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Sample records for primary human peripheral

  1. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Gregory D.; Karns, Christina M.; Dow, Mark W.; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants wer...

  2. Dose response relationships and analysis of primary processes of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    1977-02-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 220 kV X-rays, 3 MeV electrons and 15 MeV neutrons. The frequency of dicentric, acentric and atypical chromosomes and the exhange aberrations were measured and dose effect curves were constructed. The aim is to prepare the chromosome analysis to a biological dosimetry. The aberration findings could be adapted to the linear-quadrativ model y = c+ αD + βD 2 . With increasing LET the quantity lambda increased which is a measure for the share of the linear and quadratical components of the dose effect obtained. In case of electrons the RBE-values increased with increasing doses. In the case of neutrons they had their maximum in the low dose range. The feed back distances which lead to formation of primary lesions are for X-rays and electrons approximately 1 μm, for neutrons 1.7 μm. In a fractionation experiment with X-rays, the time of formation of exchange aberrations in radiation-induced primary breaks was measured. The number of dicentric chromosomes decreased with increasing time, while the intercellular distribution was not changed. The number of primary breaks decreasing per temporal interval is proportional to the number of the existing primary breaks. The average feed back time during which the primary breaks lead to induction of dicentric chromosomes, is 110 min. In order to determine the correspondence of the results of in-vivo and in-vitro experiments 15 patients and their blood were irradiated with 60 C-γ-rays. No significant differences were measured. (AJ) [de

  3. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D. Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl’s gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity, a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case, as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral versus perifoveal visual stimulation (11-15° vs. 2°-7° in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl’s gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl’s gyrus indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral versus perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex, frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in

  4. Primary quantitative analysis of the mtDNA4977bp deletion induced by lonizing radiation in human peripheral blood u-sing real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Zhikai; Liu Jiangong; Guo Wanlong; Zhang Shuxian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influence of mtDNA4977bp deletion induced by different dose of γ ray in human peripheral blood in order to explore the feasibility of mtDNA4977bp deletion as biodosimeter. Methods: Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy donors and irradiated by γ ray, MtDNA4977bp deletion was detected by real-time PCR. Results: It indicated that that from the range of 0 ∼ 8 Gy, the relationship between mtDNA4977bp deletion and irradiation dose represents certain curvilinear correlation (Y=1.2693+1.0660X+0.0198X 2 ). Conclusion: We find that γ ray has influence on the mtDNA4977bp deletion, so it may be an important biodosmeter in future. (authors)

  5. Haemopoietic progenitor cells in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation reported is to purify haemopoietic progenitor cells from human peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation in order to isolate a progenitor cell fraction without immunocompetent cells. The purification technique of peripheral blood flow colony forming unit culture (CFU-c) by means of density gradient centrifugation and a combined depletion of various rosettes is described. The results of several 'in vitro' characteristics of purified CFU-c suspensions and of the plasma clot diffusion chamber culture technique are presented. Irradiation studies revealed that for both human bone marrow and peripheral blood the CFU-c were less radioresistant than clusters. Elimination of monocytes (and granulocytes) from the test suspensions induced an alteration in radiosensitivity pararmeters. The results obtained with the different techniques are described by analysing peripheral progenitor cell activity in myeloproliferative disorders. (Auth.)

  6. Approach to Peripheral Neuropathy for the Primary Care Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher T; Seyedsadjadi, Reza

    2018-02-02

    Peripheral neuropathy is commonly encountered in the primary care setting and is associated with significant morbidity, including neuropathic pain, falls, and disability. The clinical presentation of neuropathy is diverse, with possible symptoms including weakness, sensory abnormalities, and autonomic dysfunction. Accordingly, the primary care clinician must be comfortable using the neurologic examination-including the assessment of motor function, multiple sensory modalities, and deep tendon reflexes-to recognize and characterize neuropathy. Although the causes of peripheral neuropathy are numerous and diverse, careful review of the medical and family history coupled with limited, select laboratory testing can often efficiently lead to an etiologic diagnosis. This review offers an approach for evaluating suspected neuropathy in the primary care setting. It will describe the most common causes, suggest an evidence-based workup to aid in diagnosis, and highlight recent evidence that allows for selection of symptomatic treatment of patients with neuropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral nerve injury induces glial activation in primary motor cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Julieta Troncoso; Julieta Troncoso; Efraín Buriticá; Efraín Buriticá

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that peripheral facial nerve injuries are associated with sensorimotor cortex reorganization. We have characterized facial nerve lesion-induced structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with glial cell density using a rodent facial paralysis model. First, we used adult transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in pyramidal neurons which were subjected to eithe...

  8. Peripheral nerve injury induces glial activation in primary motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Troncoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence suggests that peripheral facial nerve injuries are associated with sensorimotor cortex reorganization. We have characterized facial nerve lesion-induced structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with glial cell density using a rodent facial paralysis model. First, we used adult transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in pyramidal neurons which were subjected to either unilateral lesion of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Pyramidal cells’ dendritic arborization underwent overall shrinkage and transient spine pruning. Moreover, microglial cell density surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons was significantly increased with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. Additionally, we induced facial nerve lesion in Wistar rats to evaluate the degree and extension of facial nerve lesion-induced reorganization processes in central nervous system using neuronal and glial markers. Immunoreactivity to NeuN (neuronal nuclei antigen, GAP-43 (growth-associated protein 43, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Iba 1 (Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 were evaluated 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 35 days after either unilateral facial nerve lesion or sham surgery. Patches of decreased NeuN immunoreactivity were found bilaterally in vM1 as well as in primary somatosensory cortex (CxS1. Significantly increased GAP-43 immunoreactivity was found bilaterally after the lesion in hippocampus, striatum, and sensorimotor cortex. One day after lesion GFAP immunoreactivity increased bilaterally in hippocampus, subcortical white

  9. Effect of peripheral morphine in a human model of acute inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, J; Hammer, N A; Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, th......Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled, three-way crossover design in a human model of acute inflammatory pain (heat injury). We studied 18 healthy volunteers who each received morphine locally (2 mg), morphine systemically (2 mg), or placebo on three separate study days. The subjects received morphine infiltration subcutaneously (s.c.). 1 h......, but local morphine infiltration neither reduced pain during the burn, nor primary or secondary hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli after the burn. In conclusion, peripherally applied morphine had no acute antinociceptive effects in this human model of acute inflammatory pain....

  10. Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified with an indolent clinical course: a distinct peripheral T-cell lymphoma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, A J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTL), unspecified, are rare lymphomas, with a poor prognosis. They grow and disseminate rapidly, leading to widespread disease. We report a case of PTL, unspecified occurring on the nose. Despite its aggressive histology, this tumour behaved indolently. It is remarkably similar, clinically and histologically, to four recently described cases that occurred on the ear.

  11. Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Falaq Naz

    2012-06-29

    Jun 29, 2012 ... Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes of oral ... catechol estrogens and quinines, via redox reactions causes oxidative damage to .... volume was prepared for each donor. About, 0.8 ml of cell sus .... duce the adverse effects of OCs, such as the reduction in the estrogen content.

  12. TXNIP regulates peripheral glucose metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parikh, Hemang; Carlsson, Emma; Chutkow, William A

    2007-01-01

    combined human insulin/glucose clamp physiological studies with genome-wide expression profiling to identify thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) as a gene whose expression is powerfully suppressed by insulin yet stimulated by glucose. In healthy individuals, its expression was inversely correlated...... expression is consistently elevated in the muscle of prediabetics and diabetics, although in a panel of 4,450 Scandinavian individuals, we found no evidence for association between common genetic variation in the TXNIP gene and T2DM. CONCLUSIONS: TXNIP regulates both insulin-dependent and insulin......-independent pathways of glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle. Combined with recent studies that have implicated TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cell glucose toxicity, our data suggest that TXNIP might play a key role in defective glucose homeostasis preceding overt T2DM....

  13. Central and peripheral hemodynamics in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; González-Alonso, J; Helge, J W

    2015-01-01

    In humans, arm exercise is known to elicit larger increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) than leg exercise. However, the precise regulation of regional vascular conductances (VC) for the distribution of cardiac output with exercise intensity remains unknown. Hemodynamic responses were assessed...... perfusion pressure to increase O2 delivery, allowing a similar peak VO2 per kg of muscle mass in both extremities. In summary, despite a lower Qpeak during arm cranking the cardiovascular strain is much higher than during leg pedalling. The adjustments of regional conductances during incremental exercise...... to exhaustion depend mostly on the relative intensity of exercise and are limb-specific....

  14. Cytotoxicity of Betel leaf (Piper betel L. against primary culture of chicken embryo fibroblast and its effects on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprapto Ma’at

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Betel leaf (Piper betel L. has been used in modern and traditional medicine as antiseptic, antibacterial, and also prevention of plaque accumulation, but it still can stimulate cancer in lime-piper betel quid. Betel leaf also has anti-inflammatory properties. Purpose: The purpose of this study was examine the cytotoxicity of Betel leaf extract (BLE against primary culture of chicken embryo fibroblast and its effects on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC stimulated with LPS. Methods: MTT assay was used to investigate the survival rate of the culture with the survival rate result of the given culture extract 4%, 2% and 1% about 82%, 83.4% and 85%. There was no significant difference between treatment with various concentrations of the extract and the control (p>0.05. To evaluate the effect of Betel leaf extracts on the production of cytokines, proinflammatory was conducted by incubating the extracts of betel leaf with peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from healthy volunteers isolated by density centrifugation method using Ficoll-Hypaque. Once coupled with various concentrations of betel leaf extract and lipopolysaccharide, and then incubated for 24 hours, the culture supernatant was used to determine the level of IFN-γ and TNF-α by ELISA method. Results: It is known that the survival rates of BLE 4%, 2% and 1% were 82%, 83.4% and 85%. There was no significant of difference between several concentrations of BLE and those in the control group (p>0.05. The production of IFN-γ and TNF-α stimulated with LPS was no significant difference between BLE 4%, 2% and 1% and that in the control group (p>0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that BLE is not toxic against primary culture of chicken embryo fibroblast, and the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α by PBMC was not affected by BLE.Latar belakang: Daun

  15. Mouse forward genetics in the study of the peripheral nervous system and human peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Darlene S.; Popko, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Forward genetics, the phenotype-driven approach to investigating gene identity and function, has a long history in mouse genetics. Random mutations in the mouse transcend bias about gene function and provide avenues towards unique discoveries. The study of the peripheral nervous system is no exception; from historical strains such as the trembler mouse, which led to the identification of PMP22 as a human disease gene causing multiple forms of peripheral neuropathy, to the more recent identification of the claw paw and sprawling mutations, forward genetics has long been a tool for probing the physiology, pathogenesis, and genetics of the PNS. Even as spontaneous and mutagenized mice continue to enable the identification of novel genes, provide allelic series for detailed functional studies, and generate models useful for clinical research, new methods, such as the piggyBac transposon, are being developed to further harness the power of forward genetics. PMID:18481175

  16. Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor at unusual location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvagya Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. Most arise in association with major nerve trunks. Their most common anatomical sites are the proximal portions of the upper and lower extremities and the trunk. MPNSTs have rarely been reported in literature to occur in other unusual body parts. We review all such cases reported till now in terms of site of origin, surgical treatment, adjuvant therapy and outcome and shortly describe our experience with two of these cases. Both of our case presented with lump at unusual sites resembling neurofibroma, one at orbitotemporal area and other in the paraspinal region with characteristic feature of neurofibroma with the exception that both had very short history of progression. They underwent gross total removal of the tumor with adjuvant radiotherapy postoperatively. At 6-month follow-up both are doing well with no evidence of recurrence.

  17. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per...... strand), we report a comprehensive (92.62%) methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found...... research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies....

  18. Endurance exercise training increases peripheral vascular response in human fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, K; Shimoda, M; Maeda, J; Takemiya, T

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure is changed by endurance exercise training. The healthy male subjects (training group; n = 6) performed endurance exercise training that consisted of cycle ergometer exercise 5 d.week-1 and 30 min.d-1 for a period of 8 weeks. Changes in the peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure in the human finger were measured by a differential digital photoplethysmogram (DeltaDPG) and blood pressure during passive movement of the arm to different vertical hand positions relative to heart level. Following 8 weeks of endurance training, percent changes in DeltaDPG from heart level in the training group increased significantly (mean +/- SD, -48.1 +/- 7. 3 to -58.7 +/- 9.3% at the lowered position, 46.1 +/- 13.4 to 84.6 +/- 8.8% at the elevated position, ppressure, also significantly changed in the training group over the 8 weeks (5.6 +/- 1.3 to 2.7 +/- 1.6 mV. V-1.s-1.mmHg-1 at the lowered position, 30.0 +/- 12.4 to 54.4 +/- 18. 9 mV.V-1.s-1.mmHg-1 at the elevated position ). Maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2 max) was significantly increased in the training group. On the other hand, the control group (n = 6) showed no significant changes in all parameters for 8 weeks. Therefore these results suggest that endurance exercise training induces an increase in peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure in the human finger.

  19. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...... skeletal muscle, cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues of the limbs indicate that the situation is more complex. Measurements have been carried out during acute as well as chronic sympathetic denervation. Spinal sympathetic reflex mechanisms have been evaluated in tetraplegic patients, where supraspinal...

  20. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrui Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per strand, we report a comprehensive (92.62% methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE. These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies.

  1. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H

    2012-01-01

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral...... arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three...... demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output....

  2. Research on effects of ionizing radiation of human peripheral blood white cell adhesive molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haijun; Cheng Ying; Le Chen; Min Rui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the links between expression and function of adhesive molecule on the surface of irradiated peripheral blood white cells. Methods: Heparinized human peripheral blood was exposed to γ rays with different dose. At the different post-radiation time adhesive molecule expression on cellular surface was determined by double fluorescence labeling antibodies which were against adhesive molecule and special mark of granulocyte or mononuclear cell respectively with flow cytometry, and cellular adhesive ability to different matrixes mediated by adhesive molecule was estimated by commercializing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and crystalviolet dying. Results: A decline pattern of CD11b on surface of mononuclear cells and CD29 on surface of granulocyte with irradiation dose increase was found. The changes of adhesive ability of mononuclear cells to substance of β1-integrin and collagen-I was well related with irradiation dose. Conclusion: Good relationship shown by the changes of adhesive molecule expression and adhesive ability mediated by the molecules on the surface of peripheral blood white cells with radiation dose was primary base of further research on indicting exposure dose by biomarker. (authors)

  3. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are decreased during cocaine withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, J I; Notorangelo, M P; Pandey, S C; Reddy, P L; Pandey, G N; Davis, J M

    1994-07-01

    In the present study, homovanillic acid in plasma (pHVA) and benzodiazepine receptors (3H-PK11195 binding) in neutrophil membranes were determined in blood obtained from cocaine-dependent (DSM-III-R) adult male inpatients at baseline-(within 72 hr of last cocaine use) and after 3 weeks of cocaine abstinence, and normal controls. The mean (+/- SEM) pHVA at baseline (10.3 ng/ml +/- 1.1) was similar to normals and did not change after 3 weeks of cocaine abstinence. Similarly, the binding indices of benzodiazepine receptors in cocaine-dependent subjects as a group were not significantly different than in normal controls. In 10 cocaine-dependent subjects, however, where both blood samples were available, the number of 3H-PK11195 binding sites was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after 3 weeks of cocaine abstinence (mean +/- sem: Bmax = 6371 +/- 657 fmol/mg protein) compared with baseline (Bmax = 7553 +/- 925 fmol/mg protein), although there were no differences in the binding affinity (mean +/- sem: KD = 8.6 +/- 1.2 nmol/L after 3 weeks of abstinence compared with 8.1 +/- 1.0 nmol/L at baseline). These preliminary results suggest that peripheral benzodiazepine receptors may play an important role in the pathophysiology of cocaine withdrawal in cocaine-dependent human subjects.

  4. Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with increased peripheral eosinophils and serum IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, I; Takase, Y; Matsumoto, S; Kuyama, J; Nakajima, T; Maeda, H; Sugase, T; Hata, A; Hanada, M; Okuno, M

    1996-10-01

    Symptoms of cholestasis, including epigastralgia, fever, and jaundice, with marked increases in peripheral eosinophils and serum IgE in a 20-year-old man are reported here. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) detected constrictions of the bile ducts, compatible with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The symptoms and blood parameters of liver dysfunction were associated with the degree of eosinophilia and high serum IgE levels. During corticosteroid therapy, all of these parameters improved, and morphologic improvements of the bile ducts were also observed. The pathogenesis of PSC may be explained, in part, by the concept of hypereosinophilic syndrome or allergic reaction.

  5. Warfarin-induced Primary Dissection of Lower Peripheral Arteries: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae A; You, He Chul; Han, Young Min; Kwak, Hyo Sung [Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Primary dissection of a peripheral artery without involvement of the aorta is a rare entity. Warfarin is currently used as the standard oral anticoagulant in a variety of clinical settings. We report here on a case of focal dissection of the common iliac artery and the superficial femoral artery following prophylactic treatment with warfarin for a prosthetic heart valve. The patient's laboratory results showed a high international normalized ratio and prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time. Angiography showed a dissection of the left common iliac artery and the right superficial femoral artery. His symptoms immediately disappeared after deploying stents to the arterial dissections

  6. Warfarin-induced Primary Dissection of Lower Peripheral Arteries: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae A; You, He Chul; Han, Young Min; Kwak, Hyo Sung

    2010-01-01

    Primary dissection of a peripheral artery without involvement of the aorta is a rare entity. Warfarin is currently used as the standard oral anticoagulant in a variety of clinical settings. We report here on a case of focal dissection of the common iliac artery and the superficial femoral artery following prophylactic treatment with warfarin for a prosthetic heart valve. The patient's laboratory results showed a high international normalized ratio and prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time. Angiography showed a dissection of the left common iliac artery and the right superficial femoral artery. His symptoms immediately disappeared after deploying stents to the arterial dissections

  7. Peripheral nervous system involvement in primary burning mouth syndrome--results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakka, A; Forssell, H; Soinila, S; Virtanen, A; Röyttä, M; Laine, M; Tenovuo, O; Teerijoki-Oksa, T; Jääskeläinen, S K

    2016-05-01

    The pathophysiology of primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has remained enigmatic, but recent studies suggest pathology within the nervous system at multiple levels. This study aimed to investigate in detail the contribution of either focal or generalized alterations within the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in the etiopathogenesis of BMS. Intraepithelial nerve fiber density (IENFD) of tongue mucosa was assessed in 10 carefully characterized BMS, and the results were compared to 19 age- and gender-matched cadaver controls, 6 with lifetime diabetes. Extensive neurophysiologic and psychophysical examinations of the trigeminal system and distal extremities were performed to profile PNS function in BMS. Patients with BMS had significantly fewer intraepithelial nerve fibers (0,27, s.e. 0,18 mm(-1); P = 0.0253) than non-diabetic controls (0,92, s.e. 0,15 mm(-1)). In the subepithelial space, the amount of nerve fibers did not differ between the groups. The majority (9/10) of patients with BMS showed neurophysiologic or psychophysical signs of a more generalized PNS dysfunction. Our results in neurophysiologically optimally characterized BMS patients confirm that pure focal small fiber neuropathy of the oral mucosa has a role in the pathophysiology of primary BMS. Furthermore, BMS may be related to a more generalized, yet subclinical peripheral neuropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Gene expression in human peripheral blood 48 hours after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of human peripheral blood 48 hours after irradiation ex vivo with graded doses of gamma rays. Results have been used in building and testing classifiers to...

  9. microRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  10. Gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  11. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  12. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc.

  13. Primary hepatic peripheral T-cell lymphoma mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisun; Park, Kil Sun; Kang, Min Ho; Kim, Yook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Hanlim; Choi, Jae-Woon; Ryu, Dong Hee

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive neoplasms which may involve the liver. The imaging manifestations of hepatic lymphoma are highly variable and show overlapping appearances of numerous other hepatic diseases. As the management and prognosis of lymphoma differ markedly from those of other malignant diseases, prompt diagnosis and early effective treatment are very important. Here, we report an atypical case of primary PTCL not otherwise specified involving the liver that exhibited a solitary hepatic mass mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on CT. Liver biopsy is not commonly recommended in highly suspicious cases of HCC. However, in a patient without risk factors for HCC, consideration of other diagnostic possibilities is required and needle biopsy may be a more rational choice. An imaging approach, based on a careful review of clinical and laboratory findings is essential to prevent false-positive diagnosis of HCC and subsequent invasive treatment.

  14. Natural HIV-1 NEF accelerates virus replication in primary human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ronde, A.; Klaver, B.; Keulen, W.; Smit, L.; Goudsmit, J.

    1992-01-01

    HIV-1 NEF genes were isolated directly from peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA of two HIV-1-infected individuals and cloned into an HXB-2-infectious molecular clone. The effect of NEF on virus production in T-cell lines and primary human lymphocytes was studied. Naturally occurring NEF accelerates

  15. CGRP in human models of primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Håkan; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Ashina, Messoud

    2018-01-01

    experiments are likely due to assay variation; therefore, proper validation and standardization of an assay is needed. To what extent CGRP is involved in tension-type headache and cluster headache is unknown. CONCLUSION: Human models of primary headaches have elucidated the role of CGRP in headache...... pathophysiology and sparked great interest in developing new treatment strategies using CGRP antagonists and antibodies. Future studies applying more refined human experimental models should identify biomarkers of CGRP-induced primary headache and reveal whether CGRP provocation experiments could be used......OBJECTIVE: To review the role of CGRP in human models of primary headaches and to discuss methodological aspects and future directions. DISCUSSION: Provocation experiments demonstrated a heterogeneous CGRP migraine response in migraine patients. Conflicting CGRP plasma results in the provocation...

  16. Invasin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis activates human peripheral B cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, E; Carballeira, N; Vazquez, R; Dubinina, E; Bränden, H; Persson, H; Wolf-Watz, H

    1996-01-01

    The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cell surface-located protein invasin was found to promote binding between the pathogen and resting peripheral B cells via beta 1 integrin receptors (CD29). B cells responded by expressing several activation markers and by growing, In contrast, T cells did not react, although these cells express CD29. An isogenic invA mutant failed to activate B cells. The mutation could be complemented by providing the invA+ gene in trans. Purified invasin alone did not activat...

  17. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres...

  18. Isolation, propagation, and titration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from peripheral blood of infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 can be isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and is easily propagated on primary cells in vitro. Here we describe the method for bulk isolation of the HIV-1 quasispecies and a limiting dilution virus isolation protocol by which single coexisting clones can be obtained. In addition,

  19. Immunotoxicity assessment of rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Fu

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA is extensively used in clinics to treat a variety of diseases, such as hypoproteinemia, hemorrhagic shock, serious burn injuries, cirrhotic ascites and fetal erythroblastosis. To address supply shortages and high safety risks from limited human donors, we recently developed recombinant technology to produce HSA from rice endosperm. To assess the risk potential of HSA derived from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA before a First-in-human (FIH trial, we compared OsrHSA and plasma-derived HSA (pHSA, evaluating the potential for an immune reaction and toxicity using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. The results indicated that neither OsrHSA nor pHSA stimulated T cell proliferation at 1x and 5x dosages. We also found no significant differences in the profiles of the CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell subsets between OsrHSA- and pHSA-treated cells. Furthermore, the results showed that there were no significant differences between OsrHSA and pHSA in the production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-10 and IL-4. Our results demonstrated that OsrHSA has equivalent immunotoxicity to pHSA when using the PBMC model. Moreover, this ex vivo system could provide an alternative approach to predict potential risks in novel biopharmaceutical development.

  20. Effect of laser peripheral iridotomy on anterior chamber angle anatomy in primary angle closure spectrum eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Seema; Blieden, Lauren S.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Baker, Laura A.; Bell, Nicholas P.; Mankiewicz, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the change in trabecular-iris circumference volume (TICV) after laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) in primary angle closure (PAC) spectrum eyes Patients and Methods Forty-two chronic PAC spectrum eyes from 24 patients were enrolled. Eyes with anterior chamber abnormalities affecting angle measurement were excluded. Intraocular pressure, slit lamp exam, and gonioscopy were recorded at each visit. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) with 3D mode angle analysis scans were taken with the CASIA SS-1000 (Tomey Corp., Nagoya, Japan) before and after LPI. Forty-two pre-LPI ASOCT scans and 34 post-LPI ASOCT scans were analyzed using the Anterior Chamber Analysis and Interpretation (ACAI, Houston, TX) software. A mixed-effect model analysis was used to compare the trabecular-iris space area (TISA) changes among 4 quadrants, as well as to identify potential factors affecting TICV. Results There was a significant increase in all average angle parameters after LPI (TISA500, TISA750, TICV500, and TICV750). The magnitude of change in TISA500 in the superior angle was significantly less than the other angles. The changes in TICV500 and TICV750 were not associated with any demographic or ocular characteristics. Conclusion TICV is a useful parameter to quantitatively measure the effectiveness of LPI in the treatment of eyes with PAC spectrum disease. PMID:26066504

  1. A simple method for human peripheral blood monocyte Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos C de Almeida

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple method using percoll gradient for isolation of highly enriched human monocytes. High numbers of fully functional cells are obtained from whole blood or buffy coat cells. The use of simple laboratory equipment and a relatively cheap reagent makes the described method a convenient approach to obtaining human monocytes.

  2. [Primary peripheral T-cell lymphoma of the penis: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Lin; Yin, Hong-Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Hang-Bo; Lu, Zhen-Feng

    2008-11-01

    To report a case of primary peripheral T-cell lymphoma of the penis. We analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics of the case of primary peripheral T-cell lymphoma using histological, cytochemical and immunohistochemical methods and by review of the literature. The patient was a 65 years old man and presented with a diffuse enlargement of the penis as the initial sign, followed by erosive ulcer in the caput penis and inguinal lymphadenectasis. The tumor was pathohistologically manifested as an epidermal ulcer, with tumorous necrosis around the capillary, infiltrative growth and atypical changes of the neoplastic cells and proliferation of capillaries. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CD43 and CD3, but negative for CD20, CD79a, CD34, CD30, CD56 and CD34. Clinically it responded to the chemotherapy designed for peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Primary peripheral T-cell lymphoma of the penis is an extremely rare malignant tumor, the diagnosis of which relies on histopathological examination, immunohistochemical staining and differentiation between squamous cell carcinoma and other types of lymphoma.

  3. Altered Cytokine Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Monocytes across the Menstrual Cycle in Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyue; Hong, Min; Duan, Jinao; Liu, Pei; Fan, Xinsheng; Shang, Erxin; Su, Shulan; Guo, Jianming; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is one of the most common gynecological complaints in young women, but potential peripheral immunologic features underlying this condition remain undefined. In this paper, we compared 84 common cytokine gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six primary dysmenorrheic young women and three unaffected controls on the seventh day before (secretory phase), and the first (menstrual phase) and the fifth (regenerative phase) days of menstruation, using a real-time PCR array assay combined with pattern recognition and gene function annotation methods. Comparisons between dysmenorrhea and normal control groups identified 11 (nine increased and two decreased), 14 (five increased and nine decreased), and 15 (seven increased and eight decreased) genes with ≥2-fold difference in expression (Pdysmenorrhea. This first study of cytokine gene expression profiles in PBMCs from young primary dysmenorrheic women demonstrates a shift in the balance between expression patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TGF-β superfamily members across the whole menstrual cycle, underlying the peripheral immunologic features of primary dysmenorrhea. PMID:23390521

  4. Immunomodulatory capacity of fungal proteins on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurink, P.V.; Lull Noguera, C.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Immunomodulation by fungal compounds can be determined by the capacity of the compounds to influence the cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC). These activities include mitogenicity, stimulation and activation of immune effector cells. Eight mushroom strains

  5. Melanin-concentrating hormone in peripheral circulation in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naufahu, J; Alzaid, F; Fiuza Brito, M; Doslikova, B; Valencia, T; Cunliffe, A; Murray, J F

    2017-03-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide with a well-characterised role in energy homeostasis and emergent roles in diverse physiologic functions such as arousal, mood and reproduction. Work to date has predominantly focused on its hypothalamic functions using animal models; however, little attention has been paid to its role in circulation in humans. The aims of this study were to (a) develop a radioimmunoassay for the detection of MCH in human plasma; (b) establish reference ranges for circulating MCH and (c) characterise the pattern of expression of circulating MCH in humans. A sensitive and specific RIA was developed and cross-validated by RP-HPLC and MS. The effective range was 19.5-1248 pg MCH/mL. Blood samples from 231 subjects were taken to establish a reference range of 19.5-55.4 pg/mL for fasting MCH concentrations. There were no significant differences between male and female fasting MCH concentrations; however, there were correlations between MCH concentrations and BMI in males and females with excess fat (P < 0.001 and P = 0.020) and between MCH concentrations and fat mass in females with excess fat (P = 0.038). Plasma MCH concentrations rose significantly after feeding in a group of older individuals (n = 50, males P = 0.006, females P = 0.023). There were no robust significant correlations between fasting or post-prandial MCH and resting metabolic rate, plasma glucose, insulin or leptin concentrations although there were correlations between circulating MCH and leptin concentrations in older individuals (P = 0.029). These results indicate that the role of circulating MCH may not be reflective of its regulatory hypothalamic role. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Human factors and ergonomics for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Jeffcott, Shelly

    2016-03-01

    In the second paper of this series, we provide a brief overview of the scientific discipline of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). Traditionally the HFE focus in healthcare has been in acute hospital settings which are perceived to exhibit characteristics more similar to other high-risk industries already applying related principles and methods. This paper argues that primary care is an area which could benefit extensively from an HFE approach, specifically in improving the performance and well-being of people and organisations. To this end, we define the purpose of HFE, outline its three specialist sub-domains (physical, cognitive and organisational HFE) and provide examples of guiding HFE principles and practices. Additionally, we describe HFE issues of significance to primary care education, improvement and research and outline early plans for building capacity and capability in this setting.

  7. HLA-C is necessary for optimal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human peripheral blood CD4 lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Miriam; Matucci, Andrea; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Soprana, Elisa; Rossolillo, Paola; Lopalco, Lucia; Zipeto, Donato; Siccardi, Antonio G; De Santis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that open conformers of HLA-C on target cells might directly exert an effect on their infectability by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been suggested previously. This was tested by exploiting the peculiar specificity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) L31 for HLA-C open conformers to show that normal levels of Env-driven fusion were restored in HLA-C transfectants of a major histocompatibility complex-deleted (fusion-incompetent) cell line. The physiological relevance of this finding is now confirmed in this report, where small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology was used to silence HLA-C expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 11 healthy donors. Infectability by HIV (strains IIIB and Bal and primary isolates) was significantly reduced (P=0.016) in silenced cells compared with cells that maintained HLA-C expression in 10 of the 11 PBL donors. Normal infectability was resumed, together with HLA-C expression, when the effect of siRNA interference waned after several days in culture. Additional confirmation of the HLA-C effect was obtained in several assays employing HLA-C-positive and -negative cell lines, a number of HIV strains and also pseudoviruses. In particular, viruses pseudotyped with env genes from HIV strains AC10 and QH0692.42 were assayed on siRNA-silenced lymphocytes from three healthy donors: the differences in infection with pseudoviruses were even higher than those observed in infections with normal viruses.

  8. Two small lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood. I. Purification and surface marker profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1978-01-01

    By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form simultan......By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form...... simultaneously. The dominant marker of these E- Fc- cells was surface Ig, and during 4 days of culture this population did not alter its surface markers. Subset 2 was obtained in two ways following rosette centrifugation with AET-treated SRBC and rabbit anti-human Ig-coated autologous RBC. This 'Null cell...

  9. Primary nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas: diagnosis and therapeutic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto de Pádua Covas Lage

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a rare group of neoplasms derived from post-thymic and activated T lymphocytes. A review of scientific articles listed in PubMed, Lilacs, and the Cochrane Library databases was performed using the term "peripheral T-cell lymphomas". According to the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic tissue tumors, this group of neoplasms consists of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL, anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALCL-ALK+, and a provisional entity called anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase negative (ALCL-ALK-. Because the treatment and prognoses of these neoplasms involve different principles, it is essential to distinguish each one by its clinical, immunophenotypic, genetic, and molecular features. Except for anaplastic large cell lymphoma-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive, which has no adverse international prognostic index, the prognosis of nodal peripheral T-cell lymphomas is worse than that of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Chemotherapy based on anthracyclines provides poor outcomes because these neoplasms frequently have multidrug-resistant phenotypes. Based on this, the current tendency is to use intensified cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone (CHOP regimens with the addition of new drugs, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This paper describes the clinical features and diagnostic methods, and proposes a therapeutic algorithm for nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients.

  10. Peripheral and central components of habituation of heat pain perception and evoked potentials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffrath, Wolfgang; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2007-12-05

    For the neurophysiological examination of nociceptive pathways, contact-heat evoked potentials (contact-heat EPs) are elicited by repetitive brief noxious heat stimuli. Suppression of heat responses in primary nociceptive neurons during repetitive stimulation has been shown in animal models in vivo and in vitro. We now investigated whether heat pain and contact-heat EPs in humans display equivalent signs of habituation. Heat pain and EPs were elicited in 16 volunteers with a contact thermode (30 degrees Cs(-1)). Heat pulses at three intensities (pain threshold, moderate noxious and maximum available) were applied to the right forearm either by moving the thermode after each pulse to variable locations or when fixed to one location (inter-stimulus intervals 8-10s). Contact-heat EPs consisted of an early negativity in temporal leads (N1), followed by a biphasic response at the vertex (N2-P2). Pain ratings and contact-heat EPs (N1 and N2-P2 components) displayed significant temperature dependence. N2-P2 correlated positively with ratings. With stimulation at variable locations, both measures slowly decreased with time constants tau of 2 min (ratings) and 12 min (EPs). With stimulation at a fixed location, habituation was much faster for both, ratings (tau=10s) and EPs (tau=33 s). As a consequence, both measures were significantly reduced (pheat pain perception and contact-heat EPs display signs of rapid habituation when stimulation is restricted to a fixed location and thus, reflect fatigue of peripheral nociceptive neurons. Habituation within the central nervous system is slower and less pronounced.

  11. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Axon Regeneration After Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Animal Models and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate their lost axons but functional recovery in humans is frequently disappointing. This is so particularly when injuries require regeneration over long distances and/or over long time periods. Fat replacement of chronically denervated muscles, a commonly accepted explanation, does not account for poor functional recovery. Rather, the basis for the poor nerve regeneration is the transient expression of growth-associated genes that accounts for declining regene...

  12. Rapid resetting of human peripheral clocks by phototherapy during simulated night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marc; Boudreau, Philippe; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2017-11-24

    A majority of night shift workers have their circadian rhythms misaligned to their atypical schedule. While bright light exposure at night is known to reset the human central circadian clock, the behavior of peripheral clocks under conditions of shift work is more elusive. The aim of the present study was to quantify the resetting effects of bright light exposure on both central (plasma cortisol and melatonin) and peripheral clocks markers (clock gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMCs) in subjects living at night. Eighteen healthy subjects were enrolled to either a control (dim light) or a bright light group. Blood was sampled at baseline and on the 4 th day of simulated night shift. In response to a night-oriented schedule, the phase of PER1 and BMAL1 rhythms in PBMCs was delayed by ~2.5-3 h (P shift was observed for the other clock genes and the central markers. Three cycles of 8-h bright light induced significant phase delays (P night-oriented schedule and a rapid resetting effect of nocturnal bright light exposure on peripheral clocks.

  13. Characteristics of primary infection of a European human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B isolate in chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, W. M.; Koornstra, W. H.; Dubbes, R. H.; ten Haaft, P. J.; Verstrepen, B. E.; Jhagjhoorsingh, S. S.; Haaksma, A. G.; Niphuis, H.; Laman, J. D.; Norley, S.; Schuitemaker, H.; Goudsmit, J.; Hunsmann, G.; Heeney, J. L.; Wigzell, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to select, from a panel of candidate European human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade B primary virus isolates, one isolate based on replication properties in chimpanzee peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Secondly, to evaluate the in vivo kinetics of

  14. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  15. Expression of Activin During and After Chemotherapy in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Primary Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jueckstock, Julia; Burkhardt, Natalie; Kuhn, Christina; Blankenstein, Thomas; Mahner, Sven; Schindlbeck, Christian; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    Activins are dimeric glycoproteins that play a significant role in reproduction and in endocrine-active tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential correlation between the concentration of activins (activin A, activin B, and activin AB) in patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. The serum concentration of activins in 30 patients receiving chemotherapy within the German SUCCESS A study was analyzed using different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at three time points: After primary surgery, but before chemotherapy; 4 weeks after the end of chemotherapy; and 2 years after chemotherapy during recurrence-free follow-up. The activin concentration decreased in all patients after chemotherapy. Premenopausal patients had significantly lower concentrations of activin AB during follow-up than postmenopausal women (p=0.037). Thirteen out of 16 premenopausal patients developed chemotherapy-related amenorrhea (CRA) but did not significantly differ in their activin concentrations compared to the other premenopausal women. A positive human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu status was associated with a significant reduction of activin AB concentration (p=0.02), and trastuzumab treatment correlated with significantly decreased activin A concentration (p=0.012). Serial measurements of activin A concentration might be used for monitoring trastuzumab treatment. A sudden increase of activin concentration could be an early indicator of disease recurrence. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Secretomes of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura-Wakayama, Yukiko; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Kawai, Takamasa; Ogata, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Hibi, Hideharu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral nerve regeneration across nerve gaps is often suboptimal, with poor functional recovery. Stem cell transplantation-based regenerative therapy is a promising approach for axon regeneration and functional recovery of peripheral nerve injury; however, the mechanisms remain controversial and unclear. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells promote tissue regeneration through a paracrine mechanism. We investigated the effects of conditioned media derived from stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED-CM) on peripheral nerve regeneration. In vitro, SHED-CM-treated Schwann cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation, migration, and the expression of neuron-, extracellular matrix (ECM)-, and angiogenesis-related genes. SHED-CM stimulated neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and increased cell viability. Similarly, SHED-CM enhanced tube formation in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, a 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap model was bridged by silicon conduits containing SHED-CM or serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Light and electron microscopy confirmed that the number of myelinated axons and axon-to-fiber ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the SHED-CM group at 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. The sciatic functional index (SFI) and gastrocnemius (target muscle) wet weight ratio demonstrated functional recovery. Increased compound muscle action potentials and increased SFI in the SHED-CM group suggested sciatic nerve reinnervation of the target muscle and improved functional recovery. We also observed reduced muscle atrophy in the SHED-CM group. Thus, SHEDs may secrete various trophic factors that enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through multiple mechanisms. SHED-CM may therefore provide a novel therapy that creates a more desirable extracellular microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. [Human herpesvirus-6 pneumonitis following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yuu; Gotoh, Moritaka; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Akahane, Daigo; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2018-01-01

    A-46-year-old man was diagnosed with peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. He achieved a complete remission after pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (THP-COP) therapy and successful autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation (AutoSCT). However, 6 months post AutoSCT, he complained of fever. Chest computed tomography of the patient displayed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis. Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) DNA was detected in his bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Therefore, the patient was confirmed for HHV-6 pneumonitis. The treatment with foscarnet was effective, and no relapse was noticed in the patient. Besides, we have experienced pneumonitis of unknown origin in some patients after autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantations. Moreover, most of the above patients were clinically diagnosed using serum or plasma markers. Therefore, examining respiratory symptoms after AutoSCT would enable a more accurate diagnosis as well as treatment of patients with HHV-6 pneumonitis.

  18. Differential peripheral blood gene expression profile based on Her2 expression on primary tumors of breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Tudoran

    Full Text Available Breast cancer prognosis and treatment is highly dependent on the molecular features of the primary tumors. These tumors release specific molecules into the environment that trigger characteristic responses into the circulatory cells. In this study we investigated the expression pattern of 84 genes known to be involved in breast cancer signaling in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients with ER-, PR- primary tumors. The patients were grouped according to Her2 expression on the primary tumors in Her2+ and Her2- cohorts. Transcriptional analysis revealed 15 genes to be differentially expressed between the two groups highlighting that Her2 signaling in primary tumors could be associated with specific blood gene expression. We found CCNA1 to be up-regulated, while ERBB2, RASSF1, CDH1, MKI67, GATA3, GLI1, SFN, PTGS2, JUN, NOTCH1, CTNNB1, KRT8, SRC, and HIC1 genes were down-regulated in the blood of triple negative breast cancer patients compared to Her2+ cohort. IPA network analysis predicts that the identified genes are interconnected and regulate each other. These genes code for cell cycle regulators, cell adhesion molecules, transcription factors or signal transducers that modulate immune signaling, several genes being also associated with cancer progression and treatment response. These results indicate an altered immune signaling in the peripheral blood of triple negative breast cancer patients. The involvement of the immune system is necessary in favorable treatment response, therefore these results could explain the low response rates observed for triple negative breast cancer patients.

  19. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) as a Percentage of Net Primary Product (NPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a map identifying...

  20. Global patterns in human consumption of net primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence, William T.

    2004-06-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our own use. Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, energy flows within food webs and the provision of important ecosystem services. Here we present a global map showing the amount of net primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial balance sheet of net primary production `supply' and `demand' for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production `imports' and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  1. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3510135-11$15.00/0.

  2. Mass Spectrometry-Based Adrenal and Peripheral Venous Steroid Profiling for Subtyping Primary Aldosteronism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Dekkers, T.; Peitzsch, M.; Dietz, A.S.; Bidlingmaier, M.; Treitl, M.; Williams, T.A.; Bornstein, S.R.; Haase, M.; Rump, L.C.; Willenberg, H.S.; Beuschlein, F.; Deinum, J.; Lenders, J.W.; Reincke, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differentiating patients with primary aldosteronism caused by aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) from those with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH), which is essential for choice of therapeutic intervention, relies on adrenal venous sampling (AVS)-based measurements of aldosterone

  3. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies.

  4. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell...

  5. Caregiver burden among primary caregivers of patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to identify caregiver burden and influencing factors on the burden in primary caregivers of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients within 2-12 months following transplant, indicating early recovery period after discharge. This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outpatient units of three university hospitals in Turkey. A total of 55 patient and caregiver dyads were recruited and interviewed. The data were collected using questionnaires developed by the researchers and caregiver burden was measured with the Zarit Burden Interview. The mean score of Zarit Burden Interview was 28.41 (SD = 13.90). Patients' symptoms including nausea and self depreciation feeling were related to greater caregiver burden. Self-depreciation was referred to feeling undervalued. The mean score of the tool was significantly higher in caregivers who have not been educated beyond primary school and also caregivers who had lower income. Caregivers who supported their patients to fulfill physical needs and who did not receive help for meeting patients' psychological needs had statistically more elevated levels of burden. Moreover, the extent of care giving activities undertaken was positively correlated with caregiver burden scores. While positive impact of the care giving process on family relations decreased caregiver burden; negative effect increased the burden. This study suggests that caregiver burden of primary caregivers caring for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients varies by education, income status, and the extent of care giving activities undertaken. Changes in family ties and relations due to care giving effected caregiver burden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synergistic effect of DHT and IGF-1 hyperstimulation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperlini, Esther; Spaziani, Sara; Mancini, Annamaria; Caterino, Marianna; Buono, Pasqualina; Orrù, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    The abuse of mixed or combined performance-enhancing drugs is widespread among athletes and amateurs, adults and adolescents. Clinical studies demonstrated that misuse of these doping agents is associated with serious adverse effects to many organs in human. Previously, we demonstrated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes that high doses of anabolic androgenic steroids, such as dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), have effects at gene and protein levels. Supraphysiological treatments of DHT and IGF-1 affected the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle disorders as well as in cell-mediated immunological response. At protein level, DHT hyperdosage affects cell motility and apoptosis; IGF-1 hyperstimulation triggers an active cytoskeletal reorganization and an overproduction of immune response- and inflammation-related cytokines. In this study, we investigate the combined effects of DHT and IGF-1 hyperdosage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using a differential proteomic approach. DHT and IGF-1 combined treatment affects cell adhesion, migration, and survival through modulation of expression levels of cytokines and paxillin-signaling-related proteins, and activation of several pathways downstream focal adhesion kinase. Our results indicate a synergistic effect of DHT and IGF-1 which has potential implications for health risk factors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effect of drinking water disinfection by-products in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aftab; Kurzawa-Zegota, Malgorzata; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Gopalan, Rajendran C; Plewa, Michael J; Anderson, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose hazards to public health. Two major classes of DBPs are found in finished drinking water: haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). HAAs are formed following disinfection with chlorine, which reacts with iodide and bromide in the water. Previously the HAAs were shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. To determine the effect of HAAs in human somatic and germ cells and whether oxidative stress is involved in genotoxic action. In the present study both somatic and germ cells have been examined as peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm. The effects of three HAA compounds: iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA) and chloroacetic acid (CAA) were investigated. After determining appropriate concentration responses, oxygen radical involvement with the antioxidants, butylated hydroxanisole (BHA) and the enzyme catalase, were investigated in the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay under alkaline conditions, >pH 13 and the micronucleus assay. In the Comet assay, BHA and catalase were able to reduce DNA damage in each cell type compared to HAA alone. In the micronucleus assay, micronuclei (MNi) were found in peripheral lymphocytes exposed to all three HAAs and catalase and BHA were in general, able to reduce MNi induction, suggesting oxygen radicals play a role in both assays. These observations are of concern to public health since both human somatic and germ cells show similar genotoxic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Phases of daylight and the stability of color perception in the near peripheral human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panorgias, Athanasios; Kulikowski, Janus J; Parry, Neil R A; McKeefry, Declan J; Murray, Ian J

    2012-03-01

    Typical daylight extends from blue (morning sky) to orangey red (evening sky) and is represented mathematically as the Daylight Locus in color space. In this study, we investigate the impact of this daylight variation on human color vision. Thirty-eight color normal human observers performed an asymmetric color match in the near peripheral visual field. Unique hues were identified using a naming paradigm. The observers' performance for matching was almost perfectly coincident with the Daylight Locus but declined markedly in other regions. Interobserver variability reached a conspicuous minimum adjacent to the Daylight Locus and was maximal in the red and yellowish-green regions. In the naming task, unique blue and yellow were virtually coincident with the Daylight Locus. The results suggest that the mechanisms of color perception mediated by the phylogenetically older (blue-yellow) color pathway have been strongly influenced by the different phases of daylight.

  9. In vivo chicken model for peripheral intravascular human fibrin clot detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    A chicken model was prepared that provides a simple and economical method of evaluating the use of fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody 64C5 in the detection of peripheral vascular thrombi. Human fibrin was clotted in segments of a chicken's femoral artery and vein prior to intravenous injection of radioiodinated antibody 64C5. After a 3-hr perfusion time, the thrombosed and contralateral control segments of the vessels were excised and counted for radioactivity. The radiolabeled 64C5 uptake ratio of the thrombosed segment to the control segment was 5.4 +/- 1.2 (p less than 0.007) in the femoral artery, and 3.8 +/- 1.1 (p less than 0.02) in the femoral vein. This in vivo chicken model may also find application in studies of targeting agents for human fibrin

  10. The DNA damage of high doses of X-ray on human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Zoulian; Jiang Qisheng; Li Fengsheng; He Rui; Song Xiujun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detect the DNA damage of high doses of X-ray on human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Evaluation the level of DNA damage of human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm after high doses of X-ray. Methods: Using human peripheral blood with normal blood routine and normal sperm,give the dose of 0 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy, 6 Gy, 8 Gy, 10 Gy X-ray radiation with energy of 6MU. Detect the percentage of comet-like tail, tail length and content of DNA in tail of whole blood cell's DNA and sperm's DNA by SCGE technique in 1 hour. Results: The peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm's comet rate were 1.00±0.10%, 2.1±1.5%, respectively, have an evidently variance in 0 Gy group (υ=18, t=2.31>1.734, P 1.734, P 1.734, P<0.05). The peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm's comet rate were all 100%, 100%, have no-statistical significance in 8 Gy, 10 Gy group. Conclusion: The evidence is powerful enough. That the sperm's SCGE is more sensitive than peripheral blood nucleated cell's SCGE in reflect the X-ray damage in a certain extent (2-6 Gy). (authors)

  11. Precise chronology of differentiation of developing human primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuefeng; Xu, Shan; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Lishan; Chen, YiPing; Zhang, Yanding

    2014-02-01

    While correlation of developmental stage with embryonic age of the human primary dentition has been well documented, the available information regarding the differentiation timing of the primary teeth was largely based on the observation of initial mineralization and varies significantly. In this study, we aimed to document precise differentiation timing of the developing human primary dentition. We systematically examined the expression of odontogenic differentiation markers along with the formation of mineralized tissue in each developing maxillary and mandibular teeth from human embryos with well-defined embryonic age. We show that, despite that all primary teeth initiate development at the same time, odontogenic differentiation begins in the maxillary incisors at the 15th week and in the mandibular incisors at the 16th week of gestation, followed by the canine, the first primary premolar, and the second primary premolar at a week interval sequentially. Despite that the mandibular primary incisors erupt earlier than the maxillary incisors, this distal to proximal sequential differentiation of the human primary dentition coincides in general with the sequence of tooth eruption. Our results provide an accurate chronology of odontogenic differentiation of the developing human primary dentition, which could be used as reference for future studies of human tooth development.

  12. Peripheral inflammation acutely impairs human spatial memory via actions on medial temporal lobe glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil A; Doeller, Christian F; Voon, Valerie; Burgess, Neil; Critchley, Hugo D

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation impairs cognitive performance and is implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Rodent studies demonstrated key roles for inflammatory mediators in many processes critical to memory, including long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. They also demonstrated functional impairment of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures by systemic inflammation. However, human data to support this position are limited. Sequential fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography together with experimentally induced inflammation was used to investigate effects of a systemic inflammatory challenge on human MTL function. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning was performed in 20 healthy participants before and after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. After each scanning session, participants performed a virtual reality spatial memory task analogous to the Morris water maze and a mirror-tracing procedural memory control task. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data demonstrated an acute reduction in human MTL glucose metabolism after inflammation. The inflammatory challenge also selectively compromised human spatial, but not procedural, memory; this effect that was independent of actions on motivation or psychomotor response. Effects of inflammation on parahippocampal and rhinal glucose metabolism directly mediated actions of inflammation on spatial memory. These data demonstrate acute sensitivity of human MTL to mild peripheral inflammation, giving rise to associated functional impairment in the form of reduced spatial memory performance. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the observed epidemiologic link between inflammation and risk of age-related cognitive decline and progression of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LESIONS IN PERIPHERAL GANGLIA IN CHIMPANZEE AND IN HUMAN POLIOMYELITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodian, David; Howe, Howard A.

    1947-01-01

    1. The peripheral ganglia of eighteen inoculated chimpanzees and thirteen uninoculated controls, and of eighteen fatal human poliomyelitis cases, were studied for histopathological evidence of the route of transmission of virus from the alimentary tract to the CNS. 2. Lesions thought to be characteristic of poliomyelitis in inoculated chimpanzees could not be sharply differentiated from lesions of unknown origin in uninoculated control animals. Moreover, although the inoculated animals as a group, in comparison with the control animals, had a greater number of infiltrative lesions in sympathetic as well as in sensory ganglia, it was not possible to make satisfactory correlations between the distribution of these lesions and the routes of inoculation. 3. In sharp contrast with chimpanzees, the celiac and stellate ganglia of the human poliomyelitis cases were free of any but insignificant infiltrative lesions. Lesions in human trigeminal and spinal sensory ganglia included neuronal damage as well as focal and perivascular inflitrative lesions, as is well known. In most ganglia, as in monkey and chimpanzee sensory ganglia, these were correlated in intensify with the degree of severity of lesions in the region of the CNS receiving their axons. This suggested that lesions in sensory ganglia probably resulted from spread of virus centrifugally from the CNS, in accord with considerable experimental evidence. 4. Two principal difficulties in the interpretation of histopathological findings in peripheral ganglia were revealed by this study. The first is that the specificity of lesions in sympathetic ganglia has not been established beyond doubt as being due to poliomyelitis. The second is that the presence of characteristic lesions in sensory ganglia does not, and cannot, reveal whether the virus reached the ganglia from the periphery or from the central nervous system, except in very early preparalytic stages or in exceptional cases of early arrest of virus spread and of

  14. Investigation of micronuclei induction in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to EMF RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomiets, Irina A.; Triapitsina, Galina A.; Polevik, Nikolai D.; Pryakhin, Evgeny A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The widespread application of cellular phones is of great concern in view possible consequences for human health. The aim of this study is to assess the capability of electromagnetic fields (EMF) RF with frequency 925 MHz and modulation 217 Hz to induce genotoxic effects as evaluated by the in vitro micronucleus assay on peripheral blood lymphocytes. The flasks of peripheral blood samples collected from healthy volunteers (5 men and 5 women) were placed just on the oscillator of emitting antenna. The signals were produced by the laboratory research plant and were evaluated at four specific absorption rates (SARs) - 0; 0.29; 1.2; 8.1 W/kg. SARs were determined by the calorimetric method. Phytohaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes were exposed three times for 10 minutes in the G o (the first 30 minutes after the beginning of cultivation), S (24 hours later), G 2 -M (after 48 hours from the beginning of cultivation) stages of the cell cycle. 72-hours cultures of lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of micronuclei. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate the significance for comparison. The data indicated a significant increase of micronuclei in human lymphocytes exposed to EMF RF (6.5 ± 0.51 0/00; 7.1 ± 0.66 0/00; 7.0 ± 0.50 0/00) in comparison with sham-exposed lymphocytes (3.0 ± 0.60 0/00). There was not revealed a dose-dependent increase of micronuclei in human lymphocytes. It was suggested that the increase of micronuclei in lymphocytes is explicated by a particularity of EMF RF just near the oscillator of emitting antenna. (author)

  15. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Isheeta [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  16. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  17. Induction of mitotic micronuclei by X-ray contrast media in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, Z.; Moncada, R.; Kormano, M.; Satokari, K.; Eklund, R.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo cytogenetic effects of X-ray contrast media (CM) were determined by scoring micronuclei (MN) in 72-h cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes. Both ionic (sodium meglumine diatrizoate, methylglucamine diatrizoate, and sodium meglumine ioxaglate and nonionic CM (iosimide, iopromide, iohexol and iotrolan) were able to induce MN in lymphocytes. Based upon their calculated percent probabilities for MN induction, these agents could be ranked in their decreasing order of probability, as iosimide > sodium meglumine ioxaglate > iohexol > sodium meglumine diatrizoate > iopromide > methylglucamine diatrizoate > iotrolan. Stepwise logistic regression analysis of the data indicated that the frequency of MN in CM-exposed lymphocyte cultures was significantly higher than the frequency of MN in control cultures (P < 0.001). In clinical studies where 14 patients were injected with an ionic CM methylglucamine diatrizoate, lymphocyte cultures from 10 patients showed higher frequencies of MN. The differences between pre- and post-CM counts of MN were significant in a Mann-Whitney U test (P < 0.05). The effect of X-irradiation on MN formation in lymphocytes was separately determined and was found to be insignificant. These results indicate that irrespective of ionic and osmolality differences, X-ray contrast agents are capable of producing chromosomal damage in peripheral lymphocytes. Further studies are required to establish molecular mechanisms in the observed cytogenetic effects of CM in cell cultures. (Auth.)

  18. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanberg Paul R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain.

  19. Evaluation of an Immunomodulator Drug as a Radioprotectant on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sattarpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: IMOD™, a selenium enriched extract of the plants Tanacetum vulgare, Urtica dioica, and Rosa canina, has an excellent effect on oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of this immunomodulatory drug on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods: Peripheral blood samples obtained from venipuncture of the brachial vein were treated with IMOD™ (5, 10, 15, 20 μl for 30 min and Cobalt 60 γ-rays (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 Gy as the test groups and cultured with the control. We used the micronuclei assay, cell death detection, and cell toxicity assay to analyze the treatment effects. Results: The frequency of micronuclei were 1.66 (0 Gy, 5.33 (0.25 Gy, 9.67 (0.5 Gy, 17.67 (1 Gy, and 23.67 (2 Gy in the irradiated lymphocytes (P<0.001. The percentage of micronuclei frequency reduced to 20%, 26.83%, 37.68%, 16%, and 20.47% with IMOD™. Apoptosis and necrosis decreased significantly in the IMOD™ treated groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: IMOD™ may protect these cells against ionizing radiation.

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Regulatory T Cells Dynamics in Peripheral Blood in Human and Porcine Polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Serve

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeverely injured patients experience substantial immunological stress in the aftermath of traumatic insult, which often results in systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells (Treg play a key role in the suppression of the immune response and in the maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Little is known about their presence and dynamics in blood after trauma, and nothing is known about Treg in the porcine polytrauma model. Here, we assessed different subsets of Treg in trauma patients (TP and compared those to either healthy volunteers (HV or data from porcine polytrauma.MethodsPeripheral blood was withdrawn from 20 TP with injury severity score (ISS ≥16 at the admittance to the emergency department (ED, and subsequently on day 1 and at day 3. Ten HV were included as controls (ctrl. The porcine polytrauma model consisted of a femur fracture, liver laceration, lung contusion, and hemorrhagic shock resulting in an ISS of 27. After polytrauma, the animals underwent resuscitation and surgical fracture fixation. Blood samples were withdrawn before and immediately after trauma, 24 and 72 h later. Different subsets of Treg, CD4+CD25+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, CD4+CD25+CD127−, and CD4+CD25+CD127−FoxP3+ were characterized by flow cytometry.ResultsAbsolute cell counts of leukocytes were significantly increasing after trauma, and again decreasing in the follow-up in human and porcine samples. The proportion of human Treg in the peripheral blood of TP admitted to the ED was lower when compared to HV. Their numbers did not recover until 72 h after trauma. Comparable data were found for all subsets. The situation in the porcine trauma model was comparable with the clinical data. In porcine peripheral blood before trauma, we could identify Treg with the typical immunophenotype (CD4+CD25+CD127−, which were virtually absent immediately after trauma. Similar to the human situation, most of these cells expressed FoxP3, as assessed by

  1. The alkaline comet assay as a biomarker of primary DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of nuclear medicine personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether occupational exposure to chronic low doses of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine departments may lead to genotoxicity. The alkaline comet assay was selected as a bio-marker of exposure to evaluate the levels of primary DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of exposed and corresponding control subjects. Statistically significant differences were found between comet tail length and tail moment values measured in leukocytes from the exposed and control groups. Within exposed group significant inter-individual differences in DNA damage were assessed, indicating different genome sensitivity. In majority of exposed subjects the levels of DNA damage were in positive correlation with the duration of occupational exposure, while the influences of age and dosimeter readings could be excluded. However, the levels of primary DNA damage detected both in control and exposed subjects were significantly influenced by smoking. The present study indicates the possibility of genotoxic risks related to occupational exposure in nuclear medicine departments. Therefore, the exposed personnel should carefully apply the radiation protection procedures to minimize, as low as possible, radiation exposure to avoid possible genotoxic effects. According to results obtained, the alkaline comet assay could be usefully applied as a sensitive additional bio-marker in the regular health screening of workers occupationally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  2. Peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  3. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laulumaa Saara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  4. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA and this could be related to metabolic disturbances. This study investigated the association between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and metabolic risk factors in 1,019 subjects, aged...... 18-93 years. DNA damage was analyzed as strand breaks by the comet assay and levels of formamidopyrimidine (FPG-) and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-sensitive sites There was an association between age and levels of FPG-sensitive sites for women, but not for men. The same tendency......, cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all...

  5. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  6. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  7. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  8. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban R Fernández

    Full Text Available Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  9. Optimizing the method for generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haihui; Huang, Xia; Xu, Jing; Song, Lili; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yuan, Weiping; Li, Yanxin

    2018-06-15

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from human peripheral blood provides a convenient and low-invasive way to obtain patient-specific iPSCs. The episomal vector is one of the best approaches for reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent status because of its simplicity and affordability. However, the efficiency of episomal vector reprogramming of adult peripheral blood cells is relatively low compared with cord blood and bone marrow cells. In the present study, integration-free human iPSCs derived from peripheral blood were established via episomal technology. We optimized mononuclear cell isolation and cultivation, episomal vector promoters, and a combination of transcriptional factors to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here, we improved the generation efficiency of integration-free iPSCs from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by optimizing the method of isolating mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, by modifying the integration of culture medium, and by adjusting the duration of culture time and the combination of different episomal vectors. With this optimized protocol, a valuable asset for banking patient-specific iPSCs has been established.

  10. Human Flt3L generates dendritic cells from canine peripheral blood precursors: implications for a dog glioma clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Xiong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and carries a dismal prognosis. We have developed a conditional cytotoxic/immunotherapeutic approach using adenoviral vectors (Ads encoding the immunostimulatory cytokine, human soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (hsFlt3L and the conditional cytotoxic molecule, i.e., Herpes Simplex Type 1- thymide kinase (TK. This therapy triggers an anti-tumor immune response that leads to tumor regression and anti-tumor immunological memory in intracranial rodent cancer models. We aim to test the efficacy of this immunotherapy in dogs bearing spontaneous GBM. In view of the controversy regarding the effect of human cytokines on dog immune cells, and considering that the efficacy of this treatment depends on hsFlt3L-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs, in the present work we tested the ability of Ad-encoded hsFlt3L to generate DCs from dog peripheral blood and compared its effects with canine IL-4 and GM-CSF.Our results demonstrate that hsFlT3L expressed form an Ad vector, generated DCs from peripheral blood cultures with very similar morphological and phenotypic characteristics to canine IL-4 and GM-CSF-cultured DCs. These include phagocytic activity and expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD80 and CD14. Maturation of DCs cultured under both conditions resulted in increased secretion of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. Importantly, hsFlt3L-derived antigen presenting cells showed allostimulatory potential highlighting their ability to present antigen to T cells and elicit their proliferation.These results demonstrate that hsFlt3L induces the proliferation of canine DCs and support its use in upcoming clinical trials for canine GBM. Our data further support the translation of hsFlt3L to be used for dendritic cells' vaccination and gene therapeutic approaches from rodent models to canine patients and its future implementation in human clinical trials.

  11. Long-term culture and expansion of primary human hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, G.; Bomze, D.; Heinz, S.; Ramachandran, S.D.; Noerenberg, A.; Cohen, M.; Shibolet, O.; Sklan, E.; Braspenning, J.C.; Nahmias, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes have a critical role in metabolism, but their study is limited by the inability to expand primary hepatocytes in vitro while maintaining proliferative capacity and metabolic function. Here we describe the oncostatin M (OSM)-dependent expansion of primary human hepatocytes by low

  12. Opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying: a peripheral mechanism in humans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Opioids delay gastric emptying, which in turn may increase the risk of vomiting and pulmonary aspiration. Naloxone reverses this opiate action on gastric emptying, but it is not known whether this effect in humans is mediated by central or peripheral opiate antagonism. The importance of peripheral opioid receptor antagonism in modulating opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying was evaluated using methylnaltrexone, a quaternary derivative of the opiate antagonist naltrexone, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover placebo-controlled study, 11 healthy volunteers were given either placebo (saline), 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine, or 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine plus 0.3 mg\\/kg methylnaltrexone on three separate occasions before ingesting 500 ml deionized water. The rate of gastric emptying was measured by two methods: a noninvasive epigastric bioimpedance technique and the acetaminophen absorption test. RESULTS: The epigastric bioimpedance technique was sufficiently sensitive to detect opioid-induced changes in the rate of gastric emptying. The mean +\\/- SD time taken for the gastric volume to decrease to 50% (t0.5) after placebo was 5.5 +\\/- 2.1 min. Morphine prolonged gastric emptying to (t0.5) of 21 +\\/- 9.0 min (P < 0.03). Methylnaltrexone given concomitantly with morphine reversed the morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying to a t0.5 of 7.4 +\\/- 3.0 (P < 0.04). Maximum concentrations and area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min of serum acetaminophen concentrations after morphine were significantly different from placebo and morphine administered concomitantly with methylnaltrexone (P < 0.05). No difference in maximum concentration or area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min was noted between placebo and methylnaltrexone coadministered with morphine. CONCLUSIONS: The attenuation of morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying by methylnaltrexone suggests that the opioid effect is

  13. Low cost thermal camera for use in preclinical detection of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in primary care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, V.; Manivannan, N.; Jarry, Z.; Carmichael, J.; Vahtel, M.; Zamora, G.; Calder, C.; Simon, J.; Burge, M.; Soliz, P.

    2018-02-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) accounts for around 73,000 lower-limb amputations annually in the US on patients with diabetes. Early detection of DPN is critical. Current clinical methods for diagnosing DPN are subjective and effective only at later stages. Until recently, thermal cameras used for medical imaging have been expensive and hence prohibitive to be installed in primary care setting. The objective of this study is to compare results from a low-cost thermal camera with a high-end thermal camera used in screening for DPN. Thermal imaging has demonstrated changes in microvascular function that correlates with nerve function affected by DPN. The limitations for using low-cost cameras for DPN imaging are: less resolution (active pixels), frame rate, thermal sensitivity etc. We integrated two FLIR Lepton (80x60 active pixels, 50° HFOV, thermal sensitivity aged 35-76) were recruited. Difference in the temperature measurements between cameras was calculated for each subject and the results show that the difference between the temperature measurements of two cameras (mean difference=0.4, p-value=0.2) is not statistically significant. We conclude that the low-cost thermal camera system shows potential for use in detecting early-signs of DPN in under-served and rural clinics.

  14. Evaluation of Two Different Analytical Methods for Circulating Tumor Cell Detection in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Primary Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. S. Jaeger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence is accumulating that circulating tumor cells (CTC out of peripheral blood can serve as prognostic marker not only in metastatic but also in early breast cancer (BC. Various methods are available to detect CTC. Comparisons between the different techniques, however, are rare. Material and Methods. We evaluate two different methods for CTC enrichment and detection in primary BC patients: the FDA-approved CellSearch System (CSS; Veridex, Warren, USA and a manual immunocytochemistry (MICC. The cut-off value for positivity was ≥1 CTC. Results. The two different nonoverlapping patient cohorts evaluated with one or the other method were well balanced regarding common clinical parameters. Before adjuvant CHT 21.1% (416 out of 1972 and 20.6% (247 out of 1198 of the patients were CTC-positive, while after CHT 22.5% (359 out of 1598 and 16.6% (177 out of 1066 of the patients were CTC-positive using CSS or MICC, respectively. CTC positivity rate before CHT was thus similar and not significantly different (P=0.749, while CTC positivity rate immediately after CHT was significantly lower using MICC compared to CSS (P<0.001. Conclusion. Using CSS or MICC for CTC detection, we found comparable prevalence of CTC before but not after adjuvant CHT.

  15. Association of mitochondrial DNA in peripheral blood with depression, anxiety and stress- and adjustment disorders in primary health care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Sundquist, Kristina; Rastkhani, Hamideh; Palmér, Karolina; Memon, Ashfaque A; Sundquist, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may result in a variety of diseases. The objectives here were to examine possible differences in mtDNA copy number between healthy controls and patients with depression, anxiety or stress- and adjustment disorders; the association between mtDNA copy number and disease severity at baseline; and the association between mtDNA copy number and response after an 8-week treatment (mindfulness, cognitive based therapy). A total of 179 patients in primary health care (age 20-64 years) with depression, anxiety and stress- and adjustment disorders, and 320 healthy controls (aged 19-70 years) were included in the study. Relative mtDNA copy number was measured using quantitative real-time PCR on peripheral blood samples. We found that the mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in patients compared to controls (84.9 vs 75.9, pAnxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) and PHQ-9 scores (ß=1.00, p=0.03 and ß=0.65, p=0.04, respectively), after controlling for baseline scores, age, sex, BMI, smoking status, alcohol drinking and medication. Our findings show that mtDNA copy number is associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress- and adjustment disorders and treatment response in these disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of arginine vasopressin in electroacupuncture treatment of primary sciatica in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Shun; Yang, Jun; Sun, Fang-Jie; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Chang-Hong; He, Wei-Ya

    2015-08-01

    It has been implicated that electroacupuncture can relieve the symptoms of sciatica with the increase of pain threshold in human, and arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the brain rather than the spinal cord and blood circulation participates in antinociception. Our previous study has proven that AVP in the brain played a role in the process of electroacupuncture analgesia in rat. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of AVP in electroacupuncture in treating primary sciatica in human. The results showed that (1) AVP concentration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (7.5 ± 2.5 pg/ml), not plasma (13.2 ± 4.2 pg/ml) in primary sciatica patients was lower than that in health volunteers (16.1 ± 3.8 pg/ml and 12.3 ± 3.4 pg/ml), although the osmotic pressure in CSF and plasma did not change; (2) electroacupuncture of the bilateral "Zusanli" points (St. 36) for 60 min relieved the pain sensation in primary sciatica patients; (3) electroacupuncture increased the AVP level of CSF, not plasma in primary sciatica patients; and (4) there was the positive correlation between the effect of electroacupuncture relieving the pain and the AVP level of CSF in the primary sciatica patients. The data suggested that central AVP, not peripheral AVP might improve the effect of electroacupuncture treatment of primary sciatica in human, i.e., central AVP might take part in the electroacupuncture relieving the pain sensation in primary sciatica patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Ming-Wei; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lin, Wen-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Po-Hua; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-01-01

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. - Highlights: • We conducted a smoke reduction trial program and investigated the causal relationship between smoke and gene regulation. • MicroRNA and mRNA expression changes were examined in human PBMC. • MicroRNAs are important in regulating disease-causal genes after tobacco smoke reduction.

  18. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ming-Wei [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, Sung-Liang [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wen-Chang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ching-Hui [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Hua [School of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yungling Leo, E-mail: leolee@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. - Highlights: • We conducted a smoke reduction trial program and investigated the causal relationship between smoke and gene regulation. • MicroRNA and mRNA expression changes were examined in human PBMC. • MicroRNAs are important in regulating disease-causal genes after tobacco smoke reduction.

  19. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  20. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Komuta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration.

  1. Simulated night shift work induces circadian misalignment of the human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervezee, Laura; Cuesta, Marc; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2018-05-22

    Misalignment of the endogenous circadian timing system leads to disruption of physiological rhythms and may contribute to the development of the deleterious health effects associated with night shift work. However, the molecular underpinnings remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of a 4-day simulated night shift work protocol on the circadian regulation of the human transcriptome. Repeated blood samples were collected over two 24-hour measurement periods from eight healthy subjects under highly controlled laboratory conditions before and 4 days after a 10-hour delay of their habitual sleep period. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells to obtain transcriptomic data. Cosinor analysis revealed a marked reduction of significantly rhythmic transcripts in the night shift condition compared with baseline at group and individual levels. Subsequent analysis using a mixed-effects model selection approach indicated that this decrease is mainly due to dampened rhythms rather than to a complete loss of rhythmicity: 73% of transcripts rhythmically expressed at baseline remained rhythmic during the night shift condition with a similar phase relative to habitual bedtimes, but with lower amplitudes. Functional analysis revealed that key biological processes are affected by the night shift protocol, most notably the natural killer cell-mediated immune response and Jun/AP1 and STAT pathways. These results show that 4 days of simulated night shifts leads to a loss in temporal coordination between the human circadian transcriptome and the external environment and impacts biological processes related to the adverse health effects associated to night shift work.

  2. Differential induction from X-irradiated human peripheral blood monocytes to dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which plays an essential role in the immune system. To clarify the influences of ionizing radiation on the differentiation to DCs, we focused on human peripheral blood monocytes and investigated whether X-irradiated monocytes can differentiate into DCs. The non-irradiated monocytes and 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were induced into immature DCs (iDCs) and mature DCs (mDCs) with appropriate cytokine stimulation, and the induced cells from each monocyte expressed each DC-expressing surface antigen such as CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR. However, the expression levels of CD40 and CD86 on the iDCs derived from the 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were higher than those of iDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. Furthermore, the mDCs derived from 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes had significantly less ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in comparison to the mDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. There were no significant differences in the phagocytotic activity of the iDCs and cytokines detected in the supernatants conditioned by the DCs from the non-irradiated and irradiated monocytes. These results suggest that human monocytes which are exposed to ionizing radiation can thus differentiate into DCs, but there is a tendency that X-irradiation leads to an impairment of the function of DCs. (author)

  3. In vitro X-ray irradiation of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes enhances suppressor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of in vitro X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied with regard to their suppressor activity related to the concanavalin A (Con A)-induced suppressor system. To generate suppressor T lymphocytes, purified human T lymphocytes were incubated for 3 days in the first culture, with or without Con A. These lymphocytes were irradiated with various doses of X-ray before, mid or after the culture. After doing a second culture for 6 days, the suppressive influence of these cells on T lymphocyte proliferation rates stimulated with allogeneic mononuclear cells, and B lymphocyte proliferation rates stimulated with pokeweed mitogen was measured. Irradiation of cultures to which Con A had not been added induced much the same level of suppressor activity as seen in the cultures with Con A. The suppressor activity gradually increased with time from the irradiation to the suppressor cell assay. Suppressor T lymphocytes were resistant to X-ray irradiation and independent of DNA synthesis. However, irradiation-induced enhancement was minimal in cultures incubated with con A, regardless of the irradiation time. (author)

  4. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jacoba E; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres with diameters ranging from 5.0 to 15.0 microm. The Ranvier node model was extended to include a persistent sodium current and was incorporated into a generalised single cable nerve fibre model. Parameter temperature dependence was included. All calculations were performed in Matlab. Sensory nerve fibre excitability behaviour characteristics predicted by the new nerve fibre model at different temperatures and fibre diameters compared well with measured data. Absolute refractory periods deviated from measured data, while relative refractory periods were similar to measured data. Conduction velocities showed both fibre diameter and temperature dependence and were underestimated in fibres thinner than 12.5 microm. Calculated strength-duration time constants ranged from 128.5 to 183.0 micros at 37 degrees C over the studied nerve fibre diameter range, with chronaxie times about 30% shorter than strength-duration time constants. Chronaxie times exhibited temperature dependence, with values overestimated by a factor 5 at temperatures lower than body temperature. Possible explanations include the deviated absolute refractory period trend and inclusion of a nodal strangulation relationship.

  5. INDUCTION OF DNA STRAND BREAKS BY TRIHALOMETHANES IN PRIMARY HUMAN LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Trihalomethanes (TEMs) are disinfection by-products and suspected human carcinogens present in chlorinated drinking water. Previous studies have shown that many THMs induce sister chromatid exchanges and DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocyte...

  6. Efficacy of laser peripheral iridoplasty and iridotomy on medically refractory patients with acute primary angle closure: a three year outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jing; QING Guo-ping; WANG Ning-li; WANG Huai-zhou

    2013-01-01

    Background Argon laser peripheral iridoplasty (ALPI) is proved to be effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) of patients with mild acute primary angle closure (APAC).It is unclear whether this laser treatment is equally efficient in managing patients with severe APAC.This study aimed to evaluate the IOP-lowering efficacy of ALPI and laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) on patients with refractory APAC,who have previously responded poorly to intensive medical therapy.Methods Thirty-six patients (8 men and 28 women) were identified as medically refractory APAC,who still had ocular pain,red eye,hazy cornea,closed anterior chamber (AC) angle,and IOP of not less than 21 mmHg after two days or more of anti-glaucoma medication.All enrolled patients underwent ophthalmologic examinations including measurement of visual acuity (VA),best corrected VA (BCVA),IOP,biomicroscopy,and gonioscopy followed by ALPI immediately in the APAC eye and LPI in both eyes.Results All patients were affected unilaterally,with average age of (54.6±11.7) (range,37.0-75.0) years old.The mean IOP value of the affected eyes dropped from (31.6±7.7) (range,21.0-39.0) mmHg at enrollment to (18.4±8.7) (range,10.0-27.0) mmHg 2 hours after ALPI.At follow-up day 7,the mean IOP value maintained at (14.8±4.2) (range,9.0-21.0)mmHg,which was significantly different (P=0.000) compared with baseline.The average decrease of IOP in the APAC eyes was (16.8±7.4) (range,12.0-21.0) mmHg.At follow-up three years later,the mean IOP of the APAC eyes stabilized at (16.3±3.2) (range,9.0-20.0) mmHg with at least 180° of AC angle opened.Conclusion ALPI and LPI lower the IOP of medically refractory cases of APAC though they have responded poorly to anti-glaucoma medication.

  7. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin− mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin − ) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin + ) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin − cell population. The ability of Lin + and Lin − to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin + and Lin − were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin + mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin − stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation

  8. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  9. Effects of mercury on the proliferation of human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwecka, K.; Poniedzialek, B.; Rzymski, P.; Karczewski, J.; Zurawski, J.; Wiktorowicz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Our project aimed to investigate the effects of mercury on the proliferation of human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. The lymphocytes were isolated from the blood collected from healthy donors at Regionalne Centrum Krwiodawstwa i Krwiolecznictwa in Poznan, Poland. For the purpose of cell culture, the lymphocyte suspension (25 · 10 4 cells/ml) in Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum was prepared. Phytohaemagglutinin-L (PHA-L) was used in a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml to stimulate cell proliferation. Mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) in four different concentrations (1 μM, 10 μM, 50 μM, 100 μM) and [3H]-thymidine were added after 48 hours of incubation and the cell culture was continued for the next 24 hours. The rate of lymphocyte proliferation was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation method with a liquid scintillation counter. Results indicate that higher concentrations of mercury (50 μM, 100 μM) inhibit the [3H]-thymidine incorporation of human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. The incorporation was lower than the control sample by 65% at a concentration of 50 μM, while at a concentration of 100 μM it fell to virtually zero. Moreover, the phase of lymphocyte proliferation cycle affected by mercuric chloride was also investigated. For this purpose HgCl 2 in 2 concentrations (10 μM, 50 μM) was added to the cell culture in 4 different time points: at the start of the cell culture and after 4, 24, and 48 hours of incubation. After 48 hours, [3H]-thymidine was added and the cell culture was continued for an additional 24 hours. The rate of cell proliferation was estimated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation using a liquid scintillation counter. The inhibition effect was observed in samples with metal added at the start of the cell culture and after 4 h of incubation, i.e. at the initial phase of the lymphocyte proliferation cycle. (authors)

  10. Peripheral erythrocytes decrease upon specific respiratory challenge with grass pollen allergen in sensitized mice and in human subjects.

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    Galateja Jordakieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC. METHODS AND RESULTS: BALB/c mice (n = 20 were intraperitoneally immunized with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 and afterwards aerosol challenged with either the specific allergen Phl p 5 (n = 10 or the non-specific antigen ovalbumin (OVA (n = 10. A protocol for inducing allergic asthma as well as allergic rhinitis, according to the united airway concept, was used. Both groups of exposed mice showed significantly reduced physical activity after airway challenge. Specific airway challenge further resulted in goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced mucous secretion, intrapulmonary leukocyte infiltration and lymphoid follicle formation, associated with significant expression of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in splenocytes and also partially in lung tissue. Concerning circulating blood cell dynamics, we observed a significant drop of erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in both mouse groups, challenged with allergen or OVA. A significant decrease in circulating erythrocytes and hematocrit levels after airway challenges with grass pollen allergen was also found in grass pollen sensitized human rhinitis subjects (n = 42 at the VCC. The effects on peripheral leukocyte counts in mice and humans however were opposed, possibly due to the different primary inflammation sites. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed that, besides significant leukocyte dynamics, particularly erythrocytes are involved in acute hypersensitivity reactions to respiratory allergens

  11. Different Chondrogenic Potential among Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Diverse Origin Primary Cells

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    Yeri Alice Rim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientists have tried to reprogram various origins of primary cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. Every somatic cell can theoretically become a hiPSC and give rise to targeted cells of the human body. However, there have been debates on the controversy about the differentiation propensity according to the origin of primary cells. We reprogrammed hiPSCs from four different types of primary cells such as dermal fibroblasts (DF, n=3, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, n=3, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC, n=3, and osteoarthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (OAFLS, n=3. Established hiPSCs were differentiated into chondrogenic pellets. All told, cartilage-specific markers tended to express more by the order of CBMC > DF > PBMC > FLS. Origin of primary cells may influence the reprogramming and differentiation thereafter. In the context of chondrogenic propensity, CBMC-derived hiPSCs can be a fairly good candidate cell source for cartilage regeneration. The differentiation of hiPSCs into chondrocytes may help develop “cartilage in a dish” in the future. Also, the ideal cell source of hiPSC for chondrogenesis may contribute to future application as well.

  12. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

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    Nan Yu

    Full Text Available Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo-secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion.

  13. Primary peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing's tumor of the testis in a 46-year-old man-differential diagnosis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikaus, Sebastian; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Eucker, Jan; Hogrebe, Esther; Danebrock, Raihanatou; Wai, Daniel H; Krenn, Veit; Gabbert, Helmut E; Poremba, Christopher

    2009-06-01

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing's tumors are rare bone and soft tissue malignancies with a highly aggressive clinical course and early metastases occurring at multiple peripheral sites. Here, we present for the first time a case of a 46-year-old man with a primary peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing's tumor of the testis. The diagnosis of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing's tumor was established by histology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular pathology. The tumor revealed a rapid progress in 2 months' time. Therefore, the patient was included in the EURO-E.W.I.N.G.99 study and was placed on chemotherapy. However, the tumor progressed during ongoing therapy, and the patient died in March 2008. In conclusion, though being reported here for the first time, peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor/Ewing's tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of blue round cell tumors of the testis. A rapid and correct diagnosis of this entity is crucial for fast and accurate therapy, which is stressed by the fatal case presented here.

  14. Direct Conversion of Human Fibroblasts into Schwann Cells that Facilitate Regeneration of Injured Peripheral Nerve In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Yoshihiro; Kishida, Tsunao; Tomita, Koichi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Numajiri, Toshiaki; Mazda, Osam

    2017-04-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) play pivotal roles in the maintenance and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system. Although transplantation of SCs enhances repair of experimentally damaged peripheral and central nerve tissues, it is difficult to prepare a sufficient number of functional SCs for transplantation therapy without causing adverse events for the donor. Here, we generated functional SCs by somatic cell reprogramming procedures and demonstrated their capability to promote peripheral nerve regeneration. Normal human fibroblasts were phenotypically converted into SCs by transducing SOX10 and Krox20 genes followed by culturing for 10 days resulting in approximately 43% directly converted Schwann cells (dSCs). The dSCs expressed SC-specific proteins, secreted neurotrophic factors, and induced neuronal cells to extend neurites. The dSCs also displayed myelin-forming capability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, transplantation of the dSCs into the transected sciatic nerve in mice resulted in significantly accelerated regeneration of the nerve and in improved motor function at a level comparable to that with transplantation of the SCs obtained from a peripheral nerve. The dSCs induced by our procedure may be applicable for novel regeneration therapy for not only peripheral nerve injury but also for central nerve damage and for neurodegenerative disorders related to SC dysfunction. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1207-1216. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy of laser peripheral iridoplasty in reversing the darkroom provocative test result in Chinese patients with primary angle closure status post laser iridotomy

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    Ping Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of krypton laser peripheral iridoplasty (LPIP for Chinese patients with primary angle closure (PAC or primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG status post laser iridotomy in reversing the positive results of the dark room provocative test (DRPT.METHODS:This study was prospective, noncomparative, interventional case series. Thirty-three patients (thirty-eight eyes with PAC or PACG status post patent laser iridotomy and maintained normal intraocular pressure (IOP but with positive DRPT results were enrolled. All the subjects were treated with krypton LPIP. DRPT was repeated after krypton LPIP. Results of DRPT were recorded. The visual acuity, IOP and gonioscopy were analyzed before and after krypton LPIP. A minimum time limit for follow-up was 6mo.RESULTS:Thirty-three patients (thirty-eight eyes were followed for 17.7±8.37mo (range 7-41mo after LPIP. Positive results of DRPT decreased from 38 eyes to 9 eyes (23.7% after LPIP. Peripheral anterior synechiae of angle in 34 of 38 eyes (89.5% remained unchanged at dynamic gonioscopy throughout the follow-up period after LPIP.CONCLUSION:LPIP decreased positive rates of the DRPT significantly. The mechanism may be that LPIP minimized contact between the peripheral iris and trabecular meshwork, which is a key factor for developing peripheral anterior synechiae.

  16. Evaluation of the efficacy of laser peripheral iridoplasty in reversing the darkroom provocative test result in Chinese patients with primary angle closure status post laser iridotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping; Huang; Ling-Ling; Wu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of krypton laser peripheral iridoplasty(LPIP) for Chinese patients with primary angle closure(PAC) or primary angle-closure glaucoma(PACG) status post laser iridotomy in reversing the positive results of the dark room provocative test(DRPT).METHODS: This study was prospective, noncomparative,interventional case series. Thirty-three patients(thirty-eight eyes) with PAC or PACG status post patent laser iridotomy and maintained normal intraocular pressure(IOP) but with positive DRPT results were enrolled. All the subjects were treated with krypton LPIP. DRPT was repeated after krypton LPIP. Results of DRPT were recorded. The visual acuity, IOP and gonioscopy were analyzed before and after krypton LPIP. A minimum time limit for follow-up was 6mo.RESULTS: Thirty-three patients(thirty-eight eyes)were followed for 17.7 ±8.37mo(range 7-41mo) after LPIP. Positive results of DRPT decreased from 38 eyes to9 eyes(23.7%) after LPIP. Peripheral anterior synechiae of angle in 34 of 38 eyes(89.5%) remained unchanged at dynamic gonioscopy throughout the follow-up period after LPIP.CONCLUSION: LPIP decreased positive rates of the DRPT significantly. The mechanism may be that LPIP minimized contact between the peripheral iris and trabecular meshwork, which is a key factor for developing peripheral anterior synechiae.

  17. Inhibitory Mechanisms in Primary Somatosensory Cortex Mediate the Effects of Peripheral Electrical Stimulation on Tactile Spatial Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kei; Otsuru, Naofumi; Inukai, Yasuto; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Tsuiki, Shota; Sasaki, Ryoki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2018-06-01

    Selective afferent activation can be used to improve somatosensory function, possibly by altering cortical inhibitory circuit activity. Peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) is widely used to induce selective afferent activation, and its effect may depend on PES intensity. Therefore, we investigated the effects of high- and low-intensity PES applied to the right index finger on tactile discrimination performance and cortical sensory-evoked potential paired-pulse depression (SEP-PPD) in 25 neurologically healthy subjects. In Experiment 1, a grating orientation task (GOT) was performed before and immediately after local high- and low-intensity PES (both delivered as 1-s, 20-Hz trains of 0.2-ms electrical pulses at 5-s intervals). In Experiment 2, PPD of SEP components N20/P25_SEP-PPD and N20_SEP-PPD, respectively, were assessed before and immediately after high- and low-intensity PES. Improved GOT discrimination performance after high-intensity PES (reduced discrimination threshold) was associated with lower baseline performance (higher baseline discrimination threshold). Subjects were classified into low and high (baseline) GOT performance groups. Improved GOT discrimination performance in the low GOT performance group was significantly associated with a greater N20_SEP-PPD decrease (weaker PPD). Subjects were also classified into GOT improvement and GOT decrement groups. High-intensity PES decreased N20_SEP-PPD in the GOT improvement group but increased N20_SEP-PPD in the GOT decrement group. Furthermore, a greater decrease in GOT discrimination threshold was significantly associated with a greater N20_SEP-PPD decrease in the GOT improvement group. These results suggest that high-intensity PES can improve sensory perception in subjects with low baseline function by modulating cortical inhibitory circuits in primary somatosensory cortex. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Presence and Absence of Muscle Contraction Elicited by Peripheral Nerve Electrical Stimulation Differentially Modulate Primary Motor Cortex Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of cortical excitability by sensory inputs is a critical component of sensorimotor integration. Sensory afferents, including muscle and joint afferents, to somatosensory cortex (S1) modulate primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, but the effects of muscle and joint afferents specifically activated by muscle contraction are unknown. We compared motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following median nerve stimulation (MNS) above and below the contraction threshold based on the persistence of M-waves. Peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (PES) conditions, including right MNS at the wrist at 110% motor threshold (MT; 110% MNS condition), right MNS at the index finger (sensory digit nerve stimulation [DNS]) with stimulus intensity approximately 110% MNS (DNS condition), and right MNS at the wrist at 90% MT (90% MNS condition) were applied. PES was administered in a 4 s ON and 6 s OFF cycle for 20 min at 30 Hz. In Experiment 1 (n = 15), MEPs were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) before (baseline) and after PES. In Experiment 2 (n = 15), M- and F-waves were recorded from the right APB. Stimulation at 110% MNS at the wrist evoking muscle contraction increased MEP amplitudes after PES compared with those at baseline, whereas DNS at the index finger and 90% MNS at the wrist not evoking muscle contraction decreased MEP amplitudes after PES. M- and F-waves, which reflect spinal cord or muscular and neuromuscular junctions, did not change following PES. These results suggest that muscle contraction and concomitant muscle/joint afferent inputs specifically enhance M1 excitability. PMID:28392766

  19. Peripheral facial nerve lesions induce changes in the firing properties of primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, A; Cuestas, D M; Troncoso, J

    2012-10-25

    Facial nerve lesions elicit long-lasting changes in vibrissal primary motor cortex (M1) muscular representation in rodents. Reorganization of cortical representation has been attributed to potentiation of preexisting horizontal connections coming from neighboring muscle representation. However, changes in layer 5 pyramidal neuron activity induced by facial nerve lesion have not yet been explored. To do so, the effect of irreversible facial nerve injury on electrophysiological properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons was characterized. Twenty-four adult male Wistar rats were randomly subjected to two experimental treatments: either surgical transection of mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve (n=18) or sham surgery (n=6). Unitary and population activity of vibrissal M1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo under general anesthesia was compared between sham-operated and facial nerve-injured animals. Injured animals were allowed either one (n=6), three (n=6), or five (n=6) weeks recovery before recording in order to characterize the evolution of changes in electrophysiological activity. As compared to control, facial nerve-injured animals displayed the following sustained and significant changes in spontaneous activity: increased basal firing frequency, decreased spike-associated local field oscillation amplitude, and decreased spontaneous theta burst firing frequency. Significant changes in evoked-activity with whisker pad stimulation included: increased short latency population spike amplitude, decreased long latency population oscillations amplitude and frequency, and decreased peak frequency during evoked single-unit burst firing. Taken together, such changes demonstrate that peripheral facial nerve lesions induce robust and sustained changes of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vibrissal motor cortex. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Midazolam inhibits chondrogenesis via peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Ching; Wu, King-Chuen; Huang, Bu-Miin; So, Edmund Cheung; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2018-05-01

    Midazolam, a benzodiazepine derivative, is widely used for sedation and surgery. However, previous studies have demonstrated that Midazolam is associated with increased risks of congenital malformations, such as dwarfism, when used during early pregnancy. Recent studies have also demonstrated that Midazolam suppresses osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Given that hypertrophic chondrocytes can differentiate into osteoblast and osteocytes and contribute to endochondral bone formation, the effect of Midazolam on chondrogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we applied a human MSC line, the KP cell, to serve as an in vitro model to study the effect of Midazolam on chondrogenesis. We first successfully established an in vitro chondrogenic model in a micromass culture or a 2D high-density culture performed with TGF-β-driven chondrogenic induction medium. Treatment of the Midazolam dose-dependently inhibited chondrogenesis, examined using Alcian blue-stained glycosaminoglycans and the expression of chondrogenic markers, such as SOX9 and type II collagen. Inhibition of Midazolam by peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) antagonist PK11195 or small interfering RNA rescued the inhibitory effects of Midazolam on chondrogenesis. In addition, Midazolam suppressed transforming growth factor-β-induced Smad3 phosphorylation, and this inhibitory effect could be rescued using PBR antagonist PK11195. This study provides a possible explanation for Midazolam-induced congenital malformations of the musculoskeletal system through PBR. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  3. The production of collagenase by adherent mononuclear cells cultured from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J S; Weiss, J; Ryhänen, L; Nies, K M; Rantala-Ryhänen, S; Uitto, J

    1984-12-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and the cells adherent to plastic substrata were cultured in serum-free media supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate. These cell cultures, which consisted predominantly of monocyte-macrophages as judged by nonspecific esterase staining, accumulated collagenase in the medium. This collagenase resembled other vertebrate collagenases in that it cleaved native triple-helical type I collagen at a locus 3/4-length away from the amino-terminal end of the molecule. The collagenase activity was inhibited by Na2EDTA, dithiothreitol, and fetal calf serum, while the addition of Ca++ or N-ethylmaleimide enhanced the enzyme activity. The accumulation of collagenase in the culture media was markedly enhanced by the incubation of cells with concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate. In the presence of cycloheximide, the levels of collagenase activity were markedly reduced, suggesting that active protein synthesis was required to express the enzyme activity. In additional experiments, monocytes were further purified by counterflow centrifugation-elutriation. The collagenase production was markedly increased in cultures enriched in monocyte-macrophages and devoid of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The accumulation of collagenase in monocyte cultures incubated for 48 hours in the presence of concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate was of the same order of magnitude as in parallel cultures containing the same number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and Plasmagel sedimentation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Edaravone protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Liu, Yinghui; Dong, Liangliang; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-03-01

    Radiation-induced cellular injury is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, which play a key role in irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective efficacy of edaravone, a licensed clinical drug and a powerful free radical scavenger that has been tested against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in studies of various diseases. Edaravone was pre-incubated with lymphocytes for 2 h prior to γ-irradiation. It was found that pretreatment with edaravone increased cell viability and inhibited generation of γ-radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lymphocytes exposed to 3 Gy γ-radiation. In addition, γ-radiation decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity, such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of reduced glutathione. Conversely, treatment with 100 μM edaravone prior to irradiation improved antioxidant enzyme activity and increased reduced glutathione levels in irradiated lymphocytes. Importantly, we also report that edaravone reduced γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bax, upregulation of Bcl-2, and consequent reduction of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The current study shows edaravone to be an effective radioprotector against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in lymphocytes in vitro. Finally, edaravone pretreatment significantly reduced DNA damage in γ-irradiated lymphocytes, as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment) (p edaravone offers protection from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations.

  5. Screening and fractionation of plant extracts with antiproliferative activity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza-Fagundes Elaine M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Three hundred and thirteen extracts from 136 Brazilian plant species belonging to 36 families were tested for their suppressive activity on phytohemaglutinin (PHA stimulated proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The proliferation was evaluated by the amount of [³H]-thymidine incorporated by the cells. Twenty extracts inhibited or strongly reduced the proliferation in a dose-dependent manner at doses between 10 and 100 µg/ml. Three of these extracts appeared to be non-toxic to lymphocytes, according to the trypan blue permeability assay and visual inspection using optical microscopy. Bioassay-guided fractionation of Alomia myriadenia extract showed that myriadenolide, a labdane diterpene known to occur in this species, could account for the observed activity of the crude extract. Using a similar protocol, an active fraction of the extract from Gaylussacia brasiliensis was obtained. Analysis of the ¹H and13C NMR spectra of this fraction indicates the presence of an acetylated triterpene whose characterization is underway. The extract of Himatanthus obovatus is currently under investigation.

  6. Effects of exogenous and endogenous IL-2 on irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lansheng; Wang Ninghai; Luan Meiling

    1993-08-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated with 1 to 40 Gy of γ-ray, and then cultured with PHA to prepare supernatant containing IL-2 for observation of kinetics of endogenous IL-2 production and reversion of lymphocyte proliferation after adding a highly purified IL-2. IL-2 activity was determined by the ability to sustain IL-2 dependent cell line (CTLL), lymphocyte proliferation was determined by 3 H-TdR incorporation and T lymphocyte subsets by monoclonal antibodies. The experimental results showed that lymphocytes exposed to 60 Co synthesized less DNA than nonirradiated lymphocytes. The inhibitory effect can partially reversed by purified IL-2 at the γ-ray dose range of 1 to 10 Gy, while irradiation with 2.5 Gy resulted in a reduction of T cells and T subsets, and increase in CD + 4 /CD + 8 ratio. The ratio of subsets recovered after adding IL-2. The kinetics of IL-2 production showed that the endogenous IL-2 production rose markedly with increasing dose of irradiation at the range of 1 to 10 Gy, and the peak of IL-2 production was at the γ-ray dose of 10 Gy

  7. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating [ 3 H]thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase

  8. Adaptive response induced by low concentrations of MMC in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shuqing; Wang Bin; Jiang Jie

    1998-01-01

    Samples of cultured human peripheral lymphocytes were pre-treated with mitomycin C (MMC) in concentrations of 0.01∼0.1 μg/mL at 34 h of incubation and then exposed to 1.5 Gy of X-rays. Chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei for these lymphocytes were observed. The results show that the chromosome aberration rates for lymphocytes pre-treated with MMC in concentrations of 0.5 and 0.075 μg/mL and the frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges for lymphocytes pre-treated with MMC in concentrations of 0.01 μg/mL were significantly lower than their own expected values but the rates of micronuclei for lymphocytes pre-treated with MMC in concentrations of 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 μg/mL were significantly higher than the expected values. Such results suggest that for studying the cross resistance of lymphocytes to chemicals and ionizing radiation, inconsistent conclusions may be obtained if different endpoints are based on

  9. Survival and PHA-stimulation of #betta#-irradiated human peripheral blood T lymphocyte subpopulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Darr, D.C.; Daulden, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood T lymphocyte subpopulations were identified and isolated on the basis of their ability to bind IgG (T-G), IgM (T-M), or neither immunoglobulin class (T-null). Lymphocytes were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 or 5.0 Gy of 60 Co #betta#-rays either as a T-cell suspension or as separated T cell subsets. Survival curves, determined 5 days after irradiation, revealed that each subset has radiosensitive and radioresistant portions, and that the T-G cell is the most sensitive subset. Mitotic indices of 48-h cultures showed that the response of unirradiated T lymphocytes to PHA varied greatly among the subsets, the highest indices being obtained for the T-M and the lowest for the T-G cells. With the possible exception of the T-G cells, the subsets are realtively resistant to mitotic effects of #betta#-rays. T-G cells suppress the PHA-induced mitotic response of the other T lymphocyte subsets, and this suppressor effect is radiosensitive, being abolished by 1.0 Gy. It is concluded that lymphocytes exposed to >= 1 Gy of #betta#-rays will have very few dividing B lymphocytes or T-G cells. This together with radiation-induced loss of T-G suppressor action means that the predominant lymphocyte types in mitosis after >=1 Gy are the radioresistant T-M and T-null cells. (orig.)

  10. Preliminary study on biological dosimetry using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis of human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjie; Lu Xue; Feng Jiangbing; Chen Deqing; Chen Xiaosui

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) in biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Methods: Normal peripheral blood samples from two healthy males were exposed to different doses coblat-60 gamma-rays, ranged from 0 to 5 Gy, and the tail length (TL) and Oliver tail moment (TM) of the lymphocytes were analyzed with SCGE. The dose-effect curves of TL and TM were fitted respectively. The TL and TM of lymphocytes for eight radiation workers were analyzed with SCGE, cumulative doses were estimated using the fitted TL and TM equations, and then compared with the recorded monitoring doses. Results: The TLs or TMs of normal human lymphocytes were increased with the irradiation doses, and its relationship can be fitted with a linear-quadratic equations: Y=13.59 + 20.87X - 2.27 X 2 for TL, and Y = 8.50 + 15.04X - 1.43X 2 for TM, respectively (Y denotes TL or TM value, X is radiation dose). The doses estimated with TM equation were closer to the recorded monitoring doses than that with TL equation. Conclusions: The TM in lymphocytes analyzed with SCGE is a promising radiation biological dosimeter. (authors)

  11. Cryopreserved Human Allografts for the Reconstruction of Aortic and Peripheral Prosthetic Graft Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Matteo; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco; Ferraro, Stefania; Rivolta, Nicola; Ferrario, Massimo; Guttadauro, Chiara; Castelli, Patrizio; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2017-12-25

    Background : This study aimed to present cases with cryopreserved human allografts (CHAs) for vascular reconstruction in both aortic and peripheral infected prosthetic grafts. Materials and Methods : This is a single center, observational descriptive study with retrospective analysis. In all cases, the infected prosthetic graft material was completely removed. At discharge, patients were administered anticoagulants. Follow-up examinations included clinical visits, echo-color-Doppler ultrasounds, or computed tomography angiography within 30 days and at 3, 6, and 12 months after the treatment, and then twice per year. Results : We treated 21 patients (90% men, n=19) with the mean age of 71±12 years and mean interval between the initial operation and replacement with CHA of 30 months [range, 1-216; interquartile range (IQR), 2-36]. In-hospital mortality was 14% (n=3); no CHA-related complication led to death. Limb salvage was 100%. No patient was lost at the median follow-up of 14 months (range, 2-61; IQR, 6-39). No rupture, aneurysmal degeneration, or re-infection occurred. Estimated freedom from CHA-related adverse events (95% confidence interval, 43-63) was 95% at 3 years. Conclusion : In our experience, CHAs are a viable option for prosthetic graft infections and provide satisfactory clinical results and favorable stability because of a very low rate of CHA-related adverse events during follow-up.

  12. Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by single or fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Leonard, A.; Deknyudt, G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of single (125 and 250 R) and fractionated (2x125 R) irradiation on the output of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood kept between irradiations at the temperature of 5 deg C. The single irradiation is carried out immediately after vein-puncture. In the case of fractionated irradiation the first dose of 125R is given after vein-puncture, the second, in the interval of 2, 8 and 24 hours. Blood is cultivated immediately after two irradiations in order to prepare metaphase plates for cytogenic analysis. Repair processes in cell heritage structures are not realised in blood irradiated by fractions which is kept at 5 deg C between irradiations. On the contrary, chromosome fragments, interstitial deletions, aberrant cells and cell breaks are found in a large amount in blood irradiated by fractions. They have appeared with the authentically high statistic difference as compared with the cells irradiated one time with the same dose. This effect is probably attained due to blood preservation

  13. Dissecting interferon-induced transcriptional programs in human peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Waddell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles.We used human cDNA microarrays to (1 compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons alpha, beta, omega and gamma, IL12 and TNFalpha; and (2 characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes to IFNgamma stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNgamma and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFalpha stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNgamma, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings.

  14. Allium sativum L. regulates in vitro IL-17 gene expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutia, Mouna; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Abouelazz, Omar; Elouaddari, Anass; Al Jahid, Abdellah; Elhou, Abdelhalim; Nadifi, Sellama; Jamal Eddine, Jamal; Habti, Norddine; Badou, Abdallah

    2016-09-29

    Allium sativum L. (A.S.) "garlic", one of the most interesting medicinal plants, has been suggested to contain compounds that could be beneficial in numerous pathological situations including cancer. In this work, we aimed to assess the immunomodulatory effect of A.S. preparation on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. Nontoxic doses of A.S. were identified using MTT assay. Effects on CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation were studied using flow cytometry. The effect of A.S. on cytokine gene expression was studied using qRT-PCR. Finally, qualitative analysis of A.S. was performed by HPLC approach. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA test. The nontoxic doses of A.S. preparation did not affect neither spontaneous nor TCR-mediated CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation. Interestingly, A.S. exhibited a statistically significant regulation of IL-17 gene expression, a cytokine involved in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In contrast, the expression of IL-4, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was unaffected. Qualitative analysis of A.S. ethanol preparation indicated the presence of three polyphenol bioactive compounds, which are catechin, vanillic acid and ferulic acid. The specific inhibition of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-17 without affecting cell proliferation in human PBMCs by the Allium sativum L. preparation suggests a potential valuable effect of the compounds present in this plant for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer, where IL-17 is highly expressed. The individual contribution of these three compounds to this global effect will be assessed.

  15. Human enterovirus in the gastrocnemius of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julian K S; Zhu, Zhen; Casale, George; Koutakis, Panagiotis; McComb, Rodney D; Swanson, Stanley; Thompson, Jonathan; Miserlis, Dimitrios; Johanning, Jason M; Haynatzki, Gleb; Pipinos, Iraklis I

    2013-08-06

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by myofiber degeneration and loss of function in muscles of the lower limbs. Human enterovirus (HEV) infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of muscle diseases. However, its association with PAD has not been studied. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that infectious HEV is present in skeletal muscle of patients with PAD and is associated with severity of disease. Gastrocnemius biopsies from 37 patients with PAD and 14 controls were examined for the presence of HEV RNA, viral capsid protein, viral RNA copy number, and viral infectivity. HEV RNA was detected in 54% of the biopsies from patients with PAD but was not detected in muscle biopsies from control patients. This difference in prevalence among PAD and control patients was significant at P<0.001. Viral RNA copy numbers were increased significantly at the later stages of disease; Fontaine Stage IV (10(5.50) copies/mg muscle wet weight, at P<0.005) and Stage III (10(4.87) copies/mg, at P<0.010) compared to Stage II (10(2.50) copies/mg). Viral replication was confirmed by the presence of the negative-strand of viral RNA in all specimens positive for HEV RNA. Cultures of HeLa and human skeletal muscle cells treated with muscle homogenates showed HEV replication and the presence of HEV capsid protein. Our data identified infectious HEV in the gastrocnemius of PAD patients but not in controls. Viral copy number and prevalence of infection were higher in the later stages of disease. Our data point to the need for further studies to determine the contribution of HEV infection to the pathophysiology of PAD.

  16. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

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    Molenaar Douwe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10 and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for

  17. Peripheral axotomy of the rat mandibular trigeminal nerve leads to an increase in VIP and decrease of other primary afferent neuropeptides in the spinal trigeminal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, M E; Shehab, S A

    1986-12-01

    In the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-rich lumbosacral spinal cord, VIP increases at the expense of other neuropeptides after primary sensory nerve axotomy. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether similar changes occur in peripherally axotomised cranial sensory nerves. VIP immunoreactivity increased in the terminal region of the mandibular nerve in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis following unilateral section of the sensory root of the mandibular trigeminal nerve at the foramen orale. Other primary afferent neuropeptides (substance P, cholecystokinin and somatostatin) were depleted and fluoride-resistant acid phosphatase activity was abolished in the same circumscribed areas of the nucleus caudalis. The rise in VIP and depletion of other markers began 4 days postoperatively and was maximal by 10 days, these levels remaining unchanged up to 1 year postoperatively. VIP-immunoreactive cell bodies were absent from trigeminal ganglia from the unoperated side but small and medium cells stained intensely in the ganglia of the operated side after axotomy. These observations indicate that increase of VIP in sensory nerve terminals is a general phenomenon occurring in both cranial and spinal sensory terminal areas. The intense VIP immunoreactivity in axotomised trigeminal ganglia suggests that the increased levels of VIP in the nucleus caudalis are of peripheral origin, indicating a change in expression of neuropeptides within primary afferent neurons following peripheral axotomy.

  18. Human adipose stromal cells expanded in human serum promote engraftment of human peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells in NOD/SCID mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyun Hwa; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Seo, Su Yeong; Kim, Han Na; Lee, Jae Bong; Kim, Jae Ho; Chung, Joo Seop; Jung, Jin Sup

    2005-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), that have been reported to be present in bone marrow, adipose tissues, dermis, muscles, and peripheral blood, have the potential to differentiate along different lineages including those forming bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, and neuron. Therefore, hMSC are attractive candidates for cell and gene therapy. The optimal conditions for hMSC expansion require medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Some forms of cell therapy will involve multiple doses, raising a concern over immunological reactions caused by medium-derived FBS proteins. In this study, we cultured human adipose stromal cells (hADSC) and bone marrow stroma cells (HBMSC) in human serum (HS) during their isolation and expansion, and demonstrated that they maintain their proliferative capacity and ability for multilineage differentiation and promote engraftment of peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) cells mobilized from bone marrow in NOD/SCID mice. Our results indicate that hADSC and hBMSC cultured in HS can be used for clinical trials of cell and gene therapies, including promotion of engraftment after allogeneic HSC transplantation

  19. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmina, Nina S., E-mail: nin-kuzmin@youndex.ru; Lapteva, Nellya Sh.; Rubanovich, Alexander V.

    2016-04-15

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24–77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19–77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2–51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62–11.76, p=3.9×10{sup −7}). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10{sup −5}). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10{sup −7}). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging

  20. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmina, Nina S.; Lapteva, Nellya Sh.; Rubanovich, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24–77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19–77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2–51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62–11.76, p=3.9×10 −7 ). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10 −5 ). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10 −7 ). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with

  1. Transfection of Primary Human Skin Fibroblasts for Peroxisomal Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Janet; Waterham, Hans R.

    2017-01-01

    Functional studies with primary human skin fibroblasts from patients with a peroxisomal disorder often require efficient transfection with plasmids to correct the genetic defect or to express heterologous reporter proteins. Here, we describe a protocol we commonly use for efficient nonviral

  2. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Holstege, Gert; Wit, Hero P.; Albers, Frans W. J.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a

  3. Cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in vitro with metal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachinho, Sandra C P; Pu, Fanrong; Hunt, John A

    2013-04-01

    The failure of implanted medical devices can be associated with changes in the production of cytokines by cells of the immune system. Cytokines released by peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon contact with metal particles were quantified to understand their role in implantation intergration and their importance as messengers in the recruitment of T-lymphocytes at the implantation site. Opsonization was utilised to understand the influence of serum proteins on particle-induced cytokine production and release. Different metal compositions were used in the particulate format, Titanium (Ti), Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), and Stainless Steel 316L (SS), and were cultured in vitro with a mixed population of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes. The cells were also exposed to an exogenous stimulant mixture of phytohemagglutinin-P and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and opsonized particles with human serum. Interleukins, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as they are an indicator of the inflammation evoked by particulate metals. It has been experimentally evidenced that metal particles induced higher amounts of IL-6 and IL-1 but very low amounts of TNF-α. T-lymphocyte activation was evaluated by the quantification of IL-2 and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that nonopsonized and opsonized metal particles did not induce the release of increased levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Axon Regeneration After Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Animal Models and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate their lost axons but functional recovery in humans is frequently disappointing. This is so particularly when injuries require regeneration over long distances and/or over long time periods. Fat replacement of chronically denervated muscles, a commonly accepted explanation, does not account for poor functional recovery. Rather, the basis for the poor nerve regeneration is the transient expression of growth-associated genes that accounts for declining regenerative capacity of neurons and the regenerative support of Schwann cells over time. Brief low-frequency electrical stimulation accelerates motor and sensory axon outgrowth across injury sites that, even after delayed surgical repair of injured nerves in animal models and patients, enhances nerve regeneration and target reinnervation. The stimulation elevates neuronal cyclic adenosine monophosphate and, in turn, the expression of neurotrophic factors and other growth-associated genes, including cytoskeletal proteins. Electrical stimulation of denervated muscles immediately after nerve transection and surgical repair also accelerates muscle reinnervation but, at this time, how the daily requirement of long-duration electrical pulses can be delivered to muscles remains a practical issue prior to translation to patients. Finally, the technique of inserting autologous nerve grafts that bridge between a donor nerve and an adjacent recipient denervated nerve stump significantly improves nerve regeneration after delayed nerve repair, the donor nerves sustaining the capacity of the denervated Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. These reviewed methods to promote nerve regeneration and, in turn, to enhance functional recovery after nerve injury and surgical repair are sufficiently promising for early translation to the clinic.

  5. Cytological and cytochemical effects of sodium benzoate and gamma irradiation on human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, N.A.F.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro studies of human peripheral lymphocytes were conducted to elucidate and compare the effects of a suspected chemical clastogen, sodium benzoate, widely used in the food industry as an antimicrobial food additive, to that of a well-known physical mutagen, gamma rays. Blood from ten normal donors, five males and five females, was collected and treated with various doses of the two agents independently and in combination during G 0 or G 1 phase. Induction of structural chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and unscheduled DNA synthesis were used as parameters to monitor the effects of the two agents. Sodium benzoate at the same concentrations used in the food industry (0.05% and 0.10%) caused inhibition of mitosis and induced chromatid-type aberrations (gaps and breaks). The frequency of aberrations increased as the concentration of sodium benzoate increased. No increase in SCEs over the control level was observed as either concentration tested. The relative amount of DNA damage inflicted in the treated lymphocytes estimated as 3 H-tritiated thymidine incorporation (unscheduled DNA synthesis) was highly significant. In contrast, blood irradiated with 300, 600, or 900 rad 60 Co gamma rays produced chromatid and chromosome aberrations in cultured lymphocytes, dicentrics being the most frequent exchange event. The aberration yield was found to be dose-dependent and to fit the quadratic model. Unscheduled DNA synthesis as measured by lymphocyte 3 H-TdR incorporation following gamma irradiation was highly significantly increased with the largest uptake occurring during the first hour of incubation. The combined treatment of gamma irradiation plus 0.05% sodium benzoate did not increase the aberration frequencies over the independent irradiation treatments and had no effect on SCEs frequencies

  6. Allogeneic human dermal fibroblasts are viable in peripheral blood mononuclear co-culture

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    Restu Syamsul Hadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Transplanted allogeneic dermal fibroblasts retain stem cell subpopulations, and are easily isolated, expanded and stored using standard techniques. Their potential for regenerative therapy of chronic wounds should be evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine allogeneic fibroblast viability in the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Methods In this experimental study, fibroblasts were isolated from foreskin explants, expanded in the presence of serum, and stored using slow-freezing. We used one intervention group of allogeneic fibroblasts co-cultured with PBMC and 2 control groups of separate fibroblast and PBMC cultures.Fibroblasts were characterized by their collagen secretion and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 expression. Viability was evaluated using water soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1 proliferation assay. Absorbances were measured at 450 nm. Data analysis was performed by student’s paired t-test. Results Dermal fibroblasts were shown to secrete collagen, express OCT4, be recoverable after cryopreservation, and become attached to the culture dish in a co-culture with PBMC. Co-cultured and control fibroblasts had no significantly different cell viabilities (p>0.05. Calculated viable cell numbers increased 1.8 and 5.1-fold, respectively, at days 2 and 4 in vitro. Both groups showed comparable doubling times at days 2 and 4 in vitro. PBMC did not interfere with allogeneic fibroblast viability and proliferative capacity Conclusions Allogeneic fibroblasts remain viable and proliferate in the presence of host PBMC. Future research should evaluate allogeneic human dermal fibroblast competency in clinical settings. Dermal fibroblasts are a potential source for cell therapy in chronic wound management.

  7. Forkhead Box C1 Regulates Human Primary Keratinocyte Terminal Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianghua Bin

    Full Text Available The epidermis serves as a critical protective barrier between the internal and external environment of the human body. Its remarkable barrier function is established through the keratinocyte (KC terminal differentiation program. The transcription factors specifically regulating terminal differentiation remain largely unknown. Using a RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq profiling approach, we found that forkhead box c 1 (FOXC1 was significantly up-regulated in human normal primary KC during the course of differentiation. This observation was validated in human normal primary KC from several different donors and human skin biopsies. Silencing FOXC1 in human normal primary KC undergoing differentiation led to significant down-regulation of late terminal differentiation genes markers including epidermal differentiation complex genes, keratinization genes, sphingolipid/ceramide metabolic process genes and epidermal specific cell-cell adhesion genes. We further demonstrated that FOXC1 works down-stream of ZNF750 and KLF4, and upstream of GRHL3. Thus, this study defines FOXC1 as a regulator specific for KC terminal differentiation and establishes its potential position in the genetic regulatory network.

  8. Human primary visual cortex topography imaged via positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, E.L.; Christman, D.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    The visuotopic structure of primary visual cortex was studied in a group of 7 human volunteers using positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT) and 18 F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]DG). A computer animation was constructed with a spatial structure which was matched to estimates of human cortical magnification factor and to striate cortex stimulus preferences. A lateralized cortical 'checker-board' pattern of [ 18 F]DG was stimulated in primary visual cortex by having subjects view this computer animation following i.v. injection of [ 18 F]DG. The spatial structure of the stimulus was designed to produce an easily recognizable 'signature' in a series of 9 serial PETT scans obtained from each of a group of 7 volunteers. The predicted lateralized topographic 'signature' was observed in 6 of 7 subjects. Applications of this method for further PETT studies of human visual cortex are discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Nasal insulin changes peripheral insulin sensitivity simultaneously with altered activity in homeostatic and reward-related human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, M; Kullmann, S; Ketterer, C; Guthoff, M; Linder, K; Wagner, R; Stingl, K T; Veit, R; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2012-06-01

    Impaired insulin sensitivity is a major factor leading to type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that the brain is involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether insulin action in the human brain regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity and examined which brain areas are involved. Insulin and placebo were given intranasally. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured in 103 participants at 0, 30 and 60 min. A subgroup (n = 12) was also studied with functional MRI, and blood sampling at 0, 30 and 120 min. For each time-point, the HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as an inverse estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin increased and subsequently decreased. This excursion was accompanied by slightly decreased plasma glucose, resulting in an initially increased HOMA-IR. At 1 h after insulin spray, the HOMA-IR subsequently decreased and remained lower up to 120 min. An increase in hypothalamic activity was observed, which correlated with the increased HOMA-IR at 30 min post-spray. Activity in the putamen, right insula and orbitofrontal cortex correlated with the decreased HOMA-IR at 120 min post-spray. Central insulin action in specific brain areas, including the hypothalamus, may time-dependently regulate peripheral insulin sensitivity. This introduces a potential novel mechanism for the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity and underlines the importance of cerebral insulin action for the whole organism.

  10. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M r 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects

  11. Combustible and non-combustible tobacco product preparations differentially regulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimilli, Subhashini; Damratoski, Brad E; Prasad, G L

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and T cells play essential roles in innate and adaptive immune responses in protecting against microbial infections and in tumor surveillance. Although evidence suggests that smoking causes immunosuppression, there is limited information whether the use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products affects immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of two preparations of cigarette smoke, ST extract and nicotine on T cell and NK cell responses using Toll-like receptor-ligand stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The tobacco product preparations (TPPs) tested included whole smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), total particulate matter (TPM) and a ST product preparation in complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS). The PBMCs were stimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A marked reduction of the expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α was evident in NK cells and T cells treated with WS-CM and TPM. Consistently, attenuation of ligand-induced secretion of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) from PBMCs treated with WS-CM and TPM were observed. While the treatment with TPPs did not alter the expression of the maturation marker CD69, WS-CM and TPM inhibited the cytolytic activity of human PBMCs. Suppression of perforin by WS-CM was also detected. Although interference from the vehicle confounded the interpretation of effects of ST/CAS, some effects were evident only at high concentrations. Nicotine treatment minimally impacted expression of cytokines and cytolytic activity. Data presented herein suggests that the function of NK cells and T cells is influenced by exposure to TPPs (based on equi-nicotine units) in the following order: WS-CM>TPM>ST/CAS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis put forward by others that chronic smoking leads to immunosuppression, an effect that may contribute to increased microbial infections and cancer incidence among smokers

  12. Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis Are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Martínez-Álvarez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and S. brasiliensis are usually associated to sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis worldwide distributed. Comparative analyses between these two species indicate they contain genetic and physiological differences that are likely to impact the interaction with host cells. Here, we study the composition of the cell wall from conidia, yeast-like cells and germlings of both species and found they contained the same sugar composition. The carbohydrate proportion in the S. schenckii sensu stricto wall was similar across the three cell morphologies, with exception in the chitin content, which was significantly different in the three morphologies. The cell wall from germlings showed lower rhamnose content and higher glucose levels than other cell morphologies. In S. brasiliensis, the wall sugars were constant in the three morphologies, but glucose was lower in yeast-like cells. In S. schenckii sensu stricto cells most of chitin and β1,3-glucan were underneath wall components, but in S. brasiliensis germlings, chitin was exposed at the cell surface, and β1,3-glucan was found in the outer part of the conidia wall. We also compared the ability of these cells to stimulate cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The three S. schenckii sensu stricto morphologies stimulated increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, when compared to S. brasiliensis cells; while the latter, with exception of conidia, stimulated higher IL-10 levels. Dectin-1 was a key receptor for cytokine production during stimulation with the three morphologies of S. schenckii sensu stricto, but dispensable for cytokine production stimulated by S. brasiliensis germlings. TLR2 and TLR4 were also involved in the sensing of Sporothrix cells, with a major role for the former during cytokine stimulation. Mannose receptor had a minor contribution during cytokine stimulation by S. schenckii sensu stricto yeast-like cells and

  13. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). RESULTS/METHODOLOGY: We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease.

  14. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results/Methodology We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Conclusion Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease. PMID:25826140

  15. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap % was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0 and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24 by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002. In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  16. Vergence increases the gain of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex during peripheral hyposensitivity elicited by cold thermal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, László T; Lundberg, Yunxia W; Büki, Béla

    2018-01-01

    When viewing a far target, the gain of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is around 1.0, but when viewing a near target there is an increased response. It has been shown that while this convergence-mediated modulation is unaffected by canal plugging and clinically practical transmastoid galvanic stimulation, it is eliminated by a partial peripheral gentamicin lesion. The aim of this study was to determine if convergence increases the gain during peripheral hyposensitivity elicited by cold thermal irrigation. The high frequency VOR gain was measured using video head impulse testing immediately after the cold caloric stimulus in 9 healthy human subjects with the lateral semicircular canals oriented approximately earth-vertical. Before caloric irrigation, near viewing (15 cm) increased the average VOR gain by 28% (from 1 to 1.28). Cold (24°C) water irrigation of the right ear decreased the gain to 0.66 (far viewing) and 0.82 (near viewing) (22% difference). Although vergence also increased the gain for impulses to the left to the same degree before caloric stimulus, the caloric irrigation itself (applied to the right ear) did not influence the gain for contralateral impulses. In our experiments vergence increased the gain of the human angular VOR during peripheral hyposensitivity elicited by cold thermal irrigation. These results suggest that cold irrigation does not abolish the function of the nonlinear/phasic vestibular afferent pathway.

  17. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J., E-mail: tokare@niehs.nih.gov

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  18. Respiratory compensation to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mark; Alvarez, Naiara M; Trevino, Michael; Weinstein, Gary L

    2012-11-01

    There is limited and disparate information about the extent of the respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) that occurs in response to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans. Our aim was to examine the influence of the plasma bicarbonate concentration, the plasma base excess, and the arterial pH on the arterial carbon dioxide tension in 52 adult patients with primary metabolic alkalosis, mostly due to diuretic use or vomiting. Linear regression analysis was used to correlate degrees of alkalosis with arterial carbon dioxide tensions. In this alkalotic cohort, whose arterial plasma bicarbonate averaged 31.6 mEq/l, plasma base excess averaged 7.8 mEq/l, and pH averaged 7.48, both plasma bicarbonate and base excess correlated closely with arterial carbon dioxide tensions (r = 0.97 and 0.96, respectively; p respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) to primary metabolic alkalosis than has been reported in prior smaller studies.

  19. Attentional load modulates responses of human primary visual cortex to invisible stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Bahador; Lavie, Nilli; Rees, Geraint

    2007-03-20

    Visual neuroscience has long sought to determine the extent to which stimulus-evoked activity in visual cortex depends on attention and awareness. Some influential theories of consciousness maintain that the allocation of attention is restricted to conscious representations [1, 2]. However, in the load theory of attention [3], competition between task-relevant and task-irrelevant stimuli for limited-capacity attention does not depend on conscious perception of the irrelevant stimuli. The critical test is whether the level of attentional load in a relevant task would determine unconscious neural processing of invisible stimuli. Human participants were scanned with high-field fMRI while they performed a foveal task of low or high attentional load. Irrelevant, invisible monocular stimuli were simultaneously presented peripherally and were continuously suppressed by a flashing mask in the other eye [4]. Attentional load in the foveal task strongly modulated retinotopic activity evoked in primary visual cortex (V1) by the invisible stimuli. Contrary to traditional views [1, 2, 5, 6], we found that availability of attentional capacity determines neural representations related to unconscious processing of continuously suppressed stimuli in human primary visual cortex. Spillover of attention to cortical representations of invisible stimuli (under low load) cannot be a sufficient condition for their awareness.

  20. Non-primary motor areas in the human frontal lobe are connected directly to hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitti, S; Määttä, S; Säisänen, L; Könönen, M; Vanninen, R; Hannula, H; Mervaala, E; Karhu, J

    2008-04-15

    Structural studies in primates have shown that, in addition to the primary motor cortex (M1), premotor areas are a source of corticospinal tracts. The function of these putative corticospinal neuronal tracts in humans is still unclear. We found frontal non-primary motor areas (NPMAs), which react to targeted non-invasive magnetic pulses and activate peripheral muscles as fast as or even faster than those in M1. Hand muscle movements were observed in all our subjects about 20 ms after transcranial stimulation of the superior frontal gyrus (Brodmann areas 6 and 8). Stimulation of NPMA could activate both proximal and distal upper limb muscles with the same delay as a stimulation of the M1, indicating converging motor representations with direct functional connections to the hand. We suggest that these non-primary cortical motor representations provide additional capacity for the fast execution of movements. Such a capacity may play a role in motor learning and in recovery from motor deficits.

  1. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Project goal - The overall goal of the project is to build a legitimate transnational network to transfer ideas and experiences and implement measures to reduce brain drain and foster brain gain while reinforcing the economical and spatial development of peripheral regions in NWE. This means a

  2. [Characterization of epithelial primary culture from human conjunctiva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, L; Blázquez, A; Muñoz-Negrete, F J; López, S; Rebolleda, G; Domínguez, F; Pérez-Esteban, A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate primary cultures from human conjunctiva supplemented with fetal bovine serum, autologous serum, and platelet-rich autologous serum, over human amniotic membrane and lens anterior capsules. One-hundred and forty-eight human conjunctiva explants were cultured in CnT50(®) supplemented with 1, 2.5, 5 and 10% fetal bovine serum, autologous serum and platelet-rich autologous serum. Conjunctival samples were incubated at 37°C, 5% CO2 and 95% HR, for 3 weeks. The typical phenotype corresponding to conjunctival epithelial cells was present in all primary cultures. Conjunctival cultures had MUC5AC-positive secretory cells, K19-positive conjunctival cells, and MUC4-positive non-secretory conjunctival cells, but were not corneal phenotype (cytokeratin K3-negative) and fibroblasts (CD90-negative). Conjunctiva epithelial progenitor cells were preserved in all cultures; thus, a cell culture in CnT50(®) supplemented with 1 to 5% autologous serum over human amniotic membrane can provide better information of epithelial cell differentiation for the conjunctival surface reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular radiosensitivity and DNA damage in primary human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, R.; Burnet, N.G.; Duggal, N.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between radiation-induced cell survival and DNA damage in primary human fibroblasts to decide whether the initial or residual DNA damage levels are more predictive of normal tissue cellular radiosensitivity. Five primary human nonsyndromic and two primary ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast strains grown in monolayer were studied. Cell survival was assessed by clonogenic assay. Irradiation was given at high dose rate (HDR) 1-2 Gy/min. DNA damage was measured in stationary phase cells and expressed as fraction released from the well by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). For initial damage, cells were embedded in agarose and irradiated at HDR on ice. Residual DNA damage was measured in monolayer by allowing a 4-h repair period after HDR irradiation. Following HDR irradiation, cell survival varied between SF 2 0.025 to 0.23. Measurement of initial DNA damage demonstrated linear induction up to 30 Gy, with small differences in the slope of the dose-response curve between strains. No correlation between cell survival and initial damage was found. Residual damage increased linearly up to 80 Gy with a variation in slope by a factor of 3.2. Cell survival correlated with the slope of the dose-response curves for residual damage of the different strains (p = 0.003). The relationship between radiation-induced cell survival and DNA damage in primary human fibroblasts of differing radiosensitivity is closest with the amount of DNA damage remaining after repair. If assays of DNA damage are to be used as predictors of normal tissue response to radiation, residual DNA damage provides the most likely correlation with cell survival. 52 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  4. The uptake kinetics and immunotoxic effects of microcystin-LR in human and chicken peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankoff, Anna; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Grasman, Keith A.; Yuan, Moucun

    2004-01-01

    Microcystin-LR is a cyanobacterial heptapeptide that presents acute and chronic hazards to animal and human health. We investigated the influence of this toxin on human and chicken immune system modulation in vitro. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were treated with microcystin-LR at environmentally relevant doses of 1, 10 and 25 μg/ml for 12, 24, 48, 72 h (for proliferation assay cells were treated for 72 h). T-cell and B-cell proliferation as well as apoptosis and necrosis were determined in human and chicken samples. IL-2 and IL-6 production by human lymphocytes also was measured. In addition, uptake kinetics of microcystin-LR into human and chicken peripheral blood lymphocytes were calculated by Liquid Chromatography (LS) /Mass Spectrometry (MS) analysis. At the highest dose microcystin-LR decreased T-cell proliferation and all doses of microcystin-LR inhibited B-cell proliferation. The frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells increased in a dose and time-dependent manner. Human lymphocytes responded to stimulation with microcystin-LR by increased production of IL-6 and decreased production of IL-2. Human lymphocytes were able to uptake from 0.014 to 1.663 μg/ml and chicken lymphocytes from 0.035 to 1.733 μg/ml of the microcystin-LR added to the cultures, depending on the treatment time and dose. In conclusion, microcystin-LR acted as an immunomodulator in cytokine production and down-regulated lymphocyte functions by induction of apoptosis and necrosis. However, further studies dealing with the influence of microcystin-LR on expression cytokine genes and transcription factors are necessary to confirm these hypotheses

  5. Ex vivo measurement of calpain activation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by detection of immunoreactive products of calpastatin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek M Witkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited proteolysis of multiple intracellular proteins by endogenous Ca-dependent cysteine proteases--calpains--is an important regulatory mechanism for cell proliferation, apoptosis etc. Its importance for cellular functions is stressed by existence of endogenous calpain inhibitors--calpastatins. The calpain-calpastatin system within living cells is in a fragile balance, which depends on both partners. The interdependence of calpain--a protease--and calpastatin--an endogenous inhibitor and at the same time a substrate for this enzyme makes any assessment of actual activity of this enzyme in the cells very difficult. In this work we made an attempt to estimate and compare the activity of calpain in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by assessing the levels of limited proteolysis of calpastatin in these cells by western blot, while at the same time the levels of calpain protein inside these cells was measured by flow cytometry. Our results indicate that it is possible to compare (semi-quantitatively the activities of calpain in peripheral blood CD4+ and CD19+ lymphocytes from various donors that way. Preliminary results showed that calpain activity is increased in the CD4+ T cells isolated from peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients as compared to control lymphocytes. Extremely high intrinsic activity of calpain was detected in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CD19+ cells. All this confirms the detection of immunoreactive products of calpastatin as a good maker of endogenous calpain activity.

  6. MAJOR AND LYMPHOCYTE POPULATIONS OF HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES AND THEIR REFERENCE VALUES, AS ASSAYED BY MULTI-COLOUR CYTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Khaidukov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Determination of lymphocyte subpopulations and their phenotypes is an important diagnostic feature, in order to elucidate some disturbances connected with immune system functioning. However, insufficient data are obtained when analyzing only major populations of peripheral lymphocytes. In order to perform clinical diagnostics, the data about minor lymphocytic populations and activated cellular pools seem to be more pertinent.Studies of peripheral blood cell subpopulations of healthy donors performed in different Russian regions allowed to assess quantitative distribution intervals for both major and minor immune cell subpopulations in humans. The results obtained, as compared with data from literature, provide an evidence for similar reference intervals for main immune cell subpopulations in healthy donors, independent on their habitation area.Present work has resulted into development of algorithms for cytometric studies and generation of certain panels of monoclonal antibodies enabling evaluation of all main lymphocyte subpopulations, as well as their minor subsets participating in emerging immune response. The distribution intervals have been estimated for such minor subpopulations, as B1- and B2-lymphocytes, memory B-cells, γδ- and αβT-cells, regulatory and naїve T-cells, cytotoxic and secretory NK-cell polupations.The results of present study, while been performed with peripheral blood of healthy donors, may provide a basis of reference values when studying subpopulation profile of immune cells.

  7. Primary structure of the human fgr proto-oncogene product p55/sup c-fgr/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katamine, S.; Notario, V.; Rao, C.D.; Miki, T.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Tronick, S.R.; Robbins, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    Normal human c-fgr cDNA clones were constructed by using normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell mRNA as a template. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two such clones revealed a 1,587-base-pair-long open reading frame which predicted the primary amino acid sequence of the c-fgr translational product. Homology of this protein with the v-fgr translational product stretched from codons 128 to 516, where 32 differences among 388 codons were observed. Sequence similarity with human c-src, c-yes, and fyn translations products began at amino acid position 76 of the predicted c-fgr protein and extended nearly to its C-terminus. In contrast, the stretch of 75 amino acids at the N-terminus demonstrated a greatly reduced degree of relatedness to these same proteins. To verify the deduced amino acid sequence, antibodies were prepared against peptides representing amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the predicted c-fgr translational product. Both antibodies specifically recognized a 55-kilodalton protein expressed in COS-1 cells transfected with a c-fgr cDNA expression plasmid. Moreover, the same protein was immunoprecipitated from an Epstein-Barr virus-infected Burkitt's lymphoma cell line which expressed c-fgr mRNA but not in its uninfected fgr mRNA-negative counterpart. These findings identified the 55-kilodalton protein as the product of the human fgr proto-oncogene.

  8. Inhibition of Photo-Genotoxic Effects of UV Radiation on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocites by Echinacea Purpurea (L.) Moench Herbal Extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segvic Klaric, M.; Kosalec, I.; Vladimir-Knezevic, S.; Blazekovic, B.; Milic, M.; Kopjar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has many negative effects on human skin, including acute and chronic inflammation and oxidative stress which might cause DNA damage leading to skin photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. It was suggested that intake of phenolic acids, which are active components of some medicinal plants, might reduce DNA damage caused by UV radiation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to check wheather the pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes with lyophilisate of Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EH) extract (1 and 10 mg/mL) could reduce or prevent primary DNA damage induced by UVC radiation (253.7 nm) in laboratory conditions. Primary DNA damage was studied using the alkaline comet assay on isolated human blood lymphocytes. Plant extract used in this experiment contains phenolic acids (3.47 %), flavonoids (0.13 %), tannins (0.86 %) and proanthocyanidins (0.26 %). HPLC analysis showed that lyophilisate of EH extract contains 3.65 % of chicoric acid. Exposure of lymphocytes to UV radiation (30 and 60 min) caused a significant increase in the level of primary DNA damage (P < 0.001). Pretreatment of cells with both concentrations of EH was not genotoxic, and successfully protected the cells against the effects of UV radiation (30 min). Both concentrations of EH significantly reduced comet tail length after 60 min of UV radiation, while only pre-treatment with 1 mg/mL significantly reduced the values of tail intensity and tail moment (P < 0.001). Positive results obtained in this study speak in favour of continuing the research on effectiveness of Echinacea purpurea preparations and their potential application in developing cosmetic products for skin protection. (author)

  9. [Inhibitory effect and mechanism of tofacitinib on the secretion of cytokines by T cells in human peripheral blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kunlun; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Qiongli; Wu, Changyou

    2017-11-01

    Objective To study the inhibitory effect of tofacitinib on the production of cytokines by T cells in human peripheral blood and its mechanism. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified T cells were cultured and stimulated with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 antibodies in the presence or absence of tofacitinib (0.5 μmol/L). The levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA, and the expressions of activated molecules CD69 and CD25 on the surface of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, the production of cytokines and the phosphorylation of signal transducers and transcriptional activators STAT1, STAT3, STAT4 in T cells were examined by flow cytometry. At the same time, the proliferation and apoptosis of T cells were observed by 5- (and 6-) carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining and the flow cy tometry with annexin V-FITC/PI, respectively. Results Tofacitinib inhibited the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and the expression of CD25 on T cells from the peripheral blood. In addition, the proliferation and the phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT3, STAT4 by T cells were also depressed. However, tofacitinib had no effect on the secretion of IL-2, the expression of CD69 and the apoptosis of T cells. Conclusion Tofacitinib can inhibit the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α by T cells in the peripheral blood, and its mechanism might be related to the inhibitory effect of tofacitinib on the activation, proliferation and signal transduction in T cells.

  10. Ouabain exacerbates activation-induced cell death in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves Mabel B.; Marques-Santos Luis F.; Affonso-Mitidieri Ottília R.; Rumjanek Vivian M.

    2005-01-01

    Lymphocytes activated by mitogenic lectins display changes in transmembrane potential, an elevation in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations, proliferation and/or activation induced cell death. Low concentrations of ouabain (an inhibitor of Na+,K+-ATPase) suppress mitogen-induced proliferation and increases cell death. To understand the mechanisms involved, a number of parameters were analyzed using fluorescent probes and flow cytometry. The addition of 100nM ouabain to cultures of peripheral b...

  11. Cytotoxicity and accumulation of ergot alkaloids in human primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Dennis; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-04-11

    Ergot alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced by fungi of the species Claviceps. Toxic effects after consumption of contaminated grains are described since mediaeval times. Of the more than 40 known ergot alkaloids six are found predominantly. These are ergotamine, ergocornine, ergocryptine, ergocristine, ergosine and ergometrine, along with their corresponding isomeric forms (-inine-forms). Toxic effects are known to be induced by an interaction of the ergot alkaloids as neurotransmitters, like dopamine or serotonin. Nevertheless data concerning cytotoxic effects are missing and therefore a screening of the six main ergot alkaloids was performed in human primary cells in order to evaluate the toxic potential. As it is well known that ergot alkaloids isomerize easily the stability was tested in the cell medium. Based on these results factors were calculated to correct the used concentration values to the biologically active lysergic (-ine) form. These factors range from 1.4 for the most stable compound ergometrine to 5.0 for the most unstable ergot alkaloid ergocristine. With these factors, reflecting the instability, several controverse literature data concerning the toxicity could be explained. To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of ergot alkaloids, human cells in primary culture were used. These cells remain unchanged in contrast to cell lines and the data allow a better comparison to the in vivo situation than using immortalized cell lines. To characterize the effects on primary cells, renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) and normal human astrocytes (NHA) were used. The parameters necrosis (LDH-release) and apoptosis (caspase-3-activation, DNA condensation and fragmentation) were distinguished. The results show that depending on the individual structure of the peptide ergot alkaloids the toxic properties change. While ergometrine as a lysergic acid amide did not show any effect, the peptide ergot alkaloids revealed a different toxic potential. Of

  12. Influence of X-ray on the P53 gene in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Wenwei; Cai Ting

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and safety of varying X-ray dosage. Methods: peripheral lymphocytes of five healthy volunteers were processed by varying X-rays, then detect the P53 gene mutation in 5-9 exons by PCR-SSCP silver staining, investigate the 249 th codon's mutation by PCR-RFLP, through immunohistochemistry staining monitor the abnormal expression of P53 and screen the apoptosis employing the Bio-dUTP terminal labelling technology included by DNA terminal transferase. Results: The frequency of apoptosis represents transparent dose-dependent manner with X-ray. When exposed to X-ray > 50 cGy after 48 h, the apoptosis group has evident difference compared with the control (P 0.05). After treating peripheral lymphocytes with 5-200 cGy X-ray and culturing 96 h, utilizing PCR-SSCP to determine the mutation in 5-9 exons, there was no single strand DNA abnormal migration. PCR-RFLP result indicates no mutation in the hotspot site-249 codon, and there was no obviously abnormal expression of P53 in immunohistochemistry staining. Conclusions: The apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes is sensitive to the X-ray, and this can be a guideline or model reflecting the body state when exposing to the radiation

  13. Transcription factor fos-related antigen-2 induces progressive peripheral vasculopathy in mice closely resembling human systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Britta; Busch, Nicole; Jüngel, Astrid; Pileckyte, Margarita; Gay, Renate E; Michel, Beat A; Schett, Georg; Gay, Steffen; Distler, Jörg; Distler, Oliver

    2009-12-08

    Microvascular damage is one of the first pathological changes in systemic sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra-2), a transcription factor of the activator protein-1 family, in the peripheral vasculopathy of systemic sclerosis and examined the underlying mechanisms. Expression of Fra-2 protein was significantly increased in skin biopsies of systemic sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls, especially in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Fra-2 transgenic mice developed a severe loss of small blood vessels in the skin that was paralleled by progressive skin fibrosis at 12 weeks of age. The reduction in capillary density was preceded by a significant increase in apoptosis in endothelial cells at week 9 as detected by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, suppression of Fra-2 by small interfering RNA prevented human microvascular endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis and improved both the number of tubes and the cumulative tube lengths in the tube formation assay. In addition, cell migration in the scratch assay and vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent chemotaxis in a modified Boyden chamber assay were increased after transfection of human microvascular endothelial cells with Fra-2 small interfering RNA, whereas proliferation was not affected. Fra-2 is present in human systemic sclerosis and may contribute to the development of microvasculopathy by inducing endothelial cell apoptosis and by reducing endothelial cell migration and chemotaxis. Fra-2 transgenic mice are a promising preclinical model to study the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches of the peripheral vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis.

  14. Frequency and genetic characterization of V(DD)J recombinants in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Hicar, Mark D; Thomas, James W; Crowe, James E

    2012-09-01

    Antibody heavy-chain recombination that results in the incorporation of multiple diversity (D) genes, although uncommon, contributes substantially to the diversity of the human antibody repertoire. Such recombination allows the generation of heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) regions of extreme length and enables junctional regions that, because of the nucleotide bias of N-addition regions, are difficult to produce through normal V(D)J recombination. Although this non-classical recombination process has been observed infrequently, comprehensive analysis of the frequency and genetic characteristics of such events in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire has not been possible because of the rarity of such recombinants and the limitations of traditional sequencing technologies. Here, through the use of high-throughput sequencing of the normal human peripheral blood antibody repertoire, we analysed the frequency and genetic characteristics of V(DD)J recombinants. We found that these recombinations were present in approximately 1 in 800 circulating B cells, and that the frequency was severely reduced in memory cell subsets. We also found that V(DD)J recombination can occur across the spectrum of diversity genes, indicating that virtually all recombination signal sequences that flank diversity genes are amenable to V(DD)J recombination. Finally, we observed a repertoire bias in the diversity gene repertoire at the upstream (5') position, and discovered that this bias was primarily attributable to the order of diversity genes in the genomic locus. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Cytokine release from human peripheral blood leucocytes incubated with endotoxin with and without prior infection with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Smith, H; Sweet, C

    1993-01-01

    Previous work with a neonatal ferret model for human SIDS had indicated that inflammation caused by a combination of influenza virus and bacterial endotoxin may be a cause of human SIDS. To determine whether cytokines may be involved in this inflammatory response, levels of interleukin (IL)-1 beta......, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were examined, using ELISA assays, in culture supernatants of human peripheral blood leucocytes infected with influenza virus and subsequently incubated with endotoxin. Levels of TNF-alpha were increased compared to cells incubated with virus or endotoxin...... alone. Levels of IL-1 beta were also increased whereas levels of IL-6 were generally not enhanced. Cytokines appeared within 1-2 h of stimulation with virus or endotoxin and increased subsequently to reach maximum titres between 16 and 20 h post treatment. While levels of cytokine were much lower when...

  16. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-...

  17. PULPOTOMIES WITH PORTLAND CEMENT IN HUMAN PRIMARY MOLARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Taísa Regina; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Fornetti, Ana Paula Camolese; Moretti, Ana Beatriz Silveira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Lourenço, Natalino; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Abdo, Ruy Cesar Camargo

    2009-01-01

    Two clinical cases in which Portland cement (PC) was applied as a medicament after pulpotomy of mandibular primary molars in children are presented. Pulpotomy using PC was carried out in two mandibular first molars and one mandibular second molar, which were further followed-up. At the 3, 6 and 12-month follow-up appointments, clinical and radiographic examinations of the pulpotomized teeth and their periradicular area revealed that the treatments were successful in maintaining the teeth asymptomatic and preserving pulpal vitality. Additionally, the formation of a dentin bridge immediately below the PC could be observed in the three molars treated. PC may be considered as an effective alternative for primary molar pulpotomies, at least in a short-term period. Randomized clinical trials with human teeth are required in order to determine the suitability of PC before unlimited clinical use can be recommended. PMID:19148409

  18. The effects of high dose ionizing radiation on transcriptional regulation and paracrine signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, L.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been accepted that direct cell-cell interactions and the replacement of injured tissues with injected cells exerts therapeutic effects, it is currently believed that, in addition, paracrine factors released from different cell types activate cytoprotective and regenerative processes. Cells are now seen as bioreactors that produce and release soluble factors which might be used as therapeutics. We have previously shown that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) release a plethora of paracrine factors that enhance wound healing, attenuate myocardial damage following acute myocardial infarction, abolish microvascular obstruction, improve neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke and spinal cord injury and protect mice from experimental autoimmune myocarditis. These PBMC derived paracrine factors may exert their effects via the induction of cytoprotective pathways, augmentation of angiogenesis, induction of NO-depended vasodilation and inhibition of VASP dependent platelet aggregation, as well as driving auto-reactive CD4+ cells into apoptosis. To enhance the cellular secretory capacity, treatments which induce stress responses, such as hypoxic preconditioning or ionizing irradiation (IR), have been developed. Although these effects have been evaluated in several disease states there is little data available on the cellular effects of ionizing irradiation on human PBMCs and their secretome. In this study, we have thus undertaken to investigate the effects of IR on human PBMCs in terms of the induction of transcriptional changes and release of pleiotropic paracrine factors. There are three primary aims of this doctoral thesis: 1. To investigate cellular processes activated or repressed in human PBMCs following high dose ionizing radiation (60Gy) and high density cell cultivation (25*10"6 cells/ml) for up to 24 hours. 2. To identify paracrine factors released from these cells using a multi-methodical biochemical/bioinformatics approach. 3

  19. Purification and primary structure determination of human lysosomal dipeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Iztok; Mihelic, Marko

    2003-02-01

    The lysosomal metallopeptidase is an enzyme that acts preferentially on dipeptides with unsubstituted N- and C-termini. Its activity is highest in slightly acidic pH. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of lysosomal dipeptidase from human kidney. The isolated enzyme has the amino-terminal sequence DVAKAIINLAVY and is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 100 kDa. So far no amino acid sequence has been determined for this metallopeptidase. The complete primary structure as deduced from the nucleotide sequence revealed that the isolated dipeptidase is similar to blood plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase.

  20. Uptake of gold nanoparticles in primary human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingberg, Henrik; Oddershede, Lene B.; Löschner, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relevant in nanomedicine for drug delivery in the vascular system, where endothelial cells are the first point of contact. We investigated the uptake of 80 nm AuNPs in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by flow cytometry, 3D confocal microscopy......–3 or more particles. Pre-treatment with chlorpromazine inhibited the AuNP-uptake in HUVECs, indicating that internalisation occurred mainly by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Cell activation by exposure to tumour necrosis factor or lipopolysaccharide had a slight or no effect on the uptake of Au...

  1. Variations of B cell subpopulations in peripheral blood of healthy Mexican population according to age: Relevance for diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrón-Ruíz, L; López-Herrera, G; Ávalos-Martínez, C E; Valenzuela-Ponce, C; Ramírez-SanJuan, E; Santoyo-Sánchez, G; Mújica Guzmán, F; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Santos-Argumedo, L

    Peripheral blood B cells include lymphocytes at various stages of differentiation, each with a specific function in the immune response. All these stages show variations in percentage and absolute number throughout human life. The numbers and proportions of B subpopulation are influenced by factors such as gender, age, ethnicity, and lifestyle. This study establishes reference values according to age of peripheral blood B cell subtypes in healthy Mexican population. Peripheral blood from healthy new-borns and adults were analysed for total B cell subpopulations, using surface markers such as CD19, IgM, IgD, CD21, CD24, CD27, and CD38, to identify naïve, memory with and without isotype switch, double-negative, transitional, and plasmablast cells. We observed a significant variation in terms of frequency and absolute counts between all groups analysed. Values from each B cell subpopulation show variations according to age. In order to attempt to elucidate reference values for B cell subpopulation, the present study evaluated a population sample of healthy blood donors from this region. Values reported here can also be used as a tool for diagnosis of diseases in which B cell maturation is affected. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Atomic resolution view into the structure–function relationships of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruskamo, Salla [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Yadav, Ravi P. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Sharma, Satyan; Lehtimäki, Mari [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Laulumaa, Saara [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael [Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, Göttingen (Germany); Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Juffer, André H. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Kursula, Inari [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kursula, Petri, E-mail: petri.kursula@oulu.fi [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2 has been refined at 0.93 Å resolution. In combination with functional experiments in vitro, in vivo and in silico, the fine details of the structure–function relationships in P2 are emerging. P2 is a fatty acid-binding protein expressed in vertebrate peripheral nerve myelin, where it may function in bilayer stacking and lipid transport. P2 binds to phospholipid membranes through its positively charged surface and a hydrophobic tip, and accommodates fatty acids inside its barrel structure. The structure of human P2 refined at the ultrahigh resolution of 0.93 Å allows detailed structural analyses, including the full organization of an internal hydrogen-bonding network. The orientation of the bound fatty-acid carboxyl group is linked to the protonation states of two coordinating arginine residues. An anion-binding site in the portal region is suggested to be relevant for membrane interactions and conformational changes. When bound to membrane multilayers, P2 has a preferred orientation and is stabilized, and the repeat distance indicates a single layer of P2 between membranes. Simulations show the formation of a double bilayer in the presence of P2, and in cultured cells wild-type P2 induces membrane-domain formation. Here, the most accurate structural and functional view to date on P2, a major component of peripheral nerve myelin, is presented, showing how it can interact with two membranes simultaneously while going through conformational changes at its portal region enabling ligand transfer.

  3. Detection and quantification of live, apoptotic, and necrotic human peripheral lymphocytes by single-laser flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegler, T J; Hyun, W; Yen, T S; Stites, D P

    1995-05-01

    Regulation of peripheral lymphocyte number involves a poorly understood balance between cell renewal and loss. Disrupting this balance leads to a large number of disease states. Methods which allow qualitative and quantitative measurements of cell viability are increasingly valuable to studies directed at revealing the mechanisms underlying apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Here, we have characterized a method using single-laser flow cytometry that differentiates and quantifies the relative number of live, apoptotic, and late-stage apoptotic and necrotic peripheral lymphocytes. Following in vitro gamma irradiation and staining with acridine orange in combination with ethidium bromide, three distinct populations were seen by bivariate analysis of green versus red fluorescence. The identity of each distinct fluorescent population (whether live, apoptotic, or necrotic) was determined by sorting and examination of cellular morphology by electron microscopy. This flow cytometric method is directly compared with the techniques of trypan blue exclusion and DNA fragmentation to quantify cell death following exposure to various doses of in vitro gamma irradiation and postirradiation incubation times. We extend our findings to illustrate the utility of this method beyond analyzing radiation-induced apoptotic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); similar fluorescent patterns are shown for radiation- and corticosteroid-treated murine thymocytes, activated human PBMC, and PBMC from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals. Our results demonstrate that dual-parameter flow cytometric analysis of acridine orange-ethidium bromide-stained lymphocytes is overall a superior method with increased sensitivity, greater accuracy, and decreased subjectivity in comparison with the other methods tested. By using standard laser and filter settings commonly available to flow cytometric laboratories, this method allows rapid measurement of a large number of cells from a

  4. A novel method to generate and culture human mast cells: Peripheral CD34+ stem cell-derived mast cells (PSCMCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmetzer, Oliver; Valentin, Patricia; Smorodchenko, Anna; Domenis, Rossana; Gri, Giorgia; Siebenhaar, Frank; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    The identification and characterization of human mast cell (MC) functions are hindered by the shortage of MC populations suitable for investigation. Here, we present a novel technique for generating large numbers of well differentiated and functional human MCs from peripheral stem cells (=peripheral stem cell-derived MCs, PSCMCs). Innovative and key features of this technique include 1) the use of stem cell concentrates, which are routinely discarded by blood banks, as the source of CD34+ stem cells, 2) cell culture in serum-free medium and 3) the addition of LDL as well as selected cytokines. In contrast to established and published protocols that use CD34+ or CD133+ progenitor cells from full blood, we used a pre-enriched cell population obtained from stem cell concentrates, which yielded up to 10(8) differentiated human MCs per batch after only three weeks of culture starting with 10(6) total CD34+ cells. The total purity on MCs (CD117+, FcεR1+) generated by this method varied between 55 and 90%, of which 4-20% were mature MCs that contain tryptase and chymase and show expression of FcεRI and CD117 in immunohistochemistry. PSCMCs showed robust histamine release in response to stimulation with anti-FcεR1 or IgE/anti-IgE, and increased proliferation and differentiation in response to IL-1β or IFN-γ. Taken together, this new protocol of the generation of large numbers of human MCs provides for an innovative and suitable option to investigate the biology of human MCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. cis-4-[{sup 18}F]-Fluoro-L-proline fails to detect peripheral tumors in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffels, Gabriele; Pauleit, Dirk [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany); Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido [Department of Oncology, Hematology, and Clinical Immunology, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Salber, Dagmar [C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Nuclear Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich, FRG (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany)], E-mail: k.j.langen@fz-juelich.de

    2008-11-15

    System A amino acid transport is increased in transformed and malignant cells. The amino acid 4-cis[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-proline (cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro) has been shown to be a substrate of the System A amino acid carrier. In this pilot study, we investigated the diagnostic potential of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in patients with various tumors in comparison with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Methods: Eight patients (seven females, one male, age range 43-77 years) with large primary, recurrent or metastatic tumors of different histologies were included in this study. One patient had a recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma; two patients, metastatic colon or rectal cancer; one, a metastatic endometrial cancer; one, a multiple myeloma; one, an Ewing sarcoma; one, a metastatic breast cancer and one, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PET scans of the trunk were acquired at 1 h after intravenous injection of 400 MBq cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro and compared to PET scans with [{sup 18}F]FDG. Results: None of the tumors or metastatic lesions in this series of patients demonstrated relevant uptake of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro. In contrast, all tumors with exception of the multiple myeloma showed an intensive uptake of [{sup 18}F]FDG. The mean standardized uptake value of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in the tumor or metastases was significantly lower than that of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake (1.7{+-}0.6 vs. 5.7{+-}3.0; n=8; P<.01). Conclusion: Although other System A-specific tracers have shown relevant tumor uptake, cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro fails to detect most types of human tumors. Based on these results, we cannot recommend a further evaluation of this tracer as a tumor-seeking agent.

  6. Distribution of cyclophilin B-binding sites in the subsets of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, A; Allain, F; Foxwell, B; Spik, G

    1997-08-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is a cyclosporin A (CsA)-binding protein, mainly associated with the secretory pathway and released in biological fluids. We have recently demonstrated that both free CyPB and CyPB-CsA complex specifically bind to peripheral blood T lymphocytes and are internalized. These results suggest that CyPB might promote the targeting of the drug into sensitive cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes are subdivided in several populations according to their biological functions and sensitivity to CsA. We have investigated the binding of CyPB to these different subsets using a CyPB derivatized by fluorescein through its single cysteine which retains its binding properties. We have confirmed that only T cells were involved in the interaction with CyPB. The ligand binding was found to be heterogeneously distributed on the different T-cell subsets and surface-bound CyPB was mainly associated with the CD4-positive cells. No significant difference was noted between the CD45RA and CD45RO subsets, demonstrating that CyPB-binding sites were equally distributed between native and memory T cells. CD3 stimulation of T lymphocytes led to a decrease in the CyPB-binding capacity, that may be explained by a down-regulation of the CyPB-receptor expression upon T-cell activation. Finally, we demonstrated that CyPB-receptor-positive cells, isolated on CyPB sulphydryl-coupled affinity matrices, are more sensitive to CyPB-complexed CsA than mixed peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that CyPB potentiates CsA activity through the binding of the complex. Taken together, our results demonstrate that CyPB-binding sites are mainly associated with resting cells of the helper T lymphocyte, and that CyPB might modulate the distribution of CsA through the drug targeting to sensitive cells.

  7. Comparison of HPRT mutant frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of smokers and non-smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Kumar, P.R.; Mary Mohankumar, N.; Chatterjee, Indranil; Jeevanram, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    The mutant frequency of hypoxanthine guanine phospho ribosyl transferase (HPRT) has been studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes of six non-smokers and six smokers. The mutant frequency was studied by following a Uniform Operating Protocol (UOP). The mean lymphocyte cloning efficiency of non-smokers and smokers was about 31 %. The mean mutant frequency obtained in smokers showed a marginal increase compared to that of non-smokers, but they were not significantly different (P= 0.1416). This paper discusses the methodology adopted and the results obtained with the preliminary finding. (author)

  8. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We isolated PBMCs from subjects aged 18-83 years, as part of a health survey of the Danish population that focussed on lifestyle factors. The level of DNA repair activity was measured as incisions on potassium bromate-damaged DNA by the comet...... assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P...

  9. Regulation of human renin expression in chorion cell primary cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, K.G.; Haidar, M.A.; Baxter, J.D.; Reudelhuber, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    The human renin gene is expressed in the kidney, placenta, and several other sites. The release of renin or its precursor, prorenin, can be affected by several regulatory agents. In this study, primary cultures of human placental cells were used to examine the regulation of prorenin release and renin mRNA levels and of the transfected human renin promoter linked to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter sequences. Treatment of the cultures with a calcium ionophore alone, calcium ionophore plus forskolin (that activates adenylate cyclase), or forskolin plus a phorbol ester increased prorenin release and renin mRNA levels 1.3 endash to 6 endash fold, but several classes of steroids did not affect prorenin secretion or renin RNA levels. These results suggest that (i) the first 584 base pairs of the renin gene 5'endash flanking DNA do not contain functional glucocorticoid or estrogen response elements, (ii) placental prorenin release and renin mRNA are regulated by calcium ion and by the combinations of cAMP with either C kinase or calcium ion, and (iii) the first 100 base pairs of the human renin 5'endash flanking DNA direct accurate initiation of transcription and can be regulated by cAMP. Thus, some control of renin release in the placenta (and by inference in other tissues) occurs via transcriptional influences on its promoter

  10. Pulpal status of human primary teeth with physiological root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Joana; Day, Peter; Duggal, Monty; Morgan, Claire; Rodd, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to determine whether any changes occur in the pulpal structure of human primary teeth in association with physiological root resorption. The experimental material comprised 64 sound primary molars, obtained from children requiring routine dental extractions under general anaesthesia. Pulp sections were processed for indirect immunofluorescence using combinations of: (i) protein gene product 9.5 (a general neuronal marker); (ii) leucocyte common antigen CD45 (a general immune cell marker); and (iii) Ulex europaeus I lectin (a marker of vascular endothelium). Image analysis was then used to determine the percentage area of staining for each label within both the pulp horn and mid-coronal region. Following measurement of the greatest degree of root resorption in each sample, teeth were subdivided into three groups: those with physiological resorption involving less than one-third, one-third to two-thirds, and more than two-thirds of their root length. Wide variation was evident between different tooth samples with some resorbed teeth showing marked changes in pulpal histology. Decreased innervation density, increased immune cell accumulation, and increased vascularity were evident in some teeth with advanced root resorption. Analysis of pooled data, however, did not reveal any significant differences in mean percentage area of staining for any of these variables according to the three root resorption subgroups (P > 0.05, analysis of variance on transformed data). This investigation has revealed some changes in pulpal status of human primary teeth with physiological root resorption. These were not, however, as profound as one may have anticipated. It is therefore speculated that teeth could retain the potential for sensation, healing, and repair until advanced stages of root resorption.

  11. Habituation of the initial responses to cold water immersion in humans: a central or peripheral mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M J; Eglin, C M; Golden, F S

    1998-10-15

    1. The initial respiratory and cardiac responses to cold water immersion are thought to be responsible for a significant number of open water deaths each year. Previous research has demonstrated that the magnitude of these responses can be reduced by repeated immersions in cold waterwhether the site of habituation is central or peripheral. 2. Two groups of subjects undertook two 3 min head-out immersions in stirred water at 10 C of the right-hand side of the body (R). Between these two immersions (3 whole days) the control group (n = 7) were not exposed to cold water, but the habituation group (n = 8) undertook a further six 3 min head-out immersions in stirred water at 10 C of the left-hand side of the body (L). 3. Repeated L immersions reduced (P immersion a reduction (P < 0.05) in the magnitude of the responses evoked was seen in the habituation group but not in the control group, despite both groups having identical skin temperature profiles. 4. It is concluded that the mechanisms involved in producing habituation of the initial responses are located more centrally than the peripheral receptors.

  12. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Milena; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  13. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Milena, E-mail: milena.de.nicola@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy); Mirabile Gattia, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it [UTTMAT, ENEA-C.R. Casaccia (Italy); Traversa, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Traversa@kaust.edu.sa [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Division of Physical Science and Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Ghibelli, Lina, E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 {mu}m) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  14. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nicola, Milena; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10–50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  15. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    De Nicola, Milena D.

    2013-05-17

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  16. The pattern and time course of somatosensory changes in the human UVB sunburn model reveal the presence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustorff, Burkhard; Sycha, Thomas; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) sunburn model was characterized with a comprehensive battery of quantitative sensory testing (QST). Primary hyperalgesia in UVB-irradiated skin and secondary hyperalgesia in adjacent nonirradiated skin were studied in 22 healthy subjects 24h after irradiation with UVB at 3-fold minimal erythema dose of a skin area 5 cm in diameter at the thigh and compared to mirror-image contralateral control areas. The time course of hyperalgesia over 96 h was studied in a subgroup of 12 subjects. Within the sunburn area, cold hyperesthesia (P=.01), profound generalized hyperalgesia to heat (Psunburn was surrounded by large areas of pinprick hyperalgesia (mean±SEM, 218±32 cm(2)) and a small rim of dynamic mechanical allodynia but no other sensory changes. Although of smaller magnitude, secondary hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia adjacent to the UVB-irradiated area were statistically highly significant. Primary and secondary hyperalgesia developed in parallel within hours, peaked after 24-32 h, and lasted for more than 96 h. These data reveal that the UVB sunburn model activates a broad spectrum of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms and hence is a useful human surrogate model to be used as a screening tool for target engagement in phases 1 and 2a of drug development. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex nature of SNP genotype effects on gene expression in primary human leucocytes

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    Dinesen Lotte C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies have been hugely successful in identifying disease risk variants, yet most variants do not lead to coding changes and how variants influence biological function is usually unknown. Methods We correlated gene expression and genetic variation in untouched primary leucocytes (n = 110 from individuals with celiac disease – a common condition with multiple risk variants identified. We compared our observations with an EBV-transformed HapMap B cell line dataset (n = 90, and performed a meta-analysis to increase power to detect non-tissue specific effects. Results In celiac peripheral blood, 2,315 SNP variants influenced gene expression at 765 different transcripts (cis expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs. 135 of the detected SNP-probe effects (reflecting 51 unique probes were also detected in a HapMap B cell line published dataset, all with effects in the same allelic direction. Overall gene expression differences within the two datasets predominantly explain the limited overlap in observed cis-eQTLs. Celiac associated risk variants from two regions, containing genes IL18RAP and CCR3, showed significant cis genotype-expression correlations in the peripheral blood but not in the B cell line datasets. We identified 14 genes where a SNP affected the expression of different probes within the same gene, but in opposite allelic directions. By incorporating genetic variation in co-expression analyses, functional relationships between genes can be more significantly detected. Conclusion In conclusion, the complex nature of genotypic effects in human populations makes the use of a relevant tissue, large datasets, and analysis of different exons essential to enable the identification of the function for many genetic risk variants in common diseases.

  18. Comparing and characterizing transient and steady-state tests of the peripheral chemoreflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfoh, Jamie R; Tymko, Michael M; Abrosimova, Maria; Boulet, Lindsey M; Foster, Glen E; Bain, Anthony R; Ainslie, Philip N; Steinback, Craig D; Bruce, Christina D; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? We aimed to characterize the cardiorespiratory and cerebrovascular responses to transient and steady-state tests of the peripheral chemoreflex and to compare the hypoxic ventilatory responses (HVRs) between these tests. What is the main finding and its importance? The cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to transient tests were small in magnitude and short in duration. The steady-state isocapnic hypoxia test elicited a larger HVR than the transient 100% N(2) test, but the response magnitudes were correlated within individuals. The transient test of the HVR elicits fewer systemic effects than steady-state techniques and may have greater experimental utility than previously appreciated. Carotid chemoreceptors detect changes in arterial PO(2) and PCO(2), eliciting a peripheral chemoreflex (PCR). Steady-state (SS) hypoxia tests using dynamic end-tidal forcing (DEF) have been used to assess the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) but may be confounded by concomitant systemic effects. Transient tests of the PCR have also been developed but are not widely used, nor have the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses been characterized. We characterized the cardiorespiratory and cerebrovascular responses to transient tests of the PCR and compared the HVR between transient and SS-DEF tests. We hypothesized that the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to the transient tests would be minimal and that the respiratory responses elicited from the transient and SS-DEF tests would be different in magnitude and not well correlated within individuals. Participants underwent five consecutive trials of two transient tests [three-breath 100% N(2) (TT-N(2)) and a single-breath 13% CO(2), in air] and two 10 min SS-DEF tests [isocapnic (SS-ISO) and poikilocapnic (SS-POI) hypoxia]. In response to the transient tests, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and the middle and posterior cerebral artery blood velocity increased (all P

  19. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic, adipose tissue and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in obese humans

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    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism differ between men and women, and women tend to have better whole-body or muscle insulin sensitivity. This may be explained, in part, by differences in sex hormones and adipose tissue distribution. Few studies have investigated gender differences in hepatic, adipose tissue and whole-body insulin sensitivity between severely obese men and women. In this study, we aimed to determine the differences in glucose metabolism between severely obese men and women using tissue-specific measurements of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was compared between age and body mass index (BMI-matched obese men and women by a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. Basal endogenous glucose production and insulin sensitivity of the liver, adipose tissue and peripheral tissues were assessed. Liver fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subset of included subjects. We included 46 obese men and women (age, 48±2 vs 46±2 years, p=0.591; BMI, 41±1 vs 41±1 kg/m2, p=0.832. There was no difference in basal endogenous glucose production (14.4±1.0 vs 15.3±0.5 µmol•kg fat-free mass-1•min-1, p=0.410, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, 71.6±3.6 vs 76.1±2.6%, p=0.314 or peripheral insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated rate of disappearance of glucose, 26.2±2.1 vs 22.7±1.7 µmol•kg-1•min-1, p=0.211. Obese men were characterized by lower hepatic insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, 61.7±4.1 vs 72.8±2.5% in men vs women, resp., p=0.028. Finally, these observations could not be explained by differences in liver fat content (men vs women, 16.5±3.1 vs 16.0±2.5%, p=0.913, n=27.We conclude that obese men have lower hepatic, but comparable adipose tissue and peripheral tissue, insulin sensitivity compared to similarly obese women. Hepatic insulin resistance may

  20. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

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    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  1. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

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    Shanaz A Ghandhi

    Full Text Available We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  2. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandhi, Shanaz A; Turner, Helen C; Shuryak, Igor; Dugan, Gregory O; Bourland, J Daniel; Olson, John D; Tooze, Janet A; Morton, Shad R; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Cline, J Mark; Amundson, Sally A

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta) that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI) allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT) and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  3. Permeability transition in human mitochondria persists in the absence of peripheral stalk subunits of ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuya; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2017-08-22

    The opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membranes of mitochondria can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane and ATP synthesis, and cell death. Pore opening can be inhibited by cyclosporin A mediated via cyclophilin D. It has been proposed that the pore is associated with the dimeric ATP synthase and the oligomycin sensitivity conferral protein (OSCP), a component of the enzyme's peripheral stalk, provides the site at which cyclophilin D interacts. Subunit b contributes a central α-helical structure to the peripheral stalk, extending from near the top of the enzyme's catalytic domain and crossing the membrane domain of the enzyme via two α-helices. We investigated the possible involvement of the subunit b and the OSCP in the PTP by generating clonal cells, HAP1-Δb and HAP1-ΔOSCP, lacking the membrane domain of subunit b or the OSCP, respectively, in which the corresponding genes, ATP5F1 and ATP5O , had been disrupted. Both cell lines preserve the characteristic properties of the PTP; therefore, the membrane domain of subunit b does not contribute to the PTP, and the OSCP does not provide the site of interaction with cyclophilin D. The membrane subunits ATP6, ATP8, and subunit c have been eliminated previously from possible participation in the PTP; thus, the only subunits of ATP synthase that could participate in pore formation are e, f, g, diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues (DAPIT), and the 6.8-kDa proteolipid.

  4. The miRNA and mRNA Signatures of Peripheral Blood Cells in Humans Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

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    Smiths Lueong

    Full Text Available Simple, reliable tools for diagnosis of human African Trypanosomiases could ease field surveillance and enhance patient care. In particular, current methods to distinguish patients with (stage II and without (stage I brain involvement require samples of cerebrospinal fluid. We describe here an exploratory study to find out whether miRNAs from peripheral blood leukocytes might be useful in diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, or for determining the stage of the disease. Using microarrays, we measured miRNAs in samples from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-infected patients (9 stage I, 10 stage II, 8 seronegative parasite-negative controls and 12 seropositive, but parasite-negative subjects. 8 miRNAs (out of 1205 tested showed significantly lower expression in patients than in seronegative, parasite-negative controls, and 1 showed increased expression. There were no clear differences in miRNAs between patients in different disease stages. The miRNA profiles could not distinguish seropositive, but parasitologically negative samples from controls and results within this group did not correlate with those from the trypanolysis test. Some of the regulated miRNAs, or their predicted mRNA targets, were previously reported changed during other infectious diseases or cancer. We conclude that the changes in miRNA profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in human African trypanosomiasis are related to immune activation or inflammation, are probably disease-non-specific, and cannot be used to determine the disease stage. The approach has little promise for diagnostics but might yield information about disease pathology.

  5. Association of peripheral differential leukocyte counts with dyslipidemia risk in Chinese patients with hypertension: insight from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhong; Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Wen; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yupeng; Wang, Yu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Hou, Fan Fan; Gao, Wei; Sun, Ningling; Li, Jianping; Venners, Scott A; Jiang, Shanqun; Huo, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between peripheral differential leukocyte counts and dyslipidemia in a Chinese hypertensive population. A total of 10,866 patients with hypertension were enrolled for a comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular risk factors using data from the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. Plasma lipid levels and total leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were determined according to standard methods. Peripheral differential leukocyte counts were consistently and positively associated with serum total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and TG levels (all P dyslipidemia/normolipidemia), we found that patients in the highest quartile of total leukocyte count (≥7.6 × 10 9 cells/l) had 1.64 times the risk of high TG [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.46, 1.85], 1.34 times the risk of high TC (95% CI: 1.20, 1.50), and 1.24 times the risk of high LDL-C (95% CI: 1.12, 1.39) compared with their counterparts in the lowest quartile of total leukocyte count. Similar patterns were also observed with neutrophils and lymphocytes. In summary, these findings indicate that elevated differential leukocyte counts are directly associated with serum lipid levels and increased odds of dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  7. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon P; Franco, Nunzio F; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes.

  8. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfared, A.S.; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation. (author)

  9. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi S.M.J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective: Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method: 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old. Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results: Our results showed significant increase in ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion: The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated.

  10. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

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    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  11. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  12. Human Rights Texts: Converting Human Rights Primary Source Documents into Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariss, Christopher J; Linder, Fridolin J; Jones, Zachary M; Crabtree, Charles D; Biek, Megan A; Ross, Ana-Sophia M; Kaur, Taranamol; Tsai, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and make publicly available a large corpus of digitized primary source human rights documents which are published annually by monitoring agencies that include Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, and the United States Department of State. In addition to the digitized text, we also make available and describe document-term matrices, which are datasets that systematically organize the word counts from each unique document by each unique term within the corpus of human rights documents. To contextualize the importance of this corpus, we describe the development of coding procedures in the human rights community and several existing categorical indicators that have been created by human coding of the human rights documents contained in the corpus. We then discuss how the new human rights corpus and the existing human rights datasets can be used with a variety of statistical analyses and machine learning algorithms to help scholars understand how human rights practices and reporting have evolved over time. We close with a discussion of our plans for dataset maintenance, updating, and availability.

  13. Changes in ocular biometry and anterior chamber parameters after pharmacologic mydriasis and peripheral iridotomy in primary angle closure suspects

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    Mohammad Reza Razeghinejad

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: This study showed no change in the ocular biometric and anterior chamber parameters including iridocorneal angle after PI and/or pharmacologic mydriasis except for increments in anterior chamber volume. This factor has the potential to be used as a numerical proxy for iris position in evaluating and monitoring patients with primary angle closure suspects after PI.

  14. Cytogenetic comparison of the responses of mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, A.D.; Halperin, E.C.; Erexson, G.L.; Honore, G.; Westbrook-Collins, B.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of 60 Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a 60 Co unit to yield exposures of 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy. In addition, mice were whole-body irradiated in vivo with the same doses so that an in vitro-in vivo comparison could be made. The results indicate that mouse PBLs irradiated in whole blood, whether in vivo or in vitro, respond similarly to 60 Co gamma rays as measured by dicentric chromosome formation. In addition, mouse and human PBLs showed a similar radiosensitivity, but because the mouse PBL data were best fitted to an exponential function and the human PBL data to a quadratic function, direct comparisons were difficult to make. Pelleted MNLs from mice were much less sensitive to the clastogenic effects of gamma radiation than whole blood. This is believed to be due to hypoxic conditions that developed during irradiation and transport. Human PBLs did not show a marked difference whether irradiated in whole blood or as pelleted MNLs in tissue culture medium

  15. Conversion of adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into induced neural stem cell by using episomal vectors

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    Xihe Tang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human neural stem cells (NSCs hold great promise for research and therapy in neural diseases. Many studies have shown direct induction of NSCs from human fibroblasts, which require an invasive skin biopsy and a prolonged period of expansion in cell culture prior to use. Peripheral blood (PB is routinely used in medical diagnoses, and represents a noninvasive and easily accessible source of cells. Here we show direct derivation of NSCs from adult human PB mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs by employing episomal vectors for transgene delivery. These induced NSCs (iNSCs can expand more than 60 passages, can exhibit NSC morphology, gene expression, differentiation potential, and self-renewing capability and can give rise to multiple functional neural subtypes and glial cells in vitro. Furthermore, the iNSCs carry a specific regional identity and have electrophysiological activity upon differentiation. Our findings provide an easily accessible approach for generating human iNSCs which will facilitate disease modeling, drug screening, and possibly regenerative medicine.

  16. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  17. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannen, Rosalind F.; Michael, Anthony E.; Jaulim, Adil; Bhogal, Ranjit; Burrin, Jacky M.; Philpott, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. → Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. → Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. → StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3βHSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7- 3 H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7- 3 H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3βHSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data show that PHK are capable of extra

  18. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation of human primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jung, Yujin; Chung, Yong An; Song, In-Uk; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is making progress as a new non-invasive mode of regional brain stimulation. Current evidence of FUS-mediated neurostimulation for humans has been limited to the observation of subjective sensory manifestations and electrophysiological responses, thus warranting the identification of stimulated brain regions. Here, we report FUS sonication of the primary visual cortex (V1) in humans, resulting in elicited activation not only from the sonicated brain area, but also from the network of regions involved in visual and higher-order cognitive processes (as revealed by simultaneous acquisition of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging). Accompanying phosphene perception was also reported. The electroencephalo graphic (EEG) responses showed distinct peaks associated with the stimulation. None of the participants showed any adverse effects from the sonication based on neuroimaging and neurological examinations. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic profile showed the presence of individual variability in terms of the location and intensity of the acoustic focus. With exquisite spatial selectivity and capability for depth penetration, FUS may confer a unique utility in providing non-invasive stimulation of region-specific brain circuits for neuroscientific and therapeutic applications.

  19. Effects of Secondary Metabolites of Permafrost Bacillus sp. on Cytokine Synthesis by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenova, L F; Kolyvanova, S S; Bazhin, A S; Besedin, I M; Mel'nikov, V P

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effects of secondary metabolites of Bacillus sp. isolated from late Neogene permafrost on secretion of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-2, and IFNγ) and antiinflammatory (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It was found that metabolites of Bacillus sp. produced more potent effect on cytokine secretion than mitogen phytohemagglutinin and metabolites of Bacillus cereus, medicinal strain IP5832. Activity of metabolites depended on the temperature of bacteria incubation. "Cold" metabolites of Bacillus sp. (isolated at -5°C) primarily induced Th1-mediated secretion of IFNγ, while "warm" metabolites (obtained at 37°C) induced Th2-mediated secretion of IL-4. The results suggest that Bacillus sp. metabolites are promising material for the development of immunomodulating drugs.

  20. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  1. Sensitivity of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes to various X-ray doses and subsequent storage in Plexiglass or glass containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Geogieva, I.

    1979-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether chromosomal aberrations produced in vitro by various X-ray doses in human lymphocytes were affected by post-irradiation storage of the blood in plastic or glass containers. Following X-ray doses of up to 400 R, the yields of cells with aberrations and the incidence of dicentrics, rings, interstitial deletions, symmetrical changes and chromosome fragments increased with dose. After storage of the irradiated lymphocytes in either Plexiglass or glass, the values for exchange aberrations, deletions and aberrant cells were compared. The only statistically significant difference was a slight increase in the percentage of aberrant cells stored in the plastic containers at the 400 R dose level. It was concluded that plastics appear to have a sensitizing effect on the genetic structure of the peripheral lymphocyte and thus the use of this material to store blood in biological dosimetry studies should be discouraged. (U.K.)

  2. A Cost-Consequences analysis of the effect of Pregabalin in the treatment of peripheral Neuropathic Pain in routine medical practice in Primary Care settings

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    Torrades Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain (NeP is a common symptom of a group of a variety of conditions, including diabetic neuropathy, trigeminal neuralgia, or postherpetic neuralgia. Prevalence of NeP has been estimated to range between 5-7.5%, and produces up to 25% of pain clinics consultations. Due to its severity, chronic evolution, and associated co-morbidities, NeP has an important individual and social impact. The objective was to analyze the effect of pregabalin (PGB on pain alleviation and longitudinal health and non-health resources utilization and derived costs in peripheral refractory NeP in routine medical practice in primary care settings (PCS in Spain. Methods Subjects from PCS were older than 18 years, with peripheral NeP (diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia or trigeminal neuralgia, refractory to at least one previous analgesic, and included in a prospective, real world, and 12-week two-visit cost-of-illness study. Measurement of resources utilization included both direct healthcare and indirect expenditures. Pain severity was measured by the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ. Results One-thousand-three-hundred-fifty-four PGB-naive patients [58.8% women, 59.5 (12.7 years old] were found eligible for this secondary analysis: 598 (44% switched from previous therapy to PGB given in monotherapy (PGBm, 589 (44% received PGB as add-on therapy (PGB add-on, and 167 (12% patients changed previous treatments to others different than PGB (non-PGB. Reductions of pain severity were higher in both PGBm and PGB add-on groups (54% and 51%, respectively than in non-PGB group (34%, p Conclusion In Spanish primary care settings, PGB given either add-on or in monotherapy in routine medical practice was associated with pain alleviation leading to significant longitudinal reductions in resource use and total costs during the 12-week period of the study compared with non-PGB-therapy of patients with chronic NeP of peripheral origin

  3. Immunotoxicity testing using human primary leukocytes: An adjunct approach for the evaluation of human risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2017-04-01

    Historically, immunotoxicity testing for chemicals, pesticides and pharmaceuticals has relied heavily on animal models to identify effects on the immune system followed by extrapolation to humans. Substantial progress has been made in the past decade on understanding human immune cell regulation, adaptive and innate immune responses and its modulation. The human immune system is complex and there exists diversity within composition, localization, and activation of different immune cell types between individuals. The inherent variation in human populations owing to genetics and environment can have a significant influence on the response of the immune system to infectious agents, drugs, chemicals and other environmental factors. Several recent reports have highlighted that mouse models of sepsis and inflammation are poorly predictive of human disease physiology and pathology. Rodent and human immune cells differ in the expression of cell surface proteins and phenotypes expressed in disease models, which may significantly influence the mechanism of action of xenobiotics and susceptibility yielding a different profile of activity across animal species. In the light of these differences and recent trends toward precision medicine, personalized therapies and the 3Rs (reduce, replace and refine animal use) approaches, the importance of using 'all human' model systems cannot be overstated. Hence, this opinion piece aims to discuss new models used to assess the effects of environmental contaminants and immune modulators on the immune response in human cells, the advantages and challenges of using human primary cells in immunotoxicology research and the implication for the future of immunotoxicity testing.

  4. Critical Role of Peripheral Vasoconstriction in Fatal Brain Hyperthermia Induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under Conditions That Mimic Human Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Albert H.; Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Baumann, Michael H.; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed “rave” parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22−23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ∼1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues. PMID:24899699

  5. Effects of Platelets on Platelet Concentrate Product on the Activation of Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte Cells

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    N Sadat Razavi Hoseini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monocytes can interact with platelets due to their surface molecules such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, and form monocyte-platelet complex. In the present study, the effects of platelets interaction of platelet concentrates (PCs and peripheral blood monocytes were investigated in vitro as a model to predict the probable interactions of these cells and consequently activation of monocytes. Methods: In this experimental study, units of whole blood and PCs were prepared from Tehran Blood Transfusion Center. After isolation of monocytes from the whole blood, these cells were treated with PC- derived platelets. The activation of monocytes was assessed before and after treatment by the analysis of the respiratory burst of monocytes using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR-123. The study data were analyzed using the non-parametric test of Wilcoxon. Results: The purity of monocytes was determined as 86.1±2 using NycoPrep method. The respiratory burst of monocytes was increased after exposure with platelets. In fact, the difference was significant when platelets were used on the 5th day of storage (P=0.001. Conclusions: The study findings revealed that platelets have an efficient capacity to stimulate and activate monocytes. The possible involvement of molecules in the interaction of platelet-monocyte demand to be further studied in future.

  6. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  7. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  8. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Amini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary systemic vasculitis in pre-capillary arteries is associated with peripheral neuropathy. In some types of systematic vasculitis about 60 % of patients have peripheral nervous system (PNS involvement. In vasculitic peripheral neuropathies (VPN a necrotizing and inflammatory process leads to narrowing of vasa nervorum lumen and eventually the appearance of ischemic lesions in peripheral nerves. Some features might be suggestive of VPN, like: axonal nerve degeneration, wallerian-like degeneration, and diameter irregularity of nerve. Peripheral nervous system (PNS destruction during systemic vasculitides should be considered, due to its frequency and early occurrence in vasculitis progression. The first line treatment of non systematic VPNs is corticosteroid agents, but these drugs might worsen the VPNs or systemic vasculitis.

  9. Identification of proangiogenic TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) in human peripheral blood and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Mary Anna; De Palma, Michele; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Pucci, Ferdinando; Scielzo, Cristina; Zonari, Erika; Mazzieri, Roberta; Doglioni, Claudio; Naldini, Luigi

    2007-06-15

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), have been implicated in tumor progression. We recently described a lineage of mouse monocytes characterized by expression of the Tie2 angiopoietin receptor and required for the vascularization and growth of several tumor models. Here, we report that TIE2 expression in human blood identifies a subset of monocytes distinct from classical inflammatory monocytes and comprised within the less abundant "resident" population. These TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) accounted for 2% to 7% of blood mononuclear cells in healthy donors and were distinct from rare circulating endothelial cells and progenitors. In human cancer patients, TEMs were observed in the blood and, intriguingly, within the tumors, where they represented the main monocyte population distinct from TAMs. Conversely, TEMs were hardly detected in nonneoplastic tissues. In vitro, TEMs migrated toward angiopoietin-2, a TIE2 ligand released by activated endothelial cells and angiogenic vessels, suggesting a homing mechanism for TEMs to tumors. Purified human TEMs, but not TEM-depleted monocytes, markedly promoted angiogenesis in xenotransplanted human tumors, suggesting a potentially critical role of TEMs in human cancer progression. Human TEMs may provide a novel, biologically relevant marker of angiogenesis and represent a previously unrecognized target of cancer therapy.

  10. DNA damage and methylation induced by glyphosate in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Reszka, Edyta; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Jabłońska, Ewa; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Bukowska, Bożena

    2017-07-01

    Glyphosate is a very important herbicide that is widely used in the agriculture, and thus the exposure of humans to this substance and its metabolites has been noted. The purpose of this study was to assess DNA damage (determination of single and double strand-breaks by the comet assay) as well as to evaluate DNA methylation (global DNA methylation and methylation of p16 (CDKN2A) and p53 (TP53) promoter regions) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to glyphosate. PBMCs were incubated with the compound studied at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 mM for 24 h. The study has shown that glyphosate induced DNA lesions, which were effectively repaired. However, PBMCs were unable to repair completely DNA damage induced by glyphosate. We also observed a decrease in global DNA methylation level at 0.25 mM of glyphosate. Glyphosate at 0.25 mM and 0.5 mM increased p53 promoter methylation, while it did not induce statistically significant changes in methylation of p16 promoter. To sum up, we have shown for the first time that glyphosate (at high concentrations from 0.5 to 10 mM) may induce DNA damage in leucocytes such as PBMCs and cause DNA methylation in human cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional and Pharmacological Analysis of Cardiomyocytes Differentiated from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Michael Riedel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology have set the stage for routine derivation of patient- and disease-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocyte (CM models for preclinical drug screening and personalized medicine approaches. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs are an advantageous source of somatic cells because they are easily obtained and readily amenable to transduction. Here, we report that the electrophysiological properties and pharmacological responses of PBMC-derived iPSC CM are generally similar to those of iPSC CM derived from other somatic cells, using patch-clamp, calcium transient, and multielectrode array (MEA analyses. Distinct iPSC lines derived from a single patient display similar electrophysiological features and pharmacological responses. Finally, we demonstrate that human iPSC CMs undergo acute changes in calcium-handling properties and gene expression in response to rapid electrical stimulation, laying the foundation for an in-vitro-tachypacing model system for the study of human tachyarrhythmias.

  12. Ouabain exacerbates activation-induced cell death in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

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    Mabel B. Esteves

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes activated by mitogenic lectins display changes in transmembrane potential, an elevation in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations, proliferation and/or activation induced cell death. Low concentrations of ouabain (an inhibitor of Na+,K+-ATPase suppress mitogen-induced proliferation and increases cell death. To understand the mechanisms involved, a number of parameters were analyzed using fluorescent probes and flow cytometry. The addition of 100nM ouabain to cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes activated with 5µg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA did not modify the increased expression of the Fas receptor or its ligand FasL induced by the mitogen. However, treatment with ouabain potentiated apoptosis induced by an anti-Fas agonist antibody. A synergy between ouabain and PHA was also observed with regard to plasma membrane depolarization. PHA per se did not induce dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential but when cells were also exposed to ouabain a marked depolarization could be observed, and this was a late event. It is possible that the inhibitory effect of ouabain on activated peripheral blood lymphocytes involves the potentiation of some of the steps of the apoptotic process and reflects an exacerbation of the mechanism of activation-induced cell death.Quando linfócitos são ativados por lectinas mitogênicas apresentam mudanças do potencial de membrana, elevação das concentrações citoplasmáticas de cálcio, proliferação e/ou morte celular induzida por ativação (AICD. Concentrações baixas de ouabaína (um inibidor da Na,K-ATPase suprimem a proliferação induzida por mitógenos e aumentam a morte celular. Para entender os mecanismos envolvidos, uma série de parâmetros foram avaliados usando sondas fluorescentes e citometria de fluxo. A adição de 100nM de ouabaína para culturas de linfócitos de sangue periférico ativadas por fitohemaglutinina (PHA não modificou o aumento de expressão do receptor Fas ou de

  13. Optimizing recovery of frozen human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for flow cytometry.

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    Bo Langhoff Hønge

    Full Text Available Live peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs can be frozen and thawed for later analyses by adding and removing a cryoprotectant, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. Laboratories across the world use various procedures, but published evidence of optimal thawing procedures is scarce.PBMCs were separated from blood collected from healthy Danish blood donors, and stored at -80°C after adding of DMSO. The essential steps in the thawing procedure were modified and performance was evaluated by flow cytometry with respect to the percentage and total yield of viable PMBCs.The best-performing washing medium was Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640 at 37°C with 20% fetal bovine serum. When using 10 mL washing medium in a 15-mL Falcon tube, samples should be centrifuged for at least 10 minutes at 500 g. We failed to detect any differences between the tested methods of mixing PBMCs with washing medium. Likewise, neither the thawing duration nor centrifugation temperature (20°C and 37°C had any effect. PBMCs could be incubated (rested for up to eight hours in a 37°C 5% CO2 incubator without affecting cell counts, but incubating PBMCs for 16 hours significantly decreased viability and recovery. In general, high viability was not necessarily associated with high recovery.Changing the thawing procedure significantly impacted PBMC viability and live cell recovery. Evaluating both viability and live PBMC recovery are necessary to evaluate method performance. Investigation of differential loss of PBMC subtypes and phenotypic changes during thawing and incubation requires further evaluation.

  14. RTTN Mutations Cause Primary Microcephaly and Primordial Dwarfism in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldin, Hanan; Alazami, Anas M; Manning, Melanie; Hashem, Amal; Caluseiu, Oana; Tabarki, Brahim; Esplin, Edward; Schelley, Susan; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan; Majewski, Jacek; Bernier, Francois P; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-12-03

    Primary microcephaly is a developmental brain anomaly that results from defective proliferation of neuroprogenitors in the germinal periventricular zone. More than a dozen genes are known to be mutated in autosomal-recessive primary microcephaly in isolation or in association with a more generalized growth deficiency (microcephalic primordial dwarfism), but the genetic heterogeneity is probably more extensive. In a research protocol involving autozygome mapping and exome sequencing, we recruited a multiplex consanguineous family who is affected by severe microcephalic primordial dwarfism and tested negative on clinical exome sequencing. Two candidate autozygous intervals were identified, and the second round of exome sequencing revealed a single intronic variant therein (c.2885+8A>G [p.Ser963(∗)] in RTTN exon 23). RT-PCR confirmed that this change creates a cryptic splice donor and thus causes retention of the intervening 7 bp of the intron and leads to premature truncation. On the basis of this finding, we reanalyzed the exome file of a second consanguineous family affected by a similar phenotype and identified another homozygous change in RTTN as the likely causal mutation. Combined linkage analysis of the two families confirmed that RTTN maps to the only significant linkage peak. Finally, through international collaboration, a Canadian multiplex family affected by microcephalic primordial dwarfism and biallelic mutation of RTTN was identified. Our results expand the phenotype of RTTN-related disorders, hitherto limited to polymicrogyria, to include microcephalic primordial dwarfism with a complex brain phenotype involving simplified gyration. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA methylation-histone modification relationships across the desmin locus in human primary cells

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    Clelland Gayle K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present here an extensive epigenetic analysis of a 500 kb region, which encompasses the human desmin gene (DES and its 5' locus control region (LCR, the only muscle-specific transcriptional regulatory element of this type described to date. These data complement and extend Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE studies on region ENr133. We analysed histone modifications and underlying DNA methylation patterns in physiologically relevant DES expressing (myoblast/myotube and non-expressing (peripheral blood mononuclear primary human cells. Results We found that in expressing myoblast/myotube but not peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC cultures, histone H4 acetylation displays a broadly distributed enrichment across a gene rich 200 kb region whereas H3 acetylation localizes at the transcriptional start site (TSS of genes. We show that the DES LCR and TSS of DES are enriched with hyperacetylated domains of acetylated histone H3, with H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methylation (H3K4me2 and me3 exhibiting a different distribution pattern across this locus. The CpG island that extends into the first intron of DES is methylation-free regardless of the gene's expression status and in non-expressing PBMCs is marked with histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27me3. Conclusion Overall, our results constitute the first study correlating patterns of histone modifications and underlying DNA methylation of a muscle-specific LCR and its associated downstream gene region whilst additionally placing this within a much broader genomic context. Our results clearly show that there are distinct patterns of histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation at the DES LCR, promoter and intragenic region. In addition, the presence of H3K27me3 at the DES methylation-free CpG only in non-expressing PBMCs may serve to silence this gene in non-muscle tissues. Generally, our work demonstrates the importance of using multiple, physiologically relevant

  16. In vitro safety assessment of the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) water leaf extract and arbutin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurica, K; Brčić Karačonji, I; Mikolić, A; Milojković-Opsenica, D; Benković, V; Kopjar, N

    2018-04-25

    Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) leaves have long been used in the traditional medicine of the Mediterranean region. One of their most bioactive constituents is the glycoside arbutin, whose presence makes A. unedo suitable as a potential substitute for bearberry [Arctostaphylos uva ursi (L.) Spreng] leaves, an herbal preparation widely used for treating urinary tract infections. The safety and biocompatibility of strawberry tree water leaf extract have not yet been documented well. This study estimated arbutin content in strawberry tree water leaf extract (STE) using high performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro safety assessment of the 24 h exposure to three presumably non-toxic concentrations of standardized STE and arbutin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using the apoptosis/necrosis assay, the alkaline comet assay, and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. The STE was also tested for total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation. At a concentration corresponding to the maximum allowable daily intake of arbutin, the tested extract was not cytotoxic, had a negligible potential for causing primary DNA damage and even hindered micronuclei formation in lymphocytes. It also showed a valuable antioxidant capacity, and did not exert marked lipid peroxidation. These promising results represent a solid frame for further development of STE-based herbal preparations. Although arbutin generally had a low DNA damaging potential, the slowing down of lymphocyte proliferation observed after 24 h of exposure points to a cytostatic effect, which merits further research.

  17. Flow cytometry of human primary epidermal and follicular keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnani, Alfredo; Ipolito, Michelle Zampieri; Sobral, Christiane S; Brunialti, Milena Karina Coló; Salomão, Reinaldo; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2008-02-19

    The aim of this study was to characterize using flow cytometry cultured human primary keratinocytes isolated from the epidermis and hair follicles by different methods. Human keratinocytes derived from discarded fragments of total skin and scalp hair follicles from patients who underwent plastic surgery in the Plastic Surgery Division at UNIFESP were used. The epidermal keratinocytes were isolated by using 3 different methods: the standard method, upon exposure to trypsin for 30 minutes; the second, by treatment with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes; and the third, by treatment with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 30 minutes. Follicular keratinocytes were isolated using the standard method. On comparing the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes with the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 30 minutes, it was observed that the first group presented the largest number of viable cells, the smallest number of cells in late apoptosis and necrosis with statistical significance, and no difference in apoptosis. When we compared the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes with the group treated with trypsin, the first group presented the largest number of viable cells, the smallest number of cells in apoptosis with statistical significance, and no difference in late apoptosis and necrosis. When we compared the results of the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes with the results for follical isolation, there was a statistical difference in apoptosis and viable cells. The isolation method of treatment with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes produced the largest number of viable cells and the smallest number of cells in apoptosis/necrosis.

  18. The primary report of percutaneous polymethyl methacrylate cementoplasty in osteolytic metastases of the pelvis and peripheral bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Gang; Jin Peng; Yi Yuhai; Xie Zhiyong; Zhang Xuping; Li Guoying

    2005-01-01

    was maintained in 23 patients at the follow-up of 2-7 months. One patient with lesion of humerus re-experienced severe pain in local area of PMMA injection 27 days after the operation when he got up by using the treated arm for the support of the body weight. The condition was considered as the fracture at the cement-bone interface, and the gradual pain relief was obtained in 2 days with the external fixation of p laster for limiting the motion of the treated arm, and the complete relief maintained. There was PMMA leakage in 2 cases without corresponding clinical importance. Conclusion: The technique and treatment of percutaneous PMMA cementoplasty in osteolytic metastases of the pelvis and peripheral bone was safe and effective. Considering the incidence of the potential fracture, the external fixation formotion limitation should be given after PMMA injection to extremity lesions. (authors)

  19. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  20. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, Saskia; Meijerink, Marjolein; Molenaar, Douwe; Bron, Peter A.; de Vos, Paul; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Wells, Jerry M.; Marco, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic

  1. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  2. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Holstege, Gert; Wit, Hero P.; Albers, Frans W.J.; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.

    2007-01-01

    We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a baseline (no auditory stimulation). We found a sex difference in activation of the left and right PAC when comparing music to noise. The PAC was more activated by music than by noise in both men and women. But this difference between the two stimuli was significantly higher in men than in women. To investigate whether this difference could be attributed to either music or noise, we compared both stimuli with the baseline and revealed that noise gave a significantly higher activation in the female PAC than in the male PAC. Moreover, the male group showed a deactivation in the right prefrontal cortex when comparing noise to the baseline, which was not present in the female group. Interestingly, the auditory and prefrontal regions are anatomically and functionally linked and the prefrontal cortex is known to be engaged in auditory tasks that involve sustained or selective auditory attention. Thus we hypothesize that differences in attention result in a different deactivation of the right prefrontal cortex, which in turn modulates the activation of the PAC and thus explains the sex differences found in the activation of the PAC. Our results suggest that sex is an important factor in auditory brain studies. (orig.)

  3. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department Otorhinolaryngology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Georgiadis, Janniko R. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Groningen (Netherlands); Holstege, Gert [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Uroneurology, Groningen (Netherlands); Wit, Hero P. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Groningen (Netherlands); Albers, Frans W.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department Otorhinolaryngology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Willemsen, Antoon T.M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2007-12-15

    We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a baseline (no auditory stimulation). We found a sex difference in activation of the left and right PAC when comparing music to noise. The PAC was more activated by music than by noise in both men and women. But this difference between the two stimuli was significantly higher in men than in women. To investigate whether this difference could be attributed to either music or noise, we compared both stimuli with the baseline and revealed that noise gave a significantly higher activation in the female PAC than in the male PAC. Moreover, the male group showed a deactivation in the right prefrontal cortex when comparing noise to the baseline, which was not present in the female group. Interestingly, the auditory and prefrontal regions are anatomically and functionally linked and the prefrontal cortex is known to be engaged in auditory tasks that involve sustained or selective auditory attention. Thus we hypothesize that differences in attention result in a different deactivation of the right prefrontal cortex, which in turn modulates the activation of the PAC and thus explains the sex differences found in the activation of the PAC. Our results suggest that sex is an important factor in auditory brain studies. (orig.)

  4. Reconstituting development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia from primary human pancreas duct cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jonghyeob; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Gu, Xueying; Wang, Jing; Flowers, Brittany M.; Kim, Yoo Jung; Park, Sangbin; Szot, Gregory L.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Longacre, Teri A.; Kim, Seung K.

    2017-01-01

    Development of systems that reconstitute hallmark features of human pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), the precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, could generate new strategies for early diagnosis and intervention. However, human cell-based PanIN models with defined mutations are unavailable. Here, we report that genetic modification of primary human pancreatic cells leads to development of lesions resembling native human PanINs. Primary human pancreas duct cells harbouring...

  5. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  6. Generation of human iPSC line GRX-MCiPS4F-A2 from adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with Spanish genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cabrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have generated iPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of a healthy man using heat sensitive and non-integrative Sendai virus containing Sox2, Oct3/4, c-Myc and Klf4. Human GRX-MCiPS4F-A2 cell line was established and characterized through this study.

  7. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage uni.......0001). The synchronism of the nocturnal subcutaneous hyperemia and the decrease in systemic mean arterial blood pressure point to a common, possibly central nervous or humoral, eliciting mechanism.......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...

  8. Manufacture of endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells from steady-state peripheral blood leukapheresis using pooled human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Georg; Fleck, Erika; Elser, Stefanie; Hermanutz-Klein, Ursula; Waidmann, Marc; Northoff, Hinnak; Seifried, Erhard; Schäfer, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells (ECFCs) are promising candidates for cell therapies. However, ECFC translation to the clinic requires optimized isolation and manufacture technologies according to good manufacturing practice (GMP). ECFCs were manufactured from steady-state peripheral blood (PB) leukapheresis (11 donors), using GMP-compliant technologies including pooled human platelet (PLT) lysate, and compared to human umbilical cord endothelial cells, human aortic endothelial cells, and human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Specific variables assessed were growth kinetics, phenotype, trophic factors production, stimulation of tube formation, and Dil-AcLDL uptake. ECFCs could be isolated from PB leukapheresis units with mean processed volume of 5411 mL and mean white blood cell (WBC) concentration factor of 8.74. The mean frequency was 1.44 × 10 -8 ECFCs per WBC, corresponding to a mean of 177.8 ECFCs per apheresis unit. Expandable for up to 12 cumulative population doublings, calculated projection showed that approximately 730 × 10 3 ECFCs could be manufactured from 1 apheresis unit. ECFCs produced epidermal growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, PLT-derived growth factor-B, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, featured high potential for capillary-like tubes formation, and showed no telomerase activity. They were characterized by CD29, CD31, CD44, CD105, CD117, CD133, CD144, CD146, and VEGF-R2 expression, with the most common subpopulation CD34+CD117-CD133-. Compared to controls, ECFCs featured greater Dil-AcLDL uptake and higher expression of CD29, CD31, CD34, CD44, CD144, and VEGF-R2. Here we show that isolation of ECFCs with proangiogenic profile from steady-state PB leukapheresis is feasible, marking a first step toward ECFC product manufacture according to GMP. © 2018 AABB.

  9. Individual differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells detected in steady-state human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriya, Asami; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Miura, Toshiaki; Abe, Yoshinao

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the individual differences in radiosensitivity of lineage-committed myeloid hematopoietic progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), detected in steady-state human peripheral blood (PB). Mononuclear cells were prepared from the buffy-coat of 30 individuals PB, and were assayed for CFC by semi-solid culture supplemented with cytokines. X irradiation was performed in the range of 0.5-4 Gy at a dose rate of about 80 cGy/min. The mean number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is 5866±3408 in 1 ml of buffy-coat, suggesting that the erythroid progenitor cells are the major population. The total CFC radiosensitivity parameter D 0 and n value are 1.18±0.24 and 1.89±0.98, respectively. Using a linear regression analysis, a statistically significant correlation is observed between the D 0 value and the surviving fraction at 4 Gy (r=0.611 p 0 parameter and the level of antioxidants, plasma uric acid, plasma bilirubin, and intracellular glutathione. The present study demonstrates that there are large individual differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells as detected in steady-state human PB. These differences demonstrate almost no correlation with plasma or intracellular antioxidants. The prediction of individual differences in radiosensitivity of CFC can only be measured by 4 Gy irradiation. (author)

  10. The potential of electrical stimulation to promote functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury--comparisons between rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T; Brushart, T M; Amirjani, N; Chan, K M

    2007-01-01

    The declining capacity for injured peripheral nerves to regenerate their axons with time and distance is accounted for, at least in part, by the chronic axotomy of the neurons and Schwann cell denervation prior to target reinnervation. A largely unrecognized site of delay is the surgical suture site where, in rats, 4 weeks is required for all neurons to regenerate their axons across the site. Low frequency stimulation for just 1 h after surgery accelerates this axon crossing in association with upregulation of neurotrophic factors in the neurons. We translated these findings to human patients by examining the number of reinnervated motor units in the median nerve-innervated thenar muscles before and after carpel tunnel release surgery in a randomized controlled trial. Motor unit number estimates (MUNE) in patients with moderate and severe carpal tunnel syndrome were significantly lower than normal. This number increased significantly by 6-8 months after surgery and reached normal values by 12 months in contrast to a non-significant increase in the control unstimulated group. Tests including the Purdue Pegboard Test verified the more rapid functional recovery after stimulation. The data indicate a feasible strategy to promote axonal regeneration in humans that has the potential to improve functional outcomes, especially in combination with strategies to sustain the regenerative capacity of neurons and the support of Schwann cells over distance and time.

  11. Jatropha curcas leaf and bark fractions protect against ultraviolet radiation-B induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundari, J; Selvaraj, R; Rajendra Prasad, N; Elumalai, R

    2013-11-01

    The present study is conducted to investigate the antioxidant potential of Jatropha curcas root bark extract (RB4 fraction) and leaf extract (L1 fraction), and to study their effects on UVB-radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human blood lymphocytes. In this study, J. curcas showed strong antioxidant property in different free radical scavenging systems. Both the fractions effectively scavenged hydroxyl (OH), superoxide anion (O₂(·-)), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical cation (ABTS(·+)) in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC₅₀ (Inhibitory Concentration 50) values of J. curcas fractions were compared to standard ascorbic acid used in this study. The antioxidant potential of a compound was directly proportional to the photoprotective effect. In this study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) were exposed to UVB-radiation and there was an increase in comet attributes (% tail DNA, tail length, tail movement and Olive tail moment). Jatropha curcas RB4 fraction and L1 fraction treatment before UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the % tail DNA, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment in irradiated HPBL. These results suggested that J. curcas exhibited strong antioxidant property and RB4 and L1 fractions protected UVB-radiation-induced DNA damage in HPBL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Two immunosuppressive compounds from the mushroom Rubinoboletus ballouii using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by bioactivity-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long-Fei; Chan, Ben Chung-Lap; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Han, Quan-Bin; Leung, Ping-Chung; Liu, Ji-Kai; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2013-10-15

    Rubinoboletus ballouii is an edible mushroom wildly grown in Yunnan province, China. Up till now, little was known about the chemical and biological properties of this mushroom. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of the ethanolic extract of Rubinoboletus ballouii and its fractions on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude extract of the fruiting bodies of RB was fractionated by high-speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC). Twelve fractions were obtained and the third fraction (Fraction C) exerted the most potent anti-inflammatory activities in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Further fractionation of fraction C led to the isolation of two single compounds which were elucidated as 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one and pistillarin, respectively. The results showed that both 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one and pistillarin exhibited significant immunosuppressive effects on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs by inhibiting [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine uptake and inflammatory cytokines productions such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-1β. Besides, 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one was firstly found in natural resources, and pistillarin was also isolated from the family Boletaceae for the first time. They exhibited great potential in developing as anti-inflammatory reagents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant polyphenols mobilize nuclear copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidatively generated DNA breakage: implications for an anticancer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Uzma; Hanif, Sarmad; Ullah, M F; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhat, Showket H; Hadi, S M

    2008-08-01

    It was earlier proposed that an important anti-cancer mechanism of plant polyphenols may involve mobilization of endogenous copper ions, possibly chromatin-bound copper and the consequent pro-oxidant action. This paper shows that plant polyphenols are able to mobilize nuclear copper in human lymphocytes, leading to degradation of cellular DNA. A cellular system of lymphocytes isolated from human peripheral blood and comet assay was used for this purpose. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable copper chelator) inhibited DNA degradation in intact lymphocytes. Bathocuproine, which is unable to permeate through the cell membrane, did not cause such inhibition. This study has further shown that polyphenols are able to degrade DNA in cell nuclei and that such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine as well as bathocuproine (both of which are able to permeate the nuclear pore complex), suggesting that nuclear copper is mobilized in this reaction. Pre-incubation of lymphocyte nuclei with polyphenols indicates that it is capable of traversing the nuclear membrane. This study has also shown that polyphenols generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte nuclei which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neocuproine. These results indicate that the generation of ROS occurs through mobilization of nuclear copper resulting in oxidatively generated DNA breakage.

  14. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor gene expression by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells and peripheral blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.L.; Datta, R.; Hallahan, D.E.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces the expression of certain cytokines, such as TNF alpha/cachectin. However, there is presently no available information regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cytokine gene expression by ionizing radiation. In this report, we describe the regulation of the TNF gene by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells. The increase in TNF transcripts by x rays was both time- and dose-dependent as determined by Northern blot analysis. Similar findings were obtained in human peripheral blood monocytes. Transcriptional run-on analyses have demonstrated that ionizing radiation stimulates the rate of TNF gene transcription. Furthermore, induction of TNF mRNA was increased in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, ionizing radiation had little effect on the half-life of TNF transcripts. These findings indicate that the increase in TNF mRNA observed after irradiation is regulated by transcriptional mechanisms and suggest that production of this cytokine by myeloid cells may play a role in the pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation

  15. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, or interferon (IFN)-γ on either protein or mRNA levels. The anergic state of CD4+CD25+ T cells is not reversible by the addition of anti-CD28, anti–CTLA-4, anti–transforming growth factor β, or anti–IL-10 antibody. However, the refractory state of CD4+CD25+ T cells was partially reversible by the addition of IL-2 or IL-4. These data demonstrate that human blood contains a resident T cell population with potent regulatory properties. PMID:11390435

  16. Identification of proangiogenic TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) in human peripheral blood and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Venneri, Mary Anna; De Palma, Michele; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Pucci, Ferdinando; Scielzo, Cristina; Zonari, Erika; Mazzieri, Roberta; Doglioni, Claudio; Naldini, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), have been implicated in tumor progression. We recently described a lineage of mouse monocytes characterized by expression of the Tie2 angiopoietin receptor and required for the vascularization and growth of several tumor models. Here, we report that TIE2 expression in human blood identifies a subset of monocytes distinct from classical inflammatory monocytes and comprised within the less abundant "resident" popul...

  17. Generation of organotypic raft cultures from primary human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacker, Daniel; Moody, Cary

    2012-02-22

    The development of organotypic epithelial raft cultures has provided researchers with an efficient in vitro system that faithfully recapitulates epithelial differentiation. There are many uses for this system. For instance, the ability to grow three-dimensional organotypic raft cultures of keratinocytes has been an important milestone in the study of human papillomavirus (HPV)(1). The life cycle of HPV is tightly linked to the differentiation of squamous epithelium(2). Organotypic epithelial raft cultures as demonstrated here reproduce the entire papillomavirus life cycle, including virus production(3,4,5). In addition, these raft cultures exhibit dysplastic lesions similar to those observed upon in vivo infection with HPV. Hence this system can also be used to study epithelial cell cancers, as well as the effect of drugs on epithelial cell differentiation in general. Originally developed by Asselineau and Prunieras(6) and modified by Kopan et al.(7), the organotypic epithelial raft culture system has matured into a general, relatively easy culture model, which involves the growth of cells on collagen plugs maintained at an air-liquid interface (Figure 1A). Over the course of 10-14 days, the cells stratify and differentiate, forming a full thickness epithelium that produces differentiation-specific cytokeratins. Harvested rafts can be examined histologically, as well as by standard molecular and biochemical techniques. In this article, we describe a method for the generation of raft cultures from primary human keratinocytes. The same technique can be used with established epithelial cell lines, and can easily be adapted for use with epithelial tissue from normal or diseased biopsies(8). Many viruses target either the cutaneous or mucosal epithelium as part of their replicative life cycle. Over the past several years, the feasibility of using organotypic raft cultures as a method of studying virus-host cell interactions has been shown for several herpesviruses, as

  18. Time and dose dependent expression in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishad, S.; Ghosh, Anu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is to investigate time and dose dependent differential protein expression pattern of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after acute gamma irradiation. For this purpose, PBMCs extracted from eight healthy individuals were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays (0.3 Gy and 1 Gy) and compared with sham irradiated controls. Total proteins were extracted 1 and 4 hour post irradiation and analyzed using 2-D gel electrophoresis. A fold change of 1.5 in spot intensity was considered as 'biological significant'. Protein identification was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The MS/MS spectra were interrogated using Mascot 2.1 for searching against SWISS-PROT database. One-hour post irradiation, 18 proteins showed a significant difference between the sham (0 Gy) and 0.3 Gy irradiated group (6 proteins up-regulated and 12 proteins down-regulated) and 17 proteins between the sham (0 Gy) and 1 Gy irradiated group (9 proteins up-regulated and 8 down-regulated). Four hours after irradiation, 16 proteins were differentially expressed between the sham irradiated and 0.3 Gy treated group (5 proteins up-regulated and 11 proteins downregulated). Relatively high dose of 1 Gy showed modulation of 13 proteins (5 proteins upregulated and 8 proteins down regulated) after 4 hours. There were 15 proteins that were observed both at the early time point of 1-hour and the late time point of 4-hour. Important among these were, proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization like Actin, Plastin-2, Vinculin, PDZ and LIM domain protein, WD repeat containing protein and the chaperone proteins like HSP 90-alpha and Protein disulfide-isomerase A3. Proteins like thiol specific antioxidant peroxiredoxin-6 (indicating increased levels of ROS and oxidative stress) showed dose specific expression while proteins like Ras-related Rap-1b-like protein (involved in cell survival) were observed with both 0.3 Gy and 1 Gy. During the study, human peripheral blood

  19. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Rohaya, M. A. W. [Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 50300, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  20. Identity and Diversity of Human Peripheral Th and T Regulatory Cells Defined by Single-Cell Mass Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunicki, Matthew A; Amaya Hernandez, Laura C; Davis, Kara L; Bacchetta, Rosa; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2018-01-01

    Human CD3 + CD4 + Th cells, FOXP3 + T regulatory (Treg) cells, and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells are essential for ensuring peripheral immune response and tolerance, but the diversity of Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell subsets has not been fully characterized. Independent functional characterization of human Th1, Th2, Th17, T follicular helper (Tfh), Treg, and Tr1 cells has helped to define unique surface molecules, transcription factors, and signaling profiles for each subset. However, the adequacy of these markers to recapitulate the whole CD3 + CD4 + T cell compartment remains questionable. In this study, we examined CD3 + CD4 + T cell populations by single-cell mass cytometry. We characterize the CD3 + CD4 + Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell populations simultaneously across 23 memory T cell-associated surface and intracellular molecules. High-dimensional analysis identified several new subsets, in addition to the already defined CD3 + CD4 + Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell populations, for a total of 11 Th cell, 4 Treg, and 1 Tr1 cell subsets. Some of these subsets share markers previously thought to be selective for Treg, Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tfh cells, including CD194 (CCR4) + FOXP3 + Treg and CD183 (CXCR3) + T-bet + Th17 cell subsets. Unsupervised clustering displayed a phenotypic organization of CD3 + CD4 + T cells that confirmed their diversity but showed interrelation between the different subsets, including similarity between Th1-Th2-Tfh cell populations and Th17 cells, as well as similarity of Th2 cells with Treg cells. In conclusion, the use of single-cell mass cytometry provides a systems-level characterization of CD3 + CD4 + T cells in healthy human blood, which represents an important baseline reference to investigate abnormalities of different subsets in immune-mediated pathologies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  2. HANPP Collection: Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a digital map of human appropriation of net...

  3. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a digital map of human appropriation of net...

  4. Micronuclei induced by fast neutrons versus 60Co gamma-rays in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vral, A; Verhaegen, F; Thierens, H; De Ridder, L

    1994-03-01

    Here we compared the effectiveness of neutrons ( = 5.5 MeV) versus 60Co gamma-rays in producing micronuclei (MN) in human lymphocytes. To obtain dose-response data, blood samples of six donors were irradiated with doses ranging from 0.1 to 5 Gy for gamma-rays and 0.1-3 Gy for neutrons. A linear dependence of MN yield with dose was found for fast neutrons while for gamma-rays a nonlinear dependence existed. For both radiation qualities no significant interindividual differences were found. Derived relative biological effectiveness values decreased with increasing dose. The MN frequency distributions were overdispersed with respect to the Poisson distribution, with neutrons showing higher dispersion values than with gamma-rays. To compare the repair kinetics of both radiation qualities split-dose experiments were performed. A dose of 4 Gy gamma-rays (3 Gy neutrons) was delivered either as a single exposure or in two equal fractions separated by time intervals ranging from 30 min to 10 h (30 min to 7 h for neutrons). The data showed for gamma-rays a significant decline (30% +/- 10%) in MN yield with interfraction time due to repair of DNA damage. This repair is a continuous process starting almost immediately after the first of the two doses and lasting 3-5 h. For fast neutrons no decline was observed indicating irreparable damage.

  5. Effect of low-dose gamma radiation on HIV replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada); Conway, B. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Medicine; Montaner, J.S.G. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Medicine]|[Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver (Canada); O`Shaughnessy, M.V. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Faculty of Medicine]|[Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver (Canada); Greenstock, C.L. [AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Radiation Biology and Health Physics Branch

    1996-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that UV light and x-irradiation enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression. There are few published data on related effects of {gamma}-radiation. This may be of clinical relevance, as radiotherapy has been used extensively for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated conditions. We have studied the effects of {gamma}-radiation on HIV replication in mono-nuclear cells (MC). These cells were obtained from five seronegative healthy donors, exposed to 0-200 cGy {gamma}-radiation, stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 24 h, infected with a laboratory strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIB, multiplicity of infection = 0.001), then carried in culture for 14 days. Overall, when considering p24 antigen levels on days 7 and 11 in cultures established from cells exposed to 50 cGy, the maximal levels were significantly higher than those measured in the parallel control cultures taken as a whole (P < 0.05), with viral replication enhanced as much as 1000-fold in one case. No significant cytotoxicity was observed following exposure to doses up to 50 cGy. The mechanism of the observed effect remains unknown but may relate to direct gene activation and/or free radical generation, leading to such activation. To date, there is no evidence that viral stimulation occurs following therapeutic radiation in a clinical setting. (author).

  6. Dose Assessment using Chromosome Aberration Analyses in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The healthy five donors were recruited to establish the dose-response calibration curve for chromosomal aberrations by ionizing radiation exposure. Our cytogenetic results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosome aberration increased with increasing radiation dose. In this study, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. Therefore, these chromosome aberration analyses will be the foundation for biological dosimetric analysis with additional research methods such as translocation and PCC assay. The conventional analysis of dicentric chromosomes in HPBL was suggested by Bender and Gooch in 1962. This assay has been for many years, the golden standard and the most specific method for ionizing radiation damage. The dicentric assay technique in HPBL has been shown as the most sensitive biological method and reliable bio-indicator of quantifying the radiation dose. In contrast, the micronucleus assay has advantages over the dicentric assay since it is rapid and requires less specialized expertise, and accordingly it can be applied to monitor a big population. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a suitable method for micronuceli measurement in cultured human as well as mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to establish the dose response curve of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in HPBL by analyzing the frequency of dicentrics and micronuclei.

  7. Effect of low-dose gamma radiation on HIV replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Conway, B.; O'Shaughnessy, M.V.; Greenstock, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that UV light and x-irradiation enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression. There are few published data on related effects of γ-radiation. This may be of clinical relevance, as radiotherapy has been used extensively for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated conditions. We have studied the effects of γ-radiation on HIV replication in mono-nuclear cells (MC). These cells were obtained from five seronegative healthy donors, exposed to 0-200 cGy γ-radiation, stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 24 h, infected with a laboratory strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIB, multiplicity of infection = 0.001), then carried in culture for 14 days. Overall, when considering p24 antigen levels on days 7 and 11 in cultures established from cells exposed to 50 cGy, the maximal levels were significantly higher than those measured in the parallel control cultures taken as a whole (P < 0.05), with viral replication enhanced as much as 1000-fold in one case. No significant cytotoxicity was observed following exposure to doses up to 50 cGy. The mechanism of the observed effect remains unknown but may relate to direct gene activation and/or free radical generation, leading to such activation. To date, there is no evidence that viral stimulation occurs following therapeutic radiation in a clinical setting. (author)

  8. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  9. Effect of surface modification of silica nanoparticles on toxicity and cellular uptake by human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankoff, Anna; Arabski, Michal; Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Kruszewski, Marcin; Lisowska, Halina; Banasik-Nowak, Anna; Rozga-Wijas, Krystyna; Wojewodzka, Maria; Slomkowski, Stanislaw

    2013-05-01

    Silica nanoparticles have an interesting potential in drug delivery, gene therapy and molecular imaging due to the possibility of tailoring their surface reactivity that can be obtained by surface modification. Despite these potential benefits, there is concern that exposure of humans to certain types of silica nanomaterials may lead to significant adverse health effects. The motivation of this study was to determine the kinetics of cellular binding/uptake of the vinyl- and the aminopropyl/vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles into peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro, to explore their genotoxic and cytotoxic properties and to compare the biological properties of modified silica nanoparticles with those of the unmodified ones. Size of nanoparticles determined by SEM varied from 10 to 50 nm. The average hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential also varied from 176.7 nm (+18.16 mV) [aminopropyl/vinyl-modified] and 235.4 nm (-9.49 mV) [vinyl-modified] to 266.3 (-13.32 mV) [unmodified]. Surface-modified silica particles were internalized by lymphocytes with varying efficiency and expressed no cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects, as determined by various methods (cell viability, apoptosis/necrosis, oxidative DNA damage, chromosome aberrations). However, they affected the proliferation of the lymphocytes as indicated by a decrease in mitotic index value and cell cycle progression. In contrast, unmodified silica nanoparticles exhibited cytotoxic and genotoxic properties at high doses as well as interfered with cell cycle.

  10. Use of γ-H2AX Foci Assay on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes as Sensitive Biomarker of Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajski, G.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Geric, M.; Filipic, M.; Nunic, J.; Straser, A.; Zegura, B.

    2013-01-01

    In modern medicine, it is impossible to imagine diagnostics and treatments without equipment that emit radiation (X-ray, CT, PET, etc.). At the same time there is a need to minimize the amount of radiation that the patient will gain during such medical examination. In that manner ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle and dosimetry are the bases of assuring patients safety. The induction of gamma phosphorylated H2AX histone is newly developed tool in biodosimetry, which is more sensitive for the detection of radiation caused DNA damage than currently used micronucleus and comet assay. Gamma phosphorylation of H2AX histone is a consequence of DNA double strand breaks and its role is to trigger the DNA repair mechanisms. In this study, we tested the effect of 2 and 4 Gy X-rays on human peripheral blood lymphocytes from two healthy volunteers using γ-H2AX foci assay. The FITC signal from labelled antibodies was monitored using flow cytometry and clearly demonstrated the difference in control samples and irradiated samples. There was also the difference between the exposed blood samples from the two volunteers. The results of present study reveal new sensitive method that is capable of detecting changes in DNA when exposed to different doses of radiation, and thus potentially optimizing the ALARA principle.(author)

  11. Effects of interactive instructional techniques in a web-based peripheral nervous system component for human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Edwin B; Walls, Richard T; Reilly, Frank D

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of interactive instructional techniques in a web-based peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of a first year medical school human anatomy course. Existing data from 9 years of instruction involving 856 students were used to determine (1) the effect of web-based interactive instructional techniques on written exam item performance and (2) differences between student opinions of the benefit level of five different types of interactive learning objects used. The interactive learning objects included Patient Case studies, review Games, Simulated Interactive Patients (SIP), Flashcards, and unit Quizzes. Exam item analysis scores were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.05) for students receiving the instructional treatment incorporating the web-based interactive learning objects than for students not receiving this treatment. Questionnaires using a five-point Likert scale were analysed to determine student opinion ratings of the interactive learning objects. Students reported favorably on the benefit level of all learning objects. Students rated the benefit level of the Simulated Interactive Patients (SIP) highest, and this rating was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than all other learning objects. This study suggests that web-based interactive instructional techniques improve student exam performance. Students indicated a strong acceptance of Simulated Interactive Patient learning objects.

  12. A comparison of the effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields and gamma ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savova, G.; Stankova, K. [Molecular Radiobiology and Prophylaxis Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kuzmanova, M. [Sofia University „St. Kl. Ohridski”, Faculty of Biology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    The usage of mobile phones increased significantly in the last 15 years. The concerns about the potential negative health effects arise, because of the daily use of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. EMF, produced by cell phones may affect biological systems by increasing the production of free radicals, and even DNA damage. Other environmental factor, with an impact on humans’ life is the ionizing radiation. The main purpose of this work is to compare the effects of 900-MHz radiofrequency fields and gamma-ionizing radiation (γ-IR) on the levels of free radicals and DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The EMF generated, at a power of 2W used for cell phone applications, led to a significant increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not in persisting DNA damage 2h post-exposure. In contrast, irradiation with 4Gy of gamma rays increased dramatically both - the intracellular ROS and the DNA damage compared to background. (author)

  13. Detection of individual radiosensitivity by radiation–induced micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staynova, A.; Hadjidekova, V.; Popova, L.; Hristova, R. [Radiation Genetics Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Savov, A. [National Genetic Laboratory, University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    Aim: To investigate the association of two polymorphisms – in XRCC1 gene (Arg399Gln) and in APE1 gene (Asp148Glu) and the radiation induced frequency of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Material and methods: Genomic DNA from 34 cancer patients and 52 controls were genotyped using PCR–RFLP technique. Micronucleus test (MNT) was performed on 15 cancer patients and 15 controls, before and after in vitro irradiation with 2Gy gamma rays. Results: The data showed that cancer patients had a significantly higher spontaneous frequency of cells with micronuclei than controls (P=0.009). No statistical difference was registered when comparing the mean frequency of cells with micronuclei after in vitro irradiation between these groups. Four subjects were selected as radiosensitive after applying cut–off of the mean frequency of radiation induced micronuclei. Three of them are carriers of the XRCC1 399Gln allele and two of them are carriers of the APE1 148Glu allele. (author)

  14. Effects of folic acid deficiency and MTHFRC677T polymorphisms on cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiayu; Liang Ziqing; Zou Tianning; Wang Xu

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis (APO) and necrosis (NEC) are two different types of cell death occurring in response to cellular stress factors. Cells with DNA damage may undergo APO or NEC. Folate is an essential micronutrient associated with DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) regulates intracellular folate metabolism. Folate deficiency and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms have been shown to be related to DNA damage. To verify the cytotoxic effects of folate deficiency on cells with different MTHFR C677T genotypes, 15 human peripheral lymphocyte cases with different MTHFR C677T genotypes were cultured in folic acid (FA)-deficient and -sufficient media for 9 days. Cytotoxicity was quantified using the frequencies of APO and NEC as endpoints, the nuclear division index (NDI), and the number of viable cells (NVC). These results showed that FA is an important factor in reducing cytotoxicity and increasing cell proliferation. Lymphocytes with the TT genotype proliferated easily under stress and exhibited different responses to FA deficiency than lymphocytes with the CC and CT genotypes. A TT individual may accumulate more cytotoxicity under cytotoxic stress, suggesting that the effects of FA deficiency on cytotoxicity are greater than the effects in individuals with the other MTHFR C677T variants.

  15. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mingqian; Wang Jiongkun; Cai Jiye; Wu Yangzhe; Wang Xiaoping

    2008-01-01

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4 + T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4 + T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4 + T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4 + T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity

  16. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jones

    Full Text Available Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins.

  17. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  18. HIV-1 isolation from infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dispinseri, Stefania; Saba, Elisa; Vicenzi, Elisa; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) allows retrieval of replication-competent viral variants. In order to impose the smallest possible selective pressure on the viral isolates, isolation must be carried out in primary cultures of cells and

  19. Peripheral reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral collisions, that is, collisions involving a small amount of overlap of nuclear matter, are discussed including inclusive interactions, the magnitude of the peripheral cross section, fragmentation, a compilation of experiments and available data, limiting fragmentation, factorization, some models, fragment momentum distributions, and future research directions

  20. Microarray analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dioxin-exposed human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Hubbard, Alan E.; Zhao, Xin; Baccarelli, Andrea; Pesatori, Angela C.; Smith, Martyn T.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is classified as a human carcinogen and exerts toxic effects on the skin (chloracne). Effects on reproductive, immunological, and endocrine systems have also been observed in animal models. TCDD acts through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway influencing largely unknown gene networks. An industrial accident in Seveso, Italy in 1976 exposed thousands of people to substantial quantities of TCDD. Twenty years after the exposure, this study examines global gene expression in the mononuclear cells of 26 Seveso female never smokers, with similar age, alcohol consumption, use of medications, and background plasma levels of 22 dioxin congeners unrelated to the Seveso accident. Plasma dioxin levels were still elevated in the exposed subjects. We performed analyses in two different comparison groups. The first included high-exposed study subjects compared with individuals with background TCDD levels (average plasma levels 99.4 and 6.7 ppt, respectively); the second compared subjects who developed chloracne after the accident, and those who did not develop this disease. Overall, we observed a modest alteration of gene expression based on dioxin levels or on chloracne status. In the comparison between high levels and background levels of TCDD, four histone genes were up-regulated and modified expression of HIST1H3H was confirmed by real-time PCR. In the comparison between chloracne case-control subjects, five hemoglobin genes were up-regulated. Pathway analysis revealed two major networks for each comparison, involving cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological and hematological disease, and other pathways. Further examination of the role of these genes in dioxin induced-toxicity is warranted

  1. Clastogenic interactions of #betta# radiation and caffeine in human peripheral blood cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyes, B.G.; Koval, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether the micronucleus test could be used as a rapid assay for mutagenic interactions, we studied the effect of 50-800 R of #betta# radiation in combination with 10 - 6 -10 - 3 M caffeine in cultured human lymphocytes, with two treatment protocols. In one protocol (T 0 ), whole blood was irradiated with 50-800 R of #betta# radiation, then stimulated with PHA and cultured for 72, 96 or 120 h in the presence or absence of caffeine. Under these conditions, #betta# radiation produced micronuclei in proportion to dose but post-treatment with 1 mM caffein significantly decreased the number of micronuclei observed. The effect of caffeine was greater with the higher radiation doses and at earlier fixation times. Caffeine also decreased the mitotic index which, in turn, decreased the number of micronuclei observed; but caffeine post-treatment still had a significant effect even after mitotic activity was taken into account. In a second protocol (T 48 ), PHA-stimulated (actively cycling) cultures were irradiated 48 h after innoculation, then treated with caffeine, and fixed at 72 h post-innoculation (PI). With this protocol #betta# radiation produced more micronuclei than at T 0 ; this suggests that many of the cells damaged at T 0 are either lost or repaired. At T 48 1 mM caffeine significantly increased the number of micronuclei observed after #betta# radiation at all doses except 50 and 200 R. The mitotic index increased after 400-600 R, but only in the absence of caffeine. (orig./AJ)

  2. Inhibition of human peripheral blood lymphocyte function by protoporphyrin and longwave ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, K.E.; Yen, A.; Montisano, D.; Gigli, I.; Bigby, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Modulation of immunologic effector cells by exogenous photoactive substances has been advanced as an underlying mechanism for the efficacy of various photochemotherapeutic regimens. It is also possible that endogenous photosensitizers, such as protoporphyrin, could similarly modify the function of immune cell types. The authors examined the effects of protoporphyrin plus longwave UV light on the ability of human PBL to proliferate in response to mitogens. Noncytotoxic dosages of protoporphyrin plus UV light suppressed PHA-stimulated proliferation of both PBMC and enriched T cells. CD8 + cells were more sensitive to this inhibitory effect than CD4 + cells. The inhibitory effect was also observed when proliferation was induced by the combination of a phorbol ester and ionomycin. Inhibition of PBMC proliferation was associated with inhibition of IL-2 secretion but proliferation was not restored with exogenous IL-2. Instead, the effect of protoporphyrin plus UV light may be on IL-2R. Cells treated with protoporphyrin and UV light did not display the increase in CD25 and β-chain of the IL-2R induced by PHA in control cells. In contrast to the effects of protoporphyrin and UV light on IL-2 and IL-2R α-chain protein expression, the accumulation of mRNA for these proteins induced by PHA was unaffected. None of the effects of protoporphyrin plus UV light on lymphocytes were observed in control experiments where cells were treated with either protoporphyrin or UV light alone. They conclude that biologically relevant dosages of protoporphyrin and UV light modify the function of circulating lymphocytes. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  3. In vitro response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 60Co at single fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Lidia Maria; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Leite, M.F.; Goes, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy using gamma rays is a common modality of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this research is to investigate the biological response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to 60 Co irradiation at a single fraction of 10 Gy, 25 Gy and 50 Gy doses at 136,4 cGy.min -1 rate. Cells were irradiated at room temperature by the Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. Biological response was evaluated through cellular viability using MTT assay and nucleus damages visualized by Propidium Iodide assay and electrophoresis agarose gel after gamma irradiation. Nucleus damages induced by 60 Co irradiation were compared to damage caused by cell exposure to 10% methanol. The 50 Gy dose of irradiation did not stimulate nucleus damages at the same level as that affected by 10% methanol induction in the MDAMB-231. Further studies are necessary to understand these mechanisms in the MDAMB-231 human breast carcinoma cell line.(author)

  4. In vitro response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to {sup 60}Co at single fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Lidia Maria; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: lidia.andrade@unifenas.br; Leite, M.F. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Biofisica; Goes, A.M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia

    2005-10-15

    Radiotherapy using gamma rays is a common modality of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this research is to investigate the biological response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to {sup 60} Co irradiation at a single fraction of 10 Gy, 25 Gy and 50 Gy doses at 136,4 cGy.min{sup -1} rate. Cells were irradiated at room temperature by the Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. Biological response was evaluated through cellular viability using MTT assay and nucleus damages visualized by Propidium Iodide assay and electrophoresis agarose gel after gamma irradiation. Nucleus damages induced by {sup 60} Co irradiation were compared to damage caused by cell exposure to 10% methanol. The 50 Gy dose of irradiation did not stimulate nucleus damages at the same level as that affected by 10% methanol induction in the MDAMB-231. Further studies are necessary to understand these mechanisms in the MDAMB-231 human breast carcinoma cell line.(author)

  5. The Peripheral Whole Blood Transcriptome of Acute Pyelonephritis in Human Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Ichchha; Than, Nandor Gabor; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Tarca, Adi L.; Bhatti, Gaurav; Draghici, Sorin; Yeo, Lami; Mazor, Moshe; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn

    2018-01-01

    Objective Human pregnancy is characterized by activation of the innate immune response and suppression of adaptive immunity. The former is thought to provide protection against infection to the mother, and the latter, tolerance against paternal antigens expressed in fetal cells. Acute pyelonephritis is associated with an increased risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome and sepsis in pregnant (vs. nonpregnant) women. The objective of this study was to describe the gene expression profile (transcriptome) of maternal whole blood in acute pyelonephritis. Method A case-control study was conducted to include pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis (n=15) and women with a normal pregnancy (n=34). Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) were used for gene expression profiling. A linear model was used to test the association between the presence of pyelonephritis and gene expression levels while controlling for white blood cell count and gestational age. A fold change of 1.5 was considered significant at a false discovery rate of 0.1. A subset of differentially expressed genes (n=56) was tested with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (cases, n=19; controls, n=59). Gene ontology and pathway analysis were applied. Results A total of 983 genes were differentially expressed in acute pyelonephritis: 457 were up-regulated and 526 were down-regulated. Significant enrichment of 300 biological processes and 63 molecular functions was found in pyelonephritis. Significantly impacted pathways in pyelonephritis included a) cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction; b) T-cell receptor signaling; c) Jak-STAT signaling; and d) complement and coagulation cascades. Of 56 genes tested by qRT-PCR, 48 (85.7%) had confirmation of differential expression. Conclusion This is the first study of the transcriptomic signature of whole blood in pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis. Acute infection during pregnancy is

  6. Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22 modulates alpha 6 integrin expression in the human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PMP22, a member of the GAS3 family of tetraspan proteins, is associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Previous studies have shown that PMP22 is expressed in proliferative endometrium, but its function within this tissue is poorly understood. In this study, we first characterized the expression of PMP22 in the human menstrual cycle and began to characterize its function in the endometrium. Methods Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we characterized the expression of PMP22 in both proliferative and secretory endometrium. Differences in PMP22 expression between proliferative and secretory endometrium were determined using a Mann-Whitney U test. In order to investigate the influence of PMP22 on α6 integrin expression, cells were created that ectopically overexpressed PMP22 or expressed a siRNA to inhibit its expression. These cells were analyzed for changes in integrins and binding to extracellular matrices. Results In this study, we show that PMP22 expression is higher in proliferative phase than secretory phase. Functionally, we have begun to characterize the functional significance of this expression. Previous studies have suggested a link between PMP22 and α6 integrin, and therefore we asked whether PMP22 could associate or potentially modulate the expression of α6 integrin. Expression of both PMP22 and α6 integrin were detectable in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and we show that both proteins can associate and colocalize with each other. To understand if PMP22 directly altered the expression of a6 integrin, we examined cell lines with modulated levels of the protein. Overexpression of PMP22 was sufficient to increase α6 integrin surface expression with a concominant increase in binding to the extracellular matrix laminin, while a reduction in PMP22 suppressed α6 integrin surface expression. Conclusion These findings suggest a physiologic role for PMP22 on the

  7. Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) modulates alpha 6 integrin expression in the human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rajiv G; Sudhakar, Deepthi; Hogue, Claire P; Amici, Stephanie; Gordon, Lynn K; Braun, Jonathan; Notterpek, Lucia; Goodglick, Lee; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2011-04-25

    PMP22, a member of the GAS3 family of tetraspan proteins, is associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Previous studies have shown that PMP22 is expressed in proliferative endometrium, but its function within this tissue is poorly understood. In this study, we first characterized the expression of PMP22 in the human menstrual cycle and began to characterize its function in the endometrium. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we characterized the expression of PMP22 in both proliferative and secretory endometrium. Differences in PMP22 expression between proliferative and secretory endometrium were determined using a Mann-Whitney U test. In order to investigate the influence of PMP22 on α6 integrin expression, cells were created that ectopically overexpressed PMP22 or expressed a siRNA to inhibit its expression. These cells were analyzed for changes in integrins and binding to extracellular matrices. In this study, we show that PMP22 expression is higher in proliferative phase than secretory phase. Functionally, we have begun to characterize the functional significance of this expression. Previous studies have suggested a link between PMP22 and α6 integrin, and therefore we asked whether PMP22 could associate or potentially modulate the expression of α6 integrin. Expression of both PMP22 and α6 integrin were detectable in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and we show that both proteins can associate and colocalize with each other. To understand if PMP22 directly altered the expression of a6 integrin, we examined cell lines with modulated levels of the protein. Overexpression of PMP22 was sufficient to increase α6 integrin surface expression with a concominant increase in binding to the extracellular matrix laminin, while a reduction in PMP22 suppressed α6 integrin surface expression. These findings suggest a physiologic role for PMP22 on the expression of α6 integrin. We predict that this may be important for the

  8. Cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells alter their gene expression when challenged with endocrine-disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wens, B.; De Boever, P.; Verbeke, M.; Hollanders, K.; Schoeters, G.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to interfere with the hormonal system and may negatively influence human health. Microarray analysis was used in this study to investigate differential gene expression in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) after in vitro exposure to EDCs. PBMCs, isolated from blood samples of four male and four female healthy individuals, were exposed in vitro for 18 h to either a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126, 1 μM), a non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB153, 10 μM), a brominated flame retardant (BDE47, 10 μM), a perfluorinated alkyl acid (PFOA, 10 μM) or bisphenol (BPA, 10 μM). ANOVA analysis revealed a significant change in the expression of 862 genes as a result of EDC exposure. The gender of the donors did not affect gene expression. Hierarchical cluster analysis created three groups and clustered: (1) PCB126-exposed samples, (2) PCB153 and BDE47, (3) PFOA and BPA. The number of differentially expressed genes varied per compound and ranged from 60 to 192 when using fold change and multiplicity corrected p-value as filtering criteria. Exposure to PCB126 induced the AhR signaling pathway. BDE47 and PCB153 are known to disrupt thyroid metabolism and exposure influenced the expression of the nuclear receptors PPARγ and ESR2, respectively. BPA and PFOA did not induce significant changes in the expression of known nuclear receptors. Overall, each compound produced a unique gene expression signature affecting pathways and GO processes linked to metabolism and inflammation. Twenty-nine genes were significantly altered in expression under all experimental conditions. Six of these genes (HSD11B2, MMP11, ADIPOQ, CEL, DUSP9 and TUB) could be associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, microarray analysis identified that PBMCs altered their gene expression response in vitro when challenged with EDCs. Our screening approach has identified a number of gene candidates that warrant

  9. Correlation analyses revealed global microRNA-mRNA expression associations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Zhu, Jiang; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Xie, Fang-Fei; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Qiu, Ying-Hua; Lin, Xiang; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Neng-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2018-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate gene expression through binding to complementary sites in the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, which will lead to existence of correlation in expression between miRNA and mRNA. However, the miRNA-mRNA correlation patterns are complex and remain largely unclear yet. To establish the global correlation patterns in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), multiple miRNA-mRNA correlation analyses and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis were conducted in this study. We predicted and achieved 861 miRNA-mRNA pairs (65 miRNAs, 412 mRNAs) using multiple bioinformatics programs, and found global negative miRNA-mRNA correlations in PBMC from all 46 study subjects. Among the 861 pairs of correlations, 19.5% were significant (P correlation network was complex and highlighted key miRNAs/genes in PBMC. Some miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-148a, regulate a cluster of target genes. Some genes, e.g., TNRC6A, are regulated by multiple miRNAs. The identified genes tend to be enriched in molecular functions of DNA and RNA binding, and biological processes such as protein transport, regulation of translation and chromatin modification. The results provided a global view of the miRNA-mRNA expression correlation profile in human PBMCs, which would facilitate in-depth investigation of biological functions of key miRNAs/mRNAs and better understanding of the pathogenesis underlying PBMC-related diseases.

  10. Inquiry-Based Learning in Teacher Education: A Primary Humanities Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Lou; Harvie, Kate; Wallace, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning features strongly in the new Australian Humanities and Social Sciences curriculum and increasingly in primary school practice. Yet, there is little research into, and few exemplars of, inquiry approaches in the primary humanities context. In this article, we outline and explain the implementation of a place-based simulation…

  11. Evaluation of Root Canal Morphology of Human Primary Mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Keywords: Primary teeth, root canal, Vertucci classification. Evaluation of Root .... Radiology using CBCT; Veraviewepocs 3D R100/F40. (J Morita Mfg. Corp., .... maxillofacial structures by CBCT on a high resolution, and this ...

  12. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Butachlor exhibited strong binding affinity with DNA and produced 8-oxodG adducts. ► Butachlor induced DNA strand breaks and micronuclei formation in PBMN cells. ► Butachlor induced ROS and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in cells. ► Butachlor resulted in cell cycle arrest and eventually caused cellular necrosis. -- Abstract: Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka = 1.2 × 10 4 M −1 ) and binding capacity (n = 1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24 h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow

  13. Primary Human Blood Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy—Tailoring the Immune Response by Dendritic Cell Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone P. Sittig

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC-based cancer vaccines hold the great promise of tipping the balance from tolerance of the tumor to rejection. In the last two decades, we have gained tremendous knowledge about DC-based cancer vaccines. The maturation of DCs has proven indispensable to induce immunogenic T cell responses. We review the insights gained from the development of maturation cocktails in monocyte derived DC-based trials. More recently, we have also gained insights into the functional specialization of primary human blood DC subsets. In peripheral human blood, we can distinguish at least three primary DC subsets, namely CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. We reflect the current knowledge on maturation and T helper polarization by these blood DC subsets in the context of DC-based cancer vaccines. The maturation stimulus in combination with the DC subset will determine the type of T cell response that is induced. First trials with these natural DCs underline their excellent in vivo functioning and mark them as promising tools for future vaccination strategies.

  14. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Kishino

    Full Text Available Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  15. Consumption of selenium-enriched broccoli increases cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated ex vivo, a preliminary human intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley-Hewitt, Kerry L; Chen, Ronan K-Y; Lill, Ross E; Hedderley, Duncan I; Herath, Thanuja D; Matich, Adam J; McKenzie, Marian J

    2014-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient essential for human health, including immune function. Previous research indicates that Se supplementation may cause a shift from T helper (Th)1- to Th2-type immune responses. We aim to test the potential health promoting effects of Se-enriched broccoli. In a human trial, 18 participants consumed control broccoli daily for 3 days. After a 3-day wash-out period, the participants were provided with Se-enriched broccoli containing 200 μg of Se per serving for 3 days. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples were collected at the start and end of each broccoli feeding period for analysis of total Se and measurement of cytokine production from PBMC stimulated with antigens ex vivo. Plasma Se content remained consistent throughout the control broccoli feeding period and the baseline of the Se-enriched broccoli period (1.22 μmol/L) and then significantly increased following 3 days of Se-enriched broccoli feeding. Interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-22) production from PBMC significantly increased after 3 days of Se-enriched broccoli feeding compared with baseline. This study indicates that consumption of Se-enriched broccoli may increase immune responses toward a range of immune challenges. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effect of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on cytoskeleton of human peripheral blood monocytes with whole mount cell electron microscopy in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaomei; Guo Yuhua; Yin Zhiwei

    1992-01-01

    Whole mount cell electron microscopy was used in combination with selective extraction to prepare cytoskeletal framework. Cytoskeleton prepared by Triton X-100 treatment of human peripheral blood monocytes appeared on electron microscopy as a highly organized and interconnected three-dimensional matrix of different fibrous elements. By three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons it was demonstrated that different doses of 60 Co γ-rays caused distinctive and reproducible alterations of the cytoskeleton of intact human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The alterations were similar to those caused by cytochalasin B and by colchicine. From these observations and other workers'studies, it is presumed that 60 Co γ-ray irradiation may inhibit cytoplasmic microtubule and microfilament assembling

  17. Frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocyte cultures of human peripheral blood after the combined effect of γ-radiation and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugis, V.Yu.; Pyatkin, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    Keeping of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, irradiated in vitro with 60 Co-γ-quanta at a dose of 3 Gy at G 0 phase, with caffeine of 16 and 160 μg/ml during cultivation with PHA had no appreciable influence on the fraquency of sister chromatid exchanges. A minor increase in the number of sister chromatid exchanges was only noted when nonirradiated and irradiated lymphocytes were cultured with 160 μg/ml caffeine

  18. Action of the poison of Apis mellifera bee and gamma radiation on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats and on lymphocytes of human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    ''In vivo'' and ''in vitro'' experiments are performed to determine the radioprotective action of the poison of Apis mellifera bees. The frequency of chromosome aberrations, induced by gamma radiation, is studied in two assays: ''in vivo'' in bone marrow cells from Wistar rats and ''in vitro'' in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. The sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) are studied in the ''in vitro'' assays. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Killing effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated by γ ray on human gastric cancer MKN-28 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Daocheng; Zhang Xianqing; Mu Shijie; Liu Zhongxiang; Xia Aijun; Huang Xiaofeng; An Qunxing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the killing effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) irradiated by γ ray on cultured human gastric cancer cell line MKN-28. Methods: The experiment were divided into MKN-28 tumor cell control group, PBMCs groups and MKN-28 cells with irradiated or non-irradiated PBMCs co-culture groups. Radidation dosage were from 0.5 to 3 Gy, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining were used to observe the kill effect of PBMCs on tumor cells in different period. Results: After culture for 144h, the dead cells of several dosage irradiated PBMCs are much more than those of non-irradiated PBMCs group. At 240 hours of culture, the alive PBMCs deareses in number in both irradiated and non-irradiared groups, but decreases in radiated groups are more obvious. After culture for 72 h in the co-cultured groups, the difference is not evident among all radiation dosage groups. After 96-240 h of co-culture, the killing effect of 0.5-2Gy irradiated PBMCs on tumor cells is very strong, especially in 1Gy group, but the killing effect of PBMCs irradiated by 2.5-3Gy on tumor cells were weaker than that of 0.5-2Gy irradiated groups. At 240 hours co-cultured groups irradiated by 2.5-3Gy, tumor cells still survive and proliferate. Conclusion: Gamma ray irradiation have killing effect to some PBMCs. The cytocidal effect of PBMCs irradiated by 0.5-2Gy on tumor cells were increased. Chemotaxis and cytocidal effect of tumor cells to postirradiated PBMCs were also found. The killing effect of PBMCs irradiated by 2.5 and 3 Gy on tumor cells were restrained. (authors)

  20. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Calderón-Segura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calypso (thiacloprid, Poncho (clothianidin, Gaucho (imidacloprid, and Jade (imidacloprid are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5×10-6 to 5.7×10-5 M Jade; 2.8×10-4 to 1.7×10-3 M Gaucho; 0.6×10-1 to 1.4×10-1 M Calypso; 1.2×10-1 to 9.5×10-1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18×10-3 M Jade, 2.0×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.0×10-1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30×10-3 M Jade, 3.3×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.8×10-1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  1. Do protons and X-rays induce cell-killing in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by different mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczyk, J; Rawojć, K; Panek, A; Borkowska, A; Prasanna, P G S; Ahmed, M M; Swakoń, J; Gałaś, A

    2018-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the technological and physical aspects of dose delivery and distribution in proton therapy. However, mode of cell killing induced by protons is less understood in comparison with X-rays. The purpose of this study is to see if there is any difference in the mode of cell-killing, induced by protons and X-rays in an ex vivo human peripheral blood lymphocyte (HPBL) model. HPBL were irradiated with 60 MeV proton beam or 250-kVp X-rays in the dose range of 0.3-4.0 Gy. Frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells was determined by the Fluorescein (FITC)-Annexin V labelling procedure, 1 and 4 h after irradiation. Chip-based DNA Ladder Assay was used to confirm radiation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Chip-based DNA Ladder Assay was used to confirm radiation-induced apoptosis. Ex vivo irradiation of HPBL with proton beams of 60 MeV or 250 kVp X-rays resulted in apoptotic as well as necrotic modes of cell-killing, which were evident at both 1 and 4 h after irradiation in the whole dose and time range. Generally, our results indicated that protons cause relatively higher yields of cell death that appears to be necrosis compared to X-rays. The analysis also demonstrates that radiation type and dose play a critical role in mode of cell-killing. Obtained results suggest that X-rays and protons induce cell-killing by different modes. Such differences in cell-killing modes may have implications on the potential of a given therapeutic modality to cause immune modulation via programmed cell death (X-rays) or necrotic cell death (proton therapy). These studies point towards exploring for gene expression biomarkers related necrosis or apoptosis to predict immune response after proton therapy.

  2. Modulation of gamma ray induced chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by Hippophae rhammnoides leaf extract, SBL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuradha; Madhu Bala

    2014-01-01

    Hippophae rhammnoides L. commonly known as seabuckthorn is a temperate shrub and native of Asia and Europe. It has high antioxidant potential and is known to the traditional Indian, Chinese and Tibetan medicinal system for treatment of multiple disorders viz., circulatory and digestive disorders, hepatic injuries, neoplasia etc. One time treatment with the standardized leaf extract from H. rhammnoides (SBL-1) before whole body irradiation with 60 Co (10 Gy), rendered more than 90% survival in non SBL-1 treated irradiated animals (J herbs, spices medi plants, 2009). Present study investigated the effects of SBL-1 treatment on chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), with or without 60 Co-gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes were isolated from the blood drawn from different donors. The isolated lymphocytes were divided into several groups: Group 1-untreated control, Group 2-irradiated (2 Gy), Group 3, 4 and 5 were treated with different concentration of SBL-1, 30 min. after irradiation with 60 Co-gamma-rays (2 Gy). Group 6 was treated with the maximum concentration of SBL-1 used in the study. The metaphase spreading technique was used as per standard procedure to record chromosome breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The results were also recorded in terms of total aberrant metaphase and frequency of aberrant metaphase per 100 cells. In comparison to the untreated control, in the irradiated PBL culture, there was 8-fold increase in breaks, 211-folds in dicentrics, 75-folds in acentrics and 3-folds in rings (average data). SBL-1 alone at the highest concentration did not cause any significant change in number of breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The radiation induced aberrations decreased significantly by treatment with SBL-1 and the maximum decrease was observed when the cells were treated with 22μg/ml of SBL-1. These results demonstrated the anti-clastogenic activity of SBL-1 against gamma radiation induced damage. (author)

  3. Gene expression dose-response changes in microarrays after exposure of human peripheral lung epithelial cells to nickel(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert Y S; Zhao, Ailian; Alvord, W Gregory; Powell, Douglas A; Bare, Robert M; Masuda, Akira; Takahashi, Takashi; Anderson, Lucy M; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S

    2003-08-15

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds is associated with lung cancer risk; both genotoxic and epigenetic mechanisms have been proposed. For comprehensive examination of the acute effects of nickel(II) acetate on gene expression in cultured human peripheral lung epithelial HPL1D cells, microarray analyses were carried out with cDNA chips (approximately 8000 cDNAs). Cells were exposed for 24 h to nontoxic (50, 100, and 200 microM) or toxic (400, 800, and 1600 microM) nickel(II) concentrations. Cluster analysis was applied to the 868 genes with > or = 2-fold change at any concentration. Two main clusters showed marked up- or down-regulation at the highest, toxic concentrations. The data further subdivided into 10 highly cohesive clusters with high probability, and of these only 2 had the same response trend at low nontoxic as at high concentrations, an observation of clear relevance to the process of high- to low-dose extrapolation in risk assessment. There were 113 genes showing > or = 2-fold change at the three lower nontoxic concentrations, those most relevant to in vivo carcinogenesis. In addition to expected responses of metallothionein, ferritin, and heat-shock proteins, the results revealed for the first time changed expression of some potential cancer-related genes in response to low-dose Ni(II): RhoA, dyskerin, interferon regulatory factor 1, RAD21 homologue, and tumor protein, translationally controlled. Overall, most of the genes impacted by nontoxic concentrations of nickel(II) acetate related to gene transcription, protein synthesis and stability, cytoskeleton, signaling, metabolism, cell membrane, and extracellular matrix.

  4. Biological dosimetry of heavy ion induced chromosome lesions in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of different healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groesser, T.; Rydberg, B.; Ritter, S.; Hessel, P.; Kraft, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In the presented work the effect of sparsely ionizing X-rays or densely ionizing carbon ions on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy donors regarding the fluctuations in radiosensitivity within the same donor and between different donors was examined. This is not only of special interest for physicians and radiation biologists but also plays an important role in space flights because such fluctuations in the radiation response would reduce the accuracy of the biological dosimetry. In this context, biological changes in the aberration rate of metaphase cells as well as in cell proliferation and the mitotic index were measured. Since chromosome analyses are presently the most powerful biological method to quantify radiation exposure, the study focused on the measurements of chromosome aberrations in first-metaphase cells. The investigations showed that the aberration yield after 400 MeV/u carbon ion exposure (LET = 11 keV/micrometer) was higher than after X-irradiation. The aberration yield in first mitotic cells as well as the proportion of damaged cells was stable over the examined period up to 72h after exposure to X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, the results of the presented work revealed pronounced fluctuations in the measured parameters in the same donor as well as between different donors. If the dose effect curves of such parameters were used as calibration curves for radiation dose assessment these fluctuations will decrease their potential of use for dose estimation. This demonstrates that a general calibration curve for dose assessment might not be sufficiently precise and individual calibration curves might improve the accuracy of the biological dosimetry

  5. Multiple correlation analyses revealed complex relationship between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Fei; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Hong; Wu, Jian; Guo, Yu-Fan; Zeng, Ke-Qin; Wang, Ming-Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important regulator on the mRNA expression. However, a genome-wide correlation pattern between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is largely unknown. The comprehensive relationship between mRNA and DNA methylation was explored by using four types of correlation analyses and a genome-wide methylation-mRNA expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in PBMCs in 46 unrelated female subjects. An enrichment analysis was performed to detect biological function for the detected genes. Single pair correlation coefficient (r T1 ) between methylation level and mRNA is moderate (-0.63-0.62) in intensity, and the negative and positive correlations are nearly equal in quantity. Correlation analysis on each gene (T4) found 60.1% genes showed correlations between mRNA and gene-based methylation at P correlation (R T4  > 0.8). Methylation sites have regulation effects on mRNA expression in eQTL analysis, with more often observations in region of transcription start site (TSS). The genes under significant methylation regulation both in correlation analysis and eQTL analysis tend to cluster to the categories (e.g., transcription, translation, regulation of transcription) that are essential for maintaining the basic life activities of cells. Our findings indicated that DNA methylation has predictive regulation effect on mRNA with a very complex pattern in PBMCs. The results increased our understanding on correlation of methylation and mRNA and also provided useful clues for future epigenetic studies in exploring biological and disease-related regulatory mechanisms in PBMC.

  6. In vitro evaluation of genotoxicity of avocado (Persea americana) fruit and leaf extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Paresh; Paul, Rajkumar; Ganesh, N

    2010-07-01

    Persea americana is much sought after both for the nutritional value of its fruit and the medicinal values of its various plant parts. A chromosomal aberration assay was undertaken to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of crude extracts from avocado fruits and leaves. Chromosomal aberrations were observed in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to separately increasing concentrations of 50% methanolic extracts of Persea americana fruit and leaves. The groups exposed to leaf and fruit extracts, respectively, showed a concentration-dependent increase in chromosomal aberrations as compared to that in a control group. The mean percentage total aberrant metaphases at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 300 mg/kg concentrations of leaf extract were found respectively to be 58 ± 7.05, 72 ± 6.41, and 78 ± 5.98, which were significantly higher (p < 0.0001 each) than that in the control group (6 ± 3.39). The mean percentage total aberrant metaphases at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 300 mg/kg concentrations of fruit extract were found to be 18 ± 5.49, 40 ± 10.00, and 52 ± 10.20, respectively, which were significantly higher (p = 0.033, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.0001, respectively) than that for control (6 ± 3.39). Acrocentric associations and premature centromeric separation were the two most common abnormalities observed in both the exposed groups. The group exposed to leaf extracts also showed a significant number of a variety of other structural aberrations, including breaks, fragments, dicentrics, terminal deletion, minutes, and Robertsonian translocations. The group exposed to leaf extract showed higher frequency of all types of aberrations at equal concentrations as compared to the group exposed to fruit extract.

  7. Effect of paricalcitol and GcMAF on angiogenesis and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Amato, Marcello; Aterini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone mineralization, vitamin D is involved in immune defence, cardiovascular function, inflammation and angiogenesis, and these pleiotropic effects are of interested in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. Here we investigated the effects of paricalcitol, a nonhypercalcemic vitamin D analogue, on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and signaling, and on angiogenesis. These effects were compared with those of a known inhibitor of angiogenesis pertaining to the vitamin D axis, the vitamin D-binding protein-derived Gc-macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). Since the effects of vitamin D receptor agonists are associated with polymorphisms of the gene coding for the receptor, we measured the effects of both compounds on mononuclear cells harvested from subjects harboring different BsmI polymorphisms. Paricalcitol inhibited mononuclear cell viability with the bb genotype showing the highest effect. GcMAF, on the contrary, stimulated cell proliferation, with the bb genotype showing the highest stimulatory effect. Both compounds stimulated 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation in mononuclear cells with the highest effect on the bb genotype. Paricalcitol and GcMAF inhibited the angiogenesis induced by proinflammatory prostaglandin E1. Polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor gene, known to be associated with the highest responses to vitamin D receptor agonists, are also associated with the highest responses to GcMAF. These results highlight the role of the vitamin D axis in chronic kidney disease, an axis which includes vitamin D, its receptor and vitamin D-binding protein-derived GcMAF.

  8. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  9. Human embryonic stem cells in culture possess primary cilia with hedgehog signaling machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiprilov, Enko N; Awan, Aashir; Desprat, Romain

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potential therapeutic tools and models of human development. With a growing interest in primary cilia in signal transduction pathways that are crucial for embryological development and tissue differentiation and interest in mechanisms regulating human hESC d...

  10. Evidence from Human and Animal Studies: Pathological Roles of CD8(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Peyret, Corentin; Shi, Xiang Qun; Siron, Nicolas; Jang, Jeong Ho; Wu, Sonia; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4(+) T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4(+) T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicates that CD8(+) T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice) in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86) is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8(+) T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4(+) T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

  11. Evidence from Human and Animal Studies: Pathological Roles of CD8+ T Cells in Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Peyret, Corentin; Shi, Xiang Qun; Siron, Nicolas; Jang, Jeong Ho; Wu, Sonia; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4+ T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4+ T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicates that CD8+ T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice) in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86) is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8+ T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4+ T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26528293

  12. Pre-Treatment effects of peripheral tumors on brain and behavior: Neuroinflammatory mechanisms in humans and rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrepf, Andrew; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Pyter, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients suffer high levels of affective and cognitive disturbances, which have been attributed to diagnosis-related distress, impairment of quality of life, and side effects of primary treatment. An inflammatory microenvironment is also a feature of the vast majority of solid tumors. However, the ability of tumor-associated biological processes to affect the central nervous system (CNS) has only recently been explored in the context of symptoms of depression and cognitive disturbances. In this review, we summarize the burgeoning evidence from rodent cancer models that solid tumors alter neurobiological pathways and subsequent behavioral processes with relevance to affective and cognitive disturbances reported in human cancer populations. We consider, in parallel, the evidence from human clinical cancer research demonstrating that affective and cognitive disturbances are common in some malignancies prior to diagnosis and treatment. We further consider the underlying neurobiological pathways, including altered neuroinflammation, tryptophan metabolism, prostaglandin synthesis and associated neuroanatomical changes, that are most strongly implicated in the rodent literature and supported by analogous evidence from human cancer populations. We focus on the implications of these findings for behavioral researchers and clinicians, with particular emphasis on methodological issues and areas of future research. PMID:25958011

  13. Human Resource Architectures for New Teachers in Flemish Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekeman, Eva; Devos, Geert; Valcke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Since research shows that the quality of a school's teaching force is related to its personnel practices, there is a growing interest in human resource management (HRM) in education. Existing research has generated insights into the differences, constraints and effects of single and isolated HR practices. Yet, little research is available…

  14. Analysis of mtDNT 4977bp deletion induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood nucleated cells using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Tianli; Wang Ping; Han Lin; Liu Yulong; Liu Yumin

    2010-01-01

    To detect mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) 4977bp deletion(triangle open mtDNA 4977 ) in human peripheral blood nucleated cells exposed to ionizing radiation in vitro by using real-time PCR, and explore possibility of the index as biodosimetry for estimating biological dose in radiation accident,six healthy individuals' peripheral blood was collected,and the blood samples were irradiated with 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 Gy 60 Co gamma-ray. The triangle open mtDNA 4977 and total mtDNA copy number(mtDNA total ) in the mtDNA samples were detected, and then the deletion rates were calculated. The results showed that the mtDNA total and triangle open mtDNA 4977 copy number, and the deletion rates of mtDNA 4977bp in the mtDNA samples from 6 healthy individuals' blood exposed to 1-5 Gy radiation were higher than that with the samples exposed to 0 Gy radiation(p 0.05). The results indicated that ionizing radiation can induce accumulation of the triangle open mtDNA 4977 and increase of mtDNA total copy number in human peripheral blood nucleated cells,but both the mtDNA 4977bp deletion and exposure dose(0-5 Gy) were not obviously correlated. (authors)

  15. Electron microscopy of human peripheral nerves of clinical relevance to the practice of nerve blocks. A structural and ultrastructural review based on original experimental and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, M A; Arriazu, R; Collier, C B; Sala-Blanch, X; Izquierdo, L; de Andrés, J

    2013-12-01

    The goal is to describe the ultrastructure of normal human peripheral nerves, and to highlight key aspects that are relevant to the practice of peripheral nerve block anaesthesia. Using samples of sciatic nerve obtained from patients, and dural sac, nerve root cuff and brachial plexus dissected from fresh human cadavers, an analysis of the structure of peripheral nerve axons and distribution of fascicles and topographic composition of the layers that cover the nerve is presented. Myelinated and unmyelinated axons, fascicles, epineurium, perineurium and endoneurium obtained from patients and fresh cadavers were studied by light microscopy using immunohistochemical techniques, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Structure of perineurium and intrafascicular capillaries, and its implications in blood-nerve barrier were revised. Each of the anatomical elements is analyzed individually with regard to its relevance to clinical practice to regional anaesthesia. Routine practice of regional anaesthetic techniques and ultrasound identification of nerve structures has led to conceptions, which repercussions may be relevant in future applications of these techniques. In this regard, the ultrastructural and histological perspective accomplished through findings of this study aims at enlightening arising questions within the field of regional anaesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Iodine and freeze-drying enhanced high-resolution MicroCT imaging for reconstructing 3D intraneural topography of human peripheral nerve fascicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liwei; Guo, Yongze; Qi, Jian; Zhu, Qingtang; Gu, Liqiang; Zheng, Canbin; Lin, Tao; Lu, Yutong; Zeng, Zitao; Yu, Sha; Zhu, Shuang; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Xi; Du, Yunfei; Yao, Zhi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Xiaolin

    2017-08-01

    The precise annotation and accurate identification of the topography of fascicles to the end organs are prerequisites for studying human peripheral nerves. In this study, we present a feasible imaging method that acquires 3D high-resolution (HR) topography of peripheral nerve fascicles using an iodine and freeze-drying (IFD) micro-computed tomography (microCT) method to greatly increase the contrast of fascicle images. The enhanced microCT imaging method can facilitate the reconstruction of high-contrast HR fascicle images, fascicle segmentation and extraction, feature analysis, and the tracing of fascicle topography to end organs, which define fascicle functions. The complex intraneural aggregation and distribution of fascicles is typically assessed using histological techniques or MR imaging to acquire coarse axial three-dimensional (3D) maps. However, the disadvantages of histological techniques (static, axial manual registration, and data instability) and MR imaging (low-resolution) limit these applications in reconstructing the topography of nerve fascicles. Thus, enhanced microCT is a new technique for acquiring 3D intraneural topography of the human peripheral nerve fascicles both to improve our understanding of neurobiological principles and to guide accurate repair in the clinic. Additionally, 3D microstructure data can be used as a biofabrication model, which in turn can be used to fabricate scaffolds to repair long nerve gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, E.P.; Mettus, R.V.; DeFreitas, E.; Wroblewska, Z.; Cisco, M.; Koprowski, H.

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, the authors have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. They have clones the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome

  18. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Mohr, Magni; Fulford, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i) affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii) modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We...... hypothesized that the caffeine-induced extension of exercise capacity during repeated sets of exercise would occur despite greater disturbance of the muscle milieu due to enhanced peripheral and corticospinal excitatory output, central motor drive, and muscle contractility. Methods: Nine healthy active young...

  19. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product portion of the HANPP Collection contains tabular data on carbon-equivalents of...

  20. Dose-effect of ionizing radiation-induced PIG3 gene expression alteration in human lymphoblastoid AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Zhang, De-Qin; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lu, Xue; Wang, Xin-Ru; Li, Kun-Peng; Chen, De-Qing; Mu, Xiao-Feng; Li, Shuang; Gao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    To identify new ionizing radiation (IR)-sensitive genes and observe the dose-effect of gene expression alteration (GEA) induced by IR. Microarray was used to screen the differentially expressed genes in human lymphoblastoid cells (AHH-1) using three doses of (60)Co γ-rays (0.5-8 Gy at 1 Gy/min). Given that p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) was consistently upregulated, the GEA of PIG3 in AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) induced by γ-rays (1 Gy/min) was measured at messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. The GEA of PIG3 in AHH-1 cells exposed to neutron radiation (californium-252, 0.073 Gy/min) was also quantified. PIG3 was one of the seven differentially expressed genes found in the microarray analysis. The PIG3 mRNA and protein levels in AHH-1 cells were significantly increased from 1-10 Gy of γ-rays 8-72 h or 8-168 h after exposure, respectively. The enhancement was also observed in AHH-1 cells from 0.4-1.6 Gy of neutrons 48 h post-irradiation. The PIG3 mRNA levels (mRNA copy numbers) in HPBL were significantly increased from 1-8 Gy of γ-rays within 4-24 h post-irradiation, but the highest increase in signal-to-noise responsiveness is approximately two-fold, which was less than that of AHH-1 (approximately 20-fold). IR can upregulate the PIG3 gene expression in AHH-1 and HPBL in the early phase after exposure; however, the IR induced expression levels of PIG3 are greater in AHH-1 than HPBL.

  1. [The effect of isoflurane on the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, W; Enzan, K; Masaki, Y; Kayaba, M; Suzuki, M

    1995-07-01

    The cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 secreted from macrophages/monocytes proved to play important roles in the pathogenesis of endotoxemia, severe pancreatitis and other surgical injuries. However, it is still unclear how inhalational anesthetic agents influence the secretion of these cytokines from macrophages/monocytes. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions increased after LPS stimulation and this increase was inhibited by isoflurane in dose-dependent fashion. The inhibitory action of isoflurane disappeared between 1 and 3 hours after stopping isoflurane inhalation. We concluded that isoflurane could inhibit TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions from peripheral blood monocytes stimulated by LPS in a dose-dependent fashion and that the inhibitory action of isoflurane was reversible.

  2. DNA damage response and role of shelterin complex in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Divyalakshmi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are the DNA protein structures that cap the ends of linear DNA. It consists of short repetitive DNA sequences (TTAGGG)n and specialized telomere binding proteins. There are six telomeric proteins (TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERF2, PTOP and POT1) called as shelterin complex/telosome which maintains telomere integrity. The function of this 'telosome' is to protect the natural ends of the chromosomes from being recognized as artificial DNA breaks, thereby preventing chromosome end-to-end fusions. DNA Damage Response (DDR) induced by radiation and its interaction with telomeric protein complex is poorly understood in human PBMCs at G 0 stage. Alterations in either telomeric DNA or telomere binding proteins can impair the function of the telosome, which may lead to senescence or apoptosis. Ionizing radiation which induces a plethora of DNA lesions in human cell may also alter the expression of telomere associated proteins. In the present study, we have made an attempt to study the DNA damage response of telomere proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation. Venous blood samples were collected from eight random healthy volunteers and PBMCs were separated. Dose response as well as time point kinetics study was carried out at transcription as well as protein level. PBMCs were irradiated at various doses between 10 cGy to 2.0 Gy at a dose rate of 1.0 Gy/min. Total RNA was isolated for gene expression analysis at 0 hour and 4 hours respectively. cDNA was prepared and transcriptional pattern as studied using real time q-PCR where Taqman probes were used. Time point kinetics of transcriptional pattern of TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERF2, PTOP and POT1 was carried out at 0 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min for two different doses (1.0 Gy and 2.0 Gy). Dose response and time point kinetics of TRF2 was studied at similar doses using confocal microscopy. Our results revealed that at 2.0 Gy there was a two fold increase at the level of transcription

  3. Anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol suppresses homocysteine formation in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroecksnadel, Katharina; Winkler, Christiana; Wirleitner, Barbara; Schennach, Harald; Weiss, Günter; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Inflammation, immune activation and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders. In addition to markers of inflammation, moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and there is a link between the activation of immunocompetent cells and the enhanced formation of homocysteine in vitro. Likewise, anti-inflammatory drugs and nutrients rich in antioxidant vitamins are able to reduce cardiovascular risk and to slow down the atherogenic process. Resveratrol, a phenolic antioxidant synthesized in grapes and vegetables and present in wine, has also been supposed to be beneficial for the prevention of cardiovascular events. Apart from its strong antioxidant properties, resveratrol has also been demonstrated to act as an anti-inflammatory agent. In this study the influence of resveratrol on the production of homocysteine by stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated. Results were compared to earlier described effects of the anti-inflammatory compounds aspirin and salicylic acid and of the lipid-lowering drug atorvastatin. Stimulation of PBMCs with the mitogens concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin induced significantly higher homocysteine accumulation in supernatants compared with unstimulated cells. Treatment with 10-100 muM resveratrol suppressed homocysteine formation in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol did not influence the release of homocysteine from resting PBMCs. The data suggest that resveratrol may prevent homocysteine accumulation in the blood by suppressing immune activation cascades and the proliferation of mitogen-driven T-cells. The effect of resveratrol to down-regulate the release of homo-cysteine was comparable to the decline of neopterin concentrations in the same experiments. The suppressive effect of resveratrol was very similar to results obtained earlier with aspirin, salicylic acid and atorvastatin; however, it appeared that doses

  4. Effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells on cytokine production by peripheral blood naive, memory, and effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Paula; Pedrosa, Monia; Pedreiro, Susana; Gomes, Joana; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-05

    The different distribution of T cells among activation/differentiation stages in immune disorders may condition the outcome of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. Indeed, the effect of MSCs in the different functional compartments of T cells is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of human bone marrow MSCs on naturally occurring peripheral blood functional compartments of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells: naive, central memory, effector memory, and effector compartments. For that, mononuclear cells (MNCs) stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin were cultured in the absence/presence of MSCs. The percentage of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFNγ), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-17, IL-9, and IL-6 and the amount of cytokine produced were assessed by flow cytometry. mRNA levels of IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) in purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and phenotypic and mRNA expression changes induced by PMA + ionomycin stimulation in MSCs, were also evaluated. MSCs induced the reduction of the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing TNF-α, IFNγ, and IL-2 in all functional compartments, except for naive IFNγ(+)CD4(+) T cells. This inhibitory effect differentially affected CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as the T-cell functional compartments; remarkably, different cytokines showed distinct patterns of inhibition regarding both the percentage of producing cells and the amount of cytokine produced. Likewise, the percentages of IL-17(+), IL-17(+)TNF-α(+), and IL-9(+) within CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and of IL-6(+)CD4(+) T cells were decreased in MNC-MSC co-cultures. MSCs decreased IL-10 and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in stimulated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, whereas TGF-β was reduced in CD8(+) and augmented in CD4(+) T cells, with no changes for CTLA4. Finally, PMA

  5. The NAD+ precursor nicotinic acid improves genomic integrity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after X-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidele, Kathrin; Beneke, Sascha; Bürkle, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    NAD + is an essential cofactor for enzymes catalyzing redox-reactions as well as an electron carrier in energy metabolism. Aside from this, NAD + consuming enzymes like poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and sirtuins are important regulators involved in chromatin-restructuring processes during repair and epigenetics/transcriptional adaption. In order to replenish cellular NAD + levels after cleavage, synthesis starts from precursors such as nicotinamide, nicotinamide riboside or nicotinic acid to match the need for this essential molecule. In the present study, we investigated the impact of supplementation with nicotinic acid on resting and proliferating human mononuclear blood cells with a focus on DNA damage and repair processes. We observed that nicotinic acid supplementation increased NAD + levels as well as DNA repair efficiency and enhanced genomic stability evaluated by micronucleus test after x-ray treatment. Interestingly, resting cells displayed lower basal levels of DNA breaks compared to proliferating cells, but break-induction rates were identical. Despite similar levels of p53 protein upregulation after irradiation, higher NAD + concentrations led to reduced acetylation of this protein, suggesting enhanced SIRT1 activity. Our data reveal that even in normal primary human cells cellular NAD + levels may be limiting under conditions of genotoxic stress and that boosting the NAD + system with nicotinic acid can improve genomic stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katika, Madhumohan R. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Hendriksen, Peter J.M. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Shao, Jia [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad, E-mail: ad.peijnenburg@wur.nl [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  7. Docking and molecular dynamics studies of peripheral site ligand–oximes as reactivators of sarin-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, J.S.F.D. de; Cuya Guizado, T.R.; Guimarães, A.P.; Ramalho, T.C.; Gonçalves, A.S.; Koning, M.C. de; França, T.C.C.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we performed docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies on two groups of long-tailored oximes designed as peripheral site binders of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and potential penetrators on the blood brain barrier. Our studies permitted to determine how the tails anchor

  8. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  9. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  10. Molecular genetics of human primary microcephaly: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterised by microcephaly present at birth and non-progressive mental retardation. Microcephaly is the outcome of a smaller but architecturally normal brain; the cerebral cortex exhibits a significant decrease in size. MCPH is a neurogenic mitotic disorder, though affected patients demonstrate normal neuronal migration, neuronal apoptosis and neural function. Twelve MCPH loci (MCPH1-MCPH12) have been mapped to date from various populations around the world and contain the following genes: Microcephalin, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CASC5, ASPM, CENPJ, STIL, CEP135, CEP152, ZNF335, PHC1 and CDK6. It is predicted that MCPH gene mutations may lead to the disease phenotype due to a disturbed mitotic spindle orientation, premature chromosomal condensation, signalling response as a result of damaged DNA, microtubule dynamics, transcriptional control or a few other hidden centrosomal mechanisms that can regulate the number of neurons produced by neuronal precursor cells. Additional findings have further elucidated the microcephaly aetiology and pathophysiology, which has informed the clinical management of families suffering from MCPH. The provision of molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling may help to decrease the frequency of this disorder. PMID:25951892

  11. In vitro response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 60Co at single fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Maria Andrade

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy using gamma rays is a common modality of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this research is to investigate the biological response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC exposed in vitro to 60 Co irradiation at a single fraction of 10 Gy, 25 Gy and 50 Gy doses at 136,4 cGy.min-1 rate. Cells were irradiated at room temperature by the Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. Biological response was evaluated through cellular viability using MTT assay and nucleus damages visualized by Propidium Iodide assay and electrophoresis agarose gel after gamma irradiation. Nucleus damages induced by 60Co irradiation were compared to damage caused by cell exposure to 10% methanol. The 50 Gy dose of irradiation did not stimulate nuclus damages at the same level as that affected by 10% methanol induction in the MDAMB-231. Further studies are necessary to understand these mechanisms in the MDAMB-231 human breast carcinoma cell line.Radioterapia utilizando radiação gama é uma modalidade comum no tratamento do câncer de mama. A proposta deste estudo é investigar a resposta biológica in vitro da linhagem celular MDAMB-231 de câncer de mama humano e células do sangue periférico humano (PBMC expostas à irradiação pelo Co60 em frações simples de 10Gy, 25Gy e 50Gy e 136,4cGy min-1 rate. As células foram irradiadas a temperatura ambiente usando o equipamento de radioterapia Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. A resposta biológica, após irradiação gama, foi avaliada através do ensaio do MTT para viabilidade celular e o do ensaio com Iodeto de Propídio para visualização do dano nuclear, além da eletroforese em gel de agarose. Os danos nucleares induzidos pelo Co60 foram comparados aos danos causados pela exposição das células à solução de metanol a 10%. Nós observamos que a dose de 50Gy não estimulou a mesma quantidade de danos nucleares que a solução de metanol a 10% nas c

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor in primary human lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xueyan; Hu Guoqiang; Tian Keli; Wang Mingyun

    1996-01-01

    Cell membranes were prepared from 12 human lung cancers for the study of the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR). EGFR concentration was estimated by ligand binding studies using 125 I-radiolabeled EGF. The dissociation constants of the high affinity sites were identical, 1.48 nmol and 1.1 nmol in cancer and normal lung tissues, the EGFR contents were higher in lung cancer tissues (range: 2.25 to 19.39 pmol·g -1 membrane protein) than that in normal tissues from the same patients (range: 0.72 to 7.43 pmol·g -1 membrane protein). These results suggest that EGF and its receptor may play a role in the regulatory mechanisms in the control of lung cellular growth and tumor promotion

  13. Determination of fracture toughness of human permanent and primary enamel using an indentation microfracture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi-Sakai, Sachiko; Sakai, Jun; Sakamoto, Makoto; Endo, Hideaki

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the fracture toughness and Vickers microhardness number of permanent and primary human enamel using the indentation microfracture method. Crack resistance and a parameter indirectly related to fracture toughness were measured in 48 enamel specimens from 16 permanent teeth and 12 enamel specimens obtained from six primary teeth. The Vickers microhardness number of the middle portion was greater than the upper portion in primary enamel. The fracture toughness was highest in the middle portion of permanent enamel, because fracture toughness greatly depends upon microstructure. These findings suggest that primary teeth are not miniature permanent teeth but have specific and characteristic mechanical properties.

  14. The Effect of High Dose Cholecalciferol on Arterial Stiffness and Peripheral and Central Blood Pressure in Healthy Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Iain; Brandi, Lisbet; Schou, Morten

    2016-01-01

    and central blood pressure and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. RESULTS: 22 subjects in the cholecalciferol arm and 18 subjects in the placebo arm completed the 16 weeks of follow-up. There was no difference in changes in PWV, AIx corrected for heart rate or central or peripheral blood pressure between...... and blood pressure in healthy normotensive adults. METHODS: 40 healthy adults were randomised in this double-blinded study to either oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day or matching placebo and were followed for 16 weeks to examine any effects on pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), peripheral...... the two groups. There was no correlation between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and any of these parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day does not affect arterial stiffness or blood pressure after 16 weeks of treatment in healthy normotensive adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT...

  15. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Mohr, Magni; Fulford, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Background: Caffeine has been shown to enhance exercise performance and capacity. The mechanisms remain unclear but are suggested to relate to adenosine receptor antagonism, resulting in increased central motor drive, reduced perception of effort, and altered peripheral processes such as enhanced...... men performed five sets of intense single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure on four separate occasions: for two visits (6 mg·kg-1 caffeine vs placebo), quadriceps 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans were performed to quantify phosphocreatine kinetics and pH, and for the remaining two...... calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i) affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii) modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We...

  16. Transcription factor Fos-Related Antigen-2 induces progressive peripheral vasculopathy in mice closely resembling human systemic sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, B; Busch, N; Jüngel, A; Pileckyte, M; Gay, R E; Michel, B A; Schett, G; Gay, S; Distler, J; Distler, O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Microvascular damage is one of the first pathological changes in systemic sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra-2), a transcription factor of the activator protein-1 family, in the peripheral vasculopathy of systemic sclerosis and examined the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results-Expression of Fra-2 protein was significantly increased in skin biopsies of systemic sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls, especially in endo...

  17. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Diagnostic utility of LunX mRNA in peripheral blood and pleural fluid in patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in lung cancer is hampered by the lack of clinically useful diagnostic markers. The goal of this study was to provide a detailed evaluation of lung cancer tumor markers indicative of molecular abnormalities and to assess their diagnostic utility in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to determine LunX, CK19, CEA, VEGF-C and hnRNP A2/B1 mRNA levels in peripheral blood and pleural fluid from NSCLC patients, compared with those from patients with other epithelial cancer (esophagus cancer and breast cancer, benign lung disease (pneumonia and tuberculo pleurisy and from healthy volunteers. Results In peripheral blood LunX mRNA was detectable in 75.0% (33/44 of patients with NSCLC, but not in patients with other epithelial cancer (0/28, benign lung disease (0/10 or in healthy volunteers (0/15. In contrast, all other genetic markers were detected in patients with either NSCLC, other epithelia cancer or benign lung disease, and in healthy volunteers. The expression level and positive rate of LunX mRNA in peripheral blood correlated with the pathologic stage of NSCLC (P LunX mRNA was detected in 92.9% (13/14 of malignant pleural fluid samples and was the only marker whose expression level was significantly different between malignant and benign pleural fluid (P LunX mRNA in the peripheral blood of NSCLC patients decreased shortly after clinical treatment (P = 0.005. Conclusion Of several commonly used genetic markers, LunX mRNA is the most specific gene marker for lung cancer and has potential diagnostic utility when measured in the peripheral blood and pleural fluid of NSCLC patients.

  19. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F. Rühle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384, pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553, and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955 and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome.

  1. Metastatic behaviour of primary human tumours in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Ines J; Bagowski, Christoph P; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Vlecken, Danielle H; Nitsche, Claudia; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lagendijk, Anne K; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of cell migration drives progression of many diseases, including cancer cell invasion and metastasis formation. Analysis of tumour invasion and metastasis in living organisms to date is cumbersome and involves difficult and time consuming investigative techniques. For primary human tumours we establish here a simple, fast, sensitive and cost-effective in vivo model to analyse tumour invasion and metastatic behaviour. We fluorescently labelled small explants from gastrointestinal human tumours and investigated their metastatic behaviour after transplantation into zebrafish embryos and larvae. The transparency of the zebrafish embryos allows to follow invasion, migration and micrometastasis formation in real-time. High resolution imaging was achieved through laser scanning confocal microscopy of live zebrafish. In the transparent zebrafish embryos invasion, circulation of tumour cells in blood vessels, migration and micrometastasis formation can be followed in real-time. Xenografts of primary human tumours showed invasiveness and micrometastasis formation within 24 hours after transplantation, which was absent when non-tumour tissue was implanted. Furthermore, primary human tumour cells, when organotopically implanted in the zebrafish liver, demonstrated invasiveness and metastatic behaviour, whereas primary control cells remained in the liver. Pancreatic tumour cells showed no metastatic behaviour when injected into cloche mutant embryos, which lack a functional vasculature. Our results show that the zebrafish is a useful in vivo animal model for rapid analysis of invasion and metastatic behaviour of primary human tumour specimen

  2. Primary ciliogenesis defects are associated with human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattner Jerome B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that have been implicated in signal transduction, cell to cell communication, left and right pattern embryonic development, sensation of fluid flow, regulation of calcium levels, mechanosensation, growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. Defects in the formation and/or function of these structures underlie a variety of human diseases such as Alström, Bardet-Biedl, Joubert, Meckel-Gruber and oral-facial-digital type 1 syndromes. The expression and function of primary cilia in cancer cells has now become a focus of attention but has not been studied in astrocytomas/glioblastomas. To begin to address this issue, we compared the structure and expression of primary cilia in a normal human astrocyte cell line with five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines. Methods Cultured normal human astrocytes and five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Monospecific antibodies were used to detect primary cilia and map the relationship between the primary cilia region and sites of endocytosis. Results We show that expression of primary cilia in normal astrocytes is cell cycle related and the primary cilium extends through the cell within a unique structure which we show to be a site of endocytosis. Importantly, we document that in each of the five astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines fully formed primary cilia are either expressed at a very low level, are completely absent or have aberrant forms, due to incomplete ciliogenesis. Conclusions The recent discovery of the importance of primary cilia in a variety of cell functions raises the possibility that this structure may have a role in a variety of cancers. Our finding that the formation of the primary cilium is disrupted in cells derived from astrocytoma/glioblastoma tumors provides the first

  3. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenti, Anna; Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa M; Caimari, Antoni; Del Bas, Josep M; Anguera, Anna; Anglés, Neus; Arola, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d) for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, pcocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process. Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  4. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Crescenti

    Full Text Available DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, p<0.001. Additionally, we found an association between the cocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process.Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  5. Nutrigenomics in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells : the effects of fatty acids on gene expression profiles of human circulating cells as assessed in human intervention studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, M.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the effects of nutrition on the function and health of organs in the human body, such as liver and intestine, is difficult, because for this research organ tissue is needed. Since nutrition research is usually performed in healthy volunteers, this tissue is difficult to obtain. However,

  6. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Signaling in Human Natural Killer Cells: New Insights from Primary Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Mace

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Human natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in the control of viral infections and malignancy. Their importance in human health and disease is illustrated by severe viral infections in patients with primary immunodeficiencies that affect NK cell function and/or development. The recent identification of patients with phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K-signaling pathway mutations that can cause primary immunodeficiency provides valuable insight into the role that PI3K signaling plays in human NK cell maturation and lytic function. There is a rich literature that demonstrates a requirement for PI3K in multiple key aspects of NK cell biology, including development/maturation, homing, priming, and function. Here, I briefly review these previous studies and place them in context with recent findings from the study of primary immunodeficiency patients, particularly those with hyperactivating mutations in PI3Kδ signaling.

  7. The effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on the cytoskeleton of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaomei; Guo Yuhua; Yin Zhiwei; Mao Zijun

    1990-03-01

    The whole mount cell electron microscopy in combination with selective extraction method for preparing cytoskeletal framework was applied. Cy toskeleton prepared by Triton X-100 treatment of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes appeared in electron microscopy as a highly organized and interconnected three-dimensional matrix of different fibrous elements. Since such cytoskeletons are open membrane-free system, individual fibrous organizations can be identified by specific antibodies. An indirect immunogold procedure using monoclonal anti-tubulin or anti-actin antibodies was applied to visualize tubulin-or actin-containing structures. The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons had been used to demonstrate that different doses of 60 Co γ-ray caused a distinctive and reproducible alterations of the cytoskeletons of intact mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The results showed that there were some similar alterations with those caused by cytochalasin B and by colchicine. From these observations and other workers' studies, it's likely that 60 Co γ-ray irradiation may inhibit cytoplasmic microtubule and microfilament assembling

  8. An alkaline comet assay study on the antimalarial drug atovaquone in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a study based on clinically relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinter, Domagoj; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Atovaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone, is an anti-parasite drug, selectively targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of malaria parasite. It is used for both the treatment and prevention of malaria, usually in a fixed combination with proguanil. Although atovaquone has not often been associated with severe adverse reactions in the recommended dosages and has a relatively favorable side effect profile, the present study was undertaken to evaluate its cytogenotoxic potential towards human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Two different concentrations of atovaquone found in plasma when used in fixed-dose combination with proguanile hydrochloride were used with and without S9 metabolic activation: 2950 ng ml(-1) used for prophylactic treatment and 11 800 ng ml(-1) used in treatment of malaria. The results showed that lymphocyte viability was not affected after the treatment, suggesting that atovaquone was not cytotoxic in the given concentrations. With the alkaline comet assay we demonstrated that in human peripheral blood lymphocytes no significant changes in comet parameters occurred after the treatment. There were no differences in tested parameters with the addition of S9 metabolic activation, indicating that atovaquone either has no metabolite or it is not toxic in the given concentrations. Since no effects were observed after the treatment, it is to be concluded that atovaquone is safe from the aspect of genototoxicity in the recommended dosages. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  10. Induction and persistence of multicentric chromosomes in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes following high-dose gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Akiyama, Miho; Nakagawa, Takashi; Tominaga, Takako; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Yuki, Masanori; Nakayama, Fumiaki

    2012-01-01

    Among radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, multicentric chromosomes, as represented by dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics), are regarded as sensitive and specific biomarkers for assessing radiation dose in the 0 to 5 Gy range. The objective of this study was to characterize chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by a higher dose of radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 15 Gy gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min and harvested at 48, 50, 52, 54, 56 and 72 h. The first mitotic peak appeared at 52-54 h, showing about a 6 h mitotic delay as compared with nonirradiated control cultures. Cell-cycle analysis of parallel and simultaneous cultures by sister-chromatid differentiation staining suggests that metaphase cells examined in 48-56 h cultures were in the first mitosis after culture initiation. The mean dicentric equivalent counts ranged from 9.0 to 9.3 in consecutively harvested cultures with no significant differences among them. At 72 h, about 20% of dividing cells were tetraploid, persisting with faithfully replicated unstable chromosome aberrations. The non-random distribution of replicated chromosome pairs, deduced from multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, led us to surmise that the predominant mechanism underlying the induction of tetraploid cells is endoreduplication. These findings suggest that a high-dose in vitro irradiation applied to peripheral blood lymphocytes may affect on the replication process, in addition to structural chromosome damage. (author)

  11. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Calton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D status [25(OHD] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OHD and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Material and methods: Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test was performed using the Seahorse XFe96 flux analyser. 25(OHD was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. Results: 25(OHD increased by a median (IQR of 14.40 (20.13 nmol/L (p75 nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OHD was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Conclusion: Seasonal improvements in 25(OHD was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OHD in winter. The data warrants confirmation through cause and effect study designs. Keywords: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Bioenergetics, Vitamin D, Season, Inflammation, Insulin sensitivity

  12. Explicit formula of finite difference method to estimate human peripheral tissue temperatures during exposure to severe cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M A; Hussain, Fida

    2015-02-01

    During cold exposure, peripheral tissues undergo vasoconstriction to minimize heat loss to preserve the maintenance of a normal core temperature. However, vasoconstricted tissues exposed to cold temperatures are susceptible to freezing and frostbite-related tissue damage. Therefore, it is imperative to establish a mathematical model for the estimation of tissue necrosis due to cold stress. To this end, an explicit formula of finite difference method has been used to obtain the solution of Pennes' bio-heat equation with appropriate boundary conditions to estimate the temperature profiles of dermal and subdermal layers when exposed to severe cold temperatures. The discrete values of nodal temperature were calculated at the interfaces of skin and subcutaneous tissues with respect to the atmospheric temperatures of 25 °C, 20 °C, 15 °C, 5 °C, -5 °C and -10 °C. The results obtained were used to identify the scenarios under which various degrees of frostbite occur on the surface of skin as well as the dermal and subdermal areas. The explicit formula of finite difference method proposed in this model provides more accurate predictions as compared to other numerical methods. This model of predicting tissue temperatures provides researchers with a more accurate prediction of peripheral tissue temperature and, hence, the susceptibility to frostbite during severe cold exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fundamental studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) of human peripheral blood leukocytes using sheep red blood cells as target cells, and the effect of erythrophagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    We investigated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human peripheral blood leukocytes by using 51 Cr-labelled sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells and anti-SRBC rabbit antibody. Lysis of SRBC was mediated by either human peripheral lymphoid cells or phagocytes (Monocytes and granulocytes). SRBC were useful as target cells in ADCC assay against human lymphoid cells, since decreased cytotoxic activity of phagocyte-contaminated crude lymphocyte fraction was recovered by elimination of contaminating phagocytes. The monocytes inhibited ADCC of lymphoid cells through phagocytosis of SRBC. This assay system may be useful for estimating not only Fc receptor-mediated cytotoxicity but also Fc receptor-mediated phagocytic activity of human peripheral blood leukocytes. (author)

  14. Peripheral SLC6A4 DNA methylation is associated with in vivo measures of human brain serotonin synthesis and childhood physical aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsha Wang

    Full Text Available The main challenge in addressing the role of DNA methylation in human behaviour is the fact that the brain is inaccessible to epigenetic analysis in living humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET measures of brain serotonin (5-HT synthesis, we found in a longitudinal sample that adult males with high childhood-limited aggression (C-LHPA had lower in vivo 5-HT synthesis in the orbitofrontal cortex (OBFC. Here we hypothesized that 5-HT alterations associated with childhood aggression were linked to differential DNA methylation of critical genes in the 5-HT pathway and these changes were also detectable in peripheral white blood cells. Using pyrosequencing, we determined the state of DNA methylation of SLC6A4 promoter in T cells and monocytes isolated from blood of cohort members (N = 25 who underwent a PET scan, and we examined whether methylation status in the blood is associated with in vivo brain 5-HT synthesis. Higher levels of methylation were observed in both T cells and monocytes at specific CpG sites in the C-LHPA group. DNA methylation of SLC6A4 in monocytes appears to be associated more reliably with group membership than T cells. In both cell types the methylation state of these CpGs was associated with lower in vivo measures of brain 5-HT synthesis in the left and right lateral OBFC (N = 20 where lower 5-HT synthesis in C-LHPA group was observed. Furthermore, in vitro methylation of the SLC6A4 promoter in a luciferase reporter construct suppresses its transcriptional activity supporting a functional role of DNA methylation in SLC6A4 promoter regulation. These findings indicate that state of SLC6A4 promoter methylation is altered in peripheral white blood cells of individuals with physical aggression during childhood. This supports the relevance of peripheral DNA methylation for brain function and suggests that peripheral SLC6A4 DNA methylation could be a marker of central 5-HT function.

  15. Generation of iPSC lines from primary human chorionic villi cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Lichtner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary human chorionic villi (CV cells were used to generate the iPSC line by retroviral transduction of the four Yamanaka-factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Pluripotency was confirmed both in vivo and in vitro. The transcriptomes of the CV-derived iPSC lines and the human embryonic stem cell lines—H1 and H9 have a Pearson correlation of 0.929 and 0.943 respectively.

  16. The Adverse Effects of Heavy Metals with and without Noise Exposure on the Human Peripheral and Central Auditory System: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Castellanos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to some chemicals in the workplace can lead to occupational chemical-induced hearing loss. Attention has mainly focused on the adverse auditory effects of solvents. However, other chemicals such as heavy metals have been also identified as ototoxic agents. The aim of this work was to review the current scientific knowledge about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure with and without co-exposure to noise in humans. PubMed and Medline were accessed to find suitable articles. A total of 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results from the review showed that no evidence about the ototoxic effects in humans of manganese is available. Contradictory results have been found for arsenic, lead and mercury as well as for the possible interaction between heavy metals and noise. All studies found in this review have found that exposure to cadmium and mixtures of heavy metals induce auditory dysfunction. Most of the studies investigating the adverse auditory effects of heavy metals in humans have investigated human populations exposed to lead. Some of these studies suggest peripheral and central auditory dysfunction induced by lead exposure. It is concluded that further evidence from human studies about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure is still required. Despite this issue, audiologists and other hearing health care professionals should be aware of the possible auditory effects of heavy metals.

  17. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna L. Bowtell

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCaffeine has been shown to enhance exercise performance and capacity. The mechanisms remain unclear but are suggested to relate to adenosine receptor antagonism, resulting in increased central motor drive, reduced perception of effort, and altered peripheral processes such as enhanced calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We hypothesized that the caffeine-induced extension of exercise capacity during repeated sets of exercise would occur despite greater disturbance of the muscle milieu due to enhanced peripheral and corticospinal excitatory output, central motor drive, and muscle contractility.MethodsNine healthy active young men performed five sets of intense single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure on four separate occasions: for two visits (6 mg·kg−1 caffeine vs placebo, quadriceps 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans were performed to quantify phosphocreatine kinetics and pH, and for the remaining two visits (6 mg·kg−1 caffeine vs placebo, femoral nerve electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the quadriceps cortical motor area were applied pre- and post exercise.ResultsThe total exercise time was 17.9 ± 6.0% longer in the caffeine (1,225 ± 86 s than in the placebo trial (1,049 ± 73 s, p = 0.016, and muscle phosphocreatine concentration and pH (p < 0.05 were significantly lower in the latter sets of exercise after caffeine ingestion. Voluntary activation (VA (peripheral, p = 0.007; but not supraspinal, p = 0.074, motor-evoked potential (MEP amplitude (p = 0.007, and contractility (contraction time, p = 0.009; and relaxation rate, p = 0.003 were significantly higher after caffeine consumption, but at

  18. Simvastatin Inhibits IL-5-Induced Chemotaxis and CCR3 Expression of HL-60-Derived and Human Primary Eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tsai, Wan-Chun; Lee, Ta-Jen; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Su Pang, Jong-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    IL-5-induced chemotaxis of eosinophils is an important feature of allergic airway inflammatory diseases. Simvastatin, a lipid lowering agent, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Our aim was to investigate the effect of simvastatin on IL-5-induced eosinophil chemotaxis and its regulatory mechanisms. Eosinophils were derived by treating HL-60 clone 15 (HC15) cells with butyric acid (BA) in an alkaline condition or through direct isolation from human peripheral blood. The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and interleukin (IL)-5 receptors (IL5Rα and β) were analyzed using RT/real-time PCR. The granular proteins were stained using fast green. Eotaxin-induced chemotaxis was measured using a transwell migration assay. CCR3 protein expression was revealed by immunocytochemistry. An animal model of allergic rhinitis was established by challenging Sprague-Dawley® rats repeatedly with ovalbumin. Butyric acid significantly increased the expression of IL5Rα and IL5Rβ, CCR3 and granular proteins in HC15 cells, indicating the maturation of eosinophils (BA-E cells). IL-5 further enhanced the CCR3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis of BA-E cells. Simvastatin inhibited the effects of IL-5 on BA-E cells, but not in the presence of mevalonate. Similar results were also exhibited in human primary eosinophils. In vivo animal studies further confirmed that oral simvastatin could significantly suppress the infiltration of eosinophils into turbinate tissues of allergic rats. Therefore, simvastatin was demonstrated to inhibit IL-5-induced CCR3 expression and chemotaxis of eosinophils mediated via the mevalonate pathway. We confirmed that simvastatin also reduced eosinophilic infiltration in allergic rhinitis.

  19. Expression of NMDA receptor subunits in human blood lymphocytes: A peripheral biomarker in online computer game addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Vousooghi, Nasim; Alizadeh, Bentolhoda; Makki, Seyed Mohammad; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Nazari, Shahrzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2018-05-23

    Background and aims Repeated performance of some behaviors such as playing computer games could result in addiction. The NMDA receptor is critically involved in the development of behavioral and drug addictions. It has been claimed that the expression level of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain may be reflected in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Methods Here, using a real-time PCR method, we have investigated the mRNA expression of GluN2A, GluN2D, GluN3A, and GluN3B subunits of the NMDA receptor in PBLs of male online computer game addicts (n = 25) in comparison with normal subjects (n = 26). Results Expression levels of GluN2A, GluN2D, and GluN3B subunits were not statistically different between game addicts and the control group. However, the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit was downregulated in PBLs of game addicts. Discussion and conclusions Transcriptional levels of GluN2A and GluN2D subunits in online computer game addicts are similar to our previously reported data of opioid addiction and are not different from the control group. However, unlike our earlier finding of drug addiction, the mRNA expression levels of GluN3A and GluN3B subunits in PBLs of game addicts are reduced and unchanged, respectively, compared with control subjects. It seems that the downregulated state of the GluN3A subunit of NMDA receptor in online computer game addicts is a finding that deserves more studies in the future to see whether it can serve as a peripheral biomarker in addiction studies, where the researcher wants to rule out the confusing effects of abused drugs.

  20. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT. PMID:21435270

  1. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Jern; Chang, Chu-Ting; Wang, Guei-Jane; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lu, Shao-Chun; Kuo, Yuh-Chi

    2011-03-25

    Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  2. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Shwu-Fen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arctium lappa (Niubang, a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC, isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  3. Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma after human chorionic gonadotropin normalization following hydatidiform mole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestá, Izildinha; Leite, Fábio Vicente; Michelin, Odair Carlito

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) is rare and frequently leads to death. CASES: Two young patients presented with previous molar pregnancy and spontaneous serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) normalization. Patient 1 was referred to our center after partial response to chemo...

  4. Concordant testing results between various Human Papillomavirus assays in primary cervical cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Thurah, Lena; Bonde, Jesper; Hoa Lam, Janni Uyen

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) assays are increasingly used for primary cervical screening and HPV vaccination effect monitoring. We undertook a systematic literature review to determine the concordance in positive test results (i.e., detection of HPV infections) between Hybrid Capture 2 ...

  5. Apoptosis in the human periodontal membrane evaluated in primary and permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Marie-Louise Bastholm; Thomsen, Bjarke; Kjær, Inger

    2011-01-01

    that resorption is connected to apoptosis of the epithelial cells of Malassez. The purpose of this study is to localize cells undergoing apoptosis in the periodontal membrane of human primary and permanent teeth. Materials and methods. Human primary and permanent teeth were examined immunohistochemically...... for apoptosis and epithelial cells of Malassez in the periodontal membrane. All teeth examined were extracted in connection with treatment. Results. Apoptosis was seen in close proximity to the root surface and within the epithelial cells of Malassez. This pattern of apoptotis is similar in the periodontal...... membrane in primary and permanent teeth. Conclusions. The inter-relationship between apoptotis and root resorption cannot be concluded from the present study. Apoptosis seen in close proximity to the root surface presumably corresponds to the highly innervated layer of the periodontal membrane...

  6. Generation of dendritic cells from human bone marrow mononuclear cells: advantages for clinical application in comparison to peripheral blood monocyte derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, L; Feuerer, M; Beckhove, P; Umansky, V; Schirrmacher, V

    2002-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) currently used for vaccination in clinical studies to induce immunity against malignant cells are normally generated from peripheral blood-derived monocytes. Here we studied conditions for the generation of DCs from unseparated human bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells and compared them functionally with DCs from blood. The two types of DCs, from bone marrow (BM-DC) and peripheral blood (BL-DC), were generated in parallel from the same normal healthy donors by culturing in serum-free X-VIVO 20 medium containing GM-CSF and IL-4, and then the phenotypes and functions were compared. BM-DC generation occurred in 14 days and involved proliferative expansion from CD34 stem cells and differentiation while BL-DC generation occurred in 7 days from CD14 monocytes and involved only differentiation. A 7- to 25-fold higher number of DCs could be obtained from BM than from blood. BM-DC had similar phenotypes as BL-DC. The capacity to stimulate MLR reactivity in allogeneic T lymphocytes was higher with BM-DC than that with BL-DC. Also, the capacity to stimulate autologous memory T cell responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) or tuberculin (PPD) was higher with BM-DC than with BL-DC. These results suggest that BM-DC as produced here may be a very economic and useful source of professional antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor immunotherapeutic protocols.

  7. A dose-effect curve of premature condensation chromosome ring in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood exposed to high dose of 60Co γ-rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Bo; Li Yufang; Liu Guangxian; Huang Shan; Jiang Benrong; Ai Huisheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To establish a dose-effect curve of premature condensation chromosome ring (PCC-R) in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood after exposed to high doses of γ-rays. Methods: Peripheral blood samples was drawn from three healthy individuals, and exposed to 60 Co γ-rays with doses between 0 and 30 Gy. The frequencies of PCC-R in premature condensation chromosome (PCC) cells obtained by Okadaic acid (OA) induction were calculated, and a dose-effect curve was fitted. Results: PCC index tapered with dose. Frequencies of PCC-R per cell increased until 20 Gy, and then saturation was observed. The results were fitted to a lineal model up to 20 Gy: y=-0.020 + 0.052D, where y was the frequencies of PCC-R per cell, D was the radiation dose(Gy). Conclusions: The highest dose could be estimated is 20 Gy by the dose-effect curve established with PCC-R method. Its utility and validity will be verified in the future application of radiation accident. (authors)

  8. Absence of DNA double-strand breaks in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging assessed by γH2AX flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Sohns, Jan M.; Ritter, Christian; Lotz, Joachim [Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Kruewel, Thomas; Stahnke, Vera C. [Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Rave-Fraenk, Margret [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Goettingen (Germany); Steinmetz, Michael [German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina [Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); Schuster, Andreas [German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as a non-harming and non-invasive imaging modality with high tissue contrast and almost no side effects. Compared to other cross-sectional imaging modalities, MRI does not use ionising radiation. Recently, however, strong magnetic fields as applied in clinical MRI scanners have been suspected to induce DNA double-strand breaks in human lymphocytes. In this study we investigated the impact of 3-T cardiac MRI examinations on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in peripheral mononuclear cells by γH2AX staining and flow cytometry analysis. The study cohort consisted of 73 healthy non-smoking volunteers with 36 volunteers undergoing CMRI and 37 controls without intervention. Differences between the two cohorts were analysed by a mixed linear model with repeated measures. Both cohorts showed a significant increase in the γH2AX signal from baseline to post-procedure of 6.7 % (SD 7.18 %) and 7.8 % (SD 6.61 %), respectively. However, the difference between the two groups was not significant. Based on our study, γH2AX flow cytometry shows no evidence that 3-T MRI examinations as used in cardiac scans impair DNA integrity in peripheral mononuclear cells. (orig.)

  9. Chemosensitivity testing of primary human renal cell carcinoma by a tetrazolium based microculture assay (MTT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickisch, G; Fajta, S; Keilhauer, G; Schlick, E; Tschada, R; Alken, P

    1990-01-01

    MTT staining procedures have been used in chemosensitivity testing of established cell lines of human and other sources as well as of human leukaemias, but only limited information on its application in primary solid human tumors is presently available. We have evaluated MTT staining in primary human Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs), studied various factors interfering with the optimal use, and finally applied it in subsequent chemosensitivity testing. The method depends on the conversion of a water-soluble tetrazolium salt (MTT) to a purple colored formazan precipitate, a reaction effected by enzymes active only in living cells. Single cell suspensions of RCCs were obtained either by enzymatic dispersion or by mechanical dissagregation, filtered through gauze, and purified by Ficoll density centrifugation. Tests were carried out in 96-well microculture plates. 10(4) viable tumor cells per well at 4 h incubation time with 20 micrograms MTT/100 microliters total medium volume yielded best results. Formazan crystals were dissolved with DMSO, and the plates were immediately measured on a microculture plate reader at 540 nm. Under these criteria, linearity of the system could be demonstrated. For chemosensitivity testing, cells were continuously exposed to a number of drugs prior to the MTT staining procedure. Reproducibility of results was assessed and confirmed by culturing RCCs in flasks additionally, resubmitting them after 1, 2, and 4 weeks to the MTT assay. We conclude that the semiautomated MTT assay offers a valid, rapid, reliable and simple method to determine the degree of chemoresistance in primary human RCCs.

  10. Ultrastructural characterization of primary cilia in pathologically characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J; Rattner, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in cell cycle progression. Ultrastructurally, the primary cilium region is complex, with normal ciliogenesis progressing through five distinct morphological stages in human astrocytes. Defects in early stages of ciliogenesis are key features of astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines and provided the impetus for the current study which describes the morphology of primary cilia in molecularly characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Seven surgically resected human GBM tissue samples were molecularly characterized according to IDH1/2 mutation status, EGFR amplification status and MGMT promoter methylation status and were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We report for the first time that primary cilia are disrupted in the early stages of ciliogenesis in human GBM tumors. We confirm that immature primary cilia and basal bodies/centrioles have aberrant ciliogenesis characteristics including absent paired vesicles, misshaped/swollen vesicular hats, abnormal configuration of distal appendages, and discontinuity of centriole microtubular blades. Additionally, the transition zone plate is able to form in the absence of paired vesicles on the distal end of the basal body and when a cilium progresses beyond the early stages of ciliogenesis, it has electron dense material clumped along the transition zone and a darkening of the microtubules at the proximal end of the cilium. Primary cilia play a role in a variety of human cancers. Previously primary cilia structure was perturbed in cultured cell lines derived from astrocytomas/glioblastomas; however there was always some question as to whether these findings were a cell culture phenomena. In this study we confirm that disruptions in ciliogenesis at early stages do occur in GBM tumors and that these ultrastructural findings bear resemblance to those previously

  11. In vivo effects of myeloablative alkylator therapy on survival and differentiation of MGMTP140K-transduced human G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Cooper, Ryan J; Juliar, Beth E; Kreklau, Emi; Abonour, Rafat; Goebel, W Scott; Pollok, Karen E

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity alkylator-based chemotherapy is required to eradicate tumors expressing high levels of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). This treatment, however, can lead to life-threatening myelosuppression. We investigated a gene therapy strategy to protect human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells (MPB) from a high-intensity alkylator-based regimen. We transduced MPB with an oncoretroviral vector that coexpresses MGMT(P140K) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (n = 5 donors). At 4 weeks posttransplantation into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice, cohorts were not treated or were treated with low- or high-intensity alkylating chemotherapy. In the high-intensity-treated cohort, it was necessary to infuse NOD/SCID bone marrow (BM) to alleviate hematopoietic toxicity. At 8 weeks posttreatment, human CD45+ cells in the BM of mice treated with either regimen were EGFP+ and contained MGMT-specific DNA repair activity. In cohorts receiving low-intensity therapy, both primitive and mature hematopoietic cells were present in the BM. Although B-lymphoid and myeloid cells were resistant to in vivo drug treatment in cohorts that received high-intensity therapy, no human CD34+ cells or B-cell precursors were detected. These data suggest that improved strategies to optimize repair of DNA damage in primitive human hematopoietic cells are needed when using high-intensity anti-cancer therapy.

  12. Effects of flaxseed oil on anti-oxidative system and membrane deformation of human peripheral blood erythrocytes in high glucose level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Fu, Juan; Yu, Miao; Huang, Qingde; Wang, Di; Xu, Jiqu; Deng, Qianchun; Yao, Ping; Huang, Fenghong; Liu, Liegang

    2012-07-08

    The erythrocyte membrane lesion is a serious diabetic complication. A number of studies suggested that n-3 fatty acid could reduce lipid peroxidation and elevate α- or γ-tocopherol contents in membrane of erythrocytes. However, evidence regarding the protective effects of flaxseed oil, a natural product rich in n-3 fatty acid, on lipid peroxidation, antioxidative capacity and membrane deformation of erythrocytes exposed to high glucose is limited. Human peripheral blood erythrocytes were isolated and treated with 50 mM glucose to mimic hyperglycemia in the absence or presence of three different doses of flaxseed oil (50, 100 or 200 μM) in the culture medium for 24 h. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and L-glutathione (GSH) were measured by HPLC and LC/MS respectively. The phospholipids symmetry and membrane fatty acid composition of human erythrocytes were detected by flow cytometry and gas chromatograph (GC). The morphology of human erythrocyte was illuminated by ultra scanning electron microscopy. Flaxseed oil attenuated hyperglycemia-induced increase of MDA and decrease of GSH in human erythrocytes. Human erythrocytes treated with flaxseed oil contained higher C22:5 and C22:6 than those in the 50 mM glucose control group, indicating that flaxseed oil could reduce lipid asymmetric distribution and membrane perturbation. The ultra scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometer have also indicated that flaxseed oil could protect the membrane of human erythrocytes from deformation at high glucose level. The flaxseed oil supplementation may prevent lipid peroxidation and membrane dysfunction of human erythrocytes in hyperglycemia.

  13. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  14. Evaluation of perfluoroalkyl acid activity using primary mouse and human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Mitchell B.; Das, Kaberi P.; Wood, Carmen R.; Wolf, Cynthia J.; Abbott, Barbara D.; Lau, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    While perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been studied at length, less is known about the biological activity of other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) detected in the environment. Using a transient transfection assay developed in COS-1 cells, our group has previously evaluated a variety of PFAAs for activity associated with activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Here we use primary heptatocytes to further assess the biological activity of a similar group of PFAAs using custom designed Taqman Low Density Arrays. Primary mouse and human hepatoyctes were cultured for 48 h in the presence of varying concentrations of 12 different PFAAs or Wy14,643, a known activator of PPARα. Total RNA was collected and the expression of 48 mouse or human genes evaluated. Gene selection was based on either in-house liver microarray data (mouse) or published data using primary hepatocytes (human). Gene expression in primary mouse hepatocytes was more restricted than expected. Genes typically regulated in whole tissue by PPARα agonists were not altered in mouse cells including Acox1, Me1, Acaa1a, Hmgcs1, and Slc27a1. Cyp2b10, a gene regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor and a transcript normally up-regulated by in vivo exposure to PFAAs, was also unchanged in cultured mouse hepatocytes. Cyp4a14, Ehhadh, Pdk4, Cpt1b, and Fabp1 were regulated as expected in mouse cells. A larger group of genes were differentially expressed in human primary hepatocytes, however, little consistency was observed across compounds with respect to which genes produced a significant dose response making the determination of relative biological activity difficult. This likely reflects weaker activation of PPARα in human versus rodent cells as well as variation among individual cell donors. Unlike mouse cells, CYP2B6 was up-regulated in human hepatocytes by a number of PFAAs as was PPARδ. Rankings were conducted on the limited

  15. Measurement of in vivo HGPRT-deficient mutant cell frequency using a modified method for cloning human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, Masayuki; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kobuke, Kyoko; Awa, A.A.

    1987-07-01

    Approximately 80 % of human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes could be cloned in the presence of crude Interleukin-2, phytohemagglutinin, and X-irradiated autologous lymphocytes and Raji B-cells. This modified cloning method was used to measure the in vivo frequency of HGPRT-deficient mutant T-lymphocytes. Repeated experiments using blood from the same individuals revealed that the frequency of mutant cells was almost constant for each individual even though the cloning efficiency of lymphocytes varied somewhat from experiment to experiment. Approximately 80 % of both wild-type unselected and 6-thioguanine-resistant colonies had helper/inducer and about 20 % had suppressor/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte markers. No difference was observed in the distribution of lymphocyte subsets between wild and mutant lymphocyte colonies. (author)

  16. Vascular status in human primary and permanent teeth in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, Helen D; Boissonade, Fiona M

    2005-04-01

    The present study sought to compare the vascular status of human primary teeth with that of human permanent teeth, and to determine whether caries or painful pulpitis was associated with changes in vascularity. Coronal pulps were removed from 62 primary and 62 permanent mandibular molars with a known pain history. Teeth were categorized as intact, moderately carious or grossly carious. Pulp sections were labelled with Ulex europaeus I lectin (UEIL), which is a marker of human vascular endothelium. Image analysis was then used to quantify the percentage area of UEIL-labelled tissue (vascularity) and the number of blood vessels present within three regions: the pulp horn, the subodontoblastic region, and the mid-coronal pulp. Only the mid-coronal region of the primary tooth pulp was found to be significantly more vascular than the corresponding area of the permanent tooth pulp. Both dentitions showed a significant increase in vascularity within the pulp horn region with caries progression, but this was not accompanied by an increase in vessel number. There was no correlation between vascularity and pain symptoms. These findings suggest that the primary tooth pulp is more vascular than its successor within the mid-coronal region. However, the functional and clinical significance of this finding remains speculative.

  17. Screening for fecal carriage of MCR-producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthy humans and primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Zurfluh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of the occurrence of the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance genes mcr-1 and mcr-2 among humans is currently sparsely studied in Western Europe. Objectives To determine the occurrence of MCR-producing Enterobacteriaceae in fecal samples of healthy humans with high occupational exposure to food and primary care patients in Switzerland. Methods Stool samples from 1091 healthy individuals and fecal swabs from 53 primary care patients were screened for polymyxin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae using LB agar containing 4 mg/L colistin. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of colistin were determined for non-intrinsic colistin-resistant isolates. Isolates were screened by PCR for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes. Results The fecal carriage rate of colistin resistant (MIC value >2 mg/l Enterobacteriaceae was 1.5% for healthy people and 3.8% for primary care patients. Isolates included Hafnia alvei (n = 9, Escherichia coli (n = 3, Enterobacter cloacae (n = 4, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1 and Raoultella ornithinolytica (n = 1. None of the isolates harbored the mcr-1 or mcr-2 genes. Conclusions There is no evidence for the presence of MCR-producers in the fecal flora of healthy people or primary care patients. Therefore, the risk of transfer of mcr genes from animals, food or the environment to humans is likely to be low in Switzerland.

  18. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  19. Profile of the genes expressed in the human peripheral retina, macula, and retinal pigment epithelium determined through serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dror; Blackshaw, Seth; Cepko, Constance L.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.

    2002-01-01

    We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technique to catalogue and measure the relative levels of expression of the genes expressed in the human peripheral retina, macula, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from one or both of two humans, aged 88 and 44 years. The cone photoreceptor contribution to all transcription in the retina was found to be similar in the macula versus the retinal periphery, whereas the rod contribution was greater in the periphery versus the macula. Genes encoding structural proteins for axons were found to be expressed at higher levels in the macula versus the retinal periphery, probably reflecting the large proportion of ganglion cells in the central retina. In comparison with the younger eye, the peripheral retina of the older eye had a substantially higher proportion of mRNAs from genes encoding proteins involved in iron metabolism or protection against oxidative damage and a substantially lower proportion of mRNAs from genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction. These differences may reflect the difference in age between the two donors or merely interindividual variation. The RPE library had numerous previously unencountered tags, suggesting that this cell type has a large, idiosyncratic repertoire of expressed genes. Comparison of these libraries with 100 reported nonocular SAGE libraries revealed 89 retina-specific or enriched genes expressed at substantial levels, of which 14 are known to cause a retinal disease and 53 are RPE-specific genes. We expect that these libraries will serve as a resource for understanding the relative expression levels of genes in the retina and the RPE and for identifying additional disease genes. PMID:11756676

  20. Proteomic validation of multifunctional molecules in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumi Kim

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are one of the most attractive therapeutic resources in clinical application owing to their multipotent capability, which means that cells can differentiate into various mesenchymal tissues such as bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, muscle and marrow stroma. Depending on the cellular source, MSCs exhibit different application potentials according to their different in vivo functions, despite similar phenotypic and cytological characteristics. To understand the different molecular conditions that govern the different application or differentiation potential of each MSC according to cellular source, we generated a proteome reference map of MSCs obtained from bone marrow (BM, umbilical cord blood (CB and peripheral blood (PB. We identified approximately 30 differentially regulated (or expressed proteins. Most up-regulated proteins show a cytoskeletal and antioxidant or detoxification role according to their functional involvement. Additionally, these proteins are involved in the increase of cell viability, engraftment and migration in pathological conditions in vivo. In summary, we examined differentially expressed key regulatory factors of MSCs obtained from several cellular sources, demonstrated their differentially expressed proteome profiles and discussed their functional role in specific pathological conditions. With respect to the field of cell therapy, it may be particularly crucial to determine the most suitable cell sources according to target disease.

  1. The Induction of Chromosome Aberrations and Micronuclei in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes at Low Doses of Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Krasavin, E A; Melnikova, L A; Fadeeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    The chromosome damage induced by the low doses of gamma-irradiation with ^{60}Co and X-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied using different cytogenetic assays. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.01-1.0 Gy, simulated by PHA, and analysed for chromosome aberrations by the metaphase and the anaphase methods, by the micronucleus assay. Despite the quantitative differences in the amount of chromosome damage revealed by different methods, all of them demonstrated complex nonlinear dose dependence of the frequency of aberrant cells and aberrations. At the dose range of 0.01-0.05 Gy the cells showed the highest radiosensitivity; at 0.05-0.5 Gy the dose-independent induction of chromosome damage was revealed. At the doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy the dose-effect curves became linear with the decreased slope compared with the initial one (by a factor of 5 to 10 for different criteria) reflecting a higher radioresistance of the cells. These data confirm the idea that the direct linear extrapolation of high-dos...

  2. Incidence of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to modulated and unmodulated 2450 MHz radiofrequency fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reddy, Abhishek B; McKenzie, Raymond J; McIntosh, Robert L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Wood, Andrew W

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral blood samples from four healthy volunteers were collected and aliquots were exposed in vitro for 2 h to either (i) modulated (wideband code division multiple access, WCDMA) or unmodulated continuous wave (CW) 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) fields at an average specific absorption rate of 10.9 W/kg or (ii) sham-exposed. Aliquots of the same samples that were exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.5 Gy ionizing gamma-radiation (GR) were used as positive controls. Half of the aliquots were treated with melatonin (Mel) to investigate if such treatment offers protection to the cells from the genetic damage, if any, induced by RF and GR. The cells in all samples were cultured for 72 h and the lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of genetic damage assessed from the incidence of micronuclei (MN). The results indicated the following: (i) the incidence of MN was similar in incubator controls, and those exposed to RF/sham and Mel alone; (ii) there were no significant differences between WCDMA and CW RF exposures; (iii) positive control cells exposed to GR alone exhibited significantly increased MN; and (iv) Mel treatment had no effect on cells exposed to RF and sham, while such treatment significantly reduced the frequency of MN in GR-exposed cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human eosinophils modulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell response to Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweyongyere, R; Namanya, H; Naniima, P; Cose, S; Tukahebwa, E M; Elliott, A M; Dunne, D W; Wilson, S

    2016-08-01

    High numbers of eosinophils are observed in parasitic infections and allergic diseases, where they are proposed to be terminally differentiated effector cells that play beneficial role in host defence, or cause harmful inflammatory response. Eosinophils have been associated with killing of schistosomulae in vitro, but there is growing evidence that eosinophils can play additional immuno-regulatory role. Here, we report results of a study that examines peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine responses to Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen (SWA) when stimulated alone or enriched with autologous eosinophils. Production of the Th-2 type cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 was lower (P = 0·017, 0·018 and eosinophil cultures than in PBMC-only cultures stimulated with SWA. Substantial levels of IL-13, IL-10, interferon gamma and tumour necrosis factor alpha were recorded in cultures of eosinophils, but none of these cytokines showed significant association with the observed eosinophil-induced drop in cytokine responses of PBMC. Transwell experiments suggested that the observed effect is due to soluble mediators that downmodulate production of Th-2 type cytokines. This study shows that eosinophils may down-modulate schistosome-specific Th-2 type cytokine responses in S. mansoni-infected individuals. The mechanism of this immune modulation remains to be elucidated. © 2016 The Authors. Parasite Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Optimal Thawing of Cryopreserved Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells for Use in High-Throughput Human Immune Monitoring Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu A. Subbramanian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC constitute an important component of immune monitoring studies as they allow for efficient batch- testing of samples as well as for the validation and extension of original studies in the future. In this study, we systematically test the permutations of PBMC thawing practices commonly employed in the field and identify conditions that are high and low risk for the viability of PBMC and their functionality in downstream ELISPOT assays. The study identifies the addition of ice-chilled washing media to thawed cells at the same temperature as being a high risk practice, as it yields significantly lower viability and functionality of recovered PBMC when compared to warming the cryovials to 37 °C and adding a warm washing medium. We found thawed PBMC in cryovials could be kept up to 30 minutes at 37 °C in the presence of DMSO before commencement of washing, which surprisingly identifies exposure to DMSO as a low risk step during the thawing process. This latter finding is of considerable practical relevance since it permits batch-thawing of PBMC in high-throughput immune monitoring environments.

  5. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  6. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human α 1 -antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the α 1 antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes

  7. Telomerase-mediated life-span extension of human primary fibroblasts by human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitara, Shingo; Kakeda, Minoru; Nagata, Keiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Sano, Akiko; Osawa, Kanako; Okazaki, Akiyo; Katoh, Motonobu; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Tomizuka, Kazuma

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase-mediated life-span extension enables the expansion of normal cells without malignant transformation, and thus has been thought to be useful in cell therapies. Currently, integrating vectors including the retrovirus are used for human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-mediated expansion of normal cells; however, the use of these vectors potentially causes unexpected insertional mutagenesis and/or activation of oncogenes. Here, we established normal human fibroblast (hPF) clones retaining non-integrating human artificial chromosome (HAC) vectors harboring the hTERT expression cassette. In hTERT-HAC/hPF clones, we observed the telomerase activity and the suppression of senescent-associated SA-β-galactosidase activity. Furthermore, the hTERT-HAC/hPF clones continued growing beyond 120 days after cloning, whereas the hPF clones retaining the silent hTERT-HAC senesced within 70 days. Thus, hTERT-HAC-mediated episomal expression of hTERT allows the extension of the life-span of human primary cells, implying that gene delivery by non-integrating HAC vectors can be used to control cellular proliferative capacity of primary cultured cells

  8. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been...... conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed...... to allow investigators to readily obtain sufficient quantities of human mast cells to conduct these studies. These mast cells release the appropriate suite of inflammatory mediators in response to known mast cell activators including antigen. These systems have also been employed to examine the signaling...

  9. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solaleh Emamgholipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1 control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h; (2 melatonin (1 mM for 12 h; (3 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h; (4 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM. The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression.

  10. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exhibit Heterogeneous CD52 Expression Levels and Show Differential Sensitivity to Alemtuzumab Mediated Cytolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sambasiva P.; Sancho, Jose; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Boutin, Paula M.; Severy, Peter B.; Weeden, Timothy; Shankara, Srinivas; Roberts, Bruce L.; Kaplan, Johanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo. Although the cytolytic effects of alemtuzumab are dependent on the density of CD52 antigen on cells, there is scant information regarding the expression levels of CD52 on different cell types. In this study, CD52 expression was assessed on phenotypically distinct subsets of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from normal donors. Results demonstrate that subsets of PBMCs express differing levels of CD52. Quantitative analysis showed that memory B cells and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) display the highest number while natural killer (NK) cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and basophils have the lowest number of CD52 molecules per cell amongst lymphoid and myeloid cell populations respectively. Results of complement dependent cytolysis (CDC) studies indicated that alemtuzumab mediated profound cytolytic effects on B and T cells with minimal effect on NK cells, basophils and pDCs, correlating with the density of CD52 on these cells. Interestingly, despite high CD52 levels, mDCs and monocytes were less susceptible to alemtuzumab-mediated CDC indicating that antigen density alone does not define susceptibility. Additional studies indicated that higher expression levels of complement inhibitory proteins (CIPs) on these cells partially contributes to their resistance to alemtuzumab mediated CDC. These results indicate that alemtuzumab is most effective in depleting cells of the adaptive immune system while leaving innate immune cells relatively intact. PMID:22761788

  11. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibit heterogeneous CD52 expression levels and show differential sensitivity to alemtuzumab mediated cytolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasiva P Rao

    Full Text Available Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo. Although the cytolytic effects of alemtuzumab are dependent on the density of CD52 antigen on cells, there is scant information regarding the expression levels of CD52 on different cell types. In this study, CD52 expression was assessed on phenotypically distinct subsets of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from normal donors. Results demonstrate that subsets of PBMCs express differing levels of CD52. Quantitative analysis showed that memory B cells and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs display the highest number while natural killer (NK cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs and basophils have the lowest number of CD52 molecules per cell amongst lymphoid and myeloid cell populations respectively. Results of complement dependent cytolysis (CDC studies indicated that alemtuzumab mediated profound cytolytic effects on B and T cells with minimal effect on NK cells, basophils and pDCs, correlating with the density of CD52 on these cells. Interestingly, despite high CD52 levels, mDCs and monocytes were less susceptible to alemtuzumab-mediated CDC indicating that antigen density alone does not define susceptibility. Additional studies indicated that higher expression levels of complement inhibitory proteins (CIPs on these cells partially contributes to their resistance to alemtuzumab mediated CDC. These results indicate that alemtuzumab is most effective in depleting cells of the adaptive immune system while leaving innate immune cells relatively intact.

  12. Analyses of the peripheral immunome following multiple administrations of avelumab, a human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Renee N; Lepone, Lauren M; Grenga, Italia; Jochems, Caroline; Fantini, Massimo; Madan, Ravi A; Heery, Christopher R; Gulley, James L; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Multiple anti-PD-L1/PD-1 checkpoint monoclonal antibodies (MAb) have shown clear evidence of clinical benefit. All except one have been designed or engineered to omit the possibility to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) as a second potential mode of anti-tumor activity; the reason for this is the concern of lysis of PD-L1 positive immune cells. Avelumab is a fully human IgG1 MAb which has been shown in prior in vitro studies to mediate ADCC versus a range of human tumor cells, and clinical studies have demonstrated anti-tumor activity versus a range of human cancers. This study was designed to investigate the effect on immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood of cancer patients prior to and following multiple administrations of avelumab. One hundred twenty-three distinct immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood of cancer patients ( n  = 28) in a phase I trial were analyzed by flow cytometry prior to and following one, three, and nine cycles of avelumab. Changes in soluble (s) CD27 and sCD40L in plasma were also evaluated. In vitro studies were also performed to determine if avelumab would mediate ADCC of PBMC. No statistically significant changes in any of the 123 immune cell subsets analyzed were observed at any dose level, or number of doses, of avelumab. Increases in the ratio of sCD27:sCD40L were observed, suggesting potential immune activation. Controlled in vitro studies also showed lysis of tumor cells by avelumab versus no lysis of PBMC from five donors. These studies demonstrate the lack of any significant effect on multiple immune cell subsets, even those expressing PD-L1, following multiple cycles of avelumab. These results complement prior studies showing anti-tumor effects of avelumab and comparable levels of adverse events with avelumab versus other anti-PD-1/PD-L1 MAbs. These studies provide the rationale to further exploit the potential ADCC mechanism of action of avelumab as well as other human IgG1 checkpoint

  13. Isolation of primary human hepatocytes from normal and diseased liver tissue: a one hundred liver experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky H Bhogal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful and consistent isolation of primary human hepatocytes remains a challenge for both cell-based therapeutics/transplantation and laboratory research. Several centres around the world have extensive experience in the isolation of human hepatocytes from non-diseased livers obtained from donor liver surplus to surgical requirement or at hepatic resection for tumours. These livers are an important but limited source of cells for therapy or research. The capacity to isolate cells from diseased liver tissue removed at transplantation would substantially increase availability of cells for research. However no studies comparing the outcome of human hepatocytes isolation from diseased and non-diseased livers presently exist. Here we report our experience isolating human hepatocytes from organ donors, non-diseased resected liver and cirrhotic tissue. We report the cell yields and functional qualities of cells isolated from the different types of liver and demonstrate that a single rigorous protocol allows the routine harvest of good quality primary hepatocytes from the most commonly accessible human liver tissue samples.

  14. Momordica charantia (bitter melon inhibits primary human adipocyte differentiation by modulating adipogenic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerurkar Vivek R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escalating trends of obesity and associated type 2 diabetes (T2D has prompted an increase in the use of alternative and complementary functional foods. Momordica charantia or bitter melon (BM that is traditionally used to treat diabetes and complications has been demonstrated to alleviate hyperglycemia as well as reduce adiposity in rodents. However, its effects on human adipocytes remain unknown. The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of BM juice (BMJ on lipid accumulation and adipocyte differentiation transcription factors in primary human differentiating preadipocytes and adipocytes. Methods Commercially available cryopreserved primary human preadipocytes were treated with and without BMJ during and after differentiation. Cytotoxicity, lipid accumulation, and adipogenic genes mRNA expression was measured by commercial enzymatic assay kits and semi-quantitative RT-PCR (RT-PCR. Results Preadipocytes treated with varying concentrations of BMJ during differentiation demonstrated significant reduction in lipid content with a concomitant reduction in mRNA expression of adipocyte transcription factors such as, peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor γ (PPARγ and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c and adipocytokine, resistin. Similarly, adipocytes treated with BMJ for 48 h demonstrated reduced lipid content, perilipin mRNA expression, and increased lipolysis as measured by the release of glycerol. Conclusion Our data suggests that BMJ is a potent inhibitor of lipogenesis and stimulator of lipolysis activity in human adipocytes. BMJ may therefore prove to be an effective complementary or alternative therapy to reduce adipogenesis in humans.

  15. A Primary Human Critical Success Factors Model for the ERP System Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenko Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Many researchers have investigated various Critical success factors (CSFs and the different causes of ERP implementation project failures. Despite a detailed literature preview, we were unable to find an appropriate research with a comprehensive overview of the true causes behind CSFs, observed from a human factors perspective. The objective of this research was therefore to develop and evaluate the Primary human factors (PHFs model and to confirm the significant impact of PHFs on traditional CSFs and on the project success.

  16. Interferon-alpha mediates restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 replication in primary human macrophages at an early stage of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Cheney

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNα and β are induced directly in response to viral infection, resulting in an antiviral state for the cell. In vitro studies have shown that IFNα is a potent inhibitor of viral replication; however, its role in HIV-1 infection is incompletely understood. In this study we describe the ability of IFNα to restrict HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages in contrast to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition to HIV-1 replication in cells pretreated with IFNα occurred at an early stage in the virus life cycle. Late viral events such as budding and subsequent rounds of infection were not affected by IFNα treatment. Analysis of early and late HIV-1 reverse transcripts and integrated proviral DNA confirmed an early post entry role for IFNα. First strand cDNA synthesis was slightly reduced but late and integrated products were severely depleted, suggesting that initiation or the nucleic acid intermediates of reverse transcription are targeted. The depletion of integrated provirus is disproportionally greater than that of viral cDNA synthesis suggesting the possibility of a least an additional later target. A role for either cellular protein APOBEC3G or tetherin in this IFNα mediated restriction has been excluded. Vpu, previously shown by others to rescue a viral budding restriction by tetherin, could not overcome this IFNα induced effect. Determining both the viral determinants and cellular proteins involved may lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Our results add to the understanding of HIV-1 restriction by IFNα.

  17. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C.; Grzeschik, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Bartek, J; Rahbar, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express...... human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, and previously we found that the level of expression of HCMV immediate-early (IE) protein in GBMs is a prognostic factor for poor patient survival. In this study, we investigated the relation between HCMV infection of GBM cells and the presence of GCSCs. Primary...... GBMs were characterized by their expression of HCMV-IE and GCSCs marker CD133 and by patient survival. The extent to which HCMV infection of primary GBM cells induced a GCSC phenotype was evaluated in vitro. In primary GBMs, a large fraction of CD133-positive cells expressed HCMV-IE, and higher co...

  19. Increased ICAM-1 Expression in Transformed Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Molecular Mechanism and Functional Role in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Adhesion and Lymphokine-Activated-Killer Cell Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.; Zhang, Xinli; Park, No-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) serves as a counter-receptor for the β2-integrins, LFA-1 and Mac-1, which are expressed on leukocytes. Although expression of ICAM-1 on tumor cells has a role in tumor progression and development, information on ICAM-1 expression and its role in oral cancer has not been established. Normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK), human papilloma virus (HPV)-immortalized human oral keratinocyte lines (HOK-16B, HOK-18A, and HOK-18C), and six human oral neoplastic cell lines (HOK-16B-BaP-T1, SCC-4, SCC-9, HEp-2, Tu-177 and 1483) were used to study ICAM-1 expression and its functional role in vitro. Our results demonstrated that NHOK express negligible levels of ICAM-1, whereas immortalized human oral keratinocytes and cancer cells express significantly higher levels of ICAM-1, except for HOK-16B-BaP-T1 and HEp-2. Altered mRNA half-lives did not fully account for the increased accumulation of ICAM-1 mRNA. Adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to epithelial cells correlated with cell surface ICAM-1 expression levels. This adhesion was inhibited by antibodies specific for either ICAM-1 or LFA-1/Mac-1, suggesting a role for these molecules in adhesion. In contrast, lymphokine-activated-killer (LAK) cell cytotoxic killing of epithelial cells did not correlate with ICAM-1 levels or with adhesion. Nonetheless, within each cell line, blocking of ICAM-1 or LFA-1/Mac-1 reduced LAK cells killing, suggesting that ICAM-1 is involved in mediating this killing. PMID:10938387

  20. The human papillomavirus vaccine: A powerful tool for the primary prevention of cervical cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nubia Muñoz; Julio César Reina; Gloria Inés Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is the most promissory public health tool for primary prevention of cervical cancer. Immunization of females before the acquisition of HPV infection has the greatest impact in preventing pre-neoplasic lesions and cervical cancer. Current HPV vaccines do not eliminate cervical cancer risk, therefore, screening should continue covering vaccinated as well as women that do not get the vaccine. The strategies that include combination of high-coverage...

  1. Dissection of the transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells by the oncogene NUP98-HOXA9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R Yassin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUP98-HOXA9 is the prototype of a group of oncoproteins associated with acute myeloid leukemia. It consists of an N-terminal portion of NUP98 fused to the homeodomain of HOXA9 and is believed to act as an aberrant transcription factor that binds DNA through the homeodomain. Here we show that NUP98-HOXA9 can regulate transcription without binding to DNA. In order to determine the relative contributions of the NUP98 and HOXA9 portions to the transforming ability of NUP98-HOXA9, the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on primary human CD34+ cells were dissected and compared to those of wild-type HOXA9. In contrast to previous findings in mouse cells, HOXA9 had only mild effects on the differentiation and proliferation of primary human hematopoietic cells. The ability of NUP98-HOXA9 to disrupt the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells was found to depend primarily on the NUP98 portion, whereas induction of long-term proliferation required both the NUP98 moiety and an intact homeodomain. Using oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human CD34+ cells, a group of genes was identified whose dysregulation by NUP98-HOXA9 is attributable primarily to the NUP98 portion. These include RAP1A, HEY1, and PTGS2 (COX-2. Their functions may reflect the contribution of the NUP98 moiety of NUP98-HOXA9 to leukemic transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on gene transcription and cell transformation are mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms: one that involves promoter binding through the homeodomain with direct transcriptional activation, and another that depends predominantly on the NUP98 moiety and does not involve direct DNA binding.

  2. WNK1/HSN2 mutation in human peripheral neuropathy deregulates KCC2 expression and posterior lateral line development in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bercier

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon "HSN2" of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1 serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT-PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve

  3. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure does not modulate Toll-like receptor signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, de S.; Bouwens, M.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Cuppen, J.J.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Hermans, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on human health remain unclear. It has been reported that ELF-EMF may modulate the innate immune response to microorganisms in animal models and mammalian cell-lines. With the recently gained insight in innate immune signaling

  4. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Emily K; Keane, Kevin N; Raizel, Raquel; Rowlands, Jordan; Soares, Mario J; Newsholme, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Vitamin D status [25(OH)D] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OH)D and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test) was performed using the Seahorse XF e 96 flux analyser. 25(OH)D was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. 25(OH)D increased by a median (IQR) of 14.40 (20.13)nmol/L (pwinter to summer and was accompanied by significant improvements in indices of insulin sensitivity, McAuley's index (p=0.019) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (p=0.028). PBMC mitochondrial parameters basal respiration, non-mitochondrial respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and maximal respiration decreased in summer compared to winter. Similarly, PBMC glycolytic parameters glycolytic activity, glucose response, and glycolytic capacity were all reduced in summer compared to winter. There was also a trend for absolute resting metabolic rate (RMR) to decrease (p=0.066). Markers of systemic inflammation MCP-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12p70 decreased significantly in summer compared to winter. Participants who entered winter with a low 25(OH)D (winter 25(OH)D concentrations of 50-75nmol/L or >75nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OH)D was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Seasonal improvements in 25(OH)D was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OH)D in winter. The data warrants

  5. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles (μg/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 ± 1.38), Ni (150.8 ± 0.78), Cu (99.3 ± 0.56) and Cr (64.0 ± 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-à-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O 2 • − ) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11–25 nm. ► Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. ► CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. ► Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal breakage in PBMN cells. ► CFA-NPs resulted in mitochondrial membrane damage in PBMN cells.

  6. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Science, University of Dammam, P.O. Box 1683, Hafr Al Batin-31991 (Saudi Arabia); Musarrat, Javed, E-mail: musarratj1@yahoo.com [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, AMU, Aligarh202002 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles ({mu}g/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 {+-} 1.38), Ni (150.8 {+-} 0.78), Cu (99.3 {+-} 0.56) and Cr (64.0 {+-} 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-a-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O{sub 2} Bullet {sup -}) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11-25 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal

  7. Characterization of cryopreserved primary human corneal endothelial cells cultured in human serum-supplemented media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Monferrari Monteiro Vianna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare cryopreserved human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs grown in human serum-supplemented media (HS-SM with cryopreserved HCECs grown in fetal bovine serum-supplemented media (FBS-SM. Methods: Three pairs of human corneas from donors aged 8, 28, and 31 years were obtained from the eye bank. From each pair, one cornea was used to start a HCEC culture using HS-SM; the other cornea was grown in FBS-SM. On reaching confluence, the six cell populations were frozen using 10% dimethyl sulfoxidecontaining medium. Thawed cells grown in HS-SM were compared with those grown in FBS-SM with respect to morphology, growth curves, immunohistochemistry, real time-reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for endothelial cell markers, and detachment time. Results: No difference in morphology was observed for cells grown in the two media before or after cryopreservation. By growth curves, cell counts after thawing were similar in both media, with a slight trend toward higher cell counts in FBS-SM. Cells grown in both the media demonstrated a similar expression of endothelial cell markers when assessed by immunohistochemistry, although HCEC marker gene expression was higher in cells grown in HS-SM than in those grown in FBS-SM as assessed by RT-PCR. With FBS-SM, there was a tendency of longer detachment time and lower cell passages. Conclusions: HS-SM was similar to FBS-SM for cryopreservation of cultured HCECs as assessed by analysis of cell morphology, proliferation, and protein expression, although marker gene expression was higher in cells grown in HS-SM than in those grown in FBS-SM. Detachment time was longer with FBS-SM and in lower passages.

  8. Transforming growth factor beta-1 and interleukin-17 gene transcription in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the human response to infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Mary

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The occurrence of severe sepsis may be associated with deficient pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta-1) predominantly inhibits inflammation and may simultaneously promote IL-17 production. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a recently described pro-inflammatory cytokine, which may be important in auto-immunity and infection. We investigated the hypothesis that the onset of sepsis is related to differential TGFbeta-1 and IL-17 gene expression. METHODS: A prospective observational study in a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital wards in a university hospital. Patients (59) with severe sepsis; 15 patients with gram-negative bacteraemia but without critical illness and 10 healthy controls were assayed for TGFbeta-1, IL-17a, IL-17f, IL-6 and IL-1beta mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by quantitative real-time PCR and serum protein levels by ELISA. RESULTS: TGFbeta-1 mRNA levels are reduced in patients with bacteraemia and sepsis compared with controls (p=0.02). IL-6 mRNA levels were reduced in bacteraemic patients compared with septic patients and controls (p=0.008). IL-1beta mRNA levels were similar in all groups, IL-17a and IL-17f mRNA levels are not detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. IL-6 protein levels were greater in patients with sepsis than bacteraemic and control patients (p<0.0001). Activated TGFbeta-1 and IL-17 protein levels were similar in all groups. IL-1beta protein was not detectable in the majority of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Down regulation of TGFbeta-1 gene transcription was related to the occurrence of infection but not the onset of sepsis. Interleukin-17 production in PBMC may not be significant in the human host response to infection.

  9. Immunocytochemical investigation of immune cells within human primary and permanent tooth pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, H D; Boissonade, F M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any differences in the number and distribution of immune cells within human primary and permanent tooth pulp, both in health and disease. The research took the form of a quantitative immunocytochemical study. One hundred and twenty-four mandibular first permanent molars and second primary molars were obtained from children requiring dental extractions under general anaesthesia. Following exodontia, 10-microm-thick frozen pulp sections were processed for indirect immunofluorescence. Triple-labelling regimes were employed using combinations of the following: (1) protein gene product 9.5, a general neuronal marker; (2) leucocyte common antigen (LCA); and (3) Ulex europaeus I lectin, a marker of vascular endothelium. Image analysis was then used to determine the percentage area of immunostaining for LCA. Leucocytes were significantly more abundant in the pulp horn and mid-coronal region of intact and carious primary teeth, as compared to permanent teeth (P < 0.05, anova). Both dentitions demonstrated the presence of well-localized inflammatory cell infiltrates and marked aborization of pulpal nerves in areas of dense leucocyte accumulation. Primary and permanent tooth pulps appear to have a similar potential to mount inflammatory responses to gross caries The management of the compromised primary tooth pulp needs to be reappraised in the light of these findings.

  10. Impact of radiofrequency radiation on DNA damage and antioxidants in peripheral blood lymphocytes of humans residing in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zothansiama; Zosangzuali, Mary; Lalramdinpuii, Miriam; Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency radiations (RFRs) emitted by mobile phone base stations have raised concerns on its adverse impact on humans residing in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations. Therefore, the present study was envisaged to evaluate the effect of RFR on the DNA damage and antioxidant status in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) of individuals residing in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations and comparing it with healthy controls. The study groups matched for various demographic data including age, gender, dietary pattern, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, duration of mobile phone use and average daily mobile phone use. The RF power density of the exposed individuals was significantly higher (p base stations, showed significantly (p base station/s. The analysis of various antioxidants in the plasma of exposed individuals revealed a significant attrition in glutathione (GSH) concentration (p < 0.01), activities of catalase (CAT) (p < 0.001) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p < 0.001) and rise in lipid peroxidation (LOO) when compared to controls. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed a significant association among reduced GSH concentration (p < 0.05), CAT (p < 0.001) and SOD (p < 0.001) activities and elevated MN frequency (p < 0.001) and LOO (p < 0.001) with increasing RF power density.

  11. The discrepancy between human peripheral nerve chronaxie times as measured using magnetic and electric field stimuli: the relevance to MRI gradient coil safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recoskie, Bryan J; Chronik, Blaine A; Scholl, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) resulting from electric fields induced from the rapidly changing magnetic fields of gradient coils is a concern in MRI. Nerves exposed to either electric fields or changing magnetic fields would be expected to display consistent threshold characteristics, motivating the direct application of electric field exposure criteria from the literature to guide the development of gradient magnetic field exposure criteria for MRI. The consistency of electric and magnetic field exposures was tested by comparing chronaxie times for electric and magnetic PNS curves for 22 healthy human subjects. Electric and magnetic stimulation thresholds were measured for exposure of the forearm using both surface electrodes and a figure-eight magnetic coil, respectively. The average chronaxie times for the electric and magnetic field conditions were 109 ± 11 μs and 651 ± 53 μs (±SE), respectively. We do not propose that these results call into question the basic mechanism, namely that rapidly switched gradient magnetic fields induce electric fields in human tissues, resulting in PNS. However, this result does motivate us to suggest that special care must be taken when using electric field exposure data from the literature to set gradient coil PNS safety standards in MRI.

  12. Naturally induced secretions of the potato cyst nematode co-stimulate the proliferation of both tobacco leaf protoplasts and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, A; Rouppe van der Voort, J; Roppe van der Voort, C; Kavelaars, A; Smant, G; Schots, A; Bakker, J; Helder, J

    1999-10-01

    Naturally induced secretions from infective juveniles of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis co-stimulate the proliferation of tobacco leaf protoplasts in the presence of the synthetic phytohormones alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). With the use of a protoplast-based bioassay, a low-molecular-weight peptide(s) (cyst nematode secretions also co-stimulated mitogenesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The stimulation of plant cells isolated from nontarget tissue--these nematodes normally invade the roots of potato plants--suggests the activation of a general signal transduction mechanism(s) by an oligopeptide(s) secreted by the nematode. Whether a similar oligopeptide-induced mechanism underlies human PBMC activation remains to be investigated. Reactivation of the cell cycle is a crucial event in feeding cell formation by cyst nematodes. The secretion of a mitogenic low-molecular-weight peptide(s) by infective juveniles of the potato cyst nematode could contribute to the redifferentiation of plant cells into such a feeding cell.

  13. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cell in vitro system to test the efficacy of food bioactive compounds: Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with BMI

    KAUST Repository

    Cifre, Margalida

    2016-11-22

    Scope: To analyse the usefulness of isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to rapidly/easily reflect n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) effects on lipid metabolism/inflammation gene profile, and evaluate if these effects are body mass index (BMI) dependent. Methods and results: PBMC from normoweight (NW) and overweight/obese (OW/OB) subjects were incubated with physiological doses of docosahexaenoic (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or their combination. PBMC reflected increased beta-oxidation-like capacity (CPT1A expression) in OW/OB but only after DHA treatment. However, insensitivity to n-3 LCPUFA was evident in OW/OB for lipogenic genes: both PUFA diminished FASN and SREBP1C expression in NW, but no effect was observed for DHA in PBMC from high-BMI subjects. This insensitivity was also evident for inflammation gene profile: all treatments inhibited key inflammatory genes in NW; nevertheless, no effect was observed in OW/OB after DHA treatment, and EPA effect was impaired. SLC27A2, IL6 and TNFα PBMC expression analysis resulted especially interesting to determine obesity-related n-3 LCPUFA insensitivity. Conclusion: A PBMC-based human in vitro system reflects n-3 LCPUFA effects on lipid metabolism/inflammation which is impaired in OW/OB. These results confirm the utility of PBMC ex vivo systems for bioactive-compound screening to promote functional food development and to establish appropriate dietary strategies for obese population.

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Lassa Virus and to the Attenuated Mopeia/Lassa Reassortant 29 (ML29), a Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Carlos; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Crasta, Oswald; Zhang, Yan; Mani, Sachin; Jett, Marti; Poonia, Bhawna; Djavani, Mahmoud; White, David M.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease. PMID:24069471

  15. Transcriptome analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lassa virus and to the attenuated Mopeia/Lassa reassortant 29 (ML29, a vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Zapata

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG, as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease.

  16. Activation of human B lymphocytes. 8. Differential radiosensitivity of subpopulations of lymphoid cells involved in the polyclonally-induced PFC responses of peripheral blood B lymphocytes

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    Fauci, A S; Pratt, K R; Whalen, G [National Inst. of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1978-11-01

    The differential effect of various doses of irradiation on subpopulations of human peripheral blood lymphoid cells involved in the pokeweed mitogen induced PFC response against sheep red blood cells was studied. The plaque forming B cells were quite sensitive to low doses of irradiation with complete suppression of responses at 300 to 500 rad. On the contrary, helper T-cell function was resistant to 2000 rad. Co-culture of irradiated T cells with autologous or allogeneic B cells resulted in marked enhancement of PFC responses consistent with the suppression of naturally occurring suppressor cells with a resulting pure helper effect. Irradiated T-cell-depleted suspensions failed to produce this effect as did heat killed T cells, whereas mitomycin C treated T cells gave effects similar to irradiated T cells. These findings are consistent with a lack of requirement of cell division for a T-cell helper effect and a requirement of mitosis or another irradiation sensitive, mitomycin C sensitive process for a T-suppressor cell effect. These studies have potential relevance in the evaluation of subpopulations of human lymphoid cells involved in antibody production in normal individuals and in disease states.

  17. Protective effect of dry olive leaf extract in adrenaline induced DNA damage evaluated using in vitro comet assay with human peripheral leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarkapa, Andrea; Zivković, Lada; Zukovec, Dijana; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2014-04-01

    Excessive release of stress hormone adrenaline is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species which may cause disruption of DNA integrity leading to cancer and age-related disorders. Phenolic-rich plant product dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) is known to modulate effects of various oxidants in human cells. The aim was to evaluate the effect of commercial DOLE against adrenaline induced DNA damage in human leukocytes by using comet assay. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 6 healthy subjects were treated in vitro with three final concentrations of DOLE (0.125, 0.5, and 1mg/mL) for 30 min at 37°C under two different protocols, pretreatment and post-treatment. Protective effect of DOLE was assessed from its ability to attenuate formation of DNA lesions induced by adrenaline. Compared to cells exposed only to adrenaline, DOLE displayed significant reduction (Padrenaline genotoxicity. Results indicate genoprotective and antioxidant properties in dry olive leaf extract, strongly supporting further explorations of its underlying mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytoskeletal proteins from human skin fibroblasts, peripheral blood leukocytes, and a lymphoblastoid cell line compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giometti, C.S.; Willard, K.E.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    Differences in proteins between cells grown as suspension cultures and those grown as attached cultures were studied by comparing the proteins of detergent-resistant cytoskeletons prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes and a lymphoblastoid cell line (GM607) (both grown as suspension cultures) and those of human skin fibroblasts (grown as attached cultures) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The major cytoskeletal proteins of the leukocytes were also present in the protein pattern of GM607 cytoskeletons. In contrast, the fibroblast cytoskeletal protein pattern contained four groups of proteins that differed from the patterns of the leukocytes and GM607. In addition, surface labeling of GM607 and human fibroblasts with 125 I demonstrated that substantial amounts of vimentin and actin are exposed at the surface of the attached fibroblasts, but there is little evidence of similar exposure at the surface of the suspension-grown GM607. These results demonstrate some differences in cytoskeletal protein composition between different types of cells could be related to their ability or lack of ability to grow as attached cells in tissue culture

  19. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1 an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA; the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2 a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3 an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT. Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias.

  20. Managers' perspectives on recruitment and human resource development practices in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Kinnunen, Juha

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe primary health care managers' attitudes and views on recruitment and human resource development in general and to ascertain whether there are any differences in the views of managers in the southern and northern regions of Finland. A postal questionnaire was sent to 315 primary health care managers, of whom 55% responded. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and cross-tabulation according to the location of the health centre. There were few differences in managers' attitudes and views on recruitment and human resource development. In the southern region, managers estimated that their organization would be less attractive to employees in the future and they were more positive about recruiting employees abroad. Furthermore, managers in the northern region were more positive regarding human resource development and its various practices. Although the results are preliminary in nature, it seems that managers in different regions have adopted different strategies in order to cope with the shrinking pool of new recruits. In the southern region, managers were looking abroad to find new employees, while in the northern region, managers put effort into retaining the employees in the organization with different human resource development practices.

  1. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svantje Tauber

    Full Text Available The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes the functions of immune cells. The CELLBOX-PRIME (= CellBox-Primary Human Macrophages in Microgravity Environment experiment investigated for the first time microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, one of the most important effector cells of the immune system. The experiment was conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on board of the International Space Station ISS using the NanoRacks laboratory and Biorack type I standard CELLBOX EUE type IV containers. Upload and download were performed with the SpaceX CRS-3 and the Dragon spaceship on April 18th, 2014 / May 18th, 2014. Surprisingly, primary human macrophages exhibited neither quantitative nor structural changes of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton after 11 days in microgravity when compared to 1g controls. Neither CD18 or CD14 surface expression were altered in microgravity, however ICAM-1 expression was reduced. The analysis of 74 metabolites in the cell culture supernatant by GC-TOF-MS, revealed eight metabolites with significantly different quantities when compared to 1g controls. In particular, the significant increase of free fucose in the cell culture supernatant was associated with a significant decrease of cell surface-bound fucose. The reduced ICAM-1 expression and the loss of cell surface-bound fucose may contribute to functional impairments, e.g. the activation of T cells, migration and activation of the innate immune response. We assume that the surprisingly small

  2. Chemosensitivity of primary human fibroblasts with defective unhooking of DNA interstrand cross-links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clingen, Peter H.; Arlett, Colin F.; Hartley, John A.; Parris, Christopher N.

    2007-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterised by defects in nucleotide excision repair, ultraviolet (UV) radiation sensitivity and increased skin carcinoma. Compared to other complementation groups, XP-F patients show relatively mild cutaneous symptoms. DNA interstrand cross-linking agents are a highly cytotoxic class of DNA damage induced by common cancer chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin and nitrogen mustards. Although the XPF-ERCC1 structure-specific endonuclease is required for the repair of ICLs cellular sensitivity of primary human XP-F cells has not been established. In clonogenic survival assays, primary fibroblasts from XP-F patients were moderately sensitive to both UVC and HN2 compared to normal cells (2- to 3-fold and 3- to 5-fold, respectively). XP-A fibroblasts were considerably more sensitive to UVC (10- to 12-fold) but not sensitive to HN2. The sensitivity of XP-F fibroblasts to HN2 correlated with the defective incision or 'unhooking' step of ICL repair. Using the comet assay, XP-F cells exhibited only 20% residual unhooking activity over 24 h. Over the same time, normal and XP-A cells unhooked greater than 95% and 62% of ICLs, respectively. After HN2 treatment, ICL-associated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are detected by pulse field gel electrophoresis in dividing cells. Induction and repair of DNA DSBs was normal in XP-F fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate that in primary human fibroblasts, XPF is required for the unhooking of ICLs and not for the induction or repair of ICL-associated DNA DSBs induced by HN2. In terms of cancer chemotherapy, people with mild DNA repair defects affecting ICL repair may be more prevalent in the general population than expected. Since cellular sensitivity of primary human fibroblasts usually reflects clinical sensitivity such patients with cancer would be at risk of increased toxicity

  3. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Jiang, Di; Minor, Maisha; Chu, Hong Wei

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV) infection. We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6) production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1) in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  4. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV infection.We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6 production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1 in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  5. Frequency-specific attentional modulation in human primary auditory cortex and midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, Lars; Peters, Judith C; Valente, Giancarlo; Poser, Benedikt A; Kemper, Valentin G; Formisano, Elia; Sorger, Bettina

    2018-07-01

    Paying selective attention to an audio frequency selectively enhances activity within primary auditory cortex (PAC) at the tonotopic site (frequency channel) representing that frequency. Animal PAC neurons achieve this 'frequency-specific attentional spotlight' by adapting their frequency tuning, yet comparable evidence in humans is scarce. Moreover, whether the spotlight operates in human midbrain is unknown. To address these issues, we studied the spectral tuning of frequency channels in human PAC and inferior colliculus (IC), using 7-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) and frequency mapping, while participants focused on different frequency-specific sounds. We found that shifts in frequency-specific attention alter the response gain, but not tuning profile, of PAC frequency channels. The gain modulation was strongest in low-frequency channels and varied near-monotonically across the tonotopic axis, giving rise to the attentional spotlight. We observed less prominent, non-tonotopic spatial patterns of attentional modulation in IC. These results indicate that the frequency-specific attentional spotlight in human PAC as measured with FMRI arises primarily from tonotopic gain modulation, rather than adapted frequency tuning. Moreover, frequency-specific attentional modulation of afferent sound processing in human IC seems to be considerably weaker, suggesting that the spotlight diminishes toward this lower-order processing stage. Our study sheds light on how the human auditory pathway adapts to the different demands of selective hearing. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Current Human Coronavirus Strains in Primary Human Epithelial Cell Cultures Reveal Differences in Target Cell Tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Deijs, Martin; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R.; Molenkamp, Richard; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Thiel, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The human airway epithelium (HAE) represents the entry port of many human respiratory viruses, including human coronaviruses (HCoVs). Nowadays, four HCoVs, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1, and HCoV-NL63, are known to be circulating worldwide, causing upper and lower respiratory tract infections in nonhospitalized and hospitalized children. Studies of the fundamental aspects of these HCoV infections at the primary entry port, such as cell tropism, are seriously hampered by the lack of a universal culture system or suitable animal models. To expand the knowledge on fundamental virus-host interactions for all four HCoVs at the site of primary infection, we used pseudostratified HAE cell cultures to isolate and characterize representative clinical HCoV strains directly from nasopharyngeal material. Ten contemporary isolates were obtained, representing HCoV-229E (n = 1), HCoV-NL63 (n = 1), HCoV-HKU1 (n = 4), and HCoV-OC43 (n = 4). For each strain, we analyzed the replication kinetics and progeny virus release on HAE cell cultures derived from different donors. Surprisingly, by visualizing HCoV infection by confocal microscopy, we observed that HCoV-229E employs a target cell tropism for nonciliated cells, whereas HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1, and HCoV-NL63 all infect ciliated cells. Collectively, the data demonstrate that HAE cell cultures, which morphologically and functionally resemble human airways in vivo, represent a robust universal culture system for isolating and comparing all contemporary HCoV strains. PMID:23427150

  7. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBarrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; AlHayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.

    2009-01-01

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  8. New nanostructural biomaterials based on active silicate systems and hydroxyapatite: characterization and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opačić-Galić, V; Petrović, V; Zivković, S; Jokanović, V; Nikolić, B; Knežević-Vukčević, J; Mitić-Ćulafić, D

    2013-06-01

    To characterize and investigate the genotoxic effect of a new endodontic cement based on dicalcium- and tricalcium-silicate (CS) with hydroxyapatite (HA) on human lymphocytes. Hydrothermal treatment was applied for synthesis of CS and HA. The final mixture HA-CS, with potential to be used in endodontic practice, is composed of CS (34%) and HA (66%). Human lymphocytes were incubated with HA, HA-CS and CS for 1 h, at 37 °C and 5% CO2. Cell viability was determined using the trypan blue exclusion assay. To evaluate the level of DNA damage comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) was performed. For the statistical analysis anova and Duncan's Post Hoc Test were used. The SEM analysis indicated that CS consisted mostly of agglomerates of several micrometers in size, built up from smaller particles, with dimensions between 117 and 477 nm. This is promising because dimensions of agglomerates are not comparable with channels inside the cell membranes, whereas their nano-elements provide evident activity, important for faster setting of these mixtures compared to MTA. Values of DNA damage obtained in the comet assay indicated low genotoxic risk of the new endodontic materials. The significantly improved setting characteristics and low genotoxic risk of the new material support further research. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A novel frontier in the study of human primary immunodeficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, Itai M.; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Giliani, Silvia; Gennery, Andrew R.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Manos, Philip D.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Park, In-Hyun; Rucci, Francesca; Agarwal, Suneet; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Daley, George Q.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The novel ability to epigenetically reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells through the exogenous expression of transcription promises to revolutionize the study of human diseases. Objective Here we report on the generation of 25 induced pluripotent stem cell lines from 6 patients with various forms of Primary Immunodeficiencies, affecting adaptive and/or innate immunity. Methods Patients’ dermal fibroblasts were reprogrammed by expression of four transcription factors, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC using a single excisable polycistronic lentiviral vector. Results Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with primary immunodeficiencies show a stemness profile that is comparable to that observed in human embryonic stem cells. Following in vitro differentiation into embryoid bodies, pluripotency of the patient-derived indiced pluripotent stem cells lines was demonstrated by expression of genes characteristic of each of the three embryonic layers. We have confirmed the patient-specific origin of the induced pluripotent stem cell lines, and ascertained maintenance of karyotypic integrity. Conclusion By providing a limitless source of diseased stem cells that can be differentiated into various cell types in vitro, the repository of induced pluripotent stem cell lines from patients with primary immunodeficiencies represents a unique resource to investigate the pathophysiology of hematopoietic and extra-hematopoietic manifestations of these diseases, and may assist in the development of novel therapeutic approaches based on gene correction. PMID:21185069

  10. Ebola virus glycoprotein-mediated anoikis of primary human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Ratna B.; Basu, Arnab; Steele, Robert; Beyene, Aster; McHowat, Jane; Meyer, Keith; Ghosh, Asish K.; Ray, Ranjit

    2004-01-01

    Ebola virus glycoprotein (EGP) has been implicated for the induction of cytotoxicity and injury in vascular cells. On the other hand, EGP has also been suggested to induce massive cell rounding and detachment from the plastic surface by downregulating cell adhesion molecules without causing cytotoxicity. In this study, we have examined the cytotoxic role of EGP in primary endothelial cells by transduction with a replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus expressing EGP (Ad-EGP). Primary human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) transduced with Ad-EGP displayed loss of cell adhesion from the plastic surface followed by cell death. Transfer of conditioned medium from EGP-transduced HCMEC into naive cells did not induce loss of adhesion or cell death, suggesting that EGP needs to be expressed intracellularly to exert its cytotoxic effect. Subsequent studies suggested that HCMEC death occurred through apoptosis. Results from this study shed light on the EGP-induced anoikis in primary human cardiac endothelial cells, which may have significant pathological consequences

  11. Primary Human Placental Trophoblasts are Permissive for Zika Virus (ZIKV) Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Kjersti M; Lahon, Anismrita; Suter, Melissa A; Arya, Ravi P; Seferovic, Maxim D; Vogt, Megan B; Hu, Min; Stossi, Fabio; Mancini, Michael A; Harris, R Alan; Kahr, Maike; Eppes, Catherine; Rac, Martha; Belfort, Michael A; Park, Chun Shik; Lacorazza, Daniel; Rico-Hesse, Rebecca

    2017-01-27

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne (Aedes genus) arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV has been predominately associated with a mild or asymptomatic dengue-like disease, its appearance in the Americas has been accompanied by a multi-fold increase in reported incidence of fetal microcephaly and brain malformations. The source and mode of vertical transmission from mother to fetus is presumptively transplacental, although a causal link explaining the interval delay between maternal symptoms and observed fetal malformations following infection has been missing. In this study, we show that primary human placental trophoblasts from non-exposed donors (n = 20) can be infected by primary passage ZIKV-FLR isolate, and uniquely allowed for ZIKV viral RNA replication when compared to dengue virus (DENV). Consistent with their being permissive for ZIKV infection, primary trophoblasts expressed multiple putative ZIKV cell entry receptors, and cellular function and differentiation were preserved. These findings suggest that ZIKV-FLR strain can replicate in human placental trophoblasts without host cell destruction, thereby serving as a likely permissive reservoir and portal of fetal transmission with risk of latent microcephaly and malformations.

  12. Tuning In to Sound: Frequency-Selective Attentional Filter in Human Primary Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Sandra; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Miller, Lee M.; Clarke, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Cocktail parties, busy streets, and other noisy environments pose a difficult challenge to the auditory system: how to focus attention on selected sounds while ignoring others? Neurons of primary auditory cortex, many of which are sharply tuned to sound frequency, could help solve this problem by filtering selected sound information based on frequency-content. To investigate whether this occurs, we used high-resolution fMRI at 7 tesla to map the fine-scale frequency-tuning (1.5 mm isotropic resolution) of primary auditory areas A1 and R in six human participants. Then, in a selective attention experiment, participants heard low (250 Hz)- and high (4000 Hz)-frequency streams of tones presented at the same time (dual-stream) and were instructed to focus attention onto one stream versus the other, switching back and forth every 30 s. Attention to low-frequency tones enhanced neural responses within low-frequency-tuned voxels relative to high, and when attention switched the pattern quickly reversed. Thus, like a radio, human primary auditory cortex is able to tune into attended frequency channels and can switch channels on demand. PMID:23365225

  13. Resveratrol Differentially Regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Damm, Georg; Gebhardt, Rolf; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells) and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382). Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells. PMID:24603648

  14. Resveratrol differentially regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma cells and primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schuster

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382. Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells.

  15. A Long-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injury Therapy Using Human Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells (Sk-SCs): An Achievement of Significant Morphological, Numerical and Functional Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Saito, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Soeda, Shuichi; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Losses in vital functions of the somatic motor and sensory nervous system are induced by severe long-gap peripheral nerve transection injury. In such cases, autologous nerve grafts are the gold standard treatment, despite the unavoidable sacrifice of other healthy functions, whereas the prognosis is not always favorable. Here, we use human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (Sk-SCs) to reconstitute the function after long nerve-gap injury. Muscles samples were obtained from the amputated legs from 9 patients following unforeseen accidents. The Sk-SCs were isolated using conditioned collagenase solution, and sorted as CD34+/45- (Sk-34) and CD34-/45-/29+ (Sk-DN/29+) cells. Cells were separately cultured/expanded under optimal conditions for 2 weeks, then injected into the athymic nude mice sciatic nerve long-gap model (7-mm) bridging an acellular conduit. After 8-12 weeks, active cell engraftment was observed only in the Sk-34 cell transplanted group, showing preferential differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as formation of the myelin sheath and perineurium/endoneurium surrounding regenerated axons, resulted in 87% of numerical recovery. Differentiation into vascular cell lineage (pericyte and endothelial cells) were also observed. A significant tetanic tension recovery (over 90%) of downstream muscles following electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (at upper portion of the gap) was also achieved. In contrast, Sk-DN/29+ cells were completely eliminated during the first 4 weeks, but relatively higher numerical (83% vs. 41% in axon) and functional (80% vs. 60% in tetanus) recovery than control were observed. Noteworthy, significant increase in the formation of vascular networks in the conduit during the early stage (first 2 weeks) of recovery was observed in both groups with the expression of key factors (mRNA and protein levels), suggesting the paracrine effects to angiogenesis. These results suggested that the human Sk

  16. A Long-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injury Therapy Using Human Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells (Sk-SCs: An Achievement of Significant Morphological, Numerical and Functional Recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Tamaki

    Full Text Available Losses in vital functions of the somatic motor and sensory nervous system are induced by severe long-gap peripheral nerve transection injury. In such cases, autologous nerve grafts are the gold standard treatment, despite the unavoidable sacrifice of other healthy functions, whereas the prognosis is not always favorable. Here, we use human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (Sk-SCs to reconstitute the function after long nerve-gap injury. Muscles samples were obtained from the amputated legs from 9 patients following unforeseen accidents. The Sk-SCs were isolated using conditioned collagenase solution, and sorted as CD34+/45- (Sk-34 and CD34-/45-/29+ (Sk-DN/29+ cells. Cells were separately cultured/expanded under optimal conditions for 2 weeks, then injected into the athymic nude mice sciatic nerve long-gap model (7-mm bridging an acellular conduit. After 8-12 weeks, active cell engraftment was observed only in the Sk-34 cell transplanted group, showing preferential differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as formation of the myelin sheath and perineurium/endoneurium surrounding regenerated axons, resulted in 87% of numerical recovery. Differentiation into vascular cell lineage (pericyte and endothelial cells were also observed. A significant tetanic tension recovery (over 90% of downstream muscles following electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (at upper portion of the gap was also achieved. In contrast, Sk-DN/29+ cells were completely eliminated during the first 4 weeks, but relatively higher numerical (83% vs. 41% in axon and functional (80% vs. 60% in tetanus recovery than control were observed. Noteworthy, significant increase in the formation of vascular networks in the conduit during the early stage (first 2 weeks of recovery was observed in both groups with the expression of key factors (mRNA and protein levels, suggesting the paracrine effects to angiogenesis. These results suggested that the

  17. Development of Anti-Human Mesothelin-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor Messenger RNA-transfected Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes for Ovarian Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Xu, Xuequn; Li, Linhong; Ma, Ying; Jin, Qiu; Viley, Angelia; Allen, Cornell; Natarajan, Pachai; Shivakumar, Rama; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Emens, Leisha A

    2018-04-02

    CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T/natural killer (NK)-cell therapies can result in durable clinical responses in B-cell malignancies. However, CAR-based immunotherapies have been much less successful in solid cancers, in part due to "on-target off-tumor" toxicity related to expression of target tumor antigens on normal tissue. Based on preliminary observations of safety and clinical activity in proof-of-concept clinical trials, tumor antigen-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) CAR transfection into selected, activated, and expanded T/NK cells may permit prospective control of "on-target off-tumor" toxicity. To develop a commercial product for solid tumors, mesothelin was selected as an antigen target based on its association with poor prognosis and overexpression in multiple solid cancers. It was hypothesized that selecting, activating, and expanding cells ex vivo prior to mRNA CAR transfection would not be necessary, thus simplifying the complexity and cost of manufacturing. Now, the development of anti-human mesothelin mRNA CAR transfected peripheral blood lymphocytes (CARMA-hMeso) is reported, demonstrating the manufacture and cryopreservation of multiple cell aliquots for repeat administrations from a single human leukapheresis. A rapid, automated, closed system for cGMP-compliant transfection of mRNA CAR in up to 20 × 10 9 peripheral blood lymphocytes was developed. Here we show that CARMA-hMeso cells recognize and lyse tumor cells in a mesothelin-specific manner. Expression of CAR was detectable over approximately 7 days in vitro, with a progressive decline of CAR expression that appears to correlate with in vitro cell expansion. In a murine ovarian cancer model, a single intraperitoneal injection of CARMA-hMeso resulted in the dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and improved survival of mice. Furthermore, repeat weekly intraperitoneal administrations of the optimal CARMA-hMeso dose further prolonged disease control and survival

  18. Tailored HIV-1 vectors for genetic modification of primary human dendritic cells and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Turpin, Jocelyn; Cordeil, Stephanie; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Mahieux, Renaud; Lachuer, Joël; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) play a key role in the regulation of the immune system and are the target of numerous gene therapy applications. The genetic modification of MDDCs is possible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) but requires high viral doses to bypass their natural resistance to viral infection, and this in turn affects their physiological properties. To date, a single viral protein is able to counter this restrictive phenotype, Vpx, a protein derived from members of the HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus SM lineage that counters at least two restriction factors present in myeloid cells. By tagging Vpx with a short heterologous membrane-targeting domain, we have obtained HIV-1 LVs incorporating high levels of this protein (HIV-1-Src-Vpx). These vectors efficiently transduce differentiated MDDCs and monocytes either as previously purified populations or as populations within unsorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, these vectors can be efficiently pseudotyped with receptor-specific envelopes, further restricting their cellular tropism almost uniquely to MDDCs. Compared to conventional HIV-1 LVs, these novel vectors allow for an efficient genetic modification of MDDCs and, more importantly, do not cause their maturation or affect their survival, which are unwanted side effects of the transduction process. This study describes HIV-1-Src-Vpx LVs as a novel potent tool for the genetic modification of differentiated MDDCs and of circulating monocyte precursors with strong potential for a wide range of gene therapy applications.

  19. Movement and afferent representations in human motor areas: a simultaneous neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic/peripheral nerve-stimulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi eShitara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to primary motor cortex (M1 is an emerging technique that can examine motor-system functionality through evoked activity. However, because sensory afferents from twitching muscles are widely represented in motor areas the amount of evoked activity directly resulting from TMS remains unclear. We delivered suprathreshold TMS to left M1 or electrically stimulated the right median nerve (MNS in 18 healthy volunteers while simultaneously conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging and monitoring with electromyography (EMG. We examined in detail the localization of TMS-, muscle afferent- and superficial afferent-induced activity in M1 subdivisions. Muscle afferent- and TMS-evoked activity occurred mainly in rostral M1, while superficial afferents generated a slightly different activation distribution. In 12 participants who yielded quantifiable EMG, differences in brain activity ascribed to differences in movement-size were adjusted using integrated information from the EMGs. Sensory components only explained 10-20% of the suprathreshold TMS-induced activity, indicating that locally and remotely evoked activity in motor areas mostly resulted from the recruitment of neural and synaptic activity. The present study appears to justify the use of fMRI combined with suprathreshold TMS to M1 for evoked motor network imaging.

  20. γ-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and artificial skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Christophe E.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Bonner, William M.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.

    2009-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable in our modern society and can lead to a variety of deleterious effects including cancer and birth defects. A reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of exposure to IR and the individual response to that exposure would provide much needed information for the optimal treatment of each donor examined. We have developed a diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of the phosphorylated form of variant histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The cell responds to a nascent DSB through the phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules flanking the damaged site. This highly amplified response can be visualized as a γ-H2AX focus in the chromatin that can be detected in situ with the appropriate antibody. Here we assess the usability of γ-H2AX focus formation as a possible biodosimeter for human exposure to IR using peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated ex vivo and three-dimensional artificial models of human skin biopsies. In both systems, the tissues were exposed to 0.2-5 Gy, doses of IR that might be realistically encountered in various scenarios such as cancer radiotherapies or accidental exposure to radiation. Since the γ-H2AX response is maximal 30 min after exposure and declines over a period of hours as the cells repair the damage, we examined the time limitations of the useful detectability of γ-H2AX foci. We report that a linear response proportional to the initial radiation dose was obtained 48 and 24 h after exposure in blood samples and skin cells respectively. Thus, detection of γ-H2AX formation to monitor DNA damage in minimally invasive blood and skin tests could be useful tools to determine radiation dose exposure and analyze its effects on humans.

  1. Vaccine-Mediated Mechanisms Controlling Replication of Francisella tularensis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using a Co-culture System

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    Kjell Eneslätt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity (CMI is normally required for efficient protection against intracellular infections, however, identification of correlates is challenging and they are generally lacking. Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, facultative intracellular bacterium and CMI is critically required for protection against the pathogen, but how this is effectuated in humans is poorly understood. To understand the protective mechanisms, we established an in vitro co-culture assay to identify how control of infection of F. tularensis is accomplished by human cells and hypothesized that the model will mimic in vivo immune mechanisms. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were expanded with antigen and added to cultures with adherent PBMC infected with the human vaccine strain, LVS, or the highly virulent SCHU S4 strain. Intracellular numbers of F. tularensis was followed for 72 h and secreted and intracellular cytokines were analyzed. Addition of PBMC expanded from naïve individuals, i.e., those with no record of immunization to F. tularensis, generally resulted in little or no control of intracellular bacterial growth, whereas addition of PBMC from a majority of F. tularensis-immune individuals executed static and sometimes cidal effects on intracellular bacteria. Regardless of infecting strain, statistical differences between the two groups were significant, P < 0.05. Secretion of 11 cytokines was analyzed after 72 h of infection and significant differences with regard to secretion of IFN-γ, TNF, and MIP-1β was observed between immune and naïve individuals for LVS-infected cultures. Also, in LVS-infected cultures, CD4 T cells from vaccinees, but not CD8 T cells, showed significantly higher expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, TNF, and CD107a than cells from naïve individuals. The co-culture system appears to identify correlates of immunity that are relevant for the understanding of mechanisms of the protective host immunity to

  2. Single to Two Cluster State Transition of Primary Motor Cortex 4-posterior (MI-4p Activities in Humans

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    Kazunori Nakada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The human primary motor cortex has dual representation of the digits, namely, area 4 anterior (MI-4a and area 4 posterior (MI-4p. We have previously demonstrated that activation of these two functional subunits can be identified independently by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI using independent component-cross correlation-sequential epoch (ICS analysis. Subsequent studies in patients with hemiparesis due to subcortical lesions and monoparesis due to peripheral nerve injury demonstrated that MI-4p represents the initiation area of activation, whereas MI-4a is the secondarily activated motor cortex requiring a “long-loop” feedback input from secondary motor systems, likely the cerebellum. A dynamic model of hand motion based on the limit cycle oscillator predicts that the specific pattern of entrainment of neural firing may occur by applying appropriate periodic stimuli. Under normal conditions, such entrainment introduces a single phase-cluster. Under pathological conditions where entrainment stimuli have insufficient strength, the phase cluster splits into two clusters. Observable physiological phenomena of this shift from single cluster to two clusters are: doubling of firing rate of output neurons; or decay in group firing density of the system due to dampening of odd harmonics components. While the former is not testable in humans, the latter can be tested by appropriately designed fMRI experiments, the quantitative index of which is believed to reflect group behavior of neurons functionally localized, e.g., firing density in the dynamic theory. Accordingly, we performed dynamic analysis of MI-4p activation in normal volunteers and paretic patients. The results clearly indicated that MI-4p exhibits a transition from a single to a two phase-cluster state which coincided with loss of MI-4a activation. The study demonstrated that motor dysfunction (hemiparesis in patients with a subcortical infarct is not simply due to afferent

  3. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunjung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Park, So Jung; Bae, Il-Hong; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jeong, In Young; Kim, Hyoung-June; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Hea Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Kim, Ki Woo; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-smoothened (Smo) signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling.

  4. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Choi

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH-smoothened (Smo signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling.

  5. IL-7 Enhances Thymic Human T Cell Development in "Human Immune System" Rag2-/-IL-2R{gamma}c-/- Mice without Affecting Peripheral T Cell Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lent, Anja U.; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Siamari, Rachida; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Pouw, Stephan M.; Maijoor, Kelly A.; Weijer, Kees; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Blom, Bianca; Di Santo, James P.; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    IL-7 is a central cytokine in the development of hematopoietic cells, although interspecies discrepancies have been reported. By coculturing human postnatal thymus hematopoietic progenitors and OP9-huDL1 stromal cells, we found that murine IL-7 is approximately 100-fold less potent than human IL-7

  6. In vitro effect of the antimalarial drug proguanil hydrochloride on viability and DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajski, Goran; Dinter, Domagoj; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of proguanil, a chemical substance used for treatment and prevention of malaria on viability and DNA integrity in human lymphocytes in vitro. Two different concentrations of proguanil obtained from the plasma concentrations were used: 130ng/ml used for prophylactic treatment and 520ng/ml used in treatment of malaria. Testing was done with and without metabolic activation. Viability of lymphocytes decreased in time and dose dependent manner. Comet assay parameters showed similar effects, indicating that some damage to DNA molecule can occur. Frequency of sister chromatid exchanges did not show significant deviation from the control samples. As for the proliferation kinetics no significant changes were noticed. Since majority of DNA damaging effect is induced after metabolic activation it is to be concluded that activity of proguanil is dependent upon the active metabolite cycloguanil and that monitoring should be conducted especially among frequent travellers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  8. Electrotransfection and lipofection show comparable efficiency for in vitro gene delivery of primary human myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Tomaz; Strazisar, Marusa; Mis, Katarina; Kotnik, Nejc; Pegan, Katarina; Lojk, Jasna; Grubic, Zoran; Pavlin, Mojca

    2015-04-01

    Transfection of primary human myoblasts offers the possibility to study mechanisms that are important for muscle regeneration and gene therapy of muscle disease. Cultured human myoblasts were selected here because muscle cells still proliferate at this developmental stage, which might have several advantages in gene therapy. Gene therapy is one of the most sought-after tools in modern medicine. Its progress is, however, limited due to the lack of suitable gene transfer techniques. To obtain better insight into the transfection potential of the presently used techniques, two non-viral transfection methods--lipofection and electroporation--were compared. The parameters that can influence transfection efficiency and cell viability were systematically approached and compared. Cultured myoblasts were transfected with the pEGFP-N1 plasmid either using Lipofectamine 2000 or with electroporation. Various combinations for the preparation of the lipoplexes and the electroporation media, and for the pulsing protocols, were tested and compared. Transfection efficiency and cell viability were inversely proportional for both approaches. The appropriate ratio of Lipofectamine and plasmid DNA provides optimal conditions for lipofection, while for electroporation, RPMI medium and a pulsing protocol using eight pulses of 2 ms at E = 0.8 kV/cm proved to be the optimal combination. The transfection efficiencies for the optimal lipofection and optimal electrotransfection protocols were similar (32 vs. 32.5%, respectively). Both of these methods are effective for transfection of primary human myoblasts; however, electroporation might be advantageous for in vivo application to skeletal muscle.

  9. Primary human polarized small intestinal epithelial barriers respond differently to a hazardous and an innocuous protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, A D; Zimmermann, C; Delaney, B; Hurley, B P

    2017-08-01

    An experimental platform employing human derived intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line monolayers grown on permeable Transwell ® filters was previously investigated to differentiate between hazardous and innocuous proteins. This approach was effective at distinguishing these types of proteins and perturbation of monolayer integrity, particularly transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), was the most sensitive indicator. In the current report, in vitro indicators of monolayer integrity, cytotoxicity, and inflammation were evaluated using primary (non-transformed) human polarized small intestinal epithelial barriers cultured on Transwell ® filters to compare effects of a hazardous protein (Clostridium difficile Toxin A [ToxA]) and an innocuous protein (bovine serum albumin [BSA]). ToxA exerted a reproducible decrease on barrier integrity at doses comparable to those producing effects observed from cell line-derived IEC monolayers, with TEER being the most sensitive indicator. In contrast, BSA, tested at concentrations substantially higher than ToxA, did not cause changes in any of the tested variables. These results demonstrate a similarity in response to certain proteins between cell line-derived polarized IEC models and a primary human polarized small intestinal epithelial barrier model, thereby reinforcing the potential usefulness of cell line-derived polarized IECs as a valid experimental platform to differentiate between hazardous and non-hazardous proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

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    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  11. The organisational and human resource challenges facing primary care trusts: protocol of a multiple case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Scott J

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study is designed to assess the organisational and human resource challenges faced by Primary Care Trusts (PCTs. Its objectives are to: specify the organisational and human resources challenges faced by PCTs in fulfilling the roles envisaged in government and local policy; examine how PCTs are addressing these challenges, in particular, to describe the organisational forms they have adopted, and the OD/HR strategies and initiatives they have planned or in place; assess how effective these structures, strategies and initiatives have been in enabling the PCTs to meet the organisational and human resources challenges they face; identify the factors, both internal to the PCT and in the wider health community, which have contributed to the success or failure of different structures, strategies and initiatives. Methods The study will be undertaken in three stages. In Stage 1 the key literature on public sector and NHS organisational development and human resources management will be reviewed, and discussions will be held with key researchers and policy makers working in this area. Stage 2 will focus on detailed case studies in six PCTs designed to examine the organisational and human resources challenges they face. Data will be collected using semi-structured interviews, group discussion, site visits, observation of key meetings and examination of local documentation. The findings from the case study PCTs will be cross checked with a Reference Group of up to 20 other PCG/Ts, and key officers working in organisational development or primary care at local, regional and national level. In Stage 3 analysis of findings from the preparatory work, the case studies and the feedback from the Reference Group will be used to identify practical lessons for PCTs, key messages for policy makers, and contributions to further theoretical development.

  12. Multiplicity of nuclear receptor activation by PFOA and PFOS in primary human and rodent hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, J.A.; Butenhoff, J.L.; Wallace, K.B.

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) are surface active fluorochemicals that, due to their exceptional stability to degradation, are persistent in the environment. Both PFOA and PFOS are eliminated slowly in humans, with geometric mean serum elimination half-lives estimated at 3.5 and 4.8 years, respectively. The biological activity of PFOA and PFOS in rodents is attributed primarily to transactivation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), which is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. However, there are significant species-specific differences in the response to PFOA and PFOS exposure; non-rodent species, including humans, are refractory to several but not all of these effects. Many of the metabolic effects have been attributed to the activation of PPARA; however, recent studies using PPARα knockout mice demonstrate residual PPARA-independent effects, some of which may involve the activation of alternate nuclear receptors, including NR1I2 (PXR), NR1I3 (CAR), NR1H3 (LXRA), and NR1H4 (FXR). The objective of this investigation was to characterize the activation of multiple nuclear receptors and modulation of metabolic pathways associated with exposure to PFOA and PFOS, and to compare and contrast the effects between rat and human primary liver cells using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Our results demonstrate that multiple nuclear receptors participate in the metabolic response to PFOA and PFOS exposure resulting in a substantial shift from carbohydrate metabolism to fatty acid oxidation and hepatic triglyceride accumulation in rat liver cells. This shift in intermediary metabolism was more pronounced for PFOA than PFOS. Furthermore, while there is some similarity in the activation of metabolic pathways between rat and humans, particularly in PPARA regulated responses; the changes in primary human cells were more subtle and possibly reflect an adaptive

  13. Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S Induce Distinct Transcriptional Profiles in Differentiating Human Primary Preadipocytes.

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    Jonathan G Boucher

    Full Text Available Bisphenol S (BPS is increasingly used as a replacement plasticizer for bisphenol A (BPA but its effects on human health have not been thoroughly examined. Recent evidence indicates that both BPA and BPS induce adipogenesis, although the mechanisms leading to this effect are unclear. In an effort to identify common and distinct mechanisms of action in inducing adipogenesis, transcriptional profiles of differentiating human preadipocytes exposed to BPA or BPS were compared. Human subcutaneous primary preadipocytes were differentiated in the presence of either 25 μM BPA or BPS for 2 and 4 days. Poly-A RNA-sequencing was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Functional analysis of DEGs was undertaken in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. BPA-treatment resulted in 472 and 176 DEGs on days 2 and 4, respectively, affecting pathways such as liver X receptor (LXR/retinoid X receptor (RXR activation, hepatic fibrosis and cholestasis. BPS-treatment resulted in 195 and 51 DEGs on days 2 and 4, respectively, revealing enrichment of genes associated with adipogenesis and lipid metabolism including the adipogenesis pathway and cholesterol biosynthesis. Interestingly, the transcription repressor N-CoR was identified as a negative upstream regulator in both BPA- and BPS-treated cells. This study presents the first comparison of BPA- and BPS-induced transcriptional profiles in human differentiating preadipocytes. While we previously showed that BPA and BPS both induce adipogenesis, the results from this study show that BPS affects adipose specific transcriptional changes earlier than BPA, and alters the expression of genes specifically related to adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. The findings provide insight into potential BPS and BPA-mediated mechanisms of action in inducing adipogenesis in human primary preadipocytes.

  14. Primary structure of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. V. The complete structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Stepanik, Terrence M; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    The primary structure of the tetrameric plasma glycoprotein human alpha 2-macroglobulin has been determined. The identical subunits contain 1451 amino acid residues. Glucosamine-based oligosaccharide groups are attached to asparagine residues 32, 47, 224, 373, 387, 846, 968, and 1401. Eleven......-SH group of Cys-949 is thiol esterified to the gamma-carbonyl group of Glx-952, thus forming an activatable reactive site which can mediate covalent binding of nucleophiles. A putative transglutaminase cross-linking site is constituted by Gln-670 and Gln-671. The primary sites of proteolytic cleavage......-macroglobulin subunit is discussed. A comparison of stretches of sequences from alpha 2-macroglobulin with partial sequence data for complement components C3 and C4 indicates that these proteins are evolutionary related. The properties of alpha 2-macroglobulin are discussed within the context of proteolytically...

  15. Educational actions in human communication health: telehealth contributions in primary care

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    Gabriela Guedes de Sá Leitão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to characterize educational actions related to human communication health produced at the Tele-Health Center for health professionals in primary care. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted at the Tele-Health Center at the Federal University of Pernambuco Clinical Hospital. Educational actions produced by tele-consultants between 2008 and 2014 linked to the health of human communication were considered. Data collection was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, the data were explored and educational actions were selected based on the title and the relationship with human communication. In the second phase, each action was observed and evaluated for content. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: a few educational actions related to human communication health were concentrated in 2014. Throughout the period analyzed, the actions were restricted to the field of language and concentrated on the education issue as well as the strategic area of child and adolescent health. The most frequent occupational category among the tele-consultants was nursing. Conclusion: a small number of educational actions addressing the health of human communication was produced and the participation of speech therapists remains incipient.

  16. Human herpesvirus 6A induces apoptosis of primary human fetal astrocytes via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Bin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a T-lymphtropic and neurotropic virus that can infect various types of cells. Sequential studies reported that apoptosis of glia and neurons induced by HHV-6 might act a potential trigger for some central nervous system (CNS diseases. HHV-6 is involved in the pathogenesis of encephalitis, multiple sclerosis (MS and fatigue syndrome. However, the mechanisms responsible for the apoptosis of infected CNS cells induced by HHV-6 are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the cell death processes of primary human fetal astrocytes (PHFAs during productive HHV-6A infection and the underlying mechanisms. Re