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Sample records for problems including trauma

  1. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Jeffrey; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Goldberg, Adam J.; Farnsworth, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs) are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472), we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis), as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses) in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs), DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs), most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance), and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse). Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment. PMID:27517964

  2. PTSD Symptom Severities, Interpersonal Traumas, and Benzodiazepines Are Associated with Substance-Related Problems in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Guina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is commonly associated with substance-related problems, yet associations between specific substances and specific posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSSs are understudied. We hypothesized that substance-related problems are associated with PTSS severities, interpersonal traumas, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey methodology in a consecutive sample of adult outpatients with trauma histories (n = 472, we used logistic regression to examine substance-related problems in general (primary, confirmatory analysis, as well as alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug problems specifically (secondary, exploratory analyses in relation to demographics, trauma type, PTSSs, and benzodiazepine prescriptions. Results: After adjusting for multiple testing, several factors were significantly associated with substance-related problems, particularly benzodiazepines (AOR = 2.78; 1.99 for alcohol, 2.42 for tobacco, 8.02 for illicit drugs, DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis (AOR = 1.92; 2.38 for alcohol, 2.00 for tobacco, 2.14 for illicit drugs, most PTSSs (especially negative beliefs, recklessness, and avoidance, and interpersonal traumas (e.g., assaults and child abuse. Conclusion: In this clinical sample, there were consistent and strong associations between several trauma-related variables and substance-related problems, consistent with our hypotheses. We discuss possible explanations and implications of these findings, which we hope will stimulate further research, and improve screening and treatment.

  3. Profiles of Childhood Trauma in Patients with Alcohol Dependence and Their Associations with Addiction-Related Problems.

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    Lotzin, Annett; Haupt, Lena; von Schönfels, Julia; Wingenfeld, Katja; Schäfer, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    The high occurrence of childhood trauma in individuals with alcohol dependence is well-recognized. Nevertheless, researchers have rarely studied which types of childhood trauma often co-occur and how these combinations of different types and severities of childhood trauma are related to the patients' current addiction-related problems. We aimed to identify childhood trauma profiles in patients with alcohol dependence and examined relations of these trauma profiles with the patients' current addiction-related problems. In 347 alcohol-dependent patients, 5 types of childhood trauma (sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect) were measured using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Childhood trauma profiles were identified using cluster analysis. The patients' current severity of addiction-related problems was assessed using the European Addiction Severity Index. We identified 6 profiles that comprised different types and severities of childhood trauma. The patients' trauma profiles predicted the severity of addiction-related problems in the domains of psychiatric symptoms, family relationships, social relationships, and drug use. Childhood trauma profiles may provide more useful information about the patient's risk of current addiction-related problems than the common distinction between traumatized versus nontraumatized patients. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  4. Terrorism-related trauma in Africa, an increasing problem.

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    Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Sritharan, Kaji; Mehes, Mira; Abdullah, Fizan; Rasheed, Shahnawaz

    2015-06-01

    Global terrorist activities have increased significantly over the past decade. The impact of terrorism-related trauma on the health of individuals in low- and middle-income countries is under-reported. Trauma management in African countries in particular is uncoordinated, with little or no infrastructure to cater for emergency surgical needs. This article highlights the need for education, training and research to mitigate the problems related to terrorism and surgical public health. Copyright © 2014 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  6. Childhood and Adult Trauma Experiences of Incarcerated Persons and Their Relationship to Adult Behavioral Health Problems and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rates of childhood and adult trauma are high among incarcerated persons. In addition to criminality, childhood trauma is associated with the risk for emotional disorders (e.g., depression and anxiety and co-morbid conditions such as alcohol and drug abuse and antisocial behaviors in adulthood. This paper develops rates of childhood and adult trauma and examines the impact of age-of-onset and type-specific trauma on emotional problems and behavior for a sample of incarcerated males (N~4,000. Prevalence estimates for types of trauma were constructed by age at time of trauma, race and types of behavioral health treatment received while incarcerated. HLM models were used to explore the association between childhood and adult trauma and depression, anxiety, substance use, interpersonal problems, and aggression problems (each model estimated separately and controlling for age, gender, race, time incarcerated, and index offense. Rates of physical, sexual, and emotional trauma were higher in childhood than adulthood and ranged from 44.7% (physical trauma in childhood to 4.5% (sexual trauma in adulthood. Trauma exposure was found to be strongly associated with a wide range of behavioral problems and clinical symptoms. Given the sheer numbers of incarcerated men and the strength of these associations, targeted intervention is critical.

  7. Maternal mind-mindedness and toddler behavior problems: The moderating role of maternal trauma and posttraumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Crossman, Molly K; Caruso, Alessandra; Raskin, Maryna; Miranda-Julian, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    Maternal mind-mindedness (MM) reflects a caregiver's tendency to view a child as an individual with an independent mind. Research has linked higher MM with more favorable parenting and child adaptation. The aim of this study was to examine whether MM was associated with toddlers' behavior problems and competence, and the moderating role of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample (N = 212) of adolescent mothers and their toddlers. MM was coded from maternal utterances during free play; mothers completed the University of California at Los Angeles Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index and reported on children's behavior problems and competence using the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment. The majority of mothers (84%) experienced trauma; 45% of these mothers met criteria for partial or full PTSD. Trauma was related to greater behavior problems, and PTSD moderated MM-child functioning relations. When mothers experienced full PTSD, there was no relation between MM and behavior problems. With child competence, when compared to children of mothers with no trauma exposure, children of mothers experiencing partial PTSD symptoms were more likely to have delays in competence when mothers made more MM comments. Results are discussed in light of how MM, in the context of trauma and PTSD, may affect parenting.

  8. The problem of intrapartum asphyxia and birth trauma: editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problem of intrapartum asphyxia and birth trauma: editorial. AP Macdonald. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  9. Do post-trauma symptoms mediate the relation between neurobiological stress parameters and conduct problems in girls?

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    Babel, Kimberly A; Jambroes, Tijs; Oostermeijer, Sanne; van de Ven, Peter M; Popma, Arne; Vermeiren, Robert R J M; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Jansen, Lucres M C

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated activity of stress-regulating systems has consistently been reported in boys with conduct problems. Results in studies of girls are inconsistent, which may result from the high prevalence of comorbid post-trauma symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate post-trauma symptoms as a potential mediator in the relation between stress-regulation systems functioning and conduct problems in female adolescents. The sample consisted of 78 female adolescents (mean age 15.4; SD 1.1) admitted to a closed treatment institution. The diagnosis of disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD) was assessed by a structured interview-the diagnostic interview schedule for children version IV (DISC-IV). To assess post-trauma symptoms and externalizing behaviour problems, self-report questionnaires, youth self report (YSR) and the trauma symptom checklist for Children (TSCC) were used. The cortisol awakenings response (CAR) measured hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, whereas autonomous nervous system (ANS) activity was assessed by heart rate (HR), pre-ejection period (PEP) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Independent t-tests were used to compare girls with and without DBD, while path analyses tested for the mediating role of post- trauma symptoms in the relation between stress regulating systems and externalizing behaviour. Females with DBD (n = 37) reported significantly higher rates of post-trauma symptoms and externalizing behaviour problems than girls without DBD (n = 39). Path analysis found no relation between CAR and externalizing behaviour problems. With regard to ANS activity, positive direct effects on externalizing behaviour problems were present for HR (standardized β = 0.306, p = 0.020) and PEP (standardized β = -0.323, p = 0.031), though not for RSA. Furthermore, no relation-whether direct or indirect-could be determined from post-trauma symptoms. Present findings demonstrate that the neurobiological

  10. PTSD symptoms and perception of cognitive problems: The roles of posttraumatic cognitions and trauma coping self-efficacy.

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    Samuelson, Kristin W; Bartel, Alisa; Valadez, Racquel; Jordan, Joshua T

    2017-09-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with mild neurocognitive deficits, yet clients often complain of cognitive problems that exceed what their objective performance demonstrates. In addition, PTSD is associated with negative appraisals about the self, traumatic event, and one's ability to cope. This study examined posttraumatic cognitions as a moderator, and trauma coping self-efficacy as a mediator, of the relationship between PTSD symptoms and self-report of cognitive problems. A sample of 268 trauma-exposed adults completed the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5, the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory, the Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy Scale, the Cognitive Self-Report Questionnaire, and the Quality of Life Scale. Negative self-appraisals was a significant moderator in the relationship between PTSD symptoms and perception of cognitive problems (β = -.252, p = .001). In participants with high levels of negative posttraumatic cognitions, perception of cognitive problems was high regardless of PTSD symptom level. In a mediator analysis, there was a significant indirect effect of trauma coping self-efficacy (b = .125, 95% CI [.088, .172]). Finally, there was evidence of moderated mediation, such that trauma coping self-efficacy was a mediator only when posttraumatic cognitions were low or average. Results indicate that posttraumatic appraisals and coping self-efficacy play significant roles in perception of cognitive problems following trauma. Clinically, in patients for which there is a perception of cognitive impairment that is not borne out in neuropsychological testing, cognitive-behavioral therapy focused on altering negative self-perceptions and appraisals may be beneficial. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

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    Paertan, Gerald; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology

  12. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

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    Paertan, Gerald E-mail: gerald.paertan@smz.magwien.gv.at; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-10-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology.

  13. Fever in trauma patients: evaluation of risk factors, including traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengualid, Victoria; Talari, Goutham; Rubin, David; Albaeni, Aiham; Ciubotaru, Ronald L; Berger, Judith

    2015-03-01

    The role of fever in trauma patients remains unclear. Fever occurs as a response to release of cytokines and prostaglandins by white blood cells. Many factors, including trauma, can trigger release of these factors. To determine whether (1) fever in the first 48 hours is related to a favorable outcome in trauma patients and (2) fever is more common in patients with head trauma. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit for at least 2 days. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis. Of 162 patients studied, 40% had fever during the first 48 hours. Febrile patients had higher mortality rates than did afebrile patients. When adjusted for severity of injuries, fever did not correlate with mortality. Neither the incidence of fever in the first 48 hours after admission to the intensive care unit nor the number of days febrile in the unit differed between patients with and patients without head trauma (traumatic brain injury). About 70% of febrile patients did not have a source found for their fever. Febrile patients without an identified source of infection had lower peak white blood cell counts, lower maximum body temperature, and higher minimum platelet counts than did febrile patients who had an infectious source identified. The most common infection was pneumonia. No relationship was found between the presence of fever during the first 48 hours and mortality. Patients with traumatic brain injury did not have a higher incidence of fever than did patients without traumatic brain injury. About 30% of febrile patients had an identifiable source of infection. Further studies are needed to understand the origin and role of fever in trauma patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Lessons from a large trauma center: impact of blunt chest trauma in polytrauma patients-still a relevant problem?

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    Chrysou, Konstantina; Halat, Gabriel; Hoksch, Beatrix; Schmid, Ralph A; Kocher, Gregor J

    2017-04-20

    Thoracic trauma is the third most common cause of death after abdominal injury and head trauma in polytrauma patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate epidemiological data, treatment and outcome of polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma in order to help improve management, prevent complications and decrease polytrauma patients' mortality. In this retrospective study we included all polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma admitted to our tertiary care center emergency department for a 2-year period, from June 2012 until May 2014. Data collection included details of treatment and outcome. Patients with chest trauma and Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥18 and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) >2 in more than one body region were included. A total of 110 polytrauma patients with blunt chest injury were evaluated. 82 of them were males and median age was 48.5 years. Car accidents, falls from a height and motorbike accidents were the most common causes (>75%) for blunt chest trauma. Rib fractures, pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion were the most common chest injuries. Most patients (64.5%) sustained a serious chest injury (AIS thorax 3), 19.1% a severe chest injury (AIS thorax 4) and 15.5% a moderate chest injury (AIS thorax 2). 90% of patients with blunt chest trauma were treated conservatively. Chest tube insertion was indicated in 54.5% of patients. The need for chest tube was significantly higher among the AIS thorax 4 group in comparison to the AIS groups 3 and 2 (p < 0.001). Also, admission to the ICU was directly related to the severity of the AIS thorax (p < 0.001). The severity of chest trauma did not correlate with ICU length of stay, intubation days, complications or mortality. Although 84.5% of patients suffered from serious or even severe chest injury, neither in the conservative nor in the surgically treated group a significant impact of injury severity on ICU stay, intubation days, complications or mortality was observed. AIS

  15. The Trauma Syndrome: Identification, Treatment, and Referral of Commonly Seen Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohon, Donald J., Jr.

    This paper provides counselors and social service case workers serving Indochinese refugees in northern California with guidelines for identifying, treating and making referrals of clients with emotional problems. Freud's theory of trauma neurosis and its effect on refugees' language acquisition, learning ability and job readiness are described.…

  16. The relationship between trauma, post-migration problems and the psychological well-being of refugees and asylum seekers.

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    Carswell, Kenneth; Blackburn, Pennie; Barker, Chris

    2011-03-01

    There is growing evidence of the impact of post-migration factors on the mental health of refugees. To date, few UK studies have been conducted. The study investigated the relationship between trauma, post-migration problems, social support and the mental health of refugees and asylum seekers. Refugees and asylum seekers (n = 47) were recruited mainly from clinical settings. Self-report measures of post-migration problems, mental health problems and social support were completed in an interview. Bivariate associations were identified between increased symptoms and number of traumas, adaptation difficulties, loss of culture and support and confidant support. In multivariate analyses post-migration problems were significantly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and emotional distress. There was no significant association of symptoms and number of traumas or social support. The results suggest that clinical services should provide holistic interventions within a phased approach when working with refugees and asylum seekers. At a policy level, the results suggest the need for asylum policies that reduce post-migration problems and provide support for refugees and asylum seekers.

  17. Necessity of including medico-legal autopsy data in epidemiological surveys of individuals with major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagher, A; Wingren, C J; Ottosson, A; Andersson, L; Wangefjord, S; Acosta, S

    2015-08-01

    It is rare that epidemiological surveys of patients with major trauma include both those admitted to the emergency department and those sent for medico-legal autopsy. The main aim of the present population-based study of major trauma was to examine the importance of medico-legal autopsy data. A new injury severity score (NISS)>15 or lethal outcome was used as criteria for major trauma and to identify patients at the emergency, anaesthesiology and forensic departments and/or being within the jurisdiction of the Malmö police authority and subjected to a medico-legal autopsy between 2011 and 2013. According to Swedish legislation all trauma related deaths should be reported to the police who refer these cases for medico-legal autopsy. Among the 174 individuals included, 92 (53%) died and 81 (47%) underwent medico-legal autopsy. One hundred twenty-six patients were primarily admitted to hospital and 48 died before admission to hospital and were sent directly for medico-legal autopsy. Forty-four in-hospital deaths occurred, of whom 33 (75%) were sent to medico-legal autopsy. In those sent directly to the department of forensic medicine the proportion of accidents was lower (pautopsies among trauma-related deaths at hospital were high age (pautopsy according to legislation, but did not. The high proportion of positive toxicological findings among fatalities examined at medico-legal autopsy implies that toxicology screening should be routine in major trauma patients, in order to improve treatment and prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Academic time at a level 1 trauma center: no resident, no problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Dickinson, Rebecca M; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Frankel, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Globally, the compliance of resident work-hour restrictions has no impact on trauma outcome. However, the effect of protected education time (PET), during which residents are unavailable to respond to trauma patients, has not been studied. We hypothesized that PET has no impact on the outcome of trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective review of relevant patients at an academic level I trauma center. During PET, a trauma attending and advanced practice providers (APPs) responded to trauma activations. PGY1, 3, and 4 residents were also available at all other times. The outcome of new trauma patient activations during Thursday morning 3-hours resident PET was compared with same time period on other weekdays (non-PET) using a univariate and multivariate analysis. From January 2005 to April 2010, a total of 5968 trauma patients were entered in the registry. Of these, 178 patients (2.98%) were included for study (37 PET and 141 non-PET). The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 16.2. Although no significant difference were identified in mortality, complications, or length of stay (LOS), we do see that length of emergency department stay (ED-LOS) tends to be longer during PET, although not significantly (314 vs 381 minutes, p = 0.74). On the multiple logistic regression model, PET was not a significant factor of complications, LOS, or ED-LOS. Few trauma activations occur during PET. New trauma activations can be staffed safely by trauma activations and APPs. However, there could be some delays in transferring patients to appropriate disposition. Additional study is required to determine the effect of PET on existing trauma inpatients. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of patient volume on surgical trauma training in a Scandinavian trauma centre.

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    Gaarder, Christine; Skaga, Nils Oddvar; Eken, Torsten; Pillgram-Larsen, Johan; Buanes, Trond; Naess, Paal Aksel

    2005-11-01

    Some of the problems faced in trauma surgery are increasing non-operative management of abdominal injuries, decreasing work hours and increasing sub-specialisation. We wanted to document the experience of trauma team leaders at the largest trauma centre in Norway, hypothesising that the patient volume would be inadequate to secure optimal trauma care. Patients registered in the hospital based Trauma Registry during the 2-year period from 1 August 2000 to 31 July 2002 were included. Of a total of 1667 patients registered, 645 patients (39%) had an Injury Severity Score (ISS)>15. Abdominal injuries were diagnosed in 205 patients with a median ISS of 30. An average trauma team leader assessed a total of 119 trauma cases a year (46 patients with ISS>15) and participated in 10 trauma laparotomies. Although the total number of trauma cases seems adequate, the experience of the trauma team leaders with challenging abdominal injuries is limited. With increasing sub-specialisation and general surgery vanishing, fewer surgical specialties provide operative competence in dealing with complicated torso trauma. A system of additional education and quality assurance measures is a prerequisite of high quality, and has consequently been introduced in our institution.

  20. Association of direct exposure to terrorism, media exposure to terrorism, and other trauma with emotional and behavioral problems in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Nomura, Yoko; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Doppelt, Osnat; Abramovitz, Robert; Brom, Daniel; Chemtob, Claude

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the differential impact of various types of trauma exposure on emotional and behavioral problems in preschool children. Participants were 95 mothers of 1- to 4-year-old children in Israel. Results suggested a differential pattern of associations between the types of trauma exposure (i.e., direct exposure to terrorism, media exposure to terrorism, and other trauma) and children's internalizing and externalizing problems. This line of research is important for the identification of risk factors and the development of effective prevention and intervention strategies to promote resilience in preschool children exposed to specific type(s) of trauma.

  1. Development of the major trauma case review tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Mitchell, Rebecca; McCarthy, Amy; Wilson, Kellie; Van, Connie; Kennedy, Belinda; Tall, Gary; Holland, Andrew; Foster, Kim; Dickinson, Stuart; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-02-28

    As many as half of all patients with major traumatic injuries do not receive the recommended care, with variance in preventable mortality reported across the globe. This variance highlights the need for a comprehensive process for monitoring and reviewing patient care, central to which is a consistent peer-review process that includes trauma system safety and human factors. There is no published, evidence-informed standardised tool that considers these factors for use in adult or paediatric trauma case peer-review. The aim of this research was to develop and validate a trauma case review tool to facilitate clinical review of paediatric trauma patient care in extracting information to facilitate monitoring, inform change and enable loop closure. Development of the trauma case review tool was multi-faceted, beginning with a review of the trauma audit tool literature. Data were extracted from the literature to inform iterative tool development using a consensus approach. Inter-rater agreement was assessed for both the pilot and finalised versions of the tool. The final trauma case review tool contained ten sections, including patient factors (such as pre-existing conditions), presenting problem, a timeline of events, factors contributing to the care delivery problem (including equipment, work environment, staff action, organizational factors), positive aspects of care and the outcome of panel discussion. After refinement, the inter-rater reliability of the human factors and outcome components of the tool improved with an average 86% agreement between raters. This research developed an evidence-informed tool for use in paediatric trauma case review that considers both system safety and human factors to facilitate clinical review of trauma patient care. This tool can be used to identify opportunities for improvement in trauma care and guide quality assurance activities. Validation is required in the adult population.

  2. Early life trauma exposure and stress sensitivity in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Damion J; Ford, Julian D; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J

    2013-01-01

    The current study replicates and extends work with adults that highlights the relationship between trauma exposure and distress in response to subsequent, nontraumatic life stressors. The sample included 213 2-4-year-old children in which 64.3% had a history of potential trauma exposure. Children were categorized into 4 groups based on trauma history and current life stress. In a multivariate analysis of variance, trauma-exposed children with current life stressors had elevated internalizing and externalizing problems compared with trauma-exposed children without current stress and nontrauma-exposed children with and without current stressors. The trauma-exposed groups with or without current stressors did not differ on posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity. Accounting for number of traumatic events did not change these results. These findings suggest that early life trauma exposure may sensitize young children and place them at risk for internalizing or externalizing problems when exposed to subsequent, nontraumatic life stressors.

  3. Report on the Recovery of a Personality Problem in a Case with Borderline Personality Disorder after Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nasiri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Borderline personality disorder which constantly changes the mood, identity and interpersonal relationship is a mental disorder classified in category B. Besides, it leads to behaviors such as drug abuse, impulsive sex and suicide which make more difficult the treatment of these patients. The aim of this study was to report the recovery of a personality problem in a case with borderline personality disorder after the head trauma. CASE REPORT: The personality signs of a 28-year-old boy who had the full criteria of borderline personality disorder including drug abuse, impulsivity, mood instability, periods of anger and aggression were significantly decreased after hitting. Personality difference and improvement of patient were shown in MMPI test and MRI indicated the structural changes in his brain. He had no problem in 4-year-follow up. CONCLUSION: This report suggested the personality and behavioral changes after head trauma. MRI results indicated that the recovery is probably caused by the destruction area in the frontal lobe and the anterior temporal lobe (near the hippocampus. Thus the importance of neuropsychological factors should be considered in creating the diagnostic criteria.

  4. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Conceptual model of male military sexual trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, William B; Domino, Jessica L; Rentz, Timothy O; Mata-Galán, Emma L

    2017-08-01

    Male sexual trauma is understudied, leaving much to be known about the unique mental health needs of male survivors. This study examined veteran men's perceptions of the effects of military sexual trauma. Military sexual trauma was defined as physically forced, verbally coerced, or substance-incapacitated acts experienced during military service. Interviews were conducted with 21 male veterans who reported experiencing military sexual trauma. Data were drawn together using a grounded theory methodology. Three categories emerged from data analysis, including (a) types of military sexual trauma (being touched in a sexual way against their will [N = 18]; sexual remarks directed at them [N = 15]; being physically forced to have sex [N = 13]); (b) negative life effects (difficulty trusting others [N = 18]; fear of abandonment [N = 17]; substance use [N = 13]; fear of interpersonal violence [N = 12]; conduct and vocational problems [N = 11]; irritability/aggression [N = 8]; insecurity about sexual performance [N = 8]; difficulty managing anger [N = 8]); and (c) posttraumatic growth (N = 15). Results from this study suggest sexual trauma in the military context may affect systems of self-organization, specifically problems in affective, self-concept, and relational domains, similar to symptoms of those who have experienced prolonged traumatic stressors. This model can be used by clinicians to select treatments that specifically target these symptoms and promote posttraumatic growth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. A controlled trial of trauma-focused therapy versus problem-solving in Islamic children affected by civil conflict and disaster in Aceh, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Katie; Joscelyne, Amy; Meijer, Catherine; Steel, Zachary; Silove, Derrick; Bryant, Richard A

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the relative efficacies of trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy and problem-solving therapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder in children affected by civil conflict in Aceh, Indonesia. A controlled trial of children with post-traumatic stress disorder ( N = 64) randomized children to either five individual weekly sessions of trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy or problem-solving therapy provided by lay-counselors who were provided with brief training. Children were assessed by blind independent assessors at pretreatment, posttreatment and 3-month follow-up on post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anger, as well as caregiver ratings of the child's post-traumatic stress disorder levels. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated no significant linear time × treatment condition interaction effects for post-traumatic stress disorder at follow-up ( t(129.05) = -0.55, p = 0.58), indicating the two conditions did not differ. Across both conditions, there were significant reductions in post-traumatic stress disorder on self-reported ( t(131.26) = -9.26, p solving: 2.68, 95% confidence interval = [2.07, 3.29]). These findings suggest that trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy and problem-solving approaches are comparably successful in reducing post-traumatic stress disorder and anger in treating mental health in children in a post-conflict setting. This pattern may reflect the benefits of non-specific therapy effects or gains associated with trauma-focused or problem-solving approaches.

  7. Childhood trauma, combat trauma, and substance use in National Guard and reserve soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Bonnie M; Hoopsick, Rachel A; Homish, D Lynn; Daws, Rachel C; Homish, Gregory G

    2018-02-27

    The goal of this work was to examine associations among childhood trauma, combat trauma, and substance use (alcohol problems, frequent heavy drinking [FHD], current cigarette smoking, and current/lifetime drug use) and the interaction effects of childhood trauma and combat exposure on those associations among National Guard/reserve soldiers. Participants (N = 248) completed an electronic survey asking questions about their military experiences, physical and mental health, and substance use. Childhood trauma and combat exposure were examined jointly in regression models, controlling for age, marital satisfaction, and number of deployments. Childhood trauma was associated with current drug use (trend level, odds ratio [OR] = 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.97, 2.14; P = .072) in the main effect model; however, there was not a significant interaction with combat. Combat exposure had a significant interaction with childhood trauma on alcohol problems (b = -0.56, 95% CI: -1.12, -0.01; P = .048), FHD (b = -0.27, 95% CI: -0.47, -0.08; P = .007), and lifetime drug use (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.04; P = .035). There were no associations with either of the trauma measures and current cigarette smoking. These results demonstrate that childhood and combat trauma have differential effects on alcohol use, such that combat trauma may not add to the effect on alcohol use in those with greater child maltreatment but may contribute to greater alcohol use among those with low child maltreatment. As expected, childhood and combat trauma had synergistic effects on lifetime drug use. Screening for multiple types of trauma prior to enlistment and/or deployment may help to identify at-risk individuals and allow time for early intervention to prevent future adverse outcomes.

  8. Trauma team activation: Not just for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoenix Vuong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized trauma teams have been shown to improve outcomes in critically injured patients. At our institution, an the American College of Surgeons Committee on trauma level I Trauma center, the trauma team activation (TTA criteria includes both physiologic and anatomic criteria, but any attending physician can activate the trauma team at their discretion outside criteria. As a result, the trauma team has been activated for noninjured patients meeting physiologic criteria secondary to nontraumatic hemorrhage. We present two cases in which the trauma team was activated for noninjured patients in hemorrhagic shock. The utilization of the TTA protocol and subsequent management by the trauma team are reviewed as we believe these were critical factors in the successful recovery of both patients. Beyond the primary improved survival outcomes of severely injured patients, trauma center designation has a “halo effect” that encompasses patients with nontraumatic hemorrhage.

  9. Bone scintigraphy in children: trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harcke, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of radionuclide imaging in identifying skeletal trauma in children has been established. Growth plates present a set of problems unique to pediatric studies and diagnotic accuracy is very technique dependent. Imaging for sports injuries and suspected child abuse has been productive. An expanding role for bone scintigraphy in the management of orthopedic problems post-trauma is developing [fr

  10. Post-conflict struggles as networks of problems: A network analysis of trauma, daily stressors and psychological distress among Sri Lankan war survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawickreme, Nuwan; Mootoo, Candace; Fountain, Christine; Rasmussen, Andrew; Jayawickreme, Eranda; Bertuccio, Rebecca F

    2017-10-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that the mental distress experienced by survivors of war is a function of both experienced trauma and stressful life events. However, the majority of these studies are limited in that they 1) employ models of psychological distress that emphasize underlying latent constructs and do not allow researchers to examine the unique associations between particular symptoms and various stressors; and 2) use one or more measures that were not developed for that particular context and thus may exclude key traumas, stressful life events and symptoms of psychopathology. The current study addresses both these limitations by 1) using a novel conceptual model, network analysis, which assumes that symptoms covary with each other not because they stem from a latent construct, but rather because they represent meaningful relationships between the symptoms; and 2) employing a locally developed measure of experienced trauma, stressful life problems and symptoms of psychopathology. Over the course of 2009-2011, 337 survivors of the Sri Lankan civil war were administered the Penn-RESIST-Peradeniya War Problems Questionnaire (PRPWPQ). Network analysis revealed that symptoms of psychopathology, problems pertaining to lack of basic needs, and social problems were central to the network relative to experienced trauma and other types of problems. After controlling for shared associations, social problems in particular were the most central, significantly more so than traumatic events and family problems. Several particular traumatic events, stressful life events and symptoms of psychopathology that were central to the network were also identified. Discussion emphasizes the utility of such network models to researchers and practitioners determining how to spend limited resources in the most impactful way possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Childhood trauma exposure and toxic stress: what the PNP needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Trauma exposure in childhood is a major public health problem that can result in lifelong mental and physical health consequences. Pediatric nurse practitioners must improve their skills in the identification of trauma exposure in children and their interventions with these children. This continuing education article will describe childhood trauma exposure (adverse childhood experiences) and toxic stress and their effects on the developing brain and body. Adverse childhood experiences include a unique set of trauma exposures. The adverse childhood experiences or trauma discussed in this continuing education offering will include childhood exposure to emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, domestic violence, household substance abuse, household mental illness, parental separation or divorce, and a criminal household member. Thorough and efficient methods of screening for trauma exposure will be discussed. Appropriate intervention after identification of trauma exposure will be explored. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  13. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  14. The Criterion A problem revisited: controversies and challenges in defining and measuring psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Frank W; Keane, Terence M

    2007-04-01

    The Criterion A problem in the field of traumatic stress refers to the stressor criterion for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and involves a number of fundamental issues regarding the definition and measurement of psychological trauma. These issues first emerged with the introduction of PTSD as a diagnostic category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition (DSM-III; American Psychiatric Association, 1980) and continue to generate considerable controversy. In this article, the authors provide an update on the Criterion A problem, with particular emphasis on the evolution of the DSM definition of the stressor criterion and the ongoing debate regarding broad versus narrow conceptualizations of traumatic events.

  15. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  16. Improving geriatric trauma outcomes: A small step toward a big problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Peter M; Storey, Annika C; Bell, Teresa; Bayt, Demetria; Hockaday, Melissa S; Zarzaur, Ben L; Feliciano, David V; Rozycki, Grace S

    2016-07-01

    Because of the unique physiology and comorbidities of injured geriatric patients, specific interventions are needed to improve outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a change in triage criteria for injured geriatric patients evaluated at an American College of Surgeons Level I trauma center. As of October 1, 2013, all injured patients 70 years or older were mandated to have the highest-level trauma activation upon emergency department (ED) arrival regardless of physiology or mechanism of injury. Patients admitted before that date were designated as PRE; those admitted after were designated as POST. The study period was from October 1, 2011, through April 30, 2015. Data collected included demographics, mechanism of injury, hypotension on admission, comorbidities, Injury Severity Score (ISS), ED length of stay (LOS), complications, and mortality. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to compare outcomes between the study groups (p analysis, increasing age, higher ISS, and hypotension were associated with higher mortality. POST patients were more likely to have an ED LOS of 2 hours or shorter (odds ratio, 1.614; 95% confidence interval, 1.088-2.394) after controlling for hypotension, ISS, and comorbidities. POST mortality significantly decreased (odds ratio, 0.689; 95% confidence interval, 0.484-0.979). Based on age alone, the focused intervention of a higher level of trauma activation decreased ED LOS and mortality in injured geriatric patients. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV.

  17. Danish translation and validation of the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre questionnaires on overuse injuries and health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, J E; Rathleff, C R; Rathleff, M S; Andreasen, J

    2016-12-01

    The Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre Overuse Injury Questionnaire (OSTRC-O) and the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre questionnaire on Health Problems (The OSTRC-H) make it possible to monitor illness and injury at regular intervals capturing prevalence and incidence of acute injury, overuse injury, and illnesses. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt, and establish the face validity of the OSTRC-O and the OSTRC-H into a Danish context (DK) through cognitive interviews and the assessment of test-retest reliability. The OSTRC-O.DK was distributed to 57 heterogenous respondents; response rate was 89%. The OSTRC-H was distributed to 58 heterogenous respondents; response rate was 86%. No major disagreements were observed between the original and translated versions of the questionnaires. The OSTRC-O had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.80-0.93). The primary reliability analyses including all participants, showed reliability ICC: 0.62 (95% CI: 0.42-0.77. The secondary reliability analyses that only included subjects who did not change injury region from the test to the retest showed an ICC of 0.86 (95% CI: 0.77-0.92).The questionnaires were found to be valid, reliable, and acceptable for use in a Danish population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Among Syrian Refugees: Trauma Exposure Characteristics, Trauma Centrality, and Emotional Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Shakra, Mudar; AlQarni, Nowf; AlMazrouei, Mariam; Al Mazrouei, Sara; Al Hashimi, Shurooq

    2018-03-01

    This study revisited the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examined a hypothesized model describing the interrelationship between trauma exposure characteristics, trauma centrality, emotional suppression, PTSD, and psychiatric comorbidity among Syrian refugees. A total of 564 Syrian refugees participated in the study and completed the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Centrality of Event Scale, and Courtauld Emotional Control Scale. Of the participants, 30% met the cutoff for PTSD. Trauma exposure characteristics (experiencing or witnessing horror and murder, kidnapping or disappearance of family members or friends) were associated with trauma centrality, which was associated with emotional suppression. Emotional suppression was associated with PTSD and psychiatric comorbid symptom severities. Suppression mediated the path between trauma centrality and distress outcomes. Almost one-third of refugees can develop PTSD and other psychiatric problems following exposure to traumatic events during war. A traumatized identity can develop, of which life-threatening experiences is a dominant feature, leading to suppression of depression with associated psychological distress.

  19. Prevalence of Domestic Violence Among Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Khalil, Mazhar; Zangbar, Bardiya; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Orouji, Tahereh; Pandit, Viraj; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Gries, Lynn; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter; Davis, James W

    2015-12-01

    Domestic violence is an extremely underreported crime and a growing social problem in the United States. However, the true burden of the problem remains unknown. To assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients. A 6-year (2007-2012) retrospective analysis of the prospectively maintained National Trauma Data Bank. Trauma patients who experienced domestic violence and who presented to trauma centers participating in the National Trauma Data Bank were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes (995.80-995.85, 995.50, 995.52-995.55, and 995.59) and E codes (E967.0-E967.9). Patients were stratified by age into 3 groups: children (≤18 years), adults (19-54 years), and elderly patients (≥55 years). Trend analysis was performed on April 10, 2014, to assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence over the years. Trauma patients presenting to trauma centers participating in the National Trauma Data Bank. To assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients. A total of 16 575 trauma patients who experienced domestic violence were included. Of these trauma patients, 10 224 (61.7%) were children, 5503 (33.2%) were adults, and 848 (5.1%) were elderly patients. The mean (SD) age was 15.9 (20.6), the mean (SD) Injury Severity Score was 10.9 (9.6), and 8397 (50.7%) were male patients. Head injuries (46.8% of patients) and extremity fractures (31.2% of patients) were the most common injuries. A total of 12 515 patients (75.1%) were discharged home, and the overall mortality rate was 5.9% (n = 980). The overall reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients was 5.7 cases per 1000 trauma center discharges. The prevalence of domestic violence increased among children (14.0 cases per 1000 trauma center discharges in 2007 to 18.5 case per 1000 trauma center discharges in 2012; P = .001) and adults (3.2 cases per 1000 discharges in 2007 to 4.5 cases per

  20. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described.

  1. Presenting an evaluation model of the trauma registry software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Farkhondeh; Paydar, Somayeh

    2018-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of 10% death in the worldwide and is considered as a global concern. This problem has made healthcare policy makers and managers to adopt a basic strategy in this context. Trauma registry has an important and basic role in decreasing the mortality and the disabilities due to injuries resulted from trauma. Today, different software are designed for trauma registry. Evaluation of this software improves management, increases efficiency and effectiveness of these systems. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present an evaluation model for trauma registry software. The present study is an applied research. In this study, general and specific criteria of trauma registry software were identified by reviewing literature including books, articles, scientific documents, valid websites and related software in this domain. According to general and specific criteria and related software, a model for evaluating trauma registry software was proposed. Based on the proposed model, a checklist designed and its validity and reliability evaluated. Mentioned model by using of the Delphi technique presented to 12 experts and specialists. To analyze the results, an agreed coefficient of %75 was determined in order to apply changes. Finally, when the model was approved by the experts and professionals, the final version of the evaluation model for the trauma registry software was presented. For evaluating of criteria of trauma registry software, two groups were presented: 1- General criteria, 2- Specific criteria. General criteria of trauma registry software were classified into four main categories including: 1- usability, 2- security, 3- maintainability, and 4-interoperability. Specific criteria were divided into four main categories including: 1- data submission and entry, 2- reporting, 3- quality control, 4- decision and research support. The presented model in this research has introduced important general and specific criteria of trauma registry software

  2. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Trauma care system in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar Moussa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The high burden of injuries in Iran necessitates the establishment of a comprehensive trauma care system. The purpose of this paper is to de- scribe the current status of trauma system regarding the components and function. Methods: The current status of trauma system in all components of a trauma system was described through ex- pert panels and semi-structured interviews with trauma spe- cialists and policy makers. Results: Currently, various organizations are involved in prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries, but an integrative system approach to trauma is rather deficient. There has been ongoing progress in areas of pub- lic education through media, traffic regulation reinforcement, hospital care and prehospital services. Meanwhile, there are gaps regarding financing, legislations and education of high risk groups. The issues on education and training stan- dards of the front line medical team and continuing educa- tion and evaluation are yet to be addressed. Trauma regis- try has been piloted in some provinces, but as it needs the well-developed infrastructure (regarding staff, maintenance, financial resources, it is not yet established in our system of trauma care. Conclusions: It seems that one of the problems with trauma care in Iran is lack of coordination among trauma system organizations. Although the clinical management of trauma patients has improved in our country in the recent decade, decreasing the burden of injuries necessitates an organized approach to prevention and management of trauma in the context of a trauma system. Key words: Emergency medical services; Trauma centers; Wounds and injuries

  4. Ultrasonography in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) protocol is considered beneficial in emergent evaluation of trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injury and has become integrated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol. No guidelines exist as to the use...... of ultrasonography in trauma in Denmark. We aimed to determine the current use of ultrasonography for assessing trauma patients in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional investigation of ultrasonography usage in trauma care. The first phase consisted of an Internet-based investigation....... Twenty-one (95.5%) of the guidelines included and recommended FAST as part of trauma assessment. The recommended person to perform the examination was the radiologist in n = 11 (50.0%), the surgeon in n = 6 (27.3%), the anesthesiologist in n = 1 (4.5%), and unspecified in n = 3 (13.6%) facilities. FAST...

  5. Relationships between interpersonal trauma, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, and other mental health problems in girls in compulsory residential care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenarts, Laura E. W.; Vermeiren, Robert R. J. M.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Lodewijks, Henny P. B.; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.; Lindauer, Ramón J. L.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the relationships (using structural equation modeling) between exposure to early-onset interpersonal trauma, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), symptoms of complex PTSD, and other mental health problems. The participants were 92 girls recruited from

  6. Childhood reactions to terrorism-induced trauma: a review of the past 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Wanda P

    2004-04-01

    To summarize the literature about the clinical presentation and treatment interventions of childhood reactions to terrorism-induced trauma. The literature on children's responses to terrorist activities was reviewed. Over the past 10 years, more research has emerged on the subject of terrorism in children. Many of the effects of terrorism-induced trauma are similar to the effects of natural and man-made trauma. Children's responses include acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression, regressive behaviors, separation problems, sleep difficulties, and behavioral problems. However, several aspects of terrorist attacks result in unique stressors and reactions and pose specific challenges for treatment. The unpredictable, indefinite threat of terrorist events, the profound effect on adults and communities, and the effect of extensive terrorist-related media coverage exacerbates underlying anxieties and contributes to a continuous state of stress and anxiety. Intervention strategies include early community-based interventions, screening of children at risk, triage and referral, and trauma-loss-focused treatment programs. Advances have been made in the research of childhood reactions to terrorism-induced trauma. Further research is needed to identify children at risk and to determine the long-term impact on children's development. Although the preliminary results of interventions developed to help children are promising, outcome data have not been examined, and further research is needed to evaluate their effectiveness.

  7. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Job Satisfaction Among Trauma Nurses at a Level I Safety-Net Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munnangi, Swapna; Dupiton, Lynore; Boutin, Anthony; Angus, L D George

    Nurses are at the forefront of our health care delivery system and have been reported to exhibit a high level of burnout. Burnout and stress in trauma nurses at a safety-net hospital can negatively impact patient care. Safety-net hospitals are confronted with unique social, financial, as well as resource problems that can potentially make the work environment frustrating. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels of burnout, stress, and job satisfaction in nurses providing care to trauma patients at a Level I safety-net trauma center. A cross-sectional survey design was used to investigate principal factors including personal and professional demographics, burnout, perceived stress, and job satisfaction. Trauma nurses working at a Level I safety-net trauma center are stressed and exhibited moderate degree of burnout. The extent of emotional exhaustion experienced by the nurses varied with work location and was highest in surgical intensive care unit nurses. The level of job satisfaction in terms of opportunities for promotion differed significantly by race and the health status of the nurses. Satisfaction with coworkers was lowest in those nurses between the ages of 60-69 years. Female nurses were more satisfied with their coworkers than male nurses. In addition, the study revealed that significant relationships exist among perceived stress, burnout, and job satisfaction. Work environment significantly impacts burnout, job satisfaction, and perceived stress experienced by trauma nurses in a safety-net hospital. Nursing administration can make an effort to understand the levels of burnout and strategically improve work environment for trauma nurses in order to minimize stressors leading to attrition and enhance job satisfaction.

  8. Trauma ocular contuso y afecciones de vítreo-retina Blunt ocular trauma and vitreous and retinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Alejandro Guerra García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se consultó la bibliografía actualizada para ofrecer una orientación práctica sobre el manejo de las afecciones vítreorretinales más frecuentes provocadas por los traumas oculares contusos. Estos se encuentran presentes en 31 % de los casos y presentan como complicación seria más frecuente el desprendimiento de retina en 44 %. Se explicó la importancia de la creación de un registro nacional de trauma como herramienta inicial para la prevención de esta enfermedad. Finalmente se expuso algunas consideraciones y un flujograma orientador para el manejo de esta urgencia.Current papers were reviewed to provide practical managing guidelines in most frequent vitreous and retinal disorders infringed by blunt ocular trauma. They are present in 31 % of traumas, with retinal detachment in 44 % of cases as the most frequent serious complication. The importance of the creation of a national eye injury registry as an initial tool to prevent this disease was explained. Finally, some considerations and a guiding flowchart for the management of this visual problem were included.

  9. The implementation of a national trauma registry in Greece. Methodology and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Theodoraki, Maria E; Toutouzas, Kostas; Drimousis, Panagiotis G; Larentzakis, Antreas; Stergiopoulos, Spiros; Aggelakis, Christos; Lapidakis, George; Massalis, Ioannis; Theodorou, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide and a major health problem of the modern society. Trauma systems are considered the gold standard of managing patients with trauma. An integral part of any trauma system is a trauma registry. In Europe, and particularly in Greece, trauma registries and systems are in an embryonic stage. In this study, we present an attempt to record trauma in Greece. The Hellenic Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery invited all the official representatives of the society throughout the country to participate in the study. In succeeding meetings of the representatives, the reporting form was developed and the inclusion criteria were defined meticulously. Inclusion criteria were defined as patients with trauma requiring admission, transfer to a higher level center, or arrived dead or died in the emergency department of the reporting hospital. All reports were accumulated by the Hellenic Trauma society, imported in an electronic database, and analyzed. Thirty-two hospitals receiving patients with trauma participated in the country, representing 40% of the country's healthcare facilities and serving 40% of the country's population. In 12 months time, (October 2005 to September 2006), 8,862 patients were included in the study. Of them, 66.9% were men and 31.3% were women. The compilation rate of the reporting forms was surprisingly high, considering that the final reporting form included 150 data points and that there were no independent personnel in charge of filling the forms. Trauma registries are feasible even in health care systems where funding of medical research is sparse.

  10. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bony injuries in trauma patients diagnosed by radiological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amponsah, G.; Gorleku, P. N.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the incidence of bony injuries in trauma patients who had plain radiographs done at the Central Regional Hospital in Cape Coast. This is a retrospective study based on plain radiographs taken by trauma patients who reported to the Central Regional Hospital. The case notes of all patients with a discharge diagnosis of Road Traffic Accident or trauma of all aetiologies that presented to the hospital between January 2005 and December 2011 were retrieved, and those patients that had skeletal radiographic examinations were included in this study. The total number of cases seen was 1,133. The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 72 years. Sixty-nine (6.1%) of the patients were between 1 and 4 years old, with the majority between 20 and 49 years old, constituting 52.3%, with patients 60 years and above at 9.2%. There was statistically significant difference between male and female patients (p=0.001). A total of 912 (80.5%) patients had radiographic examination done out of which only 324 (35.5%) radiographs could be retrieved. There were 106 (32.7%) radiographs with various bony injuries which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Rib fractures represented 19/106 (17.9%) of which 62.5% had multiple rib fractures. Fifty-eight (54.7%) had long bone fractures. Other anatomical sites included the pelvis and the skull. Conclusion: Trauma is a major public health problem in the country, involving mainly the productive age group. Unnecessary exposure to X-rays is common. Inadequate management of trauma patients negatively impacts on the outcome of trauma patients. Trauma prevention is the best way forward.(au)

  12. Geriatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sasha D; Holcomb, John B

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of trauma is changing due to an aging population. Geriatric patients represent an increasing number and proportion of trauma admissions and deaths. This review explores recent literature on geriatric trauma, including triage criteria, assessment of frailty, fall-related injury, treatment of head injury complicated by coagulopathy, goals of care, and the need for ongoing education of all surgeons in the care of the elderly. Early identification of high-risk geriatric patients is imperative to initiate early resuscitative efforts. Geriatric patients are typically undertriaged because of their baseline frailty being underappreciated; however, centers that see more geriatric patients do better. Rapid reversal of anticoagulation is important in preventing progression of brain injury. Anticipation of difficult disposition necessitates early involvement of physical therapy for rehabilitation and case management for appropriate placement. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be based on the well established tenets of trauma resuscitation and injury repair, but with distinct elements that address the physiological and anatomical challenges presented by geriatric patients.

  13. Trauma histories among justice-involved youth: findings from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly B. Dierkhising

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 90% of justice-involved youth report exposure to some type of traumatic event. On average, 70% of youth meet criteria for a mental health disorder with approximately 30% of youth meeting criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Justice-involved youth are also at risk for substance use and academic problems, and child welfare involvement. Yet, less is known about the details of their trauma histories, and associations among trauma details, mental health problems, and associated risk factors. Objective: This study describes detailed trauma histories, mental health problems, and associated risk factors (i.e., academic problems, substance/alcohol use, and concurrent child welfare involvement among adolescents with recent involvement in the juvenile justice system. Method: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set (NCTSN-CDS is used to address these aims, among which 658 adolescents report recent involvement in the juvenile justice system as indexed by being detained or under community supervision by the juvenile court. Results: Age of onset of trauma exposure was within the first 5 years of life for 62% of youth and approximately one-third of youth report exposure to multiple or co-occurring trauma types each year into adolescence. Mental health problems are prevalent with 23.6% of youth meeting criteria for PTSD, 66.1% in the clinical range for externalizing problems, and 45.5% in the clinical range for internalizing problems. Early age of onset of trauma exposure was differentially associated with mental health problems and related risk factors among males and females. Conclusions: The results indicate that justice-involved youth report high rates of trauma exposure and that this trauma typically begins early in life, is often in multiple contexts, and persists over time. Findings provide support for establishing trauma-informed juvenile justice systems that can respond to the needs of traumatized youth.

  14. MAXILLOFACIAL TRAUMA MANAGEMENT IN POLYTRAUMATIZED PATIENTS – THE USE OF ADVANCED TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT (ATLS PRINCIPLES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of the multiply injured patient requires a co-ordinated multi-disciplinary approach in order to optimise patients’ outcome. A working knowledge of the sort of problems these patients encounter is therefore vital to ensure that life-threatening injuries are recognised and treated in a timely pattern and that more minor associated injuries are not omitted. This article outlines the management of polytraumatized patients using the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS principles and highlights the areas of specific involvement of the engaged medical team. Advanced Trauma Life Support is generally regarded as the gold standard and is founded on a number of well known principles, but strict adherence to protocols may have its drawbacks when facial trauma co-exists. These can arise in the presence of either major or minor facial injuries, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons need to be aware of the potential problems.

  15. Preferences for trauma treatment: A systematic review of the empirical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simiola, Vanessa; Neilson, Elizabeth C; Thompson, Richard; Cook, Joan M

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of trauma histories and related psychological problems is high in general clinical settings, but little is known about trauma patient preferences for mental health treatment. The purpose of this article is to systematically review and synthesize the literature on treatment preferences in survivors of traumatic events. Studies were identified using comprehensive searches of PsycINFO, Medline, PubMed, Published International Literature on Traumatic Stress, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases. Included in the review were articles published between January 1980 and September 2014, in English that reported patient preference of treatment for trauma related disorders in either clinical or nonclinical (e.g., analog) samples. The total number of individual participants was 6,091. Of the identified studies, 35 were quantitative and 6 were qualitative. Methodological concerns included the use of analog samples, small sample sizes, and the assessment of a limited number of treatment options (e.g., asking about only 1 type of psychotherapy or medication). Overall, participants expressed a preference for psychotherapy over medication and for talking about their trauma. Understanding and addressing trauma patient preferences may assist in improving treatment initiation as well as facilitate engagement, retention and outcome. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Complex trauma and mental health in children and adolescents placed in foster care: findings from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Johanna K P; Briggs, Ernestine C; Kisiel, Cassandra L; Layne, Christopher M; Ake, George S; Ko, Susan J; Gerrity, Ellen T; Steinberg, Alan M; Howard, Michael L; Pynoos, Robert S; Fairbank, John A

    2011-01-01

    Many children in the child welfare system (CWS) have histories of recurrent interpersonal trauma perpetrated by caregivers early in life often referred to as complex trauma. Children in the CWS also experience a diverse range of reactions across multiple areas of functioning that are associated with such exposure. Nevertheless, few CWSs routinely screen for trauma exposure and associated symptoms beyond an initial assessment of the precipitating event. This study examines trauma histories, including complex trauma exposure (physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, domestic violence), posttraumatic stress, and behavioral and emotional problems of 2,251 youth (age 0 to 21; M = 9.5, SD = 4.3) in foster care who were referred to a National Child Traumatic Stress Network site for treatment. High prevalence rates of complex trauma exposure were observed: 70.4% of the sample reported at least two of the traumas that constitute complex trauma; 11.7% of the sample reported all 5 types. Compared to youth with other types of trauma, those with complex trauma histories had significantly higher rates of internalizing problems, posttraumatic stress, and clinical diagnoses, and differed on some demographic variables. Implications for child welfare practice and future research are discussed.

  17. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of a TeamSTEPPS Trauma Nurse Academy at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, V Kristen; Harvey, Ellen M; Wright, Andi; Bath, Jennifer; Freeman, Dan; Collier, Bryan

    2018-01-01

    Nurses are crucial members of the team caring for the acutely injured trauma patient. Until recently, nurses and physicians gained an understanding of leadership and supportive roles separately. With the advent of a multidisciplinary team approach to trauma care, formal team training and simulation has transpired. Since 2007, our Level I trauma system has integrated TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies & Tools to Enhance Performance & Patient Safety; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD) into our clinical care, joint training of nurses and physicians, using simulations with participation of all health care providers. With the increased expectations of a well-orchestrated team and larger number of emergency nurses, our program created the Trauma Nurse Academy. This academy provides a core of experienced nurses with an advanced level of training while decreasing the variability of personnel in the trauma bay. Components of the academy include multidisciplinary didactic education, the Essentials of TeamSTEPPS, and interactive trauma bay learning, to include both equipment and drug use. Once completed, academy graduates participate in the orientation and training of General Surgery and Emergency Medicine residents' trauma bay experience and injury prevention activities. Internal and published data have demonstrated growing evidence linking trauma teamwork training to knowledge and self-confidence in clinical judgment to team performance, patient outcomes, and quality of care. Although trauma resuscitations are stressful, high risk, dynamic, and a prime environment for error, new methods of teamwork training and collaboration among trauma team members have become essential. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Benchmarking of trauma care worldwide: the potential value of an International Trauma Data Bank (ITDB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Hashmi, Zain G; Gupta, Sonia; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; David, Jean-Stephane; Efron, David T; Stevens, Kent A; Zafar, Hasnain; Schneider, Eric B; Voiglio, Eric; Coimbra, Raul; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-08-01

    National trauma registries have helped improve patient outcomes across the world. Recently, the idea of an International Trauma Data Bank (ITDB) has been suggested to establish global comparative assessments of trauma outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine whether global trauma data could be combined to perform international outcomes benchmarking. We used observed/expected (O/E) mortality ratios to compare two trauma centers [European high-income country (HIC) and Asian lower-middle income country (LMIC)] with centers in the North American National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). Patients (≥16 years) with blunt/penetrating injuries were included. Multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for known predictors of trauma mortality, was performed. Estimates were used to predict the expected deaths at each center and to calculate O/E mortality ratios for benchmarking. A total of 375,433 patients from 301 centers were included from the NTDB (2002-2010). The LMIC trauma center had 806 patients (2002-2010), whereas the HIC reported 1,003 patients (2002-2004). The most important known predictors of trauma mortality were adequately recorded in all datasets. Mortality benchmarking revealed that the HIC center performed similarly to the NTDB centers [O/E = 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.35)], whereas the LMIC center showed significantly worse survival [O/E = 1.52 (1.23-1.88)]. Subset analyses of patients with blunt or penetrating injury showed similar results. Using only a few key covariates, aggregated global trauma data can be used to adequately perform international trauma center benchmarking. The creation of the ITDB is feasible and recommended as it may be a pivotal step towards improving global trauma outcomes.

  20. Therapeutic Assessment of Complex Trauma: A Single-Case Time-Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarocchi, Anna; Aschieri, Filippo; Fantini, Francesca; Smith, Justin D

    2013-06-01

    The cumulative effect of repeated traumatic experiences in early childhood incrementally increases the risk of adjustment problems later in life. Surviving traumatic environments can lead to the development of an interrelated constellation of emotional and interpersonal symptoms termed complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD). Effective treatment of trauma begins with a multimethod psychological assessment and requires the use of several evidence-based therapeutic processes, including establishing a safe therapeutic environment, reprocessing the trauma, constructing a new narrative, and managing emotional dysregulation. Therapeutic Assessment (TA) is a semistructured, brief intervention that uses psychological testing to promote positive change. The case study of Kelly, a middle-aged woman with a history of repeated interpersonal trauma, illustrates delivery of the TA model for CPTSD. Results of this single-case time-series experiment indicate statistically significant symptom improvement as a result of participating in TA. We discuss the implications of these findings for assessing and treating trauma-related concerns, such as CPTSD.

  1. Influence of socioeconomic status on trauma center performance evaluations in a Canadian trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Turgeon, Alexis F; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Murat, Valérie; Lavoie, André

    2011-09-01

    Trauma center performance evaluations generally include adjustment for injury severity, age, and comorbidity. However, disparities across trauma centers may be due to other differences in source populations that are not accounted for, such as socioeconomic status (SES). We aimed to evaluate whether SES influences trauma center performance evaluations in an inclusive trauma system with universal access to health care. The study was based on data collected between 1999 and 2006 in a Canadian trauma system. Patient SES was quantified using an ecologic index of social and material deprivation. Performance evaluations were based on mortality adjusted using the Trauma Risk Adjustment Model. Agreement between performance results with and without additional adjustment for SES was evaluated with correlation coefficients. The study sample comprised a total of 71,784 patients from 48 trauma centers, including 3,828 deaths within 30 days (4.5%) and 5,549 deaths within 6 months (7.7%). The proportion of patients in the highest quintile of social and material deprivation varied from 3% to 43% and from 11% to 90% across hospitals, respectively. The correlation between performance results with or without adjustment for SES was almost perfect (r = 0.997; 95% CI 0.995-0.998) and the same hospital outliers were identified. We observed an important variation in SES across trauma centers but no change in risk-adjusted mortality estimates when SES was added to adjustment models. Results suggest that after adjustment for injury severity, age, comorbidity, and transfer status, disparities in SES across trauma center source populations do not influence trauma center performance evaluations in a system offering universal health coverage. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. From betrayal to the bottle: investigating possible pathways from trauma to problematic substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Brianna C; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-10-01

    Research in both community and clinical settings has found that exposure to cumulative interpersonal trauma predicts substance use problems. Less is known about betrayal as a dimension of trauma exposure that predicts substance use, and about the behavioral and psychological pathways that explain the relation between trauma and substance use. In a sample of 362 young adults, this study evaluated three intervening pathways between betrayal trauma exposure prior to age 18 years and problematic substance use: (a) substance use to cope with negative affect, (b) difficulty discerning and/or heeding risk, and (c) self-destructiveness. In addition, exposure to trauma low in betrayal (e.g., earthquake) was included in the model. Bootstrap tests of indirect effects revealed that betrayal trauma prior to age 18 years was associated with problematic substance use via posttraumatic stress and two intervening pathways: difficulty discerning/heeding risk (β = .07, p trauma was not associated with posttraumatic stress or problematic substance use. Results contribute to a trauma-informed understanding of substance use that persists despite potentially harmful consequences. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  4. How much does "how much" matter? Assessing the relationship between children's lifetime exposure to violence and trauma symptoms, behavior problems, and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Laura J; Jaycox, Lisa H; Setodji, Claude M; Kofner, Aaron; Schultz, Dana; Barnes-Proby, Dionne; Harris, Racine

    2013-04-01

    The study explores whether and how lifetime violence exposure is related to a set of negative symptoms: child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, child trauma symptoms, and parenting stress. Using a large sample of violence-exposed children recruited to participate in intervention research, the study employs different methods of measuring that exposure. These include total frequency of all lifetime exposure, total frequency of lifetime exposure by broad category (i.e., assault, maltreatment, sexual abuse, and witnessing violence), and polyvictimization defined as exposure to multiple violence categories. The results indicate that only polyvictimization, constructed as a dichotomous variable indicating two or more categories of lifetime exposure, emerged as a consistent predictor of negative symptoms. The total lifetime frequency of all violence exposure was not associated with negative symptoms, after controlling for the influence of polyvictimization. Likewise, in the presence of a dichotomous polyvictimization indicator the total lifetime frequency of exposure to a particular violence category was unrelated to symptoms overall, with the exception of trauma symptoms and experiences of sexual abuse. Taken together, these findings suggest that total lifetime exposure is not particularly important to negative symptoms, nor is any particular category of exposure after controlling for polyvictimization, with the single exception of sexual abuse and trauma symptoms. Instead, it is the mix of exposure experiences that predict negative impacts on children in this sample. Further research is needed to continue to explore and test these issues.

  5. Skeleton scintigraphy in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal trauma is common and presents both an opportunity and a problem in skeletal scintigraphy. The opportunity arises in the ability of skeletal scintigraphy to demonstrate abnormalities early after direct trauma. It is well recognized that the early detection of fractures in some sites cannot be reliably achieved by standard radiography, especially in the femoral neck and scaphoid bone. The problem comes in recognizing the effects of skeletal trauma when using skeletal scintigraphy for another purpose, such as the detection of metastatic disease. iatrogenic trauma to either the skeleton or soft tissues may be manifest scintigraphic ally. For example Craniotomy typically leaves a rim pattern at the surgical margin. Rib Retraction during thoracotomy can elicit periosteal reaction. Areas of the skeletal receiving curative levels of ionizing radiation (typically 4000 rads or greater) characteristically demonstrate decreased uptake within 6 months to 1 year after therapy. The generally high sensitivity of the skeletal scintigraphy seems to make it an ideal survey test in cases of suspected child abuse especially in which radiographs are unrevealing. Because of difficulties in obtaining a history of trauma from a preschool child or even eliciting a satisfactory description of the location and nature of the pain, skeletal scintigraphy provides a simple and reliable investigation in these children. Subtle trauma, such as that from stress fractures is often difficult to visualize on a plain radiograph. Skeletal scintigraphy is frequently positive at the time of clinical presentation. Skeletal scintigraphy is exquisitely sensitive to the remodeling process and typically shows abnormalities 1 to 2 weeks or more before the appearance of radiographic changes in stress fractures. The periosteal reaction can be visualized within hours of the injury. Insufficiency and fatigue fractures such as vertebral compression fracture, which is probably the most common consequence of

  6. Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Assessing the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez de Arellano, Michael A.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; George, Preethy; Dougherty, Richard H.; Daniels, Allen S.; Ghose, Sushmita Shoma; Huang, Larke; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is a conjoint parent-child treatment developed by Cohen, Mannarino, and Deblinger that uses cognitive-behavioral principles and exposure techniques to prevent and treat posttraumatic stress, depression, and behavioral problems. This review defined TF-CBT, differentiated it from other models, and assessed the evidence base. Methods Authors reviewed meta-analyses, reviews, and individual studies (1995 to 2013). Databases surveyed were PubMed, PsycINFO, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, PILOTS, the ERIC, and the CINAHL. They chose from three levels of research evidence (high, moderate, and low) on the basis of benchmarks for number of studies and quality of their methodology. They also described the evidence of effectiveness. Results The level of evidence for TF-CBT was rated as high on the basis of ten RCTs, three of which were conducted independently (not by TF-CBT developers). TF-CBT has demonstrated positive outcomes in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, although it is less clear whether TF-CBT is effective in reducing behavior problems or symptoms of depression. Limitations of the studies include concerns about investigator bias and exclusion of vulnerable populations. Conclusions TF-CBT is a viable treatment for reducing trauma-related symptoms among some children who have experienced trauma and their nonoffending caregivers. Based on this evidence, TF-CBT should be available as a covered service in health plans. Ongoing research is needed to further identify best practices for TF-CBT in various settings and with individuals from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and with varied trauma histories, symptoms, and stages of intellectual, social, and emotional development. PMID:24638076

  7. Pathological spirit possession as a cultural interpretation of trauma-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Tobias; Barnewitz, Eva; Stenmark, Hakon; Iversen, Valentina

    2016-07-01

    Spirit possession is a phenomenon frequently occurring in war-torn countries. It has been shown to be an idiom of distress entailing dissociative symptoms. However, its association with trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders remains unclear. This study aimed to explore subjective disease models and the relationship between pathological spirit possession and trauma-related disorders in the Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Seventy-three (formerly) possessed persons (74% female, mean age = 34 years), referred by traditional and spiritual healers, were interviewed about their experiences of pathological spirit possession, trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depressive symptoms, shame and guilt, psychotic symptoms, somatic complaints, and the impairment of psychosocial functioning. The most common disease model for pathological spirit possession was another person having sent the spirit, mostly a family member or a neighbor, out of jealousy or conflict over resources. Significant correlations were found between spirit possession over lifetime and PTSD symptom severity, feelings of shame and guilt, depressive symptoms, somatic complaints, and psychotic symptoms. Spirit possession during the preceding 4 weeks was associated with PTSD symptom severity, impairment of psychosocial functioning, and psychotic symptom severity. The results of this study indicate that pathological spirit possession is a broad explanatory framework for various subjectively unexplainable mental and physical health problems, including but not limited to trauma-related disorders. Understanding pathological spirit possession as a subjective disease model for various mental and physical health problems may help researchers and clinicians to develop culturally sensitive treatment approaches for affected individuals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The design, construction and implementation of a computerised trauma registry in a developing South African metropolitan trauma service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Aldous, C; Clarke, D L

    2014-01-01

    The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service formerly lacked a robust computerised trauma registry. This made surgical audit difficult for the purpose of quality of care improvement and development. We aimed to design, construct and implement a computerised trauma registry within our service. Twelve months following its implementation, we sought to examine and report on the quality of the registry. Formal ethical approval to maintain a computerised trauma registry was obtained prior to undertaking any design and development. Appropriate commercial software was sourced to develop this project. The registry was designed as a flat file. A flat file is a plain text or mixed text and binary file which usually contains one record per line or physical record. Thereafter the registry file was launched onto a secure server. This provided the benefits of access security and automated backups. Registry training was provided to clients by the developer. The exercise of data capture was then integrated into the process of service delivery, taking place at the endpoint of patient care (discharge, transfer or death). Twelve months following its implementation, the compliance rates of data entry were measured. The developer of this project managed to design, construct and implement an electronic trauma registry into the service. Twelve months following its implementation the data were extracted and audited to assess the quality. A total of 2640 patient entries were captured onto the registry. Compliance rates were in the order of eighty percent and client satisfaction rates were high. A number of deficits were identified. These included the omission of weekend discharges and underreporting of deaths. The construction and implementation of the computerised trauma registry was the beginning of an endeavour to continue improvements in the quality of care within our service. The registry provided a reliable audit at twelve months post implementation. Deficits and limitations were

  9. [Trauma registry and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, S C

    2001-10-01

    The trauma registry network constitutes an essential database in every injury prevention system. In order to rationally estimate the extent of injury in general, and injuries from traffic accidents in particular, the trauma registry systems should contain the most comprehensive and broad database possible, in line with the operational definitions. Ideally, the base of the injury pyramid should also include mild injuries and even "near-misses". The Israeli National Trauma Registry has come a long way in the last few years. The eventual inclusion of all trauma centers in Israel will enable the establishment of a firm base for the allocation of resources by decision-makers.

  10. Adult Asylum Seekers from the Middle East Including Syria in Central Europe: What Are Their Health Care Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfortmueller, Carmen Andrea; Schwetlick, Miriam; Mueller, Thomas; Lehmann, Beat; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Forced displacement related to persecution and violent conflict has reached a new peak in recent years. The primary aim of this study is to provide an initial overview of the acute and chronic health care problems of asylum seekers from the Middle East, with special emphasis on asylum seekers from Syria. Our retrospective data analysis comprised adult patients presenting to our emergency department between 01.11.2011 and 30.06.2014 with the official resident status of an "asylum seeker" or "refugee" from the Middle East. In total, 880 patients were included in the study. Of these, 625 (71.0%) were male and 255 (29.0%) female. The median age was 34 (range 16-84). 222 (25.2%) of our patients were from Syria. The most common reason for presentation was surgical (381, 43.3%), followed by medical (321, 36.5%) and psychiatric (137, 15.6%). In patients with surgical presentations, trauma-related problems were most common (n = 196, 50.6%). Within the group of patients with medical presentation, acute infectious diseases were most common (n = 141, 43.9%), followed by neurological problems (n = 70, 21.8%) and gastrointestinal problems (n = 47, 14.6%). There were no differences between Syrian and non-Syrian refugees concerning surgical or medical admissions. The most common chronic disorder of unclear significance was chronic gastrointestinal problems (n = 132, 15%), followed by chronic musculoskeletal problems (n = 108, 12.3%) and chronic headaches (n = 78, 8.9%). Patients from Syria were significantly younger and more often suffered from a post-traumatic stress disorder than patients of other nationalities (pSyria when compared to other nationalities of asylum seekers from the Middle East.

  11. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  12. Addressing Trauma in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Amanda L.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Stamman, Julia; Callahan, Molly M.; Loseu, Sahar; Bevly, Cynthia M.; Cross, Kaitlin; Woehler, Elliott S.; Calzada, Richard-Michael R.; Chadwell, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is prevalent among clients with substance abuse issues, yet addictions counselors' training in trauma approaches is limited. The purpose of the current article is to provide pertinent information regarding trauma treatment including the use of assessments, empirically supported clinical approaches, self-help groups and the risk of vicarious…

  13. Survivors of early childhood trauma: evaluating a two-dimensional diagnostic model of the impact of trauma and neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Wildschut

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A two-dimensional diagnostic model for (complex trauma-related and personality disorders has been proposed to assess the severity and prognosis of the impact of early childhood trauma and emotional neglect. An important question that awaits empirical examination is whether a distinction between trauma-related disorders and personality disorders reflects reality when focusing on survivors of early childhood trauma. And, is a continuum of trauma diagnoses a correct assumption and, if yes, what does it look like? Objective: We describe the design of a cross-sectional cohort study evaluating this two-dimensional model of the impact of trauma and neglect. To provide the rationale of our study objectives, we review the existing literature on the impact of early childhood trauma and neglect on trauma-related disorders and personality disorders. Aims of the study are to: (1 quantify the two-dimensional model and test the relation with trauma and neglect; and (2 compare the two study groups. Method: A total of 200 consecutive patients referred to two specific treatment programs (100 from a personality disorder program and 100 from a trauma-related disorder program in the north of Holland will be included. Data are collected at the start of treatment. The assessments include all DSM-5 trauma-related and personality disorders, and general psychiatric symptoms, trauma history, and perceived emotional neglect. Discussion: The results will provide an evaluation of the model and an improvement of the understanding of the relationship between trauma-related disorders and personality disorders and early childhood trauma and emotional neglect. This may improve both diagnostic as well as indication procedures. We will discuss possible strengths and limitations of the design.

  14. Patterns of ocular trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, T.F.; Khan, M.T.; Marwat, M.; Shah, A.; Murad, Y.; Khan, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the patterns of ocular trauma, cause of injury and its effects on eye. A retrospective case series. Medical records of 1105 patients admitted with ocular trauma were reviewed. The details of patients regarding age, gender, literacy, cause of injury and its effects on eye were entered into specially-designed performa. Sample selection consisted of all patients with history of ocular trauma and who were admitted to hospital. Population details consisted patients who were referred to the hospital from all parts of N.W.F.P. Thus, the frequency of trauma in the hospital admissions was analysed. Ophthalmic trauma comprised 6.78% of the hospital admission. One thousand one hundred and five patients presented with eye injuries. Out of them, 21 patients suffered from trauma to both eyes. Almost 80% patients were male and 69% patients were below 30 years of age. Delayed presentation was more common and 63.61% patients presented after one week. Open globe injuries were more common (520 eyes (46.18%)) than closed globe injuries (484 eyes (42.98%)). 23.26% of open globe injuries were associated with intraocular and intra-orbital foreign bodies. Superficial non-perforating, eyelid and adnexal and burns were seen in 122 eyes (10.83%). Among the complications, lens damage and hyphema was seen in more than 50% of the patients, 16.60% eyes were infected at the time of admission and 4.88% of eyes needed enucleation or evisceration. The common causes of injury were violence in 37.37%, occupational in 24.43% and domestic accidents in 19.18%. Ophthalmic trauma is a major public health problem. Majority of the involved are male and under 30 years of age. Delayed presentation is more common. Open globe injuries are more frequent. Violence and occupational injuries are the major causes. (author)

  15. [Trauma-Informed Peer Counselling in the Care of Refugees with Trauma-Related Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöller, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Providing adequate culture-sensitive care for a large number of refugees with trauma-related disorders constitutes a major challenge. In this context, peer support and trauma-informed peer counselling can be regarded as a valuable means to complement the psychosocial care systems. In recent years, peer support and peer education have been successfully implemented e. g. in health care education, in psychiatric care, and in the treatment of traumatized individuals. Only little research data is available for traumatized refugees. However, results are encouraging. A program is presented which integrates trauma-informed peer educators (TIP) with migration background in the care of traumatized refugees. Peers' responsibility includes emotional support and understanding the refugees' needs, sensitizing for trauma-related disorders, providing psychoeducation, and teaching trauma-specific stabilization techniques under supervision of professional psychotherapists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Applying Bayesian statistics to the study of psychological trauma: A suggestion for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalch, Matthew M

    2016-03-01

    Several contemporary researchers have noted the virtues of Bayesian methods of data analysis. Although debates continue about whether conventional or Bayesian statistics is the "better" approach for researchers in general, there are reasons why Bayesian methods may be well suited to the study of psychological trauma in particular. This article describes how Bayesian statistics offers practical solutions to the problems of data non-normality, small sample size, and missing data common in research on psychological trauma. After a discussion of these problems and the effects they have on trauma research, this article explains the basic philosophical and statistical foundations of Bayesian statistics and how it provides solutions to these problems using an applied example. Results of the literature review and the accompanying example indicates the utility of Bayesian statistics in addressing problems common in trauma research. Bayesian statistics provides a set of methodological tools and a broader philosophical framework that is useful for trauma researchers. Methodological resources are also provided so that interested readers can learn more. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Predictors of Intrathoracic Injury after Blunt Torso Trauma in Children Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Caitlin; Mironova, Irina; Lehman, Erik; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic injuries are a major cause of death associated with blunt trauma in children. Screening for injury with chest x-ray study, compared with chest computed tomography (CT) scan, has been controversial, weighing the benefits of specificity with the detriment of radiation exposure. To identify predictors of thoracic injury in children presenting as trauma activations to a Level I trauma center after blunt torso trauma, and to compare these predictors with those previously reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (trauma center between June 2010 and June 2013 as a trauma activation after sustaining a blunt torso trauma and who received diagnostic imaging of the chest as part of their initial evaluation. Data analysis was performed on 166 patients. There were 33 patients (20%) with 45 abnormalities detected on diagnostic imaging of the chest, with the most common abnormalities being lung contusion (36%), pneumothorax (22%), and rib fracture (13%). Statistically significant predictors of abnormal diagnostic imaging of the chest included Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) trauma include GCS < 15, hypoxia, syncope/dizziness, cervical spine tenderness, thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness, and abdominal/pelvic tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of antecedent trauma exposure and mental health symptoms on the post-deployment mental health of Afghanistan-deployed Australian troops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Amelia K; Van Hooff, Miranda; Lawrence-Wood, Ellie R; Grace, Blair S; Saccone, Elizabeth J; Davy, Carol P; Lorimer, Michelle; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2017-10-01

    Both traumatic deployment experiences and antecedent traumas increase personnel's risk of developing PTSD and depression. However, only cross-sectional studies have assessed whether antecedent trauma moderates stress reactions to deployment experiences. This study prospectively examines whether antecedent trauma moderates the association between deployment trauma and post-deployment PTSD and depressive symptoms after accounting for antecedent mental health problems, in a large Australian Defence Force (ADF) sample. In the ADF Middle East Area of Operations Prospective Study, currently-serving military personnel deployed to Afghanistan across 2010-2012 (n = 1122) completed self-reported measures at pre-deployment and post-deployment. Within multivariable regressions, associations between deployment trauma and PTSD and depressive symptoms at post-deployment were stronger for personnel with greater antecedent trauma. However, once adjusting for antecedent mental health problems, these significant interaction effects disappeared. Instead, deployment-related trauma and antecedent mental health problems showed direct associations with post-deployment mental health problems. Antecedent trauma was also indirectly associated with post-deployment mental health problems through antecedent mental health problems. Similar associations were seen with prior combat exposure as a moderator. Antecedent and deployment trauma were reported retrospectively. Self-reports may also suffer from social desirability bias, especially at pre-deployment. Our main effects results support the pervasive and cumulative negative effect of trauma on military personnel, regardless of its source. While antecedent trauma does not amplify personnel's psychological response to deployment trauma, it is indirectly associated with increased post-deployment mental health problems. Antecedent mental health should be considered within pre-deployment prevention programs, and deployment-trauma within post

  19. Is paediatric trauma severity overestimated at triage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DO, H Q; Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe paediatric trauma is rare, and pre-hospital and local hospital personnel experience with injured children is often limited. We hypothesised that a higher proportion of paediatric trauma victims were taken to the regional trauma centre (TC). METHODS: This is an observational...... follow-up study that involves one level I TC and seven local hospitals. We included paediatric (trauma patients with a driving distance to the TC > 30 minutes. The primary end-point was the proportion of trauma patients arriving in the TC. RESULTS: We included 1934...... trauma patients, 238 children and 1696 adults. A total of 33/238 children (13.9%) vs. 304/1696 adults (17.9%) were transported to the TC post-injury (P = 0.14). Among these, children were significantly less injured than adults [median Injury Severity Score (ISS) 9 vs. 14, P 

  20. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Imhof, H. [University and General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  1. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Imhof, H.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  2. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per

    2016-01-01

    at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP), Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients' past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social...... situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms...

  3. Evaluating trauma care capabilities in Mexico with the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Vega Rivera, Felipe; Romero Hicks, Eduardo; Guzmán Solana, Felipe; Porras Ramírez, Giovanni; Montiel Amoroso, Gilberto; de Boer, Melanie

    2006-02-01

    To identify affordable, sustainable methods to strengthen trauma care capabilities in Mexico, using the standards in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care, a publication that was developed by the World Health Organization and the International Society of Surgery to provide recommendations on elements of trauma care that should be in place in the various levels of health facilities in all countries. The Guidelines publication was used as a basis for needs assessments conducted in 2003 and 2004 in three Mexican states. The states were selected to represent the range of geographic and economic conditions in the country: Oaxaca (south, lower economic status), Puebla (center, middle economic status), and Nuevo León (north, higher economic status). The sixteen facilities that were assessed included rural clinics, small hospitals, and large hospitals. Site visits incorporated direct inspection of physical resources as well as interviews with key administrative and clinical staff. Human and physical resources for trauma care were adequate in the hospitals, especially the larger ones. The survey did identify some deficiencies, such as shortages of stiff suction tips, pulse oximetry equipment, and some trauma-related medications. All of the clinics had difficulties with basic supplies for resuscitation, even though some received substantial numbers of trauma patients. In all levels of facilities there was room for improvement in administrative functions to assure quality trauma care, including trauma registries, trauma-related quality improvement programs, and uniform in-service training. This study identified several low-cost ways to strengthen trauma care in Mexico. The study also highlighted the usefulness of the recommended norms in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication in providing a standardized template by which to assess trauma care capabilities in nations worldwide.

  4. The practicality of including the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the definition of polytrauma: experience of a level one trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Nerida E; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) has been advocated as a significant predictor of outcome in trauma. Recent trauma literature has proposed SIRS as a surrogate for physiological derangements characteristic of polytrauma with some authors recommending its inclusion into the definition of polytrauma. The practicality of daily SIRS collection outside of specifically designed prospective trials is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the availability of SIRS variables and its appropriateness for inclusion into a definition of polytrauma. We hypothesised SIRS variables would be readily available and easy to collect, thus represent an appropriate inclusion into the definition of polytrauma. A prospective observational study of all trauma team activation patients over 7-months (August 2009 to February 2010) at a University affiliated level-1 urban trauma centre. SIRS data (temperature>38°C or 90 bpm; RR>20/min or a PaCO(2)12.0×10(9)L(-1), or 10 immature bands) collected from presentation, at 24 h intervals until 72 h post injury. Inclusion criteria were all patients generating a trauma team activation response age >16. 336 patients met inclusion criteria. In 46% (155/336) serial SIRS scores could not be calculated due to missing data. Lowest rates of missing data observed on admission [3% (11/336)]. Stratified by ISS>15 (132/336), in 7% (9/132) serial SIRS scores could not be calculated due to missing data. In 123 patients ISS>15 with complete data, 81% (100/123) developed SIRS. For Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS)>2 in at least 2 body regions (64/336) in 5% (3/64) serial SIRS scores could not be calculated, with 92% (56/61) of patients with complete data developing SIRS. For Direct ICU admissions [25% (85/336)] 5% (4/85) of patients could not have serial SIRS calculated [mean ISS 15(±11)] and 90% (73/81) developed SIRS at least once over 72 h. Based on the experience of our level-1 trauma centre, the practicability of including SIRS into the

  5. Splenic Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Diaz, Fabio F; Buitrago Mejia, Francisco; Ulloa Guerrero, Luis Heber

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is the organ that is injured during the closed trauma with more frequency and it is the cause more common of foregone death in the patients with wounded abdominal. At the present time the complications of the splenic trauma are related with their severity, associate wounds, diagnostic fail or inadequate treatments. The lesions that are diagnosed in early form are managed quick and satisfactorily, but the forgotten wounds or the diagnoses and late treatments take for themselves high rates of morbid-mortality. The paper includes their phyto pathology, diagnoses, classification and treatment

  6. Comparison of quality control for trauma management between Western and Eastern European trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambale Giorgio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality control of trauma care is essential to define the effectiveness of trauma center and trauma system. To identify the troublesome issues of the system is the first step for validation of the focused customized solutions. This is a comparative study of two level I trauma centers in Italy and Romania and it has been designed to give an overview of the entire trauma care program adopted in these two countries. This study was aimed to use the results as the basis for recommending and planning changes in the two trauma systems for a better trauma care. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a total of 182 major trauma patients treated in the two hospitals included in the study, between January and June 2002. Every case was analyzed according to the recommended minimal audit filters for trauma quality assurance by The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT. Results Satisfactory yields have been reached in both centers for the management of head and abdominal trauma, airway management, Emergency Department length of stay and early diagnosis and treatment. The main significant differences between the two centers were in the patients' transfers, the leadership of trauma team and the patients' outcome. The main concerns have been in the surgical treatment of fractures, the outcome and the lacking of documentation. Conclusion The analyzed hospitals are classified as Level I trauma center and are within the group of the highest quality level centers in their own countries. Nevertheless, both of them experience major lacks and for few audit filters do not reach the mmum standard requirements of ACS Audit Filters. The differences between the western and the eastern European center were slight. The parameters not reaching the minimum requirements are probably occurring even more often in suburban settings.

  7. Sexuality following trauma injury: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Marie Connell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of the quality of life (QoL of trauma injury survivors is the aim of trauma rehabilitation. It is generally acknowledged that sexuality is an important component of QoL; however, rehabilitation services frequently fall short of including sexuality as a matter of routine. The literature was reviewed to examine the experiences of trauma survivors from three groups: spinal cord injury (SCI, traumatic brain injury (TBI and burns. The focus was on the impact of trauma on the QoL to identify future research directions and to advocate for the inclusion of sexuality as an integral part of rehabilitation. Databases searched were Proquest, Ovid, Cinahl, Medline, PsycInfo and Cochrane Central Register of controlled trials. A total of 36 eligible studies were included: SCI (n = 25, TBI (n = 6, burns (n = 5. Four themes were identified across the three trauma groups that were labeled as physiological impact of trauma on sexuality, cognitive-genital dissociation (CGD, sexual disenfranchisement (SD and sexual rediscovery (SR. Trauma injury has a significant impact on sexuality, which is not routinely addressed within rehabilitation services. Further sexuality research is required among all trauma groups to improve rehabilitation services and in turn QoL outcomes for all trauma survivors.

  8. Female Gambling, Trauma, and the Not Good Enough Self: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Gary; Evans, Kyler; Kalischuk, Ruth Grant; Solowoniuk, Jason; McCallum, Karim; Hagen, Brad

    2013-01-01

    A gap exists within current literature regarding understanding the role that trauma may play in the initiation, development, and progression of female problem and pathological gambling. The purpose of this study is to further illustrate the relationship between trauma and the development problem and pathological gambling by investigating the lived…

  9. Prehospital trauma care reduces mortality. Ten-year results from a time-cohort and trauma audit study in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Mudhafar K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt implementation of Western trauma system models is not feasible in low-resource communities with long prehospital transit times. The aims of the study were to evaluate to which extent a low-cost prehospital trauma system reduces trauma deaths where prehospital transit times are long, and to identify specific life support interventions that contributed to survival. Methods In the study period from 1997 to 2006, 2,788 patients injured by land mines, war, and traffic accidents were managed by a chain-of-survival trauma system where non-graduate paramedics were the key care providers. The study was conducted with a time-period cohort design. Results 37% of the study patients had serious injuries with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9. The mean prehospital transport time was 2.5 hours (95% CI 1.9 - 3.2. During the ten-year study period trauma mortality was reduced from 17% (95% CI 15 -19 to 4% (95% CI 3.5 - 5, survival especially improving in major trauma victims. In most patients with airway problems, in chest injured, and in patients with external hemorrhage, simple life support measures were sufficient to improve physiological severity indicators. Conclusion In case of long prehospital transit times simple life support measures by paramedics and lay first responders reduce trauma mortality in major injuries. Delegating life-saving skills to paramedics and lay people is a key factor for efficient prehospital trauma systems in low-resource communities.

  10. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds to improve trauma patient care-A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Fiona L; Mitchell, Marion

    2017-06-01

    Trauma patient management is complex and challenging for nurses in the Intensive Care Unit. One strategy to promote quality and evidence based care may be through utilising specialty nursing experts both internal and external to the Intensive Care Unit in the form of a nursing round. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds have the potential to improve patient care, collaboration and nurses' knowledge. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to improve trauma patient care and evaluate the nurses perception of improvement. The project included structured, weekly rounds that were conducted at the bedside. Nursing experts and others collaborated to assess and make changes to trauma patients' care. The rounds were evaluated to assess the nurse's perception of improvement. There were 132 trauma patients assessed. A total of 452 changes to patient care occurred. On average, three changes per patient resulted. Changes included nursing management, medical management and wound care. Nursing staff reported an overall improvement of trauma patient care, trauma knowledge, and collaboration with colleagues. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds utilizes expert nursing knowledge. They are suggested as an innovative way to address the clinical challenges of caring for trauma patients and are perceived to enhance patient care and nursing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  12. How I Manage Breast Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the anatomy of the breast and describes injuries and disorders that occur in both men and women, including runner's nipples, bicyclist's nipples, tumors, and trauma. Management of these problems and various types of sports bras are discussed. (Author/MT)

  13. Analysis of the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in 200 victims of different trauma mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Bruno Durante; Razente, Danilo Mardegam; Lacerda, Daniel Augusto Mauad; Lother, Nicole Silveira; VON-Bahten, Luiz Carlos; Stahlschmidt, Carla Martinez Menini

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the epidemiological profile and mortality associated with the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in trauma victims treated at a university hospital. we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study of trauma protocols (prospectively collected) from December 2013 to February 2014, including trauma victims admitted in the emergency room of the Cajuru University Hospital. We set up three groups: (G1) penetrating trauma to the abdomen and chest, (G2) blunt trauma to the abdomen and chest, and (G3) traumatic brain injury. The variables we analyzed were: gender, age, day of week, mechanism of injury, type of transportation, RTS, hospitalization time and mortality. we analyzed 200 patients, with a mean age of 36.42 ± 17.63 years, and 73.5% were male. The mean age was significantly lower in G1 than in the other groups (p grupos foram criados: (G1) trauma penetrante em abdome e tórax, (G2) trauma contuso em abdome e tórax, e (G3) trauma cranioencefálico. As variáveis analisadas foram: sexo, idade, dia da semana, mecanismo de trauma, tipo de transporte, RTS, tempo de internamento e mortalidade. analisou-se 200 pacientes, com média de idade de 36,42 ± 17,63 anos, sendo 73,5% do sexo masculino. A média de idade no G1 foi significativamente menor do que nos demais grupos (p grupos (p grupos G1, G2 e G3, respectivamente. A mediana do RTS entre os óbitos foi 5,49, 7,84 e 1,16, respectivamente, para os três grupos. a maioria dos pacientes eram homens jovens. O RTS mostrou-se efetivo na predição de mortalidade no trauma cranioencefálico, entretanto falhou ao analisar pacientes vítimas de trauma contuso e penetrante.

  14. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  15. Otolith function in patients with head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Dae; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don; Park, Ji Yun; Lee, Tae Kyung; Sung, Ki-Bum

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the otolith function of patients with head trauma, postulating that otolith dysfunction is a cause of nonspecific dizziness after head trauma. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients referred within 3 months after head trauma between March 2007 and December 2009. Pure tone audiometry, caloric testing and otolith function tests, including cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and subjective visual vertical (SVV) tests, were performed on all patients. The relationship between otolith function and otologic symptoms was analyzed. Of the 28 patients with head trauma, 18 complained of dizziness and 12 experienced hearing loss, including 6 patients who complained of both. On defining otolith dysfunction as an abnormal cVEMP or abnormal SVV, a significant difference in otolith dysfunction existed between the groups with and without dizziness [72 (13/18) vs. 20% (2/10)]. In contrast, no significant difference in otolith dysfunction was detected between the abnormal and normal hearing groups. A significant number of the patients who complained of nonspecific dizziness after trauma had abnormal otolith function. After trauma, when patients complain of dizziness, vestibular function tests, including otolith function tests, should be considered.

  16. Evaluating trauma nursing education: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Min; Metcalfe, Helene; Gallagher, Olivia; Hamdorf, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    A review of the current literature evaluating trauma nursing education. A variety of trauma nursing courses exist, to educate nurses working in trauma settings, and to maintain their continuing professional development. Despite an increase in the number of courses delivered, there appears to be a lack of evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of trauma nursing education and in particular the justification for this resource allocation. Integrative literature review. A search of international literature on trauma nursing education evaluation published in English from 1985 to 2015 was conducted through electronic databases CINAHL Plus, Google Scholar, PubMed, Austhealth, Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), Sciverse Science Direct (Elsevier) & One file (Gale). Only peer reviewed journal articles identifying trauma course and trauma nursing course evaluation have been included in the selection criteria. An integrative review of both quantitative and qualitative literature guided by Whittemore and Knafl's theoretical framework using Bowling's and Pearson's validated appraisal checklists, has been conducted for three months. Only 17 studies met the inclusion criteria, including 14 on trauma course evaluation and 3 on trauma nursing course evaluation. Study findings are presented as two main themes: the historical evolution of trauma nursing education and evaluation of trauma nursing education outcomes. Trauma nursing remains in its infancy and education in this specialty is mainly led by continuing professional development courses. The shortage of evaluation studies on trauma nursing courses reflects the similar status in continuing professional development course evaluation. A trauma nursing course evaluation study will address the gap in this under researched area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Social and Psychological Aspects of Dental Trauma, Behavior Management of Young Patients Who have Suffered Dental Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhakis, Aristidis; Athanasiadou, Eirini; Vlachou, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Injuries concerning the skull, the mouth and thus potentially involving the mouth and teeth are characterized as major public health problems due to their high prevalence and very serious functional and aesthetic consequences. Pain, aesthetic and functional problems arising from dental trauma significantly disrupt normal function, and impact, often dramatically, on young patients' quality of life. With regards to the behavior management approach to a child who has suffered a dental trauma, dentist's first step is to be to reassure child and parents. They should feel that the emergency is being properly treated on the part of the dentist and feel safe. The dentist should offer psychological support to child and parents and focus on alleviating any possible pain the child may feel. But, before that, a good level of communication with the child should be established. This can be achieved through the tell-show-do technique, a presentation of the special session's structure, the positive reinforcement method, the attention distraction method and exploiting the child's imagination. The detailed description of the treatment to be followed is crucial for reducing the child's level of stress, as well as that of the parents. Immediately after the completion of treatment, dentist should give listening time to the parents for any queries and include the child who probably wants to share their experience.

  18. Cardiovascular reactivity as a mechanism linking child trauma to adolescent psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleniak, Charlotte; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Ormel, Johan; Riese, Harriette

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in physiological reactivity to stress are argued to be central mechanisms linking adverse childhood environmental experiences to internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Childhood trauma exposure may influence physiological reactivity to stress in distinct ways from other forms of childhood adversity. This study applied a novel theoretical model to investigate the impact of childhood trauma on cardiovascular stress reactivity – the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat. This model suggests that inefficient cardiovascular responses to stress – a threat as opposed to challenge profile – are characterized by blunted cardiac output (CO) reactivity and increased vascular resistance. We examined whether childhood trauma exposure predicted an indicator of the threat profile of cardiovascular reactivity and whether such a pattern was associated with adolescent psychopathology in a population-representative sample of 488 adolescents (M = 16.17 years old, 49.2% boys) in the TRacking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS). Exposure to trauma was associated with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms and a pattern of cardiovascular reactivity consistent with the threat profile, including blunted CO reactivity during a social stress task. Blunted CO reactivity, in turn, was positively associated with externalizing, but not internalizing symptoms and mediated the link between trauma and externalizing psychopathology. None of these associations varied by gender. The biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat provides a novel theoretical framework for understanding disruptions in physiological reactivity to stress following childhood trauma exposure, revealing a potential pathway linking such exposure with externalizing problems in adolescents. PMID:27568327

  19. A study of diagnostic imaging in pancreatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Masashi; Kanazumi, Naohito; Kato, Koichi; Eguchi, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Yuichi; Kimura, Jiro; Ishii, Masataka

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma treatment depends on pancreatic ductal injury. We examined the usefulness and problems of diagnostic imaging, such as enhanced CT, ERP, and CT after ERP, in pancreatic trauma. Subjects were 12 patients with pancreatic trauma treated in our hospital between April 1993 and March 2000. Enhanced CT was performed in 6 patients undergoing diagnostic imagings and ERP in 4 of the 6. Overall diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic ductal injury in enhanced CT was 16.7% and accuracy in ERP with CT after ERP was 100%. Intraoperative diagnosis of main pancreatic ductal injury was difficult in 1 of 2 patients in whom ERP failed. The importance of preoperative diagnostic imaging is thus clear. We expect that MRCP, recently evaluated in pancreatic disease diagnosis, will become a new pancreatic trauma modality. (author)

  20. Current trauma care system and trauma care training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Yang Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a life-threatening “modern disease”. The outcomes could only be optimized by cost-efficient and prompt trauma care, which embarks on the improvement of essential capacities and conceptual revolution in addition to the disruptive innovation of the trauma care system. According to experiences from the developed countries, systematic trauma care training is the cornerstone of the generalization and the improvement on the trauma care, such as the Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS. Currently, the pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS has been one of the essential elements of infrastructure of health services in China, which is also fundamental to the trauma care system. Hereby, the China Trauma Care Training (CTCT with independent intellectual property rights has been initiated and launched by the Chinese Trauma Surgeon Association to extend the up-to-date concepts and techniques in the field of trauma care as well to reinforce the generally well-accepted standardized protocols in the practices. This article reviews the current status of the trauma care system as well as the trauma care training. Keywords: Trauma care system, Trauma care training, China

  1. Trauma-Related Dissociation as a Factor Affecting Musicians' Memory for Music: Some Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Inette; van Niekerk, Caroline; Hartman, Woltemade

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of trauma on musicians revealed concentration and memory problems as two of the most common symptoms hampering the performance of affected individuals. In many instances where the causes of these problems were related to trauma sequelae, these could clearly be linked to dissociative symptoms. The following…

  2. [Surgical tactics in duodenal trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P A; Grishin, A V

    2004-01-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 61 patients with injuries of the duodenum are analyzed. The causes of injuries were stab-incised wounds in 24 patients, missile wound -- in 7, closed abdominal trauma -- in 26, trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy -- in 4. All the patients underwent surgery. Complications were seen in 32 (52.5%) patients, 21 patients died, lethality was 34.4%. Within the first 24 hours since the trauma 7 patients died due to severe combined trauma, blood loss, 54 patients survived acute period of trauma, including 28 patients after open trauma, 26 -- after closed and 4 -- after trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy. Diagnostic and surgical policies are discussed. Results of treatment depending on kind and time of surgery are regarded. It is demonstrated that purulent complications due to retroperitoneal phlegmona, traumatic pancreatitis, pneumonia are the causes of significant number of unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, it is important to adequately incise and drainage infected parts of retroperitoneal fat tissue with two-lumen drainages. Decompression through duodenal tube is the effective procedure for prophylaxis of suture insufficiency and traumatic pancreatitis. Suppression of pancreatic and duodenal secretion with octreotid improves significantly surgical treatment results.

  3. Impact of Sexual Trauma on HIV Care Engagement: Perspectives of Female Patients with Trauma Histories in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Melissa H; Dennis, Alexis C; Choi, Karmel W; Ciya, Nonceba; Joska, John A; Robertson, Corne; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2017-11-01

    South African women have disproportionately high rates of both sexual trauma and HIV. To understand how sexual trauma impacts HIV care engagement, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 15 HIV-infected women with sexual trauma histories, recruited from a public clinic in Cape Town. Interviews explored trauma narratives, coping behaviors and care engagement, and transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparison method. Participants reported multiple and complex traumas across their lifetimes. Sexual trauma hindered HIV care engagement, especially immediately following HIV diagnosis, and there were indications that sexual trauma may interfere with future care engagement, via traumatic stress symptoms including avoidance. Disclosure of sexual trauma was limited; no women had disclosed to an HIV provider. Routine screening for sexual trauma in HIV care settings may help to identify individuals at risk of poor care engagement. Efficacious treatments are needed to address the psychological and behavioral sequelae of trauma.

  4. Gender differences among recidivist trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Rita O; Cureton, Elizabeth L; Dozier, Kristopher C; Victorino, Gregory P

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences among trauma recidivist patients are not well-understood. We hypothesized that males are more likely to be repeatedly involved in the trauma system and have a shorter time to recurrence between repeat episodes of injury compared with females. A retrospective analysis of trauma patients treated at an urban university-based trauma center was performed. Variables including gender, race, insurance status, age, mechanism of injury, outcomes, and injury secondary to domestic violence were compared. Differences were compared using χ(2) tests and log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Kaplan-Meier cumulative event curves. We identified 689 trauma recidivist patients (4.0% of all trauma visits) over a 10-y period. Compared to single-visit patients, recidivist patients were more likely to be male (87% versus 73%), uninsured (78% versus 66%), and have injuries secondary to assaults (54% versus 37%) (P trauma visit was shorter for females compared with males (23 ± 2.5 versus 30 ± 1.2 mo, P trauma than were male recidivists (69% versus 43%, P trauma patients have a much shorter time to recurrence for a second traumatic injury than do males. Female recidivists have a high likelihood of assault-associated injuries and domestic violence. Trauma centers should screen for domestic violence among trauma patients to aid in preventing further repeat episodes of injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blunt cerebrovascular injuries in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) includes trauma to the carotid or vertebral vessels and is noted in 0.1% of hospitalized trauma patients without an initial screening system in place. Several important topics must be addressed including determination of the appropriate screening population, the best modality of screening for diagnosis, treatment types, and required follow-up of blunt cerebrovascular injuries. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Trauma patient discharge and care transition experiences: Identifying opportunities for quality improvement in trauma centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib Conn, Lesley; Zwaiman, Ashley; DasGupta, Tracey; Hales, Brigette; Watamaniuk, Aaron; Nathens, Avery B

    2018-01-01

    Challenges delivering quality care are especially salient during hospital discharge and care transitions. Severely injured patients discharged from a trauma centre will go either home, to rehabilitation or another acute care hospital with complex management needs. This purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of trauma patients and families treated in a regional academic trauma centre to better understand and improve their discharge and care transition experiences. A qualitative study using inductive thematic analysis was conducted between March and October 2016. Telephone interviews were conducted with trauma patients and/or a family member after discharge from the trauma centre. Data collection and analysis were completed inductively and iteratively consistent with a qualitative approach. Twenty-four interviews included 19 patients and 7 family members. Participants' experiences drew attention to discharge and transfer processes that either (1) Fostered quality discharge or (2) Impeded quality discharge. Fostering quality discharge was ward staff preparation efforts; establishing effective care continuity; and, adequate emotional support. Impeding discharge quality was perceived pressure to leave the hospital; imposed transfer decisions; and, sub-optimal communication and coordination around discharge. Patient-provider communication was viewed to be driven by system, rather than patient need. Inter-facility information gaps raised concern about receiving facilities' ability to care for injured patients. The quality of trauma patient discharge and transition experiences is undermined by system- and ward-level processes that compete, rather than align, in producing high quality patient-centred discharge. Local improvement solutions focused on modifiable factors within the trauma centre include patient-oriented discharge education and patient navigation; however, these approaches alone may be insufficient to enhance patient experiences. Trauma patients

  7. Therapeutic Assessment of Complex Trauma: A Single-Case Time-Series Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tarocchi, Anna; Aschieri, Filippo; Fantini, Francesca; Smith, Justin D.

    2013-01-01

    The cumulative effect of repeated traumatic experiences in early childhood incrementally increases the risk of adjustment problems later in life. Surviving traumatic environments can lead to the development of an interrelated constellation of emotional and interpersonal symptoms termed complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD). Effective treatment of trauma begins with a multimethod psychological assessment and requires the use of several evidence-based therapeutic processes, including es...

  8. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  9. Military sexual trauma, combat exposure, and negative urgency as independent predictors of PTSD and subsequent alcohol problems among OEF/OIF veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Austin M; Tirabassi, Christine K; Simons, Raluca M; Simons, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-01

    This study tested a path model of relationships between military sexual trauma (MST), combat exposure, negative urgency, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and alcohol use and related problems. The sample consisted of 86 Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans who reported drinking at least one alcoholic beverage per week. PTSD mediated the relationships between MST and alcohol-related problems, negative urgency and alcohol-related problems, and combat exposure and alcohol-related problems. In addition, negative urgency had a direct effect on alcohol problems. These results indicate that MST, combat exposure, and negative urgency independently predict PTSD symptoms and PTSD symptoms mediate their relationship with alcohol-related problems. Findings support previous literature on the effect of combat exposure and negative urgency on PTSD and subsequent alcohol-related problems. The current study also contributes to the limited research regarding the relationship between MST, PSTD, and alcohol use and related problems. Clinical interventions aimed at reducing emotional dysregulation and posttraumatic stress symptomology may subsequently improve alcohol-related outcomes. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. [First aid system for trauma: development and status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D K; Lin, W C; Zhang, P; Kuang, S J; Huang, W; Wang, T B

    2017-04-18

    With the great progress of the economy, the level of industrialization has been increasing year by year, which leads to an increase in accidental trauma accidents. Chinese annual death of trauma is already more than 400 000, which makes trauma the fifth most common cause of death, following malignant tumor, heart, brain and respiratory diseases. Trauma is the leading cause of the death of young adults. At the same time, trauma has become a serious social problem in peace time. Trauma throws great treats on human health and life. As an important part in the medical and social security system, the emergency of trauma system occupies a very important position in the emergency medical service system. In European countries as well as the United States and also many other developed countries, trauma service system had a long history, and progressed to an advanced stage. However, Chinese trauma service system started late and is still developing. It has not turned into a complete and standardized system yet. This review summarizes the histories and current situations of the development of traumatic first aid system separately in European countries, the United States and our country. Special attentions are paid to the effects of the pre- and in-hospital emergency care. We also further try to explore the Chinese trauma emergency model that adapts to the situations of China and characteristics of different regions of China. Our review also introduces the trauma service system that suits the situations of China proposed by Professor Jiang Baoguo's team in details, taking Chinese conditions into account, they conducted a thematic study and made an expert consensus on pre-hospital emergency treatment of severe trauma, providing a basic routine and guidance of severe trauma treatment for those pre-hospital emergency physicians. They also advised to establish independent trauma disciplines and trauma specialist training systems, and to build the regional trauma care system as

  11. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  12. [Establishement for regional pelvic trauma database in Hunan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Zhu, Yong; Long, Haitao; Yang, Junxiao; Sun, Buhua; Li, Kanghua

    2017-04-28

    To establish a database for pelvic trauma in Hunan Province, and to start the work of multicenter pelvic trauma registry.
 Methods: To establish the database, literatures relevant to pelvic trauma were screened, the experiences from the established trauma database in China and abroad were learned, and the actual situations for pelvic trauma rescue in Hunan Province were considered. The database for pelvic trauma was established based on the PostgreSQL and the advanced programming language Java 1.6.
 Results: The complex procedure for pelvic trauma rescue was described structurally. The contents for the database included general patient information, injurious condition, prehospital rescue, conditions in admission, treatment in hospital, status on discharge, diagnosis, classification, complication, trauma scoring and therapeutic effect. The database can be accessed through the internet by browser/servicer. The functions for the database include patient information management, data export, history query, progress report, video-image management and personal information management.
 Conclusion: The database with whole life cycle pelvic trauma is successfully established for the first time in China. It is scientific, functional, practical, and user-friendly.

  13. Trauma in Auckland: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streat, S J; Donaldson, M L; Judson, J A

    1987-07-22

    Data are presented on all 569 subjects who, as a result of trauma, either died or were admitted to hospital in Auckland over a four week period. Median age was 23 with an overall 3:2 male:female ratio. Median injury severity score (ISS) was five with 9% of subjects having an ISS of 16 or more (major trauma). Blunt trauma accounted for 84% of all injuries. Life threatening injuries were most commonly to the head, thorax and abdomen while the largest number of less severe injuries were to the extremities. Eight subjects died before admission to hospital and a further six in hospital. Definitive care was given to 98% of patients at Middlemore and Auckland hospitals (including the onsite Princess Mary paediatric facility) but 26% had presented first to other hospitals and 43% of all patients were transferred from one hospital to another. The 561 patients used 6380 hospital days (including 314 intensive care days) and the following services--operating room 63%, orthopaedic ward 45%, plastic surgical ward 17%, paediatric ward 15%, neurosurgical ward 10%, general surgical ward 5%, intensive care 5% and CT scanner 4%. Only one hospital death was judged potentially preventable. This study reveals areas where trauma care could be improved, demonstrates the large amount of hospital resources required to treat trauma and particularly highlights the urgent need for studies into strategies for trauma prevention in New Zealand.

  14. A systematic review of technology-based interventions for co-occurring substance use and trauma symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Amanda K; Wilson, Sarah M; Skopp, Nancy A; Osenbach, Janyce E; Reger, Greg

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Technology-based mental health interventions are becoming increasingly common, and several have begun to target multiple outcomes in a single intervention. Recent developments in the treatment of co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder has led to the development and testing of technology-based interventions for these disorders. The current systematic review examined technology-based interventions designed to improve mental health outcomes among patients with co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use. Methods Of 601 articles reviewed, 14 included a technology-based intervention for patients with these co-occurring problems. Results Seven of these studies provided preliminary evidence that technology-based interventions are likely to be efficacious in reducing either trauma symptoms or substance use. The seven remaining studies demonstrated that technology-based interventions for co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use are feasible. Discussion This review suggests that technology-based interventions for co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use are feasible, but more work is needed to assess efficacy using scientifically rigorous studies.

  15. Sexuality following trauma injury: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kylie Marie Connell; Rosemary Coates; Fiona Melanie Wood

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of the quality of life (QoL) of trauma injury survivors is the aim of trauma rehabilitation. It is generally acknowledged that sexuality is an important component of QoL; however, rehabilitation services frequently fall short of including sexuality as a matter of routine. The literature was reviewed to examine the experiences of trauma survivors from three groups: spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and burns. The focus was on the impact of trauma on the QoL to ...

  16. Violent and Fatal Youth Trauma: Is There a Missed Opportunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Madlinger, DO

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accidents and assaults (homicides are the leading causes of death among the youth of the United States, accounting for 53.3% of deaths among children aged 1 to19 years. Victim recidivism,defined as repeated visits to the emergency department (ED as a victim of violent trauma, is a significantly growing public health problem. As 5-year mortality rates for recidivism are as high as 20%,it is important to determine whether victims with a history of violent trauma are at increased risk for fatal outcome with their next trauma. We hypothesized that victims of violent trauma who have had 1 prior ED visit for violent trauma will have increased odds of fatal outcome.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients presenting with penetrating trauma to the ED from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2009. All patients between the ages of 15 to 25 years who presented to the ED for any penetrating trauma were included. Patients with prior presentations for penetrating trauma were compared to those patients who were first-time presenters to determine the odds ratio of fatal outcome.Results: Overall, 15,395 patients were treated for traumatic presentations. Of these, 1,044 met inclusion criteria. Demographically, 79.4% were Hispanic, 19.4% were African American, and 0.96% were Caucasian. The average age was 21 years, and 98% of the population was male. One hundred and forty-seven (14% had prior presentations, and 897 (86% did not. Forty of the 147 patients (27%with prior presentations had a fatal outcome as compared to 29 patients of the 868 (3% without prior presentations, with odds ratio of 10.8 (95% confidence interval, 6.4–18.1; Pearson v2, P , 0.001. The 5-year mortality rate for those patients with fatal outcomes was calculated at 16.5%.Conclusion: Patients who had prior ED visits for penetrating trauma were at greater risk for fatal outcomes compared to those with no prior visits. Therefore, trauma-related ED visits might

  17. Trauma in sub-Saharan Africa: review of cost, estimation methods, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigelsky, Melissa A; Aten, Jamie D; Gerberich, Stacy; Sanders, Mark; Post, Rachael; Hook, Kimberly; Ku, Angie; Boan, David M; Monroe, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Trauma is a widely acknowledged problem facing individuals and communities in developing countries. In sub-Saharan Africa-a region that is home to some of the world's worst human rights violations, ethnic and civil conflicts, disease epidemics, and conditions of poverty-trauma is an all-too-common experience in citizens' daily lives. In order to address these conditions effectively, the impact of trauma must be understood. The authors reviewed recent literature on the cost and consequences of psychological trauma in sub-Saharan Africa to provide a substantive perspective on how trauma affects individuals, communities, and organizations and to inform the effort to determine a method for measuring the impact of trauma in sub-Saharan Africa and the efficacy of trauma interventions in the region. Several recommendations are offered to help broaden and deepen the current approaches to conceptualizing trauma, evaluating its cost, and intervening on behalf of those impacted by trauma in sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taourel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)], E-mail: p-taourel@chu-montpellier.fr; Vernhet, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Suau, A.; Granier, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Lopez, F.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Nimes (France); Aufort, S. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)

    2007-10-15

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications.

  19. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taourel, P.; Vernhet, H.; Suau, A.; Granier, C.; Lopez, F.M.; Aufort, S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications

  20. Relationship of early-life trauma, war-related trauma, personality traits, and PTSD symptom severity: a retrospective study on female civilian victims of war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Stevanović

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consequences of war-related traumatisation have mostly been investigated in military and predominant male populations, while research on female civilian victims of war has been neglected. Furthermore, research of post-war posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in women has rarely included early-life trauma in their prediction models, so the contribution of trauma in childhood and early youth is still unexplored. Objective: To examine the relationship of early-life trauma, war-related trauma, personality traits, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress among female civilian victims of the recent war in Croatia. Method: The cross-sectional study included 394 participants, 293 war-traumatised adult women civilians, and 101 women without war-related trauma. Participants were recruited using the snowball sampling method. The applied instruments included the Clinician-Administrated PTSD Scale (CAPS, the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R, the War Stressors Assessment Questionnaire (WSAQ, and the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report-Short Form (ETISR-SF. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the prediction model of PTSD symptom severity measured by CAPS score for current PTSD. Results: The prevalence of current PTSD (CAPS cut-off score=65 in this cohort was 20.7%. The regression model that included age, early-life trauma, war-related trauma, neuroticism, and extraversion as statistically significant predictors explained 45.8% of variance in PTSD symptoms. Conclusions: Older age, exposure to early-life trauma, exposure to war-related traumatic events, high neuroticism, and low extraversion are independent factors associated with higher level of PTSD symptoms among women civilian victims of war.

  1. Cumulative childhood trauma and psychological maladjustment of sexually abused children in Korea: mediating effects of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Young; Oh, Kyung Ja

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the mediating effects of emotion regulation on the association between cumulative childhood trauma and behavior problems in sexually abused children in Korea, using structural equation modeling (SEM). Data were collected on 171 children (ages 6-13 years) referred to a public counseling center for sexual abuse in Seoul, Korea. Cumulative childhood traumas were defined on the basis of number of traumas (physical abuse, witnessing domestic violence, neglect, traumatic separation from parent, and sexual abuse) and the severity and duration of traumas. Children were evaluated by their parents on emotion regulation using the Emotion Regulation Checklist and internalizing and externalizing behavior problems using the Korean-Child Behavior Checklist. SEM analyses confirmed the complete mediation model, in which emotion dysregulation fully mediates the relationship between cumulative childhood traumas and internalizing/externalizing behavior problems. These findings indicate that emotion regulation is an important mechanism that can explain the negative effects of cumulative childhood traumas and that there is a need to focus on emotion regulation in sexually abused children exposed to cumulative trauma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Selfie Wrist – Selfie induced trauma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, RF

    2017-06-01

    The selfie phenomenon has exploded worldwide over the past two years. Selfies have been linked to a large number of mortalities and significant morbidity worldwide. However, trauma associated with selfies including fractures, is rarely publicised. Here we present a case series of upper extremity trauma secondary to selfies across all age groups during the summer period. Four cases of distal radius and ulna trauma in all age groups were reported. This case series highlights the dangers associated with taking selfies and the trauma that can result.

  3. Pearls of mandibular trauma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Feldman, Evan M; Chike-Obi, Chuma J; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2010-11-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbidities. Whereas general principles guide the management of the majority of injuries, special consideration must be paid to the edentulous patient, complex and comminuted fractures, and pediatric patients. These topics are discussed in this article, with a special emphasis on pearls of mandibular trauma management.

  4. Trauma Tapping Technique: Practical First Aid for Stress and Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show a lifetime ... include re-experiencing the traumatic event, avoidant behavior for the memories of ... Methods. Trauma tapping technique (TTT) is a procedure that uses touch ...

  5. Analysis of the Revised Trauma Score (RTS in 200 victims of different trauma mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO DURANTE ALVAREZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the epidemiological profile and mortality associated with the Revised Trauma Score (RTS in trauma victims treated at a university hospital. Methods: we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study of trauma protocols (prospectively collected from December 2013 to February 2014, including trauma victims admitted in the emergency room of the Cajuru University Hospital. We set up three groups: (G1 penetrating trauma to the abdomen and chest, (G2 blunt trauma to the abdomen and chest, and (G3 traumatic brain injury. The variables we analyzed were: gender, age, day of week, mechanism of injury, type of transportation, RTS, hospitalization time and mortality. Results: we analyzed 200 patients, with a mean age of 36.42 ± 17.63 years, and 73.5% were male. The mean age was significantly lower in G1 than in the other groups (p <0.001. Most (40% of the visits occurred on weekends and the most common pre-hospital transport service (58% was the SIATE (Emergency Trauma Care Integrated Service. The hospital stay was significantly higher in G1 compared with the other groups (p <0.01. Regarding mortality, there were 12%, 1.35% and 3.95% of deaths in G1, G2 and G3, respectively. The median RTS among the deaths was 5.49, 7.84 and 1.16, respectively, for the three groups. Conclusion: the majority of patients were young men. RTS was effective in predicting mortality in traumatic brain injury, however failing to predict it in patients suffering from blunt and penetrating trauma.

  6. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  7. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ruiting

    2004-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  8. Long-term outcome and quality of life of patients treated in surgical intensive care: a comparison between sepsis and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosec Jagodic, Helena; Jagodic, Klemen; Podbregar, Matej

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to determine long-term survival and quality of life of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) because of sepsis or trauma. This was an observational study conducted in an 11-bed, closed surgical ICU at a 860-bed teaching general hospital over a 1-year period (January 2003 to December 2003). Patients were divided into two groups according to admission diagnoses: group 1 included patients with sepsis; and group 2 included patients with trauma (polytrauma, multiple trauma, head injury, or spinal injury). Quality of life was assessed after 2 years following ICU admission using the EuroQol 5D questionnaire. A total of 164 patients (98 trauma patients and 66 patients with sepsis) were included in the study. Trauma patients were younger than patients with sepsis (53 +/- 21 years versus 64 +/- 13 years; P Trauma patients stayed longer on the general ward (35 +/- 44 days versus 17 +/- 24 days; P trauma group (surgical ICU survival: 60% versus 74%; in-hospital survival: 42% versus 62%; post-hospital survival: 78% versus 92%; cumulative 2-year survival: 33% versus 57%; P quality of life in all five dimensions of the EuroQol 5D between groups: 60% of patients had signs of depression, almost 60% had problems in usual activities and 56% had pain. Patients with sepsis treated in a surgical ICU have higher short-term and long-term mortality than do trauma patients. However, quality of life is reduced to the same level in both groups.

  9. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjersberg, W R; Bergs, E A; Mushkudiani, N; Klimek, M; Schipper, I B

    2009-01-01

    To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. All victims of severe blunt trauma were consecutively included. Patients with a revised trauma score (RTS) of 12 were resuscitated by a "minor trauma" team and patients with an RTS of less than 12 were resuscitated by a "severe trauma" team. Digital video recordings were used to analyse protocol compliance and time management during initial assessment. From 1 May to 1 September 2003, 193 resuscitations were included. The "minor trauma" team assessed 119 patients, with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 7 (range 1-45). Overall protocol compliance was 42%, ranging from 0% for thoracic percussion to 93% for thoracic auscultation. The median resuscitation time was 45.9 minutes (range 39.7-55.9). The "severe team" assessed 74 patients, with a mean ISS of 22 (range 1-59). Overall protocol compliance was 53%, ranging from 4% for thoracic percussion to 95% for thoracic auscultation. Resuscitation took 34.8 minutes median (range 21.6-44.1). Results showed the current trauma resuscitation to be ATLS-like, with sometimes very low protocol compliance rates. Timing of secondary survey and radiology and thus time efficiency remains a challenge in all trauma patients. To assess the effect of trauma resuscitation protocols on outcome, protocol adherence needs to be improved.

  10. Non-trauma-associated additional findings in whole-body CT examinations in patients with multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffstetter, P.; Herold, T.; Daneschnejad, M.; Zorger, N.; Jung, E.M.; Feuerbach, S.; Schreyer, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: whole-body CT scans for patients with multiple trauma represent an increasingly accepted first diagnostic tool. The multidetector approach in particular provides appropriate diagnostic algorithms for detecting nearly all relevant traumatic findings in a short time with a high grade of sensitivity and specificity. Non-trauma-associated additional findings are commonly depicted based on these CT examinations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the number and quality of these additional findings in consecutive patients with multiple trauma. Materials and methods: between 3/04 and 8/06 we scanned 304 patients according to our dedicated multiple trauma protocol. The examination protocol includes a head scan without intravenous contrast followed by a whole-body scan including the neck, thorax and abdomen acquired by a 16-row CT Scanner (Siemens, Sensation 16). The CT scans were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists with respect to non-trauma-associated findings. Lesions were assessed according to their clinical relevance (highly relevant, moderately relevant, not relevant). For patients with highly relevant findings, additional follow-up research was performed. Results: The average age was 43 years (range 3 - 92). 236 of the patients were male (77.6%), 68 female (22.4%). 153 patients (50.3%) had additional non-trauma-associated findings. In 20 cases (6.6%) lesions with high clinical relevance were detected (e.g. carcinoma of the kidney or the ovary). In 71 patients (23.4%) findings with moderate relevance were described. In 63 patients (20.7%) additional findings without major relevance were diagnosed. Conclusion: Whole-body CT scans of patients randomized by a trauma show a considerable number of non-trauma-associated additional findings. In about 30% of cases, these findings are clinically relevant because further diagnostic workup or treatment in the short or medium-term is needed. The results of these analyses emphasize the diagnostic value of CT

  11. The development and evaluation of a trauma curriculum for psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Noor Jarun; Melton, Bengi; Banu, Sophia; Coverdale, John; Valdez, M Renee

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to briefly describe a curriculum on trauma in order to help other educators in their own planning and development of teaching on trauma. The 12-week course was offered to third-year psychiatry residents as part of their didactics scheduling. The classes included information on a wide variety of types of trauma including natural disasters, childhood trauma, refugee trauma, survivors of torture, intimate partner violence, and military sexual trauma. The course also offered techniques in therapy informed by transference and countertransference along with role-playing activities with the resident participants. Residents completed a pre- and postcourse survey in order to assess the attitudes, comfort, and knowledge in screening for trauma exposure. The proportion of residents who reported that it was very important to screen for trauma increased. Similarly, the proportion of residents who indicated they now screen for trauma increased as well. However, these were nonsignificant changes. There was no change in the proportion of residents who felt comfortable assessing for trauma before and after the curriculum. Even after the course, almost half of the respondents reported that they were still not comfortable in asking about refugee's experience of trauma or torture More residents reported that they screen for trauma after the curriculum. An ongoing development and evaluation of model curricula including possible expansion across specialties and health-care disciplines is warranted for this critically important topic area.

  12. The sequential pathway between trauma-related symptom severity and cognitive-based smoking processes through perceived stress and negative affect reduction expectancies among trauma exposed smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garey, Lorra; Cheema, Mina K; Otal, Tanveer K; Schmidt, Norman B; Neighbors, Clayton; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Smoking rates are markedly higher among trauma-exposed individuals relative to non-trauma-exposed individuals. Extant work suggests that both perceived stress and negative affect reduction smoking expectancies are independent mechanisms that link trauma-related symptoms and smoking. Yet, no work has examined perceived stress and negative affect reduction smoking expectancies as potential explanatory variables for the relation between trauma-related symptom severity and smoking in a sequential pathway model. Methods The present study utilized a sample of treatment-seeking, trauma-exposed smokers (n = 363; 49.0% female) to examine perceived stress and negative affect reduction expectancies for smoking as potential sequential explanatory variables linking trauma-related symptom severity and nicotine dependence, perceived barriers to smoking cessation, and severity of withdrawal-related problems and symptoms during past quit attempts. As hypothesized, perceived stress and negative affect reduction expectancies had a significant sequential indirect effect on trauma-related symptom severity and criterion variables. Findings further elucidate the complex pathways through which trauma-related symptoms contribute to smoking behavior and cognitions, and highlight the importance of addressing perceived stress and negative affect reduction expectancies in smoking cessation programs among trauma-exposed individuals. (Am J Addict 2016;25:565-572). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  13. Developmental trauma disorder: pros and cons of including formal criteria in the psychiatric diagnostic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Marc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article reviews the current debate on developmental trauma disorder (DTD with respect to formalizing its diagnostic criteria. Victims of abuse, neglect, and maltreatment in childhood often develop a wide range of age-dependent psychopathologies with various mental comorbidities. The supporters of a formal DTD diagnosis argue that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD does not cover all consequences of severe and complex traumatization in childhood. Discussion Traumatized individuals are difficult to treat, but clinical experience has shown that they tend to benefit from specific trauma therapy. A main argument against inclusion of formal DTD criteria into existing diagnostic systems is that emphasis on the etiology of the disorder might force current diagnostic systems to deviate from their purely descriptive nature. Furthermore, comorbidities and biological aspects of the disorder may be underdiagnosed using the DTD criteria. Summary Here, we discuss arguments for and against the proposal of DTD criteria and address implications and consequences for the clinical practice.

  14. Radiology of orbital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.K.; Lazo, A.; Metes, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography has become the gold standard against which to measure orbital imaging modalities. The simultaneous display of bone, soft tissues, paranasal sinuses, and intracranial structures is a unique advantage. Radiation dose and cost have been cited as disadvantages. These would suggest that CT be reserved for the patient with significant orbital injury or difficult diagnostic problems. Magnetic resonance is limited in the investigation of orbital trauma

  15. Use of laparoscopy in trauma at a level II trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzana, Daniel C; Kotwall, Cyrus A; Clancy, Thomas V; Hope, William W

    2011-01-01

    Enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in trauma has not rivaled that for general surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with laparoscopy at a level II trauma center. A retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic laparoscopy was performed from January 2004 to July 2010. Laparoscopy was performed in 16 patients during the study period. The average age was 35 years. Injuries included left diaphragm in 4 patients, mesenteric injury in 2, and vaginal laceration, liver laceration, small bowel injury, renal laceration, urethral/pelvic, and colon injury in 1 patient each. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in 11 patients (69%) with 3 patients requiring conversion to an open procedure. Successful therapeutic laparoscopy was performed in 5 patients for repair of isolated diaphragm injuries (2), a small bowel injury, a colon injury, and placement of a suprapubic bladder catheter. Average length of stay was 5.6 days (range, 0 to 23), and 75% of patients were discharged home. Morbidity rate was 13% with no mortalities or missed injuries. Laparoscopy is a seldom-used modality at our trauma center; however, it may play a role in a select subset of patients.

  16. Efficacy of a sedo-analgesia protocol in pre-hospital trauma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Occhionorelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-hospital trauma treatment is an important situation in which pain should be appropriately assessed and treated, but there is a great lack of studies about it. Literature has widely pointed out that the underanalgesia problem is spread to all groups of patients. The objective of the study is to verify the efficacy of a sedation-analgesia protocol based on the use of NSAIDs, Fentanyl and Midazolam, for prehospital treatment of trauma patients. The protocol was tested in three Emergency Medical Services for a four month period, in which 30 patients were included in the study. Results evidenced a good management of both pain and anxiety in the majority of patients treated, with the achievement of analgesia target in 80% of the patients and sedation target in 100% of the patients.

  17. The impact of specialist trauma service on major trauma mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ting Hway; Lumsdaine, William; Hardy, Benjamin M; Lee, Keegan; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    Trauma services throughout the world have had positive effects on trauma-related mortality. Australian trauma services are generally more consultative in nature rather than the North American model of full trauma admission service. We hypothesized that the introduction of a consultative specialist trauma service in a Level I Australian trauma center would reduce mortality of the severely injured. A 10-year retrospective study (January 1, 2002-December 31, 2011) was performed on all trauma patients admitted with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Patients were identified from the trauma registry, and data for age, sex, mechanism of injury, ISS, survival to discharge, and length of stay were collected. Mortality was examined for patients with severe injury (ISS > 15) and patients with critical injury (ISS > 24) and compared for the three periods: 2002-2004 (without trauma specialist), 2005-2007 (with trauma specialist), and 2008-2011 (with specialist trauma service). A total of 3,869 severely injured (ISS > 15) trauma patients were identified during the 10-year period. Of these, 2,826 (73%) were male, 1,513 (39%) were critically injured (ISS > 24), and more than 97% (3,754) were the victim of blunt trauma. Overall mortality decreased from 12.4% to 9.3% (relative risk, 0.75) from period one to period three and from 25.4% to 20.3% (relative risk, 0.80) for patients with critical injury. A 0.46% per year decrease (p = 0.018) in mortality was detected (odds ratio, 0.63; p 24), the trend was (0.61% per year; odds ratio, 0.68; p = 0.039). The introduction of a specialist trauma service decreased the mortality of patients with severe injury, the model of care should be considered to implement state- and nationwide in Australia. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  18. Trauma, mental health, and intergenerational associations in Kosovar Families 11 years after the war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthis Schick

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: While there is a considerable amount of literature addressing consequences of trauma in veterans and holocaust survivors, war and postwar civilian populations, particularly children, are still understudied. Evidence regarding intergenerational effects of trauma in families is inconsistent. Objective: To shed light on intergenerational aspects of trauma-related mental health problems among families 11 years after the Kosovo war. Method: In a cross-sectional study, a paired sample of 51 randomly selected triplets (school-aged child, mother, father, N=153 of Kosovar families was investigated with regard to trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress (UCLA Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, anxiety (Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, and depressive symptoms (Depressionsinventar für Kinder und Jugendliche [DIKJ; depression inventory for children and adolescents], Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Results: Considerable trauma exposure and high prevalence rates of clinically relevant posttraumatic stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were found in both parents and children. While strong correlations were found between children's depressive symptoms and paternal posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, maternal symptoms did not correlate with their children's. In multiple regression analyses, only posttraumatic stress symptoms of fathers were significantly related with children's depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Eleven years after the Kosovo war, the presence of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in civilian adults and their children is still substantial. As symptoms of parents and children are associated, mental health problems of close ones should be actively screened and accounted for in comprehensive treatment plans, using a systemic approach. Future research should include longitudinal studies conducting multivariate analyses with larger sample sizes in order to investigate

  19. Cost Savings Associated with the Adoption of a Cloud Computing Data Transfer System for Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, James M; Montgomery, Stephanie C; Wolf, Laura; Jayaraman, Vijay; Twohig, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Among transferred trauma patients, challenges with the transfer of radiographic studies include problems loading or viewing the studies at the receiving hospitals, and problems manipulating, reconstructing, or evalu- ating the transferred images. Cloud-based image transfer systems may address some ofthese problems. We reviewed the charts of patients trans- ferred during one year surrounding the adoption of a cloud computing data transfer system. We compared the rates of repeat imaging before (precloud) and af- ter (postcloud) the adoption of the cloud-based data transfer system. During the precloud period, 28 out of 100 patients required 90 repeat studies. With the cloud computing transfer system in place, three out of 134 patients required seven repeat films. There was a statistically significant decrease in the proportion of patients requiring repeat films (28% to 2.2%, P < .0001). Based on an annualized volume of 200 trauma patient transfers, the cost savings estimated using three methods of cost analysis, is between $30,272 and $192,453.

  20. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE NEED OF POLICE OFFICIALS FOR TRAUMA INTERVENTION PROGRAMMES – A QUALITATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strydom, Herman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available lOfficials in the South African Police Service (SAPS are exposed to multiple traumatic incidents. The effect of such exposure is aggravated by various contributing factors that may cause intense trauma for the individual, family members and the police service. The risk factors include post-traumatic stress, acute stress, depression, alcohol abuse, suicide and impaired productivity. It is therefore important that officials have direct access to support. The efficacy of the present trauma intervention programmes in the SAPS is questioned, because despite their implementation police officials still present high levels of acute and behavioural problems

  1. Systematic analysis of ocular trauma by a new proposed ocular trauma classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhartendu Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current classification of ocular trauma does not incorporate adnexal trauma, injuries that are attributable to a nonmechanical cause and destructive globe injuries. This study proposes a new classification system of ocular trauma which is broader-based to allow for the classification of a wider range of ocular injuries not covered by the current classification. Methods: A clinic-based cross-sectional study to validate the proposed classification. We analyzed 535 cases of ocular injury from January 1, 2012 to February 28, 2012 over a 4-year period in an eye hospital in central India using our proposed classification system and compared it with conventional classification. Results: The new classification system allowed for classification of all 535 cases of ocular injury. The conventional classification was only able to classify 364 of the 535 trauma cases. Injuries involving the adnexa, nonmechanical injuries and destructive globe injuries could not be classified by the conventional classification, thus missing about 33% of cases. Conclusions: Our classification system shows an improvement over existing ocular trauma classification as it allows for the classification of all type of ocular injuries and will allow for better and specific prognostication. This system has the potential to aid communication between physicians and result in better patient care. It can also provide a more authentic, wide spectrum of ocular injuries in correlation with etiology. By including adnexal injuries and nonmechanical injuries, we have been able to classify all 535 cases of trauma. Otherwise, about 30% of cases would have been excluded from the study.

  2. Incremental cost-effectiveness of trauma service improvements for road trauma casualties: experience of an Australian major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Michael M; Bein, Kendall J; Hendrie, Delia; Gabbe, Belinda; Byrne, Christopher M; Ivers, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of trauma service funding enhancements at an inner city major trauma centre. Methods The present study was a cost-effectiveness analysis using retrospective trauma registry data of all major trauma patients (injury severity score >15) presenting after road trauma between 2001 and 2012. The primary outcome was cost per life year gained associated with the intervention period (2007-12) compared with the pre-intervention period (2001-06). Incremental costs were represented by all trauma-related funding enhancements undertaken between 2007 and 2010. Risk adjustment for years of life lost was conducted using zero-inflated negative binomial regression modelling. All costs were expressed in 2012 Australian dollar values. Results In all, 876 patients were identified during the study period. The incremental cost of trauma enhancements between 2007 and 2012 totalled $7.91million, of which $2.86million (36%) was attributable to road trauma patients. After adjustment for important covariates, the odds of in-hospital mortality reduced by around half (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27, 0.82; P=0.01). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was A$7600 per life year gained (95% CI A$5524, $19333). Conclusion Trauma service funding enhancements that enabled a quality improvement program at a single major trauma centre were found to be cost-effective based on current international and Australian standards. What is known about this topic? Trauma quality improvement programs have been implemented across most designated trauma hospitals in an effort to improve hospital care processes and outcomes for injured patients. These involve a combination of education and training, the use of audit and key performance indicators. What does this paper add? A trauma quality improvement program initiated at an Australian Major Trauma Centre was found to be cost-effective over 12 years with

  3. The Role of Cumulative Trauma, Betrayal, and Appraisals in Understanding Trauma Symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christina Gamache; Cromer, Lisa Demarni; Deprince, Anne P; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2013-03-01

    Poor psychological outcomes are common among trauma survivors, yet not all survivors experience adverse sequelae. The current study examined links between cumulative trauma exposure as a function of the level of betrayal (measured by the relational closeness of the survivor and the perpetrator), trauma appraisals, gender, and trauma symptoms. Participants were 273 college students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event on a trauma checklist. Three cumulative indices were constructed to assess the number of different types of traumas experienced that were low (LBTs), moderate (MBTs), or high in betrayal (HBTs). Greater trauma exposure was related to more symptoms of depression, dissociation, and PTSD, with exposure to HBTs contributing the most. Women were more likely to experience HBTs than men, but there were no gender differences in trauma-related symptoms. Appraisals of trauma were predictive of trauma-related symptoms over and above the effects explained by cumulative trauma at each level of betrayal. The survivor's relationship with the perpetrator, the effect of cumulative trauma, and their combined impact on trauma symptomatology are discussed.

  4. Equine-Facilitated Therapy and Trauma: Current Knowledge, Future Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlys Staudt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Equine-facilitated therapy (EFT is a relatively new treatment for trauma and PTSD. EFT as well as animal assisted interventions in general have been introduced and implemented in mental health treatment for children and adults, though the research in support of these interventions has not kept up with practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the use of EFT for clients suffering from trauma/PTSD. Studies were included if PTSD/trauma was assessed and/or was measured as an outcome. A search of relevant databases resulted in nine peer-reviewed studies that met criteria. Studies are summarized and implications for future research are discussed. In general, findings suggest that EFT is a promising intervention for trauma/PTSD. Recommendations include a call for more research that includes veterans as well as for research that explicates the mechanisms by which EFT may be effective.      Key words: trauma, PTSD, equine, equine therapy

  5. Neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma: pitfalls and controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Sujan [University of Missouri-Kansas School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Obaldo, Ruby E. [The University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Walsh, Irene R. [The University of Missouri-Kansas City, Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lowe, Lisa H. [The University of Missouri-Kansas City, Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Although certain neuroimaging appearances are highly suggestive of abuse, radiological findings are often nonspecific. The objective of this review is to discuss pitfalls, controversies, and mimics occurring in neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma in order to allow the reader to establish an increased level of comfort in distinguishing between nonaccidental and accidental head trauma. Specific topics discussed include risk factors, general biomechanics and imaging strategies in nonaccidental head trauma, followed by the characteristics of skull fractures, normal prominent tentorium and falx versus subdural hematoma, birth trauma versus nonaccidental head trauma, hyperacute versus acute on chronic subdural hematomas, expanded subarachnoid space versus subdural hemorrhage, controversy regarding subdural hematomas associated with benign enlarged subarachnoid spaces, controversy regarding hypoxia as a cause of subdural hematoma and/or retinal hemorrhages without trauma, controversy regarding the significance of retinal hemorrhages related to nonaccidental head trauma, controversy regarding the significance of subdural hematomas in general, and pitfalls of glutaric aciduria type 1 and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis mimicking nonaccidental head trauma. (orig.)

  6. Neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma: pitfalls and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, Sujan; Obaldo, Ruby E.; Walsh, Irene R.; Lowe, Lisa H.

    2008-01-01

    Although certain neuroimaging appearances are highly suggestive of abuse, radiological findings are often nonspecific. The objective of this review is to discuss pitfalls, controversies, and mimics occurring in neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma in order to allow the reader to establish an increased level of comfort in distinguishing between nonaccidental and accidental head trauma. Specific topics discussed include risk factors, general biomechanics and imaging strategies in nonaccidental head trauma, followed by the characteristics of skull fractures, normal prominent tentorium and falx versus subdural hematoma, birth trauma versus nonaccidental head trauma, hyperacute versus acute on chronic subdural hematomas, expanded subarachnoid space versus subdural hemorrhage, controversy regarding subdural hematomas associated with benign enlarged subarachnoid spaces, controversy regarding hypoxia as a cause of subdural hematoma and/or retinal hemorrhages without trauma, controversy regarding the significance of retinal hemorrhages related to nonaccidental head trauma, controversy regarding the significance of subdural hematomas in general, and pitfalls of glutaric aciduria type 1 and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis mimicking nonaccidental head trauma. (orig.)

  7. [Optimising care structures for severe hand trauma and replantation and chances of launching a national network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, E M; Volkmer, E; Holzbach, T; Wallmichrath, J; Engelhardt, T O; Giunta, R E

    2013-12-01

    Severe hand traumata have a significant impact on our health system and on insurance companies, respectively. It is estimated that 33% of all occupational injuries and 9% of all invalidity pensions are due to severe hand trauma. Unfortunately, these high numbers are not only due to the severity of the trauma but to organisational deficiencies. Usually, the patient is treated at the general surgical emergency in the first place and only then forwarded to a microsurgeon. This redirection increases the time that is required for the patient to finally arrive at an expert for hand surgery. On the one hand, this problem can be explained by the population's lack of awareness for distinguished experts for hand and microsurgery, on the other hand, the emergency network, or emergency doctors in particular are not well informed about where to take a patient with a severe hand trauma - clearly a problem of communication between the hospitals and the ambulance. It is possible to tackle this problem, but put participating hand trauma centres have to work hand in hand as a network and thus exploit synergy effects. The French system "FESUM" is a good example for such a network and even comprises centres in Belgium and Switzerland. To improve the treatment of severe hand trauma, a similar alliance was initiated in Germany just recently. The pilot project "Hand Trauma Alliance" (www.handverletzung.com) was started in April 2013 and currently comprises two hospitals within the region of upper Bavaria. The network provides hand trauma replantation service on a 24/7 basis and aims at shortening the way from the accident site to the fully qualified hand surgeon, to improve the therapy of severe hand injuries and to optimise acute patient care in general. In order to further increase the alliance's impact it is intended to extend the project's scope from regional to national coverage - nevertheless, such an endeavour can only be done in collaboration with the German Society for Hand

  8. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multidimensional Model of Trauma and Correlated Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Willem H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have revealed an important relationship between psychosocial trauma and antisocial personality disorder. A multidimensional model is presented which describes the psychopathological route from trauma to antisocial development. A case report is also included that can illustrate the etiological process from trauma to severe antisocial…

  10. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  11. Community-based counselors' interventions for elementary school-age children coping with trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura; Baker-Phibbs, Christina; Woodson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Child trauma is a mental health concern and more information is needed about treatment in community mental health settings. This article presents results of a focus group and member checking sessions held with counselors who provided therapy for children experiencing posttraumatic stress disorder in a community-based setting. Results indicated that play and art techniques were commonly used during individual child therapy sessions. Sessions were child-directed and allowed children to review trauma experiences in a "safe" setting with an "expert" guide. Several themes were commonly addressed in sessions including opportunities to re-experience, release, and reorganize the trauma, building resilience or self-esteem for the child, promoting safety, and helping the child to regulate emotional reactions and behavior problems. Counselors focused on discussing ways to interact with the child to promote healing and there was a belief that children would return to a positive developmental trajectory after coping with traumatic experiences. Future research needs to address what works for whom, in terms of what interventions are useful in child-directed counseling sessions for children who have experienced specific types of trauma, such as sexual and physical abuse or witnessing domestic violence. Integration of knowledge from evidence-based treatments will also further inform clinical practice with children who have experienced traumatic events.

  12. Gênero e trauma Gender and trauma

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    Gláucio Ary Dillon Soares

    2005-04-01

    accidents are analyzed on the light of gender differences. Current literature suggests that women and men face traumatic experiences in different ways. However, traumas also vary by gender, raising questions about how much of the differences are due to gender or to the type of trauma. We hypothesized that women are more susceptible than men to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD when the traumatic event is common. We compared the trauma symptoms and the meaning of the loss of loved ones. A sample of 425 women (62% and 265 men (38% was drawn from a list of people that suffered violent deaths in the city of Rio de Janeiro and were interviewed in 2003-4. Fifty-four percent of the women and 41% of the men had their daily routines altered after the death of a relative/friend. There are statistically significant differences concerning health problems and entertainment practices. Half of the interviewees seriously reduced leisure. The contact with the corpse is intimately correlated with the PTSD symptoms. Controlling the extension of the contact (corpse recognition; seeing it, but not recognizing it and not seeing it and not recognizing it, women were more affected than men. The article concludes that women feel the losses more deeply than men, but part of these differences are not "intrinsic" to genders, but depend on social capital, on institutional contacts and personal interactions.

  13. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

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    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  14. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

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    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  15. Scanning in the diagnosis of hepatic and splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzer, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    The diagnosis of hepatic and splenic injuries in the trauma patient with classic physical and plain film findings usually presents little problem. If bleeding is severe there is no time for extensive roentgenographic or laboratory studies. Often, however, the trauma is mild, and the physical findings quite minimal at best. Other injuries may divert attention. The patient may be unconscious. In such circumstances, clinical evaluation of possible hepatic or splenic injuries is difficult. Scanning of the liver and spleen is a safe, accurate, noninvasive, readily available technique for the detection of traumatic rupture, laceration, or hematoma. This report describes two cases in which scanning proved helpful in the management of blunt abdominal trauma

  16. Splenic mass with remote trauma history: a management dilemma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, C J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed presentation of splenic trauma is a well described entity. METHOD: We report two patients who presented with splenic abnormality found incidentally on imaging for other medical problems. A remote history of splenic trauma was elicited during clinical evaluation; 18 months in one patient and 11 years in the second patient. Both patients underwent surgical exploration. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological investigations could not reassure us that the splenic abnormalities were benign, and their management was the subject of some debate.

  17. Emotion regulation in mothers and young children faced with trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Cohen, S; Ziv, Y; Achituv, M; Asulin-Peretz, L; Blanchard, T R; Schiff, M; Brom, D

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated maternal emotion regulation as mediating the association between maternal posttraumatic stress symptoms and children's emotional dysregulation in a community sample of 431 Israeli mothers and children exposed to trauma. Little is known about the specific pathways through which maternal posttraumatic symptoms and deficits in emotion regulation contribute to emotional dysregulation. Inspired by the intergenerational process of relational posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in which posttraumatic distress is transmitted from mothers to children, we suggest an analogous concept of relational emotion regulation, by which maternal emotion regulation problems may contribute to child emotion regulation deficits. Child emotion regulation problems were measured using the Child Behavior Checklist-Dysregulation Profile (CBCL-DP; T.M. Achenbach & I. Rescorla, 2000), which is comprised of three subscales of the CBCL: Attention, Aggression, and Anxiety/Depression. Maternal PTSD symptoms were assessed by the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (E.B. Foa, L. Cashman, L. Jaycox, & K. Perry, 1997) and maternal emotion regulation by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (K.L. Gratz & L. Roemer, 2004). Results showed that the child's emotion regulation problems were associated with both maternal posttraumatic symptoms and maternal emotion dysregulation. Further, maternal emotion regulation mediated the association between maternal posttraumatic symptoms and the child's regulation deficits. These findings highlight the central role of mothers' emotion regulation skills in the aftermath of trauma as it relates to children's emotion regulation skills. The degree of mothers' regulatory skills in the context of posttraumatic stress symptoms reflects a key process through which the intergenerational transmission of trauma may occur. Study results have critical implications for planning and developing clinical interventions geared toward the treatment of

  18. Medical problems of survivors of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, H.L.; Von Kaenel, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the medical problems that may confront survivors of a nuclear war are discussed with emphasis on infection and the spread of communicable disease. Factors which will increase the risk and severity of infection include: radiation, trauma and burns, malnutrition and starvation, dehydration, exposure, and hardship. Factors which will increase the spread of disease include: crowded shelter conditions, poor sanitation, insects, corpses, free-roaming diseased animals. Shortages of physicians, the destruction of laboratories, and the general disorganization sure to follow the attack will also contribute to the problems. The authors recommend further study in this area

  19. Organizational network in trauma management in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Chiara

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, as in other western countries, trauma is a leading cause of death during the first four decades of life, with almost 18.000 of deaths per year. Since 80s organized systems for trauma care, including a pre-hospital emergency medical system and a network of hospitals designated as Trauma Centres, have been developed in north American countries. Effectiveness of trauma systems has been investigated comparing the post-system to the pre-system trauma care with the method of panel evaluation of preventable death rates and comparison of observed survival with expected probability of survival. In Italy, a pre-hospital emergency medical system has been implemented on a national scale, while a trauma network has not been developed. Nowadays, trauma patients are often admitted to the closest hospital, independently from local resources. The Superior Council of Ministry of Health has presented in 2004 a new trauma system model (SIAT based on the recognition in the field of patients with more serious injuries and the transportation to general hospitals with resources and multidisciplinary teams specialized in trauma care (trauma team. The designation of few trauma team hospitals, one highly specialized Centre (CTS and two area Centres (CTZ every two millions of inhabitants allows each Centre to treat at least 250 severe trauma patients per year to increase experience. Less severe injured patients may be treated in non-trauma team acute care facilities, according to the inclusive system model. The development of trauma team services in some Italian hospitals has demonstrated an increase in survival and a decrease in preventable death rate from 42% to 7,6%. Economic studies of Ministry of Health have established that the implementation of a trauma system model on a national scale with a 25% decrease of preventable trauma deaths and disabilities would save 7500 million of euros of public money. Therefore, in our country the concentration of severely

  20. The UK Paediatric Ocular Trauma Study 2 (POTS2): demographics and mechanisms of injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sii, Freda; Barry, Robert J; Abbott, Joseph; Blanch, Richard J; MacEwen, Caroline J; Shah, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric ocular trauma is an important cause of visual morbidity worldwide, accounting for up to one-third of all ocular trauma admissions. It has long-term implications for those affected and significant economic consequences for healthcare providers. It has been estimated that 90% of all ocular trauma is preventable. Targeted strategies are required to reduce the incidence and the severity of pediatric ocular trauma; this requires an understanding of the epidemiology and characteristics of these injuries and the children involved. Prospective, observational study of pediatric ocular trauma cases presenting to UK-based ophthalmologists over a 1-year period; reporting cards were distributed by the British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit, and clinicians were asked to report incidents of acute orbital and ocular trauma in children aged ≤16 years requiring inpatient or day-case admission. A validated, standardized questionnaire was sent to reporting ophthalmologists to collect data on the demographics and circumstances of injury. Median age at presentation was 7.7 years, with boys more than twice as likely to be affected than girls (M:F =2.1:1.0). Almost 50% of injuries occurred at home, with 25% occurring in school or nursery. A total of 67% of injuries occurred during play, and 31% involved a sharp implement. Pediatric ocular trauma remains an important public health problem. At least three-quarters of all injuries are preventable through measures, including education of children and responsible adults, restricting access to sharp implements, improving adult supervision, and appropriate use of eye protection.

  1. A summary of trauma and trauma-related papers published in BJOMS during 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusanale, Atul; Mackenzie, Neil; Arakeri, Gururaj; McLeod, Niall; Brennan, Peter A

    2010-09-01

    This paper provides a summary of the 49 trauma and related papers published in British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery during the period January 2008 to December 2009. 16/49 (32%) of these publications were full length articles, which covered areas such as epidemiology, service provision, materials and operative surgery. In addition there were other articles including short communications, technical notes, letters to the editor and interesting cases. Whilst fewer full length articles were published compared to the other sub-specialties, it was reassuring to see that the studies represent all aspects of trauma. More basic science and randomized control studies relating to trauma need to be encouraged. Copyright 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiology of livestock-related injuries in a major trauma center in Kashan, Iran

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    Mohammadzadeh Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Livestock-related injuries are one of the important factors causing morbidity and mor-tality in patients admitted to hospital. Treatment of these patients is still a major problem in health care system. The aim of current study was to assess the epidemiology of livestock-related injuries in a major trauma center in Iran from 2006 to 2011. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with live-stock-related injuries who were consecutively admitted to the trauma center in Kashan, Iran between 2006 and 2011 were evaluated. The data collected included patient’s demographics, place and nature of accident, damaged organ, educational level, transport and outcome. Data were ex-pressed as mean±standard deviation. Results: A total of 129 patients were included in this study, accounting for 0.3% of all trauma admission (40 273 cases. The mean age was (55.27±14.45 years. Men were affected four times more than women. Falling down from livestock is the main mechanism of trauma in all groups. Upper and lower extremities were most frequently injured (n=72, followed by the head, neck and spine (n=33 for each. There was one death resulting from livestock-related injury in this study. Conclusion: Despite the low incidence, livestock-re-lated injuries can damage major organs of human body and therefore appropriate training program to increase the safety awareness in home and outdoor is very important. Key words: Epidemiology; Livestock; Iran; Wounds and injuries

  3. Adult Asylum Seekers from the Middle East Including Syria in Central Europe: What Are Their Health Care Problems?

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    Carmen Andrea Pfortmueller

    Full Text Available Forced displacement related to persecution and violent conflict has reached a new peak in recent years. The primary aim of this study is to provide an initial overview of the acute and chronic health care problems of asylum seekers from the Middle East, with special emphasis on asylum seekers from Syria.Our retrospective data analysis comprised adult patients presenting to our emergency department between 01.11.2011 and 30.06.2014 with the official resident status of an "asylum seeker" or "refugee" from the Middle East.In total, 880 patients were included in the study. Of these, 625 (71.0% were male and 255 (29.0% female. The median age was 34 (range 16-84. 222 (25.2% of our patients were from Syria. The most common reason for presentation was surgical (381, 43.3%, followed by medical (321, 36.5% and psychiatric (137, 15.6%. In patients with surgical presentations, trauma-related problems were most common (n = 196, 50.6%. Within the group of patients with medical presentation, acute infectious diseases were most common (n = 141, 43.9%, followed by neurological problems (n = 70, 21.8% and gastrointestinal problems (n = 47, 14.6%. There were no differences between Syrian and non-Syrian refugees concerning surgical or medical admissions. The most common chronic disorder of unclear significance was chronic gastrointestinal problems (n = 132, 15%, followed by chronic musculoskeletal problems (n = 108, 12.3% and chronic headaches (n = 78, 8.9%. Patients from Syria were significantly younger and more often suffered from a post-traumatic stress disorder than patients of other nationalities (p<0.0001, and p = 0.05, respectively.Overall a remarkable number of our very young group of patients suffered from psychiatric disorders and unspecified somatic symptoms. Asylum seekers should be carefully evaluated when presenting to a medical facility and physicians should be aware of the high incidence of unspecified somatic symptoms in this patient population

  4. The role of the trauma nurse leader in a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Lee Ann; Coffey, Carla; Haley, Kathy; Covert, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The trauma nurse leader role was developed by a group of trauma surgeons, hospital administrators, and emergency department and trauma leaders at Nationwide Children's Hospital who recognized the need for the development of a core group of nurses who provided expert trauma care. The intent was to provide an experienced group of nurses who could identify and resolve issues in the trauma room. Through increased education, exposure, mentoring, and professional development, the trauma nurse leader role has become an essential part of the specialized pediatric trauma care provided at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

  5. The trauma ecosystem: The impact and economics of new trauma centers on a mature statewide trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, David J; Pracht, Etienne E; Leitz, Pablo T; Spain, David A; Staudenmayer, Kristan L; Tepas, Joseph J

    2017-06-01

    Florida serves as a model for the study of trauma system performance. Between 2010 and 2104, 5 new trauma centers were opened alongside 20 existing centers. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of trauma system expansion on system triage performance and trauma center patients' profiles. A statewide data set was queried for all injury-related discharges from adult acute care hospitals using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for 2010 and 2014. The data set, inclusion criteria, and definitions of high-risk injury were chosen to match those used by the Florida Department of Health in its trauma registry. Hospitals were classified as existing Level I (E1) or Level II (E2) trauma centers and new E2 (N2) centers. Five N2 centers were established 11.6 to 85.3 miles from existing centers. Field and overall trauma system triage of high-risk patients was less accurate with increased overtriage and no change in undertriage. Annual volume at N2 centers increased but did not change at E1 and E2 centers. In 2014, Patients at E1 and E2 centers were slightly older and less severely injured, while those at N2 centers were substantially younger and more severely injured than in 2010. The injured patient-payer mix changed with a decrease in self-pay and commercial patients and an increase in government-sponsored patients at E1 and E2 centers and an increase in self-pay and commercial patients with a decrease in government-sponsored patients at N2 centers. Designation of new trauma centers in a mature system was associated with a change in established trauma center demographics and economics without an improvement in trauma system triage performance. These findings suggest that the health of an entire trauma system network must be considered in the design and implementation of a regional trauma system. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV; epidemiological, level IV.

  6. Trauma pattern in a level I east-European trauma center

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    Bogdan Stoica

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our trauma pattern profile is similar to the one found in west-European countries, with a predominance of traffic-related injuries and falls. The severity and anatomical puzzle for trauma lesions were more complex secondary to motorcycle or bicycle-to-auto vehicles collisions. A trauma registry, with prospective enrollment of patients, is a very effective tool for constant improvements in trauma care.

  7. Illinois trauma centers and community violence resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet Butler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elder abuse and neglect (EAN, intimate partner violence (IPV, and street-based community violence (SBCV are significant public health problems, which frequently lead to traumatic injury. Trauma centers can provide an effective setting for intervention and referral, potentially interrupting the cycle of violence. Aims: To assess existing institutional resources for the identification and treatment of violence victims among patients presenting with acute injury to statewide trauma centers. Settings and Design: We used a prospective, web-based survey of trauma medical directors at 62 Illinois trauma centers. Nonresponders were contacted via telephone to complete the survey. Materials and Methods: This survey was based on a survey conducted in 2004 assessing trauma centers and IPV resources. We modified this survey to collect data on IPV, EAN, and SBCV. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and bivariate statistics were performed using STATA statistical software. Results: We found that 100% of trauma centers now screen for IPV, an improvement from 2004 (P = 0.007. Screening for EAN (70% and SBCV (61% was less common (P < 0.001, and hospitals thought that resources for SBCV in particular were inadequate (P < 0.001 and fewer resources were available for these patients (P = 0.02. However, there was lack of uniformity of screening, tracking, and referral practices for victims of violence throughout the state. Conclusion: The multiplicity of strategies for tracking and referring victims of violence in Illinois makes it difficult to assess screening and tracking or form generalized policy recommendations. This presents an opportunity to improve care delivered to victims of violence by standardizing care and referral protocols.

  8. Splenic mass with remote trauma history: a management dilemma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, C J

    2011-03-02

    BACKGROUND: Delayed presentation of splenic trauma is a well described entity. METHOD: We report two patients who presented with splenic abnormality found incidentally on imaging for other medical problems. A remote history of splenic trauma was elicited during clinical evaluation; 18 months in one patient and 11 years in the second patient. Both patients underwent surgical exploration. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological investigations could not reassure us that the splenic abnormalities were benign, and their management was the subject of some debate.

  9. The relation of appraisal, coping efforts, and acuteness of trauma to PTS symptoms among former political prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanninen, Katri; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Qouta, Samir

    2002-06-01

    We examined how trauma-specific appraisals and coping efforts mediate between traumatic experiences, acuteness of trauma, and length of imprisonment and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among 103 Palestinian former political prisoners. The findings provide support for both direct and mediated models of trauma. The acuteness of trauma (time since release), appraisal of prison experience as harmful and involving loss, and use of both emotion- and problem-focused coping efforts were associated with high levels of PTS symptoms. Torture and ill-treatment had a direct association with intrusion, and recent release from prison with avoidance symptoms. Acuteness of trauma turned out to be important in the coping and symptom association: emotion-focused coping was associated with a low level of PTS symptoms in the long run, whereas problem-focused coping was associated with a low level of PTS symptoms in the short run.

  10. Including Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, Shane; SueSee, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    Many physical education curriculum frameworks include statements about the inclusion of critical inquiry processes and the development of creativity and problem-solving skills. The learning environment created by physical education can encourage or limit the application and development of the learners' cognitive resources for critical and creative…

  11. Helicopter overtriage in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Maria; Goldstein, Seth D; Salazar, Jose; Aboagye, Jonathan; Stewart, Dylan; Efron, David; Abdullah, Fizan; Haut, Elliot R

    2014-11-01

    Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) have been designed to provide faster access to trauma center care in cases of life-threatening injury. However, the ideal recipient population is not fully characterized, and indications for helicopter transport in pediatric trauma vary dramatically by county, state, and region. Overtriage, or unnecessary utilization, can lead to additional patient risk and expense. In this study we perform a nationwide descriptive analysis of HEMS for pediatric trauma and assess the incidence of overtriage in this group. We reviewed records from the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (2008-11) and included patients less than 16 years of age who were transferred from the scene of injury to a trauma center via HEMS. Overtriage was defined as patients meeting all of the following criteria: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, absence of hypotension, an Injury Severity Score (ISS) less than 9, no need for procedure or critical care, and a hospital length of stay of less than 24 hours. A total of 19,725 patients were identified with a mean age of 10.5 years. The majority of injuries were blunt (95.6%) and resulted from motor vehicle crashes (48%) and falls (15%). HEMS transported patients were predominately normotensive (96%), had a GCS of 15 (67%), and presented with minor injuries (ISS<9, 41%). Overall, 28 % of patients stayed in the hospital for less than 24 hours, and the incidence of overtriage was 17%. Helicopter overtriage is prevalent among pediatric trauma patients nationwide. The ideal model to predict need for HEMS must consider clinical outcomes in the context of judicious resource utilization. The development of guidelines for HEMS use in pediatric trauma could potentially limit unnecessary transfers while still identifying children who require trauma center care in a timely fashion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Association of Prehospital Mode of Transport With Mortality in Penetrating Trauma: A Trauma System-Level Assessment of Private Vehicle Transportation vs Ground Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandling, Michael W; Nathens, Avery B; Shapiro, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2018-02-01

    Time to definitive care following injury is important to the outcomes of trauma patients. Prehospital trauma care is provided based on policies developed by individual trauma systems and is an important component of the care of injured patients. Given a paucity of systems-level trauma research, considerable variability exists in prehospital care policies across trauma systems, potentially affecting patient outcomes. To evaluate whether private vehicle prehospital transport confers a survival advantage vs ground emergency medical services (EMS) transport following penetrating injuries in urban trauma systems. Retrospective cohort study of data included in the National Trauma Data Bank from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2012, comprising 298 level 1 and level 2 trauma centers that contribute data to the National Trauma Data Bank that are located within the 100 most populous metropolitan areas in the United States. Of 2 329 446 patients assessed for eligibility, 103 029 were included in this study. All patients were 16 years or older, had a gunshot wound or stab wound, and were transported by ground EMS or private vehicle. In-hospital mortality. Of the 2 329 446 records assessed for eligibility, 103 029 individuals at 298 urban level 1 and level 2 trauma centers were included in the analysis. The study population was predominantly male (87.6%), with a mean age of 32.3 years. Among those included, 47.9% were black, 26.3% were white, and 18.4% were Hispanic. Following risk adjustment, individuals with penetrating injuries transported by private vehicle were less likely to die than patients transported by ground EMS (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.31-0.47). This association remained statistically significant on stratified analysis of the gunshot wound (OR,  0.45; 95% CI, 0.36-0.56) and stab wound (OR,  0.32; 95% CI, 0.20-0.52) subgroups. Private vehicle transport is associated with a significantly lower likelihood of death when compared with

  13. The outcome of trauma patients with do-not-resuscitate orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Schaefer, Eric W; Won, Eugene J; Armen, Scott B

    2016-02-01

    Institutional variation in outcome of patients with do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders has not been well described in the setting of trauma. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of trauma center designation on outcome of patients with DNR orders. A statewide trauma database (Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study) was used for the analysis. Characteristics of patients with DNR orders were compared between state-designated level 1 and 2 trauma centers. Inhospital mortality and major complication rates were compared using hierarchical logistic regression models that included a random effect for trauma centers. We adjusted for a number of potential confounders and allowed for nonlinearity in injury severity score and age in these models. A total of 106,291 patients (14 level 1 and 11 level 2 trauma centers) were identified in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study database between 2007 and 2011. We included 5953 patients with DNR orders (5.6%). Although more severely injured patients with comorbid disease were made DNR in level 1 trauma centers, trauma center designation level was not a significant factor for inhospital mortality of patients with DNR orders (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-2.18; P = 0.26). Level 1 trauma centers were significantly associated with a higher rate of major complications (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-2.75; P = 0.016). Inhospital mortality of patients with DNR orders was not significantly associated with trauma designation level after adjusting for case mix. More aggressive treatment or other unknown factors may have resulted in a significantly higher complication rate at level 1 trauma centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Genesis of a Trauma Performance Improvement Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Kristopher

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assist the trauma medical and program director with developing a performance improvement and patients safety plan (PIPS), which is a required component of a successful trauma verification process by the American College of Surgeons. This article will review trauma quality standards and will describe in detail the required elements of a successful trauma center's performance improvement plan including a written comprehensive plan that outlines the mission and vision of the PIPS Program, authority of the PIPS Program, PIPS Program Committee reporting structure to the other hospital committees, list of required PIPS multidisciplinary team members, the operational components of the utilized data management system (trauma registry), list of indicators/audit filters, levels of review, peer determinations, corrective action plan with implementation, event resolution, and reevaluation. Strategies to develop a successful trauma performance improvement plan are presented.

  15. Outcome of severely injured trauma patients at a designated trauma centre in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka Kit Gilberto; Ho, Wendy; Tong, King Hung Daniel; Yuen, Wai Key

    2010-05-20

    The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) of the People's Republic of China (PRC) has seen significant changes in its trauma service over the last ten years including the implementation of a regional trauma system. The author's institution is one of the five trauma centres designated in 2003. This article reports our initial clinical experience. A prospective single-centre trauma registry from January 2004 to December 2008 was reviewed. The primary clinical outcome measure was hospital mortality. The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology was used for bench-marking with the North America Major Trauma Outcome Study (MTOS) database. There were 1451 patients. The majority (83.9%) suffered from blunt injury. The overall mortality rate was 7.8%. Severe injury, defined as the Injury Severity Score > 15, occurred in 22.5% of patients, and was associated with a mortality rate of 31.6%. A trend of progressive improvement was noted. The M-statistic was 0.99, indicating comparable case-mix with the MTOS. The Z- and W-statistics of each individual year revealed fewer, but not significantly so, number of survivors than expected. Trauma centre designation was feasible in the HKSAR and was associated with a gradual improvement in patient care. Trauma system implementation may be considered in regions equipped with the necessary socio-economic and organizational set-up.

  16. Facial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  17. Pre-migration trauma and HIV-risk behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jennifer; Herlitz, Claes; Matthews, Jesse; Snyder, Wendy; Mazzaferro, Kathryn; Baum, Andy; Theorell, Töres

    2003-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between pre-migration trauma and HIV-risk behavior in refugees from sub-Saharan Africa. The sample comprised 122 persons who had emigrated from sub-Saharan Africa and were currently residing in Sweden. Qualitative methods including individual interviews, focus groups, and interviews with key informants addressed questions regarding trauma experience and HIV-risk behavior. A history of pre-migration trauma was found to be associated with HIV-risk behavior. According to the participants, symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, adjustment disorder, and substance use mediated the relationship between pre-migration trauma and sexual risk behavior. In contrast, a minority of the participants who reported pre-migration trauma but not psychological sequelae, or experienced post-traumatic growth, reported safer sexual practices. It appears that for some individuals, pre-migration trauma resulted in psychiatric sequelae, which may increase an individual's risk to be infected with HIV. Interventions targeted at individuals at increased risk (i.e. pre-migration trauma with unresolved psychiatric symptomatology) may facilitate the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases in this population. Integration of multiple psychosocial and health issues is recommended for comprehensive treatment and prevention programs.

  18. Differences in the association between childhood trauma and BMI in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between childhood trauma and BMI in black and white South African women ... finding, including measures of body image and body size satisfaction that may explain these findings. Keywords: Childhood trauma questionnaire; Body fat; Body image; Sexual abuse; Ethnicity, ... Self-reported exposure to childhood trauma was.

  19. Prevalence of chest trauma, associated injuries and mortality: a level I trauma centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Veysi T; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Paliobeis, Christos; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2009-10-01

    A review of prospectively collected data in our trauma unit for the years 1998-2003 was undertaken. Adult patients who suffered multiple trauma with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of >/=16, admitted to hospital for more than 72 hours and with sustained blunt chest injuries were included in the study. Demographic details including pre-hospital care, trauma history, admission vital signs, blood transfusions, details of injuries and their abbreviated injury scores (AIS), operations, length of intensive care unit and hospital stays, Injury Severity Score (ISS) and mortality were analysed. Fulfilling the inclusion criteria with at least one chest injury were 1,164 patients. The overall mortality reached 18.7%. As expected, patients in the higher AIS groups had both a higher overall ISS and mortality rate with one significant exception; patients with minor chest injuries (AIS(chest) = 1) were associated with mortality comparable to injuries involving an AIS(chest) = 3. Additionally, the vast majority of polytraumatised patients with an AIS(chest) = 1 died in ICU sooner than patients of groups 2-5.

  20. Perceptions of an educational programme for registered nurses who work at non-major trauma services in Victoria, Australia: The Nursing Emergency eXternal Trauma Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Sharyn; Cross, Rachel; Decker, Kelly; Mitra, Biswadev

    2017-08-01

    Emergency nurses working in non-Major Trauma Service (non-MTS) facilities face the challenge of providing immediate care to seriously injured patients, despite infrequent presentations at their workplace. A one-day education programme endorsed by the Australian College of Nursing was developed to provide contemporary trauma education for nurses. The aim of this study was to report participants' perceptions of their experience of this programme. Peer reviewed lesson plans were developed to guide educational activities. Of 32 participants, 24 consented to and completed pre and post-programme surveys. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to report study findings. Most participants were nurses with greater than two years' experience in Emergency Nursing (92%). Trauma patient transfers each year from a non-MTS to a Major Trauma Service occurred infrequently; eight nurses (33.3%) reported greater than10 trauma transfers per year. Participant expectations of the programme included personal growth, knowledge acquisition, increased confidence and a focus on technical skills. Participants reported the day to be worthwhile and valuable; improved confidence, increased knowledge, and the opportunity to discuss current evidence based practice were highly regarded. Recommendations for future programmes included extending to two days and include burns and more complex pathophysiology. With centralisation of trauma care to major trauma services, frequent and continuing education of nurses is essential. Nurses from non-Major Trauma Service facilities in Victoria found this programme worthwhile as they gained knowledge and skills and increased confidence to care for trauma patients. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    al-Ayoubi Fawzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Methods Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. Results There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1% were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures 276 (60.9% were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4% required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%. Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3–17 and 6 (1–22. Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0–11 and 8 (1–39. Conclusion There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient

  2. Self-evaluated competence in trauma reception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Svenningsen, Peter; Fabricius, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: No formal training requirements exist for trauma teams in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the point prevalence level of training and the selfevaluated competence of doctors involved in trauma care. Methods: On two nights, all doctors on call at departments involved...... in trauma care were interviewed and answered a structured questionnaire pertaining to their level of training and self-evaluated level of competence in relevant skills. These skills included the ability to perform diagnostics and interventions as mandated by the Advanced Trauma Life Support and Definitive...... surgeons (GS) were specialists. In terms of self-evaluated competence, 95% of AN felt competent performing damage control resuscitation, 82% of OS felt competent performing damage control surgery on extremities, whereas 55% of GS felt competent performing damage control surgery in the abdomen. A total...

  3. Self-evaluated competence in trauma reception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Svenningsen, Peter; Fabricius, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: No formal training requirements exist for trauma teams in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the point prevalence level of training and the self-evaluated competence of doctors involved in trauma care. METHODS: On two nights, all doctors on call at departments involved...... in trauma care were interviewed and answered a structured questionnaire pertaining to their level of training and self-evaluated level of competence in relevant skills. These skills included the ability to perform diagnostics and interventions as mandated by the Advanced Trauma Life Support and Definitive...... surgeons (GS) were specialists. In terms of self-evaluated competence, 95% of AN felt competent performing damage control resuscitation, 82% of OS felt competent performing damage control surgery on extremities, whereas 55% of GS felt competent performing damage control surgery in the abdomen. A total...

  4. Imaging of Combat-Related Thoracic Trauma - Blunt Trauma and Blast Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, John P; Kim, Andrew M; Fisher, Dane; Tatum, Peter S; Neubauer, Brian; Peterson, P Gabriel; Carter, Brett W

    2018-03-01

    Combat-related thoracic trauma (CRTT) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality of the casualties from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Penetrating, blunt, and blast injuries are the most common mechanisms of trauma to the chest. Imaging plays a key role in the battlefield management of CRTT casualties. This work discusses the imaging manifestations of thoracic injuries from blunt trauma and blast injury, emphasizing epidemiology and diagnostic clues seen during OEF and OIF. The assessment of radiologic findings in patients who suffer from combat-related blunt thoracic trauma and blast injury is the basis of this work. The imaging modalities for this work include multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and chest radiography. Multiple imaging modalities are available to imagers on or near the battlefront, including radiography, fluoroscopy, and MDCT. MDCT with multi-planar reconstructions is the most sensitive imaging modality available in combat hospitals for the evaluation of CRTT. In modern combat, blunt and blast injuries account for a significant portion of CRTT. Individual body armor converts penetrating trauma to blunt trauma, leading to pulmonary contusion that accounted for 50.2% of thoracic injuries during OIF and OEF. Flail chest, a subset of blunt chest injury, is caused by significant blunt force to the chest and occurs four times as frequently in combat casualties when compared with the civilian population. Imaging features of CRTT have significant diagnostic and prognostic value. Pulmonary contusions on chest radiography appear as patchy consolidations in the acute setting with ill-defined and non-segmental borders. MDCT of the chest is a superior imaging modality in diagnosing and evaluating pulmonary contusion. Contusions on MDCT appear as crescentic ground-glass opacities (opacities through which lung interstitium and vasculature are still visible) and areas of consolidation that often do not

  5. Head trauma in sport and neurodegenerative disease: an issue whose time has come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Neil; Gallo, Valentina; McElvenny, Damien

    2015-03-01

    A number of small studies and anecdotal reports have been suggested that sports involving repeated head trauma may have long-term risks of neurodegenerative disease. There are now plausible mechanisms for these effects, and a recognition that these problems do not just occur in former boxers, but in a variety of sports involving repeated concussions, and possibly also in sports in which low-level head trauma is common. These neurodegenerative effects potentially include increased risks of impaired cognitive function and dementia, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Many would argue for taking a precautionary approach and immediately banning or restricting sports such as boxing. However, there are important public health issues in terms of how wide the net should be cast in terms of other sports, and what remedial measures could be taken? This in turn requires a major research effort involving both clinical and basic research to understand the underlying mechanisms, leading from head trauma to neurodegenerative disease and epidemiologic studies to assess the long-term consequences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender differences in the physical and psychological manifestation of childhood trauma and/or adversity in people with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eSweeney

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The link between childhood trauma and/or adversity and risk of psychosis is well known. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of childhood trauma and/or adversity in people who have psychotic disorders and to investigate the association between childhood trauma and/or adversity and a range of social and health measures. Participants (n=391, 42% male were specifically asked about any experience of childhood trauma and/or adversity. Respondents provided information about education, employment, physical health and health service utilisation. Univariate analyses revealed that childhood trauma and/or adversity was associated with poorer levels of self-reported physical health and social problems. This includes the experience of chronic pain, headaches, arthritis, asthma and victimisation/stigma in men. Participants with a childhood trauma and/or adversity history indicated higher rates of lifetime suicide attempts with women reporting more lifetime depressive symptoms. Multivariate analyses revealed differing profiles in relation to physical and psychological health variable between males and females. Males with the experience of childhood trauma and/or adversity were significantly more likely to report cardiovascular/stroke issues, migraines and anhedonia. Females with the experience of childhood trauma and/or adversity were more likely to report a lifetime history of elevated mood and to be married or in a defacto relationship. There has been very little research into the assessment and treatment of the effects of childhood trauma and/or adversity in adults with psychosis. Childhood trauma and/or adversity may contribute to higher rates of self-reported poor health in men and is associated with increased depression in women. Our findings suggest that interventions to address the effects of past trauma are urgently needed.

  7. Clinical Reasoning Terms Included in Clinical Problem Solving Exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, John L; Morris, Jason; Estrada, Carlos A; Kraemer, Ryan R

    2016-05-01

    Background Published clinical problem solving exercises have emerged as a common tool to illustrate aspects of the clinical reasoning process. The specific clinical reasoning terms mentioned in such exercises is unknown. Objective We identified which clinical reasoning terms are mentioned in published clinical problem solving exercises and compared them to clinical reasoning terms given high priority by clinician educators. Methods A convenience sample of clinician educators prioritized a list of clinical reasoning terms (whether to include, weight percentage of top 20 terms). The authors then electronically searched the terms in the text of published reports of 4 internal medicine journals between January 2010 and May 2013. Results The top 5 clinical reasoning terms ranked by educators were dual-process thinking (weight percentage = 24%), problem representation (12%), illness scripts (9%), hypothesis generation (7%), and problem categorization (7%). The top clinical reasoning terms mentioned in the text of 79 published reports were context specificity (n = 20, 25%), bias (n = 13, 17%), dual-process thinking (n = 11, 14%), illness scripts (n = 11, 14%), and problem representation (n = 10, 13%). Context specificity and bias were not ranked highly by educators. Conclusions Some core concepts of modern clinical reasoning theory ranked highly by educators are mentioned explicitly in published clinical problem solving exercises. However, some highly ranked terms were not used, and some terms used were not ranked by the clinician educators. Effort to teach clinical reasoning to trainees may benefit from a common nomenclature of clinical reasoning terms.

  8. Trauma as a Contributor to Violence in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, David S

    2016-06-01

    In examining contributors to violence among individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one factor that has received little attention is a history of psychological trauma. This study's purpose was to explore the possible mechanisms for an association between trauma and violence in persons with ASD. The literature regarding the neurobiology and theoretical underpinnings of ASD is reviewed and compared with the literature on the neurobiology and theoretical underpinnings of trauma as a risk factor for violence in individuals without ASD. Information from this comparison is then used to formulate possible mechanisms for a trauma-violence association in ASD. Individuals with ASD may possess sensitized prefrontal-cortical-limbic networks that are overloaded in the face of trauma, leading to unchecked limbic output that produces violent behavior, and/or cognitive dysfunction (including deficits in theory of mind, central coherence, and executive function) that impacts trauma processing in ways that portend violence. While these mechanisms for a trauma-violence association in ASD may have case-based support, more research is needed to confirm these mechanisms and clarify whether in fact trauma increases violence risk in ASD. To facilitate the investigation, it would be helpful for clinical and forensic evaluators to obtain a careful trauma history when evaluating all individuals, including those with ASD. © 2016 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  9. Interdisciplinary Trauma Management in an Elderly Patient, A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, George T; Soolari, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The current report reviews a case of mixed dental trauma consequent to a fall by an older patient. The patient’s teeth were forced out of alignment by the trauma and suffered pulpal necrosis. Treatment involved not only healing the acute injuries, but also attending to some subtle delayed problems that became apparent during treatment. Treatments involving endodontics, periodontics, orthodontics, and restorative dentistry were used to address all of the patient’s concerns. This insured that the traumatic occlusion was corrected, appropriate esthetics was restored and normal speech and function was regained. All signs of trauma were recognized, every treatment step was documented, and appropriate follow-up was provided throughout the recovery period. PMID:25419251

  10. Neuroimaging differential diagnoses to abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine [AP-HM Timone 2, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille cedex 05 (France); Aix Marseille University, UMR CNRS 7339, Marseille (France); Brunel, Herve; Dory-Lautrec, Philippe [AP-HM Timone 2, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille cedex 05 (France); Chabrol, Brigitte [AP-HM Timone, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Trauma is the most common cause of death in childhood, and abusive head trauma is the most common cause of traumatic death and morbidity in infants younger than 1 year. The main differential diagnosis of abusive head trauma is accidental traumatic brain injury, which is usually witnessed. This paper also discusses more uncommon diagnoses such as congenital and acquired disorders of hemostasis, cerebral arteriovenous malformations and metabolic diseases, all of which are extremely rare. Diagnostic imaging including CT and MRI is very important for the distinction of non-accidental from accidental traumatic injury. (orig.)

  11. Neuroimaging differential diagnoses to abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Nadine; Brunel, Herve; Dory-Lautrec, Philippe; Chabrol, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of death in childhood, and abusive head trauma is the most common cause of traumatic death and morbidity in infants younger than 1 year. The main differential diagnosis of abusive head trauma is accidental traumatic brain injury, which is usually witnessed. This paper also discusses more uncommon diagnoses such as congenital and acquired disorders of hemostasis, cerebral arteriovenous malformations and metabolic diseases, all of which are extremely rare. Diagnostic imaging including CT and MRI is very important for the distinction of non-accidental from accidental traumatic injury. (orig.)

  12. Reported exposure to trauma among adult patients referred for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laurisa van Zyl

    trauma exposure and the graded relationship between mul- ... cidal tendencies, as well as problems with self-esteem, parenting and an ..... Parental substance abuse. 19 (9.9) .... parental rearing styles, family history of mental disorders, and.

  13. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  14. The Role of Cumulative Trauma, Betrayal, and Appraisals in Understanding Trauma Symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Christina Gamache; Cromer, Lisa DeMarni; DePrince, Anne P.; Freyd, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor psychological outcomes are common among trauma survivors, yet not all survivors experience adverse sequelae. The current study examined links between cumulative trauma exposure as a function of the level of betrayal (measured by the relational closeness of the survivor and the perpetrator), trauma appraisals, gender, and trauma symptoms. Participants were 273 college students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event on a trauma checklist. Three cumulative indices were const...

  15. Biomarkers, Trauma, and Sepsis in Pediatrics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Frieri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is a logical connection with biomarkers, trauma, and sepsis. This review paper provides new information and clinical practice implications. Biomarkers are very important especially in pediatrics. Procalcitonin and other biomarkers are helpful in identifying neonatal sepsis, defense mechanisms of the immune system. Pediatric trauma and sepsis is very important both in infants and in children. Stress management both in trauma is based upon the notion that stress causes an immune imbalance in susceptible individuals. Evidence Acquisition: Data sources included studies indexed in PubMed, a meta- analysis, predictive values, research strategies, and quality assessments. A recent paper by one of the authors stated marked increase in serum procalcitonin during the course of a septic process often indicates an exacerbation of the illness, and a decreasing level is a sign of improvement. A review of epidemiologic studies on pediatric soccer patients was also addressed. Keywords for searching included biomarkers, immunity, trauma, and sepsis. Results: Of 50 reviewed articles, 34 eligible articles were selected including biomarkers, predictive values for procalcitonin, identifying children at risk for intra-abdominal injuries, blunt trauma, and epidemiology, a meta-analysis. Of neonatal associated sepsis, the NF-kappa B pathway by inflammatory stimuli in human neutrophils, predictive value of gelsolin for the outcomes of preterm neonates, a meta-analysis interleukin-8 for neonatal sepsis diagnosis. Conclusions: Biomarkers are very important especially in pediatrics. Procalcitonin and other biomarkers are helpful in identifying neonatal sepsis, defense mechanisms, and physiological functions of the immune system. Pediatric trauma and sepsis is very important both in infants and in children. Various topics were covered such as biomarkers, trauma, sepsis, inflammation, innate immunity, role of neutrophils and IL-8, reactive oxygen species

  16. Effect of a brief intervention for alcohol and illicit drug use on trauma recidivism in a cohort of trauma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cordovilla-Guardia

    Full Text Available Estimate the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing trauma recidivism in hospitalized trauma patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use.Dynamic cohort study based on registry data from 1818 patients included in a screening and brief intervention program for alcohol and illicit drug use for hospitalized trauma patients. Three subcohorts emerged from the data analysis: patients who screened negative, those who screened positive and were offered brief intervention, and those who screened positive and were not offered brief intervention. Follow-up lasted from 10 to 52 months. Trauma-free survival, adjusted hazard rate ratios (aHRR and adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR were calculated, and complier average causal effect (CACE analysis was used.We found a higher cumulative risk of trauma recidivism in the subcohort who screened positive. In this subcohort, an aHRR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41-0.95 was obtained for the group offered brief intervention compared to the group not offered intervention. CACE analysis yielded an estimated 52% reduction in trauma recidivism associated with the brief intervention.The brief intervention offered during hospitalization in trauma patients positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use can halve the incidence of trauma recidivism.

  17. Effect of a brief intervention for alcohol and illicit drug use on trauma recidivism in a cohort of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovilla-Guardia, Sergio; Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Vilar-López, Raquel; Navas, Juan F; Portillo-Santamaría, Mónica; Rico-Martín, Sergio; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Estimate the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing trauma recidivism in hospitalized trauma patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use. Dynamic cohort study based on registry data from 1818 patients included in a screening and brief intervention program for alcohol and illicit drug use for hospitalized trauma patients. Three subcohorts emerged from the data analysis: patients who screened negative, those who screened positive and were offered brief intervention, and those who screened positive and were not offered brief intervention. Follow-up lasted from 10 to 52 months. Trauma-free survival, adjusted hazard rate ratios (aHRR) and adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) were calculated, and complier average causal effect (CACE) analysis was used. We found a higher cumulative risk of trauma recidivism in the subcohort who screened positive. In this subcohort, an aHRR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41-0.95) was obtained for the group offered brief intervention compared to the group not offered intervention. CACE analysis yielded an estimated 52% reduction in trauma recidivism associated with the brief intervention. The brief intervention offered during hospitalization in trauma patients positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use can halve the incidence of trauma recidivism.

  18. Effect of a brief intervention for alcohol and illicit drug use on trauma recidivism in a cohort of trauma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Mondéjar, Enrique; Vilar-López, Raquel; Navas, Juan F.; Portillo-Santamaría, Mónica; Rico-Martín, Sergio; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Objective Estimate the effectiveness of brief interventions in reducing trauma recidivism in hospitalized trauma patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use. Methods Dynamic cohort study based on registry data from 1818 patients included in a screening and brief intervention program for alcohol and illicit drug use for hospitalized trauma patients. Three subcohorts emerged from the data analysis: patients who screened negative, those who screened positive and were offered brief intervention, and those who screened positive and were not offered brief intervention. Follow-up lasted from 10 to 52 months. Trauma-free survival, adjusted hazard rate ratios (aHRR) and adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) were calculated, and complier average causal effect (CACE) analysis was used. Results We found a higher cumulative risk of trauma recidivism in the subcohort who screened positive. In this subcohort, an aHRR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.41–0.95) was obtained for the group offered brief intervention compared to the group not offered intervention. CACE analysis yielded an estimated 52% reduction in trauma recidivism associated with the brief intervention. Conclusion The brief intervention offered during hospitalization in trauma patients positive for alcohol and/or illicit drug use can halve the incidence of trauma recidivism. PMID:28813444

  19. Pearls of Mandibular Trauma Management

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, John C.; Feldman, Evan M.; Chike-Obi, Chuma J.; Bullocks, Jamal M.

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbi...

  20. Variability in interhospital trauma data coding and scoring: A challenge to the accuracy of aggregated trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabian, Sandra S; Marcus, Michael; Captain, Kevin; Pomphrey, Michelle; Breeze, Janis; Wolfe, Jennefer; Bugaev, Nikolay; Rabinovici, Reuven

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of data aggregated in state and national trauma registries provide the platform for clinical, research, development, and quality improvement efforts in trauma systems. However, the interhospital variability and accuracy in data abstraction and coding have not yet been directly evaluated. This multi-institutional, Web-based, anonymous study examines interhospital variability and accuracy in data coding and scoring by registrars. Eighty-two American College of Surgeons (ACS)/state-verified Level I and II trauma centers were invited to determine different data elements including diagnostic, procedure, and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) coding as well as selected National Trauma Data Bank definitions for the same fictitious case. Variability and accuracy in data entries were assessed by the maximal percent agreement among the registrars for the tested data elements, and 95% confidence intervals were computed to compare this level of agreement to the ideal value of 100%. Variability and accuracy in all elements were compared (χ testing) based on Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) membership, level of trauma center, ACS verification, and registrar's certifications. Fifty registrars (61%) completed the survey. The overall accuracy for all tested elements was 64%. Variability was noted in all examined parameters except for the place of occurrence code in all groups and the lower extremity AIS code in Level II trauma centers and in the Certified Specialist in Trauma Registry- and Certified Abbreviated Injury Scale Specialist-certified registrar groups. No differences in variability were noted when groups were compared based on TQIP membership, level of center, ACS verification, and registrar's certifications, except for prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), where TQIP respondents agreed more than non-TQIP centers (p = 0.004). There is variability and inaccuracy in interhospital data coding and scoring of injury information. This finding casts doubt on the

  1. Evaluation of Pattern of Pet Animal Trauma at the Veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The record of 114 small animal trauma cases seen at the Surgery Unit of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH), Ibadan between 2008 and 2012 were studied to evaluate the pattern of trauma with reference to species, sex, age groups, causes of trauma, regional involvement, severity including fatalities, in order to develop ...

  2. The Prevalence Of Nasal Trauma In Uch,Ibadan - Nigeria | Isa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods:- A one year prospective study of Nasal trauma at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Results: A total of one thousand three hundred and fifty patients (1,350) with all forms of trauma presenting at UCH, Ibadan during the study period were included. Nasal trauma alone or in association with other ...

  3. Feasibility and profitability of a radiology department providing trauma US as part of a trauma alert team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, L W; Simmons, S; Kozar, R; Kinback, R; Hallowell, M J; Mulhern, C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and profitability of a radiology department providing a six-point trauma ultrasound (US) examination for abdominal or pelvic free fluid as part of a trauma alert team. The study included 191 trauma alerts, which generated 156 US examinations. A radiologist and a departmental technologist carried beepers and responded to level I and II traumas. A departmental secretary or technologist recorded when the responding technologist exited and re-entered the department and if US was performed. If performed, the US examination evaluated the four abdominal and pelvic quadrants and the suprapubic and subxiphoid regions. For 64 patients, the responding technologist recorded the times of the trauma alert, emergency room arrival, US start and finish, and return to the radiology department. Median response, wait, scan duration, and return times were 2, 8, 5, and 7 minutes, respectively. Median costs for the technician, physician, archiving, transcription, and equipment were $8.17, $30.85, $0.97, $4.80, and $41.22, respectively. Reimbursement per examination averaged $110.60. Sensitivity analyses that varied the time spent (median vs mean), US non-use rate (10%-18%), and years of depreciation (5-7 years) yielded net results ranging from a $36.60 profit to a $6.12 loss per examination. A radiology department can profitably respond to trauma alerts and provide a six-point trauma US examination for free fluid.

  4. Responding with Care to Students Facing Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souers, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to trauma--which many experts view as include ongoing life stressors like poverty, parents divorcing, death of a family member, or drug abuse in the home--is prevalent among school-aged children. Teachers know that facing trauma impedes students' ability to focus and learn, but it can be challenging to keep responding caringly to a…

  5. Prospective Analysis of Geriatric Patients Admitted to Emergency Department With Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Akturk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to reveal the demographic characteristics, causes of trauma, physical examination findings, the presence of fractures and the status of the outcome of the geriatric trauma patients admitted to the emergency department of an educational research hospital. Material and Methods: This study covers all the cases over 65 years who were admitted to emergency department with trauma between September 1 2011-31 August 2012. The demographic characteristics of the patients such as, age, gender, date of application and as well as the causes of trauma, physical examination findings and outcome situation in the emergency department were evaluated. The study was performed prospectively. SPSS V.20 was used for statistical analysis of the data obtained. Results: Total 175 patients were included to the study, 74 were male (42.28% and 101 were female (57.72%. The mean age of male patients were 75.01 ± 6.557 while the mean age of female patients were 76.10 ± 7.353. The most common cause of trauma in both gender was falls. This rate was 91.1% in female and 8.9% in male patients. 40.6% of the female patients and 27% of the male patients were admitted to the hospital before because of any trauma. The most common form of trauma according to exposed body localization in both gender was extremity traumas. It was seen in 51.5% of the females and 56.8% of the males. 30 female patients (29.7% and 13 male patients (17.6% had fracture in limbs. 78.3% of all patients were discharged from the emergency department and 21.7% of the patients were hospitalised. None of the patients were died in emergency department and none of the patients were referred to another institution from the emergency department. Total 38 patients were hospitalised, 32 of them were discharged, 2 of them were referred to another institution, and 4 of them were died. 26 of 38 hospitalised patients had undergone surgery while 20 of them were orthopedic surgeries

  6. Cumulative Trauma Among Mayas Living in Southeast Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millender, Eugenia I; Lowe, John

    2017-06-01

    Mayas, having experienced genocide, exile, and severe poverty, are at high risk for the consequences of cumulative trauma that continually resurfaces through current fear of an uncertain future. Little is known about the mental health and alcohol use status of this population. This correlational study explored t/he relationship of cumulative trauma as it relates to social determinants of health (years in the United States, education, health insurance status, marital status, and employment), psychological health (depression symptoms), and health behaviors (alcohol use) of 102 Guatemalan Mayas living in Southeast Florida. The results of this study indicated that, as specific social determinants of health and cumulative trauma increased, depression symptoms (particularly among women) and the risk for harmful alcohol use (particularly among men) increased. Identifying risk factors at an early stage before serious disease or problems are manifest provides room for early screening leading to early identification, early treatment, and better outcomes.

  7. Trauma Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y. Kong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available “Major Trauma. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately.” Even though I have been working at Edendale Hospital as a trauma registrar for over a year, whenever I hear this announcement over the hospital intercom system, my heart beats just a little faster than normal. When I first arrived at Edendale my colleagues told me that the adrenaline rush I would experience after being called out to attend a new emergency would decrease over time, and indeed they were right. However, it is also true to say that on some occasions more than others, it is still felt more strongly than ever.

  8. Early response to psychological trauma--what GPs can do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Darryl; Howard, Alexandra; Fletcher, Susan; Cooper, John; Forbes, David

    2013-09-01

    There is a high prevalence of psychological trauma exposure among primary care patients. General practitioners are well placed to provide appropriate support for patients coping with trauma. This article outlines an evidence-based early response to psychological trauma. Psychological first aid is the preferred approach in providing early assistance to patients who have experienced a traumatic event. General practitioners can be guided by five empirically derived principles in their early response: promoting a sense of safety, calming, self efficacy, connectedness and hope. Structured psychological interventions, including psychological debriefing, are not routinely recommended in the first few weeks following trauma exposure. General practitioner self care is an important aspect of providing post-trauma patient care.

  9. Early Life Trauma Exposure and Stress Sensitivity in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Grasso, Damion J.; Ford, Julian D.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The current study replicates and extends work with adults that highlights the relationship between trauma exposure and distress in response to subsequent, nontraumatic life stressors. Methods The sample included 213 2–4-year-old children in which 64.3% had a history of potential trauma exposure. Children were categorized into 4 groups based on trauma history and current life stress. Results In a multivariate analysis of variance, trauma-exposed children with current life stressors h...

  10. Surgical resident perceptions of trauma surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzikadic, Lejla; Burke, Peter A; Esposito, Thomas J; Agarwal, Suresh

    2010-05-01

    Presenting the opinions of surgical residents about the appeal of trauma surgery as a specialty may influence current reform. Survey study. Academic research. General surgery residents (postgraduate years 1-5 and recent graduates) registered with the American College of Surgeons. A 22-item survey. Career plans and perceptions about trauma surgery as a specialty. Of 6006 mailed surveys, we had a 20.1% response rate. Midlevel residents comprised most of the respondents, and most were undecided about their career choice or planned to enter general surgical private practice. The typical residency programs represented were academic (81.7%), urban (90.6%), and level I trauma centers (78.7%), and included more than 6 months of trauma experience (77.6%). Most respondents (70.6%) thought that trauma surgery was unappealing. The most important deterrents to entering the field were lifestyle, poor reimbursement, and limited operating room exposure, while increased surgical critical care was not seen as a restriction. When questioned about the future of trauma surgery, they believed that trauma surgeons should perform elective (86.8%) and nontrauma emergency (91.5%) cases and would benefit from active association with an outpatient clinic (76.0%). Intellectual challenge and exciting nature of the field were listed as the most appealing aspects, and ideal practice characteristics included guaranteed salary and time away from work. As demand for trauma surgeons increases, resident interest has dwindled. As a specialty, trauma surgery must undergo changes that reflect the needs of the incoming generation. We present a sampling of current surgical resident opinion and offer these data to assist the changing discipline and the evolving field of acute care surgery.

  11. Trauma treatment across Europe: where do we stand now from a perspective of seven countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldas Kazlauskas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of knowledge about the state of affairs of the trauma treatments in Europe. To start to fill in this gap, key persons from seven European countries—Georgia, Germany, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, and Turkey—accepted the invitation to give their expert opinion on the state of affairs in their country at an invited panel discussion at the XIV 2015 ESTSS Conference in Vilnius, Lithuania. Brief reports from the seven countries reveal significant diversities among different European countries in terms of awareness of health problems related to trauma, the availability of trauma treatments, and treatment approaches. Political and economic differences across the European countries contribute to the diversities in the developments of trauma treatments. European national psychotrauma societies are active in establishing training curricula and dissemination of trauma-focused treatments. Despite the growing acknowledgment of trauma and dissemination of trauma-focused treatments, there is a lack of Europe-wide policies to ensure availability of trauma treatment in Europe for trauma survivors. The need for more detailed analysis of trauma treatment in all European countries and development of European-level trauma-informed health care policies is outlined.

  12. Idioms of distress among trauma survivors: subtypes and clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    In this introduction to the Special Issue on Trauma and Idioms of Distress, we provide an overview of the concept and typology of "idioms of distress," focusing particularly on their clinical utility. This includes the role of idioms as indicators of trauma exposure, of various types of psychopathology and of levels of distress, risk and functioning. It likewise includes the fact that idioms of distress may profoundly influence the personal meaning of having a trauma-related disorder, may shape the interpersonal course of the disorder and may pattern help-seeking and self-treatment. Finally, it illustrates the fact that idioms may also help clinicians understand sufferers' views of the causes of their distress, constitute key therapeutic targets and help increase therapeutic empathy and treatment adherence. This special issue focuses on the role played by idioms of distress in the local trauma ontology, the associations between the idioms and psychiatric disorders occurring in the context of trauma and the mechanisms by which the idioms profoundly influence the personal and interpersonal course of trauma-related disorders.

  13. Outcomes following trauma laparotomy for hypotensive trauma patients: a UK military and civilian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Max; Carden, Rich; Navaratne, Lalin; Smith, Iain M; Penn-Barwell, Jowan G; Kraven, Luke M; Brohi, Karim; Tai, Nigel R M; Bowley, Douglas M

    2018-05-25

    The management of trauma patients has changed radically in the last decade and studies have shown overall improvements in survival. However, reduction in mortality for the many may obscure a lack of progress in some high-risk patients. We sought to examine the outcomes for hypotensive patients requiring laparotomy in UK military and civilian cohorts. We undertook a review of two prospectively maintained trauma databases; the UK Joint Theatre Trauma Registry (JTTR) for the military cohort (4th February 2003 to 21st September 2014), and the trauma registry of the Royal London Hospital MTC (1st January 2012 to 1st January 2017) for civilian patients. Adults undergoing trauma laparotomy within 90 minutes of arrival at the Emergency Department (ED) were included. Hypotension was present on arrival at the ED in 155/761 (20.4%) military patients. Mortality was higher in hypotensive casualties 25.8% vs 9.7% normotensive casualties (p<0.001). Hypotension was present on arrival at the ED in 63/176 (35.7%) civilian patients. Mortality was higher in hypotensive patients 47.6% vs 12.4% normotensive patients (p<0.001). In both cohorts of hypotensive patients neither the average injury severity, the prehospital time, the ED arrival SBP, nor mortality rate changed significantly during the study period. Despite improvements in survival after trauma for patients overall, the mortality for patients undergoing laparotomy who arrive at the Emergency Department with hypotension has not changed and appears stubbornly resistant to all efforts. Specific enquiry and research should continue to be directed at this high-risk group of patients. IV; Observational Cohort Study.

  14. Physical and nutrition statuses of geriatric patients after trauma-related hospitalization: Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hang Joo; Hong, Tae Hwa; Kim, Maru

    2018-03-01

    Population aging is associated with increasing numbers of geriatric trauma patients, and various studies have evaluated their short-term outcomes, assessment, and treatment. However, there is insufficient information regarding their long-term outcomes. This study evaluated the physical and nutritional statuses of geriatric patients after trauma-related hospitalization.Data regarding physical and nutritional status were obtained from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI (2013-2015).A total of 21,069 individuals participated in the survey, including 5650 geriatric individuals. After excluding individuals with missing data, 3731 cases were included in the analyses. The average age was 68 years, and most individuals were women (n = 2055, 55.08%). There were 94 patients had been hospitalized because of trauma. Trauma-related hospitalization among geriatric patients was significantly associated with reduced strength exercise (23.56% vs 12.99%, P = .043), activity limitations caused by joint pain (0.65% vs 3.31%, P = .028), self-care problems (8.00% vs 16.77%, P = .008), pain or discomfort (29.48% vs 40.51%, P = .024), hypercholesterolemia (27.37% vs 39.36%, P = .037), and mastication discomfort (39.98% vs 57.85% P = .005). The adjusted analyses revealed that trauma-related hospitalization was independently associated with activity limitations caused by joint pain (odds ratio [OR]: 5.04, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.29-19.67, P = .020), self-care problems (OR: 2.24, 95% CI: 1.11-4.53, P = .025), pain or discomfort (OR: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.08-2.89, P = .023), and mastication discomfort (OR: 2.06, 95% CI: 1.22-3.46, P = .007).Medical staff should be aware that geriatric patients have relatively poor physical and nutritional statuses after trauma-related hospitalization, and manage these patients accordingly.

  15. Effects of childhood trauma on personality in a sample of Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, XianBin; Wang, ZhiMin; Hou, YeZhi; Wang, Ying; Liu, JinTong; Wang, ChuanYue

    2014-04-01

    Childhood trauma is a major public health problem which has an impact on personality development, yet no studies have examined the association between exposure to trauma and personality in a sample of Chinese adolescents. Four hundred eighty-five students completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). The CTQ-SF cut-off scores for exposure were used to calculate the prevalence of trauma. The possible associations between specific types of trauma and the EPQ subscale scores were examined. The rates of emotional abuse (EA), physical abuse (PA), sexual abuse (SA), emotional neglect (EN), and physical neglect (PN) were 18.76%, 11.13%, 27.01%, 49.48%, and 68.66%, respectively. Individuals subjected to EA, PA, and SA had significantly higher neuroticism (EPQ-N) and psychoticism (EPQ-P) scores on the EPQ compared with those who had not experienced EA, PA, or SA (all p valueschildhood abuse and neglect. Exposure to childhood trauma is associated with personality development in Chinese adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  17. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-09-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient.

  18. Current status and future options for trauma and emergency surgery in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloğlu, Korhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2008-01-01

    The number of trauma victims in Turkey is expected to increase as a consequence of the increasing vehicular traffic, potential for earthquakes, and risk of terrorist attacks. The Turkish Association for Trauma and Emergency Surgery monitors trauma cases, publishes a quarterly journal, organizes trauma courses and seminars for various health personnel nationwide. It is also extending efforts to improve in-hospital care by establishing trauma and emergency surgery fellowships and trauma and emergency surgery centers nationwide, which is run by General Surgeons currently. Turkey faces the same dilemma as the rest of the developed world regarding the future of trauma surgeons in the current era of nonoperative trauma management. We suggest that the field of trauma and emergency surgery be redefined to include emergency general surgery and cavitary trauma.

  19. Abdominal penetrating trauma and organ damage and its prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Abri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abdominal penetrating trauma is still a serious problem in the world, due to its high prevalence in young people that impose a heavy economic burden on our country, we decided to evaluate the epidemiologic and demographic status and patient’s prognosis. Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study; all patients with abdominal penetrating trauma referred to the emergency department of Imam Reza Hospital between March 2012 and March 2014 were enrolled to study. Age, sex, injured organs, mechanism of trauma and the prognosis was documented in the checklist. Data was analyzed by SPSS 15.0, and descriptive analysis was run. Results: In this study, 137 patients were enrolled; 103 patients (75.20% did not have visceral damage. In visceral injury, the spleen was most commonly injured abdominal organs (8.03%. the damage to small intestine seen in 8 patients (5.84%, kidney and liver damage seen in 6 patients (4.38% and 5 patients, respectively, and finally diaphragm and colon injury was seen in 2 patients (1.46%. Conclusion: According to a recent study, abdominal penetrating trauma mostly occurred in men. The most common cause of abdominal penetrating trauma was related to knife damage; spleen was commonly damaged organ caused by knives and other sharp objects.

  20. Emergency treatment of male blunt urethral trauma in China: Outcome of different methods in comparison with other countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumeng Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of male urethral trauma is always a challenging problem. In China, as the incidence of urethral trauma keeps rising, more and more studies relating to this are being published. To compare the outcome of different emergency treatments in China and other countries, we searched Chinese and English literature about this topic in the past 16 years. A total of 167 studies involving 5314 patients were included, with 144 in Chinese and 23 in English. All studies were retrospective in nature. Based on the analyses, surgical methods include open realignment, endoscopic realignment and primary repair, and we summarized and compared the success rate and complications (mainly erectile dysfunction and incontinence of each method. We found that realignment of posterior urethra has similar success rate in China and other countries, but the outcome of realignment of anterior urethra is variable. The reason remains unknown. While long abandoned in Western countries, primary repair of anterior urethra is still an option in China and has high success rate. Keywords: Urethral trauma, Urethrogram, Endoscopic realignment, Primary repair

  1. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  2. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. METHODS: We

  3. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; van Achterberg, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. Methods: We

  4. Psychological Trauma in the Context of Familial Relationships: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobel, Sophie; Goodyear, Melinda; Foster, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Many forms of psychological trauma are known to develop interpersonally within important relationships, particularly familial. Within the varying theoretical constructs of psychological traumas, and distinct from the processes of diagnosis, there is a need to refine the scope and definitions of psychological traumas that occur within important familial relationships to ensure a cohesive evidence base and fidelity of the concept in application to practice. This review used a philosophical inquiry methodology of concept analysis to identify the definitions, antecedents, characteristics, and consequences of the varying conceptualizations of psychological trauma occurring within important relationships. Interactions between concepts of interpersonal trauma, relational trauma, betrayal trauma, attachment trauma, developmental trauma, complex trauma, cumulative trauma, and intergenerational trauma are presented. Understanding of the discrete forms and pathways of transmission of psychological trauma between individuals, including transgenerationally within families, creates opportunities for prevention and early intervention within trauma-focused practice. This review found that concepts of psychological trauma occurring within familial relationships are not exclusive of each other but overlap in their encompassment of events and circumstances as well as the effect on individuals of events in the short term and long term. These traumas develop and are transmitted in the space between people, both purposefully and incidentally, and have particularly profound effects when they involve a dependent infant or child. Linguistic and conceptual clarity is paramount for trauma research and practice.

  5. Ballistic trauma: lessons learned from iraq and afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Emily H; Sabino, Jennifer M; Nanos, George P; Valerio, Ian L

    2015-02-01

    Management of upper extremity injuries secondary to ballistic and blast trauma can lead to challenging problems for the reconstructive surgeon. Given the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, advancements in combat-casualty care, combined with a high-volume experience in the treatment of ballistic injuries, has led to continued advancements in the treatment of the severely injured upper extremity. There are several lessons learned that are translatable to civilian trauma centers and future conflicts. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the physics of ballistic injuries and principles in the management of such injuries through experience gained from military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  6. Palestinian Adolescents Coping with Trauma (PACT) - Phase III ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Palestinian Adolescents Coping with Trauma (PACT) - Phase III. Violent conflict has been repeatedly shown to result in severe, long-term social and mental health problems for exposed children and adolescents. While in the developed world, it is generally accepted that individuals seek professional one-on-one ...

  7. Trauma surgeon becomes consultant: evaluation of a protocol for management of intermediate-level trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Sara C; Delemos, David; Christopher, Daniel; Frost, Mary; Wesson, David E; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi

    2014-01-01

    At our level 1 pediatric trauma center, 9-54 intermediate-level ("level 2") trauma activations are received per month. Previously, the surgery team was required to respond to and assume responsibility for all patients who had "level 2" trauma activations. In 8/2011, we implemented a protocol where the emergency room (ER) physician primarily manages these patients with trauma consultation for surgical evaluation or admission. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the effects of the new protocol to ensure that patient safety and quality of care were maintained. We compared outcomes of patients treated PRE-implementation (10/2010-7/2011) and POST-implementation (9/2011-5/2012), including surgeon consultation rate, utilization of imaging and laboratory testing, ER length of stay, admission rate, and missed injuries or readmissions. Statistical analysis included chi-square and Student's t-test. We identified 472 patients: 179 in the PRE and 293 in the POST period. The populations had similar baseline clinical characteristics. The surgical consultation rate in the POST period was only 42%, with no missed injuries or readmissions. The ER length of stay did not change. However, in the POST period there were significant decreases in the admission rate (73% to 44%) and the mean number of CT scans (1.4 to 1), radiographs (2.4 to 1.7), and laboratory tests (5.1 to 3.3) ordered in the emergency room (all p<0.001). Intermediate-level pediatric trauma patients can be efficiently and safely managed by pediatric emergency room physicians, with surgical consultation only as needed. The protocol change improved resource utilization by decreasing testing and admissions and streamlining resident utilization in an era of reduced duty hours. © 2014.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of trauma CT in the trauma room versus the radiology department: the REACT trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzherr, T.P.; Goslings, J.C. [Academic Medical Center, Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bakker, F.C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Traumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olff, M. [Academic Medical Center, AMC de Meren, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijssen, K. [VU University Medical Center, Economics Department, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Asselman, F.F. [Academic Medical Center, Concern Staff Department, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reitsma, J.B. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dijkgraaf, M.G.W. [Academic Medical Center, Clinical Research Unit, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the REACT study group

    2013-01-15

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of trauma room CT compared with CT performed at the radiology department. In this randomised controlled trial, adult patients requiring evaluation in a level 1 trauma centre were included. In the intervention hospital the CT system was located within the trauma room and in the control hospital within the radiology department. Direct and indirect medical costs of the institutionalised stay and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were calculated. A total of 1,124 patients were randomised with comparable demographic characteristics. Mean number of non-institutionalised days alive was 322.5 in the intervention group (95 % CI 314-331) and 320.7 in the control group (95 % CI 312.1-329.2). Mean costs of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures per hospital inpatient day were EUR554 for the intervention group and EUR468 for the control group. Total mean costs in the intervention group were EUR16,002 (95 % CI 13,075-18,929) and EUR16,635 (95 % CI 13,528-19,743) for the control group (P = 0.77). The present study showed that in trauma patients the setting with a CT system located in the trauma room did not provide any advantages or disadvantages from a health economics perspective over a CT system located in the radiology department. (orig.)

  9. Cost-effectiveness of trauma CT in the trauma room versus the radiology department: the REACT trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltzherr, T.P.; Goslings, J.C.; Bakker, F.C.; Beenen, L.F.M.; Olff, M.; Meijssen, K.; Asselman, F.F.; Reitsma, J.B.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.W.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of trauma room CT compared with CT performed at the radiology department. In this randomised controlled trial, adult patients requiring evaluation in a level 1 trauma centre were included. In the intervention hospital the CT system was located within the trauma room and in the control hospital within the radiology department. Direct and indirect medical costs of the institutionalised stay and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were calculated. A total of 1,124 patients were randomised with comparable demographic characteristics. Mean number of non-institutionalised days alive was 322.5 in the intervention group (95 % CI 314-331) and 320.7 in the control group (95 % CI 312.1-329.2). Mean costs of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures per hospital inpatient day were EUR554 for the intervention group and EUR468 for the control group. Total mean costs in the intervention group were EUR16,002 (95 % CI 13,075-18,929) and EUR16,635 (95 % CI 13,528-19,743) for the control group (P = 0.77). The present study showed that in trauma patients the setting with a CT system located in the trauma room did not provide any advantages or disadvantages from a health economics perspective over a CT system located in the radiology department. (orig.)

  10. Decision-Making in Management of the Complex Trauma Patient: Changing the Mindset of the non-trauma Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Linda; Boffard, Kenneth; Lundberg, Lars; Rydmark, Martin; Karlgren, Klas

    2018-01-16

    European surgeons are frequently subspecialized and trained primarily in elective surgical techniques. As trauma leaders, they may occasionally have to deal with complex polytrauma, advanced management techniques, differing priorities, and the need for multidisciplinary care. There is a lack of expertise, experience, and a low trauma volume, as well as a lack of research, with limited support as to the decision-making and teaching challenges present. We studied what experienced trauma experts describe as the challenges that are specific to the advanced surgical decision-making required, whether civilian, humanitarian, or military. Design-based research using combined methods including interviews, reviews of authentic trauma cases, and video-recorded resuscitations performed at a high-volume civilian academic trauma center. Several educational dilemmas were identified: (1) thinking physiologically, (2) the application of damage control resuscitation and surgery, (3) differing priorities and time management, (4) impact of environment, (5) managing limited resources, (6) lack of general surgical skills, (7) different cultural behavior, and (8) ethical issues. The challenges presented, and the educational domains identified, constitute a basis for improved development of education and training in complex surgical decision-making. This study contributes new knowledge about the mindset required for decision-making in patients with complex multisystem trauma and competing priorities of care. This is, especially important in countries having a low intensity of trauma in both military and civilian environments, and consequential limited skills, and lack of expertise. Guidelines focused on the same decision-making process, using virtual patients and blended learning, can be developed.

  11. Applying modern error theory to the problem of missed injuries in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, D L; Gouveia, J; Thomson, S R; Muckart, D J J

    2008-06-01

    Modern theory of human error has helped reduce the incidence of adverse events in commercial aviation. It remains unclear whether these lessons are applicable to adverse events in trauma surgery. Missed injuries in a large metropolitan surgical service were prospectively audited and analyzed using a modern error taxonomy to define its applicability to trauma. A prospective database of all patients who experienced a missed injury during a 6-month period in a busy surgical service was maintained from July 2006. A missed injury was defined as one that escaped detection from primary assessment to operative exploration. Each missed injury was recorded and categorized. The clinical significance of the error and the level of physician responsible was documented. Errors were divided into planning or execution errors, acts of omission or commission, or violations, slips, and lapses. A total of 1,024 trauma patients were treated by the surgical services over the 6-month period from July to December 2006 in Pietermaritzburg. Thirty-four patients (2.5%) with missed injuries were identified during this period. There were 29 men and 5 women with an average age of 29 years (range: 21-67 years). In 14 patients, errors were related to inadequate clinical assessment. In 11 patients errors involved the misinterpretation of, or failure to respond to radiological imaging. There were 9 cases in which an injury was missed during surgical exploration. Overall mortality was 27% (9 patients). In 5 cases death was directly attributable to the missed injury. The level of the physicians making the error was consultant surgeon (4 cases), resident in training (15 cases), career medical officer (2 cases), referring doctor (6 cases). Missed injuries are uncommon and are made by all grades of staff. They are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the pattern of these errors may help develop error-reduction strategies. Current taxonomies help in understanding the error

  12. An unusual case of foreign body pulmonary embolus: case report and review of penetrating trauma at a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Laura A; Watkins, Daniel J; O'Donovan, Julie; Kenney, Brian D; Yates, Andrew R; Besner, Gail E

    2015-03-01

    Penetrating thoracic trauma is relatively rare in the pediatric population. Embolization of foreign bodies from penetrating trauma is very uncommon. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy with a penetrating foreign body from a projectile dislodged from a lawn mower. Imaging demonstrated a foreign body that embolized to the left pulmonary artery, which was successfully treated non-operatively. We reviewed the penetrating thoracic trauma patients in the trauma registry at our institution between 1/1/03 and 12/31/12. Data collected included demographic data, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Sixty-five patients were identified with a diagnosis of penetrating thoracic trauma. Fourteen of the patients had low velocity penetrating trauma and 51 had high velocity injuries. Patients with high velocity injuries were more likely to be older and less likely to be Caucasian. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with low vs. high velocity injuries regarding severity scores or length of stay. There were no statistically significant differences in procedures required between patients with low and high velocity injuries. Penetrating thoracic trauma is rare in children. The case presented here represents the only report of cardiac foreign body embolus we could identify in a pediatric patient.

  13. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Beliz; Özdemir, Y Özay; Beştepe, E Emrem

    2018-01-01

    Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD). There are few studies that focus directly on research etiology of GPP/PD and use structured scales. The aim of this study was to research childhood trauma and dissociation forms among women with GPP/PD. Fifty-five women with GPP/PD according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and 61 healthy women with no complaints of sexual function as a control group, in the age range of 18-60 years, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data form, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20) were administered to all participants. Sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect scores, which comprise the subgroups of CTQ, were found high among women with GPP/PD compared with the control group ( p =0.003, p =0.006, p =0.001). While a significant difference between the two groups' SDQ scores was obtained ( p =0.000), no significant difference was detected between the two groups' DES scores ( p =0.392). The results evoke the question are genitopelvic pain conditions, vaginismus and dyspareunia, that cannot be explained with a medical cause and that cause penetration disorder, a kind of dissociative symptom prone to develop in some women with childhood psychogenic trauma.

  14. Trauma Related Guilt Inventory - psychometric properties of the Polish adaptation (TRGI-PL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popiel, Agnieszka; Zawadzki, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    AIM : Although various aspects of guilt are frequent problems of patients suffering from PTSD, they have been included into the diagnostic criteria for PTSD just in the present version DSM-5. Kubany proposed a cognitive conceptualization of guilt in PTSD followed by development of the Trauma Related Guilt Inventory (TRGI). The aim of the paper is to present psychometric properties of the Polish version of the inventory - the TRGI-PL. A Polish adaptation of the Trauma-Related Guilt Inventory was applied to a sample of 280 motor vehicle (MVA) participants (147 females, 133 males of age from 18 to 80 (M=34,93, SD=13,71) within 1-24 months after a MVA (M=10,18, SD=6,23). Validation of the Polish version was done by analyzing the internal structure of the instrument and comparing the emotional and cognitive aspects of guilt assessed by the TRGI with PTSD symptoms, post-traumatic cognitions and responsibility for MVA and subjective agreement with the judgment. The model with four latent factors: Distress, Hindsight-Bias/Responsibility, Wrongdoing and Insufficient Justification scales showed acceptable fit (Satorra-Bentler chi2=518,62, df=203, pguilt, obtained in the studies on original TRGI version. Reliability coefficients are similar to original version. Correlations with other PTSD measures showed satisfactory convergent and discriminative validity. The Polish adaptation of the Trauma-Related Guilt Inventory is a reliable and valid tool for assessing guilt as a multidimensional phenomenon, comprising emotional and several cognitive characteristics, in trauma survivors.

  15. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Mauritz, Maria W.; Goossens, Peter J.J.; Draijer, Nel; Achterberg, Theo van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice.Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980-2010) and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and traumarelated dis...

  16. Renal trauma imaging: Diagnosis and management. A pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szmigielski, Wojciech; Kumar, Rajendra; Al Hilli, Shatha; Ismail, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate and discuss the spectrum of imaging findings, particularly computed tomography (CT), of blunt and penetrating renal trauma, based on our own materials, according to the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) renal injury grading scale. The article also indicates the conditions in which interventional radiology procedures can be applied for the management of renal trauma. Cases for this pictorial review were selected from the imaging material collected at the Radiology Department of Hamad Medical Corporation during a 14-year period from 1999 to 2012. The material includes 176 cases (164 males and 12 females) with confirmed blunt or penetrating renal trauma. Following abdominal trauma, all patients had a CT examination performed on admission to the hospital and/or during hospitalization. The most representative and illustrative cases of renal trauma were reviewed according to CT findings and were categorized according to the AAST grading system. The review describes a spectrum of imaging presentations with special emphasis on the 5 grades of renal injury on a CT according to the AAST scale. The most representative cases were illustrated and discussed with indications of possible interventional radiology treatment. Two groups of patients not included in the AAST grading system were presented separately: those with preexisting renal abnormalities and those with sustained iatrogenic renal injury. Proper application of renal trauma grading scale is essential for selecting the patients for conservative treatment, surgery or interventional radiology procedure

  17. Childhood trauma and the development of paranormal beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowski, Monisha; MacDonald, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    Belief in the paranormal is fairly prevalent in the general population. Previous research has shown a link between several personological characteristics and paranormal beliefs. The current study attempted to further investigate this link by replicating previous models that have shown a link between childhood trauma, fantasy proneness, and paranormal beliefs. In addition, the study attempted to expand on this model by including other variables such as stigma, resiliency, and coping style. The study used a sample of 198 undergraduate students. A significant correlation between trauma and paranormal beliefs was found. Partial correlations and path analyses revealed that fantasy proneness and avoidant coping style fully mediate the relationship between trauma and paranormal beliefs. The results imply that researchers need to take into account how a person responds to trauma via the development of coping strategies to accurately understand any observed relationship between trauma and paranormal beliefs.

  18. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, Maria W; Goossens, Peter J J; Draijer, Nel; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980-2010) and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders. Population-weighted mean prevalence rates in SMI were physical abuse 47% (range 25-72%), sexual abuse 37% (range 24-49%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 30% (range 20-47%). Compared to men, women showed a higher prevalence of sexual abuse in schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and mixed diagnosis groups labelled as having SMI. Prevalence rates of interpersonal trauma and trauma-related disorders were significantly higher in SMI than in the general population. Emotional abuse and neglect, physical neglect, complex PTSD, and dissociative disorders have been scarcely examined in SMI.

  19. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interest in developing an appropriate and sustainable trauma system in South ... trauma evolved with the social instability which accompanied political change in the ... increased use of military style assault weapons resulted in severe injuries ...

  20. Major trauma: the unseen financial burden to trauma centres, a descriptive multicentre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Lam, Mary; Mitchell, Rebecca; Dickson, Cara; McDonnell, Karon

    2014-02-01

    This research examines the existing funding model for in-hospital trauma patient episodes in New South Wales (NSW), Australia and identifies factors that cause above-average treatment costs. Accurate information on the treatment costs of injury is needed to guide health-funding strategy and prevent inadvertent underfunding of specialist trauma centres, which treat a high trauma casemix. Admitted trauma patient data provided by 12 trauma centres were linked with financial data for 2008-09. Actual costs incurred by each hospital were compared with state-wide Australian Refined Diagnostic Related Groups (AR-DRG) average costs. Patient episodes where actual cost was higher than AR-DRG cost allocation were examined. There were 16693 patients at a total cost of AU$178.7million. The total costs incurred by trauma centres were $14.7million above the NSW peer-group average cost estimates. There were 10 AR-DRG where the total cost variance was greater than $500000. The AR-DRG with the largest proportion of patients were the upper limb injury categories, many of whom had multiple body regions injured and/or a traumatic brain injury (P<0.001). AR-DRG classifications do not adequately describe the trauma patient episode and are not commensurate with the expense of trauma treatment. A revision of AR-DRG used for trauma is needed. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THIS TOPIC? Severely injured trauma patients often have multiple injuries, in more than one body region and the determination of appropriate AR-DRG can be difficult. Pilot research suggests that the AR-DRG do not accurately represent the care that is required for these patients. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This is the first multicentre analysis of treatment costs and coding variance for major trauma in Australia. This research identifies the limitations of the current AR-DRGS and those that are particularly problematic. The value of linking trauma registry and financial data within each trauma centre is demonstrated. WHAT ARE THE

  1. Relationship of trauma exposure and substance abuse to self-reported violence among men and women in substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C Brendan; Reiland, Sarah; Thorne, Chris; Cropsey, Karen L

    2014-05-01

    Past research showed a relationship between substance abuse and aggression and past trauma and aggression. The nature of the relationships between substance use, trauma, and aggression is inconclusive. The current research hypothesized greater aggression among those with a history of substance abuse and trauma compared with those without such a history and an additive relationship between substance abuse and trauma on aggression. Participants were 615 individuals in a substance abuse treatment program for individuals under criminal justice supervision. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews and self-report measures. Univariate and multivariate analyses assessed the relationships among substance use, trauma, and aggression. Participants with a history of trauma and regular substance use reported the highest rates of homicidal ideation, problem behaviors, and person offenses. Participants in this group also reported greater desire for help managing their stress and tension, dealing with problems in their intimate relationships, developing healthier relationships in general, and learning prosocial approaches to express their feelings. Substance abusing participants who experienced trauma reported more externalizing behaviors and a greater desire for coping- and social-skills training than participants who abused substances but did not report a history of trauma. This suggests that participants in substance abuse treatment programs may have improved outcomes with the addition of components to address these issues.

  2. Trauma Symptoms in Abused Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Mohammadkhani

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are many traumatic events (including natural disasters, physical, psychological and sexual abuse that may befall children and there is clear evidence that such experiences can produce a plethora of negative psychological effects. Children’s exposure to such traumas has been associated with a wide variety of negative mental health outcomes, including anxiety and depression, post-traumatic stress and dissociation and anger and aggression. It seems that the impacts of traumatic events are significantly related to type and intensity of trauma. Materials & Method: Through a systematized clustral sampling 3042 male and female students from junior high school who were participated in a survey study for investigating point prevalence of child abuse, completed Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children-Alternate Version (TSCC-A and Child Abuse Self-report Scale (CASRS. After recognition of abused children, they were compared based on trauma symptoms. TSCC-A is a self-report measure of post-traumatic distress and related psychological symptomatology in male and female children aged 8-16 years. It is useful in the evaluation of children who have experienced traumatic events, including physical and sexual assault, victimization by peers, major losses, the witnessing of violence done to others and natural disasters. TSCC-A makes no reference to sexual issues. CASRS is a self-report scale to assess child abuse and neglect with 38 items and four subscales (psychological abuse, neglect, physical and sexual abuse. Results: Considering the type of traumatic experiences, the results showed that abused children significantly received higher scores in scales and subscales of TSCC-A than nonabused group. They specially reported more symptoms (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, anger and dissociation comparing normal children. Conclusion: It is concluded that the type and rate of traumatic event is related to intensity of symptomatology.

  3. Responses to birth trauma and prevalence of posttraumatic stress among Australian midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Julia; Creedy, Debra K; Rowe, Heather; Gamble, Jenny

    2017-02-01

    Midwives frequently witness traumatic birth events. Little is known about responses to birth trauma and prevalence of posttraumatic stress among Australian midwives. To assess exposure to different types of birth trauma, peritraumatic reactions and prevalence of posttraumatic stress. Members of the Australian College of Midwives completed an online survey. A standardised measure assessed posttraumatic stress symptoms. More than two-thirds of midwives (67.2%) reported having witnessed a traumatic birth event that included interpersonal care-related trauma features. Midwives recalled strong emotions during or shortly after witnessing the traumatic birth event, such as feelings of horror (74.8%) and guilt (65.3%) about what happened to the woman. Midwives who witnessed birth trauma that included care-related features were significantly more likely to recall peritraumatic distress including feelings of horror (OR=3.89, 95% CI [2.71, 5.59]) and guilt (OR=1.90, 95% CI [1.36, 2.65]) than midwives who witnessed non-interpersonal birth trauma. 17% of midwives met criteria for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (95% CI [14.2, 20.0]). Witnessing abusive care was associated with more severe posttraumatic stress than other types of trauma. Witnessing care-related birth trauma was common. Midwives experience strong emotional reactions in response to witnessing birth trauma, in particular, care-related birth trauma. Almost one-fifth of midwives met criteria for probable posttraumatic stress disorder. Midwives carry a high psychological burden related to witnessing birth trauma. Posttraumatic stress should be acknowledged as an occupational stress for midwives. The incidence of traumatic birth events experienced by women and witnessed by midwives needs to be reduced. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Daily stressors, trauma exposure, and mental health among stateless Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Andrew; Varner, Andrea; Ventevogel, Peter; Taimur Hasan, M M; Welton-Mitchell, Courtney

    2017-06-01

    The Rohingya of Myanmar are a severely persecuted minority who form one of the largest groups of stateless people; thousands of them reside in refugee camps in southeastern Bangladesh. There has been little research into the mental health consequences of persecution, war, and other historical trauma endured by the Rohingya; nor has the role of daily environmental stressors associated with continued displacement, statelessness, and life in the refugee camps, been thoroughly researched. This cross-sectional study examined: trauma history, daily environmental stressors, and mental health outcomes for 148 Rohingya adults residing in Kutupalong and Nayapara refugee camps in Bangladesh. Results indicated high levels of mental health concerns: posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, somatic complaints, and associated functional impairment. Participants also endorsed local idioms of distress, including somatic complaints and concerns associated with spirit possession. The study also found very high levels of daily environmental stressors associated with life in the camps, including problems with food, lack of freedom of movement, and concerns regarding safety. Regression and associated mediation analyses indicated that, while there was a direct effect of trauma exposure on mental health outcomes (PTSD symptoms), daily environmental stressors partially mediated this relationship. Depression symptoms were associated with daily stressors, but not prior trauma exposure. These findings indicate that daily stressors play a pivotal role in mental health outcomes of populations affected by collective violence and statelessness. It is, therefore, important to consider the role and effects of environmental stressors associated with life in refugee camps on the mental health and psychosocial well-being of stateless populations such as the Rohingya, living in protracted humanitarian environments.

  5. Hernia Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Aghaie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare type of hernia, which follows blunt trauma to the abdomen, where disruption of the musculature and fascia occurs with the overlying skin remaining intact. Diagnosis of this problem is very difficult and delayed. Traumatic hernia is often diagnosed during laparatomy or laparascopy, but CT scan also has a role in distinguishing this pathology. Delay in diagnosis is very dangerous and can result in gangrene and necrosis of the organs in the hernia. The case report of a 35 years old man with liftruck blunt trauma is reported. His vital signs were stable. On physical examination, tenderness of RUQ was seen. He underwent Dpl for suspected hemoprotein. Dpl was followed up by laparatomy. Laparatomy revealed that the transverse and ascending colon partially herniated in the abdominal wall defect. The colon was reduced in the abdomen and repair of abdominal hernia was done. The patient was discharged after 5 day. The etiology, pathogenesis and management are discussed.

  6. Thoracic trauma: presentation and management outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaiq, M.; Shah, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the presentation and management outcome of thoracic trauma in a tertiary care setting. A total of 143 patients, who presented with chest trauma, were included in the study. All the patients were assessed by the history, physical examination and ancillary investigations. Appropriate managements were instituted as required. Data was described in percentages. out of 143 patients, 119 (83)% were males and 24 (17)% were females. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-50 years. Ninety seven (66)% patients were admitted for indoor management. Blunt injury was found in 125 (87.4%) patients, while penetrating injuries in only 18 (12.6%) patients. Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) were the commonest cause of trauma (n=103, 72%). Rib fracture was the commonest chest injury (74% patients). Head injury was the most frequently associated injury (18% of the patients). Tube thoracostomy was the commonest intervention undertaken in 65 (45%) patients. Seventeen (11.88%) patients were managed with mechanical ventilation. there were 17 deaths with a mortality rate of 11.88%. Thoracic trauma is an important cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in the younger population. RTAs constitute the leading cause of thoracic trauma in our setup. Tube thoracostomy is the most frequent and at times the only invasive procedure required as a definitive measure in thoracic trauma patients. A policy of selective hospitalization helps to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. (author)

  7. Trauma in Ethiopia Revisited: A systematic Review | Azaj | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This is a systematic review on trauma/injury incidents which has ... searches for trauma/injuries from peer-reviewed literature and websites from 1960 ... included study design, methodology, risk factors, and other study variables.

  8. Aetiology, epidemiology and management strategies for blunt scrotal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, D M; Davis, N F; O'Neill, D C; Brady, C M; Kiely, E A; O'Brien, M F

    2016-02-01

    To describe our experience of all patients presenting to a tertiary referral centre over a 3 year time period with blunt scrotal trauma and to describe a methodical approach for managing this group of patients. A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) of a level 1 trauma centre with blunt scrotal trauma from 2010 to 2013 inclusive. Inclusion criteria included a recent history of blunt scrotal trauma with associated pain and/or swelling of the affected testis on clinical examination. Twenty-seven male patients with a median age of 19 (range 8-65) years were included and all but 1 patient underwent scrotal ultrasonography upon presentation. Sixteen patients (59%) presented with scrotal trauma secondary to a sports related injury. Fifteen patients were managed conservatively and of the 12 who underwent urgent exploration 9 had a testicular rupture, including 1 who had an emergency orchidectomy due to a completely shattered testis. Four patients had >30% of the testis replaced by necrotic tissue/haematoma; of which 2 ultimately underwent orchidectomy and insertion of testicular prosthesis. Our findings demonstrate that the necessity for scrotal protection in sports that predispose to scrotal trauma should be reviewed. We also demonstrate the importance of scrotal ultrasonography for determining an appropriate management strategy (i.e., conservative versus surgical treatment) in this young patient cohort. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of the severity of trauma on early retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlman, Michael Bilde; Lohse, Nicolai; Sørensen, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    . SETTING: Level-one urban trauma centre. PARTICIPANTS: Patients aged 18-64 years entering the trauma centre in Copenhagen during 1999-2007 who were alive after three days were followed until early retirement, death or emigration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was early retirement, defined...... and gender. RESULTS: Of all 6687 patients admitted to the trauma centre, a total of 1722 trauma patients were included and followed for a median of 6.2 years (interquartile range (IQR) 3.7-9.1). Of these, 1305 (75.8%) were males, median age was 35.0 years (IQR 25.4-46.5), and median ISS was 16 (IQR 9...

  10. [First aid and management of multiple trauma: in-hospital trauma care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschin, Matthias; Vordemvenne, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Injuries remain the leading cause of death in children and young adults. Management of multiple trauma patients has improved in recent years by quality initiatives (trauma network, S3 guideline "Polytrauma"). On this basis, strong links with preclinical management, structured treatment algorithms, training standards (ATLS®), clear diagnostic rules and an established risk- and quality management are the important factors of a modern emergency room trauma care. We describe the organizational components that lead to successful management of trauma in hospital. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Non-Operative Management of Isolated Pneumoperitoneum Due to Severe Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kilic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonoperative management of blunt abdominal trauma is the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients. The results of nonoperative management are more successful in isolated solid organ injuries such as the liver and spleen than hollow viscus injury. In this approach, both the clinical course of the patient and the computed tomography findings play an important role. Isolated pneumoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma may be a surgical challenge for clinicians because it is usually a significant radiological sign for hallow viscus perforations. Here, we report a case of isolated pneumoperitoneum detected on computed tomography and managed non-surgically, in a young man suffered from a severe blunt abdominal trauma. Our aim is to attract the attention of surgeons to the management problems of the presence of pneumoperitoneum in the absence of other radiological findings in blunt abdominal trauma.

  12. Computed tomography in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented

  13. Computed tomography in trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  14. Vicarious traumatization in the work with survivors of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, D

    1995-04-01

    1. Persons working with victims of childhood trauma may experience traumatic countertransference and vicarious traumatization. After hearing a patient's trauma story, which is a necessary part of childhood trauma therapy, staff may experience post-traumatic stress disorder, imagery associated with the patient's story and the same disruptions in relationships as the patient. 2. During the first 6 months of working with survivors of childhood trauma, common behaviors of staff members were identified, including a lack of attention, poor work performance, medication errors, sick calls, treatment errors, irreverence, hypervigilance, and somatic complaints. 3. Staff working with victims of childhood trauma can obtain the necessary staff support through team support, in traumatic events, and in a leadership role.

  15. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria W. Mauritz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI are often not recognized in clinical practice. Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980–2010 and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders. Results: Population-weighted mean prevalence rates in SMI were physical abuse 47% (range 25–72%, sexual abuse 37% (range 24–49%, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD 30% (range 20–47%. Compared to men, women showed a higher prevalence of sexual abuse in schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and mixed diagnosis groups labelled as having SMI. Conclusions: Prevalence rates of interpersonal trauma and trauma-related disorders were significantly higher in SMI than in the general population. Emotional abuse and neglect, physical neglect, complex PTSD, and dissociative disorders have been scarcely examined in SMI.

  16. Evolution of the operative management of colon trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, John P; Magnotti, Louis J; Fabian, Timothy C; Croce, Martin A

    2017-01-01

    For any trauma surgeon, colon wounds remain a relatively common, yet sometimes challenging, clinical problem. Evolution in operative technique and improvements in antimicrobial therapy during the past two centuries have brought remarkable improvements in both morbidity and mortality after injury to the colon. Much of the early progress in management and patient survival after colon trauma evolved from wartime experience. Multiple evidence-based studies during the last several decades have allowed for more aggressive management, with most wounds undergoing primary repair or resection and anastomosis with an acceptably low suture line failure rate. Despite the abundance of quality evidence regarding management of colon trauma obtained from both military and civilian experience, there remains some debate among institutions regarding management of specific injuries. This is especially true with respect to destructive wounds, injuries to the left colon, blunt colon trauma and those wounds requiring colonic discontinuity during an abbreviated laparotomy. Some programs have developed data-driven protocols that have simplified management of destructive colon wounds, clearly identifying those high-risk patients who should undergo diversion, regardless of mechanism or anatomic location. This update will describe the progression in the approach to colon injuries through history while providing a current review of the literature regarding management of the more controversial wounds.

  17. Trauma complexo e suas implicações diagnósticas Complex trauma and diagnostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Wendt Viola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A exposição prolongada a múltiplos eventos traumáticos de natureza interpessoal, sobretudo durante o desenvolvimento, tem demonstrado consequências e sintomas psiquiátricos não considerados pelo atual diagnóstico de transtorno de estresse pós-traumático (TEPT. Essas situações negativas e crônicas durante a infância e adolescência evidenciam a existência de uma síndrome psicopatológica associada a complexas (desadaptações a efeitos traumáticos diversos. A ausência de um diagnóstico coeso e fidedigno para essas vítimas interfere negativamente na identificação sintomatológica e no método de tratamento. O presente trabalho visa revisar a definição de trauma, apresentando o conceito de trauma complexo, explorando suas implicações clínicas, bem como as categorias diagnósticas derivadas desse constructo. Importantes questões são levantadas acerca das diferenças entre trauma complexo e TEPT, investigando os sintomas e transtornos comórbidos ao diagnóstico de TEPT, assim como as limitações inerentes a esse diagnóstico. Considerando o impacto psicopatológico relacionado ao trauma complexo, discute-se a possível inserção de uma nova categoria diagnóstica na 5ª versão do Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico dos Transtornos Mentais, adjunta ao espectro de psicopatologias pós-traumáticas.Prolonged exposure to multiple traumatic events of an interpersonal nature, particularly during development, has shown psychological consequences and symptoms not included among the current diagnostic criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. These negative and chronic situations during childhood and adolescence provide further evidence of the existence of a psychopathological syndrome associated with complex (disadaptations to a number of traumatic effects. The absence of a cohesive and reliable diagnosis for these patients negatively affects symptom identification and treatment planning. The aim of the present study

  18. Utility of Glissonean Pedicle Transection for Surgical Treatment of Severe Liver Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Koizumi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The most common initial strategy for treatment of severe liver trauma is damage control in which hemostasis is achieved by perihepatic gauze packing and/or vascular embolization. However, we encounter patients in whom this strategy alone is not adequate. We have applied the principles of Glissonean pedicle transection, a technique that was originally devised to ensure safe and quick performance of planned hepatectomy for liver cancer, to 3 cases of severe liver trauma. We performed Glissonean pedicle ligation during damage control surgery in 2 patients and Glissonean pedicle transection during the definitive surgery in 1 patient. We describe the approaches and our experience with them, including operation times and outcomes. From our experience thus far, it seems that 8–12 h after the damage control procedure is appropriate for performing the definitive surgery. Although there are some problems posed by this strategy and cases to which it will not be applicable, the method seems to be particularly useful for cases of severe liver trauma in which the damage is extensive and involves the Glissonean pedicles near the hepatic hilus. We describe our 3 cases in detail and review our experience in light of the available literature.

  19. Facility disparities in reporting comorbidities to the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransman, Ryan; Kent, Alistair J; Haut, Elliott R; Reema Kar, A; Sakran, Joseph V; Stevens, Kent; Efron, David T; Jones, Christian

    2018-01-27

    The National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) includes patient comorbidities. This study evaluates factors of trauma centers associated with higher rates of missing comorbidity data. Proportions of missing comorbidity data from facilities in the NTDB from 2011 to 2014 were evaluated for associations with facility characteristics. Proportional impact analysis was performed to identify potential policy targets. Of 919 included facilities, 85% reported comorbidity data in 95% or more cases; only 31.3% were missing no data. Missing rates were significantly different based on most facility categories, but independently associated only with hospital size, region, and trauma center level. Only 15% of centers were responsible for over 80% of cases missing data. There is significant nonrandom variation in reporting trauma patient comorbidities to the NTDB. Missing data needs to be recognized and considered in studies of trauma comorbidities. Targeted intervention may improve data quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Trauma related to falls from trees treated in a specialized trauma centre in Burkina-Faso-one hundred and six cases treated in one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakouré, Patrick W H; Diallo, Malick; Traoré, André-Charles V; Gandéma, Salifou; Barro, Sie Drissa; Traoré, Ibrahim Alain; Zaré, Cyprien

    2015-12-01

    Falls from trees related traumas are rarely reported in literature. They are public health problems in developing countries where their frequency is still important. The aim of the study is to describe falls from trees related trauma patterns and to present preventative measures. An annual ongoing prospective study was held in our trauma emergency department (ED) about all the patients who sustained an injury after a recent fall from tree. A questionnaire related to the patient and to the trauma was established. The data were encoded and analysed by a statistical software. One hundred six patients who sustained a fall from tree trauma, out of a total of 139, were studied. Most patients were under 15 years old (76.4 %); they were injured in fruits season (33 %) after a fall from a fruit tree (mango trees, Shea trees, Néré, etc.) and were received late (86 %). Injuries were polymorphic from traumatic brain injuries (51.8 %) and spine injuries (13.2 %) to thoraco-abdominal (21.6 %) and limbs injuries (46.2 %). Three housewives were pregnant at the time of the trauma with secondary abortions. Patients were managed medically (33.9 %), surgically (19.8 %) or by casting (34.9 %) with good outcome in 59 cases. Twelve patients refused medical care and two died. Education programs must focus on picking fruits and leaves in order to make them safe and prevent injuries related to these traditional or professional activities.

  1. Health outcome after major trauma: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Karen; Cole, Elaine; Playford, E Diane; Grill, Eva; Soberg, Helene L; Brohi, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients. To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006-2012) were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries. Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts. 34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%), functional activities (11%) and environmental factors (2%). Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care.

  2. Trauma no idoso Trauma in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ ANTONIO GOMES DE SOUZA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O crescimento populacional de idosos, associado a uma forma de vida mais saudável e mais ativa, deixa este grupo de pessoas mais exposto ao risco de acidentes. Em alguns países, o trauma do idoso responde por uma elevada taxa de mortalidade, a qual se apresenta de forma desproporcionalmente maior do que a observada entre a população de adultos jovens. Tal fato acarreta um grande consumo de recursos financeiros destinados à assistência da saúde e um elevado custo social. As características fisiológicas próprias do idoso, assim como a presença freqüente de doenças associadas, faz com que estes pacientes se comportem diferentemente e de forma mais complexa do que os demais grupos etários. Estas particularidades fazem com que o atendimento ao idoso vítima de trauma se faça de forma diferenciada. A presente revisão aborda aspectos da epidemiologia, da prevenção, da fisiologia, do atendimento e da reabilitação do idoso vítima de trauma.The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, desproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave diferently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and reabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  3. Epidemiological findings of ocular trauma in childhood Achados epidemiológicos do trauma ocular na infância

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelino Julio Cariello

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe epidemiological findings of ocular trauma in childhood in an emergency unit. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out including patients under 16 years old who were treated for ocular trauma at the emergency unit of the Federal University of São Paulo from September 2001 to September 2004. Age, sex, involved eye, place, circumstance and mechanism of injury, initial visual acuity and immediate management were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 273 patients were included in the study. The age group comprising most cases was 7 to 10 years (39.9%. The most frequent cause of ocular injury was traumatism by external agents like stone, iron and wood objects (27.9%. The commonest place was the home (53.1%. Initial visual acuity was over 20/40 in 63.4% of cases. Closed globe injury occurred in 201 (73.6% accidents. Seventy-six children (27. 8% were treated with medicines and in forty-eight (17.6% cases surgery was necessary. CONCLUSION: Ocular trauma in childhood was more frequent in the male schoolchild and was due mostly to traumatism with agents like stone, wood and iron pieces, domestic utensils and leisure objects. The injuries occurred most frequently at home. Closed globe injuries predominated. Programs of education and prevention for ocular trauma in childhood are necessary.OBJETIVO: Descrever os achados epidemiológicos do trauma ocular na infância em uma unidade de emergência. MÉTODOS: Em estudo retrospectivo, foram analisados prontuários de pacientes menores que 16 anos que foram atendidos por trauma ocular no Pronto-Socorro de Oftalmologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo de setembro de 2001 a setembro de 2004. Foram coletadas informações a respeito da idade, sexo, olho envolvido, local, circunstância e mecanismo do trauma, acuidade visual inicial e conduta imediata. RESULTADOS: Um total de 273 pacientes foi incluído no estudo. A faixa etária com maior número de casos foi a de 7 a 10 anos (39,9%. A causa

  4. Epidemiological evaluation of hepatic trauma victims undergoing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre Kalil

    Full Text Available Objective : to evaluate the epidemiological variables and diagnostic and therapeutic modalities related to hepatic trauma patients undergoing laparotomy in a public referral hospital in the metropolitan region of Vitória-ES. Methods : we conducted a retrospective study, reviewing charts of trauma patients with liver injuries, whether isolated or in association with other organs, who underwent exploratory laparotomy, from January 2011 to December 2013. Results : We studied 392 patients, 107 of these with liver injury. The male: female ratio was 6.6 : 1 and the mean age was 30.12 years. Penetrating liver trauma occurred in 78.5% of patients, mostly with firearms. Associated injuries occurred in 86% of cases and intra-abdominal injuries were more common in penetrating trauma (p <0.01. The most commonly used operative technique was hepatorrhaphy and damage control surgery was applied in 6.5% of patients. The average amounts of blood products used were 6.07 units of packed red blood cells and 3.01 units of fresh frozen plasma. The incidence of postoperative complications was 29.9%, the most frequent being infectious, including pneumonia, peritonitis and intra-abdominal abscess. The survival rate of patients suffering from blunt trauma was 60%, and penetrating trauma, 87.5% (p <0.05. Conclusion : despite technological advances in diagnosis and treatment, mortality rates in liver trauma remain high, especially in patients suffering from blunt trauma in relation to penetrating one.

  5. Images in kidney trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Sonia Pilar; Manzano, Ana Cristina

    2007-01-01

    A case of a 3 years old female patient, who suffered blunt lumbar trauma (horse kick) with secondary kidney trauma, is reported. Imaging findings are described. Renal trauma classification and imaging findings are reviewed

  6. Trauma facilities in Denmark - a nationwide cross-sectional benchmark study of facilities and trauma care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C; Frederiksen, Christian A; Laursen, Christian B; Sloth, Erik; Mølgaard, Ole; Knudsen, Lars; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2018-03-27

    Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone for structured interviews. A total of 22 facilities in Denmark were found to receive traumatized patients. All facilities used a trauma care manual and all had a multidisciplinary trauma team. The study found three different trauma team activation criteria and nine different compositions of teams who participate in trauma care. Training was heterogeneous and, beyond the major trauma centers, databases were only maintained in a few facilities. The study established an inventory of the existing Danish facilities that receive traumatized patients. The trauma team activation criteria and the trauma teams were heterogeneous in both size and composition. A national database for traumatized patients, research on nationwide trauma team activation criteria, and team composition guidelines are all called for.

  7. Assessing trauma and mental health in refugee children and youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadeberg, A. K.; Montgomery, Edith; Frederiksen, H. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is estimated that children below 18 years constitute 50% of the refugee population worldwide, which is the highest figure in a decade. Due to conflicts like the Syrian crises, children are continuously exposed to traumatic events. Trauma exposure can cause mental health problems...... of the validated screening and measurement tools available for assessment of trauma and mental health among refugee children and youth. Methods: We systematically searched the databases PubMed, PsycINFO and PILOTS. The search yielded 913 articles and 97 were retained for further investigation. In accordance...... with the PRISMA guidelines two authors performed the eligibility assessment. The full text of 23 articles was assessed and 9 met the eligibility criteria. Results: Only nine studies had validated trauma and mental health tools in refugee children and youth populations. A serious lack of validated tools...

  8. Pharmacist's impact on acute pain management during trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kayla; Hall, A Brad; Keriazes, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    The timely administration of analgesics is crucial to the comprehensive management of trauma patients. When an emergency department (ED) pharmacist participates in trauma resuscitation, the pharmacist acts as a medication resource for trauma team members and facilitates the timely administration of analgesics. This study measured the impact of a pharmacist on time to first analgesic dose administered during trauma resuscitation. All adult (>18 years) patients who presented to this level II trauma center via activation of the trauma response system between January 1, 2009, and May 31, 2013, were screened for eligibility. For inclusion, patients must have received intravenous fentanyl, morphine, or hydromorphone in the trauma bay. The time to medication administration was defined as the elapsed time from ED arrival to administration of first analgesic. There were 1328 trauma response system activations during the study period; of which 340 patients were included. The most common analgesic administered was fentanyl (62% in both groups). When a pharmacist was participating, the mean time to first analgesic administered was decreased (17 vs 21 minutes; P = .03). Among the 78% of patients with documented pain scores, the overall mean reduction in pain scores from ED arrival to ED discharge was similar between the 2 groups. There was a 2.4 point reduction with a pharmacist versus 2.7 without a pharmacist, using a 0 to 10 numeric pain rating scale. The participation of a clinical pharmacist during trauma resuscitation significantly decreased the time to first analgesic administration in trauma patients. The results of this study supplement the literature supporting the integration of clinical ED pharmacists on trauma teams.

  9. Laparoscopic Splenectomy in Hemodynamically Stable Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gregory S; Chance, Elisha A; Hileman, Barbara M; Emerick, Eric S; Gianetti, Emily A

    2017-01-01

    No criteria define indications for laparoscopic splenectomy in trauma. This investigation compared characteristics of trauma patients and outcomes between laparoscopic and open splenectomies. Patients were identified retrospectively by using ICD-9 codes. Included patients were 18 or older, with a blunt splenic injury from January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2014, and required splenectomy. Excluded patients had penetrating trauma, successful nonoperative management, or successful embolization. Variables included demographics, presenting characteristics, injury severity scores, abdominal abbreviated injury scores, splenic injury grade, surgical indication and approach (open or laparoscopic), surgery length, intra-operative blood loss, transfusions, length of stay, complications, mortality, and discharge disposition. Forty-one patients underwent open splenectomy, and 11 underwent laparoscopic splenectomy. The mean age was 48.7 years, and men comprised the sample majority (36/52). The groups were well matched for age, abdominal injury scores, and admission vital signs. The open group had a significantly lower level of consciousness and more acidosis compared with the laparoscopic group. Most laparoscopic splenectomies were performed after failed nonoperative management or embolization. The indications for open splenectomy were a positive focused assessment with sonography for trauma and computed tomography results. Laparoscopic patients had significantly longer times between presentation and surgery and longer operations, but had significantly less blood loss and fewer transfusions compared with the open group. There were no differences in mortality, length of stay, complications, or discharge dispositions. Laparoscopic splenectomy is useful in patients with blunt trauma in whom conservative management produced no improvement and who do not have other injuries to preclude laparoscopy.

  10. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  11. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B.; Dias, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  12. The pattern of trauma in private general medical practice set-up Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Private general medical practice establishments appear to be treating a significant number of trauma cases including more serious ones. Aim: To find out the extent of such treatment of trauma and what has made this possible. METHODS: All trauma cases treated in a private general medical practice set up ...

  13. Predictors of poor outcomes after significant chest trauma in multiply injured patients: a retrospective analysis from the German Trauma Registry (Trauma Register DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephan; Biberthaler, Peter; Delhey, Patrick; Trentzsch, Heiko; Winter, Hauke; van Griensven, Martijn; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2014-09-03

    Blunt thoracic trauma is one of the critical injury mechanisms in multiply injured trauma victims. Although these patients present a plethora of potential structural damages to vital organs, it remains debated which injuries actually influence outcome and thereby should be addressed initially. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the influence of critical structural damages on mortality. All patients in the database of the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) from 2002-2011 with AIS Chest ≥ 2, blunt trauma, age of 16 or older and an ISS ≥ 16 were analyzed. Outcome parameters were in-hospital mortality as well as ventilation time in patients surviving the initial 14 days after trauma. 22613 Patients were included (mean ISS 30.5 ± 12.6; 74.7% male; Mean Age 46.1 ± 197 years; mortality 17.5%; mean duration of ventilation 7.3 ± 11.5; mean ICU stay 11.7 ± 14.1 days). Only a limited number of specific injuries had a significant impact on survival. Major thoracic vessel injuries (AIS ≥5), bilateral lung contusion, bilateral flail chest, structural heart injury (AIS ≥3) significantly influence mortality in study patients. Several extrathoracic factors (age, blood transfusion, systolic blood pressure and extrathoracic severe injuries) were also predictive of increased mortality. Most injuries of the thoracic wall had no or only a moderate effect on the duration of ventilation. Injuries to the lung (laceration, contusion or pneumothoraces) had a moderate prolonging effect. Cardiac injuries and severe injuries to the thoracic vessels induced a substantially prolonged ventilation interval. We demonstrate quantitatively the influence of specific structural damages of the chest on critical outcome parameters. While most injuries of the chest wall have no or only limited impact in the study collective, injuries to the lung overall show adverse outcome. Injuries to the heart or thoracic vessels have a devastating prognosis following blunt

  14. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Beliz; Özdemir, Y Özay; Beştepe, E Emrem

    2018-01-01

    Objective Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD). There are few studies that focus directly on research etiology of GPP/PD and use structured scales. The aim of this study was to research childhood trauma and dissociation forms among women with GPP/PD. Patients and methods Fifty-five women with GPP/PD according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and 61 healthy women with no complaints of sexual function as a control group, in the age range of 18–60 years, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data form, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20) were administered to all participants. Results Sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect scores, which comprise the subgroups of CTQ, were found high among women with GPP/PD compared with the control group (p=0.003, p=0.006, p=0.001). While a significant difference between the two groups’ SDQ scores was obtained (p=0.000), no significant difference was detected between the two groups’ DES scores (p=0.392). Discussion The results evoke the question are genitopelvic pain conditions, vaginismus and dyspareunia, that cannot be explained with a medical cause and that cause penetration disorder, a kind of dissociative symptom prone to develop in some women with childhood psychogenic trauma. PMID:29503548

  15. Changes in the management of liver trauma leading to reduced mortality: 15-year experience in a major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Kary; Skandarajah, Anita R; Knowles, Brett; Judson, Rodney; Thomson, Benjamin N

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, the evolution of management of liver injury has resulted in improved outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the trend in the management and outcomes of patients with liver injury. Primary outcomes were defined as mortality and hospital length of stay. The secondary aim was to identify independent predictors of mortality. This study utilized hospital trauma registry data of all trauma patients with liver injuries admitted from 1999 to 2013. Patients in this 15-year period were divided into three periods of 5 years each and compared in terms of demographics, management and outcomes. A total of 725 patients with hepatic trauma were included. Patient demographics were similar, except for an increase in patient transfers from rural locations. Non-operative management increased significantly. There was a significant increase in the use of damage control surgery with perihepatic packing in high-grade liver injuries managed operatively. Hepatic angioembolization commenced midway through the study period. The overall mortality decreased by approximately threefold (P trauma service has led to an evolution in the management of hepatic trauma, favouring non-operative management, damage control surgery and the use of hepatic angioembolization. We experienced a significantly improved mortality within 24 h of arrival to hospital in patients with liver trauma. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. MATERNAL TRAUMA AFFECTS PRENATAL MENTAL HEALTH AND INFANT STRESS REGULATION AMONG PALESTINIAN DYADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isosävi, Sanna; Diab, Safwat Y; Kangaslampi, Samuli; Qouta, Samir; Kankaanpää, Saija; Puura, Kaija; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

    2017-09-01

    We examined how diverse and cumulated traumatic experiences predicted maternal prenatal mental health and infant stress regulation in war conditions and whether maternal mental health mediated the association between trauma and infant stress regulation. Participants were 511 Palestinian mothers from the Gaza Strip who reported exposure to current war trauma (WT), past childhood emotional (CEA) and physical abuse, socioeconomic status (SES), prenatal mental health problems (posttraumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms), and perceived stress during their secondtrimester of pregnancy as well as infant stress regulation at 4 months. While all trauma types were associated with high levels of prenatal symptoms, CEA had the most wide-ranging effects and was uniquely associated with depression symptoms. Concerning infant stress regulation, mothers' CEA predicted negative affectivity, but only among mothers with low WT. Against hypothesis, the effects of maternal trauma on infant stress regulation were not mediated by mental health symptoms. Mothers' higher SES was associated with better infant stress regulation whereas infant prematurity and male sex predisposed for difficulties. Our findings suggest that maternal childhood abuse, especially CEA, should be a central treatment target among war-exposed families. Cumulated psychosocial stressors might increase the risk for transgenerational problems. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  17. Measuring psychological trauma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisala, Pamela A; Victorson, David; Pace, Natalie; Heinemann, Allen W; Choi, Seung W; Tulsky, David S

    2015-05-01

    To describe the development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form. Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a Psychological Trauma item bank with patient and provider focus groups, cognitive interviews, and item response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. We tested a 31-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Veterans Administration hospital. A total of 716 individuals with SCI completed the trauma items The 31 items fit a unidimensional model (CFI=0.952; RMSEA=0.061) and demonstrated good precision (theta range between 0.6 and 2.5). Nine items demonstrated negligible DIF with little impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank contains 19 items The SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank is a psychometrically robust measurement tool from which a short form and a computer adaptive test (CAT) version are available.

  18. [Low grade renal trauma (Part II): diagnostic validity of ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, R; Báca, V; Otcenásek, M; Zátura, F

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to verify whether ultrasonography can be considered a reliable method for the diagnosis of low-grade renal trauma. The group investigated included patients with grade I or grade II blunt renal trauma, as classified by the AAST grading system, in whom ultrasonography alone or in conjunction with computed tomography was used as a primary diagnostic method. B-mode ultrasound with a transabdominal probe working at frequencies of 2.5 to 5.0 MHz was used. Every finding of post-traumatic changes in the renal tissues, i.e., post-contusion hypotonic infiltration of the renal parenchyma or subcapsular haematoma, was included. The results were statistically evaluated by the Chi-square test with the level of significance set at 5%, using Epi Info Version 6 CZ software. The group comprised 112 patients (43 women, 69 men) aged between 17 and 82 years (average, 38 years). It was possible to diagnose grade I or grade II renal injury by ultrasonography in only 60 (54%) of them. The statistical significance of ultrasonography as the only imaging method for the diagnosis of low-grade renal injury was not confirmed (p=0.543) Low-grade renal trauma is a problem from the diagnostic point of view. It usually does not require revision surgery and, if found during repeat surgery for more serious injury of another organ, it usually does not receive attention. Therefore, the macroscopic presentation of grade I and grade II renal injury is poorly understood, nor are their microscopic findings known, because during revision surgery these the traumatised kidneys are not usually removed and their injuries at autopsy on the patients who died of multiple trauma are not recorded either. The results of this study demonstrated that the validity of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of low-grade renal injury is not significant, because this examination can reveal only some of the renal injuries such as perirenal haematoma. An injury to the renal parenchyma is also indicated by

  19. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruque, A. V.; Qazi, S. H.; Khan, M. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. Methods: The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonography had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Conclusions: Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be

  20. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, Ahmad Vaqas; Qazi, Saqib Hamid; Khan, Muhammad Arif Mateen; Akhtar, Wassem; Majeed, Amina

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1,2000 to December 31,2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonograpy had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be limited to those cases in which focussed

  1. Association of perpetrator relationship to abusive head trauma clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Philip V; Makoroff, Kathi L; Feldman, Kenneth W; Berger, Rachel P

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of abusive head trauma (AHT) remains a significant public health problem with limited prevention success. Providing protection from further harm is often challenged by the difficulty in identifying the alleged perpetrator (AP) responsible for this pediatric trauma. The objective of this study was to evaluate demographic and clinical characteristics of children with AHT and the relationship between APs and their victims in a large, multi-site sample. Understanding the AHT risks from various caregivers may help to inform current prevention strategies. A retrospective review of all cases of AHT diagnosed by child protection teams (CPT) from 1/1/04 to 6/30/09 at four children's hospitals was conducted. Clinical characteristics of children with AHT injured by non-parental perpetrators (NPP) were compared to parental perpetrators (PP). There were 459 children with AHT; 313 (68%) had an identified AP. The majority of the 313 children were <1 year of age (76%), Caucasian (63%), male (58%), receiving public assistance (80%), and presented without a history of trauma (62%); mortality was 19%. Overall, APs were: father (53%), parent partner (22%), mother (8%), babysitter (8%), other adult caregiver (5%); NPP accounted for 39% of APs. NPPs were more likely to cause AHT in children ≥ 1 year (77% vs. 23%, p<0.001) compared to PP. Independent associations to NPP included: older child, absence of a history of trauma, retinal hemorrhages, and male perpetrator gender. While fathers were the most common AP in AHT victims, there is a significant association for increased risk of AHT by NPPs in the older child, who presents with retinal hemorrhages, in the hands of a male AP. Further enhancement of current prevention strategies to address AHT risks of non-parental adults who provide care to children, especially in the post-infancy age seems warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Maxillofacial trauma patient: coping with the difficult airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barak Michal

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Establishing a secure airway in a trauma patient is one of the primary essentials of treatment. Any flaw in airway management may lead to grave morbidity and mortality. Maxillofacial trauma presents a complex problem with regard to the patient's airway. By definition, the injury compromises the patient's airway and it is, therefore, must be protected. In most cases, the patient undergoes surgery for maxillofacial trauma or for other, more severe, life-threatening injuries, and securing the airway is the first step in the introduction of general anaesthesia. In such patients, we anticipate difficult endotracheal intubation and, often, also difficult mask ventilation. In addition, the patient is usually regarded as having a "full stomach" and has not been cleared of a C-spine injury, which may complicate airway management furthermore. The time available to accomplish the task is short and the patient's condition may deteriorate rapidly. Both decision-making and performance are impaired in such circumstances. In this review, we discuss the complexity of the situation and present a treatment approach.

  3. Why did adolescents have sleep problems after earthquakes? Understanding the role of traumatic exposure, fear, and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Xinchun; Chen, Qiuyan; Zhen, Rui

    2017-06-01

    To examine the relationships between trauma exposure, fear, post-traumatic stress disorder, and sleep problems in adolescents, 746 adolescent survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China were assessed at 1 year (T1) and 1.5 years (T2) after the earthquake using a trauma exposure questionnaire, a fear questionnaire, a child posttraumatic stress disorder symptom scale, and a subscale on child sleep problems. The results showed that T1 trauma exposure were not directly associated with sleep problems at T1 and T2, but played a positive role in sleep problems at both T1 and T2 indirectly through T1 posttraumatic stress disorder and T1 fear. T1 trauma exposure was also positively and indirectly associated with T2 sleep problems through T1 posttraumatic stress disorder via T1 sleep problems, or through T1 fear via the path from T1 posttraumatic stress disorder to T1 sleep problems. These findings indicated that fear and posttraumatic stress disorder 1 year after the earthquake played a mediating role in the relationship between trauma exposure at 1 year after the earthquake, and sleep problems at both 1 year and 1.5 years after the earthquake, respectively. In particular, posttraumatic stress disorder also had a multiple mediating effect in the path from trauma exposure to sleep problems via fear. Furthermore, the findings indicated that sleep problems were relatively stable between 1 and 1.5 years after an earthquake. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The value of trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Clark, David E

    2008-06-01

    Trauma registries are databases that document acute care delivered to patients hospitalised with injuries. They are designed to provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency and quality of trauma care. Indeed, the combination of trauma registry data at regional or national levels can produce very large databases that allow unprecedented opportunities for the evaluation of patient outcomes and inter-hospital comparisons. However, the creation and upkeep of trauma registries requires a substantial investment of money, time and effort, data quality is an important challenge and aggregated trauma data sets rarely represent a population-based sample of trauma. In addition, trauma hospitalisations are already routinely documented in administrative hospital discharge databases. The present review aims to provide evidence that trauma registry data can be used to improve the care dispensed to victims of injury in ways that could not be achieved with information from administrative databases alone. In addition, we will define the structure and purpose of contemporary trauma registries, acknowledge their limitations, and discuss possible ways to make them more useful.

  5. EYE TRAUMA. OPEN GLOBE INJURY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Globočnik Petrovič

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ocular trauma is important cause of blindness. Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology allows us to use a standardized eye injury terminology which permits an unambigous interpretation. The Eye Injury Registry enables the analysis of medical, epidemyologic and social data.The most frequent ocular injury ocular contusion has a relatively good prognosis. An adequate primary ocular repair and correct timing of pars plana vitrectomy are very important in open globe injury management. There still exist some controversial issues concerning the role of posterior segment surgery in open globe injuries. These include timing of surgery, prophylactic scleral buckle placement and a proper use of systemic and intravitreal antibiotics.Conclusions. With adequate primary ocular repair, the use of systemic, intravitreal antibiotics, scleral buckling and proper timing for pars plana vitrectomy the prognosis for ocular trauma cases can be better.

  6. Physician Confidence in Dental Trauma Treatment and the Introduction of a Dental Trauma Decision-Making Pathway for the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Matthew; Cully, Jennifer; Nietert, Paul J; Titus, M Olivia

    2018-04-24

    The objectives of this study were to (1) survey and report the awareness and confidence of pediatric emergency medicine physicians in the management of dental trauma and (2) determine the prevalence of dental trauma decision-making pathway utilization in the pediatric emergency department. A survey was distributed through e-mail to the pediatric emergency medicine discussion list via Brown University LISTSERV. The survey study included 10 questions and was multiple-choice. The survey contained questions about physician confidence and their use of a dental trauma decision-making pathway. A total of 285 individuals responded to the survey. Somewhat confident was the most common response (61%) followed by not confident (20%) and confident (19%) by respondents in treating dental trauma. Forty-one percent of respondents felt comfortable, 39% somewhat comfortable, 19% not comfortable, and 1% not sure in replanting an avulsed tooth. Only 6% of respondents reported that their pediatric emergency department always or sometimes uses a dental trauma decision-making pathway, whereas 78% of pediatric emergency departments do not. We believe that the adoption of a decision-making pathway will provide timely management, improve emergency physician comfort, and enhance outcomes for pediatric patients presenting with a dental trauma. A future multicenter review will aim to evaluate these goals based on the utilization of our dental trauma decision-making pathway.

  7. Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Coppola, Marco; Robinson, Richard D; Scribner, James T; Vithalani, Veer; de Moor, Carrie E; Gandhi, Raj R; Burton, Mandy; Delaney, Kathleen A

    2013-04-01

    It has been found that significantly different clinical outcomes occur in trauma patients with different mechanisms of injury. Ground level falls (GLF) are usually considered "minor trauma" with less injury occurred in general. However, it is not uncommon that geriatric trauma patients sustain cervical spine (C-spine) fractures with other associated injuries due to GLF or less. The aim of this study is to determine the injury patterns and the roles of clinical risk factors in these geriatric trauma patients. Data were reviewed from the institutional trauma registry of our local level 1 trauma center. All patients had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Basic clinical characteristics, the distribution of C-spine fracture(s), and mechanism of injury in geriatric patients (65 years or older) were compared with those less than 65 years old. Furthermore, different clinical variables including age, gender, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood alcohol level, and co-existing injuries were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression in geriatric trauma patients due to GLF and internally validated by random bootstrapping technique. From 2006 - 2010, a total of 12,805 trauma patients were included in trauma registry, of which 726 (5.67%) had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Among all C-spine fracture patients, 19.15% (139/726) were geriatric patients. Of these geriatric patients 27.34% (38/139) and 53.96% (75/139) had C1 and C2 fractures compared with 13.63% (80/587) and 21.98% (129/587) in young trauma patients (P geriatric trauma patients 13.67% (19/139) and 18.71% (26/139) had C6 and C7 fractures compared with 32.03% (188/587) and 41.40% (243/587) in younger ones separately (P geriatric patients had sustained C-spine fractures due to GLF with more upper C-spine fractures (C1 and C2). Only 3.2% of those had positive blood alcohol levels compared with 52.9% of younger patients (P geriatric patients due to GLF had intracranial pathology (ICP) which was one of the most common co

  8. Health outcome after major trauma: what are we measuring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hoffman

    Full Text Available Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients.To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma.MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006-2012 were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries.Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts.34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%, functional activities (11% and environmental factors (2%.Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care.

  9. Readiness to change and reasons for intended reduction of alcohol consumption in emergency department versus trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Craig; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Anderson, Craig L; Roumani, Samer; Weiss, Jie; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2014-05-01

    The primary objective was to identify the most common reasons for intending to cut back on alcohol use, in emergency department (ED) and trauma patient populations. The secondary objective was to determine the association between reason to cut back on alcohol and education level. We conducted the study at a level one trauma center in California between 2008 and 2012. This was a retrospective analysis of data collected from computerized alcohol screening and intervention (CASI). We excluded patients who drank too little, and those whose scores were consistent with dependency (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT]>19). The CASI database includes the patient's age, gender, language, education level, an AUDIT score (1-40 scale), a readiness to change score (1-10), and the option to choose any of 10 "reasons to cut back" on their alcohol consumption. From 10,537 patients, 1,202 met criteria for the study (848 ED, 354 trauma). Overall, the most common reasons cited for cutting back on alcohol were "To avoid health problems" (68.5%), "To avoid getting a DUI" (43.6%), "It could save me money" (42.0%), and "To avoid situations where I could get hurt" (41.0%). Trauma patients cited the following reasons significantly more than ED patients: "To avoid situations where I could get hurt" (46.3% versus 38.8%, respectively), "So I can be in control of my behavior" (40.7% versus 32.2%), and "My partner or spouse wants me to stop" (20.1% versus 15.0%). Additionally, those patients who cited "To avoid health problems" reported 1.2 points higher than average (pchange scale. Those who have completed some college or an associate degree cited "To avoid health problems" less often than high school graduates (odds ratio [OR] 0.45), while they cited "To avoid situations where I could get hurt" (OR 2.5) and "To avoid being in a car crash caused by alcohol use" (OR 3.8) more often than high school graduates. Health, injury, finances, and legal issues remain top concerns for

  10. Contextualizing Afghan refugee views of depression through narratives of trauma, resettlement stress, and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Qais; James, Sigrid; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    This qualitative study explored how Afghan refugees conceptualize frames of mind that may reflect depression in general and as it relates to trauma they experienced. We performed in-depth interviews with 18 Afghans residing in the San Diego area. Views regarding the causes, symptoms, and perceived treatments of depression were gathered through free-listing techniques, and supplemented with narratives relating to pre- and post-resettlement stressors and coping mechanisms. Data were analyzed with standard qualitative content analysis methods. Items endorsed with relation to depression causality included pre-migration war traumas, notably separation from family, and post-migration stressors including status dissonance and cultural conflicts that ranged from linguistic challenges to intergenerational problems. Depressive symptoms were viewed as highly debilitating, and included changes in temperament, altered cognitions, avoidance and dissociative behaviors, and somatic complaints. Relief was sought through family reunification and community support, reliance on prayer, and the academic success of their children in the US. The findings underscore the need for practitioners to take into account situational stressors, cultural aspects of mourning and symptomatology, and existing coping mechanisms in developing interventions that are based on refugees' articulated needs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Evaluation of nutrition deficits in adult and elderly trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Charles E; Kozar, Rosemary A; Dyer, Carmel B; Bulger, Eileen M; Mourtzakis, Marina; Heyland, Daren K

    2015-05-01

    As metabolism is often escalated following injury, severely injured trauma patients are at risk for underfeeding and adverse outcomes. From an international database of 12,573 critically ill, adult mechanically ventilated patients, who received a minimum of 3 days of nutrition therapy, trauma patients were identified and nutrition practices and outcomes compared with nontrauma patients. Within the trauma population, we compared nutrition practices and outcomes of younger vs older patients. There were 1279 (10.2%) trauma patients. They were younger, were predominantly male, had lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, and had an overall lower body mass index compared with nontrauma patients. Eighty percent of trauma patients received enteral feeding compared with 78% of nontrauma patients. Trauma patients were prescribed more calories and protein yet received similar amounts as nontrauma patients. Nutrition adequacy was reduced in both trauma and nontrauma patients. Survival was higher in trauma patients (86.6%) compared with nontrauma patients (71.8%). When patients who died were included as never discharged, trauma patients were more rapidly discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital. Within the trauma population, 17.5% were elderly (≥65 years). The elderly had increased days of ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality compared with younger trauma patients. In a multivariable model, age and APACHE II score, but not nutrition adequacy, were associated with time to discharge alive from the hospital. Significant nutrition deficits were noted in all patients. Elderly trauma patients have worse outcomes compared with younger patients. Further studies are necessary to evaluate whether increased nutrition intake can improve the outcomes of trauma patients, especially geriatric trauma patients. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. A prospective evaluation of missed injuries in trauma patients, before and after formalising the trauma tertiary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzers, Gerben B; Campbell, Don; Hooper, Jeffrey; Bost, Nerolie; Crilly, Julia; Steele, Michael Craig; Del Mar, Chris; Geeraedts, Leo M G

    2014-01-01

    This study prospectively evaluated in-hospital and postdischarge missed injury rates in admitted trauma patients, before and after the formalisation of a trauma tertiary survey (TTS) procedure. Prospective before-and-after cohort study. TTS were formalised in a single regional level II trauma hospital in November 2009. All multitrauma patients admitted between March-October 2009 (preformalisation of TTS) and December 2009-September 2010 (post-) were assessed for missed injury, classified into three types: Type I, in-hospital, (injury missed at initial assessment, detected within 24 h); Type II, in-hospital (detected in hospital after 24 h, missed at initial assessment and by TTS); Type III, postdischarge (detected after hospital discharge). Secondary outcome measures included TTS performance rates and functional outcomes at 1 and 6 months. A total of 487 trauma patients were included (pre-: n = 235; post-: n = 252). In-hospital missed injury rate (Types I and II combined) was similar for both groups (3.8 vs. 4.8 %, P = 0.61), as were postdischarge missed injury rates (Type III) at 1 month (13.7 vs. 11.5 %, P = 0.43), and 6 months (3.8 vs. 3.3 %, P = 0.84) after discharge. TTS performance was substantially higher in the post-group (27 vs. 42 %, P cumulative missed injury rates >15 %. Some of these injuries were clinically relevant. Although TTS performance was significantly improved by formalising the process (from 27 to 42 %), this did not decrease missed injury rates.

  13. An assessment of the impact of trauma systems consultation on the level of trauma system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Robert J; Ball, Jane W; Cooper, Gail F; Sanddal, Nels D; Rotondo, Michael F

    2008-11-01

    Studies have shown that trauma systems decrease morbidity and mortality after injury. Despite these findings, overall progress in system development has been slow and inconsistent. The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (COT) has developed a process to provide expert consultation to facilitate regional trauma system development. This study evaluated the progress that occurred after COT consultation visits in six regional systems. All six trauma systems undergoing COT consultation between January 1, 2004 and September 1, 2006 were included in the study. Using a set of 16 objective indicators, preconsultation status was retrospectively assessed by members of the original consultation team using data from the final consultation reports. Postconsultation status was assessed by directed telephone conference, conducted by members of the original consultation team with current key representatives from each system. Progress was assessed by comparing changes in both aggregate and individual indicator scores. This study showed a statistically significant increase in aggregate indicator scores after consultation. The largest gains were seen in systems with the longest time interval between the two assessments. Individual indicators related to system planning and quality assurance infrastructure showed the most improvement. Little or no change was seen in indicators related to system funding. The COT consultation process appears to be effective in facilitating regional trauma system development. In this short-term followup study, progress was seen primarily in areas related to planning and system design. Consultation was not effective in helping systems secure stable funding.

  14. Opioid prescriptions before and after high-energy trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Stine T; Hallas, Jesper; Larsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the legal use of opioids in adult patients before and after high-energy trauma. DESIGN: The study was a retrospective database study. SETTING: Clinical care outside hospitals. PATIENTS: All patients who suffered high-energy trauma and were brought to Odense University...... Hospital (OUH), Denmark, in 2007 and 2008 were retrieved from the trauma database. These patients were linked with data on opioid use from the regional prescription database. In all, 938 patients were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Redemption of opioid prescription during the 6 months prior...... to a multitrauma or redemption of two or more prescriptions for opioids 6 months or later after a multitrauma. RESULTS: Of the 938 patients brought to OUH with severe trauma within the study period, 61 patients died (7 percent) and six of these had redeemed prescriptions for opioids within 6 months prior...

  15. Management of duodenal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Guo-qing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature in PubMed by the keywords of duodenal trauma, therapy, diagnosis and abdomen. It shows that because the diagnosis and management are complicated and the mortality is high, duodenal trauma should be treated in time and tactfully. And application of new technology can help improve the management. In this review, we discussed the incidence, diagnosis, management, and complications as well as mortality of duodenal trauma. Key words: Duodenum; Wounds and injuries; Diagnosis; Therapeutics

  16. Effectiveness of regionalization of trauma care services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Y; Rashidian, A; Jalili, M; Omidvari, A H; Jeddian, A

    2017-05-01

    Improving trauma systems in various forms has always been an important aspect of health policy. While several papers have reported the implementation of a structured trauma system of care, research evidence on the effectiveness of such regionalization for improvement in trauma outcome is limited. Systematic review. Medline, EMbase, EconLit and Health Management Information Consortium were searched, using sensitive search terms, for interventional studies that reported a trauma regionalization system as their intervention, and compared important outcomes such as mortality and preventable deaths. At least two authors assessed eligibility for inclusion and risk of bias, and extracted data from the included studies. As meta-analysis was not possible for all studies, two controlled before-after studies were included in the meta-analysis, and a narrative analysis was conducted for the other studies. After title and abstract sifting, 66 papers were retrieved. After reading the full texts, a total of 24 studies from the USA, UK, Canada, Australia, and the Netherlands were included in this review. In spite of variation in study specifications, most were before-after studies with a high risk of bias. Although a reduction in mortality was shown in most studies, only two studies were eligible for meta-analysis, and the results showed a significant reduction in mortality after implementation of an organized trauma system (odds ratio 0.840, 95% confidence interval 0.756-0.924; P = 0.00). Correlation was found between a regionalized network of trauma care and a reduction in trauma-related mortality, based on studies that did not exclude the effects of other concurrent changes on observed reductions. It is recommended that more studies with robust research designs should be conducted in a more diverse range of countries to assess the effectiveness of regionalization. Despite this limitation, the present findings support the regionalization of trauma care services. Copyright

  17. Trauma facilities in Denmark - A nationwide cross-sectional benchmark study of facilities and trauma care organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  18. TraumaTutor: Perceptions of a Smartphone Application as a Learning Resource for Trauma Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wigley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We investigated perceptions of a new smartphone application (app as a learning resource. Methods. We developed TraumaTutor, an iPhone app consisting of 150 questions and explanatory answers on trauma management. This was used by 20 hospital staff that either had a special interest in managing trauma or who were studying for relevant exams, such as ATLS. A subsequent questionnaire assessed users’ experience of smartphone applications and their perceptions of TraumaTutor. Results. Of those surveyed, 85% had a device capable of running app software, and 94% of them had used apps for medical education. Specific to TraumaTutor, 85% agreed that it was pitched at the right level, 95% felt that the explanations improved understanding of trauma management, and 100% found the app easy to use. In fact, on open questioning, the clear user interface and the quality of the educational material were seen as the major advantages of TraumaTutor, and 85% agreed that the app would be a useful learning resource. Conclusions. Smartphone applications are considered a valuable educational adjunct and are commonly used by our target audience. TraumaTutor shows overwhelming promise as a learning supplement due to its immediacy, accessibility, and relevance to those preparing for courses and managing trauma.

  19. Modular Approach to Therapy for Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems in outpatient child and adolescent mental health services in New Zealand: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Mathijs F G; Stasiak, Karolina; Crengle, Sue; Weisz, John R; Frampton, Christopher M A; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Ugueto, Ana M; Herren, Jennifer; Cribb-Su'a, Ainsleigh; Faleafa, Monique; Kingi-'Ulu'ave, Denise; Loy, Jik; Scott, Rebecca M; Hartdegen, Morgyn; Merry, Sally N

    2015-10-12

    Mental health disorders are common and disabling for young people because of the potential to disrupt key developmental tasks. Implementation of evidence-based psychosocial therapies in New Zealand is limited, owing to the inaccessibility, length, and cost of training in these therapies. Furthermore, most therapies address one problem area at a time, although comorbidity and changing clinical needs commonly occur in practice. A more flexible approach is needed. The Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) is designed to overcome these challenges; it provides a range of treatment modules addressing different problems, within a single training program. A clinical trial of MATCH-ADTC in the USA showed that MATCH-ADTC outperformed usual care and standard evidence-based treatment on several clinical measures. We aim to replicate these findings and evaluate the impact of providing training and supervision in MATCH-ADTC to: (1) improve clinical outcomes for youth attending mental health services; (2) increase the amount of evidence-based therapy content; (3) increase the efficiency of service delivery. This is an assessor-blinded multi-site effectiveness randomized controlled trial. Randomization occurs at two levels: (1) clinicians (≥60) are randomized to intervention or usual care; (2) youth participants (7-14 years old) accepted for treatment in child and adolescent mental health services (with a primary disorder that includes anxiety, depression, trauma-related symptoms, or disruptive behavior) are randomly allocated to receive MATCH-ADTC or usual care. Youth participants are recruited from 'mainstream', Māori-specific, and Pacific-specific child and adolescent mental health services. We originally planned to recruit 400 youth participants, but this has been revised to 200 participants. Centralized computer randomization ensures allocation concealment. The primary outcome measures are: (i) the

  20. MRI in chronic spinal cord trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, W.L.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Kendall, B.E.; Moseley, I.F.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-seven patients aged 16-68 years have been examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following spinal injury. The MRI findings have been correlated with length of history between trauma and investigation, extent of residual function and site of injury. They include changes at the site of injury consistent with myelomalacia in 37%, a syrinx in 40%, persistent cord compression in 32% and atrophy in 18%. An extensive syrinx can develop within 2 months of injury and it is nearly twice as common in patients with complete paralysis as in those whose paralysis was incomplete. It is suggested that investigation and management of spinal trauma should include early and repeated MRI examinations to detect sequelae at an early stage. (orig.)

  1. Positive and negative volume-outcome relationships in the geriatric trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Schaefer, Eric W; Won, Eugene J; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C; Soybel, David I

    2014-04-01

    In trauma populations, improvements in outcome are documented in institutions with higher case volumes. However, it is not known whether improved outcomes are attributable to the case volume within specific higher-risk groups, such as the elderly, or to the case volume among all trauma patients treated by an institution. To test the hypothesis that outcomes of trauma care for geriatric patients are affected differently by the volume of geriatric cases and nongeriatric cases of an institution. This retrospective cohort study using a statewide trauma registry was set in state-designated levels 1 and 2 trauma centers in Pennsylvania. It included 39 431 eligible geriatric trauma patients (aged >65 years) in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study. In-hospital mortality, major complications, and mortality after major complications (failure to rescue). Between 2001 and 2010, 39 431 geriatric trauma patients and 105 046 nongeriatric patients were captured in a review of outcomes in 20 state-designated levels 1 and 2 trauma centers. Larger volumes of geriatric trauma patients were significantly associated with lower odds of in-hospital mortality, major complications, and failure to rescue. In contrast, larger nongeriatric trauma volumes were significantly associated with higher odds of major complications in geriatric patients. Higher rates of in-hospital mortality, major complications, and failure to rescue were associated with lower volumes of geriatric trauma care and paradoxically with higher volumes of trauma care for younger patients. These findings offer the possibility that outcomes might be improved with differentiated pathways of care for geriatric trauma patients.

  2. Peer Review Audit of Trauma Deaths in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal Ali Jat

    2004-01-01

    Results and Conclusions: A total of 279 patients were registered in the trauma registry during the study period, including 18 trauma deaths. Peer review judged that six were preventable, seven were potentially preventable, and four were non-preventable. One patient was excluded because the record was not available for review. The proportion of preventable and potentially preventable deaths was significantly higher in our study than from developed countries. Of the multiple contributing factors identified, the most important were inadequate prehospital care, inappropriate interhospital transfer, limited hospital resources, and an absence of integrated and organized trauma care. This study summarizes the challenges faced in trauma care in a developing country.

  3. External Validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for Early Prediction of Mortality in Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel; Reitsma, J.

    Objectives: The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base

  4. Childhood trauma is associated with maladaptive personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Hudson W; Pereira, Rebeca; Frozi, Julia; Bisol, Luísa W; Ottoni, Gustavo L; Lara, Diogo R

    2015-06-01

    The association between childhood trauma and personality traits has been poorly characterized and reported. Our aim was to evaluate whether distinct types of childhood abuse and neglect are associated with various personality dimensions using data from a large web-based survey. A total of 12,225 volunteers responded anonymously to the Internet versions of the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R) and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) via our research website, but only 8,114 subjects (75.7% women, mean age 34.8±11.3yrs) who met the criteria for validity were included in the analysis. Childhood trauma was positively associated with harm avoidance and was negatively associated with self-directedness and, to a lesser extent, with cooperativeness. The associations were robust with emotional abuse and neglect but were non-significant or mild with physical trauma. Emotional neglect was associated with reduced reward dependence and persistence. All types of abuse, but not neglect, were associated with increased novelty seeking scores. Reporting of childhood trauma, especially of an emotional nature, was associated with maladaptive personality traits. Further investigation of the effects of different types of childhood trauma on psychological and neurobiological parameters is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trauma and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yılmaz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding and coagulation disorders related to trauma are pathological processes which are frequently seen and increase mortality. For the purpose, trauma patients should be protected from hypoperfusion, hypothermia, acidosis and hemodilution which may aggravate the increase in physiological responses to trauma as anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Performing damage control surgery and resuscitation and transfusion of adequate blood and blood products in terms of amount and content as stated in protocols may increase the rate of survival. Medical treatments augmenting fibrin formation (fibrinogen, desmopressin, factor VIIa or preventing fibrin degradation (tranexamic acid have been proposed in selected cases but the efficacy of these agents in trauma patients are not proven. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9:71-6

  6. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiological aspects, behavior, morbidity and treatment outcomes for liver trauma. We conducted a retrospective study of patients over 13 years of age admitted to a university hospital from 1990 to 2010, submitted to surgery or nonoperative management (NOM). 748 patients were admitted with liver trauma. The most common mechanism of injury was penetrating trauma (461 cases, 61.6%), blunt trauma occurring in 287 patients (38.4%). According to the degree of liver injury (AAST-OIS) in blunt trauma we predominantly observed Grades I and II and in penetrating trauma, Grade III. NOM was performed in 25.7% of patients with blunt injury. As for surgical procedures, suturing was performed more frequently (41.2%). The liver-related morbidity was 16.7%. The survival rate for patients with liver trauma was 73.5% for blunt and 84.2% for penetrating trauma. Mortality in complex trauma was 45.9%. trauma remains more common in younger populations and in males. There was a reduction of penetrating liver trauma. NOM proved safe and effective, and often has been used to treat patients with penetrating liver trauma. Morbidity was high and mortality was higher in victims of blunt trauma and complex liver injuries.

  7. Trauma-induced pemphigus: a case series of 36 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Fatehnejad, Mina; Rahbar, Ziba; Balighi, Kamran; Ghandi, Narges; Ghiasi, Maryam; Abedini, Robabeh; Lajevardi, Vahideh; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2016-02-01

    Pemphigus is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by intraepidermal acantholytic blisters. Isomorphic responses, or Koebner phenomenon (KP), defined as the appearance of typical lesions of a disease following trauma are rarely reported in pemphigus. Our aim was to present patients who developed new pemphigus lesions as a result of skin trauma. The medical files of pemphigus patients from the Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Research Center, who had a history of trauma before the onset or flare of their disease, between 1999 and 2013 were reviewed. Thirty-six pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients had a history of trauma. Thirteen patients developed new-onset PV and the other 23 had previously been diagnosed with PV. Pemphigus lesions developed most often following major surgeries including abdominal, orthopedic, and chest surgeries as well as dental procedures, blunt physical trauma, and skin surgeries. Moreover, post-cataract laser surgery, burns, radiation therapy, and physiotherapy were also shown to induce pemphigus. Mean time between trauma and lesions was 4.7 weeks for recurrent PV and 15.0 weeks for new-onset PV. Unnecessary surgery and blunt trauma should be avoided in pemphigus patients. Furthermore, posttraumatic pemphigus should be suspected in poorly healing surgical wounds and confirmatory biopsies are mandatory. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Disentangling Sense of Coherence and Resilience in case of multiple traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossion, Pierre; Leys, Christophe; Kempenaers, Chantal; Braun, Stéphanie; Verbanck, Paul; Linkowski, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Depressive and anxiety disorders (DAD) are a major public health problem. Trauma endured during childhood is known to increase the risk of DAD in adulthood. We investigate the hypothesis that Sense of Coherence (SOC) is a mediator between childhood trauma and depressive and anxious symptoms (DAD) in adulthood. We also explore the nature (personality trait or aptitude) of SOC and attempt to disentangle the concepts of resilience and SOC. Former hidden children (FHC), the Jewish youths who spent World War II in various hideaway shelters across Nazi-occupied Europe, were compared with a control group. In each group we measured the presence of multiple traumas, the resilience with the Resilience Scale for Adults, the DAD with the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist and the SOC with the SOC-13 self-report questionnaire. We tested a mediated moderation model with childhood Trauma as the predictor; Adulthood trauma as the moderator; SOC as the mediator; and DAD as the outcome variable. Results were consistent with a sensitization model of DAD partially mediated by SOC. A first component of SOC was similar to an aptitude and another part of SOC was more similar to a personality trait. We are unable to differentiate if the sensitization process is a consequence of the nature of the trauma endured by FHC (long-standing exposure to extreme external events) or a consequence of the fact that this first trauma occurred during childhood. Our results could account for the controversial debate regarding the life time stability of SOC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  10. External validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for early prediction of mortality in trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base excess, and

  11. Classifying and Standardizing Panfacial Trauma With a New Bony Facial Trauma Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Garrett G A; Fishero, Brian A; Park, Stephen S; Sochor, Mark; Heltzel, Sara B; Christophel, J Jared

    2017-01-01

    The practice of facial trauma surgery would benefit from a useful quantitative scale that measures the extent of injury. To develop a facial trauma scale that incorporates only reducible fractures and is able to be reliably communicated to health care professionals. A cadaveric tissue study was conducted from October 1 to 3, 2014. Ten cadaveric heads were subjected to various degrees of facial trauma by dropping a fixed mass onto each head. The heads were then imaged with fine-cut computed tomography. A Bony Facial Trauma Scale (BFTS) for grading facial trauma was developed based only on clinically relevant (reducible) fractures. The traumatized cadaveric heads were then scored using this scale as well as 3 existing scoring systems. Regression analysis was used to determine correlation between degree of incursion of the fixed mass on the cadaveric heads and trauma severity as rated by the scoring systems. Statistical analysis was performed to determine correlation of the scores obtained using the BFTS with those of the 3 existing scoring systems. Scores obtained using the BFTS were not correlated with dentition (95% CI, -0.087 to 1.053; P = .08; measured as absolute number of teeth) or age of the cadaveric donor (95% CI, -0.068 to 0.944; P = .08). Facial trauma scores. Among all 10 cadaveric specimens (9 male donors and 1 female donor; age range, 41-87 years; mean age, 57.2 years), the facial trauma scores obtained using the BFTS correlated with depth of penetration of the mass into the face (odds ratio, 4.071; 95% CI, 1.676-6.448) P = .007) when controlling for presence of dentition and age. The BFTS scores also correlated with scores obtained using 3 existing facial trauma models (Facial Fracture Severity Scale, rs = 0.920; Craniofacial Disruption Score, rs = 0.945; and ZS Score, rs = 0.902; P trauma scales. Scores obtained using the BFTS were not correlated with dentition (odds ratio, .482; 95% CI, -0.087 to 1.053; P = .08; measured

  12. Specific trauma subtypes improve the predictive validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Broadbridge, Carissa L; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E

    2014-12-01

    Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12 and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7 and 3%, respectively). Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations.

  13. Specific Trauma Subtypes Improve the Predictive Validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi Refugees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Broadbridge, Carissa L.; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A.; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. Methods A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Results Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12% and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7% and 3%, respectively). Discussion Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations. PMID:24549491

  14. Male genital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references

  15. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  16. The variation of acute treatment costs of trauma in high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Lynsey; Curtis, Kate; Taylor, Colman; Jan, Stephen; Glass, Parisa; Myburgh, John

    2012-08-21

    In order to assist health service planning, understanding factors that influence higher trauma treatment costs is essential. The majority of trauma costing research reports the cost of trauma from the perspective of the receiving hospital. There has been no comprehensive synthesis and little assessment of the drivers of cost variation, such as country, trauma, subgroups and methods. The aim of this review is to provide a synthesis of research reporting the trauma treatment costs and factors associated with higher treatment costs in high income countries. A systematic search for articles relating to the cost of acute trauma care was performed and included studies reporting injury severity scores (ISS), per patient cost/charge estimates; and costing methods. Cost and charge values were indexed to 2011 cost equivalents and converted to US dollars using purchasing power parities. A total of twenty-seven studies were reviewed. Eighty-one percent of these studies were conducted in high income countries including USA, Australia, Europe and UK. Studies either reported a cost (74.1%) or charge estimate (25.9%) for the acute treatment of trauma. Across studies, the median per patient cost of acute trauma treatment was $22,448 (IQR: $11,819-$33,701). However, there was variability in costing methods used with 18% of studies providing comprehensive cost methods. Sixty-three percent of studies reported cost or charge items incorporated in their cost analysis and 52% reported items excluded in their analysis. In all publications reviewed, predictors of cost included Injury Severity Score (ISS), surgical intervention, hospital and intensive care, length of stay, polytrauma and age. The acute treatment cost of trauma is higher than other disease groups. Research has been largely conducted in high income countries and variability exists in reporting costing methods as well as the actual costs. Patient populations studied and the cost methods employed are the primary drivers for the

  17. The variation of acute treatment costs of trauma in high-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willenberg Lynsey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to assist health service planning, understanding factors that influence higher trauma treatment costs is essential. The majority of trauma costing research reports the cost of trauma from the perspective of the receiving hospital. There has been no comprehensive synthesis and little assessment of the drivers of cost variation, such as country, trauma, subgroups and methods. The aim of this review is to provide a synthesis of research reporting the trauma treatment costs and factors associated with higher treatment costs in high income countries. Methods A systematic search for articles relating to the cost of acute trauma care was performed and included studies reporting injury severity scores (ISS, per patient cost/charge estimates; and costing methods. Cost and charge values were indexed to 2011 cost equivalents and converted to US dollars using purchasing power parities. Results A total of twenty-seven studies were reviewed. Eighty-one percent of these studies were conducted in high income countries including USA, Australia, Europe and UK. Studies either reported a cost (74.1% or charge estimate (25.9% for the acute treatment of trauma. Across studies, the median per patient cost of acute trauma treatment was $22,448 (IQR: $11,819-$33,701. However, there was variability in costing methods used with 18% of studies providing comprehensive cost methods. Sixty-three percent of studies reported cost or charge items incorporated in their cost analysis and 52% reported items excluded in their analysis. In all publications reviewed, predictors of cost included Injury Severity Score (ISS, surgical intervention, hospital and intensive care, length of stay, polytrauma and age. Conclusion The acute treatment cost of trauma is higher than other disease groups. Research has been largely conducted in high income countries and variability exists in reporting costing methods as well as the actual costs. Patient populations studied

  18. NASTRAN thermal analyzer: Theory and application including a guide to modeling engineering problems, volume 2. [sample problem library guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A sample problem library containing 20 problems covering most facets of Nastran Thermal Analyzer modeling is presented. Areas discussed include radiative interchange, arbitrary nonlinear loads, transient temperature and steady-state structural plots, temperature-dependent conductivities, simulated multi-layer insulation, and constraint techniques. The use of the major control options and important DMAP alters is demonstrated.

  19. Trauma Induced Coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Per; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard

    2013-01-01

    It remains debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy compared to non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients were...... sampled (median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post-injury) upon admission to our trauma centre. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analysed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue...

  20. Understanding the Risk Factors of Trauma Center Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Chu; Hsia, Renee Y.; Kuzma, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We analyze whether hazard rates of shutting down trauma centers are higher due to financial pressures or in areas with vulnerable populations (such as minorities or the poor). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective study of all hospitals with trauma center services in urban areas in the continental US between 1990 and 2005, identified from the American Hospital Association Annual Surveys. These data were linked with Medicare cost reports, and supplemented with other sources, including the Area Resource File. We analyze the hazard rates of trauma center closures among several dimensions of risk factors using discrete-time proportional hazard models. Results The number of trauma center closures increased from 1990 to 2005, with a total of 339 during this period. The hazard rate of closing trauma centers in hospitals with a negative profit margin is 1.38 times higher than those hospitals without the negative profit margin (P lower hazard of shutting down trauma centers (ratio: 0.58, P penetration face a higher hazard of trauma center closure (ratio: 2.06, P < 0.01). Finally, hospitals in areas with higher shares of minorities face a higher risk of trauma center closure (ratio: 1.69, P < 0.01). Medicaid load and uninsured populations, however, are not risk factors for higher rates of closure after we control for other financial and community characteristics. Conclusions Our findings give an indication on how the current proposals to cut public spending could exacerbate the trauma closure particularly among areas with high shares of minorities. In addition, given the negative effect of health maintenance organizations on trauma center survival, the growth of Medicaid managed care population should be monitored. Finally, high shares of Medicaid or uninsurance by themselves are not independent risk factors for higher closure as long as financial pressures are mitigated. Targeted policy interventions and further research on the causes, are needed to

  1. Primary closure in colon trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Aragón, Luis Enrique; Guevara-Torres, Lorenzo; Vaca-Pérez, Enrique; Belmares-Taboada, Jaime Arístides; Ortiz-Castillo, Fátima de Guadalupe; Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Primary repair of colon injuries is an accepted therapeutic option; however, controversy persists regarding its safety. Our objective was to report the evolution and presence of complications in patients with colon injury who underwent primary closure and to determine if the time interval (>6 h), degree of injury, contamination, anatomic site injured, PATI (Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index) >25, and the presence of other injuries in colon trauma are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This was a prospective, observational, longitudinal and descriptive study conducted at the Central Hospital "Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto," San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007. We included patients with abdominal trauma with colon injury subjected to surgical treatment. chi(2) was used for basic statistical analysis. There were 481 patients with abdominal trauma who underwent surgery; 77(16.1%) had colon injury. Ninety percent (n = 69) were treated in the first 6 h; 91% (n = 70) were due to penetrating injuries, and gunshot wound accounted for 48% (n = 37). Transverse colon was the most frequently injured (38%) (n = 29). Grade I and II injuries accounted for 75.3% (n = 58). Procedures included primary repair (76.66 %) (n = 46); resection with anastomosis (8.3%) (n = 5); and colostomy (15%) (n = 9). Associated injuries were present in 76.6% (n = 59). There was some degree of contamination in 85.7% (n = 66); 82.8% (58) had PATI colon injury. Primary repair is a safe procedure for treatment of colon injuries. Patients with primary repair had lower morbidity (p <0.009). Surgery during the first 6 h (p <0.006) and in hemodynamically stable patients (p <0.014) had a lower risk of complications.

  2. Minor head trauma – when does it become a major headache?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Head trauma is a very common problem – most parents will agree .... Tinnitus and hearing impairment. This may present ... take longer to recover than professional athletes, who are ... Training drills specific to sport, non-contact. 5. Full-contact ...

  3. The Quality of Cost-Utility Analyses in Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; O'Dea, Evan; McCormick, Frank; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    As health care in the United States transitions toward a value-based model, there is increasing interest in applying cost-effectiveness analysis within orthopedic surgery. Orthopedic trauma care has traditionally underemphasized economic analysis. The goals of this review were to identify US-based cost-utility analysis in orthopedic trauma, to assess the quality of the available evidence, and to identify cost-effective strategies within orthopedic trauma. Based on a review of 971 abstracts, 8 US-based cost-utility analyses evaluating operative strategies in orthopedic trauma were identified. Study findings were recorded, and the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument was used to grade the overall quality. Of the 8 studies included in this review, 4 studies evaluated hip and femur fractures, 3 studies analyzed upper extremity fractures, and 1 study assessed open tibial fracture management. Cost-effective interventions identified in this review include total hip arthroplasty (over hemiarthroplasty) for femoral neck fractures in the active elderly, open reduction and internal fixation (over nonoperative management) for distal radius and scaphoid fractures, limb salvage (over amputation) for complex open tibial fractures, and systems-based interventions to prevent delay in hip fracture surgery. The mean QHES score of the studies was 79.25 (range, 67-89). Overall, there is a paucity of cost-utility analyses in orthopedic trauma; however, the available evidence suggests that certain operative interventions can be cost-effective. The quality of these studies, however, is fair, based on QHES grading. More attention should be paid to evaluating the cost-effectiveness of operative intervention in orthopedic trauma. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Trauma abdominal em grávidas Abdominal trauma in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar os fatores indicativos (parâmetros clínicos e índices de gravidade fisiológicos e anatômicos da evolução materna e fetal entre gestantes vítimas de trauma abdominal submetidas à laparotomia e discutir as particularidades do atendimento nesta situação. MÉTODOS: análise retrospectiva dos prontuários de 245 mulheres com trauma abdominal e tratamento operatório, atendidas entre 1990 e 2002. Foram identificadas 13 gestantes com lesão abdominal submetidas à laparotomia. Para registro e análise estatística dos dados foram utilizados o protocolo Epi-Info 6.04 e o teste exato de Fisher, com intervalo de confiança de 95%. Foram relacionados com a mortalidade fetal: escore na escala de coma de Glasgow, pressão arterial sistólica, índices de trauma (RTS, ATI, ISS e lesão uterina. RESULTADOS: a idade variou de 13 a 34 anos (média de 22,5. Seis mulheres (46,2% estavam no terceiro trimestre de gestação. O trauma penetrante correspondeu a 53,8% das lesões e em seis dessas pacientes o mecanismo de trauma foi ferimento por projétil de arma de fogo. Três pacientes tiveram lesões uterinas, associadas com óbito fetal. Não houve óbito materno e a mortalidade fetal foi de 30,7%. Não houve associação entre os índices de trauma e a mortalidade materna e fetal. A lesão uterina foi o único fator preditivo de risco para perda fetal (p=0,014. CONCLUSÕES: apesar da casuística pequena e de se tratar de estudo retrospectivo de gestantes com trauma grave, os achados deste estudo mostram que não há indicadores com boa acurácia para indicação da evolução materna e fetal.PURPOSE: to evaluate the predictors (clinical findings and physiological and anatomical scores of the maternal and fetal outcomes among pregnant women victims of abdominal trauma who were submitted to laparotomy and to discuss particularities of assessment in this situation. METHODS: retrospective analysis of the medical records of 245 women with

  5. Trauma Systems. An Era of Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink, K.W.W.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of an inclusive trauma system in the Netherlands during last decade of the past century, has led to an improvement in Dutch trauma care. Eleven trauma regions were formed nationwide each surrounding a level I trauma center. All hospitals in a trauma region were assigned levels I, II

  6. Dentoalveolar trauma and minor trauma as precipitating factors for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Pouya Masroori; Schiodt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is often preceded by dentoalveolar trauma. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of dentoalveolar trauma precipitated ONJ and compare trauma-precipitated ONJ with spontaneously developing ONJ. STUDY DESIGN......: This was a retrospective study. All patients were examined according to a standard ONJ chart. RESULTS: Among 149 consecutive ONJ patients from the Copenhagen Cohort, 95 (64%) had a dentoalveolar trauma before referral (trauma group): dental extractions (n = 80); denture-related sore mouth (n = 12); and others (n = 3......). The remaining 54 patients had spontaneous ONJ (spontaneous group). The mean time from oral trauma to referral for ONJ was 8 months. CONCLUSION: This study documented that dentoalveolar trauma precipitated ONJ in the majority of cases. However, even minor trauma, such as intubation and impression tray lesions...

  7. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-12-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children.

  8. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children

  9. Psychological debriefing (PD of trauma: a proposed model for Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E L Van Dyk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Africa is a continent with severe trauma. Traumatic events include experiences of child soldiers, people living in war and conflict zones, and people struggling with the HIV/AIDS pandemic. These events cause high levels of trauma. The trauma causes psychological disorders like post traumatic stress disorder, acute stress disorder and combat stress reaction, specific in the military environment. This article focuses on a better understanding of the implications of trauma for military people and civilians. It discusses the different theories and models of psychological debriefing. Lastly the article discusses psychological debriefing models for military forces and the civil ian population to prevent severe psychopathology after traumatic incidents in Africa.

  10. Trauma and the psychosis spectrum: A review of symptom specificity and explanatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lauren E.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Ellman, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic life events have been robustly associated with various psychosis outcomes, including increased risk of psychotic disorders, the prodrome of psychosis, and dimensional measures of psychotic symptoms, such as attenuated positive psychotic symptoms. However, trauma exposure has been linked to various mental disorders; therefore, the specificity of trauma exposure to psychosis remains unclear. This review focuses on two understudied areas of the trauma and psychosis literature: 1) the specificity between trauma and psychosis in relation to other disorders that often result post-trauma, and 2) proposed mechanisms that uniquely link trauma to psychosis. We begin by discussing the underlying connection between trauma exposure and the entire psychosis spectrum with a focus on the influence of trauma type and specific psychotic symptoms. We then consider how the principles of multifinality and equifinality can be useful in elucidating the trauma-psychosis relationship versus the trauma-other disorder relationship. Next, we discuss several cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms that might uniquely account for the association between trauma and psychosis, as well as the role of gender. Lastly, we review important methodological issues that complicate the research on trauma and psychosis, ending with clinical implications for the field. PMID:27632064

  11. MR imaging of appendicular musculoskeletal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathol, M.H.; Montgomery, W.J.; Yuh, W.T.C.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty cases of musculoskeletal trauma to the extremities examined by MR imaging have been reviewed retrospectively. Examples of various injuries will be shown, including disruption of ligament and tendon, muscular tear and edema, hemorrhage (local or diffuse), vascular injury, bone marrow contusion, osteocartilaginous fracture, meniscal tear, and joint fluid. Many of these patients were collegiate athletes, and MR was valuable in establishing a rapid, accurate diagnosis influencing not only treatment but also return to competition. Negative examinations allowed resumption of competition with a high degree of confidence. The advantages and disadvantages of MR in musculo-skeletal trauma are discussed

  12. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  13. Spinal trauma: first aid from cross-sectional imaging; Trauma der Wirbelsaeule: erste Hilfe durch Schnittbildverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller, G.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [Emergency Radiology Schueller, Neerach (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    The diagnosis of the traumatized spine is one of the key issues for trauma radiologists. The cross-sectional imaging procedures, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the essential methods in spinal trauma radiology. These modalities are of great help in accurately assessing injury patterns and extent and in providing indications of patient outcome. In contrast to cross-sectional imaging, radiography has a role in the evaluation of minor spinal trauma only. It is generally accepted that trauma radiologists do not use typical classifications to evaluate the spine partly because such an ideal classification system does not yet exist. Not least because of this classification difficulty, eponyms and synonyms are widely used to describe traumatology of the spine as a high level of specific information is included in these various terms. The members of the trauma team should be aware of the strengths and limitations of the methods used in the assessment of the spine. This article provides a brief outline of fundamental knowledge about the diagnosis of spinal trauma. (orig.) [German] Die Beurteilung der verletzten Wirbelsaeule nimmt fuer Traumaradiologen eine zentrale Stellung ein. Die Schnittbildverfahren CT und MRT sind ihre wesentlichen Arbeitsmethoden. Sie helfen dabei, schnell und mit hoher Zuverlaessigkeit Aussagen ueber Art und Ausmass von Verletzungen zu treffen sowie Hinweise auf die Prognose der Patienten zu geben. Die Projektionsradiographie hat ihre Bedeutung lediglich in der Diagnostik des Bagatelltraumas und ist in ihrer Aussagekraft auch dort nicht unumstritten. Traumaradiologen bedienen sich nicht ausschliesslich typischer Klassifikationen des Wirbelsaeulentraumas, z. T. auch deshalb, da es die ideale Klassifikation aus heutiger Sicht nicht gibt. Vielmehr ist es wichtig, auch ueber Eponyme und Synonyme Bescheid zu wissen, da sie ein hohes Mass an spezifischen Informationen der spinalen Verletzungen verinnerlichen. Alle

  14. Clinical characteristics of dental emergencies and prevalence of dental trauma at a university hospital emergency center in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kyun; Choi, Yong-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of dental emergency patients who visited a university hospital emergency center and to evaluate the incidence of dental trauma. A retrospective chart review of patients with dental complaints and who visited the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) emergency center in Gyeonggi-do, Korea, from January 2009 to December 2009 was conducted. Information regarding age, gender, the time, day, and month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow up was collected and analyzed. One thousand four hundred twenty-five patients with dental problems visited the SNUBH emergency center. Dental patients accounted for 1.47% of the total 96,708 patients at the emergency center. The male-to-female ratio was 1.68:1, with a considerably larger number of male patients (62.7%). The age distribution peak was at 0-9 years (27.5%), followed by patients in their forties (14.1%). The number of patients visiting the dental emergency center peaked in May (14.2%), on Sundays (22.4%), and between 2100 and 2400 h (20.8%). The patients' chief complaints were as follows: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The prevalence of dental trauma was 66%. The reasons for dental emergency visits included the following: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and TMD, with 66% of the patients requiring management of dental trauma. It is important that dentists make a prompt, accurate diagnosis and initiate effective treatment in case of dental emergencies, especially dental trauma. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. PAIN INTENSITY AND PAIN INTERFERENCE AMONG TRAUMA PATIENTS: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deya Prastika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of trauma has been high and has gained attention worldwide. The energy involved in trauma results in specific tissue damage. Such tissue damage generally leads to pain. The high pain intensity possibly is consequence of trauma due to transfer energy to the body from external force and absorbed in wide area. This pain affected patients’ physical and psychological function, in which well known as pain interference. Objective: The aim of this review is to describe the pain intensity and pain interference among trauma patients. Method: A systematic search of electronic databases (CINHAL, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Google scholar was conducted for quantitative and qualitative studies measuring pain intensity and pain interference. The search limited to hospitalized trauma patients in adult age. Results: The search revealed 678 studies. A total of 10 descriptive studies examined pain intensity and pain interference and met inclusion criteria. The pain intensity and pain interference was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Pain intensity of hospitalized trauma patients were moderate to severe. These including 6 studies in orthopedic trauma, one study in musculoskeletal, two in studies in combinational between orthopedic and musculoskeletal, and two studies in burn injury. Moreover, the patients also reported pain was relentless & unbearable. In accordance, data showed that pain interference was moderate to severe from six studies. These studies result in vary of functional interference. However, those studies examined pain interference on sleep, enjoyment of life, mood, relationship with other, walking, general activity, and walking. Conclusion: The evidence from 10 studies included in this review indicates that hospitalized trauma patients perceived moderate to severe pain intensity and pain interference. Further research is needed to better evaluate the pain of hospitalized trauma patients.

  16. Trauma teams and time to early management during in situ trauma team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härgestam, Maria; Lindkvist, Marie; Jacobsson, Maritha; Brulin, Christine; Hultin, Magnus

    2016-01-29

    To investigate the association between the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery and gender, ethnicity, years in profession, experience of trauma team training, experience of structured trauma courses and trauma in the trauma team, as well as use of closed-loop communication and leadership styles during trauma team training. In situ trauma team training. The patient simulator was preprogrammed to represent a severely injured patient (injury severity score: 25) suffering from hypovolemia due to external trauma. An emergency room in an urban Scandinavian level one trauma centre. A total of 96 participants were divided into 16 trauma teams. Each team consisted of six team members: one surgeon/emergency physician (designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one registered nurse anaesthetist, one registered nurse from the emergency department, one enrolled nurse from the emergency department and one enrolled nurse from the operating theatre. HRs with CIs (95% CI) for the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery was computed from a Cox proportional hazards model. Three variables remained significant in the final model. Closed-loop communication initiated by the team leader increased the chance of a decision to go to surgery (HR: 3.88; CI 1.02 to 14.69). Only 8 of the 16 teams made the decision to go to surgery within the timeframe of the trauma team training. Conversely, call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by the team members significantly decreased the chance of a decision to go to surgery, (HR: 0.82; CI 0.71 to 0.96, and HR: 0.23; CI 0.08 to 0.71, respectively). Closed-loop communication initiated by the leader appears to be beneficial for teamwork. In contrast, a high number of call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by team members might lead to a communication overload. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. La evaluación del estrés y del trauma: presentación de la versión española de la escala de trauma acumulativo (CTS)

    OpenAIRE

    Robles, M.E.; Badosa, J.M.; Roig, A.; Pina, B.; Feixas i Viaplana, Guillem

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the most usual definitions of stress and trauma including the notion of accumulative trauma. Then, the Spanish version of the Cumulative Trauma Scale by Kira et al (2008) is presented. It has been developed by following a process of translation and by applying it to two small groups of subjects to test it for comprehension (pilot test).

  18. Is trauma in Switzerland any different? epidemiology and patterns of injury in major trauma - a 5-year review from a Swiss trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, C; Bosisio, F; Roth, A; Bloch, J; Borens, O; Daniel, R T; Denys, A; Oddo, M; Pasquier, M; Schmidt, S; Schoettker, P; Zingg, T; Wasserfallen, J B

    2014-01-01

    Switzerland, the country with the highest health expenditure per capita, is lacking data on trauma care and system planning. Recently, 12 trauma centres were designated to be reassessed through a future national trauma registry by 2015. Lausanne University Hospital launched the first Swiss trauma registry in 2008, which contains the largest database on trauma activity nationwide. Prospective analysis of data from consecutively admitted shock room patients from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012. Shock room admission is based on physiology and mechanism of injury, assessed by prehospital physicians. Management follows a surgeon-led multidisciplinary approach. Injuries are coded by Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM) certified coders. Over the 5 years, 1,599 trauma patients were admitted, predominantly males with a median age of 41.4 years and median injury severity score (ISS) of 13. Rate of ISS >15 was 42%. Principal mechanisms of injury were road traffic (40.4%) and falls (34.4%), with 91.5% blunt trauma. Principal patterns were brain (64.4%), chest (59.8%) and extremity/pelvic girdle (52.9%) injuries. Severe (abbreviated injury scale [AIS] score ≥ 3) orthopaedic injuries, defined as extremity and spine injuries together, accounted for 67.1%. Overall, 29.1% underwent immediate intervention, mainly by orthopaedics (27.3%), neurosurgeons (26.3 %) and visceral surgeons (13.9%); 43.8% underwent a surgical intervention within the first 24 hours and 59.1% during their hospitalisation. In-hospital mortality for patients with ISS >15 was 26.2%. This is the first 5-year report on trauma in Switzerland. Trauma workload was similar to other European countries. Despite high levels of healthcare, mortality exceeds published rates by >50%. Regardless of the importance of a multidisciplinary approach, trauma remains a surgical disease and needs dedicated surgical resources.

  19. VALIDITY OF PARACENTESIS IN DIAGNOSING BLUNT TRAUMA ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Bin Abdul Majeed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Blunt abdominal trauma is a common case that comes to an emergency department and it is the most easily missed diagnosis resulting in catastrophic consequences. Delay in diagnosing a case is due to the nonspecific character of the symptoms with which it presents. Clinical signs that could be elicited in blunt trauma abdomen are equally nonspecific. Thus, to avoid delay and save the life of the patient, a doctor has to depend on various investigations to rule out blunt trauma abdomen. The modalities which help include paracentesis, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST and ContrastEnhanced Computed Tomography (CECT. To choose the right investigation for the right patient helps in saving precious lives. Validity of each investigation, availability, condition of the patient are the main points to look into before deciding on the right investigative modality. Paracentesis is the simplest investigation that could be done in emergency department and also at the site of accident to triage the patient. Paracentesis has low sensitivity to detect blunt trauma. FAST is a better investigation with higher validity rates than paracentesis. This study aims to validate paracentesis, which is the simplest and commonest investigation used to identify blunt abdominal trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, 106 patients who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed up by detailed history, clinical examination, paracentesis and FAST to identify blunt abdominal trauma and then compared with a gold standard investigation, which was assigned as CECT for haemodynamically stable patients and laparotomy for haemodynamically unstable patients. Commonest organs injured in blunt trauma and their management was noted. Patients were followed up till discharge or death. Subsequently, the data were compiled using excel sheet and evaluated using tables and charts. RESULTS Paracentesis is found to have a

  20. Acute appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. Coincidence or causality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Latorre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is a common disease in clinical practice; some well-defined causes include luminal obstruction by fecoliths, lymphoid hyperplasia, foreign bodies and intestinal parasites. Closed abdominal trauma has been associated as an etiological factor, although, their causal relationship is still unclear. This paper presents the case of a patient with appendicitis after a closed abdominal trauma.

  1. Epidemiological Trends of Spine Trauma: An Australian Level 1 Trauma Centre Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tee, J. W.; Chan, C. H. P.; Fitzgerald, M. C. B.; Liew, S. M.; Rosenfeld, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of current epidemiology and spine trauma trends assists in public resource allocation, fine-tuning of primary prevention methods, and benchmarking purposes. Data on all patients with traumatic spine injuries admitted to the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne between May 1, 2009, and January 1, 2011, were collected from the Alfred Trauma Registry, Alfred Health medical database, and Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry. Epidemiological trends were analyzed as a general cohort, with...

  2. Barriers to compliance with evidence-based care in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Kudyakov, Rustam; Ballard, David; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-03-01

    We have preciously demonstrated that trauma patients receive less than two-thirds of the care recommended by evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this study was to identify patients least likely to receive optimal care. Records of a random sample of 774 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center (2006-2008) with moderate to severe injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3) were reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific processes of care (T-POC) endorsed by Advanced Trauma Life Support, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Brain Trauma Foundation, Surgical Care Improvement Project, and the Glue Grant Consortium based on evidence or consensus. These encompassed all aspects of trauma care, including initial evaluation, resuscitation, operative care, critical care, rehabilitation, and injury prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify patients likely to receive recommended care. Study patients were eligible for a total of 2,603 T-POC, of which only 1,515 (58%) were provided to the patient. Compliance was highest for T-POC involving resuscitation (83%) and was lowest for neurosurgical interventions (17%). Increasing severity of head injuries was associated with lower compliance, while intensive care unit stay was associated with higher compliance. There was no relationship between compliance and patient demographics, socioeconomic status, overall injury severity, or daily volume of trauma admissions. Little over half of recommended care was delivered to trauma patients with moderate to severe injuries. Patients with increasing severity of traumatic brain injuries were least likely to receive optimal care. However, differences among patient subgroups are small in relation to the overall gap between observed and recommended care. II.

  3. Trauma surgery in the era of nonoperative management: the Dutch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Falling operative experience and diminished job satisfaction of trauma surgeons appears to be in part the result of nonoperative management of many blunt injuries. In The Netherlands, the responsibility of trauma surgeons includes the operative treatment of most pelvic and extremity

  4. Management of colorectal trauma: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ju Yong; Keshava, Anil

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic colorectal injuries are common during times of military conflict, and major improvements in their care have arisen in such periods. Since World War II, many classification systems for colorectal trauma have been proposed, including (i) Flint Grading System; (ii) Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index; (iii) Colonic/Rectal Injury Scale; and (iv) destructive/non-destructive colonic injuries. The primary goal of these classifications was to aid surgical management and, more particularly, to determine whether a primary repair or faecal diversion should be performed. Primary repair is now the preferred surgical option. Patients who have been identified as having destructive injuries have been found to have higher anastomotic leak rates after a primary repair. Damage control principles need to be adhered to in surgical decision-making. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of injury, classifications, clinical presentation and current recommendations for the management of colorectal trauma. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. The associations of earlier trauma exposures and history of mental disorders with PTSD after subsequent traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R C; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Alonso, J; Bromet, E J; Gureje, O; Karam, E G; Koenen, K C; Lee, S; Liu, H; Pennell, B-E; Petukhova, M V; Sampson, N A; Shahly, V; Stein, D J; Atwoli, L; Borges, G; Bunting, B; de Girolamo, G; Gluzman, S F; Haro, J M; Hinkov, H; Kawakami, N; Kovess-Masfety, V; Navarro-Mateu, F; Posada-Villa, J; Scott, K M; Shalev, A Y; Ten Have, M; Torres, Y; Viana, M C; Zaslavsky, A M

    2017-09-19

    Although earlier trauma exposure is known to predict posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after subsequent traumas, it is unclear whether this association is limited to cases where the earlier trauma led to PTSD. Resolution of this uncertainty has important implications for research on pretrauma vulnerability to PTSD. We examined this issue in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys with 34 676 respondents who reported lifetime trauma exposure. One lifetime trauma was selected randomly for each respondent. DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition) PTSD due to that trauma was assessed. We reported in a previous paper that four earlier traumas involving interpersonal violence significantly predicted PTSD after subsequent random traumas (odds ratio (OR)=1.3-2.5). We also assessed 14 lifetime DSM-IV mood, anxiety, disruptive behavior and substance disorders before random traumas. We show in the current report that only prior anxiety disorders significantly predicted PTSD in a multivariate model (OR=1.5-4.3) and that these disorders interacted significantly with three of the earlier traumas (witnessing atrocities, physical violence victimization and rape). History of witnessing atrocities significantly predicted PTSD after subsequent random traumas only among respondents with prior PTSD (OR=5.6). Histories of physical violence victimization (OR=1.5) and rape after age 17 years (OR=17.6) significantly predicted only among respondents with no history of prior anxiety disorders. Although only preliminary due to reliance on retrospective reports, these results suggest that history of anxiety disorders and history of a limited number of earlier traumas might usefully be targeted in future prospective studies as distinct foci of research on individual differences in vulnerability to PTSD after subsequent traumas.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 19 September 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.194.

  6. Managing Mental Health Disorders Resulting from Trauma through Yoga: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Telles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many and varied types of trauma. The extent to which trauma influences the mental health of an individual depends on the nature of trauma, as well as on the individual's coping capabilities. Often trauma is followed by depression, anxiety, and PTSD. As the pharmacological remedies for these conditions often have undesirable side-effects, nonpharmacological remedies are thought of as a possible add-on treatment. Yoga is one such mind-body intervention. This paper covers eleven studies indexed in PubMed, in which mental health disorders resulting from trauma were managed through yoga including meditation. The aim was to evaluate the use of yoga in managing trauma-related depression, anxiety, PTSD and physiological stress following exposure to natural calamities, war, interpersonal violence, and incarceration in a correctional facility. An attempt has also been made to explore possible mechanisms underlying benefits seen. As most of these studies were not done on persons exposed to trauma that had practiced yoga, this is a definite area for further research.

  7. Combat ocular trauma and systemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Eric D; Colyer, Marcus H

    2008-11-01

    To review the recent literature regarding combat ocular trauma during hostilities in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, describe the classification of combat ocular trauma, and offer strategies that may assist in the management of eye injuries. Several recent publications have highlighted features of combat ocular trauma from Operation Iraqi Freedom. The most common cause of today's combat ocular injuries is unconventional fragmentary munitions causing significant blast injuries. These explosive munitions cause high rates of concomitant nonocular injuries such as traumatic brain injury, amputation, and other organ injuries. The most frequent ocular injuries include open-globe and adnexal lacerations. The extreme severity of combat-related open-globe injuries leads to high rates of primary enucleation and retained intraocular foreign bodies. Visual outcomes of intraocular foreign body injuries are similar to other series despite delayed removal, and no cases of endophthalmitis have occurred. Despite these advances, however, significant vision loss persists in cases of perforating globe injuries as well as open and closed-globe trauma involving the posterior segment. This review summarizes the recent literature describing ocular and systemic injuries sustained during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. An emphasis on classification of ocular injuries as well as a discussion of main outcome measures and complications is discussed.

  8. Multiple trauma in children: critical care overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Randall C; Burns, R Cartland

    2002-11-01

    Multiple trauma is more than the sum of the injuries. Management not only of the physiologic injury but also of the pathophysiologic responses, along with integration of the child's emotional and developmental needs and the child's family, forms the basis of trauma care. Multiple trauma in children also elicits profound psychological responses from the healthcare providers involved with these children. This overview will address the pathophysiology of multiple trauma in children and the general principles of trauma management by an integrated trauma team. Trauma is a systemic disease. Multiple trauma stimulates the release of multiple inflammatory mediators. A lethal triad of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy is the direct result of trauma and secondary injury from the systemic response to trauma. Controlling and responding to the secondary pathophysiologic sequelae of trauma is the cornerstone of trauma management in the multiply injured, critically ill child. Damage control surgery is a new, rational approach to the child with multiple trauma. The selection of children for damage control surgery depends on the severity of injury. Major abdominal vascular injuries and multiple visceral injuries are best considered for this approach. The effective management of childhood multiple trauma requires a combined team approach, consideration of the child and family, an organized trauma system, and an effective quality assurance and improvement mechanism.

  9. Role of focused assessment with sonography for trauma as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma in young children after high energy trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, W.; Schuppen, J.V. (J Van); H.R. Langeveld-Benders (Hester); Wilde, J.; Banderker, E.; Van, A.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The objective of the study was to review the utility of focused assessement with sonography for trauma (FAST) as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in children involved in high energy trauma (HET), and to determine whether a FAST could replace computed

  10. Prevalence of whiplash trauma in TMD patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggman-Henrikson, B; Rezvani, M; List, T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the prevalence of whiplash trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and to describe clinical signs and symptoms in comorbid TMD/whiplash compared with TMD localised to the facial region. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Bandolier databases was carried out for articles published from 1 January 1966 to 31 December 2012. The systematic search identified 129 articles. After the initial screening of abstracts, 32 articles were reviewed in full text applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six studies on the prevalence of neck trauma in patients with TMD met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Two of the authors evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. The reported prevalence of whiplash trauma ranged from 8·4% to 70% (median 35%) in TMD populations, compared with 1·7-13% in the non-TMD control groups. Compared with patients with TMD localised to the facial region, TMD patients with a history of whiplash trauma reported more TMD symptoms, such as limited jaw opening and more TMD pain, and also more headaches and stress symptoms. In conclusion, the prevalence of whiplash trauma is higher in patients with TMD compared with non-TMD controls. Furthermore, patients with comorbid TMD/whiplash present with more jaw pain and more severe jaw dysfunction compared with TMD patients without a history of head-neck trauma. These results suggest that whiplash trauma might be an initiating and/or aggravating factor as well as a comorbid condition for TMD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparison of the 1999 and 2006 Trauma Triage Guidelines: Where do Patients Go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, E. Brooke; Shah, Manish N.; Swor, Robert; Cushman, Jeremy T.; Guse, Clare E.; Brasel, Karen; Blatt, Alan; Jurkovich, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, the CDC released a revised Field Triage Decision Scheme. It is unknown how this modified scheme will affect the number of patients identified by EMS for transport to a trauma center. Objective To determine the change in the number of patients transported by EMS who meet the 2006 scheme, compared to the 1999 scheme, and to determine how the scheme change would affect under- and over-triage rates. Methods EMS providers in charge of care for injured adult patients transported to a regional trauma center in three mid-sized cities were interviewed immediately after completing transport. All injured patients were included, regardless of severity. The interview included patient demographics, vital signs, apparent anatomic injury, and the mechanism of injury. Included patients were then followed through hospital discharge. The 1999 and 2006 scheme criteria were each retrospectively applied to the collected data. The number of patients identified by the two schemes was determined. Patients were considered to have needed a trauma center if they had non-orthopedic surgery within 24 hours, ICU admission, or died. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics including 95% confidence intervals. Results EMS interviews were conducted for 11,892 patients and outcome data was unavailable for one patient. Average patient age was 48 years; 51% were men. Providers reported bringing 54% of the enrolled patients to the trauma center based on their local trauma protocol. 12% of enrolled patients were identified as needing a trauma center based on medical record review. Use of the 2006 scheme would have resulted in 1,423 fewer patients (12%; 95% CI:11-13%) being identified as needing a trauma center by EMS providers (40%; 95%CI:39-41% versus 28%; 95%CI:27-29%). 1,344 of those patients did not actually need the resources of a trauma center (94%). 78 (6%) of those patients actually needed the resources of a trauma center and would have been under-triaged. Conclusion Use of the

  12. Independent predictors of morbidity and mortality in blunt colon trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, R; Paterson, C A; Islam, S; Sweeney, W B; Baker, S P; Counihan, T C

    2004-01-01

    We sought to determine the impact of (1) grade of the colon injury, (2) the formation of an ostomy, and (3) associated injuries on outcomes such as morbidity and mortality after blunt colon injuries. We retrospectively reviewed 16,814 cases of blunt abdominal trauma. Patients with colonic injuries were selected and charts reviewed for demographic, clinical, and outcomes data. Injuries were grouped by the Colon Injury Scale (grades I-V). Independent risk factors of morbidity included spine and lung injuries, as well as increased age. A higher grade of colon injury trended toward a significant association with intra-abdominal complications. Independent risk factors of mortality included liver, heart, and lung injuries, as well as intracerebral blood and female gender. The grade of colon injury, the formation of an ostomy, and management of the colon trauma did not independently predict increased intra-abdominal complications, morbidity, or mortality. These results indicate that patients afflicted with blunt colon trauma experience a high rate of morbidity and mortality from associated injuries and or increased age. Treatment regimens directed at these factors will be most helpful in reducing the high morbidity and mortality after blunt colon trauma. Factors such as ostomy formation and management strategy are not associated with increased morbidity or mortality after blunt colon trauma.

  13. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  14. Role of focused assessment with sonography for trauma as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma in young children after high energy trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, W.; van Schuppen, J.; Langeveld, H.; Wilde, J.; Banderker, E.; van As, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to review the utility of focused assessement with sonography for trauma (FAST) as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in children involved in high energy trauma (HET), and to determine whether a FAST could replace computed tomography (CT) in clinical

  15. Current approach to liver traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Levent; Kurt, Necmi; Sikar, Hasan Ediz

    2017-03-01

    Liver injuries remain major obstacle for successful treatment, due to size and location of the liver. Requirement for surgery should be determined by clinical factors, most notably hemodynamical state. In this present study we tried to declare our approach to liver traumas. We also tried to emphasize the importance of conservative treatment, since surgeries for liver traumas carry high mortality rates. Patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Surgery at Kartal Research and Education Hospital, due to liver trauma were retrospectively analyzed between 2003 and 2013. Patient demographics, hepatic panel, APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time), PT (prothrombin time), INR (international normalized ratio), fibrinogen, biochemistry panel were recorded. Hemodynamic instability was the most prominent factor for surgery decision, in the lead of current Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Operation records and imaging modalities revealed liver injuries according to the Organ Injury Scale of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. 300 patients admitted to emergency department were included in our study (187 males and 113 females). Mean age was 47 years (range, 12-87). The overall mortality rate was 13% (40 out of 300). Major factor responsible for mortality rates and outcome was stability of cases on admission. 188 (% 63) patients were counted as stable, whereas 112 (% 37) cases were found unstable (blood pressure ≤ 90, after massive resuscitation). 192 patients were observed conservatively, whereas 108 cases received abdominal surgery. High levels of AST, ALT, LDH, INR, creatinine and low levels of fibrinogen and low platelet counts on admission were found to be associated with mortality and these cases also had Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Hemodynamic instability on admission and the type and grade of injury played major role in mortality rates). Packing was performed in 35 patients, with Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Mortality rate was %13 (40

  16. Evaluating trauma team performance in a Level I trauma center: Validation of the trauma team communication assessment (TTCA-24).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMoor, Stephanie; Abdel-Rehim, Shady; Olmsted, Richard; Myers, John G; Parker-Raley, Jessica

    2017-07-01

    Nontechnical skills (NTS), such as team communication, are well-recognized determinants of trauma team performance and good patient care. Measuring these competencies during trauma resuscitations is essential, yet few valid and reliable tools are available. We aimed to demonstrate that the Trauma Team Communication Assessment (TTCA-24) is a valid and reliable instrument that measures communication effectiveness during activations. Two tools with adequate psychometric strength (Trauma Nontechnical Skills Scale [T-NOTECHS], Team Emergency Assessment Measure [TEAM]) were identified during a systematic review of medical literature and compared with TTCA-24. Three coders used each tool to evaluate 35 stable and 35 unstable patient activations (defined according to Advanced Trauma Life Support criteria). Interrater reliability was calculated between coders using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to establish concurrent validity between TTCA-24 and the other two validated tools. Coders achieved an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 for stable patient activations and 0.78 for unstable activations scoring excellent on the interrater agreement guidelines. The median score for each assessment showed good team communication for all 70 videos (TEAM, 39.8 of 54; T-NOTECHS, 17.4 of 25; and TTCA-24, 87.4 of 96). A significant correlation between TTTC-24 and T-NOTECHS was revealed (p = 0.029), but no significant correlation between TTCA-24 and TEAM (p = 0.77). Team communication was rated slightly better across all assessments for stable versus unstable patient activations, but not statistically significant. TTCA-24 correlated with T-NOTECHS, an instrument measuring nontechnical skills for trauma teams, but not TEAM, a tool that assesses communication in generic emergency settings. TTCA-24 is a reliable and valid assessment that can be a useful adjunct when evaluating interpersonal and team communication during trauma

  17. Management of liver trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Badger, S A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Blunt and penetrating liver trauma is common and often presents major diagnostic and management problems. METHODS: A literature review was undertaken to determine the current consensus on investigation and management strategies. RESULTS: The liver is the most frequently injured organ following abdominal trauma. Immediate assessment with ultrasound has replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage in the resuscitation room, but computerised tomography remains the gold standard investigation. Nonoperative management is preferred in stable patients but laparotomy is indicated in unstable patients. Damage control techniques such as perihepatic packing, hepatotomy plus direct suture, and resectional debridement are recommended. Major complex surgical procedures such as anatomical resection or atriocaval shunting are now thought to be redundant in the emergency setting. Packing is also recommended for the inexperienced surgeon to allow control and stabilisation prior to transfer to a tertiary centre. Interventional radiological techniques are becoming more widely used, particularly in patients who are being managed nonoperatively or have been stabilised by perihepatic packing. CONCLUSIONS: Management of liver injuries has evolved significantly throughout the last two decades. In the absence of other abdominal injuries, operative management can usually be avoided. Patients with more complex injuries or subsequent complications should be transferred to a specialist centre to optimise final outcome.

  18. Changes in urine composition after trauma facilitate bacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubron Cecile

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Critically ill patients including trauma patients are at high risk of urinary tract infection (UTI. The composition of urine in trauma patients may be modified due to inflammation, systemic stress, rhabdomyolysis, life support treatment and/or urinary catheter insertion. Methods Prospective, single-centre, observational study conducted in patients with severe trauma and without a history of UTIs or recent antibiotic treatment. The 24-hour urine samples were collected on the first and the fifth days and the growth of Escherichia coli in urine from patients and healthy volunteers was compared. Biochemical and hormonal modifications in urine that could potentially influence bacterial growth were explored. Results Growth of E. coli in urine from trauma patients was significantly higher on days 1 and 5 than in urine of healthy volunteers. Several significant modifications of urine composition could explain these findings. On days 1 and 5, trauma patients had an increase in glycosuria, in urine iron concentration, and in the concentrations of several amino acids compared to healthy volunteers. On day 1, the urinary osmotic pressure was significantly lower than for healthy volunteers. Conclusion We showed that urine of trauma patients facilitated growth of E. coli when compared to urine from healthy volunteers. This effect was present in the first 24 hours and until at least the fifth day after trauma. This phenomenon may be involved in the pathophysiology of UTIs in trauma patients. Further studies are required to define the exact causes of such modifications.

  19. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Sonne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of treatment in trials with trauma-affected refugees vary considerably not only between studies but also between patients within a single study. However, we know little about why some patients benefit more from treatment, as few studies have analysed predictors of treatment outcome. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine possible psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees. Method: The participants were 195 adult refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD who were enrolled in a 6- to 7-month treatment programme at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP, Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients’ past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ. Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms Checklist-90, Global Assessment of Functioning scales, and pain rated on visual analogue scales. The relations between treatment outcomes and the total score as well as subscores of the CTP Predictor Index were analysed. Results: Overall, the total score of the CTP Predictor Index was significantly correlated to pre- to post treatment score changes on the majority of the ratings mentioned above. While employment status was the only single item significantly correlated to HTQ-score changes, a number of single items from the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with changes in depression and anxiety symptoms, but the size of the correlation coefficients were modest. Conclusions: The total score of the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly

  20. Head trauma and CT with special reference to diagnosis of complications of head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitose

    1979-01-01

    Cases in which CT was useful for the diagnosis of complications of head trauma were reported. First, complications of head trauma were given an outline, and then, cases of protrusion of the brain, traumatic pneumocephalus, and cerebro-vascular disorders caused by head trauma were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  1. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? A prospective observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Sorensen, Anne Marie; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. METHODS: Observational study at a single Level I Trauma Centre. Inclusion of 80 adult trauma patients ([greater than or equal to]18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team...

  2. The Relationship between Childhood Trauma and Suicidal Ideation: Role of Maltreatment and Potential Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Bahk, Yong-Chun; Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Choi, Kee-Hong; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Childhood trauma is recognized as an important risk factor in suicidal ideation, however it is not fully understood how the different types of childhood maltreatment influence suicidal ideation nor what variables mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and suicidal ideation. This study examined the path from childhood trauma to suicidal ideation, including potential mediators. Methods A sample of 211 healthy adults completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Beck s...

  3. Is Trauma Memory Special? Trauma Narrative Fragmentation in PTSD: Effects of Treatment and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

    2017-03-01

    Seminal theories posit that fragmented trauma memories are critical to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; van der Kolk & Fisler, 1995; Brewin, 2014) and that elaboration of the trauma narrative is necessary for recovery (e.g., Foa, Huppert, & Cahill, 2006). According to fragmentation theories, trauma narrative changes, particularly for those receiving trauma-focused treatment, should accompany symptom reduction. Trauma and control narratives in 77 men and women with chronic PTSD were examined pre- and post-treatment, comparing prolonged exposure (PE) and sertraline. Utilizing self-report, rater coding, and objective coding of narrative content, fragmentation was compared across narrative types (trauma, negative, positive) by treatment modality and response, controlling for potential confounds. Although sensory components increased with PE ( d = 0.23 - 0.44), there were no consistent differences in fragmentation from pre- to post-treatment between PE and sertraline or treatment responders and non-responders. Contrary to theories, changes in fragmentation may not be a crucial mechanism underlying PTSD therapeutic recovery.

  4. "Homelessness and trauma go hand-in-hand": pathways to homelessness among women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Poza, Ines; Washington, Donna L

    2011-01-01

    Veterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of women veterans' pathways into homelessness. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, California, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. Five predominant "roots" (precipitating experiences) initiated pathways toward homelessness: 1) childhood adversity, 2) trauma and/or substance abuse during military service, 3) post-military abuse, adversity, and/or relationship termination, 4) post-military mental health, substance abuse, and/or medical problems, and 5) unemployment. Contextual factors, which promoted development of homelessness in the setting of primary roots, included women veterans' "survivor instinct," lack of social support and resources, sense of isolation, pronounced sense of independence, and barriers to care. These contextual factors also reinforced persistence of the roots of post-military adversity and mental health and substance abuse problems, serving to maintain cycles of chronic homelessness. Collectively, these multiple, interacting roots and contextual factors form a "web of vulnerability" that is a target for action. Multiple points along the pathways to homelessness represent critical junctures for VA and community-based organizations to engage in prevention or intervention efforts on behalf of women veterans. Considering the multiple, interconnected challenges that these women veterans described, solutions to homelessness should address multiple risk factors, include trauma-informed care that acknowledges women veterans' traumatic experiences, and incorporate holistic responses that can contribute to healing and recovery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Epidemiological Trends of Spine Trauma: An Australian Level 1 Trauma Centre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, J. W.; Chan, C. H. P.; Fitzgerald, M. C. B.; Liew, S. M.; Rosenfeld, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of current epidemiology and spine trauma trends assists in public resource allocation, fine-tuning of primary prevention methods, and benchmarking purposes. Data on all patients with traumatic spine injuries admitted to the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne between May 1, 2009, and January 1, 2011, were collected from the Alfred Trauma Registry, Alfred Health medical database, and Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry. Epidemiological trends were analyzed as a general cohort, with comparison cohorts of nonsurvivors versus survivors and elderly versus nonelderly. Linear regression analysis was utilized to demonstrate trends with statistical significance. There were 965 patients with traumatic spine injuries with 2,333 spine trauma levels. The general cohort showed a trimodal age distribution, male-to-female ratio of 2:2, motor vehicle accidents as the primary spine trauma mechanism, 47.7% patients with severe polytrauma as graded using the Injury Severity Score (ISS), 17.3% with traumatic brain injury (TBI), the majority of patients with one spine injury level, 7% neurological deficit rate, 12.8% spine trauma operative rate, and 5.2% mortality rate. Variables with statistical significance trending toward mortality were the elderly, motor vehicle occupants, severe ISS, TBI, C1–2 dissociations, and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A, B, and C neurological grades. Variables with statistical significance trending toward the elderly were females; low falls; one spine injury level; type 2 odontoid fractures; subaxial cervical spine distraction injuries; ASIA A, B, and C neurological grades; and patients without neurological deficits. Of the general cohort, 50.3% of spine trauma survivors were discharged home, and 48.1% were discharged to rehabilitation facilities. This study provides baseline spine trauma epidemiological data. The trimodal age distribution of patients with traumatic spine injuries calls for further studies and intervention targeted

  6. Isolated hip fracture care in an inclusive trauma system : A trauma system wide evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, J. J E M; van Lammeren, G. W.; Houwert, R. M.; van Laarhoven, Constance; Hietbrink, F.; Leenen, L. P H; Verleisdonk, E. J M M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients with a hip fracture represent a large proportion of the trauma population; however, little is known about outcome differences between different levels of trauma care for these patients. The aim of this study is to analyse the outcome of trauma care in patients with a

  7. Implementation and Analysis of Initial Trauma Registry in Iquitos, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Duron

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Peru, 11% of deaths are due to trauma. Iquitos is a large underserved Peruvian city isolated from central resources by its geography. Our objective was to implement a locally driven trauma registry to sustainably improve trauma healthcare in this region. Methods: All trauma patients presenting to the main regional referral hospital were included in the trauma registry. A pilot study retrospectively analyzed data from the first two months after implementation. Results: From March to April 2013, 572 trauma patients were entered into the database. Average age was 26.9 years. Ten percent of patients presented more than 24 hours after injury. Most common mechanisms of injury were falls (25.5%, motor vehicle collisions (23.3%, and blunt assault (10.5%. Interim analysis revealed that 99% of patients were entered into the database. However, documentation of vital signs was poor: 42% of patients had temperature, 26% had oxygen saturation documented. After reporting to registry staff, a significant increase in temperature (42 to 97%, P < 0.001 and oxygen saturation (26 to 92%, P < 0.001 documentation was observed. Conclusion: A trauma registry is possible to implement in a resource-poor setting. Future efforts will focus on analysis of data to enhance prevention and treatment of injuries in Iquitos.

  8. Dressing-related trauma: clinical sequelae and resource utilization in a UK setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlesworth B

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Charlesworth,1 Claire Pilling,1 Paul Chadwick,2 Martyn Butcher31Adelphi Values, Macclesfield, 2Salford Royal Foundation Trust, Salford, 3Northern Devon Healthcare Trust, Devon, UKBackground: Dressings are the mainstay of wound care management; however, adherence of the dressing to the wound or periwound skin is common and can lead to dressing-related pain and trauma. Dressing-related trauma is recognized as a clinical and economic burden to patients and health care providers. This study was conducted to garner expert opinion on clinical sequelae and resource use associated with dressing-related trauma in a UK setting.Methods: This was an exploratory study with two phases: qualitative pilot interviews with six wound care specialists to explore dressing-related trauma concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization; and online quantitative research with 30 wound care specialists to validate and quantify the concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization explored in the first phase of the study. Data were collected on mean health care professional time, material costs, pharmaceutical costs, and inpatient management per sequela occurrence until resolution. Data were analyzed to give total costs per sequela and concept occurrence.Results: The results demonstrate that dressing-related trauma is a clinically relevant concept. The main types of dressing-related trauma concepts included skin reactions, adherence to the wound, skin stripping, maceration, drying, and plugging of the wound. These were the foundation for a number of clinical sequelae, including wound enlargement, increased exudate, bleeding, infection, pain, itching/excoriation, edema, dermatitis, inflammation, and anxiety. Mean total costs range from £56 to £175 for the complete onward management of each occurrence of the six main concepts.Conclusion: These results provide insight into the hidden costs of dressing-related trauma in a UK setting. This research successfully conceptualized

  9. Clinically Significant Behavior Problems among Young Children 2 Years after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Yagi, Junko; Homma, Hiroaki; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Nagao, Keizo; Okuyama, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Background On March 11, 2011, a massive undersea earthquake and tsunami struck East Japan. Few studies have investigated the impact of exposure to a natural disaster on preschool children. We investigated the association of trauma experiences during the Great East Japan Earthquake on clinically significant behavior problems among preschool children 2 years after the earthquake. Method Participants were children who were exposed to the 2011 disaster at preschool age (affected area, n = 178; unaffected area, n = 82). Data were collected from September 2012 to June 2013 (around 2 years after the earthquake), thus participants were aged 5 to 8 years when assessed. Severe trauma exposures related to the earthquake (e.g., loss of family members) were assessed by interview, and trauma events in the physical environment related to the earthquake (e.g. housing damage), and other trauma exposure before the earthquake, were assessed by questionnaire. Behavior problems were assessed by caregivers using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), which encompasses internalizing, externalizing, and total problems. Children who exceeded clinical cut-off of the CBCL were defined as having clinically significant behavior problems. Results Rates of internalizing, externalizing, and total problems in the affected area were 27.7%, 21.2%, and 25.9%, respectively. The rate ratio suggests that children who lost distant relatives or friends were 2.36 times more likely to have internalizing behavior problems (47.6% vs. 20.2%, 95% CI: 1.10–5.07). Other trauma experiences before the earthquake also showed significant positive association with internalizing, externalizing, and total behavior problems, which were not observed in the unaffected area. Conclusions One in four children still had behavior problems even 2 years after the Great East Japan Earthquake. Children who had other trauma experiences before the earthquake were more likely to have behavior problems. These data will be

  10. Abdominal computed tomography scan as a screening tool in blunt trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasel, K.J.; Borgstrom, D.C.; Kolewe, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Background. One of the most difficult problems in blunt trauma is evaluation for potential intraabdominal injury. Admission for serial abdominal exams remains the standard of care after intraabdominal injury has been initially excluded. We hypothesized a normal abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan in a subgroup of minimally injured patients would obviate admission for serial abdominal examinations, allowing safe discharge from the emergency department (ED). Methods. We reviewed our blunt trauma experience with patients admitted solely for serial abdominal examinations after a normal CT. Patients were identified from the trauma registry at a Level 1 trauma center from July 1991 through June 1995. Patients with abnormal CTs, extra-abdominal injuries necessitating admission, hemodynamic abnormalities, a Glasgow Coma Scale less than 13, or injury severity scores (ISSs) greater than 15 were excluded. Records of 238 patients remained; we reviewed them to determine the presence of missed abdominal injury. Results. None of the 238 patients had a missed abdominal injury. Average ISS of these patients was 3.2 (range, 0 to 10). Discharging these patients from the ED would result in a yearly cost savings of $32,874 to our medical system. Conclusions. Abdominal CT scan is a safe and cost-effective screening tool in patients with blunt trauma. A normal CT scan in minimally injured patients allows safe discharge from the ED. (authors)

  11. Paediatric Blunt Liver Trauma in a Dutch Level 1 Trauma Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nellensteijn, D.; Porte, R. J.; van Zuuren, W.; ten Duis, H. J.; Hulscher, J. B. F.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Paediatric blunt hepatic trauma treatment is changing from operative treatment (OT) to non-operative treatment (NOT). In 2000 the American Pediatric Surgical Association has published guidelines for NOT of these injuries. Little is known about the treatment of paediatric liver trauma

  12. Function of "nontrauma" surgeons in level I trauma centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, J W

    1997-06-01

    Although the general "trauma" surgeon is usually the team leader in level I trauma centers, the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons is frequently ill-defined. This study was done to gain data in regard to actual use of subspecialists in busy centers. First, a survey of the patterns of staffing in 140 trauma centers was elicited by mail questionnaire, supplemented by telephone cells. Second, records of 400 consecutive patients at the Elvis Presley Trauma Center were reviewed to determine the use of subspecialists during the first 24 hours of care of individual patients. There were differences in the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons at different centers: in receiving, admitting, operating, and critical care areas and in privileges for admission and attending of inpatients. Consultation "guidelines" are used for many specific injuries. At our center, a mean of 1.92 subspecialists, in addition to general surgeons, were involved in the early care of each patient. Problems exist in many centers regarding the use of subspecialists, especially for management of facial and chest injuries. In some centers nonsurgeons function in the intensive care unit, and as admitting and attending physicians of trauma patients.

  13. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  14. History of the Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum...... Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long...

  15. Attachment Dimensions and Post-traumatic Symptoms Following Interpersonal Traumas versus Impersonal Traumas in Young Adults in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lien; Chen, Sue-Huei; Su, Yi-Jen; Kung, Yi-Wen

    2017-08-01

    Greater risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is seen in individuals exposed to interpersonal traumatic events. Based on an attachment perspective, interpersonal trauma exposure may activate one's attachment insecurity system and disrupt affect, behaviour and interpersonal function, which may in turn create more difficulties to cope with interpersonal traumas and exacerbate PTSD symptomatology. The present study examined whether attachment anxiety relative to attachment avoidance would be a stronger predictor of greater PTSD symptoms following interpersonal traumas versus impersonal traumas in a Taiwanese sample. One hundred and sixty-two trauma-exposed Taiwanese young adults completed the measures of symptoms of depression, anxiety and PTSD, and attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. In this Taiwanese study, higher attachment anxiety was observed in individuals who were exposed to interpersonal traumas. The interpersonal trauma group reported greater PTSD symptoms than did the impersonal trauma group. Specifically, after controlling for age, occurrence of trauma and distress of trauma, attachment anxiety, but not attachment avoidance, predicted more PTSD total severity and avoidance symptoms in the interpersonal trauma group. The findings may be pertinent to attachment anxiety-related hyperactivating strategies, as well as specific cultural values and a forbearance strategy applied to regulate traumatic distress in a collectivist society. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Psychological distress in young adults exposed to war-related trauma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabre, Maria M; Hadi, Fawzyiah; La Greca, Annette M; Lai, Betty S

    2015-01-01

    We tested a conceptual model of the effect of war-trauma exposure in childhood on psychological distress in young adulthood. Participants included 151 urban Kuwaiti children (51% female; M age = 10.62 years) exposed to the 1990-1991 Gulf crisis (assessed in 1993); participants also included 140 parents (81% female; M age mothers = 36.50 years; M age fathers = 41 years). In 2003, 120 participants were reassessed as young adults (50% female; M age = 21.19 years). The conceptual model was evaluated with structural equations. War-trauma exposure was associated with psychological distress in children and parents, but parents reported larger effects than children. Parents' psychological distress did not contribute to children's psychological distress. Children's psychological distress did not dissipate over time. Social support may function as a potential mediator of the effect of war-trauma exposure on psychological distress. Findings support the importance of early detection and treatment of children exposed to war trauma. Findings also implicate social support as a factor to consider in clinical interventions for children exposed to war trauma.

  17. Management of duodenal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN Guo-qing; YANG Hua

    2011-01-01

    【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature...

  18. Trauma management in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutserimpas, Christos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Samonis, George

    2017-08-01

    Homer's Iliad is one of the highest intellectual products of the early ancient Greek civilisation. A plethora of medical information lies within Iliad's 24 rhapsodies, and a total of 147 injuries are described. The present study records and evaluates all cases of trauma management included in this epic poem. Not only Iliad's original text but also all myths related to Iliad from the five-volume Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were meticulously studied to locate the injured person, the type of trauma, the care provider and the type of given care as well as the outcome of each case. A total of 21 cases were found and evaluated with a 5% mortality rate. The majority of these injuries were caused by an arrow (43%) and were located to the upper extremity (43%). Injuries of the head, neck and trunk were not treated as all of them were lethal. Many of the recorded trauma management techniques can be correlated to modern medicine. Furthermore, the role and skills of military doctors and paramedics, mentioned by Homer, is discussed. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Role of Computed Tomography in Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, O B

    2015-01-01

    Blunt injury trauma is regularly encountered in the emergency department. Diagnostic tools that help in optimum management of blunt abdominal trauma include; Focussed Assessment Sonography for Trauma scan, Diagnostic peritoneal lavage and Computed Tomography scan. The aim of this study is to determine the validity of CT scan as an accurate diagnostic tool and its role in management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. A prospective analysis of 80 patients of blunt abdomen trauma who were admitted in Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal within a span of 15 months was done. Demographic data, mechanism of trauma, management and outcomes were studied. Organ injuries were graded using the Organ Injury Scale guidelines. Most of the patients in our study were in the age group of 21-40 years with an M: F ratio of 2.3:1. Road traffic accident (47.5%) was the most common mechanism of injury. Spleen (27.5%) was the commonest organ injured. CT scan was superior to FAST scan and had sensitivity of 97.3% specificity 75% positive predictive value 98.6%. FAST scan had sensitivity of 78.9%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 96% with p- value of 0.0034. 81% of patients were conservatively managed. In conjunction with close clinical monitoring, CT scan is reliable in the evaluation and management of blunt abdominal trauma patients. Our study also shows CT as a superior diagnostic modality compared to FAST scan.

  20. Evaluation and Management of Blunt Solid Organ Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jonathan G; Shah, Jay; Robinson, Craig; Dariushnia, Sean

    2017-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in patients under the age of 45 and generally associated with a high kinetic energy event such as a motor vehicle accident or fall from extreme elevations. Blunt trauma can affect every organ system and major vascular structure with potentially devastating effect. When we consider abdominal solid organ injury from blunt trauma, we usually think of the liver, spleen, and kidneys. However, all of the abdominal organs, including the pancreas and adrenal glands, may be involved. Blunt hepatic trauma is more commonly associated with venous bleeding rather than arterial injury. Stable venous injury is often managed conservatively; when the patient is hemodynamically unstable from venous hepatic injury, operative management should be first-line therapy. When the injury is arterial, endovascular therapy should be initiated. Blunt trauma to the spleen is the most common cause of traumatic injury to the spleen. Management is controversial. In our institution unstable patients are taken to the operating room, and stable patients with Grades IV-V injuries and patients with active arterial injury are taken for endovascular treatment. Renal injuries are less common, and evidence of arterial injury such as active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm is warranted before endovascular therapy. Pancreatic trauma is uncommon and usually secondary to steering wheel/handlebar mechanism injuries. Adrenal injuries are rare in the absence of megatrauma or underlying adrenal abnormality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pancreatic trauma: Universities of Melbourne HPB Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W R; Collier, N A; Banting, S W

    1999-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma is uncommon, but carries high morbidity and mortality rates, especially when diagnosis is delayed or inappropriate surgery is attempted. Although the retroperitoneal position of the pancreas confers it some immunity to injury, the force required to do so often results in severe associated injuries to other organs, which may be life threatening. Diagnosis may be difficult and surgery can be a considerable technical challenge. All patients with pancreatic trauma who attended one of three Melbourne teaching hospitals from 1977 to 1998 were identified. Injuries were graded and the method of diagnosis and treatment studied. The incidence and causation of postoperative morbidity and mortality was identified. Thirty-eight patients (26 men and 12 women) were studied. Blunt trauma was responsible in 30 patients, stab wounds in five, gunshot wounds in two and iatrogenic injury in one. Injuries to other organs occurred in 30 patients. Surgical procedures were undertaken in 34 patients, resulting in the death of five and complications in 25. Complications and death are related to the associated injuries, as much as to the pancreatic injury itself. In this study, we review the experience of the management of pancreatic trauma in three large teaching hospitals in Melbourne over a 21-year period, and suggest a strategy for dealing with these difficult patients. Adherence to the basic concepts of control of bleeding from associated vascular injury, minimization of contamination, accurate pancreatic assessment, judicious resection and adequate drainage can diminish the risk. By approaching the problem in a systematic way and adopting a generally conservative management plan, complications and deaths can be minimized in these complex cases.

  2. Defining and Measuring Decision-Making for the Management of Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Amin; Gips, Amanda; Razek, Tarek; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Mulder, David S; Grushka, Jeremy R

    Effective management of trauma patients is heavily dependent on sound judgment and decision-making. Yet, current methods for training and assessing these advanced cognitive skills are subjective, lack standardization, and are prone to error. This qualitative study aims to define and characterize the cognitive and interpersonal competencies required to optimally manage injured patients. Cognitive and hierarchical task analyses for managing unstable trauma patients were performed using qualitative methods to map the thoughts, behaviors, and practices that characterize expert performance. Trauma team leaders and board-certified trauma surgeons participated in semistructured interviews that were transcribed verbatim. Data were supplemented with content from published literature and prospectively collected field notes from observations of the trauma team during trauma activations. The data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory by 2 independent reviewers. A framework was created based on 14 interviews with experts (lasting 1-2 hours each), 35 field observations (20 [57%] blunt; 15 [43%] penetrating; median Injury Severity Score 20 [13-25]), and 15 literary sources. Experts included 11 trauma surgeons and 3 emergency physicians from 7 Level 1 academic institutions in North America (median years in practice: 12 [8-17]). Twenty-nine competencies were identified, including 17 (59%) related to situation awareness, 6 (21%) involving decision-making, and 6 (21%) requiring interpersonal skills. Of 40 potential errors that were identified, root causes were mapped to errors in situation awareness (20 [50%]), decision-making (10 [25%]), or interpersonal skills (10 [25%]). This study defines cognitive and interpersonal competencies that are essential for the management of trauma patients. This framework may serve as the basis for novel curricula to train and assess decision-making skills, and to develop quality-control metrics to improve team and individual performance

  3. Combating terror: a new paradigm in student trauma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkind, Avraham I; Faroja, Mouhammad; Mintz, Yoav; Pikarsky, Alon J; Zamir, Gideon; Elazary, Ram; Abu-Gazala, Mahmoud; Bala, Miklosh

    2015-02-01

    Other than the Advanced Trauma Life Support course, usually run for postgraduate trainees, there are few trauma courses available for medical students. It has been shown that trauma teaching for medical students is sadly lacking within the undergraduate curriculum. We stated that students following formal teaching, even just theory and some practice in basic skills significantly improved their management of trauma patients. Hadassah-Hebrew University in Israel runs an annual 2-week trauma course for final-year medical students. The focus is on hands-on practice in resuscitation, diagnosis, procedures, and decision making. After engaging a combination of instructional and interactive teaching methods including practice on simulated injuries that students must assess and treat through the 2 weeks, the course culminates in a disaster drill where students work alongside the emergency services to rescue, assess, treat, and transfer patients. The course is evaluated with a written precourse and postcourse test, an Objective Structured Clinical Examination and detailed feedback from the drill. We analyzed student feedback at the end of each course during a 6-year period from 2007 to 2012. Correct answers for the posttest results were higher each year with good reliability as assessed by Chronbach's α and with significant variation from pretest scores assessed using paired-samples t tests. Best scores were achieved in knowledge acquisition and practical skills gained. Students were also asked whether the course contributed to self-preparedness in treating trauma patients, and this consistently achieved high scores. We believe that students benefit substantially from the course and gain lasting skills and confidence in trauma management, decision making, and organizational skills. The course provides students with the opportunity to learn and ingrain trauma principles along Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines and prepares them for practice as safe doctors. We advocate

  4. Cellular High-Energy Cavitation Trauma - Description of a Novel In Vitro Trauma Model in Three Different Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuli; Risling, Mårten; Malm, Elisabeth; Sondén, Anders; Bolling, Magnus Frödin; Sköld, Mattias K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in traumatic brain injury have yet to be fully characterized. One mechanism that, especially in high-energy trauma, could be of importance is cavitation. Cavitation can be described as a process of vaporization, bubble generation, and bubble implosion as a result of a decrease and subsequent increase in pressure. Cavitation as an injury mechanism is difficult to visualize and model due to its short duration and limited spatial distribution. One strategy to analyze the cellular response of cavitation is to employ suitable in vitro models. The flyer-plate model is an in vitro high-energy trauma model that includes cavitation as a trauma mechanism. A copper fragment is accelerated by means of a laser, hits the bottom of a cell culture well causing cavitation, and shock waves inside the well and cell medium. We have found the flyer-plate model to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to control. In this study, we have used the model to analyze the cellular response to microcavitation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, Caco-2, and C6 glioma cell lines. Mitotic activity in neuroblastoma and glioma was investigated with BrdU staining, and cell numbers were calculated using automated time-lapse imaging. We found variations between cell types and between different zones surrounding the lesion with these methods. It was also shown that the injured cell cultures released S-100B in a dose-dependent manner. Using gene expression microarray, a number of gene families of potential interest were found to be strongly, but differently regulated in neuroblastoma and glioma at 24 h post trauma. The data from the gene expression arrays may be used to identify new candidates for biomarkers in cavitation trauma. We conclude that our model is useful for studies of trauma in vitro and that it could be applied in future treatment studies.

  5. Trauma surgeon personality and job satisfaction: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkrod, Kelli H; Field, Craig; Brown, Carlos V R

    2010-04-01

    Personality is correlated with job satisfaction, whereas job satisfaction is linked to performance. This study examines personality of practicing trauma surgeons in relation to their job satisfaction. The dominant theory in personality research is the five-factor model, which includes: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness. The sample was identified from American Association for Surgery of Trauma, Eastern Association for Surgery of Trauma, and Western Trauma Association membership. A web-based survey of demographics and empirically supported measures was created. Four hundred and twelve trauma surgeons (49 +/- 14-years-old, 85% male) completed the survey. When comparing satisfied to unsatisfied trauma surgeons on personality variables, extraversion (5.0 +/- 1.6 vs 4.4 +/- 1.6, P = 0.014) and emotional stability (5.8 +/- 1.1 vs 5.4 +/- 1.2, P = 0.007) were significantly higher in satisfied surgeons. Moderate correlations were found for job satisfaction with emotional stability (r = 0.20, P personality variables highlighted the significance of emotional stability and extraversion in prediction of job satisfaction. Extraversion and emotional stability are the most significant personality factors to job satisfaction of trauma surgeons. These findings may have important implications for surgical resident recruitment, job performance, and retention.

  6. An evolution of trauma care evaluation: A thesis on trauma registry and outcome prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, P.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction models play an invaluable role in the evaluation and improvement of modern trauma care. Trauma registries underlying these outcome prediction models need to be accurate, complete and consistent. This thesis focused on the opportunities and limitations of trauma registries and

  7. Dua sakit (double sick): trauma and the settlement experiences of West Papuan refugees living in North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Susan; Silove, Derrick; Kareth, Moses

    2009-08-01

    There is mounting evidence of systematic abuses, including torture, rape and extrajudicial killings directed against independence activists as well as the civilian population in Indonesian occupied West Papua. Refugees from West Papua have sought safety in neighbouring Australia, experiencing hazardous journeys during their flight. We report early observations from a mental health study among West Papuan refugees living in North Queensland, Australia. The project includes qualitative methods aimed at gathering histories of trauma and human rights violations as well as standard mental health assessments and indices of acculturation and resettlement stresses. We consider the emerging data from the vantage point of the Adaptation and Development After Persecution and Trauma model that identifies five psychosocial domains that require repair following exposure to gross human rights violations and refugee trauma. The model emphasizes the inter-relatedness of key challenges, the compounding of adversity, and the bivalent effects of complex experiences, with both positive and negative elements shaping the adaptive trajectory of displaced persons. Refugee groups have their own approaches to conceptualizing the complexity of their problems, with the term dua sakit representing the expression used by West Papuans to identify the multiple challenges they face. The study highlights the importance of assessing each refugee group within its unique social and cultural context, taking into account such diverse factors as geographical location, employment, and ongoing conflict in the homeland in designing appropriate interventions.

  8. Measuring trauma center injury prevention activity: an assessment and reporting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sise, Michael J; Sise, Carol Beth

    2006-02-01

    To develop an assessment and reporting tool for a trauma center's community partnership strategy to deliver injury prevention programs in a large metropolitan area. The tool was designed to track prevention activity and serve as a reporting format for the parent health system, county designating agency, and the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Center Verification Process. The tool collected data including trauma center paid and volunteer personnel time, equipment, resource, and financial costs, community group and public agency contributions, number of community members receiving prevention material or presentations, impact on public policy, and print and broadcast media coverage. These measurements were incorporated in a reporting grid format. Six youth injury prevention programs were evaluated over a recent 2-year interval to demonstrate the tool's usefulness. Of six programs, three focused on motor vehicle injuries, one on teen suicide, one on firearm injuries, and one on drug and alcohol abuse. Trauma Center personnel asset allocation included 3% full-time equivalent by the Trauma Medical Director, 30% by the Injury Prevention and Community Outreach Coordinator, and 473 person hours (both work and volunteer) by physicians, nurses, and other personnel. Trauma Center equipment and fixed asset expenses totaled $3,950 and monetary contribution totaled $4,430. Community groups and public agencies contributed 20,400 person hours with estimated in-kind costs exceeding $750,000. Five of the six programs continued during the 2-year period. A gun-lock giveaway program was suspended because of a product recall. A total of over 29,000 youth received prevention material and presentations. Four public policy initiatives and 18 Trauma Center media stories with over 50 mentions and 37 new community partnerships resulted. The reports generated were easily incorporated in the trauma center's reports to local and national organizations and agencies. This assessment tool

  9. Childhood trauma and compulsive buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Chang, Joy; Jewell, Bryan; Rock, Rachel

    2013-02-01

    Childhood trauma has been empirically associated with various types of self-regulatory difficulties in adulthood. However, according to the extant literature, no study has examined relationships between various types of childhood trauma and compulsive buying behavior in adulthood. Using a self-report survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive sample of 370 obstetrics/gynecology patients, we examined five types of childhood trauma before the age of 12 years (i.e. witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to compulsive buying as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). All forms of trauma demonstrated statistically significant correlations with the CBS. Using a linear regression analysis, both witnessing violence and emotional abuse significantly contributed to CBS scores. Further analyses indicated that race did not moderate the relationship between childhood trauma and compulsive buying. Findings indicate that various forms of childhood trauma are correlated with compulsive buying behavior, particularly witnessing violence and emotional abuse.

  10. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özen B

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Beliz Özen, Y Özay Özdemir, E Emrem Beştepe Erenköy Mental Health and Neurological Diseases Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD. There are few studies that focus directly on research etiology of GPP/PD and use structured scales. The aim of this study was to research childhood trauma and dissociation forms among women with GPP/PD.Patients and methods: Fifty-five women with GPP/PD according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and 61 healthy women with no complaints of sexual function as a control group, in the age range of 18–60 years, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data form, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28, Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES, and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20 were administered to all participants.Results: Sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect scores, which comprise the subgroups of CTQ, were found high among women with GPP/PD compared with the control group (p=0.003, p=0.006, p=0.001. While a significant difference between the two groups’ SDQ scores was obtained (p=0.000, no significant difference was detected between the two groups’ DES scores (p=0.392.Discussion: The results evoke the question are genitopelvic pain conditions, vaginismus and dyspareunia, that cannot be explained with a medical cause and that cause penetration disorder, a kind of dissociative symptom prone to develop in some women with childhood psychogenic trauma. Keywords: dyspareunia, sexual phobia, abuse, sexual dysfunction, intercourse, avoidance 

  11. Introduction to algorithms for managing the common trauma patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been four years since I wrote an editorial in the SAMJ[1] relating to the problems of trauma in. South Africa (SA). I was more optimistic, naïve perhaps, and looking for meaningful change. In the face of the daily carnage from road accidents and interpersonal violence, I asked, 'is 2011 the year we will stand up.

  12. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. We searched the PubMed database using the keywords "leadership" and then either "trauma" or "resuscitation" as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs

  13. Seasonality in trauma admissions - Are daylight and weather variables better predictors than general cyclic effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røislien, Jo; Søvik, Signe; Eken, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    Trauma is a leading global cause of death, and predicting the burden of trauma admissions is vital for good planning of trauma care. Seasonality in trauma admissions has been found in several studies. Seasonal fluctuations in daylight hours, temperature and weather affect social and cultural practices but also individual neuroendocrine rhythms that may ultimately modify behaviour and potentially predispose to trauma. The aim of the present study was to explore to what extent the observed seasonality in daily trauma admissions could be explained by changes in daylight and weather variables throughout the year. Retrospective registry study on trauma admissions in the 10-year period 2001-2010 at Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway, where the amount of daylight varies from less than 6 hours to almost 19 hours per day throughout the year. Daily number of admissions was analysed by fitting non-linear Poisson time series regression models, simultaneously adjusting for several layers of temporal patterns, including a non-linear long-term trend and both seasonal and weekly cyclic effects. Five daylight and weather variables were explored, including hours of daylight and amount of precipitation. Models were compared using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). A regression model including daylight and weather variables significantly outperformed a traditional seasonality model in terms of AIC. A cyclic week effect was significant in all models. Daylight and weather variables are better predictors of seasonality in daily trauma admissions than mere information on day-of-year.

  14. One-dimensional central-force problem, including radiation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasher, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    Two equal masses of equal charge magnitude (either attractive or repulsive) are held a certain distance apart for their entire past history. AT t = 0 one of them is either started from rest or given an initial velocity toward or away from the other charge. When the Dirac radiation-reaction force is included in the force equation, our Taylor-series numerical calculations lead to two types of nonphysical results for both the attractive and repulsive cases. In the attractive case, the moving charge either stops and moves back out to infinity, or violates energy conservation as it nears collision with the fixed charge. For the repulsive charges, the moving particle either eventually approaches and collides with the fixed one, or violates energy conservation as it goes out to infinity. These results lead us to conclude that the Lorentz-Dirac equation is not valid for the one-dimensional central-force problem

  15. Trauma social y memoria colectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Iglesias Saldaña

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El trauma social y la memoria colectiva, o memorias colectivas están de la mano en la América latina post-dictatorial. Desde fines de los años ochenta, se fueron destituyendo las dictaduras latinoamericanas, la mayoría sobre bases de consensos entre las fuerzas dictatoriales y los negociadores políticos de corrientes democráticas. La fuerza de los movimientos sociales sirvió de puente para las negociaciones, pero no logró estar del todo en las transacciones hacia los procesos de transición. Si así hubiera sido, la justicia y la verdad hubieran tenido un lugar privilegiado en los procesos denominados de "transición a las democracias" en distintos países del cono sur latinoamericano. La memoria colectiva ligada al trauma social tendrá varios componentes que abarcan también la memoria individual, incluyendo los espacios de la experiencia, propia y ajena. Este artículo pretende bucear en las interacciones entre ambos ámbitos de la memoria y sus conexiones con el tiempo presente.__________ABSTRACT:Social trauma and collective memory or collective memories are linked to the post-dictatorial Latin America. Since the late eighties, Latin American dictatorships were progressively dismissing, the majority on the basis of consensus between the dictatorial forces and the political mediators of the democratic part. The strength of social movements formed the bridge to negotiations, but could not entirely participate in the transactions to the transition process. If it would have been so, justice and truth would have had a special place in the process called "transition to democracy" in several Latin American Southern Cone countries. The collective memory linked to social trauma will have several components that also include individual memory, including personal and collective spaces of experience. This article aims to analyze the interactions between the two areas of memory and its connections to the present time.

  16. Emerging treatment strategies for trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, B; Fries, D

    2012-01-01

    Trauma-induced coagulopathy has a multifactorial aetiology. Coagulopathy is related to blood loss including consumption of clotting factors and platelets and haemodilution. Additionally hyperfibrinolysis, hypothermia, acidosis and metabolic changes affect the coagulation system. This is a review of pathophysiology and new treatment strategies for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Paradigms are actively changing and there is still a shortage of data. The aim of any haemostatic therapy is to control bleeding and minimize blood loss and transfusion requirements. Transfusion of allogeneic blood products as well as trauma-induced coagulopathy cause increased morbidity and mortality. Current opinion is based on present studies and results from small case series, combined with findings from experimental studies in animals, in vitro studies and expert opinions, as opposed to large, randomized, placebo-controlled studies. A summary of new and emerging strategies, including medical infusion and blood products, to beneficially manipulate the coagulation system in the critically injured patient is suggested. Future treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy may be based on systemic antifibrinolytics, local haemostatics and individualized point-of-care-guided rational use of coagulation factor concentrates such as fibrinogen, prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant factor VIIa and factor XIII. The authors speculate that timely and rational use of coagulation factor concentrates will be more efficacious and safer than ratio-driven use of transfusion packages of allogeneic blood products. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Trauma and psychological distress in dermatological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, M; Schröter, S; Friederich, H-C; Tagay, S

    2015-12-01

    Although seldom diagnosed, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has a high prevalence in primary and tertiary care. In a consecutive cross-sectional study, the prevalence of traumatic experiences and the severity of post-traumatic symptoms as well as specific characteristics of traumatized patients in the context of the dermatological treatment were examined. Standardized questionnaires for assessing general psychopathology (Brief Symptom Inventory, BSI), coping with dermatological diseases (Adjustment to Chronic Skin Diseases Questionnaire, MHF) and diagnosis of trauma (Essen Trauma-Inventory, ETI) were used in 221 patients with different skin diseases. In total, 85.1 % of the patients reported at least one potentially traumatic event in their lives, whereby psychometrically in 8.6 % of the cases the diagnostic criteria for a PTSD were met. Patients with suspected PTSD were more impacted by psychopathology, had more problems in coping with their skin diseases and attributed mental stress as having a greater influence on their skin disease than nontraumatized patients or traumatized patients without suspected PTSD. In addition, cumulative traumatization also leads to increased trauma symptomatology and greater difficulties in coping with skin diseases. The results emphasize the impact of a comorbid PTSD on a patient's ability to cope with skin diseases and underline the need for the inclusion of the differential diagnosis PTSD in dermatological treatment settings.

  18. Childhood trauma, psychosis liability and social stress reactivity : a virtual reality study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, W.; Counotte, J.; Pot-Kolder, R.; van Os, J.; van der Gaag, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Childhood trauma is associated with higher risk for mental disorders, including psychosis. Heightened sensitivity to social stress may be a mechanism. This virtual reality study tested the effect of childhood trauma on level of paranoid ideations and distress in response to social

  19. A comparison of severely injured trauma patients admitted to level 1 trauma centres in Queensland and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; Wullschleger, Martin E.; Nielsen, Susan E.; McNamee, Anitia M.; Lefering, Rolf; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan; Schuetz, Michael A.

    Background: The allocation of a trauma network in Queensland is still in the developmental phase. In a search for indicators to improve trauma care both locally as state-wide, a study was carried out comparing trauma patients in Queensland to trauma patients in Germany, a country with 82.4 million

  20. Infrastructure and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Driessen, Annemariek; Schäfer, N; Albrecht, V

    2015-01-01

    of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy, we have conducted a web-based survey amongst the delegates to the 15th European Congress of Trauma and Emergency Surgery (ECTES) and the 2nd World Trauma (WT) Congress held in Frankfurt, Germany, 25-27 May 2014. RESULTS: 446/1,540 delegates completed...... frequently used strategies for early detection and monitoring of bleeding trauma patients with coagulopathy. Only 30% of the respondents declared to use extended coagulation assays to better characterise the bleeding and coagulopathy prompted by more individualised treatment concepts. Most trauma centres (69...... intake of anticoagulants including "new oral anticoagulants" and platelet inhibitors as an increasing threat to bleeding trauma patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-haemorrhage and trauma...

  1. Education in trauma: An educational alternative that promotes injury prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Daniel Charry

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As trauma is a public health problem, different programs have been designed to prevent injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational model that measures the adolescents' attitudes towards the rules of road safety, alcohol and road accidents in Colombia. Methods: A pedagogical model evaluating the effect of road safety education and adolescents' attitudes towards and experiences of alcohol and road accidents in Colombia was created. After the education concluded, this educational process is analyzed by its impact on adolescents' behavior. The educational program included 160 adolescents with the mean age being 17.5 years. Results: The test results indicated that before the educational program 80% of adolescents did not use a safety element when driving, while after the educational program the percentage of no helmet use among adolescents decreased from 72.5% to 24.3% (p = 0.0001 and driving a vehicle under the state of drunkenness from 49.3% to 8.1% (p = 0.0001. Conclusion: An educational model aimed at preventing injuries caused by traffic accidents is shown to be effective in generating changes in adolescents' customs of and attitudes towards alcohol and road safety standards in Colombia. Keywords: Models, Educational, Trauma, Injury prevention, Alcohol

  2. Acute coagulopathy of trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R

    2010-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma predicts a poor clinical outcome. Tissue trauma activates the sympathoadrenal system resulting in high circulating levels of catecholamines that influence hemostasis dose-dependently through immediate effects on the two major compartments of hemostasis, i.......e., the circulating blood and the vascular endothelium. There appears to be a dose-dependency with regards to injury severity and the hemostatic response to trauma evaluated in whole blood by viscoelastic assays like thrombelastography (TEG), changing from normal to hypercoagulable, to hypocoagulable and finally......, is an evolutionary developed response that counterbalances the injury and catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage. Given this, the rise in circulating catecholamines in trauma patients may favor a switch from hyper- to hypocoagulability in the blood to keep the progressively more procoagulant...

  3. Head Injury-A Neglected Public Health Problem: A Four-Month ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trauma, especially head trauma, is an expanding major public health problem and the leading cause of death of the young and productive part of the world's population. Research is mainly done in high-income countries where only a small proportion of the worldwide fatalities occur. The intention of this study ...

  4. Towards a national trauma registry for the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barka Ezedin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma is a major health problem in the United Arab Emirates (UAE as well as worldwide. Trauma registries provide large longitudinal databases for analysis and policy improvement. We aim in this paper to report on the development and evolution of a national trauma registry using a staged approach by developing a single-center registry, a two-center registry, and then a multi-center registry. The three registries were established by developing suitable data collection forms, databases, and interfaces to these databases. The first two registries collected data for a finite period of time and the third is underway. The steps taken to establish these registries depend on whether the registry is intended as a single-center or multi-center registry. Findings Several issues arose and were resolved during the development of these registries such as the relational design of the database, whether to use a standalone database management system or a web-based system, and the usability and security of the system. The inclusion of preventive medicine data elements is important in a trauma registry and the focus on road traffic collision data elements is essential in a country such as the UAE. The first two registries provided valuable data which has been analyzed and published. Conclusions The main factors leading to the successful establishment of a multi-center trauma registry are the development of a concise data entry form, development of a user-friendly secure web-based database system, the availability of a computer and Internet connection in each data collection center, funded data entry personnel well trained in extracting medical data from the medical record and entering it into the computer, and experienced personnel in trauma injuries and data analysis to continuously maintain and analyze the registry.

  5. Beliefs and expectations of rural hospital practitioners towards a developing trauma system: A qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan D F; Cole, Elaine; Brundage, Susan I; Morrison, Zoe; Jansen, Jan O

    2018-03-22

    An understanding of stakeholders' views is key to the successful development and operation of a rural trauma system. Scotland, which has large remote and rural areas, is currently implementing a national trauma system. The aim of this study was to identify key barriers and enablers to the development of an effective trauma system from the perspective of rural healthcare professionals. This is a qualitative study, which was conducted in rural general hospitals (RGH) in Scotland, from April to June 2017. We used an opportunistic sampling strategy to include hospital providers of rural trauma care across the region. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, recorded, and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used to identify and group participant perspectives on key barriers and enablers to the development of the new trauma system. We conducted 15 interviews with 18 participants in six RGHs. Study participants described barriers and enablers across three themes: 1) quality of care, 2) interfaces within the system and 3) interfaces with the wider healthcare system. For quality of care, enablers included confidence in basic trauma management, whilst a perceived lack of change from current management was seen as a barrier. The theme of interfaces within the system identified good interaction with other services and a single point of contact for referral as enablers. Perceived barriers included challenges in referring to tertiary care. The final theme of interfaces with the wider healthcare system included an improved transport system, increased audit resource and coordinated clinical training as enablers. Perceived barriers included a rural staffing crisis and problematic patient transfer to further care. This study provides insight into rural professionals' perceptions regarding the implementation of a trauma system in rural Scotland. Barriers included practical issues, such as retrieval, transfer and referral processes. Importantly, there is a degree of uncertainty

  6. Tracheobronchial injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid Montazeri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheobronchial injuries are uncommon but potentially fatal complication of blunt thoracic trauma harboring a high morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed early . A recent series gleaning cases from four major Trauma Center in Los Angeles nine cases in a seven- year period , but the incidence of these injuries has been increasing recently. This has been attributed to improvement in hospital care and advanced Trauma Centers and earlier diagnosis of such injuries. Disruption of tight main bronchus is more common, such injuries are often associated with rib or clavicular fractures. Findings: Clinical and paraclinical data gathered from records of three patients referred with tracheobronchial injuries during the recent ten years have been reviewed .These include clinical manifestations, diagnostic findings, treatment modality and clinical course. The outcome has been satisfactory in all three patients who have undergone operation 2-5 hours after sustaining the injury. We have not had any mortality. Conclusion: These results are similar to those of other series emphasizing over early diagnosis and treatment of such injuries .

  7. Acute trauma-induced Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, G.; Houri, R.; Randrianasolo, S.; Gailleton, R.

    1995-01-01

    The diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome is based on clinical signs including liver enlargement and ascites and findings of complementary examinations: echography, echo-Doppler, cat scanning (CT-scan), magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, pressure readings, laparoscopy and biopsy. Trauma is rarely reported as a cause of acute Budd-Chiari syndrome. In some cases, the trauma is so violent the supra-hepatic veins are ruptured and the dramatic outcome leaves no time for the syndrome to develop. In others, the resulting haematomas form a compression block of the supra hepatic vessels. The mechanism of the trauma in our case appears to have been unreported to date. Four days after a violent motorcycle accident, a 33-year-old man developed an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome probably due to partial and temporary thrombosis of the left and middle supra hepatic veins. A side-to-side porto-cava anastomosis with a calibrated venous graft was performed in an emergency procedure. Outcome was quite favourable and after a 4 year follow-up, the patient is in good health. (authors). 13 refs

  8. Pattern of ocular trauma among primary school pupils in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanniyi, A A; Mahmoud, O A; Olatunji, F O; Ayanniyi, R O

    2009-06-01

    To report the pattern of ocular trauma among school pupils in Ilorin, Nigeria, a cross sectional survey of primary school children in 10 randomly selected primary schools within Ilorin, Nigeria was carried out between July 2005 and January 2006. Relevant ocular history and basic ocular examinations were carried out on the children that were selected from a multi-stage sampling process. Diagnosis of ocular trauma was based on historical recollection together with corroborating ocular signs among affected pupils. Ocular trauma was found among 11 (8 boys and 3 girls) out of 1393 (0.8%) pupils and their ages ranged from 5 to 13 years. The trauma related ocular pathology found among the 11 pupils included unilateral phthisis bulbi (2, 0.14%), couching (1, 0.07%) and retinal detachment (1, 0.07%) all leading to blindness in the affected eyes. There was also a unilateral visual impairment caused by traumatic optic atrophy. Others included eyelid bruises (2, 0.14%) and one pupil (0.07%) each with hyphema, eyelid ecchymosis, eyelid laceration, and subconjunctival haemorrhage. The ocular trauma occurred following unsupervised play (4, 36.40%), corporal punishment at school and at home (3, 27.30%), fight (2, 18.20%), home accident (1, 9.10%) and couching (1, 9.10%). School pupils can lose vision to preventable traumatic eye injuries both at school and at home. Measures to minimize ocular trauma both in the home and at school are advocated.

  9. Are routine pelvic radiographs in major pediatric blunt trauma necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Jyothi; Slovis, Thomas; Thomas, Ronald; Knazik, Stephen; Stankovic, Curt

    2012-07-01

    Screening pelvic radiographs to rule out pelvic fractures are routinely used for the initial evaluation of pediatric blunt trauma. Recently, the utility of routine pelvic radiographs in certain subsets of patients with blunt trauma has been questioned. There is a growing amount of evidence that shows the clinical exam is reliable enough to obviate the need for routine screening pelvic radiographs in children. To identify variables that help predict the presence or absence of pelvic fractures in pediatric blunt trauma. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2005 to January 2010 using the trauma registry at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. We analyzed all level 1 and level 2 trauma victims, evaluating history, exam and mechanism of injury for association with the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture. Of 553 level 1 and 2 trauma patients who presented during the study period, 504 were included in the study. Most of these children, 486/504 (96.4%), showed no evidence of a pelvic fracture while 18/504 (3.6%) had a pelvic fracture. No factors were found to be predictive of a pelvic fracture. However, we developed a pelvic fracture screening tool that accurately rules out the presence of a pelvic fracture P = 0.008, NPV 99, sensitivity 96, 8.98 (1.52-52.8). This screening tool combines eight high-risk clinical findings (pelvic tenderness, laceration, ecchymosis, abrasion, GCS blunt trauma can reliably be ruled out by using our pelvic trauma screening tool. Although no findings accurately identified the presence of a pelvic fracture, the screening tool accurately identified the absence of a fracture, suggesting that pelvic radiographs are not warranted in this subset of patients.

  10. Effectiveness of prehospital trauma triage systems in selecting severely injured patients: Is comparative analysis possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Eveline A J; van der Sluijs, Rogier; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2018-01-27

    In an optimal trauma system, prehospital trauma triage ensures transport of the right patient to the right hospital. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate and compare prehospital trauma triage system quality worldwide and determine effectiveness in terms of undertriage and overtriage for trauma patients. A systematic search of Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed, using "trauma", "trauma center," or "trauma system", combined with "triage", "undertriage," or "overtriage", as search terms. All studies describing ground transport and actual destination hospital of patients with and without severe injuries, using prehospital triage, published before November 2017, were eligible for inclusion. To assess the quality of these studies, a critical appraisal tool was developed. A total of 33 articles were included. The percentage of undertriage ranged from 1% to 68%; overtriage from 5% to 99%. Older age and increased geographical distance were associated with undertriage. Mortality was lower for severely injured patients transferred to a higher-level trauma center. The majority of the included studies were of poor methodological quality. The studies of good quality showed poor performance of the triage protocol, but additional value of EMS provider judgment in the identification of severely injured patients. In most of the evaluated trauma systems, a substantial part of the severely injured patients is not transported to the appropriate level trauma center. Future research should come up with new innovative ways to improve the quality of prehospital triage in trauma patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. An in-situ simulation-based educational outreach project for pediatric trauma care in a rural trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayouth, Lilly; Ashley, Sarah; Brady, Jackie; Lake, Bryan; Keeter, Morgan; Schiller, David; Robey, Walter C; Charles, Stephen; Beasley, Kari M; Toschlog, Eric A; Longshore, Shannon W

    2018-02-01

    Outcome disparities between urban and rural pediatric trauma patients persist, despite regionalization of trauma systems. Rural patients are initially transported to the nearest emergency department (ED), where pediatric care is infrequent. We aim to identify educational intervention targets and increase provider experience via pediatric trauma simulation. Prospective study of simulation-based pediatric trauma resuscitation was performed at three community EDs. Level one trauma center providers facilitated simulations, providing educational feedback. Provider performance comfort and skill with tasks essential to initial trauma care were assessed, comparing pre-/postsimulations. Primary outcomes were: 1) improved comfort performing skills, and 2) team performance during resuscitation. Provider comfort with the following improved (p-values education improves provider comfort and performance. Comparison of patient outcomes to evaluate improvement in pediatric trauma care is warranted. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. What Are the Costs of Trauma Center Readiness? Defining and Standardizing Readiness Costs for Trauma Centers Statewide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Dennis W; Mullins, Robert F; Dente, Christopher J; Garlow, Laura; Medeiros, Regina S; Atkins, Elizabeth V; Solomon, Gina; Abston, Dena; Ferdinand, Colville H

    2017-09-01

    Trauma center readiness costs are incurred to maintain essential infrastructure and capacity to provide emergent services on a 24/7 basis. These costs are not captured by traditional hospital cost accounting, and no national consensus exists on appropriate definitions for each cost. Therefore, in 2010, stakeholders from all Level I and II trauma centers developed a survey tool standardizing and defining trauma center readiness costs. The survey tool underwent minor revisions to provide further clarity, and the survey was repeated in 2013. The purpose of this study was to provide a follow-up analysis of readiness costs for Georgia's Level I and Level II trauma centers. Using the American College of Surgeons Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient guidelines, four readiness cost categories were identified: Administrative, Clinical Medical Staff, Operating Room, and Education/Outreach. Through conference calls, webinars and face-to-face meetings with financial officers, trauma medical directors, and program managers from all trauma centers, standardized definitions for reporting readiness costs within each category were developed. This resulted in a survey tool for centers to report their individual readiness costs for one year. The total readiness cost for all Level I trauma centers was $34,105,318 (avg $6,821,064) and all Level II trauma centers was $20,998,019 (avg $2,333,113). Methodology to standardize and define readiness costs for all trauma centers within the state was developed. Average costs for Level I and Level II trauma centers were identified. This model may be used to help other states define and standardize their trauma readiness costs.

  13. Curcumin protects against acoustic trauma in the rat cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyalıç, Harun; Gevrek, Fikret; Karaman, Serhat

    2017-08-01

    In this study we evaluated the therapeutic utility of curcumin in a rodent model of acoustic trauma using histopathology, immunohistochemical, and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAEs) measurements. 28 Wistar albino rats were included in the study and randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. The first group (group 1) served as the control and was exposed to acoustic trauma alone. Group 2 was the curcumin group. Group 3 was the curcumin plus acoustic trauma group. Group 4 was the saline plus acoustic trauma group. Otoacoustic emission measurements were collected at the end of the experiment and all animals were sacrificed. Cochlea were collected and prepared for TUNEL (TdT-mediated deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick end-labelling) staining assay. Group 3 maintained baseline DPOAEs values at 3000 Hz, 4000 Hz and 8000 Hz on the 3rd and 5th day of the experiment. DPOAEs results were correlated with the immunohistochemical and histopathological findings in all groups. In comparison to the histopathologic control group, Group 1 exhibited a statistically significant increase in apoptotic indices in the organ of Corti, inner hair cell, and outer hair cell areas (p curcumin may protect the cochlear tissues from acoustic trauma in rats. Curcumin injection prior to or after an acoustic trauma reduces cochlear hair cell damage and may protect against hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Occult pneumothorax in trauma patients: should this be sought in the focused assessment with sonography for trauma examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Michael M K

    2005-01-01

    At present, CT scan is the gold standard for detecting occult traumatic pneumothorax not apparent on supine chest X-ray radiograph. Recently there were suggestions to expand focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) to include thoracic ultrasound for detecting pneumothorax. The aim of the present study is to determine the incidence of occult pneumothorax (as shown by CT) in the subgroup of trauma patients undergoing FAST. Review of all trauma patients with FAST done from 1 June 2001 to 31 October 2002. Incidence of occult pneumothorax as diagnosed by CT was determined. Patients were not counted as having true occult pneumothorax if they had chest drains inserted before arrival or imaging studies. Selected clinical findings were tested for association with occult pneumothorax. In total, 143 patients underwent FAST, of whom 137 (95.8%) had chest X-ray examination performed. Of the 137 patients 59 required CT abdomen and/or thorax. Occult pneumothorax was found in three patients (2.1%). A history of thorax and/or abdominal injury plus one or more of: (i) mechanisms potentially causing major trauma; (ii) abnormal chest examination; and (iii) chest X-ray radiograph abnormality in the absence of pneumothorax, was significantly associated with the presence of occult pneumothorax (P = 0.03, Fisher's exact test; sensitivity: 100%; specificity: 71%; likelihood ratio: 3.42). The incidence of occult pneumothorax in the subgroup of trauma patients undergoing FAST is low. It implies that routine screening for its presence by adding thoracic ultrasound to FAST is unnecessary. Identifying those at risk of occult pneumothorax for further investigation appeared feasible.

  15. [Girls detained under civil and criminal law in juvenile detention centres; psychiatric disorders, trauma and psychosocial problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerlynck, S M J J; Doreleijers, Th A H; Vermeiren, R R J M; Cohen-Kettenis, P T

    2009-01-01

    As from 2008, juveniles sentenced under civil law and juveniles sentenced under criminal law can no longer be assigned to the same juvenile detention centres. The reasoning runs as follows: the centres are unlikely to provide adequate treatment for the 'civil' group, and the 'criminal' group may exert a negative influence on the 'civil' group. Hitherto, there has been no research into the question of whether the problems and treatment requirements of girls in the two categories call for detention in the same detention centres or in different ones. The aim of this study is to investigate differences between the two groups of girls with regard to offence history, sociodemographic characteristics, contact with the social services, psychiatric disorders and trauma. Investigation of a representative sample of 211 female minors in three juvenile detention centres using standard instruments. results 82% of the girls were detained under civil law, 18% under criminal law. There were strong similarities between the groups. However, the 'criminal' group more often had a violent history of delinquency and a non-Dutch background, whereas the 'civil' group more often had a background of residential placements, oppositional-defiant disorder, suicidality and self-harm. Girls detained under civil and under criminal law differed in characteristics such as criminal record, but there were striking similarities in the girls' behavioural problems and psychiatric disorders. It is argued that assignment to a particular type of detention centre should depend on treatment requirements rather than on measures imposed by civil or criminal law.

  16. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  17. The prevalence and impact of trauma history in eating disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Backholm

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early experiences of traumatic events (TEs may be associated with subsequent eating disturbance. However, few studies have investigated overall exposure and trauma-type frequency in various types of eating disorders (EDs. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and type of TEs in a nationally representative sample of Swedish ED patients. Method: Data from a database (Stepwise for specialized ED care were used. Trauma history was assessed as a part of the routine, initial assessment. Participants over the age of 18 with a diagnosed DSM-IV ED were included (N=4,524. Results: The number of patients having experienced at least one TE was 843 (18.6%, and 204 (24.2% reported at least one additional trauma. Sexual trauma was the most common form of TE (6.3%. There was no difference in overall traumatic exposure or in type of experienced trauma between the ED diagnostic subgroups (AN, BN, EDNOS, and BED. Overall traumatic exposure was linked to self-reported severity of ED symptoms, more secondary psychosocial impairment, psychiatric comorbidity, and negative self-image. Conclusions: Trauma history in ED patients merits attention. Results are partly in line with and partly in contrast to previous research. Measurement of trauma history has varied substantially in research on EDs, and this study adds to the indistinct literature on trauma history in ED.

  18. Development of statewide geriatric patients trauma triage criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werman, Howard A; Erskine, Timothy; Caterino, Jeffrey; Riebe, Jane F; Valasek, Tricia

    2011-06-01

    The geriatric population is unique in the type of traumatic injuries sustained, physiological responses to those injuries, and an overall higher mortality when compared to younger adults. No published, evidence-based, geriatric-specific field destination criteria exist as part of a statewide trauma system. The Trauma Committee of the Ohio Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Board sought to develop specific criteria for geriatric trauma victims. A literature search was conducted for all relevant literature to determine potential, geriatric-specific, field-destination criteria. Data from the Ohio Trauma Registry were used to compare elderly patients, defined as age >70 years, to all patients between the ages of 16 to 69 years with regards to mortality risk in the following areas: (1) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score; (2) systolic blood pressure (SBP); (3) falls associated with head, chest, abdominal or spinal injury; (4) mechanism of injury; (5) involvement of more than one body system as defined in the Barell matrix; and (6) co-morbidities and motor vehicle collision with one or more long bone fracture. For GCS score and SBP, those cut-off points with equal or greater risk of mortality as compared to current values were chosen as proposed triage criteria. For other measures, any criterion demonstrating a statistically significant increase in mortality risk was included in the proposed criteria. The following criteria were identified as geriatric-specific criteria: (1) GCS score trauma; (2) SBP trauma. In addition, these data suggested that elderly patients with specific co-morbidities be given strong consideration for evaluation in a trauma center. The state of Ohio is the first state to develop evidence-based geriatric-specific field-destination criteria using data from its state-mandated trauma registry. Further analysis of these criteria will help determine their effects on over-triage and under-triage of geriatric victims of traumatic injuries and the impact on the

  19. O trauma na obra de Freud: ramificações conceituais e consequências clínicas

    OpenAIRE

    Marina de Andrade Vahle

    2012-01-01

    Nossa proposta consiste em realizar uma investigação teórica em torno do conceito de trauma na obra freudiana, assim como das problemáticas a que responde. Objetivamos pesquisar se a teoria do trauma teria de fato desaparecido no período situado entre o abandono da teoria da sedução e os construtos de 1920, como defendem alguns autores na literatura psicanalítica. Nossa hipótese é que a noção de trauma teria continuado a sustentar a teoria freudiana do sofrimento psíquico, não só por meio de ...

  20. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    OBJETIVO: avaliar os aspectos epidemiológicos, conduta, morbidade e resultados do tratamento trauma hepático. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo de doentes com mais de 13 anos de idade admitidos em um hospital universitário de 1990 a 2010, submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico ou não operatório (TNO). RESULTADOS: foram admitidos 748 pacientes com trauma hepático. O mecanismo de trauma mais frequente foi o trauma penetrante (461 casos; 61,6%). O trauma fechado ocorreu em 287 pacientes (38,4%). De acor...

  1. Comparing premodern melancholy/mania and modern trauma: an argument in favor of historical experiences of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembinski, Donna

    2011-02-01

    Historians and psychiatrists have repeatedly looked to both real and imagined individuals of the past, like Achilles and Samuel Pepys, and found evidence that they were suffering from symptoms of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder. The assumptions that allow such historical "diagnoses" have, however, recently been called into question by philosophers such as lan Hacking, anthropologists like Allan Young and psychiatrists such as Patrick Bracken. These scholars have all suggested in various ways that experiences of trauma could not have occurred until the diagnosis of trauma and its symptoms had been formalized and the language of trauma had been developed in the late 19th century. This article attempts to resolve this bifurcation of opinion on the universality of the mind and historical experiences of trauma in two ways. First, it argues for the necessity of applying modern categories of analysis to further present understandings of the past. Second, it considers discussions of"melancholia" and "mania" in premodern medical literature and argues that there are enough similarities between the causes and symptoms of these premodern disorders and modern trauma to suggest that experiences of trauma may not be wholly culturally bound to the modern world, as the above scholars have suggested. While melancholy or mania cannot simply be understood as premodern names for trauma, and it is not always correct to "diagnose" a premodern person who exhibits symptoms of these illnesses with trauma, such an assumption is not always ahistorical or incorrect either.

  2. Early trauma, attachment experiences and comorbidities in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Gabínio

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate attachment patterns in subjects with schizophrenia and their relationships to early traumatic events, psychotic symptoms and comorbidities. Methods Twenty patients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5 underwent retrospective symptom assessment and careful assessment of the number and manner of childhood caregiver changes. The Diagnostic Interview for Psychosis and Affective Disorders (DI-PAD was used to assess symptoms related to schizophrenia (positive and negative symptoms, depression and mania. Anxiety disorder comorbidities were assessed by the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS, Yale-Brown Obsessions and Compulsions Scale (Y-BOCS and Panic and Schizophrenia Interview (PaSI. Experience in Close Relationships – Relationship Structures (ECR-RS and Early Trauma Inventory Self Report-Short Form (ETISR-SF were used to assess attachment patterns and traumatic history, respectively. Results Moderate and significant correlations between attachment patterns and early trauma showed that greater severity of anxious attachment was predicted by a higher frequency of total early traumas (Spearman ρ = 0.446, p = 0.04, mainly general traumas (ρ = 0.526, p = 0.017; including parental illness and separation, as well as natural disaster and serious accidents. Among the correlations between early trauma and comorbid symptoms, panic attacks occurring before the onset of schizophrenia showed significant and positive correlations with ETISR-SF total scores and the sexual trauma subscale. Conclusion Children with an unstable early emotional life are more vulnerable to the development of psychopathology, such as panic anxiety symptoms. Traumatic events may also predict later schizophrenia.

  3. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book bridges the communication gap, between the radiologist and the orthopedic surgeon in regard to trauma. It also combines ease of use with authoritative information, and includes in each discussion a review of the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, and radiology and orthopedic classification

  4. Social problem solving strategies and posttraumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Catherine M; Blackwell, Náthali; Simmons, Catherine A; Beck, J Gayle

    2015-05-01

    Social factors are often associated with the development or maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of interpersonal traumas. However, social problem solving strategies have received little attention. The current study explored the role of social problem solving styles (i.e., rational approaches, impulsive/careless strategies, or avoidance strategies) as intermediary variables between abuse exposure and PTSD severity among intimate partner violence survivors. Avoidance problem solving served as an intermediating variable for the relationship between three types of abuse and PTSD severity. Rational and impulsive/careless strategies were not associated with abuse exposure. These findings extend the current understanding of social problem solving among interpersonal trauma survivors and are consistent with more general avoidance coping research. Future research might examine whether avoidance problem solving tends to evolve in the aftermath of trauma or whether it represents a longstanding risk factor for PTSD development. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The management of colonic trauma in the damage control era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazi, B; Bruce, J L; Laing, G L; Sartorius, B; Clarke, D L

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of this study was to audit our current management of colonic trauma, and to review our experience of colonic trauma in patients who underwent initial damage control (DC) surgery. METHODS All patients treated for colonic trauma between January 2012 and December 2014 by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service were included in the study. Data reviewed included mechanism of injury, method of management (primary repair [PR], primary diversion [PD] or DC) and outcome (complications and mortality rate). Results A total of 128 patients sustained a colonic injury during the study period. Ninety-seven per cent of the injuries were due to penetrating trauma. Of these cases, 56% comprised stab wounds (SWs) and 44% were gunshot wounds (GSWs). Management was by PR in 99, PD in 20 and DC surgery in 9 cases. Among the 69 SW victims, 57 underwent PR, 9 had PD and 3 required a DC procedure. Of the 55 GSW cases, 40 were managed with PR, 9 with PD and 6 with DC surgery. In the PR group, there were 16 colonic complications (5 cases of breakdown and 11 of wound sepsis). Overall, nine patients (7%) died. CONCLUSIONS PR of colonic trauma is safe and should be used for the majority of such injuries. Persistent acidosis, however, should be considered a contraindication. In unstable patients with complex injuries, the optimal approach is to perform DC surgery. In this situation, formal diversion is contraindicated, and the injury should be controlled and dropped back into the abdomen at the primary operation. At the repeat operation, if the physiological insult has been reversed, then formal repair of the colonic injury is acceptable.

  6. Interpersonal trauma moderates the relationship between personality factors and suicidality of individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yongjoon; Park, Hyeon-Ju; Park, Soowon; Cho, Maeng Je; Cho, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ji Yeon; Choi, Soo-Hee; Lee, Jun-Young

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more prone to suicidal ideation and behavior. While those who have experienced interpersonal trauma exhibit more suicidality than those who have experienced non-interpersonal trauma, it is unclear how the traumatic effects are related to an individual's personality characteristics. This study examined the association between interpersonal trauma and personality factors with suicidality, and elucidated the moderating role of interpersonal trauma in individuals with PTSD. The study included 6,022 participants from the Korean Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study 2011. The Korean Version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used for the survey, including the participants' history of suicidality, the traumas they have experienced, and their PTSD symptoms. The 11-item version of the Big Five Inventory (BFI-11) was used to assess the participants' personality factors. 76 individuals were diagnosed with PTSD, while 810 had been exposed to trauma but were not diagnosed with any DSM-IV mental disorder. Among the individuals with PTSD, those who had experienced interpersonal trauma were more likely to have suicidal ideation than those who had experienced non-interpersonal trauma (p = .020; odds ratio [OR] = 3.643; 95% confidence interval of OR = [1.226, 10.825]). High agreeableness and conscientiousness predicted less suicidality in those exposed to non-interpersonal trauma, while predicting more suicidality in those exposed to interpersonal trauma. Clinicians examining individuals with PTSD should pay closer attention to the trauma that they have experienced, as well as their personality factors, to provide appropriate treatment.

  7. [Screening for psychiatric risk factors in a facial trauma patients. Validating a questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletti, J M; Bruneau, S; Farisse, J; Thiery, G; Chossegros, C; Guyot, L

    2014-12-01

    We recorded similarities between patients managed in the psychiatry department and in the maxillo-facial surgical unit. Our hypothesis was that some psychiatric conditions act as risk factors for facial trauma. We had for aim to test our hypothesis and to validate a simple and efficient questionnaire to identify these psychiatric disorders. Fifty-eight consenting patients with facial trauma, recruited prospectively in the 3 maxillo-facial surgery departments of the Marseille area during 3 months (December 2012-March 2013) completed a self-questionnaire based on the French version of 3 validated screening tests (Self Reported Psychopathy test, Rapid Alcohol Problem Screening test quantity-frequency, and Personal Health Questionnaire). This preliminary study confirmed that psychiatric conditions detected by our questionnaire, namely alcohol abuse and dependence, substance abuse, and depression, were risk factors for facial trauma. Maxillo-facial surgeons are often unaware of psychiatric disorders that may be the cause of facial trauma. The self-screening test we propose allows documenting the psychiatric history of patients and implementing earlier psychiatric care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute and overuse elbow trauma: radio-orthopaedics overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Elisabetta Antonia; Cucchi, Davide; Arrigoni, Paolo; Brioschi, Marco; Fusi, Cristiano; Genovese, Eugenio A; Messina, Carmelo; Randelli, Pietro; Masciocchi, Carlo; Aliprandi, Alberto

    2018-01-19

    The correct management of acute, subacute and overuse-related elbow pathologies represents a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problem. While major trauma frequently requires a rapid surgical intervention, subluxation and minor trauma allow taking more time for diagnostics and planning the correct elective treatment after careful clinical and radiological investigation. In these conditions, communication between orthopaedic surgeon and radiologist allow to create a detailed radiology report, tailored to the patient's and surgeon's needs and optimal to plan proper management. Imaging technique as X-Ray, CT, US, MRI, CTA and MRA all belong to the radiologist's portfolio in elbow diagnostics. Detailed knowledge of elbow pathology and its classification and of the possibilities and limits of each imaging technique is of crucial importance to reach the correct diagnosis efficiently. The aim of this review is to present the most frequent elbow pathologies and suggest a suitable diagnostic approach for each of them.

  9. Psychological Distress After Orthopedic Trauma: Prevalence in Patients and Implications for Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Heather K; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Vincent, Kevin R; Brisbane, Sonya T; Sadasivan, Kalia K

    2015-09-01

    Orthopedic trauma is an unforeseen life-changing event. Serious injuries include multiple fractures and amputation. Physical rehabilitation has traditionally focused on addressing functional deficits after traumatic injury, but important psychological factors also can dramatically affect acute and long-term recovery. This review presents the effects of orthopedic trauma on psychological distress, potential interventions for distress reduction after trauma, and implications for participation in rehabilitation. Survivors commonly experience post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and anxiety, all of which interfere with functional gains and quality of life. More than 50% of survivors have psychological distress that can last decades after the physical injury has been treated. Early identification of patients with distress can help care teams provide the resources and support to offset the distress. Several options that help trauma patients navigate their short-term recovery include holistic approaches, pastoral care, coping skills, mindfulness, peer visitation, and educational resources. The long-term physical and mental health of the trauma survivor can be enhanced by strategies that connect the survivor to a network of people with similar experiences or injuries, facilitate support groups, and social support networking (The Trauma Survivors Network). Rehabilitation specialists can help optimize patient outcomes and quality of life by participating in and advocating these strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Boltuc

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The work presents the assessment of the results of treatment of open tibial shaft fractures in polytrauma patients. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 28 patients who underwent surgical treatment of open fractures of the tibial shaft with locked intramedullary nailing. The mean age of the patients was 43 years (range from 19 to 64 years. The criterion for including the patients in the study was concomitant multiple trauma. For the assessment of open tibial fractures, Gustilo classification was used. The most common concomitant multiple trauma included craniocerebral injuries, which were diagnosed in 12 patients. In 14 patients, the surgery was performed within 24 h after the injury. In 14 patients, the surgery was delayed and was performed 8-10 days after the trauma. Results: The assessment of the results at 12 months after the surgery included the following features: time span between the trauma and the surgery and complications in the form of osteomyelitis and delayed union. The efficacy of gait, muscular atrophy, edema of the operated limb and possible disturbances of its axis were also taken under consideration. In patients operated emergently within 24 h after the injury, infected nonunion was observed in three (10.8% males. These patients had grade III open fractures of the tibial shaft according to Gustilo classification. No infectious complications were observed in patients who underwent a delayed operation. Conclusion: Evaluation of patients with open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma showed that delayed intramedullary nailing performed 8-10 days after the trauma, resulted in good outcome and avoided development of delayed union and infected nonunion. This approach gives time for stabilization of general condition of the patient and identification of pathogens from wound culture.

  11. Profile of ocular trauma in industries-related hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikala, P; Sadiqulla, Mohammed; Shivakumar, D; Prakash, K H

    2013-05-01

    Ocular trauma is a worldwide cause of visual morbidity, a significant proportion of which occurs in the industrial workplace and includes a spectrum of simple ocular surface foreign bodies, abrasions to devastating perforating injuries causing blindness. Being preventable is of social and medical concern. A prospective case series study, to know the profile of ocular trauma at a hospital caters exclusively to factory employees and their families, to co-relate their demographic and clinical profile and to identify the risk factors. Patients with ocular trauma who presented at ESIC Model hospital, Rajajinagar, Bangalore, from June 2010 to May 2011 were taken a detailed demographic data, nature and cause of injury, time interval between the time of injury and presentation along with any treatment received. Ocular evaluation including visual acuity, anterior and posterior segment findings, intra-ocular pressure and gonio-scopy in closed globe injuries, X-rays for intraocular foreign body, B-scan and CT scan were done. Data analyzed as per the ocular trauma classification group. The rehabilitation undertaken medically or surgically was analyzed. At follow-up, the final best corrected visual acuity was noted. A total of 306 cases of ocular trauma were reported; predominantly in 20-40 year age group (72.2%) and in men (75%). The work place related cases were 50.7%and of these, fall of foreign bodies led the list. Visual prognosis was poorer in road traffic accidents rather than work place injuries owing to higher occurrence of open globe injuries and optic neuropathy. Finally, 11% of injured cases ended up with poor vision. Targeting groups most at risk, providing effective eye protection, and developing workplace safety cultures may together reduce occupational eye injuries.

  12. Ventricular septal necrosis after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ahmadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD after blunt chest trauma is a very rare traumatic affection.We report here a case of blunt chest injury-related VSD and pseudoaneurysm.A 30-year old male truck driver was referred from a trauma center to our hospital seven days after a blunt chest trauma and rib fracture. The patient had severe pulmonary edemaand echocardiography showed large VSD. Several mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of this affection including an acute compression of the heart muscle between the sternum and the spine, leading to excessive changes in the intrathoracic and most likely theintracardiac pressure after blunt chest injury. Traumatical patients with the same symptoms may be at risk of sudden death. Therefore, a high grade of suspicion is mandatory even without solid evidence of myocardial damage on the initial evaluation. In continue somehidden angles of this case was discussed. Given the prognostic implications of traumatic VSD with associated pseudoaneurysm, its detection has critical value for preventing its clinicalsequelae.

  13. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Sullivan, Ashley N. [St. George' s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies (Grenada); Bloom, David A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  14. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H.; Sullivan, Ashley N.; Bloom, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  15. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, D.; Babyn, P.S.; Palder, S.; Bergmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  16. Radiation dose from initial trauma assessment and resuscitation: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Catherine M; MacGregor, John H; Tien, Homer C; Kortbeek, John B

    2009-04-01

    Trauma care benefits from the use of imaging technologies. Trauma patients and trauma team members are exposed to radiation during the continuum of care. Knowledge of exposure amounts and effects are important for trauma team members. We performed a review of the published literature; keywords included "trauma," "patients," "trauma team members," "wounds," "injuries," "radiation," "exposure," "dose" and "computed tomography" (CT). We also reviewed the Board on Radiation Effects Research (BEIR VII) report, published in 2005 and 2006. We found no randomized controlled trials or studies. Relevant studies demonstrated that CT accounts for the single largest radiation exposure in trauma patients. Exposure to 100 mSv could result in a solid organ cancer or leukemia in 1 of 100 people. Trauma team members do not exceed the acceptable occupation radiation exposure determined by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Management. Modern imaging technologies such as 16- and 64-slice CT scanners may decrease radiation exposure. Multiple injured trauma patients receive a substantial dose of radiation. Radiation exposure is cumulative. The low individual risk of cancer becomes a greater public health issue when multiplied by a large number of examinations. Though CT scans are an invaluable resource and are becoming more easily accessible, they should not replace careful clinical examination and should be used only in appropriate patients.

  17. Pitfalls in penetrating thoracic trauma (lessons we learned the hard way...).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiannis, Elias; Zinn, Richard Joseph

    2008-10-01

    The majority of patients with penetrating thoracic trauma are managed non-operatively. Those requiring surgery usually go to theater with physiological instability. The critical condition of these patients coupled with the rarity of penetrating thoracic trauma in most European countries makes their surgical management challenging for the occasional trauma surgeon, who is usually trained as a general surgeon. Most general surgeons have a general knowledge of basic cardiothoracic operative surgery, knowledge originating from their training years and possibly enhanced by reading operative surgery textbooks. Unfortunately, the details included in most of these books are not extensive enough to provide him with enough armamentaria to tackle the difficult case. In this anatomical region, their operative dexterity and knowledge cannot be compared to that of their cardiothoracic colleagues, something that is taken for granted in their cardiothoracic trauma textbooks. Techniques that are considered basic and easy by the cardiothoracic surgeons can be unfamiliar and difficult to general surgeons. Knowing the danger points and the pitfalls that will be encountered in cardiothoracic trauma surgery will help them to avoid intraoperative errors and improve patient outcome. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight the commonly encountered pitfalls by trauma surgeons operating on penetrating trauma to the chest.

  18. Frequency of operative trauma to anal sphincters: evaluation with endoanal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiadis, Apostolos; Konstantinou, Evangelos; Theodosopoulou, Eleni; Mamoura, Konstantinia

    2002-01-01

    Sphincter trauma after anorectal surgery is usually asymptomatic. Frequency of trauma cannot be established with the clinical examination only. The frequency of operative sphincter defects and their correlation with disorders of continence was evaluated with the endoanal ultrasound. This study includes 123 subjects who had undergone anorectal surgery in the past and were examined with endoanal ultrasound for various indications such as continence disorders, recurrent fistula, idiopathic perineal pain, or simple postoperative follow-up. No subjects had isolated external anal sphincter defects. Nineteen of 123 patients (15%) had minor or major continence disorders, 55 patients (45%) had no sphincter defects, 42 (34%) had only internal anal sphincter (IAS) defects, and 26 (21%) had simultaneously external and internal anal sphincter (EAS) defects. The incidence of IAS and EAS trauma after Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy was 1/18 (5.5%) and 0/18 respectively; after fistula repair, 24/42 (57%) and 12/42 (29%); and after anal dilatation, 13/17 (76%) and 4/17 (24%). Sixteen of 26 patients (62%) with EAS trauma and 51/68 patients (75%) with IAS trauma did not report any disorders of continence. In patients with two or more operations, the frequency of IAS trauma was 74%, 30% for EAS trauma, and 26% for continence disorders.

  19. Prevalence and relief of pain in trauma patients in Emergency Medical Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Schoonhoven; T. Meijs; Sivera Berben; A. van Vugt; P. van Grunsven

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to give insight in the prevalence of pain, and the (effect of) pain management according to the national emergency medical services analgesia protocol in trauma patients in the Netherlands. The retrospective document study included adult and alert trauma patients. Data

  20. Management and outcome of patients with pancreatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Pal Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pancreatic trauma is a rare entity occurring in 0.2% of patients with blunt trauma abdomen. Once the diagnosis is made, the management of patients is dependent on multiple variables. Conservative management, suture repair, drainage, and resection have been utilized with varying degree of success. This study is aimed to evaluate the management of patients with pancreatic trauma. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study done in the Department of Surgery in Dayanand Medical College and Hospital where forty hemodynamically stable patients diagnosed to have pancreatic trauma on contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen were included in the study. Results: Out of forty patients taken in this study, 38 were male and two were female with age ranging from 3 to 50 years. Road traffic accident was the most common cause of pancreatic injury. Pancreatic injuries were graded according to the American Association for Surgery in Trauma scale. Twelve patients had Grade I and II injuries. Grade III was the most common injury occurring in 14 patients. Twenty-four patients underwent surgical management. Mortality rate was 45% and it was in direct correlation with the severity of injury. Conclusion: Grade I and II pancreatic injury can be managed conservatively depending upon the hemodynamic status of the patient. Grade III and IV injuries have a better prognosis if managed surgically.

  1. Updated concepts on the pathophysiology and the clinical management of trauma hemorrhage and coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Maegele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hemorrhage and subsequent trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC are still the principle causes for preventable death after trauma and early detection and aggressive management have been associated with reduced mortality. Despite increasing knowledge about trauma resuscitation, best practice to treat this newly defined entity is still under debate. A synopsis of best current knowledge with reference to the updated European trauma guideline on the management of severe trauma hemorrhage and TIC is presented. The implementation of evidence-based local protocols and algorithms including clinical quality and safety management systems together with parameters to assess key measures of bleeding control and outcome is advocated.

  2. Does the minor trauma during pregnancy have any effect on perinatal outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Yerebasmaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Women having major trauma during pregnancy are at increased risk for both maternal and fetal morbidity. However, the association between minor trauma and adverse perinatal outcomes is still unknown. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the incidence of minor trauma in pregnancy and effect on the outcomes of pregnancy. Methods: The data of patients, who were admitted to the emergency service of Etlik Zübeyde Hanım Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital between January 2013 and December 2014, were evaluated. A total of 283 patients (0.3%, who had minor trauma during pregnancy, were included in the study. Demographic and obstetric data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Additionally, antenatal complications and pregnancy outcomes were evaluated in 188 patients, who were followed during pregnancy and delivered their babies at our hospital Results: During the study period, of 105,727 women who were admitted to the emergency service of our hospital, 283 (0.3% had minor trauma during pregnancy. The causes of minor trauma, in order of frequency, included home accidents (81.3%, domestic violence (9.9% and traffic accidents (8.8%. Preterm delivery has been the most frequently antenatal complication observed in these patients (15.4%. Conclusion: Home accidents and domestic violence are the most common causes of minor trauma during pregnancy, and the patients are particularly at risk during the second trimester. The patients must be cautioned regarding the risk of preterm delivery and advised to attend regular pregnancy follow-up visits due to the fact that these patients have a higher risk of preterm delivery.

  3. Is there Complex Trauma Experience typology for Australian's experiencing extreme social disadvantage and low housing stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Carol A; Magee, Christopher A; Kelly, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic childhood experiences predict many adverse outcomes in adulthood including Complex-PTSD. Understanding complex trauma within socially disadvantaged populations has important implications for policy development and intervention implementation. This paper examined the nature of complex trauma experienced by disadvantaged individuals using a latent class analysis (LCA) approach. Data were collected through the large-scale Journeys Home Study (N=1682), utilising a representative sample of individuals experiencing low housing stability. Data on adverse childhood experiences, adulthood interpersonal trauma and relevant covariates were collected through interviews at baseline (Wave 1). Latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify distinct classes of childhood trauma history, which included physical assault, neglect, and sexual abuse. Multinomial logistic regression investigated childhood relevant factors associated with class membership such as biological relationship of primary carer at age 14 years and number of times in foster care. Of the total sample (N=1682), 99% reported traumatic adverse childhood experiences. The most common included witnessing of violence, threat/experience of physical abuse, and sexual assault. LCA identified six distinct childhood trauma history classes including high violence and multiple traumas. Significant covariate differences between classes included: gender, biological relationship of primary carer at age 14 years, and time in foster care. Identification of six distinct childhood trauma history profiles suggests there might be unique treatment implications for individuals living in extreme social disadvantage. Further research is required to examine the relationship between these classes of experience, consequent impact on adulthood engagement, and future transitions though homelessness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors related to attrition from trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamser-Nanney, Rachel; Steinzor, Cazzie E

    2017-04-01

    Attrition from child trauma-focused treatments such as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is common; yet, the factors of children who prematurely terminate are unknown. The aim of the current study was to identify risk factors for attrition from TF-CBT. One hundred and twenty-two children (ages 3-18; M=9.97, SD=3.56; 67.2% females; 50.8% Caucasian) who received TF-CBT were included in the study. Demographic and family variables, characteristics of the trauma, and caregiver- and child-reported pretreatment symptoms levels were assessed in relation to two operational definitions of attrition: 1) clinician-rated dropout, and 2) whether the child received an adequate dose of treatment (i.e., 12 or more sessions). Several demographic factors, number of traumatic events, and children's caregiver-rated pretreatment symptoms were related to clinician-rated dropout. Fewer factors were associated with the adequate dose definition. Child Protective Services involvement, complex trauma exposure, and child-reported pretreatment trauma symptoms were unrelated to either attrition definition. Demographics, trauma characteristics, and level of caregiver-reported symptoms may help to identify clients at risk for premature termination from TF-CBT. Clinical and research implications for different operational definitions and suggestions for future work will be presented. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Risk factors for mortality in children with abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Steven L; Bell, Michael J; Kochanek, Patrick M; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Feldman, Kenneth; Makoroff, Kathi; Scribano, Philip V; Berger, Rachel P

    2012-10-01

    We sought to identify risk factors for mortality in a large clinical cohort of children with abusive head trauma. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression models identified demographic, physical examination, and radiologic findings associated with in-hospital mortality of children with abusive head trauma at 4 pediatric centers. An initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8 defined severe abusive head trauma. Data are shown as OR (95% CI). Analysis included 386 children with abusive head trauma. Multivariable analysis showed children with initial GCS either 3 or 4-5 had increased mortality vs children with GCS 12-15 (OR = 57.8; 95% CI, 12.1-277.6 and OR = 15.6; 95% CI, 2.6-95.1, respectively, P < .001). Additionally, retinal hemorrhage (RH), intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and cerebral edema were independently associated with mortality. In the subgroup with severe abusive head trauma and RH (n = 117), cerebral edema and initial GCS of 3 or 4-5 were independently associated with mortality. Chronic subdural hematoma was independently associated with survival. Low initial GCS score, RH, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and cerebral edema are independently associated with mortality in abusive head trauma. Knowledge of these risk factors may enable researchers and clinicians to improve the care of these vulnerable children. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MR imaging of spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, W.; Springer, P.; Birbamer, G.; Judmaier, W.; Kathrein, A.; Daniaux, H.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the acute and chronic stages of spinal trauma. 126 MR examinations of 120 patients were evaluated retrospectively. In 15 cases of acute spinal cord injury, correlation of MR findings with the degree of neurological deficit and eventual recovery was undertaken. Cord anomalies in the acute stage were seen in 16 patients. Intramedullary haemorrhage (n=6) and cord transection (n=2) were associated with complete injuries and poor prognosis, whereas patients with cord oedema (n=7) had incomplete injuries and recovered significant neurological function. In the chronic stage, MR findings included persistent cord compression in 8 patients, syringomyelia or post-traumatic cyst in 12, myelomalacia in 6, cord atrophy in 9, and cord transection in 7 patients. In acute spinal trauma, MR proved useful in assessing spinal cord compression and instability. In addition, direct visualisation and characterisation of posttraumatic changes within the spinal cord may offer new possibilities in establishing the prognosis for neurological recovery. In the later stages, potentially remediable causes of persistent or progressive symptoms, such as chronic spinal cord compression or syringomyelia can be distinguished from other sequelae of spinal trauma, such as myelomalacia, cord transection or atrophy. (orig.) [de

  7. Adrenal trauma: Elvis Presley Memorial Trauma Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrazin, Reza; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Kincade, Matthew C; Thomas, Adam C; Gold, Robert; Wake, Robert W

    2007-11-01

    Adrenal gland injury is a potentially devastating event if unrecognized in the treatment course of a trauma patient. We reviewed our single-center experience and outcomes in patients with adrenal gland trauma. We performed a retrospective review of all patients presenting with trauma to the Regional Medical Center at Memphis who had adrenal gland injuries from January 1991 through March 2006. Each chart was reviewed with attention to the demographics, associated injuries, complications, and outcomes. Patients were stratified into two subgroups according to age (35 years or younger and older than 35 years) to allow for an age-based comparison between the two groups. Of 58,000 patients presenting with trauma, 130 (0.22%) were identified with adrenal injuries, of which 8 (6.2%) were isolated and 122 (93.8%) were not. Of these 130 patients, 125 (96.2%) had their injury diagnosed by computed tomography and 5 (3.8%) had their injury diagnosed during exploratory laparotomy. Right-sided injuries predominated (78.5%), with six (4.6%) bilateral. Four patients (3.1%) underwent adrenalectomy. Seven patients (5.4%) with adrenal injuries died. One patient (0.77%) required chronic steroid therapy. Patients older than 35 years were more likely to have complications such as deep venous thrombosis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Patient age of 35 years or younger was associated with a significantly increased incidence of liver lacerations. Adrenal gland injury is uncommon, although mostly associated with greater injury severity. Although adding to morbidity, most are self-limited and do not require intervention.

  8. Contemporary management of high-grade renal trauma: Results from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Genitourinary Trauma study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihani, Sorena; Xu, Yizhe; Presson, Angela P; Hotaling, James M; Nirula, Raminder; Piotrowski, Joshua; Dodgion, Christopher M; Black, Cullen M; Mukherjee, Kaushik; Morris, Bradley J; Majercik, Sarah; Smith, Brian P; Schwartz, Ian; Elliott, Sean P; DeSoucy, Erik S; Zakaluzny, Scott; Thomsen, Peter B; Erickson, Bradley A; Baradaran, Nima; Breyer, Benjamin N; Miller, Brandi; Santucci, Richard A; Carrick, Matthew M; Hewitt, Timothy; Burks, Frank N; Kocik, Jurek F; Askari, Reza; Myers, Jeremy B

    2018-03-01

    The rarity of renal trauma limits its study and the strength of evidence-based guidelines. Although management of renal injuries has shifted toward a nonoperative approach, nephrectomy remains the most common intervention for high-grade renal trauma (HGRT). We aimed to describe the contemporary management of HGRT in the United States and also evaluate clinical factors associated with nephrectomy after HGRT. From 2014 to 2017, data on HGRT (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grades III-V) were collected from 14 participating Level-1 trauma centers. Data were gathered on demographics, injury characteristics, management, and short-term outcomes. Management was classified into three groups-expectant, conservative/minimally invasive, and open operative. Descriptive statistics were used to report management of renal trauma. Univariate and multivariate logistic mixed effect models with clustering by facility were used to look at associations between proposed risk factors and nephrectomy. A total of 431 adult HGRT were recorded; 79% were male, and mechanism of injury was blunt in 71%. Injuries were graded as III, IV, and V in 236 (55%), 142 (33%), and 53 (12%), respectively. Laparotomy was performed in 169 (39%) patients. Overall, 300 (70%) patients were managed expectantly and 47 (11%) underwent conservative/minimally invasive management. Eighty-four (19%) underwent renal-related open operative management with 55 (67%) of them undergoing nephrectomy. Nephrectomy rates were 15% and 62% for grades IV and V, respectively. Penetrating injuries had significantly higher American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grades and higher rates of nephrectomy. In multivariable analysis, only renal injury grade and penetrating mechanism of injury were significantly associated with undergoing nephrectomy. Expectant and conservative management is currently utilized in 80% of HGRT; however, the rate of nephrectomy remains high. Clinical factors, such as surrogates of

  9. CT diagnosis of concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jiansong; Wei Tiemin; Wang Zufei; Zhao Zhongwei; Tu Jianfei; Fan Xiaoxi; Xu Min

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CT findings of concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma. Methods: CT findings of 11 cases with concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma proved by surgery were identified retrospectively. Results: The main special signs included: (1) Free air in 4 cases, mainly around injured small bowel or under the diaphragm, or in the retroperitoneal space or and in the lump. (2) High density hematoma between the intestines or in the bowel wall (4 cases). (3) Bowel wall injury sign, demonstrated as low density of the injured intestinal wall, attenuated locally but relatively enhanced in neighbor wall on enhanced CT. (4) Lump around the injured bowel wall with obvious ring-shaped enhancement (4 cases). Other signs included: (1) Free fluid in the abdominal cavity or between the intestines with blurred borders. (2) Bowel obstruction. Conclusion: CT is valuable in diagnosing concealed rupture of intestine following abdominal trauma. (authors)

  10. Trauma Imaging: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Jason Heath; Wertz, Christopher Ira; Onstott, Kimberly L; Wertz, Joss R

    2017-01-01

    To inform radiologic technologists about which imaging modalities and examinations are best suited for evaluating specific anatomical structures in patients who have sustained a traumatic injury. Two scholarly research databases were searched to identify articles focused on trauma imaging of the head, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Articles focused on trauma diagnosis were excluded. Thirty-two articles were selected for analysis. Physical examination and plain-film radiographs typically are used to assess nasal bone fracures. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess zygomaticomaxillary complex, mandibular, and temporal bone fractures. Traumatic brain injuries are difficult to assess, and broad classifications are used. Depending on the severity of cervical spine trauma, plain-film radiographs or CT imaging is adequate, with magnetic resonance imaging used as a means for further evaluation. Trauma to the thorax typically is assessed with radiography and CT, and CT is recommended for assesment of abdominal and pelvic trauma. The literature was consistent regarding which examinations to perform to best evaluate suspected injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The need for, and correct use of, imaging in evaluating trauma to the head and cervical spine is more controversial. Despite the need for additional research, emergency department care providers should be familiar with the structures most commonly injured during trauma and the role of medical imaging for diagnosis.

  11. Role of focused assessment with sonography for trauma as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma in young children after high energy trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, W; van Schuppen, J; Langeveld, H; Wilde, J; Banderker, E; van As, A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to review the utility of focused assessement with sonography for trauma (FAST) as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in children involved in high energy trauma (HET), and to determine whether a FAST could replace computed tomography (CT) in clinical decision-making regarding paediatric BAT. Children presented at the Trauma Unit of the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, after HET, and underwent both a physical examination and a FAST. The presence of free fluid in the abdomen and pelvis was assessed using a FAST. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) for identifying intraabdominal injury were calculated for the physical examination and the FAST, both individually and when combined. Seventy-five patients were included as per the criteria for HET as follows: pedestrian motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) ( n = 46), assault ( n = 14), fall from a height ( n = 9), MVC passenger ( n = 4) and other ( n = 2). The ages of the patients ranged from 3 months to 13 years. The sensitivity of the physical examination was 0.80, specificity 0.83, PPV 0.42 and NPV 0.96. The sensitivity of the FAST was 0.50, specificity 1.00, PPV 1.00 and NPV 0.93. Sensitivity increased to 0.90 when the physical examination was combined with the FAST. Nonoperative management was used in 73 patients. Two underwent an operation. A FAST should be performed in combination with a physical examination on every paediatric patient involved in HET to detect BAT. When both are negative, nonoperative management can be implemented without fear of missing a clinically significant injury. FAST is a safe, effective and easily accessible alternative to CT, which avoids ionising radiation and aids in clinical decision-making.

  12. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Are routine repeat chest x-rays before leaving the trauma room useful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers, M.; Saltzherr, T. P.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Ponsen, K. J.; Goslings, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Several guidelines advocate multiple chest x-rays during primary resuscitation of trauma patients. Some local hospital protocols include a repeat x-ray before leaving the trauma resuscitation room (TR). The purpose of this study was to determine the value of routine repeat x-rays. One-year data of

  14. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  15. Urological injuries following trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, C.; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M.; Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N.; Fotheringham, T.

    2008-01-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated

  16. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  17. Urological injuries following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, C; Iyngkaran, T; Power, N; Matson, M; Hajdinjak, T; Buchholz, N; Fotheringham, T

    2008-12-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  18. Accuracy of Perceived Estimated Travel Time by EMS to a Trauma Center in San Bernardino County, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Neeki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mobilization of trauma resources has the potential to cause ripple effects throughout hospital operations. One major factor affecting efficient utilization of trauma resources is a discrepancy between the prehospital estimated time of arrival (ETA as communicated by emergency medical services (EMS personnel and their actual time of arrival (TOA. The current study aimed to assess the accuracy of the perceived prehospital estimated arrival time by EMS personnel in comparison to their actual arrival time at a Level II trauma center in San Bernardino County, California. Methods: This retrospective study included traumas classified as alerts or activations that were transported to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in 2013. We obtained estimated arrival time and actual arrival time for each transport from the Surgery Department Trauma Registry. The difference between the median of ETA and actual TOA by EMS crews to the trauma center was calculated for these transports. Additional variables assessed included time of day and month during which the transport took place. Results: A total of 2,454 patients classified as traumas were identified in the Surgery Department Trauma Registry. After exclusion of trauma consults, walk-ins, handoffs between agencies, downgraded traumas, traumas missing information, and traumas transported by agencies other than American Medical Response, Ontario Fire, Rialto Fire or San Bernardino County Fire, we included a final sample size of 555 alert and activation classified traumas in the final analysis. When combining all transports by the included EMS agencies, the median of the ETA was 10 minutes and the median of the actual TOA was 22 minutes (median of difference=9 minutes, p<0.0001. Furthermore, when comparing the difference between trauma alerts and activations, trauma activations demonstrated an equal or larger difference in the median of the estimated and actual time of arrival (p<0.0001. We also found

  19. Imaging of Neonatal Child Abuse with an Emphasis on Abusive Head Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Rick R.; Spevak, Melissa R.

    2011-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect is a serious clinical and socioeconomic problem that is sometimes underestimated. One of the most devastating forms is abusive head trauma. This review addresses the radiological workup in cases of suspected child abuse. The use of all modalities, and their advantages and

  20. Tram-related trauma in Melbourne, Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Biswadev; Al Jubair, Jubair; Cameron, Peter A; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2010-08-01

    To establish the incidence and pattern of injuries in patients presenting to hospital with tram-related injuries. Data on tram-related injury pertaining to 2001-2008 calendar years were extracted from three datasets: the population-based Victorian State Trauma Registry for major trauma cases, the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset for ED presentations and the National Coroners' Information System for deaths. Incidence rates adjusted for the population of Melbourne, and trends in the incidence of tram-related ED presentations and major trauma cases, were analysed and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRR). There were 1769 patients who presented to ED after trauma related to trams in Melbourne during the study period. Of these, 107 patients had injuries classified as major trauma. There was a significant increase in the rate of ED presentations (IRR 1.03, P = 0.010) with falls (46%) the most commonly reported mechanism. Most falls occurred inside the trams. There was also a significant increase in the incidence rates of major trauma cases (IRR 1.12, P = 0.006) with pedestrians accounting for most major trauma cases. Most cases of trauma related to trams have minor injuries and are discharged following ED management. Primary prevention of falls in trams and the separation of pedestrians from trams are key areas requiring immediate improvement. In the face of increasing trauma associated with trams, continuing safety surveillance and targeted public safety messages are important to sustain trams as safe and effective mode of transport.