engage religion, secularism, and spirituality in meaningful ways. #DigitalFaith resources are the digital platforms and communities supporting religious, secular, and spiritual development, and they offer potential avenues for professional development. This…

  11. Nurturing Medical Professionalism in the Surgical Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching community in a Kenyan context on how ... buttressed by the Mezirow's theory of transformative learning, especially .... programs with the other institutions, or like other medical ... “A career day where they bring different professionals:.

  12. Nurturing Medical Professionalism in the Surgical Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The teaching of professionalism worldwide is changing for effectiveness. Our aim was to explore the reflection of the surgical teaching community in a Kenyan context on how professionalism can be effectively inculcated through the socio-cultural concept of activity theory. Methods: A sequential mixed-methods ...

  13. Professional Learning Communities: Teachers' Perceptions and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLC's) are designed to help schools improve student achievement; all decisions are based on the needs of students. PLC's are an effective way to receive professional development (PD), allow for collaboration with fellow teachers, and offer timely intervention to all students. In a district known for PLC…

  14. Improving curriculum development practices in a technical vocational community college: examining effects of a professional development arrangement for middle managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, Nabeel; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2015-01-01

    Learning about curriculum development is critical for middle managers of technical vocational institutions in order to assume curriculum leadership in maintaining and enhancing the quality and relevance of their educational programs. This case study reports on the design and effects of a

  15. Soccer Endurance Development in Professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, C. R.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.; Huijgen, B. C. H.; Visscher, C.

    The development of intermittent endurance capacity, its underlying mechanisms and role in reaching professional level in soccer was investigated. The sample included 130 talented youth soccer players aged 14-18, who became professional (n = 53) or non-professional (n = 77) players in adulthood. In

  16. Observation Tools for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Professional development of teachers, including English language teachers, empowers them to change in ways that improve teaching and learning (Gall and Acheson 2011; Murray 2010). In their seminal research on staff development--professional development in today's terms--Joyce and Showers (2002) identify key factors that promote teacher change.…

  17. Development of professional expertise in optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Caroline

    2011-04-01

    Development of professional expertise is the gradual transition from novice to expert within a profession. Studies on expertise in the profession of optometry have never been published. However, many studies have been performed in other health professions (e.g., nursing, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy). This report is an overview of the development of professional expertise that will highlight some applications for optometry. A 5-level scale of professional expertise development, divided into 2 parts, is described. The first part is the progression of students during their professional studies (novice, intermediate, competent). The second part is the professional development occurring during the practice years (advanced, expert). Personal and collective efforts are required to foster the progression toward expertise. Great interest for the profession, motivation, and deliberate practice are individual attitudes that help this progression. The "optometric community of practice," by means of university (professional) training, continuing education, and collaboration between colleagues, also contributes to this process. Professional development is an integral part of the Optometric Oath. Each clinical case is a potential learning experience contributing to one's professional development. Optometrists' attitudes are predominant factors in the progression from one level to another. Copyright © 2011 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Making the Most of Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Brasfield, Amanda; Dupree, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    As more and more schools implement professional learning communities (PLCs), school librarians often ask: What is the role of school librarians in PLCs? What should they be doing to contribute? What are their colleagues in other schools doing? In this article the authors explore these questions by first describing eight potential roles for school…

  19. A Conversation about Professionalism and Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Patricia A.; Crowson, Robert L.; Goldring, Ellen B.; Mawhinney, Hanne B.; Ogawa, Rodney T.; Driscoll, Mary Erina

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interactive electronic conversation among a group of scholars. Participants examined the nature of relationships between professionals and school communities and debated the degree to which conflict was either inevitable or useful in sustaining this connection. They tried to imagine the organizational structures and policies needed to…

  20. Effective Strategies for Sustaining Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia R.

    2010-01-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLCs), in which educators work collaboratively to improve learning for students, need effective strategies to sustain them. PLCs promote continuous improvement in student learning and build academic success with increased teacher expertise. Grounded in organizational systems theory, participative leadership…

  1. Mothers' perceptions of community health professional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunders, Helena; Giles, David; Douglas, Hazel

    2007-04-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore mothers' experiences of the support they received from community health professionals. Every third mother was selected from an NHS Trust's database of women whose health visitors had used the Solihull Approach. Forty-two women were sent information packs and consent forms. Nine mothers who returned consent forms were interviewed. The interview transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results expand on previous research and contribute additional ideas to the existing evidence base. The findings explore the concepts of trust, expertise and understanding within the working partnership. In addition, the results address mothers' need for reliability, and a preference for professionals who understood women's beliefs about what it means to be a 'good mother'. The results and recommendations are pertinent to those community health professionals who work in the area of early childhood intervention, including practitioners who use the Solihull Approach.

  2. Developing professional competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of university programs for professionals is to qualify the students to act competently in a subsequent job situation. Practical experiences as well as comprehensive research studies have shown that only a limited part of what is learned during the coursework is applied in the subsequent...

  3. Definition of Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning Forward, 2015

    2015-01-01

    President Obama signed into law the Every Student Succeeds Act, the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, on December 10, 2015. "Learning Forward's focus in this new law is its improved definition of professional learning," said Stephanie Hirsh, executive director of Learning Forward. "We've long advocated…

  4. Twitter and Physics Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadji, Taoufik

    2016-01-01

    The advent of Twitter® and other social media services of its type ushered in a new era of professional development in education. This article addresses how a group of users have been employing Twitter to conduct professional development sessions that would benefit their participants by advancing their pedagogical approaches to learning and…

  5. Online Professional Development: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Meg S.; Phalen, Lena; Moran, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Many teachers are turning to online professional development to meet their learning needs, but the vast array of available opportunities may be overwhelming. This article provides a framework for making sense of common online teacher learning opportunities. It also suggests situations where online professional development may be most useful and…

  6. Designing Professional Development That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Beatrice F.; Desimone, Laura; Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    By studying survey data from 1,000 teachers participating in a Title II workshop, researchers identified three structural features (form, duration, and collective participation) that set a proper context for professional development. Three core features of professional-development learning experience include content focus, active learning, and…

  7. Educating for Professional Identity Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Tan (Chin Peil)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In preparing students for their role in their respective communities, vocational and professional education should provide for learning experiences that acculturate them to become the new and bona fide practitioners. In addition to acquiring pre-requisite knowledge

  8. ICT FOR TEACHER'S PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Nina P. Dementievska; Nataliia V. Morze

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on pedagogy and psychological issues connected to high order thinking skills development in process of PBL (Project Based Learning) with using ICT (Information Communication Technology). Based on materials of teacher's professional development training course.

  9. Values conflicts in professional-community collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, James E

    2010-01-01

    GAP/I and INP+ represent markedly divergent cultures and therefore highlight the opportunities and strains associated with professional-community collaborations. I believe, however, that the factors that emerge from studying GAP/I-INP+ are not idiosyncratic and are relevant for other professional-community dyads. Every such partnership is likely to require some form of bridging mechanism to serve the same purposes as Mr Varghese's role did. The task of creating a zone of optimal tension may be less familiar than the need to build bridges but it is no less important. Tension between partners with significantly different cultural backgrounds has tremendous potential for generating misunderstanding and distrust. Avoiding tension-laden issues is likely to entail significant cost, whether in the form of resentment, distrust, withdrawal, or settling for a lesser outcome than could be achieved. Finally, creating and sustaining the potential for constructive tension typically requires the humble virtues associated with servant-leadership: patience, persistence and understanding.

  10. Union Contracts and Teacher Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V. Bredeson

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I report the results of an investigation that examined the impact of teacher union contracts on the development of professional learning communities in schools. There are three primary sources of data used in the study: 1 100 written teacher union contract documents; 2 structured interview data from 21 educators (school superintendents, principals, directors of staff development, and teacher union representatives; and 3 focus group interview data from educational leaders in schools. The analysis and discussion focus on five areas related to teacher professional development with implications for policy and practice: explicit language covering opportunities for teaching learning in their work; governance and decision making structures, that is, specific provisions covering wages, hours, and conditions of employment; the description of legitimate and sponsored activities for the professional development of teachers; and the resources supporting the on-going professional growth of teachers. The findings indicate that rethinking, restructuring, and organizational re-culturing in schools are initial expressions of a new unionism that has the potential to lead to the development of more powerful professional learning communities in schools.

  11. Perceptions of School Principals on Participation in Professional Learning Communities as Job-Embedded Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudioso, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Perceptions of School Principals on Participation in Professional Learning Communities as Job-Embedded Learning Jennifer Gaudioso Principal Professional Learning Communities (PPLCs) have emerged as a vehicle for professional development of principals, but there is little research on how principals experience PPLCs or how districts can support…

  12. The Role of Departmental Leadership for Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanblaere, Bénédicte; Devos, Geert

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Department heads play a pivotal role in the functioning of departments in secondary schools. However, quantitative research about the role of departmental leadership for the development of professional learning communities (PLCs) in subject departments in secondary schools remains scarce. As PLCs are seen as promising contexts for…

  13. Designing Professional Learning Communities through Understanding the Beliefs of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jie; Kang, Rui; Liu, Di

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to initiate the process of building professional development learning communities for pre-service math teachers through revealing those teachers' conceptions/beliefs of students' learning and their own learning in China. It examines Chinese pre-service math teachers' conceptions of student learning and their related…

  14. Accelerated Schools as Professional Learning Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Julie K.

    The goal of the Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) is to develop schools in which all children achieve at high levels and all members of the school community engage in developing and fulfilling the school's vision. But to fully implement the ASP model, a school must become a learning community that stresses relationships, shared values, and a…

  15. Physiotherapists' stories about professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Anna F; Bolander Laksov, Klara; Fjellström, Mona

    2015-01-01

    A professional career may extend over a period of 40 years. Although learning is a feature of professional competence, little is known about learning and development after professional entry education. Narrative inquiry was used to understand how physiotherapists learned and developed over time, and stories from a purposeful sample of 12 physiotherapists were collected. Stories were thematically analyzed with regard to key elements related to learning and development, and common themes were identified across stories. Four themes emerged from the analysis where physiotherapists learned and developed in working life: (1) facing challenges; (2) contrasting perspectives; (3) drawing on hundreds of educators; and (4) building on personal experience. Non-formal ways of learning in working life may help physiotherapists learn and develop confidence, communication strategies and different approaches to treatment. Besides reflection on personal experience and patient encounters, learning and development may be promoted and supported by taking on challenges and changing settings.

  16. Professional mobile application development

    CERN Document Server

    McWherter, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Create applications for all major smartphone platforms Creating applications for the myriad versions and varieties of mobile phone platforms on the market can be daunting to even the most seasoned developer. This authoritative guide is written in such as way that it takes your existing skills and experience and uses that background as a solid foundation for developing applications that cross over between platforms, thereby freeing you from having to learn a new platform from scratch each time. Concise explanations walk you through the tools and patterns for developing for all the mobile platfo

  17. The development, design, testing, refinement, simulation and application of an evaluation framework for communities of practice and social-professional networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Dianne

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communities of practice and social-professional networks are generally considered to enhance workplace experience and enable organizational success. However, despite the remarkable growth in interest in the role of collaborating structures in a range of industries, there is a paucity of empirical research to support this view. Nor is there a convincing model for their systematic evaluation, despite the significant potential benefits in answering the core question: how well do groups of professionals work together and how could they be organised to work together more effectively? This research project will produce a rigorous evaluation methodology and deliver supporting tools for the benefit of researchers, policymakers, practitioners and consumers within the health system and other sectors. Given the prevalence and importance of communities of practice and social networks, and the extent of investments in them, this project represents a scientific innovation of national and international significance. Methods and design Working in four conceptual phases the project will employ a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to develop, design, field-test, refine and finalise an evaluation framework. Once available the framework will be used to evaluate simulated, and then later existing, health care communities of practice and social-professional networks to assess their effectiveness in achieving desired outcomes. Peak stakeholder groups have agreed to involve a wide range of members and participant organisations, and will facilitate access to various policy, managerial and clinical networks. Discussion Given its scope and size, the project represents a valuable opportunity to achieve breakthroughs at two levels; firstly, by introducing novel and innovative aims and methods into the social research process and, secondly, through the resulting evaluation framework and tools. We anticipate valuable outcomes in the

  18. Professional Tizen application development

    CERN Document Server

    Jaygarl, HoJun; Kim, YoonSoo; Choi, Eunyoung; Bradwick, Kevin; Lansdell

    2014-01-01

    Create powerful, marketable applications with Tizen for the smartphone and beyond  Tizen is the only platform designed for multiple device categories that is HTML5-centric and entirely open source. Written by experts in the field, this comprehensive guide includes chapters on both web and native application development, covering subjects such as location and social features, advanced UIs, animations, sensors and multimedia. This book is a comprehensive resource for learning how to develop Tizen web and native applications that are polished, bug-free and ready to sell on a range of smart dev

  19. Professional Sitecore Development

    CERN Document Server

    West, John

    2012-01-01

    The first book on the shelf to cover Sitecore development Sitecore is the leading provider of .NET CMS software and, as such, helps businesses increase revenue and decrease costs. This authoritative guide walks you through the process of creating a Sitecore web site. You'll discover how to handle the initial installation, take a look at the .Net development process, learn how to use the APIs, and finally deploy the site. Using a linear approach, this book guides you through the entire Sitecore process from start to finish. Introduces you to the process of creating a Sitecore web site so you ca

  20. Communities of practice: pedagogy and internet-based technologies to support educator's continuing technology professional development in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Schols, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) as well as modern pedagogical perspectives have created new possibilities to facilitate and support learning in higher education (HE). Emerging technologies bring opportunities to reconsider teaching and learning. New ideas and concepts about the educational use of new technologies transform the roles of teachers. In this context the key question of this study is: whether learning as part of a (virtual) community of practice suppor...

  1. Measuring the utility of the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) Academy Measurement Tool in assessing the development of K-8 STEM academies as professional learning communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Teresa J.

    The aim of this study was to provide insights addressing national concerns in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education by examining how a set of six perimeter urban K-12 schools were transformed into STEM-focused professional learning communities (PLC). The concept of a STEM Academy as a STEM-focused PLC emphasizes the development of a STEM culture where professional discourse and teaching are focused on STEM learning. The STEM Academies examined used the STEM Academy Measurement Tool and Rubric (Tool) as a catalyst for discussion and change. This Tool was developed with input from stakeholders and used for school-wide initiatives, teacher professional development and K-12 student engagement to improve STEM teaching and learning. Two primary goals of this study were to assess the levels of awareness and use of the tool by all stakeholders involved in the project and to determine how the Tool assisted in the development and advancement of these schools as STEM PLCs. Data from the STEM Academy Participant Survey was analyzed to determine stakeholders' perceptions of the Tool in terms of (i) how aware stakeholders were of the Tool, (ii) whether they participated in the use of the Tool, (iii) how the characteristics of PLCs were perceived in their schools, and finally (iv) how the awareness of the Tool influenced teachers' perceptions of the presence of PLC characteristics. Findings indicate that school faculty were aware of the Tool on a number of different levels and evidence exists that the use of the Tool assisted in the development of STEM Academies, however impact varied from school to school. Implications of this study suggest that the survey should be used for a longer period of time to gain more in-depth knowledge on teachers' perceptions of the Tool as a catalyst across time. Additional findings indicate that the process for using the Tool should be ongoing and involve the stakeholders to have the greatest impact on school culture

  2. New Zealand archaeology professional development cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.; Low, M.

    2015-01-01

    In March 2006, the NZAA Council hosted a workshop in Wellington for consulting archaeologists to debate issues relating to professionalism and accreditation within the professional consulting archaeological community. Topics covered included radiocarbon dating, calibration and interpretation of dates.

  3. Information professionals: core competencies and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We discuss the concept of core competencies applied to policies for teaching and training information professionals, particularly librarians. Method. Sixty graduates of the Institute were employed as information professionals. These sixty were asked to attribute degrees of importance to specific items associated with knowledge and skills that, within the scope of this research, were considered core competencies for meeting the demands of their jobs. Participants were also asked to cite knowledge they acquired in school and knowledge they use in exercising their profession, the skills that they consider necessary but that they did not gain in school, and the difficulties they encounter in exercising their profession and for which they were not sufficiently well prepared. Analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative data analyses were performed. The data were tabulated using Access and several reports and cross-tabulations were generated. Results. The results suggest a gulf between knowledge and skills acquired in library school and those that are required by the job market. In particular, participants lacked the skills they needed to work with information and communication technologies. Conclusion. The concept of core competencies is increasingly taken into account by the productive sector of the economy. The educational system ought to keep up with this change. The empirical research described shows that there is a need to establish advanced and modern policies for the education of librarians, participants in the market for information professionals.

  4. Education practitioners' understanding of professional development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The committee of Teacher Education Policy (COTEP) considers the professional development of practitioners as one way to improve the quality of professional practice. An analysis of the literature on professional development in education ...

  5. Distance learning: the future of continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southernwood, Julie

    2008-10-01

    The recent development of a market economy in higher education has resulted in the need to tailor the product to the customers, namely students, employers and commissioning bodies. Distance learning is an opportunity for nurse educators and institutions to address marketing initiatives and develop a learning environment in order to enhance continuing professional development. It provides options for lifelong learning for healthcare professionals--including those working in community settings--that is effective and cost efficient. Development of continuing professional development programmes can contribute to widening the participation of community practitioners in lifelong learning, practice and role development. This paper considers the opportunities that web-based and online education programmes can provide community practitioners to promote professional skills while maintaining a work-life balance, and the role of the lecturer in successfully supporting professionals on web-based learning programmes.

  6. The development of professional competence of future professional teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Muslimov Narzulla Alixanovich; Kadyrov Khayot Scharipovich

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the elements of professional and personal, theoretical and practical components of pedagogical activities, serving the measure and method of creative self-realization of a professional education teacher in the resolution of various pedagogical situations aimed at professional competence development.

  7. Professional Android 4 Application Development

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Developers, build mobile Android apps using Android 4 The fast-growing popularity of Android smartphones and tablets creates a huge opportunities for developers. If you're an experienced developer, you can start creating robust mobile Android apps right away with this professional guide to Android 4 application development. Written by one of Google's lead Android developer advocates, this practical book walks you through a series of hands-on projects that illustrate the features of the Android SDK. That includes all the new APIs introduced in Android 3 and 4, including building for tablets, u

  8. Classroom Research and Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira Vergara Luján

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to share the experience of a group of teachers in the Classroom Research Seminar of the Teacher Development Program in English carried out at Universidad del Valle, Cali, from January to June, 2007. The seminar was part of a high-level in-service program for teachers of English of a network of private educational institutions. We would like to share the highlights and difficulties of the experience. We will start with the general framework of the program and the concept of professional development that underlies it. Next we will focus on the classroom research seminar, its objectives, methodology and results. Finally we share the voices of some of the participants, who talk about the influence this seminar had on their professional development and daily work.

  9. Leading and Managing Continuing Professional Development: Developing People, Developing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Peter; Bubb, Sara

    2004-01-01

    This book has been written for those who lead and manage continuing professional development (CPD). Continuing professional development co-coordinators hold a key role and one that needs to be developed further in many schools. This book is intended to help people think more deeply about the professional development and training of staff--all…

  10. Teacher Professional Development Strategies in Australian Government and Professional Associations Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostina, Ludmyla

    2015-01-01

    Teacher in Australia is determined as an active participant of professional community with high level of collaboration, professional development coherent activities and collaborative learning practice. Thus, teacher quality is one of critical factors affecting student outcomes. The article touches upon the issue of the potential to improve…

  11. Community development planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The focus of this paper will be methods of local community involvement in the community development planning efforts which will be required at the recommended sites. Community development planning will include capital improvement plans, housing plans, zoning changes, business development plans and other community service and fiscal plans required to meet the projected needs of new residents as a result of the repository construction and operation. This paper will present, (1) the need for community planning, (2) methods of responding to community planning needs, (3) current community planning issues to be addressed. 2 references, 1 figure

  12. A professional learning community model: a case study of primary teachers community in west Bandung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, A.; Suryadi, D.; Syaodih, E.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an alternative model of professional learning community for primary school teachers in improving the knowledge and professional skills. This study is a qualitative research with case study method with data collection is an interview, observation and document and triangulation technique for validation data that focuses on thirteen people 5th grade elementary school teacher. The results showed that by joining a professional learning community, teachers can share both experience and knowledge to other colleagues so that they can be able to continue to improve and enhance the quality of their learning. This happens because of the reflection done together before, during and after the learning activities. It was also revealed that by learning in a professional learning community, teachers can learn in their own way, according to need, and can collaborate with their colleagues in improving the effectiveness of learning. Based on the implementation of professional learning community primary school teachers can be concluded that teachers can develop the curriculum, the students understand the development, overcome learning difficulties faced by students and can make learning design more effective and efficient.

  13. Continuing education and professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Edwina

    2002-01-01

    The success of a profession will be determined upon its education and training. A profession is required to encompass: a core body of knowledge; a set of ethical codes of practice; and have practitioners with humanistic qualities. In order to maintain the success of a profession it is necessary to have continuing education, which enhances professional development. Continuing professional education includes a form of self-regulation, which ensures the maintenance of a minimum standard of practice in this ever-changing workplace, and by regulating this standard, the discipline becomes more accountable to the client and the profession as a whole. In Australia, the Nuclear Medicine society's continuing education programs and Universities offering postgraduate programs promote continuing education. If technologists are to successfully keep up with developments in instrumentation, protocols and changing health care requirements, we must ensure that the education of practitioners does not cease at certification of entry to the workplace (Au)

  14. Integrating professional behavior development across a professional allied health curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumas, Linda J; Pelletier, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Professional behaviors are an integral part of clinical practice in all allied health and medical fields. A systematic process for instruction, the education, and development of professional behaviors, cannot be taught in the same way that memorization of human anatomy or medical terminology is taught. One cannot expect professional behaviors to just appear in an individual upon graduation and entry into a health care field. Professional behavior development is an essential component of physical therapy professional education and is clearly defined through the guiding documents of the American Physical Therapy Association, which include 'A Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education,' 'Evaluative Criteria for Accreditation of Education Programs for the Preparation of Physical Therapists,' and the 'Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.' Building a comprehensive and progressive curricular thread for professional behaviors can pose a challenge for a professional program and the core faculty. This paper will present a curricular model of weaving professional behaviors into a core entry-level professional curriculum using a specific curricular thread, activities for different levels of students, and assessment at each point in the path. This paper will demonstrate the potential for universal application of a professional behaviors.

  15. Leading for Change: Creating a Professional Learning Community for Collaborative Relationships and Shared Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This action research study examines school reform through the development of a professional learning community for teacher-leaders. Through action research, this study organized a select group of teacher-leaders into a professional learning community to engage in a series of readings through a book club. The purpose of the book club was to develop…

  16. Combining forces. Distributed Leadership and a professional learning community in primary and secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsbos, Frank; Van Langevelde, Stefan; Evers, Arnoud

    2018-01-01

    This report describes an in depth case study of two good practice schools where a professional learning community and distributed leadership are highly developed. The goal of this study was to learn what conditions in the school support a professional learning community and distributed leadership.

  17. A QUEST for sustainable continuing professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2017-01-01

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) can be crucial in improving teaching, and student learning. Extant research suggests consensus pertaining to the core features of effective CPD including content focus, active learning, coherence, duration and collaborative activities. This chapter reports...... organized by the local PLC, and individual enactments in the teachers’ own classrooms. This “rhythm” has now been institutionalized, and even though the project has come to an end, there is still networking across schools and PLC activities continue in all five municipalities. In order to assess...... on a large-scale, long-term Danish CPD project for which all the activities were created with these consensus criteria in mind. The overall purpose has been to develop a sustainable model for CPD that acknowledges teachers’ situated learning in professional learning communities (PLCs), supports bottom...

  18. Professional development and extension programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, G. [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Professional Development (PD) refers to the means by which people acquire, develop, maintain and enhance the specialist knowledge and skills needed to practice in their profession. Extension Programs (aka Continuing Education) are offered by most post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate granting institutions.The courses are typically taken on a part-time basis, and course delivery often includes distance learning technology. An important implementation of PD is via workplace training, industry specific seminars, workshops and non-credit courses offered by a wide range of service providers.

  19. Professional development and extension programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.

    2015-01-01

    Professional Development (PD) refers to the means by which people acquire, develop, maintain and enhance the specialist knowledge and skills needed to practice in their profession. Extension Programs (aka Continuing Education) are offered by most post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate granting institutions.The courses are typically taken on a part-time basis, and course delivery often includes distance learning technology. An important implementation of PD is via workplace training, industry specific seminars, workshops and non-credit courses offered by a wide range of service providers.

  20. On-line Professional Learning Communities: Increasing Teacher Learning and Productivity in Isolated Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Salazar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available On-line and distance professional learning communities provides teachers with increased access and flexibility as well as the combination of work and education. It also provides a more learner-centered approach, enrichment and new ways of interacting with teachers in isolated rural areas. For educational administrators, on-line learning offers high quality and usually cost-effective professional development for teachers. It allows upgrading of skills, increased productivity and development of a new learning culture. At the same time, it means sharing of costs, of training time, increased portability of training, and the exchange of creativity, information, and dialogue.

  1. A Measure of Professional Identity Development for Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chin Pei; Van der Molen, H. T.; Schmidt, H. G.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a new scale with a validated construct to measure professional identity development in students being prepared to become new practitioners. Using the new survey instrument (named the Professional Identity Five-Factor Scale), data were collected from a polytechnic with students enrolled in a wide range of…

  2. professional development through informal learning' : workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr.ir. Quinta Kools

    2013-01-01

    professional development through informal learning In planning professional development for teachers or teacher educators, very often a formal course or training is offered. There is a lack of attention for the fact that a lot of professional development takes place at work through so-called

  3. Planning Considerations for Afterschool Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, L. Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Professional development is vital to the success of afterschool programs. Effective professional development enhances afterschool program quality by facilitating staff performance and knowledge; in addition, professional development is vital for improving student learning outcomes (Bouffard & Little, 2004; Hall & Surr, 2005; Joyce &…

  4. Develop a Professional Learning Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Staff Development, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A professional learning plan establishes short-and long-term plans for professional learning and implementation of the learning. Such plans guide individuals, schools, districts, and states in coordinating learning experiences designed to achieve outcomes for educators and students. Professional learning plans focus on the program of educator…

  5. Global Education and Professional Development of Minority Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Sdunzik, Jennifer; Leon, Rocio; Yaryyeva, Annagul

    2018-01-01

    “Global Education and Professional Development of Minority Youth" was developed to establish connections between the Purdue student body and the Frankfort community. By engaging high school students in workshops that focus on identities, students are encouraged to identify and market the talents they contribute to an increasingly globalized world. Students participate in workshops to develop their professional skills and articulate their transnational social location. The workshops were desig...

  6. Grounding our practice in nursing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2014-07-01

    The Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice is foundational to the work of nurses in a continuing professional development role. Use of the practice and professional performance aspects of the standards supports both quality of learning activities and the continuous growth process of nurses engaged in this area of practice. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Developing Professional Identity in an Online Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Line Helverskov

    2015-01-01

    identity as the outcome for the intern. This paper describes the interactions in an online learning environment. The online platform sought to enable peer interaction between younger and older students in a discussion of the professional identity of Natural and Cultural Heritage Management (NCHM......From a socio-cultural perspective, the development of a professional identity is an on-going process that is social in nature and negotiated in communities of practice (Wenger, 1998). Internships in higher education function as such communities of practice, with an improved sense of professional...

  8. "Learning" in a Transgressive Professional Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Juul; Drachmann, Merete; Jeppesen, Lise Kofoed

    2015-01-01

    to deal with overwhelming experiences concerning the naked bodies of patients and death, useful application of theoretical knowledge, the path from novice to advanced beginner, and adjusting to the workplace community. The conclusion is that the learning of nursing students during their first clinical in......This material is a part of a longitudinal development project which seeks to comprehend learning experiences of nursing students during their first clinical in-service placement. The study has a qualitative methodology, inspired by Michael Eraut’s thoughts on learning in the workplace. When...... the workplace perspective is applied, learning seems to be concentrated on actual situations which the learner is in, in contrast to employing constructed concepts. The nursing students’ learning seems to be oriented towards socialization in the clinic as a workplace. This means that the nursing students seek...

  9. Professional development in college science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aimee Kathryn

    Graduate students earning a doctorate in the sciences historically focus their work on research and not professional development in college science teaching. However, for those who go on to a career in academia, a majority of their time will be dedicated to teaching. During the past few years, graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) have been prepared to teach by attending a daylong workshop that included logistical information, but left pedagogy largely unexplored. Since that time, a seminar has been added to provide an introduction to pedagogical theory and practices and to provide practice teaching in the biological sciences laboratory course. Yet, more pedagogical preparation is needed. This study was conducted to determine if there was a need for a teaching certificate program for doctoral students in the College of Science and Technology (CoST) at The University of Southern Mississippi. The GTA respondents studied set teaching goals that were consistent with faculty members across the country; however, this research went further by finding out how competent the GTAs perceived they were and how much support they perceived they needed with respect to teaching and professional development. The GTAs did not differ in their perceived level of competence based on experience level; however, the less experienced GTAs did perceive they needed more support than the experienced GTAs. To help GTAs develop a skill set that many CoST graduates currently lack, it is recommended that the University provide ample training and supervision. Establishing a certificate program can potentially impact the community in the following ways: (1) the training of GTAs contributes to the academic preparation of future academic professionals who will be teaching in various institutions; (2) GTA training provides professional development and awareness that teaching requires life long professional development; (3) ensuring competent academicians, not only in content but also in pedagogy; (4

  10. Applying Intersubjectivity for Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvaldina Montoya Janecek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This is an intersubjective review of Loewen, G. V. (2012. Hermeneutic Pedagogy: Teaching and learning as dialogue and interpretation. Alcoa, TN, USA. Old Moon Academic Press. The four authors of the review used a reflective-reflexive, dialogic process to interpret and analyze Loewen’s text. Their review is presented in a dialogue format that resulted after analyzing a much longer set of narrative data.[1][1] Editorial Note: This is a very unusual review! There are four points of interest that make this review an interesting read. The first one concerns the subject of the review: the book on hermeneutics. The second point is the form of the review: it is dialogue between the authors presented in its development. The third point of interest is the personal nature of the contents: the authors masterly show how their work on the review of the book penetrates their lives thus showing the real life with its changes, happiness, sadness, struggles and tribulations. The last point of interest that makes this review worth to be read  is the pioneering character of the work behind this review. Glenda Moss used this review as a tool for professional development for the colleagues in her department. In my humble opinion, this review is the result of the very courageous, pioneering and inspirational work! (Mikhail Gradovski

  11. Closer to Learning: Social Networks, Trust, and Professional Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Hwa; Daly, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, educators, and policymakers suggest the use of professional learning communities as one important approach to the improvement of teaching and learning. However, relatively little research examines the interplay of professional interactions (structural social capital) around instructional practices and key elements of professional…

  12. Learning Nursing in the Workplace Community: The Generation of Professional Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Mary

    This chapter explores the connections between learning, working and professional communities in nursing. It draws on experiences and research in nursing practice and education, where not only do isolated professionals learn as a result of their actions for patients and others, but those professionals are part of a community whose associated networks enable learning to occur. Several characteristics of this professional community are shared with those found in Communities of Practice (CoPs) (Lave and Wenger, 1991; Wenger, 1998), but the balance and importance of many elements can differ. For instance, whilst Lave and Wenger (1991) describe many aspects of situated learning in CoPs that apply to nurses, their model is of little help in understanding the ways in which other professions as well as patients/clients and carers influence the development of nursing practice. Therefore, I shall argue that it is not just the Community of Practice that we need to consider

  13. Opening the Classroom Door: Professional Learning Communities in the Math and Science Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamos, James E.; Bergin, Kathleen B.; Maki, Daniel P.; Perez, Lance C.; Prival, Joan T.; Rainey, Daphne Y.; Rowell, Ginger H.; VanderPutten, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at how professional learning communities (PLCs) have become an operational approach for professional development with potential to de-isolate the teaching experience in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The authors offer a short synopsis of the intellectual origins of PLCs, provide multiple…

  14. Discourse analysis and personal/professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyes, C.

    2004-01-01

    The article discusses discourse analysis and its relevance to personal and professional development, drawing on elements of social theory. Related terms such as text, discourse and genre are defined and social theoretical implications explored. Practical application of discourse analysis to CPD is illustrated. A case is developed for understanding contemporary practice and the construction of personal and professional identity through discourse. Understanding discourse is presented as an enabling structure for personal and professional development

  15. Presentatie: Professional development of university teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebrecht, Diny

    2012-01-01

    Ebrecht, D. (2012, 4 juni). Professional development of university teachers. Presentatie bijeenkomst UOC-vertegenwoordigers in het kader van Erasmusuitwisseling, Heerlen, Nederland: Open Universiteit, L&C.

  16. A QUEST for sustainable continuing professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2017-01-01

    on a large-scale, long-term Danish CPD project for which all the activities were created with these consensus criteria in mind. The overall purpose has been to develop a sustainable model for CPD that acknowledges teachers’ situated learning in professional learning communities (PLCs), supports bottom...... organized by the local PLC, and individual enactments in the teachers’ own classrooms. This “rhythm” has now been institutionalized, and even though the project has come to an end, there is still networking across schools and PLC activities continue in all five municipalities. In order to assess...... experiencing changes in collaboration and classroom practice. Furthermore there seems to be a delayed correlation between schools with the most sustained PLC activities and student outcomes. Factors supporting sustainability are discussed, these include scaffolding the teachers’ collaborative inquiries...

  17. From youth worker professional development to organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sheetal; Baumgardner, Briana; Germanic, Ofir; Graff, Randy; Korum, Kathy; Mueller, Megan; Randall, Steve; Simmons, Tim; Stokes, Gina; Xiong, Will; Peterson, Karen Kolb

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing, innovative youth worker professional development is described in this article. This initiative began as youth worker professional development and then transcended to personal and organizational development. It grew from a moral response of Saint Paul Parks and Recreation staff and two faculty members of Youth Studies, University of Minnesota to offer higher-quality services to youth for their healthy development. Its underlying philosophies and ethos included building and sustaining meaningful relationships, cocreating a space for learning and change, becoming a reflecting practitioner, and community organizing. This professional development responded to the participants' interests and needs or to local situations in that moment, that space, and the discussions, and took on different shapes at different times. There were many accomplishments of, challenges and barriers to, and lessons learned from this professional development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  18. Examining the Satisfaction Levels of Continual Professional Development Provided by a Rural Accounting Professional Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA) recognises education as a lifelong process, and there is a need for continuing education and training to be available to rural communities. This paper examines the satisfaction levels of accounting continual professional development (CPD) when provided by a rural accounting…

  19. PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITIES AND HIGH SCHOOL: TO FIND INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Artamonova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Discusses the issue of development of professionally-oriented educational programs on the basis of requirements for the competence of graduates of higher educational institutions as a way to improve the quality of education and higher education model adaptation to modern conditions. Analyzes the experience of interaction between higher education institutions and professional associations in the formation of professional standards.

  20. Cultural Core Competencies: Perceptions of 4-H Youth Development Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Fox

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As society grows increasingly diverse, it is critical that youth development professionals are equipped with cultural core competencies. This descriptive study gauged the perceived level of cultural competence among 4-H Youth Development professionals from a Southern state in the United States. Based on the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competency (PRKC Model (Stone & Rennekamp, 2004, youth development professionals rated their cultural competence (equity, access, and opportunity in eight core competency areas. Based on a five-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = No knowledge to 4 = Expert, youth development professionals evaluated their cultural competence ranging from 0.66 to 4.00. According to an interpretive scale, most youth development professionals rated their competence as intermediate. Participants reported the skills of active listening and an open attitude as areas in which they felt most competent. Areas of least competence were community outreach policies and procedures. No significant relationships existed between the demographic variables of gender, degree earned, and field of study when compared to perceived cultural competence. The findings will be used to detect deficiencies and create opportunities for professional training and development experiences in supporting the cultural competence and growth of youth professionals.

  1. Change Management in Dental Education: A Professional Learning Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatta, Anthony M

    2018-06-01

    Professional learning communities (PLCs) are defined as "a group of people sharing and critically interrogating their practice in an ongoing, reflective, collaborative, inclusive, learning-oriented, growth-promoting way." PLCs have been found to be an effective change management strategy in business and education when confronted by rapid change. The American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education new national program-ADEA CCI 2.0-includes the development of a PLC. By employing an "engage and learn" model PLC centered on continuous quality improvement and systems thinking, dental faculty can identify internal and external barriers to change that could lead to innovative solutions to complex issues. This article argues that a PLC is a viable change management strategy to counteract the effect of multiple external forces impacting dental education and thus to develop future-ready faculty.

  2. Giving “Best Advice”: Proposing a Framework of Community Pharmacist Professional Judgement Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicely Roche

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Community pharmacy is often portrayed as a marriage of professional and business roles in a commercial domain, thereby creating a need for, and value in, pursuing the development of professional competencies for use in the community pharmacy business. In context, professional judgement is the application of knowledge, skills and attitudes (competencies which, when applied to situations where there is no one or obvious right or wrong way to proceed, gives a patient a better likelihood of a favourable outcome than if a lay-person had made the decision. The challenge for community pharmacists is that professional judgement formation is influenced by professional, commercial and personal criteria with inherent interconnected challenges. In community pharmacy practice in the Republic of Ireland (ROI, this challenge is compounded by the fact that advice is normally provided in an environment where the pharmacist provides professional advice “for free” and then may offer to sell the patient a product or service based on that advice, an activity which amounts to a commercial transaction. While there is currently no evidence to confirm whether or not these professional judgement influences are resolved successfully, their very existence poses a risk that their resolution “in the wrong way” could compromise patient outcomes or professional standing following the delivery of pharmacy services. It is therefore apparent that a community pharmacist requires skills in identifying and analysing professional/commercial/personal influences in order to appreciate the criteria which may affect both parties’ (patient and pharmacist decision making. By contemplating the interaction between the pharmacist’s professional competencies and the individual influences on that pharmacist, we can consider the enhancement of professional competencies that underpin the “best” advice being offered to the patient, regardless of whether that advice is offered in

  3. Developing Opportunities for Professional Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas A.

    Because cancer patients and their families have special psychological needs that are not always met through medical care, the Bowman Gray School of Medicine at Wake Forest University established the Cancer Patient Support Program (CPSP) at the Oncology Research Center. Services provided by the CPSP's 2 professional counselors and approximately 35…

  4. Integrating Personal and Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitt, Gordon L.

    1980-01-01

    The author outlines ways to integrate work identity and social identity in order to improve the quality of life. He presents a model for maintaining balance between personal and professional growth, which can stimulate achievement in six areas of human potential. (SK)

  5. Toward Understanding Business Student Professional Development Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Blessley, Misty; Kunkle, Matthew; Schirmer, Michael; Regan, Laureen

    2017-01-01

    Professional development engagement (PDE) is defined as the level of perceived undergraduate engagement in professional development activities. An 11-item measure of PDE exhibited a good reliability. Using a complete data sample of 467 graduating business undergraduates, four variable sets (student background or precollege variables,…

  6. The professional development of teacher educators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Mieke; Willemse, Martijn

    2010-01-01

    Two years ago, at the annual conference of the International Professional Development Association in Belfast, a claim was made by one of us, with a great deal of justification, that there had been very few papers published in the International Professional Development Association journal

  7. The Makerspace Experience and Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Andrea; Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Huang, Xiaoxia; Pereira, Nielsen; Huss, Jeanine; Chandler, Wanda; Paganelli, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the use of makerspaces as a professional development activity when examined through the analysis of qualitative data reflecting participant experience. The data were gathered in the course of a professional development opportunity at a university during a conference held on campus. The researchers wanted to select an innovative…

  8. Faculty Professional Development for Quality Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou-Ray, Jennifer; Bentley, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful technology use in education continues to improve given an increase in access to available technologies and professional development. For educators, professional development has focused on approaches for technology use that foster content-specific best practices and improve student learning in traditional classroom formats. Meaningful…

  9. The Principal as Professional Development Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Phyllis H.; Speck, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    Individual teachers have the greatest effect on student performance. Principals, as professional development leaders, are in the best position to provide teachers with the professional development strategies they need to improve skills and raise student achievement. This book guides readers through a step-by-step process to formulate, implement,…

  10. Professional Development: Focusing on Transition. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azúa, Ramón L.; Keleher, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In 2017, the National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth (NDTAC) released its first in a series of professional development briefs that focus on the professional development needs and interests of Neglected or Delinquent (N or D) State coordinators, correctional educators, and providers of…

  11. Measuring the Quality of Professional Development Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumer Erickson, Amy S.; Noonan, Patricia M.; Brussow, Jennifer; Supon Carter, Kayla

    2017-01-01

    High-quality, evidence-based professional development is essential to ensure that teachers obtain the knowledge, strategies and skills necessary to positively impact student learning. While the primary form of professional development, training has rarely been evaluated for quality beyond the satisfaction of those being trained. The Observation…

  12. Professional Competence and Continuing Professional Development in Accounting: Professional Practice vs. Non-Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brid

    2017-01-01

    In 2004, the International Federation of Accountants introduced International Education Standard 7 (IES 7), requiring all member professional accounting bodies to adopt mandatory continuing professional development (CPD) schemes. IES 7 places responsibility on individual accounting practitioners to maintain, develop and certify appropriate…

  13. Advancing Work Practices Through Online Professional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    The natural expectation for professional development courses is that they will improve a participant’s work performance, but do they? This PhD research challenges several assumptions underlying the design of online professional development courses, revealing that it is after such interventions...... was not effective and subsequently terminate change that could have advanced their practices. This underlines the need to think beyond the course format to make online professional development interventions continuous, committing, and contextual. The research suggests rethinking online professional development...... as adaptive “just-in-time” technologies and proposes a design theory called “situated online professional development,” entailing six design principles for advancing work practices....

  14. Technology Integration through Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Lauren; Maxwell, Gerri; Bulu, Sanser

    2011-01-01

    We describe efforts to build a learning community to support technology integration in three rural school districts and the contributions of various program strategies toward teacher growth. The Stages of Adoption Inventory, classroom observations, the Questionnaire for Technology Integration, interviews, STAR evaluation surveys, a survey of…

  15. The impact of a faculty learning community on professional and personal development: the facilitator training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Hirschmann, Krista; Fortin, Auguste H; Lichstein, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Relationship-centered care attends to the entire network of human relationships essential to patient care. Few faculty development programs prepare faculty to teach principles and skills in relationship-centered care. One exception is the Facilitator Training Program (FTP), a 25-year-old training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare. The authors surveyed FTP graduates to determine the efficacy of its curriculum and the most important elements for participants' learning. In 2007, surveys containing quantitative and narrative elements were distributed to 51 FTP graduates. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The authors analyzed narratives using Burke's dramatistic pentad as a qualitative framework to delineate how interrelated themes interacted in the FTP. Forty-seven respondents (92%) identified two essential acts that happened in the program: an iterative learning process, leading to heightened personal awareness and group facilitation skills; and longevity of learning and effect on career. The structure of the program's learning community provided the scene, and the agents were the participants, who provided support and contributed to mutual success. Methods of developing skills in personal awareness, group facilitation, teaching, and feedback constituted agency. The purpose was to learn skills and to join a community to share common values. The FTP is a learning community that provided faculty with skills in principles of relationship-centered care. Four further features that describe elements of this successful faculty-based learning community are achievement of self-identified goals, distance learning modalities, opportunities to safely discuss workplace issues outside the workplace, and self-renewing membership.

  16. Occupational therapy, professional development and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Morten

    2009-01-01

    The article's aim is to reflect on and contribute to developing occupational therapy as a profession. I propose an ethical interpretation of health and helping professions in general and occupational therapy in particular. According to this ethical interpretation, the essential function and mission...... principles and guidelines; it contributes to building up and preserving a shared professional identity; it puts emphasis on a client-centred perspective on professional work; and it provides a constructive framework for inter-professional co-operation....

  17. Teachers’ professional development: An analysis of the use of Professional Development Plans in a Dutch school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Sandra; Kreijns, Karel; Theo, Bastiaens; Stijnen, Sjef; Vermeulen, Marjan

    2018-01-01

    Professional development of teachers has become an essential condition in today’s knowledge-based society to sustain the quality of teaching. Therefore, the Dutch government promotes this now professional development. As a result, Professional Development Plans (PDPs) are now increasingly used to

  18. Examining Sense of Community among Medical Professionals in an Online Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye O. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the number of online degree programs continues to grow, one of the greatest challenges is developing a sense of community among learners who do not convene at the same time and place. This study examined the sense of community among medical professionals in an online graduate program for healthcare professionals. We took the sample from a fully online program delivered jointly by a state university and a local children's hospital in the Midwest. We administered Rovai's Classroom Community Survey with 11 additional demographic questions. We also utilized online interviews to further explore students’ understanding of sense of community. A bi-factor model was fitted to the online sense of community survey data. Using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA we identified potential group differences. The qualitative data were analyzed thematically in a recursive and iterative process. Study results suggested that a dominant factor existed: sense of community with two sub-domain factors including sense of learning and sense of connectedness. No significant differences in sense of community with regard to gender, native language, or area of medical practice were detected. However, results showed a difference in sense of community between the three courses examined. This study is the first to examine the sense of community among online medical professionals. Since our findings are in contrast to those of previous studies, this opens the door to additional studies around the possible differences between the community characteristics and needs of medical professionals as online students.

  19. On Community Education and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušana Findeisen

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Dušana Findeisen introduces community education and development. She particularly insists upon the fact that in the future our life will not be organised around a paid full time job and that we will be forced into searching other ways of getting involved into society and to acquire our social identity. Community education is one of the ways we could eventually choose. Since community development education in Slovenia has not developed yet the author begins by describing some basic concepts like community and history of community education and community development movement. Further on, she introduces the Andragogical Summer School based in a small Slovenian town, its aim being to encourage Slovenian adult educators to encourage community development projects.

  20. Redesigning Professional Development: Reconceptualising Teaching Using Social Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas; Narayan, Vickel

    2013-01-01

    This article evaluates the use of a community of practice model for redesigning a lecturer professional development course investigating the impact of mobile web 2.0 technologies in higher education. The results show a significant change in lecturer conceptions of pedagogy were achieved by this approach. Drawing on our experience of two iterations…

  1. Old-Fashioned Bus Trips: New Age Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldhues, Katherine; Epley, Hannah K.

    2018-01-01

    Two 4-H Camp-related bus tours offered new nontraditional professional development (PD) experiences that better align Extension's PD opportunities with the organization's experiential education pedagogy. Creating quality PD opportunities for employees is important because such experiences can affect overall work performance, community connections,…

  2. Intellectual Capital: The Intangible Assets of Professional Development Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Carole G., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    A Professional Development School (PDS) offers unique university-school relationships that can change the culture of learning and add value to students and the community. Initially created in the 1980s, the PDS movement is growing across the country and is now a respected teacher education model. In this book, Carole G. Basile has collected…

  3. The Tale of Two Virtual Teacher Professional Development Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keown, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Virtual communities of practice (VCoP) have been advocated for some time as a promising means of taking professional development to teachers in widely distributed locations. However, geography, and indeed education literature as a whole, contains very few examples where this has been achieved. This paper reports on two VCoP professional…

  4. Learning to Teach Online: Promoting Success through Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Janice M.; LaPrairie, Kimberely N.

    2005-01-01

    The study reported in this paper examined the types of professional-development activities, support systems, and organizational structures necessary for community college faculty to make transitions from traditional teaching to Web-based teaching. Results indicate that (a) instructional change can by initiated through sustained professional…

  5. Continuing Professional Development in the quantity surveying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study was conducted in order to investigate Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the South African quantity surveying profession. The study further aimed to establish the reasons why some quantity surveyors do not acquire the required CPD hours and face losing their professional registration with ...

  6. Barriers to continuous professional development participation for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Updating knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis is an important requirement if one is to remain professionally relevant. Formalised continuous professional development (CPD) is, therefore, essential to stay up to date in a dynamic work environment. The majority of radiographers in Kenya work in remote ...

  7. The Development of Competent Marketing Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ian; Tsarenko, Yelena; Wagstaff, Peter; Powell, Irene; Steel, Marion; Brace-Govan, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The process of transition from university undergraduate to business professional is a crucial stage in the development of a business career. This study examines both graduate and employer perspectives on the essential skills and knowledge needed by marketing professionals to successfully perform their roles. From in-depth interviews with 14…

  8. The community health worker cultural mentoring project: preparing professional students for team work with health workers from urban communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwen, Laurie N; Schwolsky-Fitch, Elena; Rodriquez, Romelia; Horta, Greg; Lopez, Ivanna

    2007-01-01

    Community Health Workers or CHWs (also known by a variety of alternative titles) are health workers drawn from communities to provide access to care for members of their communities. CHWs have been documented as effective in delivering a variety of services in a culturally-sensitive manner, and in providing a bridge between health professionals and underserved or minority communities. Yet, CHWs have not been well incorporated into interdisciplinary health care teams. The majority of health professionals are not even aware of the possible role and skills of CHWs. Believing that the best time to educate professionals about this valuable health worker and ensure that CHWs become part of interdisciplinary health care teams is during the student years, the Hunter College Schools of the Health Professions, and the Community Health Worker Network of New York City developed a pilot project, the Community Health Worker Cultural Mentoring Project. Community Health Workers, who were members of the Network, served as "community mentors" for health professions students drawn from the programs of community health education, nursing, and nutrition. CHWs worked with faculty of selected courses in each of the professional programs, and served as panelists in these courses, presenting information about health beliefs and alternative health practices of diverse cultural groups in communities of New York City. Class sessions were first held in the fall of 2004; subsequent sessions were held in following semesters. Approximately 40 students participated in 7 classes, with 6 CHWs serving as mentors - two per class. At the end of the classroom presentations, students wrote reflections relating to their understanding of the CHW role and relevance for their future interdisciplinary practice. The majority of reflections met the goal of increasing professional students' understanding of the CHW role and skills. At this point, quantitative and qualitative data will need to be collected to

  9. Effect of Faculty Member's Use of Twitter as Informal Professional Development during a Preservice Teacher Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Educators have increasingly turned to Twitter as a means for receiving professional development and building and sustaining professional learning communities. This paper reports the results of a study of 82 undergraduate preservice teachers and their attitudes regarding Twitter as a medium for informal professional development support during their…

  10. Assessing the Interactivity and Prescriptiveness of Faculty Professional Development Workshops: The Real-Time Professional Development Observation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Alice; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Professional development workshops are one of the primary mechanisms used to help faculty improve their teaching, and draw in many STEM instructors every year. Although workshops serve a critical role in changing instructional practices within our community, we rarely assess workshops through careful consideration of how they engage faculty.…

  11. Forging Professional Learning Communities: The Role of External Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Jill; Kong, Peggy A.

    2018-01-01

    This article explored the effects of external agency on the establishment of professional learning communities (PLCs). The research was undertaken in the context of schools that have chosen to adopt the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate (IB) worldwide. The study employed a two-stage qualitative sequential design…

  12. Tweeting Educational Technology: A Tale of Professional Community of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Blau

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores an Israeli professional community on Twitter practicing educational technology. Networking analysis of 42 users and 296 structural connections among them revealed that the adoption of Twitter was normally distributed and active participation was asymmetrical - 14.3% of users produced 80% of the tweets. Investment in participation was highly gratified by influence on the audience.

  13. Analyzing Learning in Professional Learning Communities: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lare, Michelle D.; Brazer, S. David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to build a conceptual framework that informs current understanding of how professional learning communities (PLCs) function in conjunction with organizational learning. The combination of sociocultural learning theories and organizational learning theories presents a more complete picture of PLC processes that has…

  14. Teacher Collaboration and Student Learning in a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Mary Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have endorsed teacher collaboration within a professional learning community (PLC) that is focused on student learning. Despite these research-based endorsements, several Algebra 1 teachers in a southeastern high school implemented components of a PLC with little or no results in student achievement. The purpose of this study was to…

  15. Professional Learning Communities: Teachers Working Collaboratively for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Louise Ann

    2009-01-01

    Current research indicates that a professional learning community (PLC) is an effective means for helping teachers to bridge the gap between research and practice. A PLC is a team of educators systematically working together to improve teaching practice and student learning. This study evaluated the PLC formed by teachers at a public elementary…

  16. Ontology-Based Empirical Knowledge Verification for Professional Virtual Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Jen

    2011-01-01

    A professional virtual community provides an interactive platform for enterprise experts to create and share their empirical knowledge cooperatively, and the platform contains a tremendous amount of hidden empirical knowledge that knowledge experts have preserved in the discussion process. Therefore, enterprise knowledge management highly…

  17. Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Sloep, P. B. (2009). Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning. Presentation at a NeLLL seminar with Etienne Wenger held at the Open Universiteit Nederland. September, 10, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  18. Chemistry teacher professional development using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemistry teacher professional development using the technological pedagogical content knowledge(TPACK) framework. ... But with the advent of modern technologies, information and communication ... [AJCE 4(3), Special Issue, May 2014] ...

  19. The pedagogical professional development of the English teacher in the Professional and Technical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Padrón Otaño

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The teacher of English in Informatics studies in the Professional and Technical Education shows an insufficient preparation to plan the teaching learning process of reading comprehension in professional contexts, a fact that affects the communicative development of their students. The limitations in the development of these teachers of English were confirmed as one of the key causes. This research follows a dialectical materialist philosophy. In the diagnosis and the evaluation empirical methods such as the interview to teachers of English and document analysis, specialist criterion and a preexperimental design were used. The main research outcome is a contextualized pedagogical professional development strategy. The strategy comprises scientific foundations, diagnosis, general objective, specific actions and the evaluation. The main action of the strategy is postgraduate course to develop the pedagogical professional skills in the use of a methodology which promotes the development of knowledge and skills in both the technical sphere and a specialized didactics (Content and Language Integrated Learning. The practical implementation of the strategy elaborated seemed to allow the teachers of English to be able to plan their lessons using this methodology, and to show a new attitude which meant their active involvement in the creation of a community of learning with higher levels of interdisciplinary collaboration between the teachers of English and those of the technical sphere, as well as an effective management of their own continuing professional development.

  20. Professional development as learning in relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Noworolnik-Mastalska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a clasification of selected leading conceptions within professional development, using socio-cultural perspective of learning in different relationships. Beside drawing on the classical social theory of learning through interactions with others, another dimensions of learning are added: related to the self, personal dimension of learning through professional identity development and societal dimension, where learning results from the ability to respond comprehensively to ...

  1. Supporting Teacher Change Through Online Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J. Boling, Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This multiple case study examines elementary teachers’ experiences as they participated in the online professional development course, Cognitive Literacy Strategies for the Elementary Classroom. This study explores teacher change and the elements necessary to facilitate the change. Issues concerning content, the change process, the online learning environment, and technology are examined. Findings indicate that online learning is a viable means of providing professional development and facilitating teacher change.

  2. Professional learning communities (PLCs) for early childhood science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Jungwon

    beliefs toward science teaching. Face-to-face group teachers' comfort with planning and doing different science activities increased significantly after the workshop and after the combination of workshop and face-to-face PLC. This study contributes to the research about various forms of professional development and their process and outcome in early childhood science education and informs early childhood professional communities of creative ways to improve science teaching and learning.

  3. Professional Development of Novice Special Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara de Oliveira Gomes Papi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The professional development of novice teachers in the profession and in special education is poorly understood, despite its relevance to the improvement of teaching. This study analyzes the challenges faced by such teachers with a view to understanding their professional development. The participants in the research were teachers of classrooms equipped with multifunctional resources (SRM in state schools. The research follows a critical-dialectic approach and a qualitative focus. The results indicate deficiencies in the professional development of novices, who experience difficulties related to teaching and bureaucracy, despite having specific training in the area. They also feel alienated in the schools and seek alternatives to fill existing gaps related to their professional practice.

  4. Mentoring: A Practice Developed in Community?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Hazel; Carpenter, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Behaviourist and cognitive theories of learning view learning as a process of individual internalisation. Social theorists view learning as a process that is socially constructed and developed in social contexts. Wenger suggests that professional practice is a social process that is constructed in communities. Mentoring in Initial Teacher…

  5. A Qualitative Analysis of Pesantren Educational Management: School Culture and Leadership of a Professional Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyimas Mu'azzomi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore supportive and shared leadership structures at one Indonesian Islamic boarding school (Pesantren as a function of school culture policies and procedures in a professional learning community in the disctrict. A qualitative study was conducted at one Pesantren located in Jambi, an Indonesian province in west part of Sumatra island. We interviewed three administrators and five teachers to get in-depth information about the purpose of this paper. The interview transcriptions were translated, coded, divided into themes, and elaborated in the findings of the paper. The findings of study conclude that Pesantren leaders in the perspective of the participants must provide supportive and shared leadership structures for teachers in order to create positive cultures and effective a professional learning community for the development of the Pesantren. Leaders of the Pesantren must directly cooperate with teaching staff to provide policies and procedures for teachers in the leadership structure to directly impact school improvement through professional learning community collaborative attempts. This study was conducted based on the school culture and professional learning communities literature by exploring existent policies and practices in schools as unique cases. This study is significant to the community as specific cases informing educational leaders especially in Islamic education on mechanisms that may be leveraged to ensure successful implementation of policies and procedures on the leadership and school culture of a professional learning community literature.

  6. School nurse summer institute: a model for professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and spring. Coalition building is an important tool to enhance the influence of the school nurse in improving the health of individuals, families, and communities. School nurses and nursing educators with expertise in the specialty of school nursing could replicate this model in their own regions.

  7. Career Mapping for Professional Development and Succession Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tammy; Diamond-Wells, Tammy; Jeffs, Debra

    Career mapping facilitates professional development of nurses by education specialists and nurse managers. On the basis of national Nursing Professional Development Scope and Standards, our education and professional development framework supports the organization's professional practice model and provides a foundation for the professional career map. This article describes development, implementation, and evaluation of the professional career map for nurses at a large children's hospital to support achievement of the nursing strategic goals for succession planning and professional development.

  8. Electronic Communities: a Forum for Supporting Women Professionals and Students in Technical and Scientific Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.; Cunningham, Christine M.; Single, Richard M.

    In this article, we report on electronic discussion lists (e-lists) sponsored by MentorNet, the National Electronic Industrial Mentoring Network for Women in Engineering and Science. Using the Internet, the MentorNet program connects students in engineering and science with mentors working in industry. These e-lists are a feature of MentorNet's larger electronic mentoring program and were sponsored to foster the establishment of community among women engineering and science students and men and women professionals in those fields. This research supports the hypothesis that electronic communications can be used to develop community among engineering and science students and professionals and identifies factors influencing the emergence of electronic communities (e-communities). The e-lists that emerged into self-sustaining e-communities were focused on topic-based themes, such as balancing personal and work life, issues pertaining to women in engineering and science, and job searching. These e-communities were perceived to be safe places, embraced a diversity of opinions and experiences, and sanctioned personal and meaningful postings on the part of the participants. The e-communities maintained three to four simultaneous threaded discussions and were sustained by professionals who served as facilitators by seeding the e-lists with discussion topics. The e-lists were sponsored to provide women students participating in MentorNet with access to groups of technical and scientific professionals. In addition to providing benefits to the students, the e-lists also provided the professionals with opportunities to engage in peer mentoring with other, mostly female, technical and scientific professionals. We discuss the implications of our findings for developing e-communities and for serving the needs of women in technical and scientific fields.

  9. From Professional Practice to Practical Leader: Teacher Leadership in Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Adrianne

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research is to illuminate perceptions and lived experiences of secondary teachers through their involvement in a Professional Learning Community (PLC). Teachers' experiences within a PLC were examined for patterns of cultivated leadership. The second purpose of the study was to identify variables that either promote or…

  10. Auditing Community Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mészáros Gergely

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with European efforts related to Critical Information Infrastructure Protection, in Hungary a special department called LRL-IBEK has been formed which is designated under the Disaster Management. While specific security issues of commercial applications are well understood and regulated by widely applied standards, increasing share of information systems are developed partly or entirely in a different way, by the community. In this paper different issues of the open development style will be discussed regarding the high requirements of Critical Information Infrastructures, and possible countermeasures will be suggested for the identified problems.

  11. Developing a scholarship community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbie, Sharon; Weinert, Clarann; Luparell, Susan; Conley, Virginia; Smith, James

    2005-01-01

    To report the results of a multidisciplinary, interinstitutional writing support group established to facilitate faculty scholarly productivity. ORGANIZING CONCEPT: The road to scholarship can be filled with many obstacles, among them time constraints, teaching and meeting demands, student needs, office interruptions, and lack of colleagueship. The problems associated with lack of colleagueship, in particular, can be compounded for faculty who work in isolated contexts with few, if any, senior faculty to serve as mentors. METHODS OF DEVELOPMENT: The Western Writers Coercion Group evolved over a 2-year period from a small group of nursing faculty at a single institution to include, by its second year, 21 faculty from five western university campuses and three academic disciplines. The group met biweekly via teleconference with the objectives of defining and accomplishing realistic individual scholarship goals and providing a forum for the critical exchange of ideas. The ongoing support and mentoring of the group led to significant writing outcomes in the form of manuscripts submitted for publication, abstracts submitted for conference presentation, grant proposals developed, and collegial relationships formed. Although the benefits of group participation varied somewhat for faculty at different points in the career trajectory, they seemed to accrue at all levels of development. Group members underscored the many less quantifiable advantages of group participation: exposure to broader professional perspectives, the formation of key professional relationships, the enrichment of multidisciplinary input, and individualized assistance with time management, goal setting, and actual drafts. The structure and experience of this group, which continues to meet regularly, might be a model to guide other groups of scholars who face geographic isolation and who struggle with balancing time and work and finding motivation for the process of writing.

  12. Strategies, Use, and Impact of Social Media for Supporting Teacher Community within Professional Development: The Case of One Urban STEM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Joshua M.; Greenhalgh, Spencer P.; Wolf, Leigh Graves; Koehler, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the use of social media to foster community connections within the MSU Urban Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) program. We describe the strategies employed by the program and the technologies employed by instructors to provide support, build community, and showcase learning. We highlight three particular…

  13. Development of a Basic Professional Educational Programs for Teacher Training according to Teacher Professional Standart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtarieva R.F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A teaching position involves professional activities in keeping with professional standards, as well as competences and knowledge necessary for it. Development of a basic professional educational program improves teacher training to make it more practice-oriented, so the ability of the future teacher to act according to the professional standard becomes basic educational result. The article describes the features of our basic professional educational program for teaching training, developed according to professional standards and peculiarities of professional activity. The basic professional program consists of modules developed in the light of idea of “eventness” when Incoming or Outcoming Event means the level of ability to professional performance.

  14. Professional Flash Lite Mobile Development

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J G

    2010-01-01

    Discover how to create Flash Lite mobile apps from the ground up. Adobe Flash is an ideal choice for developing rich interactive content for "Flash-enabled" mobile devices; and with this book, you'll learn how to create unique applications with Flash Lite. Through a series of code samples and extensive example applications, you'll explore the core concepts, key features, and best practices of the Flash Lite player. Coverage reveals various ways to develop Flash mobile content, create applications with a cross-platform programming framework based on the Model, View and Controller conc

  15. Professional Development through Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsibande, Rejoice; Garraway, James

    2011-01-01

    Formative evaluation and its associated methodology of reflection on practice are used extensively in academic staff development. In reflecting on formative evaluation processes in both more traditional and newer programmes conducted at a university of technology, a number of variables reported in the literature were observed to have influenced…

  16. Pedagogical innovation from the perspective of professional learning communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Cortés, Ana María

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the relationship between the participation of teachers in professional learning communities and the teaching practices related to the socio-constructivist model. For this purpose, a quantitative non-experimental model with a cross-sectional design was implemented, using the results of the survey entitled "Teaching and learning international survey", which was applied by the OECD in 2008 in 24 countries. The results of the conducted study determined that the dimensions of professional learning communities have a weak positive relationship with the categories of teaching practices. Additionally, the investigation addressed the differences in the responses of teachers according to variables, such as age, gender, teaching experience, and level of education.

  17. Community Involvement - Outreach / Development

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Tonya Aiken: Horse Program Success. Kyle Cecil: Natural Resources and the Extension Educator. Karol Dyson: Building Strong Communities through Empowerment. Lisa Dennis: "Food Smart". Theresa M. Ferrari: Community Service Experiences & 4-H Teens. t. Stacey Harper: Connecting the Youth with the Community. Joseph G. Hiller: Extension Work in Indian Country. Alice P. Kersey: Outreach to the NR Community. Carla M. Sousa: Learning from Latino Community Efforts.

  18. Professional Development of the Teachers from the Angle of School Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Mirascieva, Snezana

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the problem of teachers' professional development and its relation to school management. The professional development of teachers is a common phrase that has actuality among educational experts. The role of the teacher in the development and progress of the community is determined by the teacher’s development. The teacher will monitor changes in the community, will apply new scientific knowledge, develop practice applying new teaching strategies and media depends on its d...

  19. Continuous professional development of educators: the state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous Professional Development (CPD) for educators should form an integral part of an education system. CPD should include diverse programmes that are reflective and that promote and embrace technological development. Such programmes would make it possible to respond to challenges brought about by ...

  20. Young Adult Literature and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jacqueline; Choate, Laura Hensley; Parker, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    As the body of high quality young adult literature (YAL) continues to grow, what role might these texts play in professional development for educators? This article describes ways in which schools can develop book study programs that use this literature to promote meaningful dialogue and understanding of contemporary adolescent issues. Based on…

  1. Professional Development Seen as Employment Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Practitioners need to invest in professional development to enhance credibility, job security and employment prospects. Employer expectations of continuing development as a performance measure link to the notion of career capital; namely that knowledge competence influences job advancement. This study uses an interpretivist approach to explore…

  2. Teaching HR Professionals: The Classroom as a Community of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avramenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an innovative course design incorporating both communities of practice and reflective practice as a learning strategy for part-time learners in higher education. The new design has been applied to teaching HR practitioners in a UK-based business school. Findings indicate that the suggested way of organizing teaching and learning for part-time professionals is very informative and facilitates a richer engagement with theory whilst addressing issues of practice.

  3. Instructional Technology Professional Development Evaluation: Developing a High Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytan, Jorge A.; McEwen, Beryl C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The literature contains very few studies that focused on evaluating the impact of professional development activities on student learning. And, many of these studies failed to determine whether the professional development activities met their primary goal--to improve the learning process. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use…

  4. A Model of Professional Development: Teachers' Perceptions of Their Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidov-Ungar, Orit

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to evaluate the manner in which teachers perceive their professional development process. Forty-three teachers from Israeli schools participated in the study. I used a semi-structured interview to understand the teachers' perceptions about their professional development. The qualitative analysis identified two dimensions that…

  5. Professional Development on a Budget: Facilitating Learning Opportunities for Information Literacy Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Shamchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How do you stay on top of evolving trends and changes to information literacy delivery, especially while coping with shrinking professional development allocations? This article details various in-house, professional development opportunities created for MacEwan University’s library staff. Low-cost, practical ideas are given to help jump-start a library's information literacy professional development offerings. Included are details about organizing an Information Literacy Community, internal Library Professional Development Days and an information literacy event open to local library professionals.

  6. Enabling School Structures, Collegial Trust and Academic Emphasis: Antecedents of professional learning communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Julie; Kruse, Sharon; Tarter, C. John

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the role of enabling school structures, collegial trust and academic emphasis in the development of professional learning communities (PLCs) in a low-income school district. The empirical study was based upon the perceptions of teachers and principals as provided by survey responses (N = 67 schools). While enabling school…

  7. The Art and Science of Leadership in Learning Environments: Facilitating a Professional Learning Community across Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Catherine; Guzar, Katlyn; Rodrigue, Anne

    2015-01-01

    A professional learning community (PLC) is one of the most promising strategies for effecting change in educational practices to improve academic achievement and wellbeing for all students. The PLC facilitator's role in developing and leading blended (online and face-to-face) PLCs with members from Ontario's school districts was examined through a…

  8. Professional/Peer-Learning Community: Impacts on Workplace Training at Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phusavat, Kongkiti Peter; Delahunty, David; Kess, Pekka; Kropsu-Vehkapera, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to examine the issues relating to workplace learning at the upper secondary school level. This study is based on the two questions. How should the professional/peer-learning community or PLC be developed and deployed to help strengthen in-service teacher training? The second question is what are the success factors which…

  9. The Role of a Professional Learning Community in Teacher Change: A Perspective from Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Angela Choi Fung

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed to examine the role of a professional learning community (PLC) in changing teachers' beliefs and practices. Teachers of a Chinese department in a Hong Kong secondary school were interviewed and observed. The findings indicate that the features of a PLC-facilitating teacher change are development of a coherent…

  10. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  11. Professional Learning Community in Secondary Schools Community in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Abdullah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a research towards an initial assessment of the stage of the PLC in secondary schools in Malaysians secondary school with teachers as the main focus. A brief philosophy of the importance of learning organization and its development in various countries was reviewed and incorporated by the current situations, leading to the objectives and methodology for this study. The result showed the teachers can be active in their learning and improving their schools as to enhance the learning performance of the students in the first four characteristic dimensions refer to the practice of shared values, goals, mission and vision among teachers which play an important role in shaping the PLC in secondary school.

  12. Promoting professional development through poster presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Poster presentations are commonplace at regional and national nursing conferences, although the development of a poster remains an intimidating task for many staff nurses. The author describes the staff development department's role in implementing in-house poster presentation sessions. Nursing staff are provided support and assistance in presenting posters to their colleagues at yearly sessions. The result has been increased comfort and experience with poster creation, participation in professional development activities, and dissemination of nursing practice innovation.

  13. Continuing professional development | Hellenberg | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It would be unlikely that many of today\\'s practicing family doctors have not been involved in Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. It would be equally unlikely, however, that these activities were part of any contextually structured educational plan towards professional development. Often driven by external need ...

  14. Professional Development Needs of Online Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mamta; Boboc, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in mind the rising rate of K-12 enrollment, and the increased demand for online teachers, the need for professional development of online teachers is keenly felt. The skills needed for teaching in face-to-face environments are not always transferable to online settings. There is a pointed change in the way teaching takes place in an online…

  15. Relational Dynamics in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Teacher professional development (PD) is considered essential to improving student achievement toward high standards. I argue that while current notions of high quality PD foreground cognitive aspects of learning, they undertheorize the influence of relational dynamics in teacher learning interactions. That is, current conceptions of high quality…

  16. Developing Moral Responsibleness through Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Sharon M.; Tennyson, W. Wesley

    1989-01-01

    Argues that more attention must be given in counselor preparation and practice to developing critical reflectiveness about valued ends when making professional judgments. Describes and evaluates an instructional model designed to further students' capacities and motivations for making rational moral judgments in counseling. (Author/TE)

  17. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best…

  18. Assessing an Academic Library Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Karen R.; O'Toole, Erin; Sassen, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Professional development programs have been established in many academic libraries to support the research and scholarly activities of librarians. Continuous assessment can contribute to the sustainability and effectiveness of these programs. This study describes how measures of need, participation, satisfaction, and impact were employed to assess…

  19. Continuing Professional Development in the quantity surveying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-01

    Jan 1, 1991 ... The research established that quantity surveyors regarded handing in their CPD ... Surveying, Walter Sisulu University, PO Box 1421, East London, 5200, South Africa. ... Keywords: Continuing professional development, quantity surveying, perception .... In spite of this opportunity enshrined in the Act, the.

  20. Research and professional development of teacher educators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Mieke; Willemse, Martijn

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade teacher educators have started to systematically study the processes involved in their efforts to improve their teacher education practices. This research by teacher educators (self-study research) has made an enormous contribution to the professional development of the teacher

  1. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with…

  2. Professional Development in Environmental and Sustainability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    explore how professional development at a tertiary institution can be used to support practising Science ... challenges related to 'the how' and 'the what' of implementation of environmental education ... teaching environmental and sustainability education, attest to this lack of capacity to implement ..... Profiles of participants.

  3. Competency-based continuing professional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Competence is traditionally viewed as the attainment of a static set of attributes rather than a dynamic process in which physicians continuously use their practice experiences to "progress in competence'' toward the attainment of expertise. A competency-based continuing professional development

  4. Teachers' professional development: Awareness of literacy practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    professional development and deepen teachers' understanding of literacy practices and teaching. Interviews and ... these disadvantages, linked to both material and human resources, have continued, and in fact become .... given access to literacy usage and variation, but ... English as their LoLT, though it may be their.

  5. Making Professional Development Flexible: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case study of an online course that was designed for staff professional development at Manchester Metropolitan University (United Kingdom). Discusses the flexibility of online courses; course design; activities for short online workshops; evaluation methods for course evaluation; and results of participant questionnaires. (LRW)

  6. Moving toward Teamwork through Professional Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Meghan M.; Theilheimer, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of three Head Start Centers analyzed surveys, interviews, and focus group data to determine how education coordinators, teachers, and teacher assistants believed professional development activities could support teamwork at their centers. The researchers sorted data related to teamwork into four categories: knowledge and…

  7. Infusing Neuroscience into Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Janet M.; Roehrig, Gillian; Varma, Sashank

    2013-01-01

    Bruer advocated connecting neuroscience and education indirectly through the intermediate discipline of psychology. We argue for a parallel route: The neurobiology of learning, and in particular the core concept of "plasticity," have the potential to directly transform teacher preparation and professional development, and ultimately to…

  8. Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2009). Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning. Presentation of the Learning Network Programme for a Korean delegation of Chonnam National University and Dankook University (researchers dr. Jeeheon Ryu and dr. Minjeong Kim and a Group of PhD and

  9. Professional Development in Tough Financial Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandel, Paul B.; Golden, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    The authors asked a diverse cross-section of their colleagues how they were addressing professional development in tight economic times, when they are all being asked to work more effectively across organizational boundaries. While the survey was informal and not scientific, the authors found that many organizations have maintained strong…

  10. Learning Strategies at Work and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemer, Hannah Deborah; Borges-Andrade, Jairo Eduardo; Cassiano, Simone Kelli

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the prediction of current and evolutionary perceptions of professional development through five learning strategies at work and through training and how individual and job characteristics predict those strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Variables were measured in a cross-sectional survey, with 962…

  11. Meaningful Professional Development: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rebecca Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article shares a personal story of the evolution of professional development in practice in K-12 schools from three states over a 30 year period. The article begins with reference to general subject area life awarded teaching credentials and concludes with the addition of language addressing prekindergarten, specifically the inclusion of…

  12. Science teachers’ foreground for continued professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that are dedicated to qualify our understanding of the significance of lived experiences as well as foregrounds for science teachers’ participation in professional development. Seven Danish science teachers were interviewed and observed. Three of these teachers exemplify...

  13. Give Your Professional Development a Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Pursuing professional development (PD) is contractual for some, and oxygen for others. As technology has increased access to anytime-anywhere learning, many of the hurdles for conquering time and space constraints have been addressed with online learning in web-based classroom environments, webinars, and even some of the newer social networking…

  14. Teacher Professional Development through Digital Content Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kui; Kim, Min Kyu; Cheng, Sheng-Lun; Luthy, Nicole C.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, researchers designed and implemented a 1-year professional development (PD) program that focused on supporting teachers in evaluating and selecting digital learning contents. Participants in this investigation included 109 teachers who consented to the study amongst a total of 171 teachers from five school districts across central…

  15. Preservice Teachers' Microblogging: Professional Development via Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Twitter has demonstrated potential to facilitate learning at the university level, and K-12 educators' use of the microblogging service Twitter to facilitate professional development appears to be on the rise. Research on microblogging as a part of teacher education is, however, limited. This paper investigates the use of Twitter by preservice…

  16. Professional Development to Promote Teacher Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Allison Ward; Ankrum, Julie Winneur; Morewood, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Effective professional development (PD) follows adaptive teaching principles; it increases teacher understanding and instructional purpose, which ultimately supports and extends adaptive teaching. Through this article, we compare and contrast training models with educative models of PD (Duffy, 2004). We discuss characteristics of effective PD that…

  17. Surviving the Lunacy Act of 1890: English Psychiatrists and Professional Development during the Early Twentieth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Akinobu

    2017-04-01

    In recent decades, historians of English psychiatry have shifted their major concerns away from asylums and psychiatrists in the nineteenth century. This is also seen in the studies of twentieth-century psychiatry where historians have debated the rise of psychology, eugenics and community care. This shift in interest, however, does not indicate that English psychiatrists became passive and unimportant actors in the last century. In fact, they promoted Lunacy Law reform for a less asylum-dependent mode of psychiatry, with a strong emphasis on professional development. This paper illustrates the historical dynamics around the professional development of English psychiatry by employing Andrew Abbott's concept of professional development. Abbott redefines professional development as arising from both abstraction of professional knowledge and competition regarding professional jurisdiction. A profession, he suggests, develops through continuous re-formation of its occupational structure, mode of practice and political language in competing with other professional and non-professional forces. In early twentieth-century England, psychiatrists promoted professional development by framing political discourse, conducting a daily trade and promoting new legislation to defend their professional jurisdiction. This professional development story began with the Lunacy Act of 1890, which caused a professional crisis in psychiatry and led to inter-professional competition with non-psychiatric medical service providers. To this end, psychiatrists devised a new political rhetoric, 'early treatment of mental disorder', in their professional interests and succeeded in enacting the Mental Treatment Act of 1930, which re-instated psychiatrists as masters of English psychiatry.

  18. Development Professionals at Religiously Based Nonprofit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Pinder

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of why a fundraising professional would choose to leave his or her employer is critical to the ongoing success of religiously based nonprofit organizations as they work to achieve their mission. Without continuity in the donor relationship, donors will likely leave the organization or become disenfranchised. This study focuses on development professionals at Seventh-Day Adventist institutions across North America. The results of this study are applicable to other religiously based nonprofit organizations. The present article reveals the reasons affecting employee retention and proposes approaches to mitigate the loss of valuable employees. Data were gathered using a structured online survey and analyzed for its descriptive outcomes.

  19. Global perspective on continuing professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence T. Sherman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare professionals worldwide participate in continuing professional development (CPD to remain competent in practice, and to ensure they provide high-quality care to patients. Globally, CPD systems have evolved at different rates resulting in significant variation in structure, requirements, and oversight. In some countries, CPD has moved from single profession educational designs and formal didactic methods of delivery to educational models that are innovative, dynamic, and learnercentric. In other countries, CPD is a neglected part of the healthcare education continuum. This article provides a global perspective on the evolution of CPD over the past 20 years, and identifies opportunities for the future.

  20. Violent Extremism, Community-Based Violence Prevention, and Mental Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weine, Stevan M; Stone, Andrew; Saeed, Aliya; Shanfield, Stephen; Beahrs, John; Gutman, Alisa; Mihajlovic, Aida

    2017-01-01

    New community-based initiatives being developed to address violent extremism in the United States are utilizing mental health services and leadership. This article reviews current approaches to preventing violent extremism, the contribution that mental illness and psychosocial problems can make to violent extremism, and the rationale for integrating mental health strategies into preventing violent extremism. The authors describe a community-based targeted violence prevention model and the potential roles of mental health professionals. This model consists of a multidisciplinary team that assesses at-risk individuals with comprehensive threat and behavioral evaluations, arranges for ongoing support and treatment, conducts follow-up evaluations, and offers outreach, education, and resources for communities. This model would enable mental health professionals in local communities to play key roles in preventing violent extremism through their practice and leadership.

  1. Developing Professional “Game Teacher” Repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieberoth, Andreas; Hanghøj, Thorkild

    2017-01-01

    for in their professional careers. We expand and explain these findings using embedded mixed methods analysis, and conclude that games are a good practical case for training various teaching competences, but that building flexible professional repertoires requires more varied experiences than a single course can muster.......The first Danish Game-Based Learning course offered by a teachers college enrolled 42 students with a variety of backgrounds and interests in games. We characterize the students who enrolled in the course in terms of gaming literacies and preferences, and gauge the impact of the course in terms...... of building actionable skill sets. Following Schön (1986) we use these data to frame students’ transition from gamers or game curious teachers to developing professional repertoires.Interviews and statistical comparison to other students indicate that while student’s existing preferences for the “heavier...

  2. Professional Development for School Library Media Professionals: Elements for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carol A.; Dotson, Lana Kaye; Yontz, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    The American Association for School Librarians suggests an important mission for school librarians is to ensure personal growth through ongoing exposure to conferences, journal articles, webinars, presentations, and membership in professional organizations. As professional educators, School Librarians should exemplify the vision for being…

  3. PROFESSIONAL AMBITION: AMBITION AS A MOTIVE OF PROFESSIONAL AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF PERSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana V. Barsukova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the content of ambition as a motive, guiding the professional growth and career advancement of the person. Ambition in this case fulfils the function of achieving the social recognition, which is specified in getting the deserved recognition due to the professional achievements of the person. Professional ambition - is the human desire to get deserved recognition of the professional community as a professional for real progress and achievements in the chosen field. Professional ambition is discussed in more detail on the example of pedagogical ambition and moral aspect –on the example of ambitions of scientists and criminals.

  4. Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education: Developing Knowledge of Technology Enhanced Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal-Jamani, Kamini; Figg, Candace; Gallagher, Tiffany; Scott, Ruth McQuirter; Ciampa, Katia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a professional development initiative for teacher educators, called the "Digital Pedagogies Collaboration," in which the goal was to build faculty knowledge about technology enhanced teaching (TPACK knowledge), develop a collaborative learning and research community of faculty members around technology enhanced…

  5. Who Provides Professional Development? A Study of Professional Development in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald; Reynolds, Dudley; Toledo, Will; Abu-Tineh, Abdullah Mohammad Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that understanding what is offered as professional development frames what matters in English language teaching in a national education system. Analyzing these offerings articulates the values and perceptions of the work environment in which teachers live professionally. The "Learning4Teaching" ("L4T") project…

  6. Literacy-Related Professional Development Preferences of Secondary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shara L.; Lee, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    A survey of 100 teachers in one Ontario school board examined their literacy-related professional development preferences. The majority preferred short durations of literacy-related professional development. A small number did not want any literacy-related professional development. The most preferred forms of professional development were shared…

  7. Manifesto for the Software Development Professionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Red Latinoamericana en Ingeniería de Software (RedLatinaIS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the central problems of current economic development and industrial competitiveness, social and scientific, is the complexity of large and intensive software systems, and processes for their development and implementation. This complexity is defined by the amount and heterogeneity of the interaction of the hardware with the software components, their inter-relationships, of incorporation of the technical and organizational environments, and the interfaces to humans. The domain of these systems requires actions and scientific thoughts, hierarchical and systematic; also, the success of the products, services and organizations, is increasingly determined by the availability of suitable software products. Therefore, highly qualified professionals, able to understand and master the systems, involved in the entire life cycle of software engineering, and adopt different roles during the development. This is the reason that guide the thinking of this Manifesto , which aims is to achieve the Professionalization of Software Development.

  8. Rural Community Development: Bedrock for National Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper advocates that community development is the bedrock for national development. For any meaningful development to take place, whether national or global development must have its building blocks or firm-root in rural development. However, the rural communities are characterized by isolation from ideas and ...

  9. The competent community: toward a vital reformulation of professional ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W Brad; Barnett, Jeffrey E; Elman, Nancy S; Forrest, Linda; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2012-10-01

    Psychologists are ethically obligated to ensure their own competence. When problems of professional competence occur, psychologists must take appropriate steps to regain competence while protecting those they serve. Yet conceptualizations of the competence obligation are thoroughly intertwined with Western ideals of individualism and a model of the person as self-contained, self-controlled, and perpetually rational. Research in health care, education, and multicultural and social psychology raise serious doubts about psychologists' capacity for consistently accurate self-assessments of competence. To address this problem, the authors advocate that education, training, professional ethics standards, and credentialing criteria be infused with a robust communitarian ethos and a culturally pervasive ethic of care. The authors propose a shift in discourse about competence to incorporate both competent individuals and competent communities.

  10. Identifying professionals' needs in integrating electronic pain monitoring in community palliative care services: An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sally; Allsop, Matthew J; Bekker, Hilary L; Bennett, Michael I; Bewick, Bridgette M

    2017-07-01

    Poor pain assessment is a barrier to effective pain control. There is growing interest internationally in the development and implementation of remote monitoring technologies to enhance assessment in cancer and chronic disease contexts. Findings describe the development and testing of pain monitoring systems, but research identifying the needs of health professionals to implement routine monitoring systems within clinical practice is limited. To inform the development and implementation strategy of an electronic pain monitoring system, PainCheck, by understanding palliative care professionals' needs when integrating PainCheck into routine clinical practice. Qualitative study using face-to-face interviews. Data were analysed using framework analysis Setting/participants: Purposive sample of health professionals managing the palliative care of patients living in the community Results: A total of 15 interviews with health professionals took place. Three meta-themes emerged from the data: (1) uncertainties about integration of PainCheck and changes to current practice, (2) appraisal of current practice and (3) pain management is everybody's responsibility Conclusion: Even the most sceptical of health professionals could see the potential benefits of implementing an electronic patient-reported pain monitoring system. Health professionals have reservations about how PainCheck would work in practice. For optimal use, PainCheck needs embedding within existing electronic health records. Electronic pain monitoring systems have the potential to enable professionals to support patients' pain management more effectively but only when barriers to implementation are appropriately identified and addressed.

  11. Pathways to URM Retention: IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2013-05-01

    As a not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. IBP also assists with formative program evaluation design and implementation to help strengthen URM recruitment and retention elements. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URMs with mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an improved retention rate of URM students. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science and Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science (ESS) Professional Development Program. The NASA OSSI recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA education and employment opportunities. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with Ocean Science REU programs and serves as a resource for REU program directors. Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The mentoring manual, which is organized by roles, provides undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty and project directors with valuable resources. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives, focuses on increasing the retention rate of URM students receiving advanced degrees in ESS. The program addresses barriers to retention in ESS including isolation, lack of preparation and professional development, and lack of mentoring. Program activities center on peer-to-peer community building, professional development exercises, networking experiences, one

  12. Professional identity development: Learning and journeying together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Stephanie J

    2018-03-01

    Pharmacy students start to develop their professional values through engagement with the course, practice exposure, staff and fellow students. Group working is an element of pedagogy which draws on the social aspects of learning to facilitate knowledge and skills development, but its potential role in facilitating professional identity formation has as yet been under researched. This study aimed to explore the potential of mutual learning through group work to contribute not only to academic knowledge and understanding, but also to the development of students' professional values and selves. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 home and international first year undergraduate pharmacy students in a UK School of Pharmacy, to explore their experiences of interacting for learning with other students on the course. Thematic analysis of the interview data highlighted four main benefits of mutual learning, which are that it: promotes friendly interactions; aids learning about the subject and the profession; opens the mind through different opinions and ways of thinking; and enables learning about other people. Through working together students developed their communication skills and confidence; reflectively considered their own stance in the light of others' experiences and healthcare perspectives; and started to gain a wider worldview, potentially informing their future interactions with patients and colleagues. Some difficulties arose when group interactions functioned less well. Opportunity for collaboration and exchange can positively influence development of students' professional outlook and values. However, careful management of group working is required, in order to create a mutually supportive environment wherein students feel able to interact, share and develop together. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Conceptualization and Support of the Role of Teachers Serving as Team Leaders in a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Lanelle

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of a phenomenological qualitative investigation into the new role of teachers serving as team leaders in a professional learning community, as well as the support team leaders need from members and principals to be effective. Collaborative teacher teams in 6 schools that have been developing as professional learning…

  14. Continuous Professional Development of English Language Teachers: Perception and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2016-01-01

    Professional development is considered as an essential element in enhancing the teaching and learning process to ensure student learning. Professional development can also be deemed as a cornerstone of teacher professionalism and quality. The governments and educational institutions invest significantly in Continuous Professional Development (CPD)…

  15. Training Master's Thesis Supervisors within a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossøy, Ingrid; Haara, Frode Olav

    2016-01-01

    Completion of a master's degree has changed significantly from being the specific responsibility of the candidate and his/her supervisor to being the responsibility of the whole educational institution. As a consequence, we have initiated an internal training course for professional development related to the supervision of master's theses. In…

  16. Communities of practice; facilitating teacher professionalization in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Donald Ropes

    2005-01-01

    The field of higher professional educational in the Netherlands is undergoing drastic structural changes. Organizational-wide mergers are commonplace and are often followed by development of new curricula. Furthermore, this is often accompanied by the implementation of a completely new educational

  17. Professional development needs of nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltner, Rebecca S; Jukkala, Angela; Dawson, Martha A; Patrician, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    Nurse managers have a key role in creating positive work environments where safe, high-quality care is consistently provided. This requires a broad range of skills to be successful within today's complex health care environment; however, managers are frequently selected based on their clinical expertise and are offered little formal preparation for this leadership role. We conducted three focus groups with 20 nurse managers to understand their professional development needs. Transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Three themes emerged: Managing Versus Leading, Gaining a Voice, and Garnering Support. Managers focused on daily tasks, such as matching staffing to patient needs. However, the data suggested gaps in foundational management skills, such as understanding organizational behavior, use of data to make decisions, and refined problem-solving skills. Professional development activities focusing on higher level leadership competencies could assist managers to be more successful in this challenging, but critical, role. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Professional Development Programs for Teachers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singgih Widodo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Well-planned programs based on the needs for professional development of teachers are strongly needed to enhance the teaching-staff improvement.The impact of teacher improvement will effect the students learning and school achievement. This paper aims at raising awareness of English teachers to upgrade themselves as autonomous learners as well as researchers and broaden their horizon for stepping the ladder-career of their profession. For that purpose, a survey as reported here aimed to identify the needs of individual English teachers and the preferred programs for professional development. The findings indicated that the 36 teachers involved needed teacher training, teacher association, teacher materials, continuing education, and interschool visit and that teacher training was the most well known program among teachers.

  19. Some aspects of school seen as a Professional Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradea Adela

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Each school is part of the community and at the same time, a provider of education services. This makes school a Learning Community for both teachers and students. While in the case of students this is a mission accomplished, in that of teachers’ things seem to be a bit more difficult. The latter ones should see themselves as members of a Professional Learning Community (PLC, where each teacher should cooperate with the other to achieve common goals, engage in common research activities for the progress of their school, take part in evaluating school results and propose plans to improve them etc. This research aimed to identify teachers’ perception of the role of school as a Professional Learning Community, to identify how school boards support and encourage this idea through participative management and to identify lines of joint research in which teachers are involved. The instrument used was a questionnaire having 30 close-ended items, administered to pre-university teachers from Bihor county, Romania. The implementation period was January to June 2016. The results show that there is collaboration between the same subject area teachers, who form committees to discuss, analyse and propose solutions. The research has also showed that more effort is required to improve collaboration between more experienced teachers and those who are at the beginning of their career, to improve collaboration between different subject area teachers by getting them to engage in joint projects, but above all, there is a need for a greater involvement of teachers, of school boards in managing schools so that participative management is achieved.

  20. Enrolling science teachers in continual professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical paper presents a model of how science teachers working in small groups can use video to diagnose the challengees that students face when learning science content, and how they can then design and refine appropriate teaching interventions. The analysis and discussion suggest...... that the proposed professional development program, based around group learning, should be formatively assessed, researched and refined over time following the principles of design based research, likewise the teachers' classroom interventions....

  1. Assessing a GTA professional development program

    OpenAIRE

    Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Masip, Joan Espar; Sullivan, Carol Subiño; Schatz, Michael F.

    2018-01-01

    For the last four years, the School of Physics at Georgia Tech have been preparing new Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) through a program that integrates pedagogy, physics content, and professional development strategies. Here we discuss various assessments we have used to evaluate the program, among them surveys, GTA self-reporting, and end-of-semester student evaluations. Our results indicate that GTAs who participate in the program find its practical activities useful, feel better prepa...

  2. Nursing Professional Development Organizational Value Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mary G; Aucoin, Julia; Warren, Joan I

    2016-01-01

    A common question nursing professional development (NPD) practitioners ask is, "How many NPD practitioners should my organization have?" This study examined correlations among facility size and structure, NPD practitioner characteristics and time in service, and organizational outcomes. Organizations with a higher rate of NPD full-time equivalents per bed had higher patient satisfaction with nurses' communication and provision of discharge instruction on their HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Provider and Systems) scores.

  3. Professional SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Tom; Fried, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Learn to leverage the features of the newest version of SharePoint, in this update to the bestseller. More than simply a portal, SharePoint is Microsoft's popular content management solution for building intranets and Web sites or hosting wikis and blogs. Offering broad coverage on all aspects of development for the SharePoint platform, this comprehensive book shows you exactly what SharePoint does, how to build solutions, and what features are accessible within SharePoint. Written by one of the most recognized names in SharePoint development, Professional SharePoint 2010 Development offers an

  4. Interdisciplinary Professional Development: Astrolabes for Medievalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2014-06-01

    Astronomers and astronomy educators have significantly broadened the intended audience for their outreach activities, from the traditional venues of public schools, libraries and planetariums to national parks, coffee houses, and concert halls. At the same time, significant attention has been paid to improving the quality and relevance of professional development directed toward preservice and inservice science teachers. Many of our outreach and professional development programs have also become increasingly creative in their use of interdisciplinary connections to astronomy, such as cultural astronomy and the history of astronomy. This poster describes a specific example of interdisciplinary professional development directed at a different audience, humanities faculty and researchers, through hands-on workshops on the basic astronomical background and usage of an astrolabe conducted at the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in 2013 and 2014. The goal was to explain the basic astronomy behind astrolabes (as well as their cultural relevance) to medieval scholars in history, literature, and other disciplines. The intention was to increase their comfort with manipulating and explaining astrolabes to a basic level where they could share their knowledge with their own college classes. In this way the relevance of astronomy to myriad human endeavors could be reinforced by humanities faculty within their own courses.

  5. The CORE Community: Career and Technical Education Teachers' Perceptions of the Common Core State Standards after a Professional Development Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stair, Kristin; Hock, Gaea; Warner, Wendy; Levy, Natalie; Conrad, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1983 U.S Department of Education's report, "A Nation at Risk," various educational initiatives have been developed to support an increase in state standards and greater educational accountability (Liebtag, 2013). Despite opportunities to link Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and instructional curriculum, CTE teachers often…

  6. It takes a village: supporting inquiry- and equity-oriented computer science pedagogy through a professional learning community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Jean; Goode, Joanna; Margolis, Jane

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the importance that high school computer science teachers place on a teachers' professional learning community designed around an inquiry- and equity-oriented approach for broadening participation in computing. Using grounded theory to analyze four years of teacher surveys and interviews from the Exploring Computer Science (ECS) program in the Los Angeles Unified School District, this article describes how participating in professional development activities purposefully aimed at fostering a teachers' professional learning community helps ECS teachers make the transition to an inquiry-based classroom culture and break professional isolation. This professional learning community also provides experiences that challenge prevalent deficit notions and stereotypes about which students can or cannot excel in computer science.

  7. Professional Associations: Their Role in Promoting Sustainable Development in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Hegarty, Kathryn; Whitman, Stuart; MacGregor, Val

    2012-01-01

    Professional associations have a strong influence on what is covered in the curricula of universities, especially that of professional degrees. They also provide members with professional development throughout their careers. Professional associations have the potential to facilitate development of sustainability competency in the workforce in…

  8. Professional Communities in the Context of Teachers' Professional lives: A Case of Mathematics Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Susan D.; Moriarty, Gail

    2005-01-01

    We describe an urban school initiative aimed at teachers' professional development with the goal of increasing their mathematics content knowledge and helping them improve their practice. In the lowest performing schools, mathematics specialists were employed to teach only mathematics in upper-elementary grades (ages 9-12). One aspect of this…

  9. Developing the Developers: Supporting and Researching the Learning of Professional Development Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Emily; Boylan, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Research on teacher professional development is extensive but there are fewer studies about the practitioners who facilitate professional development. Here we report on a pilot programme for professional development facilitators rooted in a cycle of action research. Informed by a categorisation of professional knowledge and skills of facilitators,…

  10. Tanzanian midwives' perception of their professional role and implications for continuing professional development education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brooke; Michael, Rene; Butt, Janice; Hauck, Yvonne

    2016-03-01

    This study explored Tanzanian midwives' perceptions of their professional role within their local context. Findings were to inform recommendations for continuing professional development education programs by Western midwifery educators. Using focus group interviews with sixteen Tanzanian midwives, the findings revealed that the midwives' overwhelming focus was on saving lives of women and newborns. The fundamental elements of saving lives involved prioritising care through receiving handover and undertaking physical assessment. Midwives were challenged by the poor working conditions, perceived lack of knowledge and associated low status within the local community. Based upon these findings, recommendations for continuing professional development education for Tanzanian midwives must ensure that saving lives is a major focus and that strategies taught must be relevant to the low-resource context of this developing country. In recognition of the high-risk women being cared for, there needs to be a focus on the prevention and management of maternity emergencies, in collaboration with medical practitioners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new inter-professional course preparing learners for life in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medves, Jennifer; Paterson, Margo; Chapman, Christine Y; Young, John H; Tata, Elizabeth; Bowes, Denise; Hobbs, Neil; McAndrews, Brian; O'Riordan, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The 'Professionals in Rural Practice' course was developed with the aim of preparing students enrolled in professional programs in Canada to become better equipped for the possible eventuality of professional work in a rural setting. To match the reality of living and working in a rural community, which by nature is interprofessional, the course designers were an interprofessional teaching team. In order to promote group cohesiveness the course included the participation of an interprofessional group of students and instructors from the disciplines of medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, teacher education, and theology. The format of the course included three-hour classes over an eight-week period and a two-day field experience in a rural community. The course utilized various experiential and interactive teaching and learning methods, along with a variety of assessment methods. Data were collected from student participants over two iterations of the course using a mixed methods approach. Results demonstrate that students value the interprofessional and experiential approach to learning and viewed this course as indispensable for gaining knowledge of other professions and preparation for rural practice. The data reveal important organizational and pedagogical considerations specific to interprofessional education, community based action research, and the unique interprofessional nature of training for life and work in a rural community. This study also indicates the potential value of further longitudinal study of participants in this course. Key words: Canada, community based action research, education, interdisciplinary, interprofessional.

  12. Professional WordPress Plugin Development

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Brad; Tadlock, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Taking WordPress to the next level with advanced plugin developmentWordPress is used to create self-hosted blogs and sites, and it's fast becoming the most popular content management system (CMS) on the Web. Now you can extend it for personal, corporate and enterprise use with advanced plugins and this professional development guide. Learn how to create plugins using the WordPress plugin API: utilize hooks, store custom settings, craft translation files, secure your plugins, set custom user roles, integrate widgets, work with JavaScript and AJAX, create custom post types. You'll find a practic

  13. Professional WordPress design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Brad; Stern, Hal

    2014-01-01

    The highest rated WordPress development and design book on the market is back with an all new third edition. Professional WordPress is the only WordPress book targeted to developers, with advanced content that exploits the full functionality of the most popular CMS in the world. Fully updated to align with WordPress 4.1, this edition has updated examples with all new screenshots, and full exploration of additional tasks made possible by the latest tools and features. You will gain insight into real projects that currently use WordPress as an application framework, as well as the basic usage a

  14. Professional development needs of nurse educators. An Australian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprescu, Florin; McAllister, Margaret; Duncan, David; Jones, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Because there is a global shortage of nurse educators, highly productive and committed nurse educators are needed to supply a rapidly expanding and changing health landscape. To support the aforementioned effort professional development needs of nurse educators must be systematically identified. This study explores practical issues around professional development needs of nurse educators. One hundred and thirty eight Australian nurse educators based in Queensland answered an online survey around professional development needs. Results indicate that 83% (n = 115) of the respondents were enthusiastic about nurse education yet only 45% (n = 62) were confident in their skills and less than 10% (n = 13) saw themselves as expert nurse educators. The most desired areas of future development in teaching were information technology skills, assessment and technical knowledge. There seems to be a shared need for developing global online and offline support resources and communities of practice to support nurse educators in their teaching and research endeavours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Educational model to develop trustworthy professional activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Torruco-García, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The reorganization of the national health system (SNS), enforces reflection and transformation on medical education in clinical contexts. The study presents an educational model to develop entrusted professionals activities (MEDAPROC) to train human resources in health with reliable knowledge, skills and attitudes to work in the shifting scenario of the SNS. The paper discusses international and national documents on skills in medicine. Based on the analysis of 8 domains, 50 skills and 13 entrusted professional activities (RPA) proposed by the Association of the American Medical College (AAMC) we propose a curriculum design, with the example of the undergraduate program of Gynecology and Obstetrics, with the intention to advance to internship and residency in a continuum that marks milestones and clinical practices. The pedagogical design of MEDAPROC was developed within three areas: 1) proposal of the AAMC; 2) curricular content of programs in pre and postgraduate education 3) organization of the daily agenda with academic mechanisms to develop the competencies, cover program items and develop clinical practice in deliberate learning activities, as well as milestones. The MEDAPROC offers versatility, student mobility and curricular flexibility in a system planed by academic units in diverse clinical settings.

  16. Competency-based continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Sherbino, Jonathan; Cate, Olle Ten; Holmboe, Eric S

    2010-01-01

    Competence is traditionally viewed as the attainment of a static set of attributes rather than a dynamic process in which physicians continuously use their practice experiences to "progress in competence" toward the attainment of expertise. A competency-based continuing professional development (CPD) model is premised on a set of learning competencies that include the ability to (a) use practice information to identify learning priorities and to develop and monitor CPD plans; (b) access information sources for innovations in development and new evidence that may potentially be integrated into practice; (c) establish a personal knowledge management system to store and retrieve evidence and to select and manage learning projects; (d) construct questions, search for evidence, and record and track conclusions for practice; and (e) use tools and processes to measure competence and performance and develop action plans to enhance practice. Competency-based CPD emphasizes self-directed learning processes and promotes the role of assessment as a professional expectation and obligation. Various approaches to defining general competencies for practice require the creation of specific performance metrics to be meaningful and relevant to the lifelong learning strategies of physicians. This paper describes the assumptions, advantages, and challenges of establishing a CPD system focused on competencies that improve physician performance and the quality and safety of patient care. Implications for competency-based CPD are discussed from an individual and organizational perspective, and a model to bridge the transition from residency to practice is explored.

  17. A Grounded Theory of Professional Learning in an Authentic Online Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teräs, Hanna; Kartoglu, Umit

    2017-01-01

    Online professional development (OPD) programs have become increasingly popular. However, participating in professional development does not always lead to profound professional learning. Previous research endeavours have often focussed on measuring user acceptance or on comparing the effectiveness of OPD with a face-to-face delivery, but there is…

  18. [Batas Nómadas in Madrid Salud: art and artists in professional community health teams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, Mar; Fernández-Cedena, Jorge; Siles, Silvia; Claver, María Dolores; Ávila, Noemí

    2018-06-14

    This article describes the strategy of incorporating artists into the teams of community health in the city of Madrid, specifically in the Madrid Salud Centers. The artistic colletive, Batas Nómadas, formed by three artists expertized in visual arts, has developed performances and participatory aproach to explain the incorporation of art and artists in these teams of professionals of Madrid Salud. Batas Nómadas has carried out sessions in 14 work teams of the Madrid Salud Centers and has collected data in a creative way from the 179 professionals that have participated in these sessions. These actions have shown some needs in community health, and have noticed a meaningful reflection on the usefulness of the art to develop participative strategies into the Madrid Salud teams. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  19. [Awareness and attitude toward suicide in community mental health professionals and hospital workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soung Nam; Lee, Kang Sook; Lee, Seon Young; Yu, Jae Hee; Hong, A Rum

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate community mental health professionals and hospital workers attitude and awareness towards suicide. This study investigated 264 community mental health professionals and 228 hospital workers. SOQs (Suicidal Opinion Questionnaires) were used from July 2007 to September 2007. After a factor analysis for the attitude towards suicide, the items on ethics, mental illness, religion, risk, and motivation were included in the subsequent analysis. There were significant differences in the attitude towards suicide according to religion, age, educational background, the marriage status, the economic position, and different professional licenses. Hospital workers' view was different from the community workers'. The hospital workers judged that suicide was due to mental illness, and suicide was high for the people in a special environment and who lacked motivation, which caused them to fall in a dangerous situation. For the lower educational group, they thought that suicide was attributable to mental illness. The awareness for suicide was significantly higher in the group with a postgraduate education, unmarried people, mental health professionals and the persons who had concern and experience with suicide. The factors that had an influence on the awareness of suicide were the items of mental illness, religion, risk and motivational factors. This study suggested that the factors to increase the awareness and attitude for suicide were the experience of increased education and case management of suicide. Therefore, education dealing with suicide and reinforcement of crisis management programs should be developed.

  20. Continuing professional development for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulinius, Charlotte; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The profession of medicine has long been characterised by virtues such as authorisation, specialisation, autonomy, self-regulation and adherence to an ethical code of practice, and its complexity has granted it the privilege of self-regulation. Studies have shown continuing professional...... development (CPD) for general practitioners (GPs) to be most effective when it is set up within a multi-method design. This paper reports a research-based evaluation of a 2-year educational CPD project for 21 GPs. METHODS: The project focused on the issue of 'children in need' and was delivered through group...

  1. European projects as Continuous Professional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    Recent years have seen an increased awareness of the need for Continuous Professional Development (CPD) of academic staff teaching international programmes to diverse student audiences. At the same time, many academic units are under pressure from the university leadership teams to demonstrate...... the impact it has had on partner representatives’ awareness of the key issues related to the teaching and learning in the multilingual and multicultural learning space. Moreover, it demonstrates to which extent they have changed their behavior as a result of what they, personally, have learned while working...

  2. Evaluation of a community transition to professional practice program for graduate registered nurses in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggar, Christina; Gordon, Christopher J; Thomas, Tamsin H T; Wadsworth, Linda; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2018-03-26

    Australia has an increasing demand for a sustainable primary health care registered nursing workforce. Targeting graduate registered nurses who typically begin their nursing career in acute-care hospital settings is a potential workforce development strategy. We evaluated a graduate registered nurse Community Transition to Professional Practice Program which was designed specifically to develop and foster skills required for primary health care. The aims of this study were to evaluate graduates' intention to remain in the primary health care nursing workforce, and graduate competency, confidence and experiences of program support; these were compared with graduates undertaking the conventional acute-care transition program. Preceptor ratings of graduate competence were also measured. All of the 25 graduates (n = 12 community, n = 13 acute-care) who completed the questionnaire at 6 and 12 months intended to remain in nursing, and 55% (n = 6) of graduates in the Community Transition Program intended to remain in the primary health care nursing workforce. There were no differences in graduate experiences, including level of competence, or preceptors' perceptions of graduate competence, between acute-care and Community Transition Programs. The Community Transition to Professional Practice program represents a substantial step towards developing the primary health care health workforce by facilitating graduate nurse employment in this area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2016-06-16

    Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the target group ranged from 1.6% to 29% (n

  4. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. Objectives This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. Methods An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Results Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the

  5. Final Report National Laboratory Professional Development Workshop for Underrepresented Participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Valerie [Texas Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The 2013 CMD-IT National Laboratories Professional Development Workshop for Underrepresented Participants (CMD-IT NLPDev 2013) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory campus in Oak Ridge, TN. from June 13 - 14, 2013. Sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Scientific Computing Research Program, the primary goal of these workshops is to provide information about career opportunities in computational science at the various national laboratories and to mentor the underrepresented participants through community building and expert presentations focused on career success. This second annual workshop offered sessions to facilitate career advancement and, in particular, the strategies and resources needed to be successful at the national laboratories.

  6. The I-Tribe Community Pharmacy Practice Model: professional pharmacy unshackled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Greg L; Waitzman, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    To describe a mechanism by which pharmacists could create a disruptive innovation to provide professional primary care services via a Web-based delivery model. Several obstacles have prevented pharmacists from using available technology to develop business models that capitalize on their clinical skills in primary care. Community practice has experienced multiple sustaining innovations that have improved dispensing productivity but have not stimulated sufficient demand for pharmacy services to disrupt the marketplace and provide new opportunities for pharmacists. Pharmacists are in a unique position to bridge the gap between demand for basic primary medical care and access to a competent medical professional. Building on the historic strengths of community pharmacy practice, modern pharmacists could provide a disruptive innovation in the marketplace for primary care by taking advantage of new technology and implementing the I-Tribe Community Pharmacy Practice Model (I-Tribe). This model would directly connect pharmacists to patients through an interactive, secure Web presence that would liberate the relationship from geographic restrictions. The I-Tribe is a disruptive innovation that could become the foundation for a vibrant market in pharmacist professional service offerings. The I-Tribe model could benefit society by expanding access to primary medical care while simultaneously providing a new source of revenue for community practice pharmacists. Entrepreneurial innovation through I-Tribe pharmacy would free pharmacists to become the care providers envisioned by the profession's thought leaders.

  7. Sustainable Development: The Challenge for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Dorothy N.; Weil, Marie O.

    1997-01-01

    Five areas of inquiry shape the sustainable development movement: environmental movement, women's movement, overpopulation concerns, critique of development models, and new indicators of social progress. Community development workers are challenged to prepare local development projects within a sustainable development framework. (SK)

  8. Developing a Physician׳s Professional Identity Through Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Kenneth E; Abercrombie, Caroline L

    2017-02-01

    Professionalism represents a fundamental characteristic of physicians. Professional organizations have developed professionalism competencies for physicians and medical students. The aim of teaching medical professionalism is to ensure the development of a professional identity in medical students. Professional identity formation is a process developed through teaching principles and appropriate behavioral responses to the stresses of being a physician. Addressing lapses and critical reflection is an important part of the educational process. The "hidden curriculum" within an institution plays an important role in professional identity formation. Assessment of professionalism involves multiple mechanisms. Steps in remediating professionalism lapses include (1) initial assessment, (2) diagnosis of problems and development of an individualized learning plan, (3) instruction encompassing practice, feedback and reflection and (4) reassessment and certification of competence. No reliable outcomes data exist regarding the effectiveness of different remediation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TA Professional Development: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are essential for teaching large introductory physics classes. In such courses, undergraduates spend approximately half of their in-class contact time in instructional environments (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by GTAs, which means GTAs can have a large impact on student learning. Therefore it is crucial to adequately prepare GTAs before they first enter the classroom, and to offer them continued support throughout. Since many of the skills required to become effective teachers will also be relevant to their future research careers, it is useful for a GTA preparation program to also include professional development strategies. But what exactly do GTAs get out of these programs? The School of Physics at Georgia Tech runs a preparation and mentoring program for GTAs that focuses on pedagogical knowledge, physics content, and professional development, as well as their intersections. Nearly seventy graduate students have gone through this program in the three years since it was established. Here we discuss the impact this program has had on our GTAs, from their own point of view: the program's effect on their teaching abilities, how it has influenced their attitudes towards teaching, what elements they have found useful, and what changes they have suggested to its curriculum. We find that, in general, GTAs are more receptive when the curriculum is more hands-on and they are presented with frequent opportunities for practice and feedback.

  10. Learning, Motivation, and Transfer: Successful Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lex

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I am concerned with three key issues of teacher professional development--teacher learning, motivation, and transfer of learning. Each issue has received minimal attention in teacher professional development literature. The three issues are discussed, and a model of an integrative professional development approach is outlined,…

  11. Teachers Know Best: Teachers' Views on Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2014

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the roadblocks to implementing effective professional development, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation contracted with the Boston Consulting Group in 2014 to reach more than 1,300 teachers, professional development leaders in district and state education agencies, principals, professional development providers, and…

  12. Transformation and Framework of Teacher Professional Development in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the situation of teacher professional development in Taiwan, including the history and the framework of teacher professional development. With diversification of teacher education systems and institutions, teacher professional development in Taiwan is undergoing a gradual governance shift from the model of centralised state…

  13. Professional Development in Technology at High Achieving Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed educators' perception of professional development offered through schools in the area of technology implementation and tried to define its perceived effectiveness in meeting the professional development conceptual framework defined by Gardner, Baker, Vogt, and Hodel in "Four Approaches to Professional Development".…

  14. Investigating Rural Teachers' Professional Development, Instructional Knowledge, and Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Todd A.; Nugent, Gwen C.; Chumney, Frances L.; Ihlo, Tanya; Shapiro, Edward S.; Guard, Kirra; Koziol, Natalie; Bovaird, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Teachers Speak was a national survey study designed to investigate the characteristics of rural elementary school teachers' existing professional development; differences in professional development practices between rural and non-rural settings; and the potential influence of professional development characteristics on rural teachers' knowledge,…

  15. Helping Teachers Help Themselves: Professional Development That Makes a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Tannehill, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    For school administrators to facilitate impactful teacher professional development, a shift in thinking that goes beyond the acquisition of new skills and knowledge to helping teachers rethink their practice is required. Based on review of the professional development literature and our own continued observations of professional development, this…

  16. The Investigation of Teachers' Metaphoric Perceptions about Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    Professional development is an ongoing process in which teachers review their teaching practices and learn how to respond to their students' needs. To make the professional development process more effective, we need to define the identity of a teacher correctly and clarify the perspective about teachers' professional development. The purpose of…

  17. Contributions of blended learning training to teacher professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Duarte Hueros

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The central theme of this study is the analysis of a balanced integrated teaching methodology (face-to-face and virtual, as blended learning and the extent of its implementation in teacher training, as well as the importance of leadership in planning, supervising and coordinating this process. We began with a systematic review of the literature of the last 15 years (2002-2017 on the Web of Science (WOS, the most highly rated database in the scientific community. We identified 190 studies related to blended learning, professional teaching development and leadership in education. We then selected 163 documents that fell specifically into the educational research category, of which 75 were articles. We further fine-tuned the search by excluding those articles related to research fields other than teachers’ professional development, and arrived at 35 articles that fulfilled our preliminary criteria. We reduced the sample to the 24 articles that contained all the features required by our investigation. The results show that blended learning is a valuable training tool that enables teachers to acquire competences and which can aid their professional development; it can also foment collaborative work, augment teachers’ technical and didactic skills around technology, promote interdisciplinary experiences and help teachers to share innovations, etc., among other potential outcomes.

  18. Putting the PLE into PLD: Virtual Professional Learning and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Owen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The range of affordances that a virtual environment offers can provide opportunities for more formal Professional Learning and Development (PLD that has flexibility of choice, time and approach for educators. It was this potential that inspired the design of the Virtual Professional Learning and Development (VPLD program that was instigated in October 2009 by the NZ Ministry of Education, who also funded the project. The findings from the pilot of the VPLD program in 2010 indicated that when professional learning was situated within the practitioner's context, and with complementary, easily-accessible opportunities for sharing of practice within an online Community of Practice, participants demonstrated high levels of engagement as well as changes in their own teaching practice. The VPLD Programme was facilitated and researched again during 2011, building on findings from 2010. Findings to date suggest that the educators developed a sense of self-efficacy that motivated them to trial alternative approaches, and to initiate iterative cycles of trial, error, and improvement.

  19. Assessing the interactivity and prescriptiveness of faculty professional development workshops: The real-time professional development observation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Alice; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-12-01

    Professional development workshops are one of the primary mechanisms used to help faculty improve their teaching, and draw in many STEM instructors every year. Although workshops serve a critical role in changing instructional practices within our community, we rarely assess workshops through careful consideration of how they engage faculty. Initial evidence suggests that workshop leaders often overlook central tenets of education research that are well established in classroom contexts, such as the role of interactivity in enabling student learning [S. Freeman et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 8410 (2014)]. As such, there is a need to develop more robust, evidence-based models of how best to support faculty learning in professional development contexts, and to actively support workshop leaders in relating their design decisions to familiar ideas from other educational contexts. In response to these needs, we have developed an observation tool, the real-time professional development observation tool (R-PDOT), to document the form and focus of faculty engagement during workshops. In this paper, we describe the motivation and methodological considerations behind the development of the R-PDOT, justify our decisions to highlight particular aspects of workshop sessions, and demonstrate how the R-PDOT can be used to analyze three sessions from the Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshop. We also justify the accessibility and potential utility of the R-PDOT output as a reflective tool using preliminary data from interviews with workshop leaders, and consider the roles the R-PDOT could play in supporting future research on faculty professional development.

  20. Nuclear power - Sustainable development - Professional skill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Paraschiva, M.V.; Banutoiu, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Sustainable development of society implies taking political decisions integrating harmoniously ingredients like these: - technological maturity; - socio-economic efficiency; - rational and equitable use of natural resources; - compliance with requirements concerning the environment and population; - professional ethics; - communications with the public and media; - professional skill; - public opinion acceptance. A rational analysis of these factors shows clearly that nuclear power appears to be an optimal ground for a sustainable power source besides the hydro and thermo-electric systems. Such a conclusion was confirmed by all types of analyses, methodologies or programs like for instance: MAED, WASP, FINPLAN, DECADES, ENPEP and more recently MESSAGE. The paper describes applications of these analytical methodologies for two scenarios of Cernavoda NPP future development. To find the optimal development strategy for the electric system, implying minimal costs the optimization analysis mode of the ELECSAM analysis module was used. The following conclusions were reached: - the majority of Romania's classical electrical stations are old; consequently, part of them should be decommissioned while others will be refurbished. Instead of installing new power groups these options will result in lowering the investment cost, as well as, in reduction of noxious gas emission; - the nuclear power system developed in Romania upon the CANDU technology appears to be one of the most performing and safe technology in the world. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioned on December 2, 1996 covers about 10% to 12% of the energy demand of the country. The CANDU systems offers simultaneously secure energy supply, safe operation, low energy costs and practically a zero impact upon the environment. The case study for Romania by means of DECADES project showed that the development program with minimal cost for electrical stations implies construction of new 706.5 MW nuclear units and new 660 MW

  1. Communities of practice and the construction of the professional identities of nurse educators: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Andrew; Cashin, Andrew; Stockhausen, Lynette

    2016-02-01

    To comprehensively review the Community of Practice literature from nursing contexts to explore whether and how these communities contribute to the social construction of nurse educator professional identity. Due to the wide scope of predominately qualitative literature on the topic, papers were analysed and themed inductively. CINAHL, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, EBSCO databases, Emerald, Proquest & Google Scholar. These online databases were searched for relevant peer-reviewed journal papers in the English language with no date range specified. The search terms 'nurs* educator' and 'nurs* teacher' were combined with each of the terms 'communit* of practice', 'identity' and 'role' resulting in 293 peer-reviewed journal papers. Where abstracts were missing, introductory and background sections were skimmed for related content. Papers that made incidental reference to either professional identity or a Community of Practice were excluded. In total, 63 primary study or discussion papers were found to have a focus on nurse educator identity and/or communities of practice in healthcare contexts. Papers specifically focused on communities of practice in nursing (n=33) could only be found from the last 10 years (2005-2015). Only five of these focused on nurse educators. Community of Practice theory and the professional teaching literature offers collaborative and active ways for nurse educators to further develop their professional identities. Despite the emergence of communities of practice in the nursing literature, further studies are required to explore how such a construct can facilitate the social construction of nurse educator professional identity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Professional development of international classroom lecturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    and cultural backgrounds. The training of higher education teachers (lecturers) vary considerably from one country – or even higher education institution – to the other, and the overarching picture changes from mandatory to voluntary programmes to no programmes at all. Where they exist, they have different...... and weaknesses) and discuss their applicability in a wider context. Key words: Professional development; International classroom; English Medium Instruction, Opportunities and challenges Simon, Eszter & Gabriela Pleschová (eds).2013. Teacher Development in Higher Education. Existing Programs, Program Impact...... through a language other than their own first language to students who also learn through what for them is a second or third language. As part of a survey conducted by the IntlUni Erasmus Academic Network project in 2013, 38 Higher Education institutions in 27 countries were asked to which extent...

  3. Continuing Professional Development in Context: Teachers' Continuing Professional Development Culture in Germany and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermke, Wieland

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the continuing professional development (CPD) culture of teachers, and asks how it is influenced by properties of the school system. It reports the results of a questionnaire study with 418 secondary teachers from Sweden and Germany. The results show highly significant differences between Swedish and German teachers'…

  4. Transition-Focused Professional Development: An Annotated Bibliography of Essential Elements and Features of Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzberg, Debra G.; Clark, Kelly A.; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2018-01-01

    Transition professional development (PD) has been identified as a way to improve transition services; however, there is a dearth of literature on transition-focused PD. To learn more about the essential features of effective PD, 73 published articles were evaluated in the area of PD in both secondary transition and special education. Articles were…

  5. Governing Teachers by Professional Development: State Programmes for Continuing Professional Development in Sweden since 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Nils; Wermke, Wieland

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to analyse how teachers' continuing professional development (CPD) contributes to the government of the teaching profession. This is done by examining the CPD initiatives organized by two Swedish national educational agencies since 1991 involving the school subjects of Swedish (standard language education) and…

  6. Effective Regional Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Rebecca; Merkowitz, Rose Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Times are changing, and so are Extension programs. These changes affect every aspect of the educational effort, including program development, project funding, educational delivery, partnership building, marketing, sharing impacts, and revenue generation. This article is not about how Extension is restructuring to adapt to changes; instead, it…

  7. Building up STEM education professional learning community in school setting: Case of Khon Kaen Wittayayon School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thana, Aduldej; Siripun, Kulpatsorn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    The STEM education is new issue of teaching and learning in school setting. Building up STEM education professional learning community may provide some suggestions for further collaborative work of STEM Education from grounded up. This paper aimed to clarify the building up STEM education learning community in Khon Kaen Wittayayon (KKW) School setting. Participants included Khon Kaen University researchers, Khon Kaen Wittayayon School administrators and teachers. Methodology regarded interpretative paradigm. The tools of interpretation included participant observation, interview and document analysis. Data was analyzed to categories of condition for building up STEM education professional learning community. The findings revealed that the actions of developing STEM learning activities and research showed some issues of KKW STEM community of inquiry and improvement. The paper will discuss what and how the community learns about sharing vision of STEM Education, supportive physical and social conditions of KKW, sharing activities of STEM, and good things from some key STEM teachers' ambition. The paper may has implication of supporting STEM education in Thailand school setting.

  8. MOOCs for Teacher Professional Development: Reflections, and Suggested Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pradeep Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Teacher Professional Development (TPD) has become a major policy priority within education systems worldwide. But keeping teachers professionally up-to-date and providing them professional development opportunities on continuing basis is a big challenge. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) can be a cost and resource effective means to complement…

  9. School Culture and Postgraduate Professional Development: Delineating the "Enabling School"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Linet; Marland, Harriet; Pill, Amanda; Rea, Tony

    2010-01-01

    The culture of the "enabling school" is investigated within the context of the government's policy of continuing professional development and postgraduate professional development for teachers in England. This context is problematised by considering teachers' conceptualisations of their professional autonomy, status and personal…

  10. Flipped ESL Teacher Professional Development: Embracing Change to Remain Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Kaur, Dalwinder; Halili, Siti Hajar; Ramlan, Zahri

    2016-01-01

    Many traditional professional development programs that are initiated to equip ESL teachers with knowledge and skills have been futile for numerous reasons. This paper addresses a gap in the recent research of ESL teachers' professional development. Literature has revealed many shortcomings of the traditional and online professional development…

  11. System approach to development of professional competence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the issue of developing the professional competence of students and managers with the use of acme logical technologies. The influence of acme logical technologies, which are used in professional-oriented creative projects, is regarded, considering its effect on the development of professional ...

  12. Enrolling science teachers in continual professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical paper presents a model of how science teachers working in small groups can use video to diagnose the challengees that students face when learning science content, and how they can then design and refine appropriate teaching interventions. The analysis and discussion suggest that t...... that the proposed professional development program, based around group learning, should be formatively assessed, researched and refined over time following the principles of design based research, likewise the teachers' classroom interventions.......The theoretical paper presents a model of how science teachers working in small groups can use video to diagnose the challengees that students face when learning science content, and how they can then design and refine appropriate teaching interventions. The analysis and discussion suggest...

  13. Communities of Practice. Niches voor de samenwerking tussen ervaringswerkers en professionals bij gebiedsgericht werken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Scholtens

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Communities of Practice. Niches for cooperation between experts-by-experience and professionals in community developmentSince 2000, problems in the care of people with multiple complex problems have been on the increase. These people can often have problems in multiple domains of life which may reinforce each other in a negative way. Unfortunately, these people, who need care more than others, often do not receive appropriate care. This is due to the compartmentalized way in which care is organized. Caregiving is supply-oriented and not tailored to the needs and abilities of these people. Two studies, “Bridge building” by Kal (2001 and “A theory of presence” by Baart (2001 have helped to put this topic onto the social agenda.However, a method has been developed in mental health care to support people with psychiatric problems in everyday life. Beginning on a small scale in the 1990s, the use of a social support system involves a network of individuals and organizations that supports those with a history of psychiatric issues in their daily lives. The bridge builders (professionals who work towards an inclusive society and the “experts-by-experience” are at the centre of this social support system. They try to eliminate any mismatches and to align the support needed with the support provided. To prevent the compartmentalization of the care, they seek to cooperate with the organizations involved in the household. Based on the principle of joint responsibility, they manage the care given in consultation with the people concerned.Since 2010, care in the Netherlands has increasingly become community-based. Professionals who were previously based in different institutions for people with mental illness, addiction or a mental disability, now organize themselves regionally. Their work has changed in two ways: firstly, they must now cooperate with professionals from different sectors working in a particular area, and secondly, their work

  14. An assessment of community pharmacists’ attitudes towards professional practice in the Republic of Moldova.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordina M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy in Moldova is undergoing a period of transition. The professional practice is adjusting to a market-oriented economy from the previous Soviet system. The pharmaceutical sector has been liberalised giving rise to a significant increase in the number of community pharmacies. This has led to some adverse effects on the profession of pharmacy with pharmacists having considerable difficulties fulfilling their professional aspirations and possibly losing confidence in further developing their professional role. Objective: To assess community pharmacists’ attitudes towards their professional practice and to determine their perceived competence in various pharmaceutical activities.Methods: A questionnaire which addressed managerial activities, dispensing activities, pharmaceutical care activities, inter-professional relationships, public health and competence was mailed to 600 community pharmacists who were asked to score the importance and perceived competence for each activity on a scale ranging from 0-5. In the case of pharmaceutical care activities, pharmacists were asked to score their degree of agreement or disagreement as to whether it is the responsibility of the pharmacist to engage in specific pharmaceutical care activities.Results: A total of 370 valid questionnaires were returned giving a response rate of 61.7%. Managerial and dispensing activities were scored the highest both in terms of perceived importance and competence. The more innovative pharmaceutical care activities scored relatively low. Overall scores relating to the importance of pharmacists engaging in public health activities appear to be the lowest of the entire questionnaire. Younger pharmacists between the ages of 22-30 obtained significantly higher scores with regards to the perceived pharmacist’s responsibility in engaging in various pharmaceutical care activities. Respondents who practiced in an accredited pharmacy scored higher in the majority of questions

  15. Professional development and leadership training opportunities for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E

    2013-11-01

    Formal leadership training is a relatively recent addition to the educational armamentarium of the health care executive. Leadership training opportunities for physicians, surgeons, and scientists have gradually appeared over the past 15 to 20 years, but information about them has been scant, with few comprehensive reviews made available to the community at large. This article describes the major opportunities available to obtain formal and informal leadership training for careers in medical school administration. Programs that are specifically targeted to women are described in detail. Information was obtained from the author's direct knowledge, direct communication with the leadership of each program, and the Web site of each sponsoring organization, when available. Many opportunities for leadership training are now available to surgeons, with several specifically designed for women. The author strongly encourages surgeons to avail themselves of these opportunities, as both anecdotal information and published data suggest that these programs are highly effective in enhancing leadership careers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Higher professional education as a means for development in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi Castell, R

    2000-02-01

    The author reflects on how higher training contributes to development in Nursing, understanding by this term the discipline but also the set of professionals which exercise it. Therefore, the author analyzes those elements which are part of professional development; be this intrinsic, professional discourse, excellent professional exercise, market dominance, syndical capacity or representation. The author ends her article with a very simple proposal: make a world full of care, with a recognition of successes, a correction of errors and a deepening of attitudes.

  17. Reflection of the Development of Professional Graduates Education in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of professional degree graduates education plays a crucial role in social economy development and the industrial restructuring, promotes academic degrees and graduates education growth and could further ameliorate China's professional degrees education system. Currently, the professional degree graduates education meet with some problems, such as low level of professional degrees education, the scale of development imbalances, lack of innovation in training mode, quality assurance and management system is incomplete, the policy formulated backwardness. As a higher education theory researcher, rational thinking of these problems would help to stimulate the long-term development of professional degree graduates education and to provide educational reference.

  18. Construct Validation--Community College Instructional Development Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Soua; Delgado, Nexi; Wood, J. Luke; Harris, Frank, III

    2017-01-01

    This white paper describes the construct validation of the Community College Instructional Development Inventory (CC-IDI). The CC-IDI is an institutional assessment tool designed to inform professional development programming for instructional faculty. The instrument was developed to serve as a standardized assessment tool to determine the…

  19. Professional Learning Communities' Impact on Science Teacher Classroom Practice in a Midwestern Urban School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this reputation-based, multiple-site case study was to explore professional learning communities' impact on teacher classroom practice. The goal of this research was to describe the administrator and teachers' perceptions with respect to professional learning communities as it related to teacher practice in their school. Educators…

  20. Preparing FCS Professionals for a Multilingual Society: Building Community through the Experiences of Multilingual Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Janine; Duncan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    As demographics in the United States shift, family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals must be prepared to foster healthy communities that embrace multilingual families. Because hegemonic language ideologies challenge multilingual families, FCS professionals need to know how to inclusively reframe communities to honor multilingual families.…

  1. An empirical approach to selecting community-based alcohol interventions: combining research evidence, rural community views and professional opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeshaft Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given limited research evidence for community-based alcohol interventions, this study examines the intervention preferences of rural communities and alcohol professionals, and factors that influence their choices. Method Community preferences were identified by a survey of randomly selected individuals across 20 regional Australian communities. The preferences of alcohol professionals were identified by a survey of randomly selected members of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs. To identify preferred interventions and the extent of support for them, a budget allocation exercise was embedded in both surveys, asking respondents to allocate a given budget to different interventions. Tobit regression models were estimated to identify the characteristics that explain differences in intervention preferences. Results Community respondents selected school programs most often (88.0% and allocated it the largest proportion of funds, followed by promotion of safer drinking (71.3%, community programs (61.4% and police enforcement of alcohol laws (60.4%. Professionals selected GP training most often (61.0% and allocated it the largest proportion of funds, followed by school programs (36.6%, community programs (33.8% and promotion of safer drinking (31.7%. Community views were susceptible to response bias. There were no significant predictors of professionals' preferences. Conclusions In the absence of sufficient research evidence for effective community-based alcohol interventions, rural communities and professionals both strongly support school programs, promotion of safer drinking and community programs. Rural communities also supported police enforcement of alcohol laws and professionals supported GP training. The impact of a combination of these strategies needs to be rigorously evaluated.

  2. Project ECHO: A Telementoring Network Model for Continuing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers G; Thornton, Karla A; Komaromy, Miriam S; Katzman, Joanna G; Struminger, Bruce B; Rayburn, William F

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge with current systems of CME is the inability to translate the explosive growth in health care knowledge into daily practice. Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is a telementoring network designed for continuing professional development (CPD) and improving patient outcomes. The purpose of this article was to describe how the model has complied with recommendations from several authoritative reports about redesigning and enhancing CPD. This model links primary care clinicians through a knowledge network with an interprofessional team of specialists from an academic medical center who provide telementoring and ongoing education enabling community clinicians to treat patients with a variety of complex conditions. Knowledge and skills are shared during weekly condition-specific videoconferences. The model exemplifies learning as described in the seven levels of CPD by Moore (participation, satisfaction, learning, competence, performance, patient, and community health). The model is also aligned with recommendations from four national reports intended to redesign knowledge transfer in improving health care. Efforts in learning sessions focus on information that is relevant to practice, focus on evidence, education methodology, tailoring of recommendations to individual needs and community resources, and interprofessionalism. Project ECHO serves as a telementoring network model of CPD that aligns with current best practice recommendations for CME. This transformative initiative has the potential to serve as a leading model for larger scale CPD, nationally and globally, to enhance access to care, improve quality, and reduce cost.

  3. Continuing professional development and ICT: target practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, K A; Reynolds, P A

    2008-07-26

    Ever-increasing needs and demands by dentists and all other members of the dental team for education and training at all levels - undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing - are straining the resources of existing providers of such education. At the same time, there are ever-increasing opportunities to develop online delivery and the use of a range of information and communication technology (ICT) systems and services further, in all aspects of dental education. This paper reviews recent developments that have led to an increased demand for dental postgraduate programmes and continuing professional development (CPD) courses in the United Kingdom and then discusses how ICT has and will impact on teaching practice. Examples include the use of teaching and learning resources in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and the increasing use of blended learning. The paper then explores the need for both teachers and students to adapt to the new environment to ensure they can benefit to the maximum and that teaching and learning practices are changed accordingly.

  4. The importance of making progress in teacher professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatović, Jelena; Kundačina, Milenko

    2014-01-01

    Professional development of teachers depends on many conditions, but the most distinguished ones are teachers' motivation and their opportunities for development and advancement. Quality planning of professional teacher development contributes to better development of school and teachers. This paper presents research that is aimed to acquire knowledge on important issues related to the promotion of teachers in professional development. The study sample consisted of 786 primary and secondary s...

  5. What is the veterinary professional identity? Preliminary findings from web-based continuing professional development in veterinary professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage-Chan, E; Maddison, J; May, S A

    2016-03-26

    Professionalism and professional skills are increasingly being incorporated into veterinary curricula; however, lack of clarity in defining veterinary professionalism presents a potential challenge for directing course outcomes that are of benefit to the veterinary professional. An online continuing education course in veterinary professionalism was designed to address a deficit in postgraduate support in this area; as part of this course, delegates of varying practice backgrounds participated in online discussions reflecting on the implications of professional skills for their clinical practice. The discussions surrounding the role of the veterinary professional and reflecting on strengths and weaknesses in professional skills were analysed using narrative methodology, which provided an understanding of the defining skills and attributes of the veterinary professional, from the perspectives of those involved (i.e. how vets understood their own career identity). The veterinary surgeon was understood to be an interprofessional team member, who makes clinical decisions in the face of competing stakeholder needs and works in a complex environment comprising multiple and diverse challenges (stress, high emotions, financial issues, work-life balance). It was identified that strategies for accepting fallibility, and those necessary for establishing reasonable expectations of professional behaviour and clinical ability, are poorly developed. British Veterinary Association.

  6. Rebel with a Cause: A Pioneer in the Field Reflects on the Evolution of Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Carlene U.

    2012-01-01

    A revolution took place in staff development in the late 1980s and into the 1990s. It was not reported on the evening news. Very few knew it was happening. The author was a rebel, along with others she had not yet met, in the rebellion that resulted in learning communities, the dominant form of professional development today. In 1978, the…

  7. Reflection and Professional Identity Development in Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Monica W.; Hutchinson, Alisa

    2018-01-01

    Design thinking positions designers as the drivers of the design space yet academic discourse is largely silent on the topic of professional identity development in design. Professional identity, or the dynamic narratives that individuals construct and maintain to integrate their personal qualities with professional responsibilities, has not been…

  8. Interdisciplinary Professional Development Needs of Cooperative Extension Field Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondgerath, Travis

    2016-01-01

    The study discussed in this article sought to identify cross-program professional development needs of county-based Extension professionals (field educators). The study instrument was completed by 105 county-based Extension professionals. Interdisciplinary topics, such as program evaluation and volunteer management, were identified as subjects of…

  9. Development of Professional Teacher Competences for Cooperation with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskovic, Ivana; Višnjic Jevtic, Adrijana

    2017-01-01

    Based on the belief that professional competences can partially be developed through professional training a cycle of ten educational workshops was designed. Combining theoretical knowledge, quality practice examples and discussions, the workshops strived to improve professional teacher competences. The assumed outcome was determined by difference…

  10. Involving lay People in Research and Professional Development Through Gaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    a systematic mapping review methodology, the focus was to map and examine research in these types of games or game environments, and to identify potentials and gaps in the field to inform future research. 89 studies were identified through iterative searching and identification processes applying keywords......Due to the increasing significance of games where lay people are involved in generating knowledge for research or development, the current paper presents a mapping review of status and trends in research of games designed for citizen science, crowdsourcing or community driven research. Using...... they were involved and studies where participants develop knowledge for professional use. The 32 studies were selected for a grounded theory inspired qualitative review and six themes were identified: 1. Motivation; 2. Quality of participant contribution; 3. Learning/education; 4. System/task analysis; 5...

  11. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients \\'at risk\\' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored.

  12. Professional "Development" and Professional "Learning": Bridging the Gap for Experienced Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kathleen M.; Yelling, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses the career-long continuing professional development (CPD) of 85 experienced physical education (PE) teachers in England. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews (20 teachers) and open-ended profile questionnaires (a further 65 teachers) to find out what forms of professional development these teachers had…

  13. Bridging Communities: Culturing a Professional Learning Community that Supports Novice Teachers and Transfers Authentic Science and Mathematics to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, B. E.; Miller, H. R.; Loving, C. L.; Pedersen, S.

    2006-12-01

    Professional Learning Community Model for Alternative Pathways (PLC-MAP) is a partnership of North Harris Montgomery Community Colleges, Texas A&M University, and 11 urban, suburban, and rural school districts in the Greater Houston area focused on developing a professional learning community that increases the retention and quality of middle and high school mathematics and science teachers who are being certified through the NHMCCD Alternative Certification Program. Improved quality in teaching refers to increased use of effective inquiry teaching strategies, including information technology where appropriate, that engage students to ask worthy scientific questions and to reason, judge, explain, defend, argue, reflect, revise, and/or disseminate findings. Novice teachers learning to adapt or designing authentic inquiry in their classrooms face two enormous problems. First, there are important issues surrounding the required knowledgebase, habit of mind, and pedagogical content knowledge of the teachers that impact the quality of their lesson plans and instructional sequences. Second, many ACP intern teachers teach under challenging conditions with limited resources, which impacts their ability to implement authentic inquiry in the classroom. Members of our professional learning community, including scientists, mathematicians and master teachers, supports novice teachers as they design lesson plans that engage their students in authentic inquiry. The purpose of this research was to determine factors that contribute to success or barriers that prevent ACP secondary science intern and induction year teachers from gaining knowledge and engaging in classroom inquiry as a result of an innovative professional development experience. A multi-case study design was used for this research. We adopted a two-tail design where cases from both extremes (good and poor gains) were deliberately chosen. Six science teachers were selected from a total of 40+ mathematics and science

  14. Teacher Professional Learning: Developing with the Aid of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyprianou, Marianna; Nikiforou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Education is a field that constantly changes, which dictates the need for continuing teacher professional learning and development. Teacher professional learning and development can be divided into two categories: formal learning/ development and informal learning/development. This paper focuses on the experience of the presenters as coordinators…

  15. Defense Threat Reduction Agency > Careers > Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integration Command Senior Enlisted Leader Media News News Archive Strategic Plan Videos Mission Research Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current Justifications & Approvals Careers Who We Are Our Values Strategic Recruiting Programs Professional

  16. Strategies to facilitate professional development of the occupational health nurse in the occupational health setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolene de Jager

    2016-10-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the needs for professional development of the OHN in the occupational health setting. Method: An explorative, descriptive, contextual generic and qualitative research method was used in this study. The purposive sampling method was used as the OHNs surveyed described their personal need for professional development in the occupational health setting. Data was collected by means of semi-structured individual interviews. Eight interviews were done by an interviewer who held a doctoral degree in community health nursing and a qualification in occupational health and was affiliated with a private occupational health institution at the time of the study. The interviews were conducted during August 2012. Results: The OHNs reported that professional development needs have to be identified by the OHNs. Short courses need to be designed by training institutions and should be attended by the OHNs to improve their operational functioning on a day-to-day basis in the occupational health setting. The OHNs experienced that their role and function in the workplace were not valued by their managers. The results of this study revealed four major themes, namely constraints hindering the OHN in developing professionally, positive aspects identified by the OHNs regarding the need for professional development, professional development needs of the OHN and suggestions of how to meet the OHNs' professional development needs. Conclusion: There is a need for OHNs to identify their professional development needs and recommendations were made to meet these needs.

  17. Factors Driving Learner Success in Online Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phu Vu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined factors that contributed to the success of online learners in an online professional development course. Research instruments included an online survey and learners’ activity logs in an online professional development course for 512 in-service teachers. The findings showed that there were several factors affecting online learners’ success in online professional development. In addition, there were also significant differences between successful and unsuccessful online learners in terms of course login frequency and learning activities viewed.

  18. Experience Learning and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena Mijoč

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the field of education, carried out in living and working environment, which has undergone so profound changes recently, is of extreme importance. In schools, courses and seminars, one cannot prepare him/herself for the changes as these are often so rapid that it is impossible to foresee them. Therefore, one can only learn by experience. In defining the term 'experience learning', the teoreticians vary greatly. In this paper, experience learning is understood as a process of learning taking part mainly outside the planned educational process and including an active and participative attitude towards environment and people. Original and direct experience can thus serve as a basis for gaining new comprehensions, for planning future activities as well as for a reinterpretation of the past experiences. Let us first mention the basic factors of successful experience learning, such as an individual's character features, possibilities for learning, learning atmosphere and positive stimulations. It has been estimated that local community can increase or decrease the possibilities for experience learning. However, the relation is active in other direction too: the more experience learning bas been asserted in a community, the greater its influence on social and cultural development of the community. On has to bear in mind that well-planned education for local community and stimulating sociocultural animation can facilitate the development of local community.

  19. Developer communities, education and innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés L. Martínez Ortiz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Andrés L. Martínez Ortiz, a.k.a Almo, is Developer Program Manager in Google's Engineering Organisation. He is focused on driving the success of Google's developer products and the open web by creating a thriving ecosystem of 3rd party applications and businesses built on them. Closely with Product Management, Marketing, Public Relations, Business Development, and other, he works with and supports developer communities, initiating activities that meet the needs of the innovation ecosystem. In addition, he meets with developers and partners in large companies, startups, universities and enterprises, promoting open standards and Google technologies.

  20. Journaling: An Effective Approach to Professional Development For Reflective Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Peng

    2008-01-01

    As a new curriculum reform program was put forward in China,higher standards for teachers were given that teachers must have a potential of reflective development.Continuing and effective professional development is a common concern of most teachers and professional educators.Effective professional development usually means that not only does it have immediate impact on the work of the professional educator,but it has a long lasting impact.Unfortunately,such effective professional development activities are rare and,in turn,costly to the organization.The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a form of effective professional development which is not only economical but effective.That is the reflective journal.This article analyzes the application of Journal writing from these aspects of the definition,content and the procedures.

  1. An analysis of zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek-Sandor, Joy

    Informal science institutions are a significant provider of science teacher professional development. As pressure continues to critically analyze the work of teachers and their effectiveness in the classroom, it is important to understand how informal science institutions contribute to effective change in teacher science content knowledge and pedagogy. This research study analyzed zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development to respond to the research questions: How do zoos and aquaria determine and assess their goals for teacher professional development? How do these goals align with effective teacher change for science content knowledge and pedagogy? Theoretical frameworks for high quality teacher professional development, effective evaluation of teacher professional development, and learning in informal science settings guided the research. The sample for the study was AZA accredited zoos and aquariums providing teacher professional development (N=107). Data collection consisted of an online questionnaire, follow-up interviews, and content analysis of teacher professional development artifacts. Analysis revealed that by and large zoos and aquariums are lacking in their provision of science teacher professional development. Most professional development focuses on content or resources, neglecting pedagogy. Assessments mismatch the goals and rely heavily on self-report and satisfaction measures. The results demonstrate a marked difference between those zoos and aquariums that are larger in capacity versus those that are medium to small in size. This may be an area of research for the future, as well as analyzing the education resources produced by zoos and aquariums as these were emphasized heavily as a way they serve teachers.

  2. United States Army Officer Professional Development: Black Officers' Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Craig

    1997-01-01

    .... Even so, they have not fared statistically as well as their majority contemporaries. These statistics pose interesting questions about black officer professional development and career progress...

  3. Critical Friends Group for EFL Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Long Thanh; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2010-01-01

    For the best student outcomes, teachers need to engage in continuous professional development. As a result, models of teacher professional development have been developed, among which is the Critical Friends Group (CFG) technique. However, whether it works well with EFL teachers in an Asian context like Vietnam, where EFL teachers in particular do…

  4. A case study of continuing teacher professional development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider the professional development of in-service teachers and review traditional development efforts that have been used in the past. An alternative form of professional development using Japanese lesson study is proposed and discussed as a possibility. A case study involving the Mpumalanga Secondary Science ...

  5. Organizations as professional communities in the post/modern era.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. ing. Adriaan Oosterloo

    2011-01-01

    What is the meaning of social context for the connection between Psychologists and Social Workers with the organization they work for? Many professionals are searching for both professional space, and a fitting connectedness to the organization. This connection seems to be greatly influenced by

  6. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of the nuclear and radiation professional engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Professional Engineer is the national qualification stipulated by the Professional Engineer Act. A Professional Engineer in this Act means a person who conducts business on matters of planning, research, design, analysis, testing, evaluation or guidance thereof, which requires application of extensive scientific and technical expertise, and has three obligation and two responsibility related to engineer ethic. A technical discipline for nuclear and radiation technology in 2004, was established for the purpose of upgrading the skills of engineers in nuclear technology fields, utilizing their ability in nuclear safety regulation fields, and further strengthening safety management system in each entity. The activity of the nuclear and radiation professional engineers for the past 10 years was evaluated. For the next ten years, awareness of the role of the professional engineer to talk with general public is needed, and it is important to continue professional development. (author)

  7. Feasibility of an Online Professional Development Program for Early Intervention Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Chiu, Caya; Kemp, Peggy; Aldersey, Heather Michelle; Turnbull, Ann P.; Lindeman, David P.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from 2 studies situated within a larger scope of design research on a professional development program, "Early Years," for Part C early intervention practitioners, working with families in home and community settings. Early Years includes online modules and onsite mentor coaching, and its development has…

  8. Twitter and Public Health (Part 1): How Individual Public Health Professionals Use Twitter for Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Mark; Stetten, Nichole E; Islam, Sabrina; Pizarro, Katherine

    2017-09-20

    The use of social networking sites is increasingly being adopted in public health, in part, because of the barriers to funding and reduced resources. Public health professionals are using social media platforms, specifically Twitter, as a way to facilitate professional development. The objective of this study was to identify public health professionals using Twitter and to analyze how they use this platform to enhance their formal and informal professional development within the context of public health. Keyword searches were conducted to identify and invite potential participants to complete a survey related to their use of Twitter for public health and professional experiences. Data regarding demographic attributes, Twitter usage, and qualitative information were obtained through an anonymous Web-based survey. Open-response survey questions were analyzed using the constant comparison method. "Using Twitter makes it easier to expand my networking opportunities" and "I find Twitter useful for professional development" scored highest, with a mean score of 4.57 (standard deviation [SD] 0.74) and 4.43 (SD 0.76) on a 5-point Likert scale. Analysis of the qualitative data shows the emergence of the following themes for why public health professionals mostly use Twitter: (1) geography, (2) continuing education, (3) professional gain, and (4) communication. For public health professionals in this study, Twitter is a platform best used for their networking and professional development. Furthermore, the use of Twitter allows public health professionals to overcome a series of barriers and enhances opportunities for growth. ©Mark Hart, Nichole E Stetten, Sabrina Islam, Katherine Pizarro. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 20.09.2017.

  9. Professional Training of Social Workers: Development of Professionally Significant Qualities in the Future Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzhanov, Nurlan A.; Ertysbaeva, Gaukhar N.; Abdakimova, Madina K.; Ishanov, Pirmagambet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Today, the traditional approach to professional training is obsolete. This problem has determined the need to create new didactic forms related to the organization of training in the modern education system. The purpose of this study was to analyze possible development of professionally important qualities and abilities in the future social care…

  10. Forming the Professional Self: Bildung and the Ontological Perspective on Professional Education and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellenz, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Ontological perspectives in higher education and particularly in professional education and development have focused attention on the question of the learner's being and becoming rather than on the epistemological concern of what and how they know. This study considers the formation of the professional self in the light of the requirements for…

  11. Using Electronic Portfolio to Promote Professional Learning Community for Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers at Alquds University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khales, Buad

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to explore whether the electronic portfolio can influence pre-service teachers' education and to examine how professional learning communities develop through electronic portfolios. To achieve this, twenty-four student-teachers taking a course in early childhood education at Al-Quds University participated in a study to…

  12. Resilience and professional development for primary school teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Dulc, Tjaša

    2016-01-01

    A teacher’s professional role is becoming more and more demanding, therefore resiliency has become one of the important aspects of the quality of a teacher’s work and their professional development. Resiliency in the teaching environment means not only resistance from stress but also knowing how to face it. Despite teachers’ taking part in several courses that help them grow professionally and develop themselves, there remains a question in what extent and in what way these courses help teach...

  13. Working atmosphere, job satisfaction and individual characteristics of community mental health professionals in integrated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Kleine-Budde, Katja; Bramesfeld, Anke; Stegbauer, Constance

    2018-03-01

    Working requirements of community mental healthcare professionals in integrated care are complex. There is a lack of research concerning the relation of job satisfaction, working atmosphere and individual characteristics. For the current study, a survey evaluating job satisfaction and working atmosphere of mental healthcare professionals in integrated care was performed. About 321 community mental healthcare professionals were included in the survey; the response rate was 59.5%. The professional background of community mental healthcare professionals included nursing, social work and psychology. Community mental healthcare professionals reported the highest satisfaction with colleagues and the lowest satisfaction with income. Moreover, it could be shown that more responsibility, more recognition and more variety in job tasks lead to an increase of overall job satisfaction. Healthcare for mentally ill patients in the community setting is complex and requires well-structured care with appropriate responsibilities within the team. A co-operative relationship among colleagues as well as clearly defined responsibilities seem to be the key for the job satisfaction of community mental healthcare professionals in integrated care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Releasing Your Inner Leader: Spinning 21st-Century Standards-Driven Evaluations and Professional Development into Stronger School Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Carolyn Jo

    2012-01-01

    Simply put, professional development is evolving into something new and inspiring in the twenty-first century. Professional development is becoming more relevant, more reflective, and, most importantly, more social. Socially united groups give rise to a collective intelligence that bonds the members into a more ordered community. Collective social…

  15. A Multi-Year Study of the Impact of the Rice Model Teacher Professional Development on Elementary Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, Dana Viorica; Radigan, Judy; Suskavcevic, Milijana; Nichol, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    A teacher professional development program for in-service elementary school science teachers, the Rice Elementary Model Science Lab (REMSL), was developed for urban school districts serving predominately high-poverty, high-minority students. Teachers with diverse skills and science capacities came together in Professional Learning Communities, one…

  16. The Impact of Professional Development on Poverty, Schooling, and Literacy Practices: Teacher Narratives and Reformation of Mindset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    The study examines the impact of professional development on the topic of poverty in one high poverty school community located in a small city in southern Ontario, Canada. It considers narrative-based experiences of teachers' collaborative inquiry on literacy practices after a significant amount of professional development was provided to…

  17. Evaluating a Graduate Professional Development Program for Informal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeremy Paul

    This study is an examination and evaluation of the outcomes of a series of courses that I helped build to create a graduate certificate. Specifically, I wanted to evaluate whether or not the online iteration of the Informal Science Institutions Environmental Education Graduate Certificate Program truly provided the long term professional development needed to enhance the skills of the formal and informal educators participating so that they could contribute meaningfully to the improvement of science literacy in their respective communities. My role as an internal evaluator provided an extraordinary opportunity to know the intent of the learning opportunities and why they were constructed in a particular fashion. Through the combination of my skills, personal experiences both within the certificate's predecessor and as an educator, I was uniquely qualified to explore the outcomes of this program and evaluate its effectiveness in providing a long-term professional development for participants. After conducting a literature review that emphasized a need for greater scientific literacy in communities across America, it was evident that the formal education enterprise needs the support of informal educators working on the ground in myriad different settings in ways that provide science as both content and process, learning science facts and doing real science. Through a bridging of informal science educators with formal teachers, it was thought each could learn the culture of the other, making each more fluent in accessing community resources to help make these educators more collaborative and able to bridge the classroom with the outside world. This bridge promotes ongoing, lifelong learning, which in turn can help the national goal of greater scientific literacy. This study provided insight into the thinking involved in the learners' growth as they converted theory presented in course materials into practice. Through an iterative process of reviewing the course

  18. The Development of Professional Values of Journalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; And Others

    To determine the impact of college and professional experiences on journalists, interviews were conducted with graduating journalism majors at three universities in the springs of 1980 through 1982. Follow-up questionnaires were mailed in the summer following graduation. In another phase of the project, questionnaires were given to 485 journalists…

  19. Using Learning Trajectories for Teacher Learning to Structure Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagliotti, Anna E.; Anderson, Celia Rousseau

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the increased focus on data literacy and data science across the world, there has been a large demand for professional development in statistics. However, exactly how these professional development opportunities should be structured remains an open question. The purpose of this paper is to describe the first iteration of a design…

  20. Philosophy of Education Subscales: Predictors of EFL Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hamid; Kafi, Zahra H.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between Iranian EFL, English as a foreign language, male and female instructors' philosophy of education and their professional development to see whether there is any significant relation between the type of philosophy of education that teachers hold and their professional development. It…

  1. Teachers as Learners: Implications of Adult Education for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Effective communication with teachers is a critical element of any successful professional development. Teachers are the foundational component of any educational system. It is vital that adequate attention is focused on appropriate and effective training of these teachers. Ideally, professional development offers a means of collaborative support…

  2. Professional Development Needs of English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandehroo, Koroush; Mukundan, Jayakaran; Alavi, Zhinoos Kamal

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed the professional development (PD) needs of school English language teachers at Melaka State in Malaysia. With close cooperation with the Department of Language at the Ministry of Education, the whole population of English language teachers had been studied on their types of professional development needs in instructional…

  3. Professional development of teacher educators through informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEd Marly Gootzen; drs Maurice Schols; dr Rita Schildwacht; dr.ir. Quinta Kools; drs Marina Bouckaert-den Draak

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and theoretical background Professional development of teacher educators is an important issue because in order to be able to teach the teachers of the future, teacher educators have to keep their own knowledge and skills 'future proof' (Kools, 2011a). A lot of professional development

  4. Delivering Online Professional Development in Mathematics to Rural Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Jo; Rearden, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Rural school districts struggle to attract, retain, and support highly qualified mathematics teachers. A series of four online professional development courses in the form of integrated mathematics content and pedagogy courses was designed to meet the professional development needs of rural middle school mathematics teachers. Changes in teachers'…

  5. Standards for Reporting Mathematics Professional Development in Research Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajn, Paola

    2011-01-01

    This Research Commentary addresses the need for standards for describing mathematics professional development in mathematics education research reports. Considering that mathematics professional development is an emerging research field, it is timely to set expectations for what constitutes high-quality reporting in this field. (Contains 2 tables.)

  6. Relational Restorative Justice Pedagogy in Educator Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaandering, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    What would a professional development experience rooted in the philosophy, principles, and practices of restorative justice look and feel like? This article describes how such a professional development project was designed to implement restorative justice principles and practices into schools in a proactive, relational and sustainable manner by…

  7. Professional Identity Development: A Review of the Higher Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Franziska; Macklin, Rob; Bridges, Donna

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extant higher education literature on the development of professional identities. Through a systematic review approach 20 articles were identified that discussed in some way professional identity development in higher education journals. These articles drew on varied theories, pedagogies and learning strategies; however,…

  8. Teacher Perspectives on Literacy and Mathematics Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christie; Polly, Drew; Mraz, Maryann; Algozzine, Robert

    2018-01-01

    This study examines teacher's perspectives of the most beneficial professional development they have participated in over the last three years in the content areas of literacy and mathematics. It also investigates teachers views on how professional development influences student learning. Specifically, this study is grounded in the following…

  9. Professional Development for Rural and Remote Teachers Using Video Conferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Damian; Prescott, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Teachers in rural and remote schools face many challenges including those relating to distance, isolation and lack of professional development opportunities. This article examines a project where mathematics and science teachers were provided with professional development opportunities via video conferencing to help them use syllabus documents to…

  10. Prevalent Approaches to Professional Development in State 4-H Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.; Worker, Steven M.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Meehan, Cheryl L.; Lewis, Kendra M.; Schoenfelder, Emily; Brian, Kelley

    2017-01-01

    High-quality 4-H programming requires effective professional development of educators. Through a mixed methods study, we explored professional development offered through state 4-H programs. Survey results revealed that both in-person and online delivery modes were used commonly for 4-H staff and adult volunteers; for teen volunteers, in-person…

  11. Providing Effective Professional Development: Lessons from the Eisenhower Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.; Desimone, Laura M.; Birman, Beatrice F.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on two studies evaluating the effectiveness of the federal government's Eisenhower Professional Development Program. Describes high quality professional development of in-service teachers, changes in teaching practice, six key practices identified in literature, and the relationship between district policies and the quality of professional…

  12. Facilitating Professional Development for Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Daniella

    2013-01-01

    The study explores the process of facilitation in professional development for educators. The study relies on discourse analysis of interaction among K-12 teachers and administrators in a Midwestern U.S. state during a semester-long professional development program especially designed for educators working with English language learners (ELLs).…

  13. The Evolution from Traditional to Online Professional Development: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Joshua C.

    2017-01-01

    Online professional development offers opportunities for growth to teachers who may not be able to participate otherwise due to constraints. These constraints include, but are not limited to, time and travel distance. This document is a narrative review of relevant literature as it relates to the evolution of teacher professional development. This…

  14. Welcome to professional courtesy discounts: the medical community's pandora's box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, A D

    1998-01-01

    Recent government regulations on fraud and abuse have transformed the tradition of professional courtesy discounts into a legal minefield threatening to explode on the uninformed medical provider. This paper offers an understanding of the issues involved and provider options.

  15. Developing Learning Communities: Using Communities of Practice within Community Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawthom, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The idea that communities need to be inclusive is almost axiomatic. The process, whereby, community members engage in inclusive practices is far less understood. Similarly, UK universities are being encouraged to include the wider community and extent campus boundaries. Here, I suggest a particular theoretical lens which sheds light on engagement…

  16. Professional development strategies for teaching urban biology teachers to use concept maps effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor Petgrave, Dahlia M.

    Many teachers are not adequately prepared to help urban students who have trouble understanding conceptual ideas in biology because these students have little connection to the natural world. This study explored potential professional development strategies to help urban biology teachers use concept maps effectively with various topics in the biology curriculum. A grounded theory approach was used to develop a substantive professional development model for urban biology teachers. Qualitative data were collected through 16 semi-structured interviews of professional developers experienced in working with concept maps in the urban context. An anonymous online survey was used to collect quantitative data from 56 professional developers and teachers to support the qualitative data. The participants were from New York City, recruited through the NY Biology-Chemistry Professional Development Mentor Network and the NY Biology Teachers' Association. According to the participants, map construction, classroom applications, lesson planning, action research, follow-up workshops, and the creation of learning communities are the most effective professional development strategies. The interviewees also proposed English language learning strategies such as picture maps, native word maps, and content reading materials with underlined words. This study contributes to social change by providing a professional development model to use in planning workshops for urban teachers. Urban teachers improve their own conceptual understanding of biology while learning how to implement concept mapping strategies in the classroom. Students whose teachers are better prepared to teach biology in a conceptual manner have the potential of growing into more scientifically literate citizens.

  17. An Examination of the Relationship between Professional Development Providers' Epistemological and Nature of Science Beliefs and Their Professional Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Arriola, Alfonso

    In the last twenty years in US science education, professional development has emphasized the need to change science instruction from a direct instruction model to a more participatory and constructivist learning model. The result of these reform efforts has seen an increase in science education professional development that is focused on providing teaching strategies that promote inquiry learning to learn science content. Given these reform efforts and teacher responses to professional development, research seems to indicate that whether teachers actually change their practice may depend on the teachers' basic epistemological beliefs about the nature of science. The person who builds the bridge between teacher beliefs and teacher practice is the designer and facilitator of science teacher professional development. Even though these designers and facilitators of professional development are critical to science teacher change, few have studied how these professionals approach their work and what influence their beliefs have on their professional development activities. Eight developers and designers of science education professional development participated in this study through interviews and the completion of an online questionnaire. To examine the relationship between professional development providers' science beliefs and their design, development, and implementation of professional development experiences for science teachers, this study used the Views on Science Education Questionnaire (VOSE), and interview transcripts as well as analysis of the documents from teacher professional development experiences. Through a basic interpretive qualitative analysis, the predominant themes that emerged from this study suggest that the nature of science is often equated with the practice of science, personal beliefs about the nature of science have a minimal impact on the design of professional development experiences, current reform efforts in science education have a

  18. Extended professional development for systemic curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitskey, Mary Elizabeth

    Education standards call for adopting inquiry science instruction. Successful adoption requires professional development (PD) to support teachers, increasing the need for research on PD. This dissertation examines the question: What is the influence of high quality, curriculum aligned, long-term group workshops and related practice on teacher learning? I focus on the following subquestions: (1) What is the influence of high quality, curriculum aligned, long-term, group workshops on teacher knowledge and beliefs? (2) What is the impact of the workshops on teacher practice? (3) What is the influence of practice on student response? (4) What is the impact of practice and student response on teacher knowledge and beliefs? I focus on an instance of PD nested within a long-term systemic change initiative, tracing eleven science teachers' learning from workshops and associated enactments. The data included pre and post-unit interviews (n=22), two post-workshop interviews (n=17), workshop observations (n=2), classroom observations (n=24) and student work (n=351). I used mixed-methods analysis. Quantitative analysis measured teacher learning by comparing pre and post-unit interview ratings. Qualitative components included two case study approaches: logic model technique and cross-case synthesis, examining teacher learning within and across teachers. The findings suggested a teacher-learning model incorporating PD, teacher knowledge, beliefs, practice and student response. PD impacts teachers' knowledge by providing teachers with new knowledge, adapting previous knowledge, or convincing them to value existing knowledge they chose not to use. The workshops can influence beliefs, providing teachers with confidence and motivation to adopt the practice. Beliefs can mediate how knowledge manifested itself in practice that, in turn, impacts students' response. Student response influences the teachers' beliefs, either reinforcing or motivating change. This teacher-learning model

  19. Designing Multidimensional Policing Strategy And Organization: Towards A Synthesis Of Professional And Community Police Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suve Priit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyse professional police and community policing in view of professionalism, strategy and structures. We aim to find ways for synthesizing these models that are usually seen as incompatible. Unlike many earlier studies of police organizations or strategies, we view strategies in the organization at the corporate, functional and operational levels, and argue that by combining them with functional and divisional principles of structuring, it is possible to place professional strategy at the core of policing, while using the community policing strategy mainly as a component part of the strategy in the framework of divisional organization. This way it is possible to avoid the risk of alienating police from the community and to ensure the successful implementation of corporate strategy through providing professional police units that perform the narrow functions, with quick and adequate information from the community.

  20. The relationship between departments as professional communities and student achievement in secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomos, C.; Hofman, R.H.; Bosker, R.J.

    Secondary school teaching is organized in departments and effective departments functioning as collaborative teams have been associated with effective schools. Therefore, this study investigates the relationship of mathematics departments perceived as professional communities and student achievement

  1. Design and Implementation of a Professional Development Course Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Beth; Spooner, Joshua J; Tanzer, Kim; Dintzner, Matthew R

    2017-12-01

    Objective. To design and implement a longitudinal course series focused on professional development and professional identity formation in pharmacy students at Western New England University. Methods. A four-year, theme-based course series was designed to sequentially and longitudinally impart the values, attributes, and characteristics of a professional pharmacist. Requirements of the course include: goal planning and reflective assignments, submission of "Best Works," attendance at professional meetings, completion of service hours, annual completion of a Pharmacy Professionalism Instrument, attendance at Dean's Seminar, participation in roundtable discussions, and maintenance of an electronic portfolio. Though the Professional Development course series carries no credit, these courses are progression requirements and students are assessed on a pass/fail basis. Results. Course pass rates in the 2015-2016 academic year for all four classes were 99% to 100%, suggesting the majority of students take professional development seriously and are achieving the intended outcomes of the courses. Conclusion. A professional development course series was designed and implemented in the new Doctor of Pharmacy program at Western New England University to enhance the professional identity formation of students.

  2. Elementary Teachers' Perception of Professional Capital within Their Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Allison Edwards

    2017-01-01

    Many teachers, after having worked in isolation for so long and a business capital model of education reform, do not understand the concept of professional capital and its impact for transforming education. The purpose of this study was to examine elementary teachers' perception of professional capital within their community of practice. The data…

  3. Psychiatrists, Psychologists, or Counselors? Community College Students' Perceptions of Professional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lawrence J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates community college students' perceptions of help-givers' characteristics and services. Student perceptions of professional helpers' characteristics and of professionals whom students were likely to consult concerning educational-vocational choices, intrapersonal concerns, and interpersonal problems varied in several ways. (Author)

  4. Developing early algebraic reasoning in a mathematical community of inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Jodie Margaret Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the development of early algebraic reasoning in mathematical communities of inquiry. Under consideration is the different pathways teachers take as they develop their own understanding of early algebra and then enact changes in their classroom to facilitate algebraic reasoning opportunities. Teachers participated in a professional development intervention which focused on understanding of early algebraic concepts, task development, modification, and enactment, and clas...

  5. Secondary science teachers' view toward and classroom translation of sustained professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elizabeth Blake

    This study concerns the phenomenon of secondary science teacher learning and enacting instructional strategies learned at the Communication in Science Inquiry Project (CISIP) teacher professional development events, as well as teacher perception of, and relationship to, this year-long professional development program. The CISIP program teaches science teachers how to build scientific classroom discourse communities with their students. Some of the science teachers were previous participants in the professional development, and acted as mentor teachers. The research design employed an integrated conceptual framework of situated learning theory with an analytical lens of teachers' professional, institutional and affinity, identities. A multi-method approach was used to generate data. Throughout the 2007-2008 academic year, the teachers' fidelity to the professional development model was measured using a classroom observation instrument aligned with the professional development model. From these observation data a longitudinal model, using hierarchical linear modeling, was constructed. In addition, surveys and interview data were used to construct both whole group and case studies of two high school science teachers who taught biology at the same school. The results indicated that there was a significant difference between previous and new participants; specifically, the longer teachers had participated in the professional development, and adopted a mentorship role, the greater their fidelity of classroom instruction to the CISIP model. Additionally, the case study teacher who developed a CISIP model-aligned affinity identity implemented more of the instructional strategies than the teacher who maintained his school-based institutional identity.

  6. Opportunity for Tourism Professional Development in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Menara Simanjuntak

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on opportunities related to the professional growth of tourism in Indonesia at this time and in the future. The proportion of workers in the tourism sector, including the fourth largest after agriculture, manufacturing and non-manufacturing, tends to grow very fast, because tourists visiting Indonesia will increase sharply in coming years. The purpose of this study is to provide advice to the government, tourism, and educational institutions in Indonesia's tourism industry ...

  7. Social media: The next frontier for professional development in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Celeste; Cowling, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiographers are required to undertake professional development in order to maintain registration. Professional development activities can be passive and isolate the practitioner. Social media is an interactive, collaborative, instant form of communication, which potentially addresses these concerns. Objectives: To establish whether the inherent challenges of social media use reduce its feasibility as a platform for professional development in radiography. Methods: A systematic review was undertaken using the PRISMA Guidelines. Academic databases were searched using pre-defined search terms, limits and inclusion criteria. Results: Zero reviewable papers were identified in the field of radiography globally. The search was expanded to “healthcare” and 810 papers were identified. After inclusion criteria and limits were applied, 12 papers were reviewed. Conclusions: Professional development using social media includes higher education, collaboration and networking. Managed with consideration to the inherent risks, social media provides a new means of inclusive professional development. - Highlights: • Professional development in radiography can draw on the benefits of social media. • Benefits of the social media platform are education, collaboration and networking. • Social media can reduce geographic and professional isolation. • Practitioners can share case studies and contribute professional opinions

  8. Development of a Professional Certification in Cancer Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, Janet; D'souza, Anna; Masse, Adeline; Boyko, Susan; Clarke, Susan; Giuliani, Meredith; MacKinnon, Keira; McBain, Sarah; McCallum, Meg; MacVinnie, Jan; Papadakos, Tina

    2018-04-19

    Patient educators come into the field from diverse professional backgrounds and often lack training in how to teach and develop patient education resources since no formal patient education professional certification program exists. A professional certification program for patient educators would further define the professional scope of practice and reduce variability in performance. The purpose of this study was to (1) determine the level of interest among Canadian cancer patient educators in a patient education professional certification program and (2) determine the competencies to be included in the professional certification program. A 12-item survey was designed by executive members of the Canadian Chapter of the Cancer Patient Education Network. The survey included a list of competencies associated with patient education, and a 4-point Likert scale ranging from "slightly important" to "very important" was used to determine the rank of each competency. The survey was sent to 53 patient educators across Canada. Ninety-two percent of the patient educators are interested in a professional certification program. Patient educators indicated that competencies related to developing patient resources, collaboration, plain language expertise, and health literacy were of most importance. Patient educators support the development of a patient education professional certification program and endorsed the competencies proposed. This information provides the foundation for the creation of a professional certification program for cancer patient educators.

  9. Teachers' Experience from a School-Based Collaborative Teacher Professional Development Programme: Reported Impact on Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out how science teachers who have participated in a one-year school-based collaborative teacher professional development programme, perceive the programme's impact on their professional development. Constant comparative analysis was used on data from three schools to generate the findings in this study. The…

  10. Analysis of Video-Based Training Approaches and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Serge

    2018-01-01

    The use of videos to analyze teaching practices or initial teacher training is aimed at helping build professional skills by establishing more explicit links between university education and internships and practical work in the schools. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the English-speaking community with French research via a study…

  11. Multilevel Boundary Crossing in a Professional Development School Partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Sanne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217379788; Bruining, Ton

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand the recurrent challenges of professional development school (PDS) partnerships experienced by many countries. It does so by conceptualizing PDS partnerships as endeavors to cross institutionally and epistemologically developed boundaries between teacher education,

  12. Perceived Effectiveness of Community-driven Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived Effectiveness of Community-driven Development Approach of Community and Social ... African Journal of Sustainable Development ... that CSDP in Oyo state be scaled up and the CDD approach be adopted for rural development.

  13. The Language of Collaboration: Dialogue and Identity in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crafton, Linda; Kaiser, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    This article explores several professional development models currently being used in the US and in other countries to support teacher learning, including coaching, mentoring and communities of practice. While in some contexts the activities of the participants are informed by social constructivist views of learning, the authors argue that…

  14. English Teachers' Cultural Models about Technology: A Microethnographic Perspective on Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2014-01-01

    Prompted by calls for research on technology-focused professional development, this ethnographic case study investigates how teachers' participation in learning communities may influence technology integration within the secondary English curriculum. In this article, I draw on educational psychology, cognitive anthropology, and sociolinguistics to…

  15. Facebook Band Director's Group: Member Usage Behaviors and Perceived Satisfaction for Meeting Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, David A.; Brewer, Wesley D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate participation in a Facebook social media community known as Band Director's Group (BDG) through examination of members' demographic profiles, self-reported usage behaviors, and perceptions about how group activity satisfies their professional development needs. Respondents to an online survey (n = 336)…

  16. Creating, Constructing, and Cultivating Professional Development within a Reggio-Inspired Early Childhood Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the professional development system of an early childhood education program which was influenced by the Reggio Emilia Approach to early learning. This multi-site program thrived within low-income, inner-city communities of Chicago. Literature connected to the program's historical context of the Settlement House and the Reggio…

  17. Discovering Sexual Health Conversations between Adolescents and Youth Development Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Niodita; Chandak, Aastha; Gilson, Glen; Pelster, Aja Kneip; Schober, Daniel J.; Goldsworthy, Richard; Baldwin, Kathleen; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Fisher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Youth development professionals (YDPs) working at community-based organizations are in a unique position to interact with the adolescents because they are neither parents/guardians nor teachers. The objectives of this study were to explore qualitatively what sexual health issues adolescents discuss with YDPs and to describe those issues using the…

  18. Teachers' Professional Development: The Case of WhatsApp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansoy, Ramazan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the kinds of shares made by science teachers in a WhatsApp group as an online community of practice to support professional development were examined. The netnographic research method, one of the qualitative research methods, was used in the study. The messages shared by 12 science teachers, who worked at a private school between…

  19. Collaborative Professional Development in Chemistry Education Research: Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szteinberg, Gabriela; Balicki, Scott; Banks, Gregory; Clinchot, Michael; Cullipher, Steven; Huie, Robert; Lambertz, Jennifer; Lewis, Rebecca; Ngai, Courtney; Weinrich, Melissa; Talanquer, Vicente; Sevian, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Professional development that bridges gaps between educational research and practice is needed. However, bridging gaps can be difficult because teachers and educational researchers often belong to different Communities of Practice, as their activities, goals, and means of achieving those goals often differ. Meaningful collaboration among teachers…

  20. Innovative Uses of IT Applications in STEM Classrooms: A Preliminary Review of ITEST Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Caroline E.; Stylinski, Cathlyn; Darrah, Marjorie; McAuliffe, Carla; Gupta, Preeti

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program provides a unique opportunity to assess a broad spectrum of professional development projects that share key characteristics but were designed to meet distinct local school and community contexts. To better understand how innovative…

  1. Faculty Professional Development: Advancing Integrative Social Pedagogy Using ePortfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhika, Rajendra; Francis, Andrea; Miller, Dionne

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the work of three faculty members across two different professional development seminars at LaGuardia Community College. It illustrates how their work was guided and is linked together by a common thread--the use of ePortfolio to foster integrative social pedagogy--as a result of their participation in these seminars. This…

  2. Using social media to enhance career development opportunities for health promotion professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Leah A

    2014-07-01

    For health promotion professionals, social media offers many ways to engage with a broader range of colleagues; participate in professional development events; promote expertise, products, or services; and learn about career-enhancing opportunities such as funding and fellowships. Previous work has recommended "building networking into what you are already doing." This article provides updated and new social media resources, as well as practical examples and strategies to promote effective use of social media. Social media offers health promotion professionals cost-effective opportunities to enhance their career by building communities of practice, participating in professional development events, and enriching classroom learning. Developing the skills necessary to use social media for networking is important in the public health workforce, especially as social media is increasingly used in academic and practice settings. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Teacher Activist Organizations and the Development of Professional Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Rand; Carl, Nicole Mittenfelner

    2015-01-01

    Teacher professional agency refers to the ability of teachers to control their work within structural constraints. In this paper, we show how teacher activist organizations can assist in the development of professional agency. We focus on a teacher activist organization in a large urban district in the United States and identify three…

  4. Enabling Adaptive System Leadership: Teachers Leading Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Internationally, there is increasing emphasis on teacher leadership of professional development. This provides opportunities for teachers to initiate and facilitate professional learning activities beyond their own schools. There is a need for theoretical tools to analyse their leadership activity and how to support it. Constructs from complexity…

  5. Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP): A Model for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofras, Pamela Anderson; Emory-Maier, Ambre

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, North Carolina Dance Theatre, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School system joined forces to create a multidimensional, professional development program for dance professionals (teachers and artists) in the public schools called, The Dance Educator Enrichment Program (DEEP). DEEP was designed…

  6. Reviewing a Reading Program: Professional Development Module. Facilitator's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosanovich, Marcia; Jordan, Georgia; Arndt, Elissa; VanSciver, Mary; Wahl, Michelle; Rissman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    This "Facilitator's Guide" has been prepared for presenters of the Reviewing a Reading Program professional development training. It is one of three pieces comprising a suite of materials on reviewing reading programs: this "Guide", the "Reviewing a Reading Program Participant's Guide" and the "Reviewing a Reading Program" Professional Development…

  7. The Impact of Professional Development Schools on Teacher Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Michael N.

    2010-01-01

    Although there is no common definition for teacher leadership, the concept is continually advanced as a key component for both the success of schools and professionalization of teachers. Studies have shown that teachers who feel empowered as leaders are more effective in the classroom. Professional development schools (PDSs) provide multiple…

  8. Professionalism, Portfolios and the Development of School Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Wallace, John

    1998-01-01

    Describes how two reforms--portfolio culture and teacher professionalism--converge in a systemwide program for school leaders' professional development. Investigates use of portfolios to help (Australian) principals, deputy principals, and department heads improve their performance and accountability. Participants used portfolios as evidence of…

  9. Exploring Elements That Support Teachers Engagement in Online Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestridge, Sarah; Tondeur, Jo

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to identify the most effective elements required in online professional development to enable teachers to improve their use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) in their classrooms. Four schools in Queensland were involved, with twelve classroom teachers participating in a year-long online professional development…

  10. Integrating Professional Development across the Curriculum: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarocco, Natalie J.; Dinella, Lisa M.; Hatchard, Christine J.; Valosin, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The current study empirically tested the effectiveness of a modular approach to integrating professional development across an undergraduate psychology curriculum. Researchers conducted a two-group, between-subjects experiment on 269 undergraduate psychology students assessing perceptions of professional preparedness and learning. Analysis…

  11. EAL Teacher Agency: Implications for Participation in Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Laura; Liyanage, Indika

    2016-01-01

    Teachers construct their practice, education and professional development within two domains of professionalism: sponsored and independent. The association between these two domains, however, is complex; it is overlapping, inseparable and sometimes uneasy. The complexity is further exacerbated by the codependent nature of association between the…

  12. The development of integrated service centre system for professional teachers empowerment in North Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultom, S.; Simanjorang, M. M.; Muchtar, Z.; Mansyur, A.

    2018-03-01

    Based on Act number 12 in year 2012 the function of higher education is related to individual, social community, knowledge and technology development. Hence, higher education providers need to think and develop policies in order to improve their service and fulfil the higher education function. As part of the effort to fulfil its function Universitas Negeri Medan (Unimed), which historically was a pre-service teacher training institute, should has a special interest on improving teachers’ professionalism. The Act number 14 in year 2005 described requirements for professional teacher, including academic qualification and set of competencies possessed by the teacher. The Act also guaranties teachers’ right to have opportunities for improving their competencies and academic qualification through training and other professionalism development programme. The question is how this guarantee can be implemented. In order to answer this question a developmental study has been done which aimed on developing an integrated service centre system for professional teachers empowerment. As the name implies, this integrated service centre system is expected to be a real manifestation of Unimed’s support towards the improvement of professional teachers quality, which in the end will boils down to the improvement of national education services quality. The result of this study is an integrated service centre system for professional teachers empowerment that fulfils the professionalism principles described in the Act number 14 in year 2005, which has been developed by considering problems faced by and also supports needed by teachers post certification programme.

  13. School Culture and Leadership of Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore supportive and shared leadership structures at schools as a function of school culture policies and procedures. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was conducted at three secondary schools in the Midwestern USA. Administrators and teachers were interviewed, professional learning…

  14. Adult Education and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krajnc

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Community education means a new way of connecting knowledge with what people create. It increases the applicability of knowledge and con­ nects education with the direct needs of people. There are quite few things one can do by him/her­ self. Mainly one is dependent on the things he/she can create together with others. In non-democratic societies people get used to being given solutions from above, which is why they can wait for some­ one else (especially institutions to solve their problems while they remain passive. Socio-economic and political changes require from the people in Slovenia to redefine their attitude to the environment and life in general and to assume an active role. Community education means learning in groups of interested people in order to reach a certain goal or find a solution to a certain problem, e. g. establishing a local museum, publishing a tourist guide, constructing a bypass to decrease the traffic in town, erecting a monument, protecting green areas, introducing new forms of child care, solving problems of the disabled, unemployment and income maintenance, etc. People leam in order to be able to work. There are two goals which are always present: product and knowledge. People leam parallelly with the phases of work in order to achieve certain goal. It is typical of community education that it was developed in order to meet the needs of local people explicitly. It is therefore of great importance for adult educators facilitating problem-solving based on knowledge to get to know the real needs of people first. Generallack of knowledge is manifested in functional illiteracy. As long as people are unable to communicate orally or by writing with the others, their activities are blocked and they cannot help themselves. They can only live a dependent life, based on help expected from others, which nowadays is not possible any more. Each individual has to be responsible for his/her own survival. In the present

  15. Community mental health nurses speak out: the critical relationship between emotional wellbeing and satisfying professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

    2006-10-01

    The article reports on selected findings of a research study concerning emotional wellbeing and professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). It highlights the relationship between community mental health nurses' and emotional wellbeing, and their capacity to provide satisfying professional nursing practice (Rose 2002). The notion of emotional wellbeing, factors that impacted upon the participants' emotional wellbeing, and the relationship of emotional wellbeing to professional practice were revealed in the study. These findings were based on a qualitative critical feminist research inquiry and specifically, interviews with five women community mental health nurses in Australia. Whilst complex, emotional wellbeing was found to be both implicitly and explicitly linked to the participants intertwined personal and professional experiences. Four key components were identified: the nebulous notion; the stress relationship; the mind, body, spirit connection; and, inner sense of balance. In terms of emotional wellbeing and professional practice, three themes were revealed. These were: being able to speak out (or not); being autonomous (or not) and being satisfied (or not). The authors argue that the emotional wellbeing of nurses working in community mental health settings is critical to satisfying professional practice. Furthermore nursing work involves emotional work which impacts on one's emotional wellbeing and emotional wellbeing is integrally linked to professional practice. It is recommended that health organisations must be pro-active in addressing the emotional needs of nurses to ensure the delivery of health care that is aligned to professional practice. This approach will ensure nurses will feel more recognised and validated in terms of their nursing practice.

  16. The Factors that Affect Science Teachers' Participation in Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Judi Ann

    Scientific literacy for our students and the possibilities for careers available in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) areas are important topics for economic growth as well as global competitiveness. The achievement of students in science learning is dependent upon the science teachers' effectiveness and experienced science teachers depend upon relevant professional development experiences to support their learning. In order to understand how to improve student learning in science, the learning of science teachers must also be understood. Previous research studies on teacher professional development have been conducted in other states, but Minnesota science teachers comprised a new and different population from those previously studied. The purpose of this two-phase mixed methods study was to identify the current types of professional development in which experienced, Minnesota secondary science teachers participated and the factors that affect their participation in professional development activities. The mixed-methods approach s utilized an initial online survey followed by qualitative interviews with five survey respondents. The results of the quantitative survey and the qualitative interviews indicated the quality of professional development experiences and the factors which affected the science teachers' participation in professional development activities. The supporting and inhibiting factors involved the availability of resources such as time and money, external relationships with school administrators, teacher colleagues, and family members, and personal intrinsic attributes such as desires to learn and help students. This study also describes implications for science teachers, school administrators, policymakers, and professional development providers. Recommendations for future research include the following areas: relationships between and among intrinsic and extrinsic factors, science-related professional development activities

  17. Community managers: a picture of the present and the future of an emerging professional figure of the Web 2.0. His influence on the online reputational profitability

    OpenAIRE

    Treviño Carrero, Pilar; Barranquero, Alejandro; Zusberro, Nerea

    2013-01-01

    Due to the expansion of social software, companies need to develop strategies to facilitate communication between users and organizations. The professional who makes it possible is the community manager. In Spain, the competences for this new job of online communication are not defined yet. The target of this research is focused on dealing in depth with his formative and professional profile and searching on whether it is an incidental popularization or if this professional figure will be nor...

  18. Enabling professionals to change practices aimed at tackling social inequality through professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente; Brandi, Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    the impact of a professional development programme on changing practices that can address social inequality in ECEC. The article explores how a professional development programme, VIDA, can contribute to enabling professionals in enhancing the change potentials in ECEC, with a view to enhancing the learning......Research has shown the potential for early childhood education and care (ECEC) in making a difference for all children. However, research also highlights how hard overcoming the ‘gaps’ between children from differing social backgrounds still is. The overall aim of this article is to examine...... conditions and well-being of all children, and socially disadvantaged children in particular. The overall argument is that co-construction as well as openness and reflection in the ECEC field is needed when professionals are to change their pedagogical practices towards tackling the issues of social...

  19. Continuous Professional Development of English Language Teachers: Perception and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman Al Asmari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Professional development is considered as an essential element in enhancing the teaching and learning process to ensure student learning. Professional development can also be deemed as a cornerstone of teacher professionalism and quality. The governments and educational institutions invest significantly in Continuous Professional Development (CPD to improve teacher quality and to meet the changing needs of the students. To uncover the perceptions and practices of professional development in Saudi Arabia, a survey was conducted at Taif University English Language Centre. The sample consisted of 121 English language teachers from various countries and having varied educational and academic experiences. The survey comprised items relevant to learning approaches, concept of professional development, perceptions and feedback on CPD. The respondents supported lifelong learning and experiential learning leading towards learner centered approach. They perceived the CPD as a challenge to their existing knowledge and classroom practice. However, they expressed their concerns regarding indigenization of activities in CPDs, institutional support in conducting classroom activities, and follow up activities.  Keywords: Professional development, Teacher perception, ELT in Saudi Arabia

  20. Development of the Professional Self-Care Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorociak, Katherine E; Rupert, Patricia A; Bryant, Fred B; Zahniser, Evan

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on the importance of self-care for psychologists and other mental health professionals. With the growth of positive psychology and preventive medicine, self-care is an emerging topic, promulgated as a means of avoiding the adverse effects of stress and promoting professional functioning and well-being. However, the research on self-care is limited because of the lack of an empirically based, psychometrically sound measure of this construct. Thus, the purpose of this project was to develop a measure of professional self-care. Professional psychologists were the focus of study, with the goal being to develop a measure that can be used in this population and similar groups of professionals. Based on expert feedback and a preliminary study of 422 licensed psychologists in Illinois, a 5-factor, 21-item scale was created. Factor analysis identified the following self-care factors: Professional Support, Professional Development, Life Balance, Cognitive Awareness, and Daily Balance. Preliminary analyses provided initial support for the validity of the 5 factors. A follow-up study was conducted with a second sample of clinical psychologists. The 5-factor structure provided a good fit to the data with the second sample. Thus, based on factor analysis and validity data, a 5-factor, 21-item Professional Self-Care Scale was established for further study and use in future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Development and Integration of Professional Core Values Among Practicing Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Patricia Quinn; Guenther, Lee Ann; Wainwright, Susan F

    2016-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has adopted professional core values, which define expected values for its members, and developed a self-assessment tool with sample behaviors for each of the 7 core values. However, evidence related to the integration of these core values into practice is limited. The aims of this study were: (1) to gain insight into physical therapists' development of professional core values and (2) to gain insight into participants' integration of professional core values into clinical practice. A qualitative design permitted in-depth exploration of the development and integration of the American Physical Therapy Association's professional core values into physical therapist practice. Twenty practicing physical therapists were purposefully selected to explore the role of varied professional, postprofessional, and continuing education experiences related to exposure to professional values. The Core Values Self-Assessment and résumé sort served as prompts for reflection via semistructured interviews. Three themes were identified: (1) personal values were the foundation for developing professional values, which were further shaped by academic and clinical experiences, (2) core values were integrated into practice independent of practice setting and varied career paths, and (3) participants described the following professional core values as well integrated into their practice: integrity, compassion/caring, and accountability. Social responsibility was an area consistently identified as not being integrated into their practice. The Core Values Self-Assessment tool is a consensus-based document developed through a Delphi process. Future studies to establish reliability and construct validity of the tool may be warranted. Gaining an in-depth understanding of how practicing clinicians incorporate professional core values into clinical practice may shed light on the relationship between core values mastery and its impact on patient care. Findings may

  2. More than "Continuing Professional Development": A Proposed New Learning Framework for Professional Accountants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores literature relating to continuing professional development (CPD) and lifelong learning to develop an understanding of how the learning landscape has evolved in recent years, both in the accountancy profession and more widely. Three different perspectives on learning are drawn together and this synthesis is used to develop a…

  3. Exploring the role of GIS during community health assessment problem solving: experiences of public health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotch Matthew

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Community health assessment (CHA involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS in conjunction with other software to analyze health and population data and perform numerical-spatial problem solving. There has been little research on identifying how public health professionals integrate this software during typical problem solving scenarios. A better understanding of this is needed to answer the "What" and the "How". The "What" identifies the specific software being used and the "How" explains the way they are integrated together during problem solving steps. This level of understanding will highlight the role of GIS utilization during problem solving and suggest to developers how GIS can be enhanced to better support data analysis during community health assessment. Results An online survey was developed to identify the information technology used during CHA analysis. The tasks were broken down into steps and for our analysis these steps were categorized by action: Data Management/Access, Data Navigation, Geographic Comparison, Detection of Spatial Boundaries, Spatial Modelling, and Ranking Analysis. 27 CHA professionals completed the survey, with the majority of participants (14 being from health departments. Statistical software (e.g. SPSS was the most popular software for all but one of the types of steps. For this step (detection of spatial boundaries, GIS was identified as the most popular technology. Conclusion Most CHA professionals indicated they use statistical software in conjunction with GIS. The statistical software appears to drive the analysis, while GIS is used primarily for simple spatial display (and not complex spatial analysis. This purpose of this survey was to thoroughly examine into the process of problem solving during community health assessment data analysis and to gauge how GIS is integrated with other software for this purpose. These findings suggest that GIS is used more for spatial

  4. Approaches and Activities of Professional Development During Graduate/Postdoctoral Summer Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Hughes, W. J.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Schrijver, K.; Bagenal, F.; Sojka, J. J.; Munoz-Jaramillo, A.

    2017-12-01

    NSF and NASA each fund a space physics summer school - the Space Weather Summer School (https://www2.hao.ucar.edu/CISM-Summer-School) and the Heliophysics Summer School (https://cpaess.ucar.edu/heliophysics/summer-school) - each of which provide a comprehensive introduction to their fields at the conceptual and quantitative level for graduate and postdoctoral researchers. Along with specific content goals, each summer school also recognizes professional development goals for the students. Each school intentionally develops community among the summer school students to promote professional networking between the students and between students and instructors. Community is promoted both as part of the formal program and through informal gatherings and outings. Social media is intentionally used for this purpose as well. The summer schools also promote practice with discussing science concepts in small groups through peer instruction, practice presenting in small groups, and discussing results with minimal preparation. Short formal student presentations and poster sessions are organized as part of the formal schedule of one of the summer schools. Much of the professional development work is informed by improvisational theater approaches. Group improv training focuses on the development of the group or the community rather than the individual. Group improv activities are used to build the group and encourage full participation. This talk will outline the professional development activities in each school and how they are informed by improv.

  5. Implementation of a professional portfolio: a tool to demonstrate professional development for advanced practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamblee, Tracy B; Dale, Juanita Conkin; Drews, Barbie; Spahis, Joanna; Hardin, Teri

    2015-01-01

    The literature has a gap related to professional development for APRNs. In the United States, many health care organizations use clinical advancement programs for registered nurses, but APRNs are not often included in these programs. If APRNs are included, advancement opportunities are very limited. At CMC, implementation of a professional portfolio resulted in increased satisfaction among APPs regarding their ability to showcase professional growth and expertise, as well as the uniqueness of their advanced practice. Use of the professional portfolio led to improved recognition by APS and organizational leaders of APP performance excellence during the annual performance evaluation, as well as improved recognition among APP colleagues in terms of nominations for honors and awards.

  6. Teachers’ goal orientation profiles and participation in professional development activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, E.M.; van Woerkom, M.; Poell, R.F.

    2018-01-01

    Participation in professional development activities is important for teachers to continuously improve their knowledge and skills. However, teachers differ in their attitude towards learning activities. This paper examined how different goal orientation profiles are related to participation in

  7. Building Community: A 2005 Conference for Education and Public Outreach Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Bennett, M.; Garmany, K.

    2004-12-01

    In support of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's (ASP) mission to increase the understanding and appreciation of astronomy, the ASP will host an international meeting in September 14-16, 2005 in Tucson focused on building and supporting a vibrant and connected community of individuals and groups engaged in educational and public outreach (EPO) in the disciplines of astronomy, astrobiology, space, and earth science. This conference is specially designed for individuals who are bringing the excitement of astronomy to non-astronomers. This community of science communicators includes: NASA and NSF-funded EPO program managers, developers, evaluators, PIOs, and others who support outreach efforts by government agencies and commercial industries; Scientists working with or assigned to EPO programs or efforts; Individuals working in formal science education: K-14 schools/colleges and minority-serving institutions as faculty or curriculum developers; Informal educators working in widely diverse settings including science centers, planetariums, museums, parks, and youth programs; Amateur astronomers involved in or interested in engaging children and adults in the excitement of astronomy; Public outreach specialists working in observatories, visitor centers, public information offices, and in multimedia broadcasting and journalism. The conference goals are to improve the quality and increase the effective dissemination of EPO materials, products, and programs through a multi-tiered professional development conference utilizing: Visionary plenary talks; Highly interactive panel discussions; Small group workshops and clinics focused on a wide range of EPO topics including evaluation and dissemination, with separate sessions for varying experience levels; Poster and project exhibition segments; Opportunities to increase program leveraging through structured and unstructured networking sessions; and Individual program action planning sessions. There will both separate and

  8. Enabling adaptive system leadership: teachers leading professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Boylan, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Internationally, there is increasing emphasis on teacher leadership of professional development. This provides opportunities for teachers to initiate and facilitate professional learning activities beyond their own schools. There is a need for theoretical tools to analyse their leadership activity and how to support it. Constructs from complexity leadership theory and the concept of teacher system leadership are used to develop a framework to analyse the purposes and practices of teacher prof...

  9. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  10. OPPORTUNITIES FOR HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT BY PROFESSIONAL INTEGRATION / REINTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAVINIA ELISABETA POPP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents some opportunities for the development of human resources by means of professional insertion / reinsertion. It is about an intervention project, more precisely the establishment of a Centre for Career Counselling and Professional Requalification (CORP within the University “Eftimie Murgu” of Reşita. The objective was the promotion of an inclusive society able to facilitate the access and integration on the labour market of the young unemployed. By its activities, the project forwards an inclusive model of social inclusion of the professionally inactive young people through individualised programmes of qualification - requalification, support and professional counselling. By its results the project contributed to the stimulation of the participation of young unemployed persons to the social, economic and educational life, the consideration of the importance of the role played by education and professional training among the youth.

  11. Exploring the Influence of Student Focus Groups in Their Professional and Personal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S.; Hut, R.

    2014-12-01

    A scientific career is often more than a 9-to-5 commitment, both in terms of time and passion. An important factor that fuels this passion is engaging with the community on many levels. In the history of education and professional development, there are numerous studies that emphasis the importance of surrounding groups and like-minded peers in one's professional and personal development in a less constrained environment. In our experience, in modern days where students are surrounded with too much information and yet too little clear signal, the idea of mentor and advisor can no longer limit to one or two people. We strongly feel it is imperative to have the opportunity to share expertise on scientific issues, career options, develop presenting and writing skills, participate in professional volunteer activities with alike and advanced colleagues, share future opportunities, and successfully navigating life both inside and outside of graduate school in a relaxed environment. Most of the professional scientific and engineering communities put a lot of effort to create and maintain professional groups in masters and Ph.D. levels but the dynamics within these groups prove it to be very different and it is challenging to maintain both momentum and productivity. Authors of this report would present their experience in creating, running and maintaining various student groups in the discipline of physics, astronomy, planetary science, hydrology, and optical engineering in US, Europe and Middle East. The common factors and differences based on the supportive community, location, and the educational level would be discussed. An outline of potential helpful factors within the academic institutes and professional communities would be presented based on the examination on various successful and unsuccessful experiences.

  12. Design, Implementation and Impact of the MS PHD’S Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson Whitney, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S)® in Earth System Science initiative facilitates the involvement of underrepresented minority undergraduate and graduate Earth system science students in a series of activities designed to: (1) increase exposure to and engagement in the Earth system science community, via participation in scientific conferences, mentoring relationships, virtual activities, and field trips; (2) enhance professional skills, grantsmanship, oral and written communication; (3) provide funding, education and career opportunity resources; (4) facilitate networking opportunities with established researchers and educators; (5) and sustain on-going interaction, communication and support via membership within a virtual community comprised of peers, junior/senior-level researchers, and educators actively involved in facilitating full participation of minorities in the Earth system sciences. These activities, conducted in three phases, occur during professional society meetings, field trips, visits to several federal agencies, and a 'capstone' event at the National Academies. Nearly 150 Earth system science undergraduate, graduate and recent minority graduates have participated in MS PHD’S activities and are better prepared to successfully achieve their academic and professional goals. It is also expected that because of mentor-mentee partnerships, science exposure, and networking activities, MS PHD'S participants will remain actively engaged in their fields of specialization and respective professional societies. Evaluation data for MS PHD’S activities indicate that virtual and face-to-face mentoring, on-site professional development and community-building activities resulted in increased participant exposure to and engagement in the Earth system science professional community and served to better equip student participants to make informed post-baccalaureate academic and professional career decisions.

  13. 161 Teachers' Continuing Professional Development as Correlates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    development on universal basic education in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Using descriptive ... constitutes an enduring career development process which is very crucial in the overall .... affect their roles and their student's production. Accordingly ...

  14. Factors affecting the impact of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice, student outcomes & efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ingvarson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This report examines effects of structural and process features of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice and efficacy. It is based on four recent (2002-2003 studies undertaken through the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme, designed to enhance teacher quality. The total data set for the survey study includes 3,250 teachers who had participated in eighty individual professional development1 activities within these studies. Teachers were surveyed at least three months after participating in an activity, which provided them with the opportunity to gauge the impact of programs on their practice. To investigate factors affecting impact, a theoretical model was developed based on recent research into the characteristics of effective professional development and tested using blockwise regression analysis. The model included contextual factors (e.g., school support, structural features of programs (e.g. ,length, process features (e.g., emphasis on content; active learning; examination of student work; feedback; follow-up, a mediating variable (level of professional community generated, and four outcome measures (knowledge; practice; student learning and efficacy. Consistent significant direct effects were found across the four studies for the impact of content focus, active learning, and follow-up on knowledge and professional community. Feedback was rarely incorporated into program design. Impact on efficacy was strongly related to the perceived impact of activities on teachers' practice and student learning outcomes.

  15. MOOCs for Teacher Professional Development: Reflections and Suggested Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar Misra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Teacher Professional Development (TPD has become a major policy priority within education systems worldwide. But keeping teachers professionally up-to-date and providing them professional development opportunities on continuing basis is a big challenge. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs can be a cost and resource effective means to complement the traditional methods of professional development of teachers. This optimism is based on the assumption that use of MOOCs will facilitate mass training of teachers as per their convenience and ease. The other assumption is that being MOOCs-based training, it will be easy to adapt it to different cultures and languages. Considering these assumptions, this concept paper which is based on reviews of different reports, documents and research papers - discusses the challenges of TPD, reflects upon promises of using MOOCs for TPD; details initiatives and experiences of using MOOCs for TPD; and suggests actions for promoting the use of MOOCs for TPD.

  16. Democracy, Community, and Psychologically-based professional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    The purpose of this presentation is to offer some personal reflections in relation to the Congress theme about “democratizing education,” (e.g., universal access to quality schooling). Several points are discussed: (a) the importance of the public sphere and community engagement in relation...

  17. A Logical Approach to Supporting Professional Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Seward

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative knowledge sharing requires that dialogues successfully cross organizational barriers and information silos. Successful communication in person or in a virtual community involves a willingness to share ideas and consider diverse viewpoints. This research examines a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM content management system called NASATalk, which offers public and private blog posts, file sharing, asynchronous discussion, and live chat services. The service is designed to provide a virtual environment where educators can share ideas, suggestions, successes, and innovations in STEM teaching and learning activities. This study features qualitative data from STEM education groups that helped extend the design of the NASATalk Web 2.0 collaborative tools and features. The analysis shows that the context, e-collaborative tools, integration strategies, and outcomes varied, but also contributed additional space, time, tools, integration strategies, and outcomes through the virtual collaborative learning environment. This study is designed to inform the STEM education community as well as those offering virtual community resources and tools of the added value of using virtual communities to help STEM educators work together in collaborative, virtual environments to discuss ways they can improve their instruction and student performance.

  18. Community College Students and Applied Research. Professional File. Number 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Sabrina Faust

    2009-01-01

    Student participation in applied research as a form of experiential learning in community colleges is relatively new. Ontario Colleges today participate at different levels with different numbers of projects and faculty involved. A few colleges in Ontario are more established in doing applied research including having basic infrastructure for…

  19. Professional development in statistics, technology, and cognitively demanding tasks: classroom implementation and obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Gregory D.; Bakr Khoshaim, Heba; Alsaeed, Maha; Nihan Er, S.

    2012-03-01

    Attending professional development programmes can support teachers in applying new strategies for teaching mathematics and statistics. This study investigated (a) the extent to which the participants in a professional development programme subsequently used the techniques they had learned when teaching mathematics and statistics and (b) the obstacles they encountered in enacting cognitively demanding instructional tasks in their classrooms. The programme created an intellectual learning community among the participants and helped them gain confidence as teachers of statistics, and the students of participating teachers became actively engaged in deep mathematical thinking. The participants indicated, however, that time, availability of resources and students' prior achievement critically affected the implementation of cognitively demanding instructional activities.

  20. Reframing cooperation: Challenges in overcoming tensions between professional services and volunteer organizations providing parenting support in immigrant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponzoni, E.

    2015-01-01

    Volunteer organizations can potentially partner with mainstream professional services to provide better parenting support to immigrant parents. This qualitative study of cooperation between professional agencies and volunteer organizations known as migrant volunteer and community organizations

  1. Examining the Professional Development Experiences and Non-Technical Skills Desired for Geoscience Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, H. R.; Ricci, J.; Wilson, C. E.; Keane, C.

    2014-12-01

    Professional development experiences, such as internships, research presentations and professional network building, are becoming increasingly important to enhance students' employability post-graduation. The practical, non-technical skills that are important for succeeding during these professional development experiences, such as public speaking, project management, ethical practices and writing, transition well and are imperative to the workplace. Thereby, graduates who have honed these skills are more competitive candidates for geoscience employment. Fortunately, the geoscience community recognizes the importance of these professional development opportunities and the skills required to successfully complete them, and are giving students the chance to practice non-technical skills while they are still enrolled in academic programs. The American Geosciences Institute has collected data regarding students' professional development experiences, including the preparation they receive in the corresponding non-technical skills. This talk will discuss the findings of two of AGI's survey efforts - the Geoscience Student Exit Survey and the Geoscience Careers Master's Preparation Survey (NSF: 1202707). Specifically, data highlighting the role played by internships, career opportunities and the complimentary non-technical skills will be discussed. As a practical guide, events informed by this research, such as AGI's professional development opportunities, networking luncheons and internships, will also be included.

  2. Professional SharePoint 2013 development

    CERN Document Server

    Alirezaei, Reza; Ranlett, Matt; Hillier, Scot; Wilson, Brian; Fried, Jeff; Swider, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thorough coverage of development in SharePoint 2013 A team of well-known Microsoft MVPs joins forces in this fully updated resource, providing you with in-depth coverage of development tools in the latest iteration of the immensely popular SharePoint. From building solutions to building custom workflow and content management applications, this book shares field-tested best practices on all aspect of SharePoint 2013 development. Offers a thorough look at Windows Azure and SharePoint 2013Includes new chapters on Application Life Cycle Management, developing apps in ShareP

  3. The development of the Professional Values Model in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ayla; Boz, İlkay

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important criteria for professionalism is accumulation of knowledge that is usable in professional practice. Nursing models and theories are important elements of accumulating nursing knowledge and have a chance to guarantee the ethical professional practice. In recent years, there has been an increase in the use of models in nursing research and newly created terminology has started to be used in nursing. In this study, a new model, termed as the Professional Values Model, developed by the authors was described. Concepts comprising the conceptual framework of the model and relations between the concepts were explained. It is assumed that awareness about concepts of the model will increase not only the patients' satisfaction with nursing care, but also the nurses' job satisfaction and quality of nursing care. Contemporary literature has been reviewed and synthesized to develop this theoretical paper on the Professional Values Model in nursing. Having high values in nursing increases job satisfaction, which results in the improvement of patient care and satisfaction. Also, individual characteristics are effective in the determination of individual needs, priorities, and values. This relation, proved through research about the Professional Values Model, has been explained. With development of these concepts, individuals' satisfaction with care and nurses' job satisfaction will be enhanced, which will increase the quality of nursing care. Most importantly, nurses can take proper decisions about ethical dilemmas and take ethical action when they take these values into consideration when giving care. The Professional Values Model seems suitable for nurse managers and it is expected that testing will improve it. Implementation of the Professional Values Model by nurse managers may increase motivation of nurses they work with. It is suggested that guidance by the Professional Values Model may help in enhancement of motivation efforts of the nurse managers

  4. Prosthetist/orthotist educational experience & professional development in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lina; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2009-11-01

    To explore areas in which the education at the Pakistan Institute of Prosthetic & Orthotic Science (PIPOS) could be improved or supplemented to facilitate clinical practice of graduates. To describe educational opportunities PIPOS graduates have had since their graduation and explore their further educational needs. 15 graduates from PIPOS participated in semi-structured interviews. A qualitative content analysis was applied to the transcripts. Respondents indicated a need to upgrade the education at PIPOS. This should include upgrading of resources such as literature and internet access as well as providing staff with the opportunity to further their own education. Females experienced inequality throughout their education but were supported by management. Upon entering the workforce graduates reported that they were supported by senior staff but experienced difficulties in determining appropriate prescriptions. They further indicated that a multidisciplinary approach to patient care is lacking. Graduates knowledge of workshop management was identified as a problem when entering the workforce. Limited awareness of the prosthetics and orthotics profession by both the general community and the medical community was also identified as a problem. If offered the opportunity to continue their studies the respondents would like to specialize. "Brain drain" was noted as a risk associated with post graduate education. Interaction from international collaborators and networking within the country was desired. The education at PIPOS meets a need in the country. Graduates indicated that P&O services for Pakistan can be better provided by modifying program content, upgrading teachers' knowledge, improving access to information and addressing issues of gender equality. PIPOS graduates have had limited opportunities for professional development and have a desire for further education.

  5. K-12 Professional Development at the Harvard Forest LTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts seeks to train the next generation of researchers, by involving K-12 grade students and their teachers in hands-on, field-based, ecological research in their own schoolyard and community. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website. To prepare teachers for project protocols, teachers are given direct access to Harvard ecologists with professional development workshops and on-line resources. With the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, students can participate in three different research projects focusing on phenology, invasive insects, and vernal pools. Teachers attend the Summer Institute for Teachers to learn project content and methods. They return in fall to participate in one of three levels of data workshops to learn how to input, manage, and analyze project data. In the spring, teachers again meet with the Harvard ecologists about project protocols, and to share, through a series of teacher presentations, the ways these project themes are being integrated into class curricula. These professional development opportunities result in long term collaborative partnerships with local schools and the Harvard Forest LTER. In addition to the LTER Schoolyard Ecology Program, the Harvard Forest has supported a successful Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program for the last six years. Throughout the summer, teachers work on research projects alongside Harvard Forest and affiliated scientists, post-docs, graduate students, and REU's (Research Experience for Undergraduates). The RET program provides teachers with the opportunity to build scientific knowledge, develop an understanding of research methods, and translate their new knowledge and experiences into cutting edge classroom lessons. The past two summers I have worked with Dr. Andrew Richardson

  6. Changing professional autonomy through quality development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Peter Kragh

    An analysis of quality development i helath care in Denmark and Norway and a discussion of the reactions of the medical professions.......An analysis of quality development i helath care in Denmark and Norway and a discussion of the reactions of the medical professions....

  7. Teacher Professional Development with an Education for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This national case study reports on the development of a national network, curriculum framework and resources for teacher education, with specific focus on the inclusion of environment and sustainability, also known as education for sustainable development (ESD) in the South African teacher education system. It reviews ...

  8. Barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management: perspectives of older community dwellers and health professionals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huixia; Edwards, Helen; Courtney, Mary; McDowell, Jan; Wei, Juan

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about self-management among people with Type 2 diabetes living in mainland China. Understanding the experiences of this target population is needed to provide socioculturally relevant education to effectively promote self-management. The aim of this study was to explore perceived barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management for both older community dwellers and health professionals in China. Four focus groups, two for older people with diabetes and two for health professionals, were conducted. All participants were purposively sampled from two communities in Shanghai, China. Six barriers were identified: overdependence on but dislike of western medicine, family role expectations, cuisine culture, lack of trustworthy information sources, deficits in communication between clients and health professionals, and restriction of reimbursement regulations. Facilitators included family and peer support, good relationships with health professionals, simple and practical instruction and a favourable community environment. The findings provide valuable information for diabetes self-management intervention development in China, and have implications for programmes tailored to populations in similar sociocultural circumstances. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Community and school mental health professionals' knowledge and use of evidence based substance use prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Steven W; Randy Koch, J; Brady, Christine; Meszaros, Peggy; Sadler, Joanna

    2013-07-01

    Youth with learning and behavioral problems are at elevated risk for substance use during adolescence. Although evidence-based substance use prevention and screening practices are described in the literature, the extent with which these are provided to these youth is unclear. Mental health professionals in schools and community mental health centers are in an ideal position to conduct substance use screening and prevention practices since they have frequent contact with this high risk group. In order to determine whether these mental health professionals were using evidence based substance use screening and prevention programs with these youth, we analyzed 345 completed surveys from mental health professionals in schools and community clinics throughout a mid-Atlantic state. Results indicated that a large portion of the respondents were unfamiliar with evidence based practices and they were infrequently used. Implications for the division of labor at schools and community mental health centers are discussed in relation to time allotment and priority for these procedures.

  10. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Influence of Leadership Styles on Community. Development Programmes' Implementation in. Rural Communities of Akwa Ibom State Nigeria. Okoji, Olufemi Onweazu - Department of Educational Management,. Lead City University, Ibadan, Nigeria. E-mail: femiokoji2008@yahoomail.com. Abstract. Community development ...

  11. The effect of perceived organisational support on burnout among community health nurses in China: the mediating role of professional self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu

    2016-01-01

    To examine the mediating effect of professional self-concept on the association between perceived organisational support and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Burnout is a common phenomenon among nurses and previous studies have focused on work environmental factors contributing to burnout. Limited studies have examined the effects of perceived organisational support and professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses. This was a cross-sectional study with 551 community health nurses in Chengdu, China, which included a two-stage sampling method. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the relationships among perceived organisational support, professional self-concept and burnout. The final sample included 456 nurses (82.7%). Perceived organisational support was a significant positive direct predictor for professional self-concept and a significant negative direct predictor for burnout. Professional self-concept was a significant negative direct contributor to burnout. Professional self-concept had a mediating effect on the relationship between perceived organisational support and burnout. Perceived organisational support may result in reduced burnout by facilitating the development of positive professional self-concept. Strategies such as establishing a supportive work environment and professional competence training may be effective methods for burnout prevention and management among community health nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Career advancement and professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Rita K; Smith-Glasgow, Mary Ellen; Bhattacharya, Anand; Xu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Excellence underscores the need for nurses to keep their skills and competencies current through participation in professional development and career advancement. Evidence suggests that internationally educated nurses (IENs) progress relatively slowly through the career ladder and participate less in professional development compared with nurses educated in the United States (UENs). Mentorship and self-efficacy are considered major determinants of career advancement. The aim of the study was to understand the differences in levels of mentorship function and self-efficacy as well as the differences in participation in professional development and career advancement between UENs and IENs. A descriptive survey design was implemented using a Web-based survey. Significant disparities were noted in the role model function of mentoring and some professional development and career advancement measures between UENs and IENs. Mentorship is essential for professional growth. Sociodemographic characteristics of mentors are important because mentors are role models. Standardized career advancement structures are needed to promote professional growth. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  13. Teacher Professionalism on the Developing Children Creativier Professionalism on the Developing Children Creativity (Sociology of Education PerspectiveProfessionalism on the Developing Children Creativity (Sociology of Education Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummi Nurul Muslimah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is to study the concept of teachers’ professionalism and children creativity also the relation in sociology of educational perspective. This is a library research with a descriptive method. The writer collected the data from the writing sources published about some problems of teacher’s professionalism on the developing children creativity. Then, analyzing the thinking of every ideology and philosophy described clearly and completely, so the similarity and differences can be treated clearly by using the description of teacher professionalism on developing children creativity. The findings of this study showed that the relation between teacher professionalism and developing children creativity in sociology of education is every educator have an important role in children education, although in teaching learning process or in out class, educators have always supported and challenged abilities of the gift, talent and creativity. The reason is because the children are more often spend much time with teacher, so the teacher more to know and more responsible to their children.

  14. Professional NFC application development for Android

    CERN Document Server

    Coskun, Vedat; Ozdenizci, Busra

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide to developing and deploying Near Field Communication (NFC) applications There has been little practical guidance available on NFC programming, until now. If you're a programmer or developer, get this unique and detailed book and start creating apps for this exciting technology. NFC enables contactless mobile communication between two NFC-compatible devices. It's what allows customers to pay for purchases by swiping their smartphones with Google Wallet, for example. This book shows you how to develop NFC applications for Android, for all NFC operating modes: reader

  15. Professional JavaScript for Web Developers

    CERN Document Server

    Zakas, Nicholas C

    2011-01-01

    A significant update to a bestselling JavaScript book As the key scripting language for the web, JavaScript is supported by every modern web browser and allows developers to create client-side scripts that take advantage of features such as animating the canvas tag and enabling client-side storage and application caches. After an in-depth introduction to the JavaScript language, this updated edition of a bestseller progresses to break down how JavaScript is applied for web development using the latest web development technologies. Veteran author and JavaScript guru Nicholas Zakas shows how Jav

  16. IMPACT ON DEVELOPMENT AGE AND GENDER CHARACTERISTICS PROFESSIONAL PERSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdeyeva Irina Olegovna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In article some questions mentioning gender and age features of the identity of municipal employees, working in the social sphere and their influence on professionalism development are considered. Diagnostics of professional and important qualities and features of experts, their moral and regulatory sphere, adaptation potential and a motivational complex on means of application of the following diagnostic techniques is carried out: R. Kettell's 16 factorial questionnaire (16-PF, a form C, "Valuable orientations" M. Rokich, a multilevel personal questionnaire "Adaptability" (MLO-AM, a technique of studying of motivation of professional activity (K.Zemfir in A.Rean's modification. In this research the example of the multiple parameter linear model created and approved for identification and the analysis of age transformations of municipal employees, working in the social sphere is given. Conclusions are drawn on wagging of gender and age features of experts on development of professionalism of their personality.

  17. Professional Development Award: Agriculture and Food Security ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-08-28

    Aug 28, 2017 ... Development of communication products. ... to the program's website, knowledge management platform, and social media. ... 8-10 words);; A description of the purpose of the research;; Methodology;; Ethical considerations.

  18. Writing a continuing professional development article for publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2014-07-01

    Writing for journal publication is a worthwhile but challenging activity that requires clear motives, purpose, planning and execution. Continuing professional development (CPD) articles are designed to be informative and educative, with the aim of enhancing the reader's understanding of a particular subject. This article provides an overview of how to approach and plan the writing of a CPD article to enhance the success of its acceptance for publication in a professional journal.

  19. MOOCs as a Professional Development Tool for Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Ecclestone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores how reference and instructional librarians taking over new areas of subject responsibility can develop professional expertise using new eLearning tools called MOOCs. MOOCs – Massive Open Online Courses – are a new online learning model that offers free higher education courses to anyone with an Internet connection and a keen interest to learn. As MOOCs proliferate, librarians have the opportunity to leverage this technology to improve their professional skills.

  20. 國小校長領導專業學習社群以發展學校集體智慧的策略 A Study on Principals’ Leading Strategies to Develop the School Collective Wisdom in the Professional Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    梁金都 Chin-Tu Liang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available 本研究目的在探究校長領導專業學習社群的策略,以達成學校集體智慧的目的。研究者主要選取七位國小校長和七位教師為研究參與者,並進行10次的焦點團體訪談,以蒐集豐富的實地資料,最終獲致了以下重要結論:一、校長領導專業學習社群在三階段和七項原則性策略下,發展出28個實際策略,並達成七項學校集體智慧的成果。二、校長在三階段領導專業學習社群的實際策略,顯現出規劃性作為等七項不同的領導特質。三、信任關係、領導能力、協同合作、專業發展等是專業學習社群實際運作的核心精神。四、校長可採取28個領導專業學習社群的實際策略,並掌握七項領導特質和四種核心精神,有效地達成學校集體智慧的目的。 The purpose of this study was to explore the leading strategies employed by principals to develop the school collective wisdom in the professional learning communities. Seven elementary school principals and seven teachers as the participants were chosen and abundant field data through ten focus group interviews were collected. After careful analyses and fervent discussions, several conclusions were obtained. First, twenty-eight specific strategies were found from the seven principle’s leading strategies on three stages of professional learning communities’ development that could attain seven achievements of collective wisdom at school. Second, the principals played seven leading characteristics on twenty-eight specific strategies of three stages on professional learning communities’ development. Third, the core sprits of practice on professional learning communities were trust relationship, leadership capacities, collaborative teamwork, and professional development. Lastly, principals can attain the goal of collective wisdom at school through these specific strategies and their seven leading characteristics and

  1. Using communication technology to support professional development in teaching science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Cheryl White

    The impact of collaboration via communication technology on follow-up to on-site professional development was the central focus of this hypothesis-generating study. The study used a combination of quantitative methodology and qualitative methodology. A convenient sample of 18 teachers was drawn from 208 teachers in an existing professional development program in science in a southeastern state. The statewide professional development program focused on energy education with a strong emphasis on using technology to enhance learning. Data sources included E-mail messages, lesson plans, photographs, workshop evaluations, surveys, and the report of an external reviewer. The study focused on two on-site workshops, February and June 2000 that were designed to model constructivist pedagogy and instruct teachers in effective utilization of computer-based laboratories in science classrooms. Follow-up to the on-site workshops was facilitated with several communication technologies (Internet, E-mail, telephone, and mail). The research found E-mail was the preferred mode for follow-up to on-site workshops because of the convenience of the medium. Barriers to effective distance professional development were time constraints, equipment failure, and lack of consistent Internet access to teachers in rural and under-served areas. Teacher characteristics of the sample, teacher efficacy, technical skill, experience, and constructivist pedagogy did not appear to impact the use of communication technologies as a means of follow-up to on-site professional development workshops. However, teacher efficacy might have negatively impacted effective implementation of calculator-based laboratory technology in the classroom. The study found E-mail was the most convenient and efficient way to facilitate follow-up to on-site professional development. Teacher characteristics (efficacy, technical skill, experience, and constructivist pedagogy) did not appear to impact the use of E-mail to facilitate

  2. Stages of Teachers' Careers: Implications for Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Judith; And Others

    This monograph on the development of teachers' careers synthesizes researchers' prescriptions for early-, mid-, and late-career professional development; and describes successful programs that demonstrate sensitivity to the stages of teachers' growth. The first chapter, "Teachers' Career Development," reviews current adult- and career-stage…

  3. Mentoring and Professional Development in Rural Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Pamela W.; Carter McLean, Marsha; Waajid, Badiyyah; Pittman, Evelyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and pilot a small-scale professional development program that incorporated substantial group and one-on-one mentoring aimed at preparing rurally based preschool teacher assistants to earn the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Using a framework that emphasized the relational, developmental,…

  4. Supporting Teachers' Understandings of Function through Online Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This article explores one segment of an extended research and development project that was conducted to better understand the ways online teacher professional development can support teachers' development of deep and connected mathematical understandings. In particular, this article discusses teachers' understandings of the concept of…

  5. Designing Education for Professional Expertise Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Quincy; Imants, Jeroen; Dankbaar, Ben; Segers, Mien

    2017-01-01

    How to facilitate learning by novices (students) on their road to expertise has attracted the attention of a vast number of researchers in cognitive and educational psychology as well in the field of learning and instruction. Although many studies have investigated the phenomenon of expertise development, the implications of the findings for…

  6. Special Education Professional Development Needs in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitiyo, Morgan; Hughes, Elizabeth M.; Changara, Darlington M.; Chitiyo, George; Montgomery, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Since 1980 when Zimbabwe obtained political independence, special education has not received the same priority as the entire education system. One of the manifestations of this discrepancy is the shortage of qualified special education teachers in the country. In order to address this trend and promote the development of special education,…

  7. Professional development themes in strength and conditioning coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, David A; Bond, Kath A; Lavallee, David

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore professional development themes in experienced strength and conditioning coaches. Strength and conditioning coaches (N = 15, mean age = 34.3 years, SD = 5.2 years) with 11.4 (SD = 4.9) years experience working with elite, professional, or talented athletes were interviewed about their professional development. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and content analyzed. Over time, subjects' service-delivery practices became more flexible and client driven. Their role understanding also broadened to include various dimensions, such as the need to consider various stakeholders and the value of good relationships with athletes. The subjects shifted from relying on external justification for professional decision making to their experience-based knowledge. The subjects believed athlete work experience, interactions with senior strength and conditioning coaches and other colleagues, the professional literature, and nonprofessional experiences, such as their own athletic experience and sales or managerial training, were the primary influences on their professional development. Typically, the subjects experienced anxiety about their competence, both early in their careers and when working in new contexts or with new athlete groups, but over time, they developed increased confidence. In addition, the subjects experienced reduced narcissism over time about the control they had over athletes and their competitive results. The current results provide information about the characteristics of effective strength and conditioning coaches, the ways they develop their competencies to help athletes, and the emotions they experience throughout their careers. These results may help strength and conditioning practitioners in planning and optimizing their professional development and effectiveness with athletes.

  8. The Use of the Professional Standard as a Tool for Professional Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ir. Veronique van de Reijt; dr.ir. Quinta Kools

    2013-01-01

    Research topic/aim The professional development of teacher educators (T Eds) is increasingly being recognised as a topic of paramount importance, partly caused by the attention for the lifelong learning of those responsible for teaching student teachers. In this presentation we focus on the

  9. 77 FR 6096 - Applications for New Awards; Indian Education-Professional Development Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Indian Education--Professional Development...: Notice. Overview Information: Indian Education--Professional Development Grants Program Notice inviting... Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The purposes of the Indian Education Professional Development...

  10. Placement, support, and retention of health professionals: national, cross-sectional findings from medical and dental community service officers in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M; Onah, Michael; Kornik, Saul; Peacocke, Julia; Reid, Stephen

    2014-02-26

    In South Africa, community service following medical training serves as a mechanism for equitable distribution of health professionals and their professional development. Community service officers are required to contribute a year towards serving in a public health facility while receiving supervision and remuneration. Although the South African community service programme has been in effect since 1998, little is known about how placement and practical support occur, or how community service may impact future retention of health professionals. National, cross-sectional data were collected from community service officers who served during 2009 using a structured self-report questionnaire. A Supervision Satisfaction Scale (SSS) was created by summing scores of five questions rated on a three-point Likert scale (orientation, clinical advising, ongoing mentorship, accessibility of clinic leadership, and handling of community service officers' concerns). Research endpoints were guided by community service programmatic goals and analysed as dichotomous outcomes. Bivariate and multivariate logistical regressions were conducted using Stata 12. The sample population comprised 685 doctors and dentists (response rate 44%). Rural placement was more likely among unmarried, male, and black practitioners. Rates of self-reported professional development were high (470 out of 539 responses; 87%). Participants with higher scores on the SSS were more likely to report professional development. Although few participants planned to continue work in rural, underserved communities (n = 171 out of 657 responses, 25%), those serving in a rural facility during the community service year had higher intentions of continuing rural work. Those reporting professional development during the community service year were twice as likely to report intentions to remain in rural, underserved communities. Despite challenges in equitable distribution of practitioners, participant satisfaction with the

  11. Teachers’ dialogue in a learner centered professional development initiative In a us urban high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Alvarez Gutiérrez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using paradigms emerging from Learner Centered Professional Development (LCPD, dialogic education and Transformative Pedagogical Practices (TPPs, this research study examined pedagogies that ignited a revitalization of shared values as a community of learners, challenged assumptions about learning while invigorating professional identities and cultivating possibilities for transforming praxis of a group of female teachers and female administrators in an urban high school. The LCPD initiative engaged teachers (13 and administrators (3 in dialogue, self-examination, and reflection, while also chipping away dearth perceptions of Latina/o student as learners and nourish possibilities for their successes. The data for this study is part of a larger corpus of data exploring teacher professional development initiatives in a large urban city in the southwestern region of Texas. Narrative analysis was the methodological tool used to code and analyze the data. The authors highlight the pedagogies that served to renew teachers and administrators’ sense of community, professional identities and modifications of teachers’ attitudes and pedagogies regarding themselves and Latina/o students. Our research findings underscore the urgency of educational reform to include on-going LCPD in order to transform and encourage professional enrichment, teacher agency and revive pedagogies that support all students’ academic and social successes.

  12. Peer Observation as a Means to Develop Teachers’ Professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosriadi -

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of reflective practice in promoting teacher professional development has been discussed in many literatures. Research studies showed the benefits of conducting reflective practice to improve teachers’ classroom instruction. Peer observation as one of the reflective practice activities is viewed as an effective strategy in developing teachers’ pedagogy and professional competences. Peer observation refers to the act of teachers collaborate to identify the strength and the weakness of their teachings. By doing so, it is expected there will be improvement in learning outcomes. This study explored EFL teachers’ perceptions on peer observation as means to develop teachers’ professionalism. Two EFL teachers who worked as English teachers were purposively selected as the respondents of the study. The participating teachers got at least 1 year teaching experience to assure their involvement in peer observation. To meet the objectives of the study, the data were gained through classroom observation, and followed by in depth interview. Then, they were analyzed by using interactive model data analysis for qualitative study. The results of the study indicated teachers’ positive perceptions on peer observation as professional development tool. Peer observation brought some benefits for teachers. It helped teachers solve the problems they found in their teachings, instead it also could be used as learning opportunity by observing new teaching method/strategy from other colleagues. Key words: reflective practice; peer observation; classroom instruction; professional development tool

  13. The Professional Culture of Community Pharmacy and the Provision of MTM Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagen M. Rosenthal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration of advanced pharmacy services into community pharmacy practice is not complete. According to implementation research understanding professional culture, as a part of context, may provide insights for accelerating this process. There are three objectives in this study. The first objective of this study was to validate an adapted version of an organizational culture measure in a sample of United States’ (US community pharmacists. The second objective was to examine potential relationships between the cultural factors identified using the validated instrument and a number of socialization and education variables. The third objective was to examine any relationships between the scores on the identified cultural factors and the provision of MTM services. This study was a cross-sectional online survey for community pharmacists in the southeastern US. The survey contained questions on socialization/education, respondents’ self-reported provision of medication therapy management (MTM services, and the organizational culture profile (OCP. Analyses included descriptive statistics, a principle components analysis (PCA, independent samples t-test, and multivariate ordinal regression. A total of 303 surveys were completed. The PCA revealed a six-factor structure: social responsibility, innovation, people orientation, competitiveness, attention to detail, and reward orientation. Further analysis revealed significant relationships between social responsibility and years in practice, and people orientation and attention to detail and pharmacists’ training and practice setting. Significant positive relationships were observed between social responsibility, innovation, and competitiveness and the increased provision of MTM services. The significant relationships identified between the OCP factors and community pharmacist respondents’ provision of MTM services provides an important starting point for developing interventions to improve the

  14. The Professional Culture of Community Pharmacy and the Provision of MTM Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Meagen M; Holmes, Erin R

    2018-03-21

    The integration of advanced pharmacy services into community pharmacy practice is not complete. According to implementation research understanding professional culture, as a part of context, may provide insights for accelerating this process. There are three objectives in this study. The first objective of this study was to validate an adapted version of an organizational culture measure in a sample of United States' (US) community pharmacists. The second objective was to examine potential relationships between the cultural factors identified using the validated instrument and a number of socialization and education variables. The third objective was to examine any relationships between the scores on the identified cultural factors and the provision of MTM services. This study was a cross-sectional online survey for community pharmacists in the southeastern US. The survey contained questions on socialization/education, respondents' self-reported provision of medication therapy management (MTM) services, and the organizational culture profile (OCP). Analyses included descriptive statistics, a principle components analysis (PCA), independent samples t-test, and multivariate ordinal regression. A total of 303 surveys were completed. The PCA revealed a six-factor structure: social responsibility, innovation, people orientation, competitiveness, attention to detail, and reward orientation. Further analysis revealed significant relationships between social responsibility and years in practice, and people orientation and attention to detail and pharmacists' training and practice setting. Significant positive relationships were observed between social responsibility, innovation, and competitiveness and the increased provision of MTM services. The significant relationships identified between the OCP factors and community pharmacist respondents' provision of MTM services provides an important starting point for developing interventions to improve the uptake of practice

  15. Advancing the Practice of CRCs: Why Professional Development Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Prikhidko, Alena; Kolb, H Robert

    2018-01-01

    Clinical research coordinators (CRCs) assume critical responsibilities central to the success of the research team. The complexity of their role requires essential professional qualifications. One barrier to professionalization, however, has been the inconsistent, or absent, competency-based training. This study explored participants' perceptions of training experiences designed to prepare them for the national certification exam. Focus group methodology was used to document their experiences. The findings showed that sustainable mentoring relationships developed, participant confidence levels increased, and anxiety about performance capacity diminished. Cognitive reframing of the work environment and CRC roles was facilitated by training that fostered sharing and social reinforcement of professional and personal identities. Findings from this study suggest that access to meaningful training and quality instruction supports the professionalization of CRCs.

  16. Professional SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Tom; Fried, Jeff; Swider, Paul J; Hillier, Scot; Schaefer, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Updated guidance on how to take advantage of the newest features of SharePoint programmability More than simply a portal, SharePoint is Microsoft's popular content management solution for building intranets and websites or hosting wikis and blogs. Offering broad coverage on all aspects of development for the SharePoint platform, this comprehensive book shows you exactly what SharePoint does, how to build solutions, and what features are accessible within SharePoint. Written by a team of SharePoint experts, this new edition offers an extensive selection of field-tested best practices that shows

  17. AGU Pathfinder: Career and Professional Development Resources for Earth and Space Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, D. E.; Asher, P. M.; Hankin, E. R.; Janick, N. G.; Marasco, L.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is committed to inspiring and educating present and future generations of diverse, innovative, and creative Earth and space scientists. To meet our commitment, AGU provides career and educational resources, webinars, mentoring, and support for students and professionals at each level of development to reduce barriers to achievement and to promote professional advancement. AGU is also working with other organizations and educational institutions to collaborate on projects benefiting the greater geoscience community. The presentation will include an overview of current Pathfinder efforts, collaborative efforts, and an appeal for additional partnerships.

  18. Professional ideologies and the development of syringe exchange: Wales as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, J M; Stimson, G V

    1997-12-01

    This paper is derived from an evaluative study of HIV prevention programs for drug injectors across Wales. It considers how different professional territories and ideologies, concepts of drug misuse and models of HIV prevention may influence policy development. The research involved monitoring the introduction and development of agency and community based syringe exchange schemes and initiatives taken by community pharmacists. Interviews with staff, managers and administrators, and descriptions of service history, development and delivery inform the discussion. HIV prevention varied in different areas of Wales depending on the particular professional group involved, local ideologies regarding drug use treatment, and the extent to which HIV prevention was seen either as a specialist area of expertise and specific remit of drug workers or a generic health care task. Drug agencies with an abstinence policy rejected syringe exchange; instead, prevention in those areas developed in ad hoc ways as health care workers and pharmacists attempted to develop a community based service. Drug agencies with a pre-existing harm minimisation model easily integrated syringe exchange into their work and played the major part in establishing the service, but there was difficulty in extending it beyond their professional caseloads. As there were disincentives to use treatment agencies, and their catchment areas were limited, these factors influenced effective service provision.

  19. Teacher professional development: articulation between contexts and dispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Barolli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the conditions that can promote professional teacher development is extremely relevant, especially in the perspective of providing subsidies for the planning of contexts for this purpose. In this work, we had the objective of investigating the trajectory of two Physics teachers when interacting with two formative contexts (Professional Master’s and Teaching Initiation Scholarship Institutional Program - PIBID differentiated in terms of requirements and possibilities of professional teacher development. Through semi-structured interviews, we obtained the necessary elements to reconstruct the trajectory of these teachers during their participation in those contexts based on Narrative Analysis associated with another procedure coming from Sociology, which is the Sociological Portrait. To reconstruct the history of these teachers we took into account the concept of individual heritage of dispositions addressed by Bernard Lahire (2005, as well as the dimensions of professional development proposed by Barolli et al. (2017. Our results indicate that it is not enough to propose a context that follows the guidelines of the literature in the sense of not being guided, for example, only in the guidelines of a technical rationality, so that the subject develops professionally. Deep changes seem to require conditions that have been closely linked to the particularities of subjects and contexts.

  20. Teacher Professional Development in Laredo, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Keely D.; Macri, L. M.; Hemenway, M.; Wetzel, M.; Preston, S.; Rood, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the fall of 2012, McDonald Observatory, Texas A&M University, and Texas A&M International University conducted a series of workshops on astronomy content for 5th - 8th grade teachers in Laredo, Texas. Three one-day workshops were held at the Lamar Bruni Vergara Planetarium of Texas A&M International University, using a mix of in-person and distance learning technology. Texas A&M professor Lucas Macri gave public talks in English and Spanish, and a lunch-time presentation to the teachers. A series of evaluation tools were used to assess the success of the workshops. A Nominal Group Technique (NGT) discussion was used, through which groups developed consensus answers about their learning, expectations for classroom use, and satisfaction with the workshop. The Astronomy/Space Science Test (MOSART Grades 5-8) was also issued as a pre- and post-test to assess gains in knowledge. Teacher consensus was that the materials and activities of the workshop had been helpful for learning and that they expected to use many of them in their classrooms. However, the evaluation also showed that teachers would have preferred the Observatory educator be physically present for all workshops. Past video-conferencing workshops, where local facilitators first participated in workshops at the Observatory, showed better feedback and results concerning this point. Comparing those results to the present case, we conclude that more clearly defined roles and better training for the science specialists and local facilitators would improve the video conference experience for the teachers. Comparison of pre- and post-test results showed improved teacher knowledge. An additional benefit of this project was the further development of partnerships between McDonald Observatory and Texas A&M International University, which has resulted in further education projects, including a video-conference presentation series to eight-grade students and their families. This secondary project focused on

  1. Organisational and Task Factors Influencing Teachers' Professional Development at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Arnoud T.; Van der Heijden, Béatrice I. J. M.; Kreijns, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate organisational (cultural and relational) and task factors which potentially enhance teachers' professional development at work (TPD at Work). The development of lifelong learning competencies and, consequently, the careers of teachers, has become a permanent issue on the agenda of schools…

  2. Te Kotahitanga: Culturally Responsive Professional Development for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Russell; Berryman, Mere

    2010-01-01

    Te Kotahitanga is a research and professional development project that aims to support teachers to raise the achievement of New Zealand's indigenous Maori students in public/mainstream classrooms. An Effective Teaching Profile, developed from the voices of Maori students, their families, principals and some of their teachers, provides direction…

  3. Organisational and task factors influencing teachers’ professional development at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.T.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Kreijns, K.

    2016-01-01

    - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate organisational (cultural and relational) and task factors which potentially enhance teachers’ professional development at work (TPD at Work). The development of lifelong learning competencies and, consequently, the careers of teachers, has

  4. Professional Development of HR Practitioners--A Phenomenographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Moira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is an investigation into the experiences of professional development of human resource (HR) practitioners in the North of Scotland, and the use of non-formal learning in that development. Design/methodology/approach: In-depth semi-structured interviews from a purposively selected sample of HR practitioners were…

  5. Saudi Continuous Professional Development and Leadership Skills Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsughayyer, Arwa

    2016-01-01

    Higher education in Saudi Arabia has undergone major reforms over the past decade. Investment in leadership development has received particular focus by policymakers. Little is known about leaders and their participations in professional development (PD) programs and effective leadership skills. Therefore, this study examined, using a quantitative…

  6. Teachers' Continuing Professional Development: Framing a Model of Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, John; Kinder, Kay

    2014-01-01

    In order to contribute towards the construction of an empirically-grounded theory of effective continuing professional development (CPD), this paper seeks to develop a model of the effects of teachers' CPD or in-service education and training (INSET). It builds on an earlier typology of INSET outcomes and compares it to two previous classification…

  7. Continuing Professional Development: Rhetoric and Practice in the NHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Arthur; Cullinane, Joanne; Pye, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the experience of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by supervisory-level clinical staff in the National Health Service. Four main themes are highlighted in the literature, namely the nature and experience of CPD, its relationship with human resource management practices and in particular in career development and…

  8. Real World 101: A Professional Development Seminar for Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Tanya Misner

    2002-01-01

    This article explains the origins of Delaware Valley College's (DVC) "Professional Development Seminar," jointly developed by DVC's Office of Career and Life Education and the Central Bucks Chamber of Commerce to help seniors prepare for their transition from college to the workplace. Also outlines the program's content methodology and details its…

  9. Creating Sustainable Societies: Developing Emerging Professionals through Transforming Current Mindsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Future professionals will bear the brunt of creating sustainable societies. Equipping them for the task is the challenge of current educators. Educational experiences facilitating the development of sustainable habits of mind are needed. This research reports on the experiences of developing scientists and engineers engaged in a sustainable energy…

  10. Gateway to Quality: Online Professional Development for Family Childcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Tonia; Mincemoyer, Claudia; Crandall, Leslie; Alviz, Kit; Garcia, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    High-quality family childcare (FCC) can positively influence all areas of a child's growth and development. Thus, it is important to invest in efforts to increase quality, including providing professional development to enhance the skills of those caring for children in their homes. This study explores the characteristics of FCC providers who…

  11. Continuing professional development and the charity paradigm: interrelated individual, collective and organisational issues about continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Kathleen M

    2008-11-01

    This paper aims to highlight some issues and tensions that currently challenge the profession, individual nurses and their employers when considering the need for continuing professional development. The Nursing and Midwifery Council states the professional requirements for continuing professional development. However the nature and type required seems to be determined by the individual on the one hand and the organisation on the other, rather than an integral part of professional activity within the context of work. This can lead to a mismatch between personal and organisational goals. Views emerged from participants in a previous case study that focused on learning through work, about support available to nurses for professional development. The perceptions of nurses and their managers about learning through work were explored, using semi structured interviews, picture mapping and structured interviews. The 'Charity Paradigm' is presented as an outcome of major issues within an organisation. It underpins negative perceptions of individuals about employer support of continuing professional development. It is suggested that there is a need for collaborative collective approaches to structured development in order to meet both individual and organisational needs. This is also advocated in order to achieve life long learning and transformational learning within an organisation. The tension between individual personal ambitions and employer demands can adversely affect the professional development of the practitioner and the organisation that employs them. The personal perspectives of nurses and managers about learning within their organisation are therefore important to acknowledge in terms of positive and negative influences. It is also necessary to recognise the contribution of the employer as well as the identifiable charitable contribution of individual practitioners and the input from external contributors to the organisation.

  12. Networking and professional development among teachers of Early Childhood Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Mérida Serrano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the professional development of 24 teachers involved in the Early Childhood Education-CPD Centre for Teachers-University Network ([blind review]. Collaborative research-action is carried out with teachers and pupils of Early Childhood Education, an adviser from the Continuing Professional Development (CPD Centre for Teachers, researchers, and teacher training undergraduates from the University of [blind review] ([blind review]. Taking a qualitative approach, through interviews, focus groups, and research journals, the benefits obtained by the teachers through their involvement in the [blind review] network are identified: (1 Their colleagues offer them emotional support and provide examples of good practices; (2 The teacher training undergraduates provide technological resources and the possibility of calmly observing what goes on in the classroom; (3 The researchers foster processes of reflection about practice and endorse the validity of the Project Approach; (4 The adviser provides continuing professional development.

  13. CLIL Teacher Professional Development for Content Teachers in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punwalai Kewara

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, the new educational policy is mandated to encourage content teachers to integrate English in content classrooms. The policy has created tensions and misconceptions among content teachers, who must change the medium of instruction from Thai to English. This paper presents an attempt to foster teacher knowledge about the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL approach in a teacher professional development program. Classroom language in English and CLIL classroom structure were provided for 15 teachers at a secondary school. Four volunteer teachers were observed to determine the extent to which teachers implemented CLIL. The findings revealed the teachers partly implemented classroom language in English and the provided CLIL structure was not evident. The contribution of this paper is to the literature of CLIL teacher professional development effectiveness and the implementation fidelity of a professional development program.

  14. A Discussion of Professional Identity Development in Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Maginnis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Becoming a nurse requires development of professional capabilities, specifically socialisation into the profession and developing a professional identity (PI. A search of the literature highlights a lack of empirical research in PI development during pre-registration nursing education. A range of factors will be explored that relate to PI, including identity, professional socialisation, a sense of belonging to the profession and clinical placement. Exploring the development of a PI in nursing students can assist with identifying drivers and inhibitors. The aim of this paper is to describe PI development in pre-registration nursing students’ education and the relationship between development of a PI and the tertiary provided education. There are a multitude of factors that impact on developing a PI such as identity, professional socialisation, belonging, clinical placements and educators. Nursing students predominantly develop a nursing PI in the pre-registration program with professional socialisation through exposure to academia, clinical practice and role models. The onus of responsibility for developing a PI in nursing students is attributed to educational institutions. An expected outcome of the pre-registration program is that nursing students will have formed a PI. A greater depth of understanding PI is important in supporting the education of the nurses of the future. There may not be one simple explanation for what PI is, or how it is developed, but a greater depth of understanding of PI by both the tertiary sector and the nursing profession is important in supporting the education of the nurses of the future. Further research will enable a dialogue describing the development of a PI in nursing students and an understanding of the attributes and conceptions attributed to a nursing PI.

  15. Professional Development of Older Employees in Small and Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Trochimiuk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is to present and assess professional development opportunities for older employees in SME. Methodology: In the process of desk research, the author has discerned a number of characteristics of training activities conducted by SMEs. The management of older employees’ professional development is discussed on the basis of selected research findings, i.a. CATI and CAPI surveys conducted in the framework of the “Comprehensive program of activation of people aged 50+” project carried out by the Department of Human Resource Management at Kozminski University in 2010–2012. Findings: The first part of the paper discusses the specificity of training measures undertaken in SMEs. According to a large body research results available, these include: informality, reactivity, short-term perspective, focus on solving current problems, “learning by doing”, focus on the development of specific skills and organizational knowledge, lack of professional organization of trainings. The core part of the paper focuses on the management of professional development of older employees in SMEs. The majority of surveyed firms have declared providing their older and younger employees with the same access to training. However, it does not always mean training is organised, or that employees aged 50+ participate in it. Moreover, the survey has proven the existence of significant differences in assessments and opinions among entrepreneurs and employees. Originality/value: This paper discusses professional development of older SME employees, which is a relatively new problem; it is based on an extensive body of research. Managing professional development of older workers is one of the most important challenges faced by SMEs in the twentyfirst century and it shall require extensive and thorough research in the future.

  16. Communities of Practice in the Conservatory: Learning with a Professional Musician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkula, Esa

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the sociocultural learning of popular and jazz music in communities of practice as part of secondary vocational music education in a Finnish conservatory. The research is based on performance workshops which were implemented as a joint effort between professional musicians and music students. These workshops are suggested as…

  17. Organizing to Use Facebook Advertisements: A Planning Tool for Extension Professionals, Businesses, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, James

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain how Extension professionals, businesses, and communities can use Facebook advertisements effectively. The article is a planning tool that introduces Facebook's Advertiser Help Center, explains some applicable key concepts, and suggests best practices to apply before launching a Facebook advertising…

  18. Building Sustainable Futures: Emerging Understandings of the Significant Contribution of the Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Dorothy; Lewis, Marian

    2004-01-01

    This article draws on the experiences of a range of Australian schools engaging with a teacher-centred process of whole-school renewal known as IDEAS (Innovative Designs for Enhancing Achievement in Schools). IDEAS enhances the professional capacity of teachers to improve school outcomes such as student learning, relationships with the community,…

  19. Professional Learning Communities Assessment: Adaptation, Internal Validity, and Multidimensional Model Testing in Turkish Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Selçuk; Tatik, R. Samil; Yurtseven, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to adapt and validate the Professional Learning Communities Assessment Revised (PLCA-R) by Olivier, Hipp, and Huffman within the context of Turkish schools. The instrument was translated and adapted to administer to teachers in Turkey. Internal structure of the Turkish version of PLCA-R was investigated by using…

  20. Relationship between Professional Learning Community, Bureaucratic Structure and Organisational Trust in Primary Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    This research uses relational survey method to determine the relationship between professional learning community, bureaucratic structure and organisational trust according to the perceptions of teachers who work in primary education schools. Data were collected from 805 teachers who work in primary education schools in the districts (Altindag,…