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Sample records for primary detrital magnetite

  1. Biogenic magnetite, detrital hematite, and relative paleointensity in Quaternary sediments from the Southwest Iberian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Hodell, D. A.; Margari, V.; Skinner, L. C.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Kesler, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic properties of late Quaternary sediments on the SW Iberian Margin are dominated by bacterial magnetite, observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with contributions from detrital titanomagnetite and hematite. Reactive hematite, together with low organic matter concentrations and the lack of sulfate reduction, lead to dissimilatory iron reduction and availability of Fe(II) for abundant magnetotactic bacteria. Magnetite grain-size proxies (κARM/κ and ARM/IRM) and S-ratios (sensitive to hematite) vary on stadial/interstadial timescales, contain orbital power, and mimic planktic δ18O. The detrital/biogenic magnetite ratio and hematite concentration are greater during stadials and glacial isotopic stages, reflecting increased detrital (magnetite) input during times of lowered sea level, coinciding with atmospheric conditions favoring hematitic dust supply. Magnetic susceptibility, on the other hand, has a very different response being sensitive to coarse detrital multidomain (MD) magnetite associated with ice-rafted debris (IRD). High susceptibility and/or magnetic grain-size coarsening, mark Heinrich stadials (HS), particularly HS2, HS3, HS4, HS5, HS6 and HS7, as well as older Heinrich-like detrital layers, indicating the sensitivity of this region to fluctuations in the position of the polar front. Relative paleointensity (RPI) records have well-constrained age models based on planktic δ18O correlation to ice-core chronologies, however, they differ from reference records (e.g. PISO) particularly in the vicinity of glacial maxima, mainly due to inefficient normalization of RPI records in intervals of enhanced hematite input.

  2. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  3. Magnetite solubility studies under simulated PWR primary-side conditions, using lithiated, hydrogenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, John; Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Dickinson, Shirley; Henshaw, Jim

    2014-01-01

    As software for modelling dissolution, precipitation, and transport of metallic species and subsequent CRUD deposition within nuclear plant becomes more advanced, there is an increasing need for accurate and reliable thermodynamic data. The solubility behaviour of magnetite is an example of such data, and is central to any treatment of CRUD solubility due to the prevalence of magnetite and nickel ferrites in CRUD. Several workers have shown the most consistent solubility data comes from once-through flowing systems. However, despite a strong consensus between the results in acidic to mildly alkaline solutions, there is disagreement between the results at approximately pH 25C 9 and higher. A programme of experimental work is on-going at the University of Birmingham, focusing on solubility of metal oxides (e.g., magnetite) in conditions relevant to PWR primary coolant. One objective of this programme is to calculate thermodynamic constants from the data obtained. Magnetite solubility from 200 to 300°C, in lithiated, hydrogenated water of pH 25C 9–11 is being studied using a once-through rig constructed of 316L stainless steel. The feedwater is pumped at 100 bar pressure through a heated bed of magnetite granules, and the output solution is collected and analysed for iron and several other metals by ICP-MS. This paper presents results from preliminary tests without magnetite granules, in which the corroding surface of the rig itself was used as the sole source of soluble iron and of dissolved hydrogen. Levels of iron were generally within an order of magnitude of literature solubility values. Comparison of results at different flow rates and temperatures, in conjunction with conclusions drawn from the published literature, suggests that this is likely due to the presence of particulate matter in a greatly under-saturated solution, compensating for the low surface area of oxide in contact with the solution. (author)

  4. Mathematical modelling for magnetite (crude removal from primary heat transfer loop by ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Nawaz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present research focuses to develop mathematical model for the removal of iron (magnetite by ion-exchange resin from primary heat transfer loop of process industries. This mathematical model is based on operating capacities (that’s provide more effective design as compared to loading capacity from static laboratory tests. Results showed non-steady state distribution of external Fe2+ and limitations imposed on operating conditions, these conditions includes; loading and elution cycle time, flow rate, concentration of both loading and removal, volume of resin required. Number of generalized assumptions was made under shortcut modeling techniques to overcome the gap of theoretical and actual process design.

  5. Diagenetic versus detrital origin of the magnetic susceptibility variations in some carbonate Frasnian-Famennian boundary sections from Northern Africa and Western Europe: implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquier, Laurent; Averbuch, Olivier; Devleeschouwer, Xavier; Tribovillard, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    To provide a new insight into the diagenetic versus detrital origin of the magnetic susceptibility variations in ancient carbonate sequences, a study was conducted within four Frasnian-Famennian platform carbonate sections from Germany, France and Morocco. The study includes along-section magnetic susceptibility and carbonate content measurements complemented by analyses of magnetic hysteresis parameters, inorganic geochemistry and clay mineralogy. Our results show that the magnetic susceptibility evolution is dominantly controlled by the variations in the concentration of low-coercivity ferromagnetic magnetite grains and, to a lesser extent, of paramagnetic clays. In more detail, hysteresis ratios suggest the coexistence of two magnetite populations with significantly different grain size: (1) a dominantly coarse-grained detrital fraction including a mixture of multi-domain and single-domain particles (2) an authigenic fine-grained fraction composed of a mixture of single-domain and superparamagnetic particles. Despite a diagenetic imprint on the clay assemblages, no relationship is established between magnetic susceptibility and illite crystallinity, therefore discarding a noticeable distortion of primary within-section magnetic susceptibility evolution. The overall inherited character of the magnetic susceptibility fluctuations is corroborated by a significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with terrigenous proxies (Zr, Th). The poorer correlation of magnetic susceptibility with the Fe content is consistent with the existence of a very fine-grained authigenic magnetite component that possibly induces a global magnetic susceptibility increase at the section scale, but no distortion of the within-section evolution. The magnetic susceptibility curves presented here provide a general record of climate-driven detrital influx and carbonate productivity through Frasnian-Lower Famennian times.

  6. Magnetite precipitation and characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, A.; Garside, J.; Ivens, R.

    1988-06-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) precipitation was investigated as a possible alternative treatment process to the conventional ferric hydroxide for removal of actinides from radioactive effluents. This offered the possibility of improved dewatering of filtered residues. Whilst a poor quality magnetite could be produced from deoxygenated ferrous/ferric solutions, all attempts to prepare magnetite from effluent simulates were unsuccessful. The failure was attributed to the presence of high nitrate and other interfering ions. (author)

  7. Nanogeochemistry of hydrothermal magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Simon, Adam C.; Suvorova, Alexandra; Knipping, Jaayke; Roberts, Malcolm P.; Rubanov, Sergey; Dodd, Aaron; Saunders, Martin

    2018-06-01

    Magnetite from hydrothermal ore deposits can contain up to tens of thousands of parts per million (ppm) of elements such as Ti, Si, V, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, which tend to either structurally incorporate into growth and sector zones or form mineral micro- to nano-sized particles. Here, we report micro- to nano-structural and chemical data of hydrothermal magnetite from the Los Colorados iron oxide-apatite deposit in Chile, where magnetite displays both types of trace element incorporation. Three generations of magnetites (X-Z) were identified with concentrations of minor and trace elements that vary significantly: SiO2, from below detection limit (bdl) to 3.1 wt%; Al2O3, 0.3-2.3 wt%; CaO, bdl-0.9 wt%; MgO, 0.02-2.5 wt%; TiO2, 0.1-0.4 wt%; MnO, 0.04-0.2 wt%; Na2O, bdl-0.4 wt%; and K2O, bdl-0.4 wt%. An exception is V2O3, which is remarkably constant, ranging from 0.3 to 0.4 wt%. Six types of crystalline nanoparticles (NPs) were identified by means of transmission electron microscopy in the trace element-rich zones, which are each a few micrometres wide: (1) diopside, (2) clinoenstatite; (3) amphibole, (4) mica, (5) ulvöspinel, and (6) Ti-rich magnetite. In addition, Al-rich nanodomains, which contain 2-3 wt% of Al, occur within a single crystal of magnetite. The accumulation of NPs in the trace element-rich zones suggest that they form owing to supersaturation from a hydrothermal fluid, followed by entrapment during continuous growth of the magnetite surface. It is also concluded that mineral NPs promote exsolution of new phases from the mineral host, otherwise preserved as structurally bound trace elements. The presence of abundant mineral NPs in magnetite points to a complex incorporation of trace elements during growth, and provides a cautionary note on the interpretation of micron-scale chemical data of magnetite.

  8. Sediment unmixing using detrital geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Glenn R.; Johnstone, Samuel A.

    2017-11-01

    Sediment mixing within sediment routing systems can exert a strong influence on the preservation of provenance signals that yield insight into the effect of environmental forcing (e.g., tectonism, climate) on the Earth's surface. Here, we discuss two approaches to unmixing detrital geochronologic data in an effort to characterize complex changes in the sedimentary record. First, we summarize 'top-down' mixing, which has been successfully employed in the past to characterize the different fractions of prescribed source distributions ('parents') that characterize a derived sample or set of samples ('daughters'). Second, we propose the use of 'bottom-up' methods, previously used primarily for grain size distributions, to model parent distributions and the abundances of these parents within a set of daughters. We demonstrate the utility of both top-down and bottom-up approaches to unmixing detrital geochronologic data within a well-constrained sediment routing system in central California. Use of a variety of goodness-of-fit metrics in top-down modeling reveals the importance of considering the range of allowable that is well mixed over any single best-fit mixture calculation. Bottom-up modeling of 12 daughter samples from beaches and submarine canyons yields modeled parent distributions that are remarkably similar to those expected from the geologic context of the sediment-routing system. In general, mixture modeling has the potential to supplement more widely applied approaches in comparing detrital geochronologic data by casting differences between samples as differing proportions of geologically meaningful end-member provenance categories.

  9. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabello, G.; Lenders, J.J.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in many biological and geological systems, and also in many technological applications. The magnetic properties of magnetite crystals depend strongly on the size and shape of its crystals. Hence, engineering magnetite nanoparticles

  10. Degeneration of biogenic superparamagnetic magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-L; Pfiffner, S M; Dyar, M D; Vali, H; Konhauser, K; Cole, D R; Rondinone, A J; Phelps, T J

    2009-01-01

    Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 h incubation and 5-year anaerobic storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 h and 5-year crystals are 8.4164A and 8.3774A, respectively. The Mössbauer spectra indicated that the 265 h magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe(3+) (1.990)Fe(2+) (1.015)O(4)) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe(3+) (2.388)Fe(2+) (0.419)O(4)). Such crystal-chemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases (fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  11. Degeneration of Biogenic Superparamagnetic Magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dr. Yi-Liang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Pfiffner, Susan M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dyar, Dr. M Darby [Mount Holyoke College; Vali, Dr. Hojatolah [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Konhauser, Dr, Kurt [University of Alberta; Cole, David R [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 hours incubation and 5-year storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, M ssbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 hour and 5-year crystals are 8.4164 and 8.3774 , respectively. The M ssbauer spectra indicated that the 265 hour magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe3+1.9901Fe2+ 1.0149O4) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe3+2.3875Fe2+0.4188O4). Such crystal-hemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases(fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  12. Kinetics of dissolution of magnetite in PDCA based formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Prince, A.A.M.; Raghavan, P.S.; Gopalan, R.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetite is one of the important corrosion products of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) where carbon steel is the dominant surface in the primary heat transport system. Designing of formulations capable of dissolving magnetite is important for effective decontamination of such surfaces. The rate of dissolution of synthetically prepared magnetite was studied in low concentrations of PDCA containing acidic formulations. The effect of addition of ascorbic acid, citric acid, Fe 2+ -PDCA complex on the rate was also studied. The effects of pH and the temperature on the dissolution rate were determined. The PDCA as a complexant has some positive factors like low protonation constant and enhanced stability to radiation. (author)

  13. Detrital Zircons Split Sibumasu in East Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Chung, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    It is widely accepted that Sibumasu developed as a united terrane and originated from NW Australian margin in East Gondwana. Here we report new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic data from Sumatra that, in combination with literature data, challenge and refute the above long-held view. In particular, the East and West Sumatra terranes share nearly identical Precambrian to Paleozoic detrital zircon age distributions and Hf isotopes, indicating a common provenance/origin for them. The Sumatra detrital zircons exhibit a prominent population of ca. 1170-1070 Ma, indistinguishable from those of the Lhasa and West Burma terranes, with detritus most probably sourcing from western Australia. By contrast, Sibuma (Sibumasu excluding Sumatra) detrital zircons display a prevailing population of ca. 980-935 Ma, strongly resembling those of the western Qiangtang terrane, with detrital materials most likely derived from Greater India and Himalayas. Such markedly distinct detrital zircon age profiles between Sumatra and Sibuma require disparate sources/origin for them, provoking disintegration of the widely-adopted, but outdated, term Sibumasu and thus inviting a new configuration of East Gondwana in the early Paleozoic, with Sumatra and West Burma lying outboard the Lhasa terrane in the NW Australian margin and Sibuma situated in the northern Greater Indian margin. More future investigations are needed to establish the precise rifting and drifting histories of Sumatra and Sibuma, as two separated terranes, during the breakup of Gondwana.

  14. Primary Data on U/Pb-Isotope Ages and Lu/Hf-Isotope Geochemical Systematization of Detrital Zircons from the Lopatinskii Formation (Vendian-Cambrian Transition Levels) and the Tectonic Nature of Teya-Chapa Depression (Northeastern Yenisei Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Priyatkina, N. S.; Rud'ko, S. V.; Shatsillo, A. V.; Collins, W. J.; Romanyuk, T. V.

    2018-03-01

    The main results are presented on U/Pb-isotope dating of 100 detrital zircons and, selectively, on the Lu/Hf-isotope system of 43 grains from sandstones of the Lopatinskii formation (the lower stratigraphic level of the Chingasan group). Ages from 896 ± 51 to 2925 ± 38 Ma were obtained with a pronounced maximum of 1890 Ma in the curve of probability density, along with ɛHf estimates from +8.4 to-15.1, which allow one to throw doubt upon the molasse nature of the Lopatinskii formation.

  15. The characterisation of precipitated magnetites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, D.F.; Segal, D.L.

    1982-06-01

    Methods are described for the preparation of magnetite by precipitation from aqueous solutions of iron(II) and iron(III) salts. The magnetites have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy, chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. Transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy has also been used to characterise precipitated magnetites and a comparison of the spectra has been made with those obtained from nickel ferrite and hydrated ferric oxides. The hydrothermal stability of magnetite at 573 K has also been investigated. This work is relevant to corrosion processes that can occur in the water coolant circuits of nuclear reactors. (author)

  16. Detrital and early chemical remanent magnetization in redbeds and their rock magnetic signature: Zicapa Formation, southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Rojas, Maria Isabel; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2018-06-01

    Poles from continental redbeds are a large fraction of the world's palaeomagnetic database. Nonetheless, the time of acquisition and origin of the remanent magnetization of redbeds has been long debated. We report palaeomagnetic data, rock magnetic data and microscope observations for Lower Cretaceous redbeds in southern Mexico. These data allow us to discriminate between the hysteresis properties of remanent magnetizations of detrital and chemical origin, and to establish the early origin of a chemical remanence. Red sandstones of the Zicapa Formation contain a multicomponent remanence revealed by thermal demagnetization, and consisting of three stable components with partially overlapping laboratory unblocking temperatures of 600 °C, (low, intermediate and high temperature, respectively). They are interpreted as a viscous remanence residing in detrital magnetite, a chemical remanence residing in authigenic hematite and a depositional remanence residing in detrital hematite, respectively. The low-temperature component is nearly parallel to the recent dipole field. The tilt-corrected overall site means of the intermediate (chemical) and high temperature (depositional) components are indistinguishable (Dec = 282.0°, Inc = 12.4°, k = 13.33, α95 = 10.1°, N = 17, for the intermediate temperature; and Dec = 272.5°, Inc = 16.5°, k = 14.04, α95 = 11, N = 14, for the high temperature). Elongation/inclination analysis suggests that depositional and chemical components require applying an f = factor of approximately 0.4. Both of these components define a magnetic polarity zonation, but the polarity of the chemical and detrital components may or may not be the same. The chemical remanence coincides, more often than not, with the polarity of the depositional remanence of the overlying (younger) strata, suggesting a delay in remanence acquisition of tens to a few hundred ka for the chemical component. Pigmentary and detrital haematite were recognized with microscopic

  17. Kinetics of dissolution of magnetite in PDCA based formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S.; Prince, A.A.M.; Raghavan, P.S.; Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian Coll., Tambaram (India); Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1997-08-01

    Magnetite is one of the important corrosion products of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) where carbon steel is the dominant surface in the primary heat transport system. Designing of formulations capable of dissolving magnetite is important for effective decontamination of such surfaces. The rate of dissolution of synthetically prepared magnetite was studied in low concentrations of PDCA containing acidic formulations. The effect of addition of ascorbic acid, citric acid, Fe{sup 2+}-PDCA complex on the rate was also studied. The effects of pH and the temperature on the dissolution rate were determined. The PDCA as a complexant has some positive factors like low protonation constant and enhanced stability to radiation. (author)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles from mineral magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Mauricio; Martínez, Francisco; Mosquera, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized magnetite nanoparticles with sizes that range from 20 to 30 nm from mineral magnetite roughly 45 μm in size. The procedure consists in the dissolution of the mineral in an acidic medium and subsequent precipitation in a basic medium in the presence of oleic acid. Two experiments were conducted in different gaseous environments. The first was carried out in an environment exposed to air (M1) and the second in an N 2 (M2) environment. The x-ray diffraction results showed a slight difference, which corresponds to the surface oxidation of magnetite. The sizes of the modified nanoparticles were determined through the Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscopy. An organic material mass loss corresponding to 18% was observed through a thermogravimetric analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis provides information about the type of bond that is formed on the surface of the nanoparticle, which corresponds to a bidentate chelate. The vibrating sample magnetometer results show a superparamagnetic behavior for sample M1. - Highlights: • A new method for synthesis of nanoparticles from mineral microparticles. • Search agreggate value to the mineral by mean nanoscience. • The stoichiometric ratio of the ions Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ from the mineral magnetite is synergistic

  19. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles from mineral magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, Mauricio, E-mail: mmorel@ing.uchile.cl [Laboratorio de Síntesis y Polímeros, Departamento de ciencias de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de ciencias de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Avenue Tupper 2069, Santiago (Chile); Martínez, Francisco, E-mail: polimart@ing.uchile.cl [Laboratorio de Síntesis y Polímeros, Departamento de ciencias de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Mosquera, Edgar [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de ciencias de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Avenue Tupper 2069, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    We have synthesized magnetite nanoparticles with sizes that range from 20 to 30 nm from mineral magnetite roughly 45 μm in size. The procedure consists in the dissolution of the mineral in an acidic medium and subsequent precipitation in a basic medium in the presence of oleic acid. Two experiments were conducted in different gaseous environments. The first was carried out in an environment exposed to air (M1) and the second in an N{sub 2} (M2) environment. The x-ray diffraction results showed a slight difference, which corresponds to the surface oxidation of magnetite. The sizes of the modified nanoparticles were determined through the Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscopy. An organic material mass loss corresponding to 18% was observed through a thermogravimetric analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis provides information about the type of bond that is formed on the surface of the nanoparticle, which corresponds to a bidentate chelate. The vibrating sample magnetometer results show a superparamagnetic behavior for sample M1. - Highlights: • A new method for synthesis of nanoparticles from mineral microparticles. • Search agreggate value to the mineral by mean nanoscience. • The stoichiometric ratio of the ions Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} from the mineral magnetite is synergistic.

  20. Using the chemical analysis of magnetite to constrain various stages in the formation and genesis of the Kiruna-type chadormalu magnetite-apatite deposit, Bafq district, Central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarian, Hassan; Lentz, David; Alirezaei, Saeed; Peighambari, Sima; Hall, Douglas

    2016-12-01

    Textural and compositional data are presented for different types of magnetite in the Chadormalu iron deposit to discern the genesis of various styles of mineralization. Samples were chosen according to their paragenetic relations to apatite and their host setting: magnetite-apatite veins in the altered host rocks, disseminated magnetite-apatite assemblages in the marginal parts of the main ore body, and massive magnetite associated with irregular apatite veinlets from internal part of the main ore body. Scanning electron microscopy - back scatter electron (SEM-BSE) images reveal that there are three main generations of magnetite in each of the different magnetite-apatite assemblages. Primary magnetite (Mag1) features abundant porosity and a dark appearance. A second generation of magnetite (Mag2) replacing Mag1 shows a lighter appearance with both sharp and gradational contacts with the primary magnetite crystals. The two magnetite types are related to dissolution-precipitation processes due to changing physico-chemical parameters of the ore fluids. A third type of magnetite (Mag3) with a recrystallized appearance and foam-like triple junctions was mostly observed in magnetite-apatite veins in the main ore body and in veins hosted by altered rocks. Electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) were utilized to discriminate the various magnetite generations in the different magnetite-apatite assemblages. Applying published elemental discrimination diagrams shows that most primary magnetites fall into the hydrothermal- and Kiruna-type fields. Primary magnetite contains lower FeO (88.77-93.65 wt.%; average 91.5 wt.%), and higher SiO2 (0.21-2.26 wt.%; ave. 0.32 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.001-0.45 wt.%; ave. 0.053 wt.%), and CaO (0.002-0.48 wt.%; ave. 0.078 wt.%) contents, which might be related to magmatically derived fluids. Secondary magnetites have higher FeO (89.23-93.49 wt.%; ave. 92.11 wt.%), lower SiO2 (0.037-0.189 wt.%; ave. 0.072 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.004-0.072 wt.%; ave. 0.019 wt

  1. Magnetite and the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landaberry, S.C.; Magalhaes, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent observations concerning interstellar circular polarization are explained by a simple two-cloud model using magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) grains as polarizing agents. Three stars covering a wide range of linear polarization spectral shapes were selected. Reasonably low column densities are required in order to interpret polarization data [pt

  2. Cosmogenic 3He in detrital gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Finlay; Yakubovich, Olga; Caracedo, Ana; Nesterenok, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Since the measurement of cosmogenic He in an alluvial diamond by McConville and Reynolds (1996) the application of cosmogenic noble gases to individual detrital grains to quantify surface processes has not been vigorously pursued. The likely low rate of diffusion of cosmogenic He in native metals, and their resistance to weathering and disintegration during erosion and transport, makes them a potential record of long-term Earth surface processes. In an effort to assess the extent that detrital refractory metals record the exposure history during transport and storage we have undertaken a reconnaissance study of the He isotope composition in 18 grains (2-200 mg) of native gold, copper, silver, and PtPd, Pt3Fe and OsIr alloys from alluvial placer deposits from around the world. 4He is dominantly the result of U and Th decay within the grains, or decay of 190Pt in the Pt-rich alloys. 3He is measurable in 13 grains, concentrations range up to 2.7E+6 atoms/g. 3He/4He are always in excess of the crustal radiogenic ratio, up to 306 Ra. Although nucleogenic 3He produced by (n,α) reactions on 6Li, and 3He from trapped hydrothermal fluids, are present, the majority of the 3He is cosmogenic in origin. Using newly calculated cosmogenic 3He production rates in heavy metals, and a determination of the effect of implantation based on the stopping distances of spallogenic 3He and 3H, the grains have 3Hecos concentrations that are equivalent to 0.35 to 1.5 Ma exposure at Earth's surface. In a study of detrital gold grains from several sites in Scotland we have found that 10 % have 3He concentrations that are significantly in excess of that generated since the Last Glacial Maximum. These studies demonstrate that, with refinement, cosmogenic 3He in refractory detrital minerals can be used to quantify sediment transport and storage on the 1-10 Ma timescale. P. McConville & J.H. Reynolds (1989). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 2365-75.

  3. SON68 glass alteration enhanced by magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godon, Nicole; Gin, Stephane; Rebiscoul, Diane; Frugier, Pierre [CEA, DEN-Marcoule, F30207, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and modeling results of SON68 glass / magnetite interactions while in contact with synthetic groundwater from a clay environment. It is shown that magnetite enhances glass alteration, first by the sorption of Si released from the glass onto magnetite surfaces, then by a second process that could be the precipitation of an iron silicate mineral or the transformation of magnetite into a more reactive phase like hematite or goethite. This study globally suggests a detrimental effect of magnetite on the long-term durability of nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions. (authors)

  4. Magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sora, Sergiu; Ion, Rodica Mariana

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to establish and to optimize the conditions for chemical synthesis of nanosized magnetic core-shell iron oxide. The core is magnetite and for the shell we used gold in order to obtain different nanoparticles. Iron oxides was synthesized by sonochemical process using ferrous salts, favoring the synthesis at low-temperature, low costs, high material purity and nanostructure control. After synthesis, some investigation techniques as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and UVVis absorbance spectroscopy, have been used to see the characteristics of the nanoparticles. For in vitro applications, it is important to prevent any aggregation of the nanoparticles, and may also enable efficient excretion and protection of the cells from toxicity. For biomedical applications like magnetic biofunctional material vectors to target tissues, the particles obtained have to be spherical with 10 nm average diameter. Key words: magnetite, nanocomposite, core-shell, sonochemical method

  5. Neutron magnetic multiple diffraction in a natural magnetite crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocchi, V.L.; Parente, C.B.R.

    1988-09-01

    Neutron multiple diffraction has been employed in the study of the magnetism in magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ). Magnetite has a crystallographic structure of an inverted spinel with tetrahedral A sites occupied solely by trivalent Fe 3+ ions and octahedral B sites occupied both by divalent Fe 2+ ions and the remaining Fe 3+ ions in random distribution. At room temperature magnetite is a Neel A-B ferrimagnet where the ions on the A, B sites are coupled antiferromagneticaly. This coupling disappears at T sup c approx. or approx.= 580 0 C. Employing a natural single crystal of magnetite experimental neutron multiple diffraction patterns were obtained for the primary reflection 111 at room temperature and 703 0 C. This reflection is almost entirely magnetic in origin resulting in 'Aufhellung' patterns below T c and mixed 'Aufhellung-Umweganregung' patterns above T c . Theoretical patterns were calculated employing the iterative method for the approximation of intensities by a Taylor series and compared to the experimental results. (author) [pt

  6. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from mineral waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rohit [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 013 (India); Sakthivel, R., E-mail: velsak_r@yahoo.com [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 013 (India); Behura, Reshma; Mishra, B.K. [CSIR – Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 013 (India); Das, D. [UGC-DAE Consortium, Kolkata (India)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Mineral waste becomes a valuable source for the synthesis of magnetite. • Milling helps uniform mixing of reductant with iron ore tailings. • Magnetite nanoparticles exhibit saturation magnetization of 60 emu/g. • Ag coating induces antibacterial activity of magnetite. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized from iron ore tailings – a mineral waste collected from the iron ore processing plant. Mechanical milling followed by chemical route is employed to obtain the magnetite nanoparticles from the waste. The magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the existence of a magnetite phase. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopic (FE-SEM) pictures reveal that the particle size is below 100 nm. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum shows a band at 570 cm{sup −1} for the Fe–O bond vibration. Vibrating Sample Magnetometric (VSM) study shows high saturation magnetization value of 60 emu/g at low applied magnetic field. Silver coated magnetite nanoparticles exhibits antibacterial property whereas bare magnetite does not.

  7. Sonochemical coating of magnetite nanoparticles with silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Feng; Enomoto, Naoya; Hojo, Junichi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with silica through the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The ultrasonic irradiation was used to prevent the agglomeration of the magnetite particles and accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS. TEM, DLS, XRF, VSM, TG and sedimentation test were used to characterize the silica-coated magnetite particles. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles in aqueous solution was improved significantly and the agglomerate particle size was decreased to 110 nm. It was found that the agglomerate particle size of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the coating temperature and the pH value in the silica-coating process. The weight ratio of silica in silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the pH value in the silica-coating process. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the agglomerate particle size of the suspension. The oxidation of magnetite particles in air was limited through the coated silica. The magnetism of silica-coated magnetite particles decreased slightly after silica-coating.

  8. Synthesis and surface modification of hydrophobic magnetite to processible magnetite at silica-propylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Kyoungja [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Nanomaterials Research Center, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kjwoo@kist.re.kr; Hong, Jangwon [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Nanomaterials Research Center, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jae-Pyoung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Nanomaterials Research Center, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-05-15

    Hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5} in octyl ether solution of oleic acid and by consecutive aeration. The nanoparticles were converted into magnetite core/silica shell (magnetite at silica) structured particles with hydrophilic and processible aminopropyl groups on their surfaces.

  9. Quantification of Biogenic Magnetite by Synchrotron X-ray Microscopy During the PETM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Kent, D. V.; Chen-Wiegart, Y. C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals, including spearhead-like and spindle-like ones up to 4 microns, have been reported in clay-rich sediments recording the ~56 Ma Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ and along with magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) chains, were suggested [Schumann et al. 2008 PNAS; Kopp et al. 2009 Paleoceanography] to account for the distinctive single domain (SD) rock magnetic properties of these sediments [Lanci et al. 2002 JGR]. However, because uncalibrated magnetic extraction techniques were used to provide material for TEM imaging of the biogenic magnetite, it is difficult to quantitatively analyze their concentration in the bulk clay. In this study, we use a synchrotron transmission X-ray microscope to image bulk CIE clay. We first take mosaic images of sub-millimeter-sized bulk clay samples, in which we can identify many of the various types of giant biogenic magnetite crystals, as well as several other types of iron minerals, such as pyrite framboids, siderite, and detrital magnetite. However, limited by the instrument resolution (~50 nm), we are not able to identify MTB chains let alone isolated magnetic nanoparticles that may be abundant the clay. To quantitatively estimate the concentration of the giant biogenic magnetite, we re-deposited the bulk clay sample in an alcohol solution on a silicon nitride membrane for 2D X-ray scans. After scanning a total area of 0.55 mm2 with average clay thickness of 4 μm, we identified ~40 spearheads, ~5 spindles and a few elongated rods and estimated their total magnetization as SD particles to be less than about 10% of the mass normalized clay for the scanned area. This result suggests that the giant biogenic magnetite is not a major source of the SD signal for the clay and is in good agreement with rock magnetic analyses using high-resolution first-order reversal curves and thermal fluctuation tomography on bulk CIE clay

  10. Identification of Detrital Carbonate in East Cepu High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, R.; Andika, I. K.; Haris, A.; Miftah, A.

    2018-03-01

    East Cepu High is a part of horst – graben series which formed by extensional tectonic processes during Paleogene in North East Java Basin. Due to excellent paleogeography position, the carbonate build-up was growth very well and as the main reservoir in East Cepu High. Sea level change have important factor to provide variation of facies in each carbonate buildup, one of emerging facies is detrital carbonate. Detrital carbonate indicated by onlap horizon featured with carbonate build up body. Based on paleogeography, fluctuation of sea level change and sediment source, detrital carbonate formed in leeward area in lowstand or highstand phases. Distinguish between detrital carbonate facies with other facies, advanced seismic processing performed by using continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and seismic inversion. CWT is one method of spectral decomposition used to find the frequency that represent a facies. The result from seismic inversion will support the interpretation for facies distribution. As the result, seismic data which have interval frequency 10 – 45 Hz and Acoustic Impedance (AI) value above 35000 (from cross plot between acoustic impedance and gamma ray) can be interpreted as detrital carbonate. Based on seismic interpretation, detrital carbonate facies distributed along leeward area with geometrical spreading. The lateral facies change from detrital carbonate to shale was identified which causing this facies become potential as hydrocarbon reservoir with stratigraphic trap. Based on the earlier studies, North East Java Basin have a strong hydrocarbon migration to fill the reservoir, therefore the detrital carbonate have high chance to be a new hydrocarbon prospect in this area.

  11. Magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles with diluted magnet-like behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garza-Navarro, Marco; Torres-Castro, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Virgilio; Ortiz, Ubaldo; De la Rosa, Elder

    2010-01-01

    In the present work is reported the use of the biopolymer chitosan as template for the preparation of magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems, following a two step procedure of magnetite nanoparticles in situ precipitation and subsequent silver ions reduction. The crystalline and morphological characteristics of both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nanobeam diffraction patterns (NBD). The results of these studies corroborate the core/shell morphology and the crystalline structure of the magnetite core and the silver shell. Moreover, magnetization temperature dependent, M(T), measurements show an unusual diluted magnetic behavior attributed to the dilution of the magnetic ordering in the magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems. - Graphical abstract: Biopolymer chitosan was used as stabilization media to synthesize both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles. Results of HRTEM and NBD patterns confirm core/shell morphology of the obtained nanoparticles. It was found that the composites show diluted magnet-like behavior.

  12. Electrical resistivity of ferrimagnetic magnetite thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Yogi, A.; Kaurav, N.; Gupta, R.P.; Phase, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have grown Fe 3 O 4 (III) epitaxial film on Al 2 O 3 (0001) substrate by pulsed laser deposition, with thickness of 130 nm. X-ray diffraction studies of magnetite show the spinel cubic structure of film with preferential (III) orientation. The electrical resistivity measurement demonstrates that the properties of thin film of magnetite are basically similar to those of bulk magnetite and clearly shows semiconductor-insulator transition at Verwey transition temperature (≅140 K). We have found higher Verwey transition temperature when compared with earlier reports on similar type of system. Possible causes for increase in transition temperature are discussed. (author)

  13. Petrogenesis, detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology, and tectonic implications of the Upper Paleoproterozoic Seosan iron formation, western Gyeonggi Massif, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Seong; Jang, Yirang; Samuel, Vinod O.; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Jung-Woo; Yi, Keewook; Choi, Seon-Gyu

    2018-05-01

    This study involves investigations on the Upper Paleoproterozoic iron formation (viz., Seosan iron formation) from the Seosan Group, Gyeonggi Massif of the southwestern Korean Peninsula. It occurs as thin banded layers within meta-arkosic sandstone, formed by alternating processes of chemical (hydrothermal) and detrital depositions under a shallow marine environment. It mainly consists of alternating layers of iron oxides, mostly hematite, and quartz. Minor amounts of magnetite surrounded by muscovite, clinopyroxene and amphibole indicate hydrothermal alteration since its formation. Meta-arkosic sandstone is composed of recrystallized or porphyroclastic quartz and microcline, with small amounts of hematite and pyrite clusters. The Seosan iron formation has high contents of total Fe2O3 and SiO2 with positive Eu anomalies similar to those of other Precambrian banded iron formations, and its formation is clearly related to hydrothermal alteration since its deposition. Detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology data from a meta-arkosic sandstone (SN-1) and an iron formation (SN-2) show mainly two age groups of ca. 2.5 Ga and ca. 1.9-1.75 Ga. This together with intrusion age of the granite gneiss (ca. 1.70-1.65 Ga) clearly indicate that the iron formations were deposited during the Upper Paleoproterozoic. The dominant Paleoproterozoic detrital zircon bimodal age peaks preserved in the Seosan iron formation compare well with those from the South China Craton sedimentary basins, reflecting global tectonic events related to the Columbia supercontinent in East Asia.

  14. Thermally Induced Magnetite-Haematite Transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazo-Zuluaga, J.; Barrero, C. A.; Diaz-Teran, J.; Jerez, A.

    2003-01-01

    The products of thermal treatments of pure and copper doped magnetites have been investigated using Moessbauer spectrometry, XRD and thermal analysis techniques. The samples were heated in air between RT and 800 o C at several heating rates. Samples treated at 520 o C during 12 and 24 hours consist only of well-crystallized haematite. On the other hand, magnetites treated at 350 o C consisted of mixtures of haematite, maghemite and magnetite, with relative amount of each phase depending on the presence of copper as well as on the heating time. Results show that the transformation of magnetite to haematite goes through the formation of maghemite, and that the presence of copper delays this transformation.

  15. Thermally Induced Magnetite-Haematite Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazo-Zuluaga, J.; Barrero, C. A. [Universidad de Antioquia, Grupo de Estado Solido, Instituto de Fisica (Colombia); Diaz-Teran, J.; Jerez, A. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia UNED, Po Senda del Rey 9, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica (Spain)

    2003-06-15

    The products of thermal treatments of pure and copper doped magnetites have been investigated using Moessbauer spectrometry, XRD and thermal analysis techniques. The samples were heated in air between RT and 800{sup o}C at several heating rates. Samples treated at 520{sup o}C during 12 and 24 hours consist only of well-crystallized haematite. On the other hand, magnetites treated at 350{sup o}C consisted of mixtures of haematite, maghemite and magnetite, with relative amount of each phase depending on the presence of copper as well as on the heating time. Results show that the transformation of magnetite to haematite goes through the formation of maghemite, and that the presence of copper delays this transformation.

  16. On modifying the magnetite films with complexonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.I.; Bardasheva, T.I.

    1992-01-01

    Formation of magnetite layers on the surface of low-carbon steels and in neutral ammonium-nitrade eelctrolytes containing complexonate type inhibitors is studied to improve protection corrosion resistance of oxide coatings by means of electrochemical and gravimetrical techniques. Phosphonates are determined to affect kinetics and thickness of magnetite film formation, to increase protection properties of oxide layers. Complexonate-modified oxide coating is characterized by increased corrosion-resistance including that to chloride activating action

  17. 3-D Characterization of Detrital Zircon Grains and its Implications for Fluvial Transport, Mixing, and Preservation Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, V.; Kirkland, C. L.; Mehnert, A.; Gessner, K.; Shaw, J.

    2017-12-01

    Detrital zircon studies can suffer from selective loss of provenance information due to U-Pb age discordance, metamictization, metamorphic overprinting and fluviatile transport processes. The relationship between isotopic composition and zircon grain shape, and how grain shape is modified during transport, is largely unknown. We combine X-ray tomography with U-Pb geochronology to quantify how fluvial transport affects 3-D zircon shape, detrital age signature, and grain density along the Murchison River, whose catchment comprises Eoarchean to Early Paleozoic source rocks in Western Australia. We acquired tomographic volumes and isotopic data from 373 detrital zircons to document changes in size, shape and density in transport direction, and explore how grain shape, age spectra and the proportion of discordant material vary along the channel. Results show that shape characteristics are sensitive to transport distance, stream gradient, proximity to source material, and whether the source consists of primary or recycled zircons. With increasing transport distance, grain lengths decrease more than their widths. Furthermore, the loss of metamict grains occurs at a near constant rate, resulting in a linear increase of mean calculated zircon density by ca. 0.03 g/cm3 per 100 km transport distance. 3-D grain shape is therefore strongly linked to detrital age signature, and mean grain density is a function of the absolute transport distance. 3-D shape characteristics provide valuable information on detrital zircon populations, including the interaction between source materials with fluvial transport processes, which significantly affects preservation bias and, by inference, the representativeness of the sampled data.

  18. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United

  19. Detrital carbon pools in temperate forests: magnitude and potential for landscape-scale assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Bradford; Peter Weishampel; Marie-Louise Smith; Randall Kolka; Richard A. Birdsey; Scott V. Ollinger; Michael G. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Reliably estimating carbon storage and cycling in detrital biomass is an obstacle to carbon accounting. We examined carbon pools and fluxes in three small temperate forest landscapes to assess the magnitude of carbon stored in detrital biomass and determine whether detrital carbon storage is related to stand structural properties (leaf area, aboveground biomass,...

  20. Aging study of the powdered magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Umar Saeed, E-mail: omar_aps@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Rahim, Abdur, E-mail: rahimkhan533@gmail.com [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM), COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat (Pakistan); Muhammad, Nawshad; Rehman, Fozia [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM), COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Ahmad, Khalid [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, PO Box 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Iqbal, Jibran [College of Natural and Health Sciences, Zayed University, 144534 Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2017-03-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were produced via co-precipitation method and then stored at room temperature for 6 years in aerobic atmosphere. Variations in the inherent solid phase and solid interfacial properties of the prepared magnetite nanoparticles were investigated. For this purpose the fresh and aged samples were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffractometer and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The solid phase transformations of magnetite nanoparticles to maghemite nanoparticles as well as formation of other iron oxides were happened. After aging of 6 years, no change was occurred in the magnetic features; however increase in particle size from 9.6 to 18.5 measured by transmission electron microscopy was confirmed. The crystallite size and vibrating sample magnetometer values were measured before and after aging and found to increase from 8.98 nm and 47.23 emu/g to 16.18 nm and 58.36 emu/g respectively. The formation of other iron oxides, recrystallization and agglomeration during aging process, caused a significant decrease in the specific surface area from 124.43 to 45.00 m{sup 2}/g of the stored sample. - Highlights: • Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) were produced via co-precipitation method. • Inherent solid phase and interfacial properties of NP were evaluated after 6 years. • The solid phase transformations of magnetite NPs to maghemite NPs was happened. • After aging of 6 years, no change was occurred in the magnetic features.

  1. Aging study of the powdered magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Umar Saeed; Rahim, Abdur; Khan, Nasrullah; Muhammad, Nawshad; Rehman, Fozia; Ahmad, Khalid; Iqbal, Jibran

    2017-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were produced via co-precipitation method and then stored at room temperature for 6 years in aerobic atmosphere. Variations in the inherent solid phase and solid interfacial properties of the prepared magnetite nanoparticles were investigated. For this purpose the fresh and aged samples were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffractometer and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The solid phase transformations of magnetite nanoparticles to maghemite nanoparticles as well as formation of other iron oxides were happened. After aging of 6 years, no change was occurred in the magnetic features; however increase in particle size from 9.6 to 18.5 measured by transmission electron microscopy was confirmed. The crystallite size and vibrating sample magnetometer values were measured before and after aging and found to increase from 8.98 nm and 47.23 emu/g to 16.18 nm and 58.36 emu/g respectively. The formation of other iron oxides, recrystallization and agglomeration during aging process, caused a significant decrease in the specific surface area from 124.43 to 45.00 m"2/g of the stored sample. - Highlights: • Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) were produced via co-precipitation method. • Inherent solid phase and interfacial properties of NP were evaluated after 6 years. • The solid phase transformations of magnetite NPs to maghemite NPs was happened. • After aging of 6 years, no change was occurred in the magnetic features.

  2. Oxidation of magnetite in aerated aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.; Owen, D.G.

    1993-04-01

    Metastable equilibria involving phases less stable than hematite can be significantly more oxidizing than the calculated equilibrium between well-crystallized hematite and magnetite. In this report, generalized solubility and stability relationships between magnetite and Fe 2 O 3 .xH 2 O phases are derived to describe the metastable equilibria. Experiments with synthetic magnetite powders in aerated aqueous solutions show that crystalline hematite is formed within days at temperatures above 100 C in pure water or solutions containing anions (e.g., Cl - , SO 4 2 - , HCO 3 - ) that do not form very strong surface complexes with iron oxides. In the presence of dissolved phosphate or silica, however, the dissolution-precipitation route to hematite is strongly inhibited, and maghemite is a persistent metastable product. Thus, phosphate or silica are expected to delay the approach to magnetite-hematite equilibrium in aerated groundwaters conditioned by magnetite. These findings are presented in the context of nuclear fuel waste disposal. (author). 63 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs

  3. Electrochemical assessment of magnetite anti corrosive paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, D. M.; Arroyave, C.; Jaramillo, F.; Mattos, O. R.; Margarit, I. c.; Calderon, J.

    2003-01-01

    With the purpose of deepening in the understanding of the mechanisms of protection of anticorrosive pigments based on iron oxides, this work has been carried out on the production of pure magnetite, and copper and chromium doped magnetite, which were evaluated by different characterization techniques. The paints were prepared with a solvent less epoxy resin maintaining the Pigment volume Content near the Practical Critical value (CPVC), established for each pigment. The paints were applied on polished steel and monitored with electrochemical techniques at total immersion conditions. Permeability and impedance measurements of free films were also done. Impedance data were simulated with the Boukamp software. Results show that the paints pigmented with doped magnetite present better behaviour than a paint prepared with commercial hematite. (Author) 8 refs

  4. Magnetic disaccommodation in Sn substituted magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Gomez, P.; Bendimya, K.; Francisco, C. de; Munoz, J.M.; Alejos, O.; Torres, C.

    2001-01-01

    The relaxation of the initial magnetic permeability has been measured in polycrystalline Sn-doped magnetite with nominal composition Sn x Fe 3-x O 4 with x ranging from x=0 to 0.6. In the temperature range between 80 and 500 K, the time decay of the initial permeability after sample demagnetization has been represented by means of isochronal disaccommodation curves, which show the presence of different relaxation processes at 250 K (IV' peak), 275 K (IV), 300 K (III), 400 K (II) and 440 K (I). This behavior is explained on the basis of the disaccommodation of vacancy-doped magnetite and another similar tetravalent substitution, as the previously analyzed Ti-doped magnetite

  5. Actinide removal from aqueous solution with activated magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochen, R.L.; Thomas, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    An actinide aqueous waste treatment process using activated magnetite has been developed at Rocky Flats. The use and effectiveness of various magnetites in lowering actinide concentrations in aqueous solution are described. Experiments indicate that magnetite particle size and pretreatment (activation of the magnetite surface with hydroxyl ions greatly influence the effective use of magnetite as an actinide adsorbent. With respect to actinide removal, Ba(OH) 2 -activated magnetite was more effective over a broader pH range than was NaOH-activated magnetite. About 50% less Ba(OH) 2 -activated magnetite was required to lower plutonium concentration from 10 -4 to 10 -8 g/l. 7 refs., 8 tabs

  6. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  7. New Silica Magnetite Sorbent: The Influence of Variations of Sodium Silicate Concentrations on Silica Magnetite Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmiyawati, C.; Pratiwi, P. I.; Darmawan, A.

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption capacity of an adsorbent is determined by the adsorbent and the adsorbate properties. The character of the adsorbent will play a major role in its ability to adsorb the corresponding adsorbate. Therefore, in this study we looked at the effects of variations of sodium silicate concentrations on the resulting magnetite silica adsorbent properties. The application of silica coating on the magnetite was carried out through a sol-gel process with sodium silicate and HCl precursors. Based on the characterization data obtained, it was found that the silica coating on magnetite can increase the resistance to acid leaching, increase the particle size, but decrease the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Based on Gas Sorption Analyzer (GSA) and X-ray Difraction (XRD) data it can successively be determined that increase in concentration of sodium silicate will increase the surface area and amorphous structure of the Silica Magnetie.

  8. Muon spin-rotation study on magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Olsen, C.E.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Muon spin-rotation (μSR) results on synthetic single crystals of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) support the idea of muon bond formation in oxides. The anomaly in the temperature dependence of the μSR signal observed in Fe 3 O 4 may be attributed to the existence of molecular polarons in the Verwey transition-temperature region

  9. Magnetite nano-islands on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nathaniel; Zhang, Qiang; Rosenberg, Richard; Vaknin, David

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) of ex-situ iron nano-islands grown on graphene reveals that iron oxidation spontaneously leads to the formation of magnetite nano-particles - i.e, the formation of the inverse spinel Fe3O4. Fe islands have been grown with two different heights (20 and 75 MLs) on epitaxial graphene and we have determined their magnetic behavior both as function of temperature and applied external field. Our XAS and XMCD at an applied magnetic field of B = 5 T show that the thin film (20 MLs) is totally converted to magnetite whereas the thicker film (75 MLs) exhibits magnetite properties but also those of pure metal iron. For both samples, temperature dependence of the XMCD shows clear transitions at ~120 K consistent with the Verwey transition of bulk magnetite. XMCD at low temperatures shows a weak hysteresis and provide the average spin and angular-momentum moments, the dipolar term, and the total moment . In addition, manipulation and comparison of the XMCD data from both samples allows us to extract information about the pure iron nano-islands from the thicker sample. Ames Laboratory is supported by the U.S. DOE, BES, MSE Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. APS is supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. Magnetite nanoparticles embedded in biodegradable porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granitzer, P.; Rumpf, K.; Roca, A.G.; Morales, M.P.; Poelt, P.; Albu, M.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles, which are coated with oleic acid in a hexane solution and exhibit an average diameter of 7.7 nm, were embedded in a porous silicon (PS) matrix by immersion under defined parameters (e.g. concentration, temperature, time). The porous silicon matrix is prepared by anodization of a highly n-doped silicon wafer in an aqueous HF-solution. Magnetic characterization of the samples has been performed by SQUID-magnetometry. The superparamagnetic behaviour of the magnetite nanoparticles is represented by temperature-dependent magnetization measurements. Zero field (ZFC)/field cooled (FC) experiments indicate magnetic interactions between the particles. For the infiltration into the PS-templates different concentrations of the magnetite nanoparticles are used and magnetization measurements are performed in respect with magnetic interactions between the particles. The achieved porous silicon/magnetite specimens are not only interesting due to their transition between superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behaviour, and thus for magnetic applications but also because of the non-toxicity of both materials giving the opportunity to employ the system in medical applications as drug delivery or in medical diagnostics.

  11. Chemical Remagnetization of Jurassic Carbonates and a Primary Paleolatitude of Lower Cretaceous Volcaniclastic Rocks of the Tibetan Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Dekkers, M. J.; Garzanti, E.; Dupont Nivet, G.; Lippert, P. C.; Li, X.; Maffione, M.; Langereis, C. G.; Hu, X.; Guo, Z.; Kapp, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Paleolatitudes for the Tibetan Himalaya Zone based on paleomagnetic inclinations provide kinematic constraints of the passive northern Indian margin and the extent of 'Greater India' before the India-Asia collision. Here, we present a paleomagnetic investigation of the Jurassic (carbonates) to Lower Cretaceous (volcaniclastic rocks) Wölong section of the Tibetan Himalaya in the Everest region. The carbonates yield positive fold tests, suggesting that the remanent magnetizations have a pre-folding origin. However, detailed paleomagnetic analyses, rock magnetic tests, end-member modeling of acquisition curves of isothermal remanent magnetization, and petrographic studies reveal that the magnetic carrier of the Jurassic carbonates is authigenic magnetite, whereas the dominant magnetic carrier of the Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic rocks is detrital magnetite. We conclude that the Jurassic carbonates were remagnetized, whereas the Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastics retain a primary remanence. We hypothesize that remagnetization of the Jurassic carbonates was probably caused by the oxidation of early diagenetic pyrite to magnetite within the time interval at ~86-84 Ma during the latest Cretaceous Normal Superchron and earliest deposition of Cretaceous oceanic red beds in the Tibetan Himalaya. The remagnetization of the limestones prevents determining the size of 'Greater India' during Jurassic time. Instead, a paleolatitude of the Tibetan Himalaya of 23.8±2.1° S at ~86-84 Ma is suggested. This value is lower than the expected paleolatitude of India from apparent polar wander path (APWP). The volcaniclastic rocks with the primary remanence, however, yielded a Lower Cretaceous paleolatitude of Tibetan Himalaya of 55.5±3° S, fitting well with the APWP of India.

  12. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  13. Biomimetic magnetite mediated by magnetosome proteins vs. ALH84001 meteorite magnetite: Are both comparable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry-Sosa, A.; Jimenez-Lopez, C.

    2016-07-01

    The suggestion in 1996 that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 could contain proof of possible biologic activity in the past have generated a huge controversy that last until today. One of the most discussed evidence is the presence of magnetite crystals that resemble those produced by a particular group of bacteria, the so called magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). These microorganisms are the only known example of biologically controlled biomineralization among the prokaryotes and exert an exquisite control over the biomineralization process of intracellular magnetite that result in crystals with very unique features that, so far, cannot be replicated by inorganic means. These unique features have been used to recognize the biological origin of natural terrestrial magnetites, but the problem arises when those same biogenecity criteria are applied to extraterrestrial magnetites. Most of the problems are caused by the fact that it is not clear whether or not some of those characteristics can be reproduced inorganically. Magnetosome protein mediated magnetite synthesis seems to be the best approach to obtain magnetosome-like magnetites, and such strategy may help clarify what is the specific biosignature of magnetotactic bacteria. (Author)

  14. Deposition of magnetite particles onto alloy-800 steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basset, M.; Arbeau, N.; McInerney, J.; Lister, D.H. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Fouling is a particularly serious problem in the power generating industry. Deposits modify the thermalhydraulic characteristics of heat transfer surfaces by changing the resistance to heat transfer and the resistance to fluid flow, and, if thick enough, can harbour aggressive chemicals. Deposits are also implicated in the increase of radiation fields around working areas in the primary heat transfer systems of nuclear power plants. In order to understand the preliminary steps of the formation of corrosion product deposits on the outsides of steam generator tubes, a laboratory program has investigated the deposition of magnetite particles from suspension in water onto Alloy-800 surfaces under various conditions of flow, chemistry and boiling heat transfer. A recirculating loop made of stainless steel operating at less than 400kPa pressure, with a nominal coolant temperature of 90 degrees C, was equipped with a vertical glass column which housed a 2.5E-01m-long Alloy-800 boiler tube capable of generating a heat flux of 240kW/m{sup 2} . A concentration of suspended magnetite of 5.0E-03kg/m{sup 3} was maintained in the recirculating coolant, which was maintained at a pH of 7.5. The magnetite was synthesized with a sol-gel process, which was developed to produce reproducibly monodispersed, colloidal (<1{mu}m) and nearly spherical particles. A radiotracing method was used to characterize the deposit evolution with time and to quantify the removal of magnetite particles. The results from a series of deposition experiments are presented here. The deposition process is described in terms of a two-step mechanism: the transport step, involving the transport from the bulk of the liquid to the vicinity of the surface, followed by the attachment step, involving the attachment of the particle onto the surface. Under non-boiling heat transfer conditions, diffusion seems to be the dominant factor ruling deposition with a small contribution from thermophoresis; removal was

  15. Deposition of magnetite particles onto alloy-800 steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basset, M.; Arbeau, N.; McInerney, J.; Lister, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Fouling is a particularly serious problem in the power generating industry. Deposits modify the thermalhydraulic characteristics of heat transfer surfaces by changing the resistance to heat transfer and the resistance to fluid flow, and, if thick enough, can harbour aggressive chemicals. Deposits are also implicated in the increase of radiation fields around working areas in the primary heat transfer systems of nuclear power plants. In order to understand the preliminary steps of the formation of corrosion product deposits on the outsides of steam generator tubes, a laboratory program has investigated the deposition of magnetite particles from suspension in water onto Alloy-800 surfaces under various conditions of flow, chemistry and boiling heat transfer. A recirculating loop made of stainless steel operating at less than 400kPa pressure, with a nominal coolant temperature of 90 degrees C, was equipped with a vertical glass column which housed a 2.5E-01m-long Alloy-800 boiler tube capable of generating a heat flux of 240kW/m 2 . A concentration of suspended magnetite of 5.0E-03kg/m 3 was maintained in the recirculating coolant, which was maintained at a pH of 7.5. The magnetite was synthesized with a sol-gel process, which was developed to produce reproducibly monodispersed, colloidal (<1μm) and nearly spherical particles. A radiotracing method was used to characterize the deposit evolution with time and to quantify the removal of magnetite particles. The results from a series of deposition experiments are presented here. The deposition process is described in terms of a two-step mechanism: the transport step, involving the transport from the bulk of the liquid to the vicinity of the surface, followed by the attachment step, involving the attachment of the particle onto the surface. Under non-boiling heat transfer conditions, diffusion seems to be the dominant factor ruling deposition with a small contribution from thermophoresis; removal was considered

  16. Study on magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by chemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Wenli; Kumada, H.; Natusme, T.; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with controlled size were synthesized by chemical method. Higher deposition temperature and a rapid-raising temperature procedure are favorable to particle size distribution and fabrication of monodisperse nanoparticles. The larger nanoparticles can be synthesized by the two-step method. The large nanoparticle (up to 25 nm) without agglomeration was successfully produced. The saturation magnetization of 11 nm magnetite particles was 45 emu/g at room temperature, which is smaller than that of bulk magnetite due to surface effect. Hysteresis of the magnetite nanoparticle was very small, indicating superparamagnetic behavior. The magnetic domains of the 11 nm magnetite nanoparticles were successfully observed by MFM

  17. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (∼350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (500 ppm) concentrations.

  18. The dissolution kinetics of magnetite under regenerative conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolution studies of magnetite were carried out under regenerative conditions in dilute chemical decontamination formulations. During regeneration of the formulation, the H + from the strong acid cation exchange resin gets released and the metal is absorbed on the resin. The efficiency of the regenerative process depends on the stability constants of the complexes involved and the selectivity on the ion exchange column. The regenerative condition helps to maintain a constant chelating agent concentration and pH during the dissolution experiment. Such a condition is ideal for obtaining data on the dissolution behaviour of the corrosion products with special application to actual reactor decontamination. The ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) based formulation used was found to be ineffective due to the high stability constant of Fe(III)-EDTA complex, which is not easily cleaved by the cation exchange resin. Hence, knowledge of the kinetics of magnetite dissolution under regenerative condition is of primary importance. The 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid formulation is found to be better for the dissolution of Fe 3 O 4 in both static and regenerative modes in the presence of reductants than nitrilotriacetic acid and EDTA. (orig.)

  19. The dissolution kinetics of magnetite under regenerative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [New Brunswick Univ., Frederiction (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Raghavan, P.S.; Gopalan, R.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Lab. of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) (India)

    2004-07-01

    Dissolution studies of magnetite were carried out under regenerative conditions in dilute chemical decontamination formulations. During regeneration of the formulation, the H{sup +} from the strong acid cation exchange resin gets released and the metal is absorbed on the resin. The efficiency of the regenerative process depends on the stability constants of the complexes involved and the selectivity on the ion exchange column. The regenerative condition helps to maintain a constant chelating agent concentration and pH during the dissolution experiment. Such a condition is ideal for obtaining data on the dissolution behaviour of the corrosion products with special application to actual reactor decontamination. The ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) based formulation used was found to be ineffective due to the high stability constant of Fe(III)-EDTA complex, which is not easily cleaved by the cation exchange resin. Hence, knowledge of the kinetics of magnetite dissolution under regenerative condition is of primary importance. The 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid formulation is found to be better for the dissolution of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in both static and regenerative modes in the presence of reductants than nitrilotriacetic acid and EDTA. (orig.)

  20. Solubility of magnetite in coolant of NPP boiling reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembo, V.I.; Kritskij, V.G.; Slobodov, A.A.; Puchkov, L.V.

    1988-01-01

    To improve water-chemical NPP regimes calculations of iron solubility up to 600 K temperature in Fe 3 O 4 -H 2 O-O 2 and Fe(OH) 3 -H 2 O systems are performed using a system of selected and consistent values of thermal constants of various chemical iron forms in standard aqueous solution state. Calculations have shown that up to 423 K in aqueous medium containing oxygen, magnetite is unstable and is oxidized first up to Fe(OH) 3 and then - up to Fe OOH and Fe 2 O 3 . Calculations complying with experimental data have demonstrated the presence of maximum on the curve solubility-temperature in desalinized water containing 10 μkg/kg of oxygen. A sequence of processes of oxygen effect on water regime and corrosion prduct deposition in a condensate-feed circuit of NPP boiling reactor is proposed. It is proved that under oxygen water chemistry of condensate-feed circuit after magnetite transfomation into gematite, reduction of soluble iron form inlet to reactor loop occurs, which allows one to expect reduction of γ-radiation dose rate buildup around the primary loop pipelines

  1. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles using electrochemical oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ya. Levitin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles are promising for use in the biomedical industry for targeted drug delivery, cell separation and biochemical products, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, immunological studies, etc. Classic method for the synthesis of magnetite is the chemical condensation Elmore’s, it is simple and cheap, but it is complicated by the formation of side compounds which impair the magnetic properties of the final product. Biological and medical purposes require high purity magnetite nanoparticles. Electrochemical methods of producing nanoparticles of magnetite acquire significant spread. The kinetics of electrochemical processes are a function of a larger number of parameters than the kinetics of conventional chemical reaction, thus electrochemical reactions can be thinner and more completely adjusted to give a predetermined size nanoparticles. In the kinetics of the electrochemical oxidation and reduction the important role is played by the nature of the electrode. In many industrial processes, it is advisable to use lead dioxide anodes with titanium current lead. Purpose of the work To determine the optimum conditions of electrochemical oxidation of Fe2+ Fe3+to produce magnetite with high purity and improved magnetic characteristics. Materials and methods Electrochemical studies were carried out in a glass cell ЯСЭ-2 using a potentiostat ПИ-50-1.1 and a recording device ПДА1. Reference electrode - silver chloride ЭВЛ1М 3.1, potentials listed on the hydrogen scale. The test solution contained 80 g/ l FeSO4×7H2O and H2SO4(to pH 1. The pH of the solution was measured with a pH–meter « рН–150». Concentration ratio of Fe3+/Fe2+in the solution was measured by permanganometric method. Magnetite particle sizes were measured by an electron microscope computer ЭВМ-100Л, an increasing is 2×105. Saturation magnetization was evaluated by the magnetization curve, for the measured sample in the field with strength

  2. Magnetite thin films: A simulational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazo-Zuluaga, J.; Restrepo, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the study of the magnetic properties of magnetite thin films is addressed by means of the Monte Carlo method and the Ising model. We simulate LxLxd magnetite thin films (d being the film thickness and L the transversal linear dimension) with periodic boundary conditions along transversal directions and free boundary conditions along d direction. In our model, both the three-dimensional inverse spinel structure and the interactions scheme involving tetrahedral and octahedral sites have been considered in a realistic way. Results reveal a power-law dependence of the critical temperature with the film thickness accordingly by an exponent ν=0.81 and ruled out by finite-size scaling theory. Estimates for the critical exponents of the magnetization and the specific heat are finally presented and discussed

  3. Encapsulated magnetite particles for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Landfester, K

    2003-01-01

    The process of miniemulsification allows the generation of small, homogeneous, and stable droplets containing monomer or polymer precursors and magnetite which are then transferred by polymer reactions to the final polymer latexes, keeping their particular identity without serious exchange kinetics involved. It is shown that the miniemulsion process can excellently be used for the formulation of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles which can further be used for biomedical applications. The use of high shear, appropriate surfactants, and the addition of a hydrophobe in order to suppress the influence of Ostwald ripening are key factors for the formation of the small and stable droplets in miniemulsion and will be discussed. Two different approaches based on miniemulsion processes for the encapsulation of magnetite into polymer particles will be presented in detail.

  4. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heterogeneous catalysis is highlighted. Use of an oxide of earth-abundant iron for various applications in catalysis and environmental remediation.

  5. One step facile synthesis of ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suppiah, Durga Devi; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee, E-mail: sharifahbee@um.edu.my

    2016-09-15

    The ferromagnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were influenced by the nanoparticle size, hence importance were given to the synthesis method. This paper clearly shows that magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by employing one step controlled precipitation method using a single salt (Iron(II) sulfate) iron precursor. The acquired titration curve from this method provides vital information on the possible reaction mechanism leading to the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles formation. Goethite (α-FeOOH) was obtained at pH 4, while the continuous addition of hydroxyl ions (OH{sup −}) forms iron hydroxides (Fe(OH){sub 2}). This subsequently reacts with the goethite, producing magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at pH 10. Spectroscopy studies validate the magnetite phase existence while structural and morphology analysis illustrates cubic shaped magnetite with an average size of 35 nm was obtained. The synthesized magnetite might be superparamagnetic though lower saturation magnetization (67.5 emu/g) measured at room temperature as compared to bulk magnetite. However the nanoparticles surface anisotropy leads to higher remanence (12 emu/g) and coercivity (117.7 G) making the synthesized magnetite an excellent candidate to be utilized in recording devices. The understanding of the magnetite synthesis mechanism can not only be used to achieve even smaller magnetite nanoparticles but also to prepare different types of iron oxides hydroxides using different iron precursor source. - Highlights: • Magnetite strong magnetism properties make it versatile in various applications including biomedical and electromagnetic materials. • Sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) anion plays a major role in the structure control of iron oxide during synthesis. • Phase pure magnetite nanoparticles with high magnetism properties can be obtained using a single salt (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) method.

  6. A Moessbauer study of doped magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, C.I.; Boekema, C.; Woude, F. van der; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Doped magnetite was investigated by means of the Moessbauer effect to ascertain the behaviour of conduction electrons in magnetite. The Moessbauer spectrum of Fe 3 O 4 recorded at room temperature consisted of two patterns: one corresponding to the Fe 3+ (A) ions and another corresponding to the Fe(B) ions. The first A and B lines of the room temperature Moessbauer spectra of Msub(0.1)Fesub(2.9)O 4 with M = Li, Ni and Sn are presented. The B site lines of the spectra were asymmetrically broadened and showed a certain structure whereas the A site lines were narrow. In the Moessbauer spectrum of Lisub(0.2)Fesub(2.8)O 4 recorded at 407 0 C even separate lines between the A and B patterns were observed. It was found that the symmetry and line broadening were only slightly temperature dependent and were still present at higher temperatures. The application of a charge oscillation model was found to be valid only for lower impurity concentrations. The Moessbauer study of doped magnetite revealed the occurrence of spin and charge density oscillations in the B sublattice. (Z.S.)

  7. Paleolatitudes of the Tibetan Himalaya from primary and secondary magnetizations of Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wentao; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Garzanti, Eduardo; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Lippert, Peter C.; Li, Xiaochun; Maffione, Marco; Langereis, Cor G.; Hu, Xiumian; Guo, Zhaojie; Kapp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Tibetan Himalaya represents the northernmost continental unit of the Indian plate that collided with Asia in the Cenozoic. Paleomagnetic studies on the Tibetan Himalaya can help constrain the dimension and paleogeography of "Greater India," the Indian plate lithosphere that subducted and underthrusted below Asia after initial collision. Here we present a paleomagnetic investigation of a Jurassic (limestones) and Lower Cretaceous (volcaniclastic sandstones) section of the Tibetan Himalaya. The limestones yielded positive fold test, showing a prefolding origin of the isolated remanent magnetizations. Detailed paleomagnetic analyses, rock magnetic tests, end-member modeling of acquisition curves of isothermal remanent magnetization, and petrographic investigation reveal that the magnetic carrier of the Jurassic limestones is authigenic magnetite, whereas the dominant magnetic carrier of the Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic sandstones is detrital magnetite. Our observations lead us to conclude that the Jurassic limestones record a prefolding remagnetization, whereas the Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic sandstones retain a primary remanence. The volcaniclastic sandstones yield an Early Cretaceous paleolatitude of 55.5°S [52.5°S, 58.6°S] for the Tibetan Himalaya, suggesting it was part of the Indian continent at that time. The size of "Greater India" during Jurassic time cannot be estimated from these limestones. Instead, a paleolatitude of the Tibetan Himalaya of 23.8°S [21.8°S, 26.1°S] during the remagnetization process is suggested. It is likely that the remagnetization, caused by the oxidation of early diagenetic pyrite to magnetite, was induced during 103-83 or 77-67 Ma. The inferred paleolatitudes at these two time intervals imply very different tectonic consequences for the Tibetan Himalaya.

  8. A spectroscopic study of uranium(VI) interaction with magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Aamrani, S.; Gimenez, J.; Rovira, M.; Seco, F.; Grive, M.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Pablo, J. de

    2007-01-01

    The uranium sorbed onto commercial magnetite has been characterized by using two different spectroscopic techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Magnetite samples have been put in contact with uranium(VI) solutions in conditions in which a high uranium uptake is expected. After several days, the magnetite surface has been analysed by XPS and EXAFS. The XPS results obtained are not conclusive regarding the uranium oxidation state in the magnetite surface. On the other hand, the results obtained with the EXAFS technique show that the uranium-magnetite sample spectrum has characteristics from both the UO 2 and schoepite spectra, e.g. a relatively high coordination number of equatorial oxygens and two axial oxygens, respectively. These results would indicate that the uranium sorbed onto magnetite would be a mixture of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Gd-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Honghu; Malik, Vikash; Mallapragada, Surya; Akinc, Mufit

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles has attracted increasing interest due to their importance in biomedical and technological applications. Tunable magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles to meet specific requirements will greatly expand the spectrum of applications. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to studying and controlling the size, shape and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles. Here we investigate gadolinium (Gd) doping to influence the growth process as well as magnetic properties of magnetite nanocrystals via a simple co-precipitation method under mild conditions in aqueous media. Gd doping was found to affect the growth process leading to synthesis of controllable particle sizes under the conditions tested (0–10 at% Gd"3"+). Typically, undoped and 5 at% Gd-doped magnetite nanoparticles were found to have crystal sizes of about 18 and 44 nm, respectively, supported by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that Gd-doped nanoparticles retained the magnetite crystal structure, with Gd"3"+ randomly incorporated in the crystal lattice, probably in the octahedral sites. The composition of 5 at% Gd-doped magnetite was Fe_(_3_−_x_)Gd_xO_4 (x=0.085±0.002), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. 5 at% Gd-doped nanoparticles exhibited ferrimagnetic properties with small coercivity (~65 Oe) and slightly decreased magnetization at 260 K in contrast to the undoped, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles. Templation by the bacterial biomineralization protein Mms6 did not appear to affect the growth of the Gd-doped magnetite particles synthesized by this method. - Highlights: • Gd-doped magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized via aqueous co-precipitation method under mild conditions. • Gd doping affects growth of magnetite nanoparticles leading to tunable particle size. • Gd-doped magnetite nanoparticles exhibit ferrimagnetic properties.

  10. The use of magnetite for decontaminating alpha containing effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivens, R.

    1988-06-01

    The feasibility of retention of precipitated magnetite by magnetic filtration followed by direct cementation offered an attractive alternative to conventional ferric hydroxide treatment of radioactive liquid effluents. The magnetically-assisted dewatering of laboratory-prepared magnetite was examined in a number of ways, none of which achieved the desired optimum solids content for cementation. Attempts to prepare magnetite in situ from typical effluents containing iron were unsuccessful owing to the presence of interfering ions. Preformed magnetite was reasonably effective at absorbing actinides from solution but did not appear to offer any significant advantage over ferric hydroxide. (author)

  11. Structure and superparamagnetic behaviour of magnetite nanoparticles in cellulose beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Jose R., E-mail: correa@fq.uh.cu [Department of General Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Havana, Zapata and G, Havana City 10400 (Cuba); Bordallo, Eduardo [Sugar Cane-Cellulose Research Center, Cuba-9, Quivican (Cuba); Canetti, Dora [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Havana, Zapata and G, Havana City 10400 (Cuba); Leon, Vivian [Sugar Cane-Cellulose Research Center, Cuba-9, Quivican (Cuba); Otero-Diaz, Luis C. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry-1, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Electron Microscopy Center, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Negro, Carlos [Chemical Engineering Department, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gomez, Adrian [Electron Microscopy Center, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Saez-Puche, Regino [Department of Inorganic Chemistry-1, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles were obtained starting from a mixture of iron(II) and iron(III) solutions in a preset total iron concentration from 0.04 to 0.8 mol l{sup -1} with ammonia at 25 and 70 {sup o}C. The regeneration of cellulose from viscose produces micrometrical spherical cellulose beads in which synthetic magnetite were embedded. The characterization of cellulose-magnetite beads by X-ray diffraction, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy and magnetic measurement is reported. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the higher is the total iron concentration and temperature the higher is the crystal size of the magnetite obtained. Transmission Electron Microscopy studies of cellulose-magnetite beads revealed the distribution of magnetite nanoparticles inside pores of hundred nanometers. Magnetite as well as the cellulose-magnetite composites exhibit superparamagnetic characteristics. Field cooling and zero field cooling magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the superparamagnetic behaviour and the blocking temperature for the magnetite with a mean size of 12.5 nm, which is 200 K.

  12. Magnetite deposition in PWR secondary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, V.; Riess, R.; Ruehle, W.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, local magnetite (Fe 3 04) deposition has been observed at various locations within the secondary systems of Siemens-designed PWRs. These deposits sometimes limited operational flexibility and affected routine operation checks. In addition, these deposits may affect the heat transfer characteristics of heat exchangers. Prior to replacement of components or piping or other extensive maintenance activities it should be investigated whether any modification in secondary-side water chemistry might counteract this corrosion phenomenon, which has proven very effective in maintaining steam generator performance. A VGB study will make an assessment of available field information, and countermeasures will be elaborated. This paper describes the current status of the project. (orig.) [de

  13. Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe2+ and magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Handler, Robert M; Beard, Brian L; Pasakarnis, Timothy; Johnson, Clark M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-11-20

    The reaction between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) has been extensively studied due to its role in contaminant reduction, trace-metal sequestration, and microbial respiration. Previous work has demonstrated that the reaction of Fe(2+) with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) results in the structural incorporation of Fe(2+) and an increase in the bulk Fe(2+) content of magnetite. It is unclear, however, whether significant Fe atom exchange occurs between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+), as has been observed for other Fe oxides. Here, we measured the extent of Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe(2+) and magnetite by reacting isotopically "normal" magnetite with (57)Fe-enriched aqueous Fe(2+). The extent of Fe atom exchange between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) was significant (54-71%), and went well beyond the amount of Fe atoms found at the near surface. Mössbauer spectroscopy of magnetite reacted with (56)Fe(2+) indicate that no preferential exchange of octahedral or tetrahedral sites occurred. Exchange experiments conducted with Co-ferrite (Co(2+)Fe(2)(3+)O(4)) showed little impact of Co substitution on the rate or extent of atom exchange. Bulk electron conduction, as previously invoked to explain Fe atom exchange in goethite, is a possible mechanism, but if it is occurring, conduction does not appear to be the rate-limiting step. The lack of significant impact of Co substitution on the kinetics of Fe atom exchange, and the relatively high diffusion coefficients reported for magnetite suggest that for magnetite, unlike goethite, Fe atom diffusion is a plausible mechanism to explain the rapid rates of Fe atom exchange in magnetite.

  14. Gravity settling of precipitated magnetite and ferric floc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, N.S.; Loft, P.R.

    1983-06-01

    A comparison is presented of the gravity settling performance of ferric floc and magnetite, both in batch settling tests, and on a continuous gravity settler. The precipitation of magnetite from solution on a continuous basis was also demonstrated, and the process was shown not to be significantly affected by the presence of a wide range of chemical species. (U.K.)

  15. Treatment of alpha-contaminated effluents by magnetite precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, N.S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies of the magnetic filtration of precipitated magnetite have continued enabling data on the effect of magnetic field strength on collecting efficiency to be extended from 0.32 Tesla to 0.8 Tesla with some interesting observations. Tests have been carried out on the direct encapsulation of the magnetite loaded matrices from these runs. (U.K.)

  16. Spin and charge density oscillations in doped magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Woude, F. van der; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A classical selfconsistent model was proposed based upon local compensation and upon neutrality conditions describing the response of conduction electrons in narrow d bands to local electric perturbation caused by an impurity placed at a particular site in the lattice. Theoretical results obtained by the model applied to magnetite are in good agreement with recent Moessbauer data on doped magnetite. (Z.S.)

  17. Electro-precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles: an electrochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Mona; Groenen-Serrano, Karine; Noé, Laure; Garcia, Cécile; Verelst, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles of magnetites (Fe3O4) are synthesized with a new process based on electro-precipitation in ethanol medium. A mechanism pathway is proposed consisting of a Fe(OH)3 precipitation followed by the reduction of iron hydroxide to magnetite in the presence of hydroxyl ions which are enerated at the cathode.

  18. Magnetic interactions, bonding, and motion of positive muons in magnetite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive-muon behavior in magnetite is investigated by the muon-spin-rotation technique. The observed muon relaxation rate in zero applied field, in conjunction with the measured local field, allows us to separate muon-motion effects from phase transitions associated with magnetite. The local

  19. Utilization of detrital complexes by the oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The contribution of bacteria and nonliving particulate organic matter of detrital complexes to the nutrition of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was investigated in the laboratory under normal feeding conditions. Results indicate the oysters were capable of assimilating crude fiber extracted from 14 C-Spartina alterniflora with an efficiency of approximately 3% and that enteric bacteria did not enhance this process. Less than 1% of an oyster's energetic demands could be met by direct utilization of this substrate, in the Choptank River subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay. The potential contribution of refractory organics to oysters in large salt marshes having crude fiber concentration greater than in the Choptank system, are discussed. The ability of the oyster to utilize 14 C and 15 N from cellulolytic marine bacteria, isolated from a S. alterniflora dominated salt marsh, was also studied

  20. In situ detrital zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, A.; Monteleone, B. D.; van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K.; Hourigan, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Detrital studies of both sand and rock are relevant to many problems, ranging from the climate and tectonics feedback debate to the long-term record of orogenic evolution. When applying the conventional (U-Th)/He technique to such studies, two important issues arise. Often, only euhedral grains are permissible for analysis in order to make simple geometric corrections for α-recoil. In detrital samples, this is problematic because euhedral grains can be scarce due to mechanical abrasion during transport, and potentially introduce bias in favour of more proximally sourced grains. Second, inherent to detrital studies is the need to date many grains (>100) per sample to ensure a representative sampling of the sediment source region, thus making robust conventional detrital studies both expensive and time-consuming. UV laser microprobes can improve this by permitting careful targeting of the grain interior away from the α-ejection zone, rendering the α-recoil correction unnecessary, thus eliminating bias toward euhedral grains. In the Noble Gas, Geochemistry, and Geochronology Laboratory at ASU, apatite and zircon have been successfully dated using in situ methods. For this study, the conventional and in situ techniques are compared by dating zircons from a modern river sand that drains a small catchment in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Ladakh Batholith in NW India. This sample has a simple provenance, which allows us to demonstrate the robustness of the in situ method. Moreover, different microbeam techniques will be explored to establish the most efficient approach to obtain accurate and precise U-Th concentrations using synrock, which is our powdered, homogenized, and reconstituted zircon-rock standard. Without this, such in situ U-Th data would be difficult to obtain. 117 zircons were dated using the conventional (U-Th)/He method, revealing dates ranging from 9.70±0.35 to 106.6±3.5 Ma (2σ) with the major mode at 26 Ma. For comparison, 44 grains were dated using the in

  1. Review on theoretical calculation of the magnetite solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myongjin; Kim, Hongpyo

    2013-01-01

    FAC is influenced by many factors such as water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (D. O.) in a solution, and etc.), chemical composition of carbon steel, and fluid dynamics. Magnetite is formed at the inner surface of carbon steel, and protects the integrity of pipes from the damage. The magnetite has a stable state at each equilibrium condition, so that it can be dissolved into the fluid under conditions that satisfy the equilibrium state. The iron solubility can be calculated by considering the reaction equilibrium constants for prediction of a change in the magnetite layer. In the present work, studies on the magnetite solubility were reviewed for the theoretical calculation of magnetite, and iron solubility data were compared to find the proper solubility values of each study

  2. Necessity of electrically conductive pili for methanogenesis with magnetite stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Magnetite-mediated direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET between Geobacter and Methanosarcina species is increasingly being invoked to explain magnetite stimulation of methane production in anaerobic soils and sediments. Although magnetite-mediated DIET has been documented in defined co-cultures reducing fumarate or nitrate as the electron acceptor, the effects of magnetite have only been inferred in methanogenic systems. Methods Concentrations of methane and organic acid were analysed with a gas chromatograph and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The concentration of HCl-extractable Fe(II was determined by the ferrozine method. The association of the defined co-cultures of G. metallireducens and M. barkeri with magnetite was observed with transmission electron micrographs. Results Magnetite stimulated ethanol metabolism and methane production in defined co-cultures of G. metallireducens and M. barkeri; however, magnetite did not promote methane production in co-cultures initiated with a culture of G. metallireducens that could not produce electrically conductive pili (e-pili, unlike the conductive carbon materials that facilitate DIET in the absence of e-pili. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that G. metallireducens and M. barkeri were closely associated when magnetite was present, as previously observed in G. metallireducens/G. sulfurreducens co-cultures. These results show that magnetite can promote DIET between Geobacter and Methanosarcina species, but not as a substitute for e-pili, and probably functions to facilitate electron transfer from the e-pili to Methanosarcina. Conclusion In summary, the e-pili are necessary for the stimulation of not only G. metallireducens/G. sulfurreducens, but also methanogenic G. metallireducens/M. barkeri co-cultures with magnetite.

  3. A long-term study on the effect of magnetite supplementation in continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy effluent - Magnetic separation and recycling of magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gahyun; Jung, Heejung; Kim, Jaai; Lee, Changsoo

    2017-10-01

    Promotion of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between exoelectrogenic bacteria and electron-utilizing methanogens has recently been discussed as a new method for enhanced biomethanation. This study evaluated the effect of magnetite-promoted DIET in continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy effluent and tested the magnetic separation and recycling of magnetite to avoid continuous magnetite addition. The applied magnetite recycling method effectively supported enhanced DIET activity and biomethanation performance over a long period (>250days) without adding extra magnetite. DIET via magnetite particles as electrical conduits was likely the main mechanism for the enhanced biomethanation. Magnetite formed complex aggregate structures with microbes, and magnetite recycling also helped retain more biomass in the process. Methanosaeta was likely the major methanogen group responsible for DIET-based methanogenesis, in association with Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi populations as syntrophic partners. The recycling approach proved robust and effective, highlighting the potential of magnetite recycling for high-rate biomethanation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanometric hybrid films of xanthan and magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Edla M.A.; Silva, Anielle M.; Petri, Denise F.S.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (NMM) were synthesized by co-characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and potentiometric titration. Xanthan thin films and NMM were deposited alternately onto Si wafers. The attachment of first xanthan layer onto Si wafer was obtained in the presence of Ca 2+ 1 mM and at pH 10. Under these conditions calcium ions interact electrostatically with both silanol groups and xanthan carboxylate groups, yielding stable xanthan (1.5 ± 0.5) nm thick films. The deposition of NMM was forced by applying a magnetic field set under the sample. The following bilayers were formed by 'layer-by-layer' electrostatic process and magnetic field action. The bilayers formation was monitored by the variation in the ellipsometric angles values, Δ e ψ, and atomic force microscopy. (author)

  5. Degradation of magnetite nanoparticles in biomimetic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceño, Sarah; Hernandez, Ana C.; Sojo, Juan [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Lascano, Luis [Dpto. Física, Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Ecuador); Gonzalez, Gema, E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.gob.ve, E-mail: gema.gonzalez@epn.edu.ec [Escuela Nacional Politécnica (Ecuador)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} obtained by coprecipitation (COP), thermal decomposition (DT), and commercial sample (CM) have been degraded in similar conditions to physiological medium at pH 4.7 and in simulated body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4. The formation of the nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In view of medical and environmental applications, the stability of the particles was measured with dynamic light scattering. The degradation processes were followed with atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA) and TEM. Magnetic measurements were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Our results revealed that the structural and magnetic properties of the remaining nanoparticles after the degradation process were significantly different to those of the initial suspension. The degradation kinetics is affected by the pH, the coating, and the average particle size of the nanoparticles.

  6. Observing thermomagnetic stability of nonideal magnetite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Kasama, Takeshi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    The thermomagnetic behavior of remanence-induced magnetite (Fe3O4) particles in the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) size range (similar to 0.1-10 mu m), which dominate the magnetic signature of many rock lithologies, is investigated using off-axis electron holography. Construction of magnetic induction...... of the Fe3O4 grain, in this instance, remains thermally stable close to its unblocking temperature and exhibits a similar in-plane remanent state upon cooling; i.e., the particle is effectively behaving like a uniaxial single-domain particle to temperatures near T-C. Such particles are thought to be robust...... magnetic recorders. It is suggested that evidence for PSD behavior should therefore not preclude paleomagnetic investigation....

  7. Preparation of Magnetite Nanocrystals from Ferrous Sulphate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho Yu Mon; Tint Tint Kywe; Moe Moe Kyaw

    2010-12-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle were prepared by hydrothermal process in two ways, which would be used for production of copier toner.In this investigation, the first process was made from ferrous sulphate (FeSO4 . 7H2O) by using 10 M sodium hydroxide solution. In this method, magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by changing aeration time from 1 to 3 hr and heated at 90C for 15 min. The alternative process was carried out from ferrous sulphate (FeSO4.7H2O) by using 6.6 M sodium hydroxide solution and sodium silicate solution.Magnetite (black iron oxide) was synthesized by using different aeration times and reaction times. Aeration time was changed from 1 to 2 hr and reaction time was changed from 1 to 5.5 hr at 85 C. The magnetites obtained were examined by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) technique. The average particle size range of magnetite nanoprticles were 90-120 nm and 120-150 nm in each process. The maximum yied percentages of magnetite based on FeSO4 in both processing were found to be 46.30% and 60.72%. The precent yields of magnetite in both preparation based on theoretical yields were 91.02% and 94.83% respectively.

  8. Bats use magnetite to detect the earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Doak, Thomas G; Wikelski, Martin

    2008-02-27

    While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a "compass organelle" containing the iron oxide particles magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic "Kalmijn-Blakemore" pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular magnetite is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of magnetite as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use magnetite to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating magnetite particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the magnetite containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals.

  9. LA-ICP-MS of magnetite: Methods and reference materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadoll, P.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a common accessory mineral in many geologic settings. Its variable geochemistry makes it a powerful petrogenetic indicator. Electron microprobe (EMPA) analyses are commonly used to examine major and minor element contents in magnetite. Laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is applicable to trace element analyses of magnetite but has not been widely employed to examine compositional variations. We tested the applicability of the NIST SRM 610, the USGS GSE-1G, and the NIST SRM 2782 reference materials (RMs) as external standards and developed a reliable method for LA-ICP-MS analysis of magnetite. LA-ICP-MS analyses were carried out on well characterized magnetite samples with a 193 nm, Excimer, ArF LA system. Although matrix-matched RMs are sometimes important for calibration and normalization of LA-ICP-MS data, we demonstrate that glass RMs can produce accurate results for LA-ICP-MS analyses of magnetite. Cross-comparison between the NIST SRM 610 and USGS GSE-1G indicates good agreement for magnetite minor and trace element data calibrated with either of these RMs. Many elements show a sufficiently good match between the LA-ICP-MS and the EMPA data; for example, Ti and V show a close to linear relationship with correlation coefficients, R2 of 0.79 and 0.85 respectively. ?? 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Porphyrin-magnetite nanoconjugates for biological imaging

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nowostawska, Malgorzata

    2011-04-08

    Abstract Background The use of silica coated magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents has resulted in the production of highly stable, non-toxic solutions that can be manipulated via an external magnetic field. As a result, the interaction of these nanocomposites with cells is of vital importance in understanding their behaviour and biocompatibility. Here we report the preparation, characterisation and potential application of new "two-in-one" magnetic fluorescent nanocomposites composed of silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles covalently linked to a porphyrin moiety. Method The experiments were performed by administering porphyrin functionalised silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles to THP-1 cells, a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line. Cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 25 mM HEPES supplemented with heat-inactivated foetal bovine serum (FBS). Results We have synthesised, characterised and analysed in vitro, a new multimodal (magnetic and fluorescent) porphyrin magnetic nanoparticle composite (PMNC). Initial co-incubation experiments performed with THP-1 macrophage cells were promising; however the PMNC photobleached under confocal microscopy study. β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) was employed to counteract this problem and resulted not only in enhanced fluorescence emission, but also allowed for elongated imaging and increased exposure times of the PMNC in a cellular environment. Conclusion Our experiments have demonstrated that β-ME visibly enhances the emission intensity. No deleterious effects to the cells were witnessed upon co-incubation with β-ME alone and no increases in background fluorescence were recorded. These results should present an interest for further development of in vitro biological imaging techniques.

  11. The role of magnetite in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Mahajan, V.; Huffman, G.P.; Rao, V.U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron catalysts from a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Pilot Plant run at different time-on-stream periods were carried out. Magnetite Fe 3 O 4 was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction which accompanies the FT synthesis reaction over Fe-based catalysts. A correlation between the ratio of the occupancy of octahedral sites to the tetrahedral sites in magnetite to the WGS activity was found. Cation-deficient magnetite gave higher WGS activity as compared to the stoichiometric phase. (orig.)

  12. Room temperature deposition of magnetite thin films on organic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisi, E.; Bergenti, I.; Cavallini, M.; Murgia, M.; Riminucci, A.; Ruani, G.; Dediu, V.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the growth of magnetite films directly on thin layers of organic semiconductors by means of an electron beam ablation method. The deposition was performed at room temperature in a reactive plasma atmosphere. Thin films show ferromagnetic (FM) hysteresis loops and coercive fields of hundreds of Oersted. Micro Raman analysis indicates no presence of spurious phases. The morphology of the magnetite film is strongly influenced by the morphology of the underlayer of the organic semiconductor. These results open the way for the application of magnetite thin films in the field of organic spintronics

  13. Detrital zircon study along the Tsangpo River, SE Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y.; Chung, S.; Liu, D.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Chu, M.; Ji, J.; Song, B.; Pearson, N. J.

    2004-12-01

    The interactions among tectonic uplift, river erosion and alluvial deposition are fundamental processes that shape the landscape of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen since its creation from early Cenozoic time. To better understand these processes around the eastern Himalayan Syntaxis, we conducted a study by systematic sampling riverbank sediments along the Tsangpo River, SE Tibet. Detrital zircons separated from the sediments were subjected to U-Pb dating by the SHRIMP II at the Beijing SHRIMP Center and then in-situ measurements of Hf isotope ratios using LA-MC-ICPMS at GEMOC. These results, together with U-Pb ages and Hf isotope data that we recently obtained for the Transhimalayan plutonic and surrounding basement rocks, allow a more quantitative examination of the provenance or protosource areas for the river sediments. Consequently, the percentage inputs from these source areas can be estimated. Our study indicates that, before the Tsangpo River flows into the Namche Barwa Syntaxis of the eastern Himalayas where the River forms a 180° Big Bend gorge and crosscuts the Himalayan sequences, the Gangdese batholith that crops out just north of the River appear to be an overwhelming source accounting for ˜50 % of the bank sediments. The Tethyan Himalayan sequences south of the River are the second important source, with an input of ˜25 %. The proportion of sediment supply changes after the River enters the Big Bend gorge and turns to south: ˜25 % of detrital zircons are derived from the Greater Himalayas so that the input from the Tethyan Himalayas decreases (< 10 %) despite those from the Gangdese batholith remains high ( ˜40 %). Comparing with the sediment budget of the Brahmaputra River in the downstream based on literature Sr, Nd and Os isotope information, which suggests dominant ( ˜90-60 %) but subordinate ( ˜10-40 %) contributions by the (Greater and Lesser) Himalayan and Tibetan (including Tethyan Himalayan) rocks, respectively, the change is interpreted

  14. The dissolution rate constant of magnetite in water at different temperatures and pH conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajery, Khatereh; Deydier de Pierrefeu, Laurent; Lister, Derek H.

    2012-09-01

    Under the nominal conditions of power system coolants, the corrosion of components made of carbon steel is limited by the magnetite films that develop on surfaces. In some situations, the magnetite film loses much of its protective ability and corrosion and loss of iron to the system are exacerbated. Common examples of such situations occur when the system is non-isothermal so that temperature gradients cause differences in magnetite solubility around the circuit; the resulting areas of under-saturation in iron give rise to dissolution of normally protective films. Condensing steam in two-phase systems may also promote oxide dissolution. When the turbulence in the system is high, oxide degradation is aggravated and flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) results. The subsequent increased loading of systems with iron leads to fouling of flow passages and heat transfer surfaces and in reactor primary coolants to rising radiation fields, while FAC can have disastrous results in terms of pipe wall thinning and eventual rupture. Magnetite dissolution is clearly a key contributor to these processes. Thus, the conventional mechanistic description of FAC postulates magnetite dissolution in series with mass transfer of iron from the film to the bulk coolant. In the resulting equations, if the dissolution rate constant is considerably less than the mass transfer coefficient for a particular situation, dissolution will control and flow should have no effect. This is clearly untenable for FAC, so it is often assumed that mass transfer controls and the contribution from oxide dissolution is ignored - on occasion when data on dissolution kinetics are available and sometimes when those data show that dissolution should control. In most cases, however, dissolution rate constants for magnetite are not available. At UNB Nuclear we have a research program using a high-temperature loop to measure dissolution rates of magnetite in water under various conditions of flow, temperature and

  15. Hydrothermal reequilibration of igneous magnetite in altered granitic plutons and its implications for magnetite classification schemes: Insights from the Handan-Xingtai iron district, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guang; Li, Jian-Wei; Hofstra, Albert H.; Koenig, Alan E.; Lowers, Heather A.; Adams, David

    2017-09-01

    Magnetite is a common mineral in igneous rocks and has been used as an important petrogenetic indicator as its compositions and textures reflect changing physiochemical parameters such as temperature, oxygen fugacity and melt compositions. In upper crustal settings, igneous rocks are often altered by hydrothermal fluids such that the original textures and compositions of igneous magnetite may be partly or completely obliterated, posing interpretive problems in petrological and geochemical studies. In this paper, we present textural and compositional data of magnetite from variably albitized granitoid rocks in the Handan-Xingtai district, North China Craton to characterize the hydrothermal reequilibration of igneous magnetite. Four types of magnetite have been identified in the samples studied: pristine igneous magnetite (type 1), reequilibrated porous magnetite (type 2), reequilibrated nonporous magnetite (type 3), and hydrothermal magnetite (type 4). Pristine igneous magnetite contains abundant well-developed ilmenite exsolution lamellae that are largely replaced by titanite during subsequent hydrothermal alteration. The titanite has a larger molar volume than its precursor ilmenite and thus causes micro-fractures in the host magnetite grains, facilitating dissolution and reprecipitation of magnetite. During sodic alteration, the igneous magnetite is extensively replaced by type 2 and type 3 magnetite via fluid-induced dissolution and reprecipitation. Porous type 2 magnetite is the initial replacement product of igneous magnetite and is subsequently replaced by the nonoporous type 3 variety as its surface area is reduced and compositional equilibrium with the altering fluid is achieved. Hydrothermal type 4 magnetite is generally euhedral and lacks exsolution lamellae and porosity, and is interpreted to precipitate directly from the ore-forming fluids. Hydrothermal reequilibration of igneous magnetite has led to progressive chemical purification, during which trace

  16. Lithofacies control in detrital zircon provenance studies: Insights from the Cretaceous Methow basin, southern Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraaff-Surpless, K.; Mahoney, J.B.; Wooden, J.L.; McWilliams, M.O.

    2003-01-01

    High-frequency sampling for detrital zircon analysis can provide a detailed record of fine-scale basin evolution by revealing the temporal and spatial variability of detrital zircon ages within clastic sedimentary successions. This investigation employed detailed sampling of two sedimentary successions in the Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin of the southern Canadian Cordillera to characterize the heterogeneity of detrital zircon signatures within single lithofacies and assess the applicability of detrital zircon analysis in distinguishing fine-scale provenance changes not apparent in lithologic analysis of the strata. The Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin contains two distinct stratigraphic sequences of middle Albian to Santonian clastic sedimentary rocks: submarine-fan deposits of the Harts Pass Formation/Jackass Mountain Group and fluvial deposits of the Winthrop Formation. Although both stratigraphic sequences displayed consistent ranges in detrital zircon ages on a broad scale, detailed sampling within each succession revealed heterogeneity in the detrital zircon age distributions that was systematic and predictable in the turbidite succession but unpredictable in the fluvial succession. These results suggest that a high-density sampling approach permits interpretation of finescale changes within a lithologically uniform turbiditic sedimentary succession, but heterogeneity within fluvial systems may be too large and unpredictable to permit accurate fine-scale characterization of the evolution of source regions. The robust composite detrital zircon age signature developed for these two successions permits comparison of the Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin age signature with known plutonic source-rock ages from major plutonic belts throughout the Cretaceous North American margin. The Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin detrital zircon age signature matches best with source regions in the southern Canadian Cordillera, requiring that the basin developed in close proximity to the

  17. Thermal Stability and Magnetic Properties of Polyvinylidene Fluoride/Magnetite Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Zen-Wei; Chen, Erh-Chiang; Wu, Tzong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the thermal stability and magnetic properties of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/magnetite nanocomposites fabricated using the solution mixing technique. The image of transmission electron microscopy for PVDF/magnetite nanocomposites reveals that the 13 nm magnetite nanoparticles are well distributed in PVDF matrix. The electroactive β-phase and piezoelectric responses of PVDF/magnetite nanocomposites are increased as the loading of magnetite nanoparticles increases. The pi...

  18. Surface modification of Chlorella vulgaris cells using magnetite particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, G.; Šafařík, Ivo; Brányik, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2012 (2012), s. 1778-1787 E-ISSN 1877-7058 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : microalgae * physicochemical approaches * surface interactions * magnetite * XDLVO theory * harvesting Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  19. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of aminoacids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, Gabriela; Patron, Luminita; Culita, Daniela C.; Neagoe, Cristian; Lepadatu, Costinel I.; Balint, Ioan; Bessais, Lotfi; Cizmas, Corneliu Bazil

    2006-01-01

    A new synthesis route to prepare magnetite nanoparticles in only one step is described. The precipitation of magnetite is performed in the presence of aminoacid solution. The experimental protocol is original and the nanomagnetites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM and SQUID magnetometry. A theoretical study of the consistent experimental results was performed using QSPR (Quantitative Structure Property Relationsheep). According with these studies the synthesized nanoparticles seem to be organized into a core-shell system, where the inner-core is formed from unit cells of magnetite. A way to control the self-assembly and the physical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles consists in their correlation with descriptors representing the aminoacid chemical structures. Using quantum chemical as well as the other simplest original descriptors it was found a relationship between the used aminoacids and the magnetization, nanoparticles diameter, magnetite core diameter and the (Fe 3 O 4 ) 8 cells in each nanoparticle core

  20. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M., E-mail: yuliasoshnikova@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Baum, Olga I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Obrezkova, Mariya V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E. [University of Nottingham, National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (United Kingdom); Sobol, Emil N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valeriy V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non‐stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  1. Using a C4 Invasive Grass to Isolate the Role of Detrital Carbon versus Rhizodeposit Carbon in Supplying Soil Carbon Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, N.; Bradford, M.

    2016-12-01

    Plant inputs are the primary sources of carbon (C) to soil organic carbon (SOC) pools. Historically, detrital plant sources were thought to dominate C supply to SOC pools. An emerging body of research highlights the previously underestimated role of root exudates and other rhizodeposits. However, few experimental field studies have directly tracked the relative contributions of rhizodeposits versus detritial C inputs into different SOC pools, due to how methodologically challenging they are to measure in a field setting. Here, I present the first 3 years of data from an experimental field study of the prolific, C4 invasive grass species Microstegium vimineum. I use its unique isotopic signature in plots manipulated to contain detrital-only and rhizodeposit-only inputs, to track their relative contributions into microbial biomass C, particulate organic C (POC; >53 um) and mineral-associated organic C (MIN C; emerging theory on the primacy of the belowground, root-associated pathway in supplying C to soil C pools, this increase is generally assumed to be through the MIN C pool due to 1) the lower molecular weight of rhizodeposit compounds, and 2) the close physical association between rhizodeposits and soil mineral surfaces. Our results point to an underappreciated, central role of the POM C pool as a passageway for both detrital and rhizodeposit C inputs to the soil.

  2. Sonochemical preparation of magnetite nanoparticles by reverse precipitation method

    OpenAIRE

    Shuto, Tatsuya; Nakagoe, Osamu; Tanabe, Shuji

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were successfully prepared by reverse precipitation method with the assistance of ultrasound. Obtained nanoparticles were identified as magnetite (Fe_3O_4) by XRD measurement. It was found that obtained magnetite nanoparticles have small sizes (about 10.7 ±2.9 nm in diameter) and spherical shape by TEM observations. In reverse precipitation method, the dropping conditions of aqueous FeSO_4 solution affect on the sizes and uniformity of the products.

  3. Texture, microstructure and geochemistry of magnetite from the Banduhurang uranium mine, Singhbhum shear zone, India - implications for physico-chemical evolution of magnetite mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dibakar; Dutta, Tusar; Samanta, Susanta K.; Pal, Dipak C.

    2013-01-01

    The Singhbhum Shear zone in eastern India is one of the largest repositories of uranium and copper in India. Besides uranium and copper, apatite-magnetite mineralization is widespread in this shear zone. This study aims at deciphering the physico-chemical evolution of magnetite mineralization in relation to progressive shearing integrating field relations, micro-textures, structures and compositions of magnetite in the Banduhurang uranium mine. Apatite-magnetite ores occur as discrete patches, tongues, and veins in the strongly deformed, fine grained quartz-chlorite schist. Textures and microstructures of magnetite indicate at least three stages of magnetite formation. Coarse-grained magnetite (magnetite-1) with long, rotational, and complex strain fringes, defined by fibrous and elongate quartz, is assigned to a stage of pre-/early-shearing magnetite formation. Medium grained magnetite (magnetite-2), characterized by single non-rotational strain fringe equivalent to the youngest fringe of magnetite-1, grew likely at the mid-/late-stage of shearing. Fine grained magnetite (magnetite-3) is generally devoid of any pressure shadow. This indicates even a much later stage of formation of this magnetite, presumably towards the closing stage of shearing. Some of the magnetite-1 grains are optically heterogeneous with a dark, pitted Cr-Ti-bearing core overgrown by lighter, fresh rim locally containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, and chlorite inclusions. The cores are also locally characterized by high AI and Si content. Homogeneous magnetite-1 is optically and compositionally similar to the overgrowth of heterogeneous magnetite-1. This homogeneous magnetite-1 that grew as separate phase is contemporaneous with the overgrowth on pitted core of heterogeneous magnetite-1. Magnetite-2 is compositionally very similar to homogeneous magnetite-1, but is devoid of sulfide inclusion. Magnetite-3 is generally devoid of any silicate or sulfide inclusion and is most pure with least

  4. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  5. In Situ Mineralization of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Chitosan Hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongliang; Li, Baoqiang; Zhou, Yu; Jia, Dechang

    2009-09-01

    Based on chelation effect between iron ions and amino groups of chitosan, in situ mineralization of magnetite nanoparticles in chitosan hydrogel under ambient conditions was proposed. The chelation effect between iron ions and amino groups in CS-Fe complex, which led to that chitosan hydrogel exerted a crucial control on the magnetite mineralization, was proved by X-ray photoelectron spectrum. The composition, morphology and size of the mineralized magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravity. The mineralized nanoparticles were nonstoichiometric magnetite with a unit formula of Fe2.85O4 and coated by a thin layer of chitosan. The mineralized magnetite nanoparticles with mean diameter of 13 nm dispersed in chitosan hydrogel uniformly. Magnetization measurement indicated that superparamagnetism behavior was exhibited. These magnetite nanoparticles mineralized in chitosan hydrogel have potential applications in the field of biotechnology. Moreover, this method can also be used to synthesize other kinds of inorganic nanoparticles, such as ZnO, Fe2O3 and hydroxyapatite.

  6. In Situ Mineralization of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Chitosan Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yongliang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on chelation effect between iron ions and amino groups of chitosan, in situ mineralization of magnetite nanoparticles in chitosan hydrogel under ambient conditions was proposed. The chelation effect between iron ions and amino groups in CS–Fe complex, which led to that chitosan hydrogel exerted a crucial control on the magnetite mineralization, was proved by X-ray photoelectron spectrum. The composition, morphology and size of the mineralized magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravity. The mineralized nanoparticles were nonstoichiometric magnetite with a unit formula of Fe2.85O4and coated by a thin layer of chitosan. The mineralized magnetite nanoparticles with mean diameter of 13 nm dispersed in chitosan hydrogel uniformly. Magnetization measurement indicated that superparamagnetism behavior was exhibited. These magnetite nanoparticles mineralized in chitosan hydrogel have potential applications in the field of biotechnology. Moreover, this method can also be used to synthesize other kinds of inorganic nanoparticles, such as ZnO, Fe2O3and hydroxyapatite.

  7. Aqueous immune magnetite nanoparticles for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guoxin; Liu Yanbo; Zhang Chunfu; Hu Weiqing; Xu Wanbang; Li Zheng; Liang Sheng; Cao Jinquan; Wang Yongxian

    2009-01-01

    Immune magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are prepared by four successive reactions, which are MNPs preparation, silica-coating, surface modification with amino group, and conjugation with bio-molecule, respectively. The crystal structure and morphology of intermediate products are characterized by XRD, TEM and AFM. Qualitative and quantitative assays for amino group on the MNPs' surface are made by FTIR and Organic Element Assay. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum can indirectly illustrate the quantity of bio-molecule conjugated with MNPs. In addition, specific combination and nonspecific combination of immune MNPs are measured by commercial RIA box. The results show that the size of MNPs prepared is 10 ± 5 nm, and silica-coated MNPs with spinel structure have quasi-spherical morphology. Infrared absorption bands of -NH 2 are appeared around 3380-3200 cm -1 and 1650-1510 cm -1 , and the amino group content is 0.5 μmol -NH 2 per mg MNPs. The specific immune combination of immune MNPs is up to 75%, and nonspecific combination is under 5%.

  8. Complex Effects of Ecosystem Engineer Loss on Benthic Ecosystem Response to Detrital Macroalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rossi

    Full Text Available Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies the response to macroalgal detrital enrichment of sediment biogeochemical properties, microphytobenthos and macrofauna assemblages. A field manipulative experiment was done on an intertidal sandflat (Oosterschelde estuary, The Netherlands. Lugworms were deliberately excluded from 1× m sediment plots and different amounts of detrital Ulva (0, 200 or 600 g Wet Weight were added twice. Sediment biogeochemistry changes were evaluated through benthic respiration, sediment organic carbon content and porewater inorganic carbon as well as detrital macroalgae remaining in the sediment one month after enrichment. Microalgal biomass and macrofauna composition were measured at the same time. Macroalgal carbon mineralization and transfer to the benthic consumers were also investigated during decomposition at low enrichment level (200 g WW. The interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment did not modify sediment organic carbon or benthic respiration. Weak but significant changes were instead found for porewater inorganic carbon and microalgal biomass. Lugworm exclusion caused an increase of porewater carbon and a decrease of microalgal biomass, while detrital enrichment drove these values back to values typical of lugworm-dominated sediments. Lugworm exclusion also decreased the amount of macroalgae remaining into the sediment and accelerated detrital carbon mineralization and CO2 release to the water column. Eventually, the interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment affected macrofauna abundance and diversity, which collapsed at high level of enrichment only when the lugworms were present. This study reveals that in nature the

  9. Complex Effects of Ecosystem Engineer Loss on Benthic Ecosystem Response to Detrital Macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Gribsholt, Britta; Gazeau, Frederic; Di Santo, Valentina; Middelburg, Jack J

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies the response to macroalgal detrital enrichment of sediment biogeochemical properties, microphytobenthos and macrofauna assemblages. A field manipulative experiment was done on an intertidal sandflat (Oosterschelde estuary, The Netherlands). Lugworms were deliberately excluded from 1× m sediment plots and different amounts of detrital Ulva (0, 200 or 600 g Wet Weight) were added twice. Sediment biogeochemistry changes were evaluated through benthic respiration, sediment organic carbon content and porewater inorganic carbon as well as detrital macroalgae remaining in the sediment one month after enrichment. Microalgal biomass and macrofauna composition were measured at the same time. Macroalgal carbon mineralization and transfer to the benthic consumers were also investigated during decomposition at low enrichment level (200 g WW). The interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment did not modify sediment organic carbon or benthic respiration. Weak but significant changes were instead found for porewater inorganic carbon and microalgal biomass. Lugworm exclusion caused an increase of porewater carbon and a decrease of microalgal biomass, while detrital enrichment drove these values back to values typical of lugworm-dominated sediments. Lugworm exclusion also decreased the amount of macroalgae remaining into the sediment and accelerated detrital carbon mineralization and CO2 release to the water column. Eventually, the interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment affected macrofauna abundance and diversity, which collapsed at high level of enrichment only when the lugworms were present. This study reveals that in nature the role of this

  10. Strong adsorption of chlorotetracycline on magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Di; Niu, Hongyun; Zhang, Xiaole; Meng, Zhaofu; Cai, Yaqi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fe 3 O 4 MNPs selectively adsorb CTC through chelation between CTC and Fe atoms. → Fe 3 O 4 MNPs remain high adsorption ability to CTC in environmental water samples. → Fe 3 O 4 MNPs sorbed with CTC are easily collected from water under a magnetic field. → The collected Fe 3 O 4 MNPs are regenerated by treatment with H 2 O 2 or calcination. - Abstract: In this work, environmentally friendly magnetite nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 MNPs) were used to adsorb chlorotetracycline (CTC) from aqueous media. Fe 3 O 4 MNPs exhibit ultrahigh adsorption ability to this widely used antibiotic. The adsorption behavior of CTC on Fe 3 O 4 MNPs fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, and the adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 10 h. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity of CTC on Fe 3 O 4 (476 mg g -1 ) was obtained at pH 6.5. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and spontaneous. Low concentration of NaCl and foreign divalent cations hardly affected the adsorption. Negative effect of coexisting humic acid (HA) on CTC adsorption was also observed when the concentration of HA was lower than 20 mg L -1 . But high concentration of HA (>20 mg L -1 ) increased the CTC adsorption on Fe 3 O 4 MNPs. The matrix effect of several environmental water samples on CTC adsorption was not evident. Fe 3 O 4 MNPs were regenerated by treatment with H 2 O 2 or calcination at 400 o C in N 2 atmosphere after separation from water solution by an external magnet. This research provided a high efficient and reusable adsorbent to remove CTC selectively from aqueous media.

  11. Correlation of Brunhes detrital-layer stratigraphy into the North Atlantic from Orphan Knoll (Labrador Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channell, J. E.; Hodell, D. A.; Romero, O. E.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.; Stoner, J. S.; Mazaud, A.; Roehl, U.

    2011-12-01

    IODP Site U1302-U1303, on the SE flank of Orphan Knoll (Labrador Sea), has a record of detrital layers that extends through most of the Brunhes Chron. The age model is built by tandem matching of relative paleointensity (RPI) and oxygen isotope data (δ18O) from Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin.) to reference records, indicating a mean Brunhes sedimentation rate of 14 cm/kyr. Sedimentation back to marine isotope stage (MIS) 18 is characterized by detrital layers that are detected by higher than background gamma-ray attenuation (GRA) density, peaks in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) indicators for detrital carbonate (Ca/Sr) and detrital silicate (Si/Sr), an ice-rafted debris (IRD) proxy (>106 μm), magnetic susceptibility, and magnetic grain-size peaks. The age model enables correlation of Site U1302/03 to IODP Site U1308 (re-drill of DSDP Site 609) in the heart of the central Atlantic IRD belt where an age model and a similar set of detrital-layer proxies have already been derived. Ages of Heinrich layers H1, H2, H4, H5 and H6 are within ~2 kyr at the two sites (H0, H3 and H5a are not observed at Site U1308), and agree with previous work at Orphan Knoll within ~3 kyr. At Site U1308, Brunhes detrital layers are restricted to peak glacials and glacial terminations back to MIS16, however, these same proxies at Site U1302/03 indicate detrital layers distributed throughout the record in both glacial and most interglacial stages. At Site U1302/03, we distinguish Heinrich-type layers in glacial stages, which are associated with IRD (some of which have near-synchronous analogues at Site U1308), from detrital layers within interglacial stages manifested by multiple detrital layer proxies (including Ca/Sr) but usually not associated with IRD, that may be attributed to a distinct depositional process, namely drainage and debris-flow events funneled down the nearby NAMOC (North Atlantic Mid-Ocean Channel).

  12. A method for evaluating basement exhumation histories from closure age distributions of detrital minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovera, Oscar M.; Grove, Marty; Kimbrough, David L.; Abbott, Patrick L.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional, thermokinetic model that predicts the closure age distributions of detrital minerals from pervasively intruded and differentially exhumed basement. Using this model, we outline a method to determine the denudation history of orogenic regions on the basis of closure age distributions in synorogenic to postorogenic forearc strata. At relatively high mean denudation rates of 0.5 km m.y.-1 sustained over millions of years, magmatic heating events have minimal influence upon the age distributions of detrital minerals such as K-feldspar that are moderately retentive of radiogenic Ar. At lower rates, however, the effects of batholith emplacement may be substantial. We have applied the approach to detrital K-feldspars from forearc strata derived from the deeply denuded Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB). Agreement of the denudation history deduced from the detrital K-feldspar data with thermochronologic constraints from exposed PRB basement lead us to conclude that exhumation histories of magmatic arcs should be decipherable solely from closure age distributions of detrital minerals whose depositional age is known. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union

  13. Magnetisation of magnetite nanoparticles medium with dipol-dipol interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali-zade, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Magnetisation expression for magnetite nanoparticles medium with dipo-dipol interaction has been obtained. We suggested, that energy magnetic dipol-dipol interaction of magnetite nanopaticles is determined by: E d-d = - m 2 /4πμ 0 r 3 (cth x -1/x) 2 where x=mH/kT. This expression has been substituted in statistical sum of magnetite nanoparticles medium. Obtained statistical sum consists the production of two statistical sums. The first statistical sum described non-interacting magnetite nanoparticle medium and from this is obtained Langevan equation. Second statistical sum is: Z 2 -∫exp(Σm 2 /4π 0 r 3 (cth x -1/x) 2 ) dΩ 2 . The second statistical sum has been expanded in Taylor's set and taken into consideration first two terms. Integration has been carried out over all volume. In this case take into account that, number twice interactions of magnetite nanoparticles in unit volume is equal to N(N-1)/2 at N>>1 to N 2 /2. We obtain expressions for magnetisation and initial magnetic susceptibility of interacting magnetite nanoparticles medium take into account that Φ=-kT ln Z, M=-dΦ/dH, χ=dM/dH: M=M Sφm (cth x -1/x)+ 1/3 M S 2 φ m 2 (1μ 0 H) ln(VM S /kT).(cth x -1/x)(-xcsch 2 x+1/x) χ 0 =1/3 (m/kT)+ 1/27 M S 2 φ m 2 (1μ 0 )ln(VM S /kT).(m/kT) 2 . Second term in the magnetisation is sufficient at weak and middle magnetic fields. At large magnetic fields, it leads to zero. The second term of magnetisation has maximum at x=1.566. The values of experimental and calculated magnetic field corresponding to magnetisation maximum for magnetite nanoparticles medium (mean diameter of nanoparticle is 9.4 nm) are 1.19 10 4 A/m and 1.25 10 4 A/m respectively. Magnetic dipol-dipol interaction influence to magnetisation of magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite nanoparticles lined along external magnetic fields line and formatted chains. Magnetisation of medium occurs by the 'parallel' mechanism method magnetisation of chains

  14. Electrochemistry and dissolution kinetics of magnetite and ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Hochella, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Natural samples of magnetite and ilmenite were experimentally weathered in pH 1-7 anoxic solutions at temperatures of 2-65 ??C. Reaction of magnetite is described as [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 2H+ ??? ??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + H2O. Dynamic polarization experiments using magnetite electrodes confirmed that this reaction is controlled by two electrochemical half cells, 3[Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) ??? 4??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2e- and [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 8 H+ + 2e- ??? 3Fe2+ + 4H2O, which result in solid state Fe3+ reduction, formation of an oxidized layer and release of Fe(II) to solution. XPS data revealed that iron is present in the ferric state in the surfaces of reacted magnetite and ilmenite and that the Ti Fe ratio increased with reaction pH for ilmenite. Short-term (<36 h) release rates of Fe(II) were linear with time. Between pH 1 and 7, rates varied between 0.3 and 13 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for magnetite and 0.05 and 12.3 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for ilmenite. These rates are two orders of magnitude slower than electrochemical rates determined by Tafel and polarization resistance measurements. Discrepancies are due to both differences in geometric and BET surface area estimates and in the oxidation state of the mineral surface. In long-term closed-system experiments (<120 days), Fe(II) release slowed with time due to the passivation of the surfaces by increasing thicknesses of oxide surface layers. A shrinking core model, coupling surface reaction and diffusion transport, predicted that at neutral pH, the mean residence time for sand-size grains of magnetite and ilmenite will exceed 107 years. This agrees with long-term stability of these oxides in the geologic record. ?? 1994.

  15. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles-β-cyclodextrin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobos Cruz, L.A.; Martinez Perez, C.A.; Monreal Romero, H.A.; Garcia Casillas, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the synthesis and characterization of a magnetite (M) and β-cyclodextrin (CD) complex is presented. The chemical bonding between the magnetite and CD was studied as evidence of host-guest interaction; therefore the CD works like a reactor with the magnetite inside of it, as consequence the growth of the particle is restricted by the electrostatic interaction of M-CD complex. The particle size of the magnetite-cyclodextrin complex (M-CD) decreased 79.1% with 0.5% of CD. The average particle size of the M-CD complex was 10 nm. The saturation magnetization (σ s ) and intrinsic coercivity (H c ) increased 10% and 20%, respectively. In order to understand how the the CD affects the results obtained, the second derivate of remission function was obtained from the ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to elucidate the interaction between the magnetite and CD. The thermal analysis was measured by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA). The magnetic properties, intrinsic coercivity (H c ) and the saturation magnetization were determined by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM); the size and shape of nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The identification of phases was made by X-ray diffraction

  16. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. B. Cotten

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.

  17. Adherence of paclitaxel drug in magnetite chitosan nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar Zapata, Edna V.; Martinez Perez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Claudia A.; Castro Carmona, Javier S. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ave. Del Charro 610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320, Cd. Juarez Chihuahua (Mexico); Quevedo Lopez, Manuel A. [Departamento de Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Garcia-Casillas, Perla E., E-mail: pegarcia@uacj.mx [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ave. Del Charro 610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320, Cd. Juarez Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan silica magnetite adsorbs antineoplastic drug. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica coating improve the drug adherence. - Abstract: Cancer treatment is a big challenge in medicine where chemotherapies and radiotherapies are aggressive and poorly effective having side effects as delirium, fatigue, insomnia, nausea and vomiting which are common problems for cancer patients. For this reason, during the last two decades, many researchers have developed several techniques to improve the current therapies; one of them is the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with an average crystallite size 21.8 nm were covered in a core/shell type; magnetite/silica, magnetite/chitosan, and a double shell magnetite/silica/chitosan were developed for attaching an antineoplastic drug. The mechanism for the functionalization of the nanoparticles with a single and double shell was studied with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adherence of an antineoplastic drug, paclitaxel, onto functionalized nanoparticles was analyzed with a UV-Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength of 253 nm. It was found that the adherence of the drug is improved up to 18% when magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a single chitosan shell, and when the nanoparticles are coated with a silica/chitosan shell the adherence increases up to 29%.

  18. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotten, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable

  19. Adherence of paclitaxel drug in magnetite chitosan nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Zapata, Edna V.; Martínez Pérez, Carlos A.; Rodríguez González, Claudia A.; Castro Carmona, Javier S.; Quevedo Lopez, Manuel A.; García-Casillas, Perla E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chitosan silica magnetite adsorbs antineoplastic drug. ► Silica coating improve the drug adherence. - Abstract: Cancer treatment is a big challenge in medicine where chemotherapies and radiotherapies are aggressive and poorly effective having side effects as delirium, fatigue, insomnia, nausea and vomiting which are common problems for cancer patients. For this reason, during the last two decades, many researchers have developed several techniques to improve the current therapies; one of them is the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with an average crystallite size 21.8 nm were covered in a core/shell type; magnetite/silica, magnetite/chitosan, and a double shell magnetite/silica/chitosan were developed for attaching an antineoplastic drug. The mechanism for the functionalization of the nanoparticles with a single and double shell was studied with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adherence of an antineoplastic drug, paclitaxel, onto functionalized nanoparticles was analyzed with a UV–Visible spectroscopy at a wavelength of 253 nm. It was found that the adherence of the drug is improved up to 18% when magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a single chitosan shell, and when the nanoparticles are coated with a silica/chitosan shell the adherence increases up to 29%.

  20. Glacial magnetite dissolution in abyssal NW Pacific sediments - evidence for carbon trapping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Lucia; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The abyssal North Pacific Ocean's large volume, depth, and terminal position on the deep oceanic conveyor make it a candidate site for deep carbon trapping as postulated by climate theory to explain the massive glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2. As the major basins of the North Pacific have depths of 5500-6500m, far below the modern and glacial Calcite Compensation Depths (CCD), these abyssal sediments are carbonate-free and therefore not suitable for carbonate-based paleoceanographic proxy reconstructions. Instead, paleo-, rock and environmental magnetic methods are generally well applicable to hololytic abyssal muds and clays. In 2009, the international paleoceanographic research cruise SO 202 INOPEX ('Innovative North Pacific Experiment') of the German RV SONNE collected two ocean-spanning EW sediment core transects of the North Pacific and Bering Sea recovering a total of 50 piston and gravity cores from 45 sites. Out of seven here considered abyssal Northwest Pacific piston cores collected at water depths of 5100 to 5700m with mostly coherent shipboard susceptibility logs, the 20.23m long SO202-39-3, retrieved from 5102 m water depth east of northern Shatsky Rise (38°00.70'N, 164°26.78'E), was rated as the stratigraphically most promising record of the entire core transect and selected for detailed paleo- and environmental magnetic, geochemical and sedimentological investigations. This core was dated by correlating its RPI and Ba/Ti records to well-dated reference records and obviously provides a continuous sequence of the past 940 kyrs. The most striking orck magnetic features are coherent magnetite-depleted zones corresponding to glacial periods. In the interglacial sections, detrital, volcanic and even submicron bacterial magnetite fractions are excellently preserved. These alternating magnetite preservation states seem to reflect dramatic oxygenation changes in the deep North Pacific Ocean and hint at large-scale benthic glacial carbon trapping

  1. Hydrothermal Preparation of Apatite Composite with Magnetite or Anatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Setsuaki; Ishida, Emile H.; Ioku, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure designed porous hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) composites with magnetite (Fe3O4) particles or anatase (TiO2) dispersion were prepared by hydrothermal treatment. These composites had micro-pores of about 0.1-0.5 μm in size. Magnetite / Hydroxyapatite composites should be suitable for medical treatment of cancer, especially in bones, because HA can bond to bones directly and magnetite can generate heat. They must be used for hyperthermia therapies of cancer in bones. Meanwhile, anatase / Hydroxyapatite composite should be suitable for environmental purification, because HA rod-shape particles expose the specific crystal face, which adsorbs organic contaminants and so on

  2. Evaluation of magnetite nanoparticles as molybdenum ions adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, Helber; Yamaura, Mitiko; Sousa, Jose Silva; Freitas, Antonio Alves

    2011-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the generator radionuclide of the most used radioisotope for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals with diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine, technetium-99m (Tc-99m). One way of Mo-99 obtaining is as fission product of irradiated uranium targets in reactor. In this work, the potential application of magnetite particles in the separation of Mo-99 from a dissolution solution of U targets was evaluated. Synthetic magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by alkaline precipitation method from Fe 2+ ions and heat-treated via microwave irradiation in a conventional household oven. Adsorption kinetics was studied. It was observed that the adsorption of Mo by magnetite nanoparticles is fast and followed the model of pseudo-second order. (author)

  3. Critical Parametric Study on Final Size of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, A. H. M.; Salimi, M. N.; Jamlos, M. F.

    2018-03-01

    The great performance of magnetite nanoparticle in varsity field are mainly depended on their size since size determine the saturation magnetisation and also the phase purity. Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared using a simple co-precipitation method in order to study the influence of synthesis condition on the final size. Variable parameters include stirring rate, reaction temperature and pH of the solution can finely tuned the size of the resulting nanoparticles. Generally, any increase in these parameters had a gently reduction on particle size. But, the size was promoted to increase back at certain point due to the specific reason. Nucleation and growth processes are involved to clarify the impact of synthesis condition on the particle sizes. The result obtained give the correct conditions for pure magnetite synthesis at nanoscale size of dimensions less than 100 nm.

  4. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles by microwave irradiation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, Helber; Yamaura, Mitiko

    2009-01-01

    Nanometer-scale magnetic particles have been research target because of their peculiar magnetic properties as observed in magnetite nanoparticles. These nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetic characteristics with potential applications in biomedical, environmental, and engineering fields. In this work, magnetite nanoparticles from Fe 2+ ions were obtained from two different processes, by precipitation and heating in a boiling water bath and by precipitation and heating in a domestic microwave oven. Influence of heating time of both systems for obtaining of magnetite particles was investigated. The characterization of the products was done by Scanning Electron Microscopy to determine the morphology, X-ray Diffractometry to estimate the crystal structure and the size of crystallite and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to show the principal bands of absorption. (author)

  5. Synthesis of Stabilized Myrrh-Capped Hydrocolloidal Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M. Atta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report a new method for synthesizing stabilized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP colloids. A new class of monodisperse water-soluble magnetite nano-particles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The ferrous and ferric ions were hydrolyzed at low temperature at pH 9 in the presence of iodine to produce iron oxide nanoparticles. The natural product myrrh gum was used as capping agent to produce highly dispersed coated magnetite nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogel was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD was used to examine the crystal structure of the produced magnetite nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Jaime; Melendres, Julio; Almada, Mario; Burboa, María G.; Taboada, Pablo; Juárez, Josué; Valdez, Miguel A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new hybrid nanoparticles system performed by magnetite nanoparticles, loaded in a PLGA matrix, and stabilized by different concentrations of chitosan. Magnetite nanoparticles were hydrophobized with oleic acid and entrapped in a PLGA matrix by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, after that, magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by adding dropwise magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles in chitosan solutions. Magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles produced with different molar ratios did not show significant differences in size and the 3:1 molar ratio showed best spherical shapes as well as uniform particle size. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrated that the first stage of PLGA-chitosan interaction is mostly regulated by electrostatic forces. Based on a single set of identical sites model, we obtained for the average number of binding sites a value of 3.4, which can be considered as the number of chitosan chains per nanoparticle. This value was confirmed by using a model based on the DLVO theory and fitting zeta potential measurements of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles. From the adjusted parameters, we found that an average number of chitosan molecules of 3.6 per nanoparticle are attached onto the surface of the PLGA matrix. Finally, we evaluated the effect of surface charge of nanoparticles on a membrane model of endothelial cells performed by a mixture of three phospholipids at the air-water interface. Different isotherms and adsorption curves show that cationic surface of charged nanoparticles strongly interact with the phospholipids mixture and these results can be the basis of future experiments to understand the nanoparticles- cell membrane interaction.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Jaime; Melendres, Julio; Almada, Mario; Juárez, Josué; Valdez, Miguel A; Burboa, María G; Taboada, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new hybrid nanoparticles system performed by magnetite nanoparticles, loaded in a PLGA matrix, and stabilized by different concentrations of chitosan. Magnetite nanoparticles were hydrophobized with oleic acid and entrapped in a PLGA matrix by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, after that, magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by adding dropwise magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles in chitosan solutions. Magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles produced with different molar ratios did not show significant differences in size and the 3:1 molar ratio showed best spherical shapes as well as uniform particle size. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrated that the first stage of PLGA-chitosan interaction is mostly regulated by electrostatic forces. Based on a single set of identical sites model, we obtained for the average number of binding sites a value of 3.4, which can be considered as the number of chitosan chains per nanoparticle. This value was confirmed by using a model based on the DLVO theory and fitting zeta potential measurements of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles. From the adjusted parameters, we found that an average number of chitosan molecules of 3.6 per nanoparticle are attached onto the surface of the PLGA matrix. Finally, we evaluated the effect of surface charge of nanoparticles on a membrane model of endothelial cells performed by a mixture of three phospholipids at the air–water interface. Different isotherms and adsorption curves show that cationic surface of charged nanoparticles strongly interact with the phospholipids mixture and these results can be the basis of future experiments to understand the nanoparticles- cell membrane interaction. (paper)

  8. Synthesis of magnetite from iron-rich mine water using sodium carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akinwekomi, V

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available is highly mineralised and technologies are required for the processing of the final sludge for possible industrial application. Conventionally, magnetite is synthesized using iron-rich, industrial grade chemical reagents making magnetite expensive to produce...

  9. Simple and Rapid Synthesis of Magnetite/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Ryo; Murase, Kenya; Takata, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type) hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of magnetite nanoparticles, during which the magnetite nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant magnetite/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing magnetite concentration. For a magnetite concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments. PMID:23629669

  10. Emerging investigator series: As( v ) in magnetite: incorporation and redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhmann, Brittany L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; University of Iowa; Iowa City; USA; Neumann, Anke [School of Engineering; Newcastle University; Newcastle upon Tyne; UK; Boyanov, Maxim I. [Biosciences Division; Argonne National Laboratory; Argonne; USA; Institute of Chemical Engineering; Kemner, Kenneth M. [Biosciences Division; Argonne National Laboratory; Argonne; USA; Scherer, Michelle M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; University of Iowa; Iowa City; USA

    2017-01-01

    As coprecipitated with magnetite remained incorporated over time whereas sorbed As was redistributed and became increasingly incorporated into magnetite, both the absence and presence of aqueous Fe(ii).

  11. Simple and Rapid Synthesis of Magnetite/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Iwasaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of magnetite nanoparticles, during which the magnetite nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant magnetite/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing magnetite concentration. For a magnetite concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments.

  12. Simulating Porous Magnetite Layer Deposited on Alloy 690TT Steam Generator Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Son, Yeong-Ho; Choi, Won-Ik; Song, Geun Dong; Hur, Do Haeng

    2018-01-02

    In nuclear power plants, the main corrosion product that is deposited on the outside of steam generator tubes is porous magnetite. The objective of this study was to simulate porous magnetite that is deposited on thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 steam generator tubes. A magnetite layer was electrodeposited on an Alloy 690TT substrate in an Fe(III)-triethanolamine solution. After electrodeposition, the dense magnetite layer was immersed to simulate porous magnetite deposits in alkaline solution for 50 days at room temperature. The dense morphology of the magnetite layer was changed to a porous structure by reductive dissolution reaction. The simulated porous magnetite layer was compared with flakes of steam generator tubes, which were collected from the secondary water system of a real nuclear power plant during sludge lancing. Possible nuclear research applications using simulated porous magnetite specimens are also proposed.

  13. Detrital shadows: estuarine food web connectivity depends on fluvial influence and consumer feeding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Emily; Simenstad, Charles A; Ogston, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    We measured the influence of landscape setting on estuarine food web connectivity in five macrotidal Pacific Northwest estuaries across a gradient of freshwater influence. We used stable isotopes (δ 13 C, δ 15 N, δ 34 S) in combination with a Bayesian mixing model to trace primary producer contributions to suspension- and deposit-feeding bivalve consumers (Mytilus trossulus and Macoma nasuta) transplanted into three estuarine vegetation zones: emergent marsh, mudflat, and eelgrass. Eelgrass includes both Japanese eelgrass (Zostera japonica) and native eelgrass (Zostera marina). Fluvial discharge and consumer feeding mode strongly influenced the strength and spatial scale of observed food web linkages, while season played a secondary role. Mussels displayed strong cross-ecosystem connectivity in all estuaries, with decreasing marine influence in the more fluvial estuaries. Mussel diets indicated homogenization of detrital sources within the water column of each estuary. In contrast, the diets of benthic deposit-feeding clams indicated stronger compartmentalization in food web connectivity, especially in the largest river delta where clam diets were trophically disconnected from marsh sources of detritus. This suggests detritus deposition is patchy across space, and less homogenous than the suspended detritus pool. In addition to fluvial setting, other estuary-specific environmental drivers, such as marsh area or particle transport speed, influenced the degree of food web linkages across space and time, often accounting for unexpected patterns in food web connectivity. Transformations of the estuarine landscape that alter river hydrology or availability of detritus sources can thus potentially disrupt natural food web connectivity at the landscape scale, especially for sedentary organisms, which cannot track their food sources through space. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  14. Adsorption of uranyl ions in nanoparticles of magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, Helber; Yamaura, Mitiko

    2009-01-01

    This work studied the uranium (VI) adsorption, in the form of UO 2 2+ ions, of the nitride solution by the syntetic magnetite. This solution was prepared by precipitation adding a solution of NaOH to the solution containing the ions Fe 2+ . The time of contact and the isothermal of equilibrium of ions UO 2 2+ adsorption was verified. The isothermal of equilibrium presented more concordance with the Freundlich model, which characterized a heterogeneous adsorption surface of the magnetite. The great advantage of this technology is the combination of two separation techniques, by adsorption and magnetic, resulting in a highly efficient and reusable system

  15. Arsenic Sorption on Mechanically Activated Magnetite and Olivine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Bujňáková

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic sorption on mechanically activated minerals such as magnetite Fe3O4 (Kiruna, Sweden and olivine (Mg,Fe2SiO4 (Ǻheim,Norway has been studied and compared in this work. Experiments were carried out with non-activated and mechanically activatedsamples. The activation of both minerals was performed in a planetary mill at different milling conditions. The specific surface areaand consequent sorption activity were enhanced by mechanical activation. The using of olivine seems to be better than magnetite fromthe point of view of milling time, which is necessary for achievement of the same sorption effect.

  16. Magnetite effect in radionuclide retention : cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, M.; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Clarens, F.; Pablo, J. de

    2004-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the interaction of magnetite with cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium, in the frame of radionuclide retention by canister corrosion products. For each radionuclide, the retention on magnetite has been studied as a function of pH and the mass/ volume ratio. The experimental results have been modeled by means of Surface Complexation Models (SCM), that constitute a tool that allows an approach to sorption mechanisms in a wide range of experimental conditions taking into account electrostatic interactions at the mineral-water interface.(Author)

  17. Magnetic interactions, bonding, and motion of positive muons in magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive-muon behavior in magnetite is investigated by the muon-spin-rotation technique. The observed muon relaxation rate in zero applied field, in conjunction with the measured local field, allows us to separate muon-motion effects from phase transitions associated with magnetite. The local magnetic field is observed to be 4.02 kOe directed along the axis, the easy axis of magnetization. Possible origins of this field are discussed in terms which include local muon diffusion and a supertransfer hyperfine interaction resulting from muon-oxygen bonding. An anomaly in the muon hyperfine interactions is observed at 247 K

  18. Mineralogy, chemistry of magnetite and genesis of Korkora-1 iron deposit, east of Takab, NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2014-10-01

    and chalcopyrite. Magnetite is the most important mineral and has 0.2 to 4 mm grain size and partly transformed into hematite, limonite and goethite. In some places, magnetite can be seen as euhedral grains in hand specimen. Supergene minerals such as chalcocite, malachite, azurite, and covellite are also present. Hematite formed as primary and secondary types in which primary type occurred in deeper parts of the ore body along with magnetite and has lamellar texture with up to 0.2 mm grain size. Meanwhile, secondary type of hematite formed from martitization along magnetite grain boundaries and fractures. In the surface area of the deposit, ore minerals strongly altered to mixtures of oxide and hydroxide minerals (ochre like goethite, hematite, limonite and lepidochrocite which changed the color of the ore body to yellow, deep orange, red and brown. Pyrite is the most important sulfide mineral and formed in three stages. In the first stage, pyrite occurred with magnetite and has 0.1 to 0.3 mm subhedral to anhedral grains which altered to oxide and hydroxide minerals. At the second stage, pyrite has 0.2 to 1 mm euhedral grains, occurred between the magnetite and gangue minerals and converting to chalcopyrite. At the third stage, pyrite with magnetite, calcite and quartz filled fractures as open-space fillings and are pretty unaltered. The skarn zone includes garnet, pyroxene, secondary calcite, epidote, and chlorite and the metamorphic zone includes marble. Sericitization, silicification, calcitization, chloritization-epidotization, argilitization, propylitization and actinolitizion are the important alterations in the area from which chloritization-epidotization and calcitization in the ore and propylitic alteration in the volcanics are dominant. The EPMA analytical results on 30 points on magnetite and hematite suggest that the amount of Ti and V (0.004 wt % and 0.002 wt % in average, respectively are low in contrary to Mn and Al (0.33 wt % and 5.32 wt % in average

  19. The effect of bed particle size and deposit morphology on the filtration of magnetite through granular graphite beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.R.; Bercovich, E.J.; Liberman, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite filters are of great interest for water purification in nuclear power reactors' primary systems due to their possible operation at high temperature. The influence of the bed particle size on the retention of magnetite from aqueous suspensions at room temperature was studied. The filtration coefficient changes from 0.0 to 0.18 as the mean graphite particle diameter decreases from 1.2 to 0. mm. As the retention increases, there is also an increase in the differential pressure across the bed, so both effects must be considered in order to optimize filter's operation. The specific effective volume of the deposit was calculated with the Blake-Kozeny equation and the experimental specific volumes. These are much larger than the specific volume of solid magnetite. From the results, information regarding the morphology of the deposit in the filter is obtained. (M.E.L) [es

  20. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/hydroxyapatite tubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The first step is the formation of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) tubes on natural template followed by hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramic coated on the Fe 3 O 4 tubes. HAp improves the biocompatibility and stability of the prepared tubes. Sintering at 900 ∘ C improves the crystalline stability of nanotubes and removes the natural ...

  1. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heteroge...

  2. Adsorptive removal of bisphenol A using synthesized magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimolade, B. O.; Adekola, F. A.; Adebayo, G. B.

    2018-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an organic compound which is often used as plasticizer and has been reported to be hazardous to man. In this research the efficiency of removal of BPA from water by magnetite through adsorption process was studied. The magnetite was synthesized using reverse co-precipitation method and fully characterized. Various physicochemical parameters affecting the adsorption of BPA using magnetite were studied as well. The optimum time for the adsorption process was found to be 60 min at pH of 6, adsorbent dose of 0.2 g and 50 ppm of BPA. The adsorption data were fitted by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm best with a regression value of 0.957. The R L value was 0.179 which revealed that the process is favorable. The Freundlich constant n which was 1.901 also revealed that the adsorption is normal and favorable. The data were in agreement with the pseudo-second-order kinetics with regression value of 0.98. From the thermodynamic studies, the process was found to be exothermic and the Gibb's free energy value which was negative showed that the adsorption was spontaneous. The synthesized magnetite therefore offers great potential for the remediation of bisphenol A-contaminated media.

  3. Ion from Aqueous Solution using Magnetite, Activated Carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Thermodynamic studies on Adsorption of lead (II) Ion from Aqueous Solution using. Magnetite ... process industries and agricultural activities, which tends to ... osmosis. These processes are however, not economically feasible for small scale industries .... Freundlich coefficient. ..... from binary component system, Beni-suef.

  4. Effect of magnetite nanoparticles on dye absorption properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetite@carbon (Fe 3 O 4 @C) composites were prepared using three kinds of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs). All the Fe 3 O 4 @C composites could be easily separated from water by an external magnet. The Fe 3 O 4 NPs synthesized by a microreactor system have the smallest size and narrowest size distribution among ...

  5. Experimental and theoretical studies of manganite and magnetite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinitiwarawong, Chatchai

    2002-01-01

    In the recent years interest in the transition oxide compounds has renewed among researchers in the field of condensed matter physics. This thesis presents the studies of the two families of the transition oxides, the manganite and magnetite compounds. Manganite has regained the interest since the discovery of the large magnetoresistance around its Curie temperature in 1990s. Magnetite on the other hand is the oldest magnetic material known to man however some of its physical properties are still controversial. The experimental works address some basic properties of these compounds when fabricated in the form of thin films. These include the resistivity measurements and magnetic measurements as well as the Hall effect. The various models of transport mechanism have been compared. The magnetic field and the temperature dependence of magnetoresistance have also been studied. Simple devices such as an artificial grain boundary and bilayers thin film have been investigated. The second part of this thesis concentrates on the theoretical aspects of the fundamental physics behind these two compounds. The problem of electrons tunnelling between the magnetite electrodes has been addressed taking into account the surface effect with distortion. The last chapter presents a theoretical study of the spinless-Hubbard model which is the simplest approximation of the conduction electrons in magnetite and manganite. The results are obtained from the Hartree-Fock and the Hubbard-I approximations as well as the exact diagonalisation method. (author)

  6. Benefaction studies on the Hasan Celebi magnetite deposit, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, Jean W.; Akar, Ali

    1972-01-01

    Bench-scale and semicontinuous tests were performed on surface, trench, and diamond drill core samples from the Hasan Celebi low-grade magnetite deposit to determine the optimum benefication procedures utilizing wet magnetic separation techniques. Composite core samples typically contain about 27 percent recoverable magnetite and require crushing and grinding through 1 mm in size to insure satisfactory separation of the gangue from the magnetite. Regrinding and cleaning the magnetite concentrate to 80 percent minus 150-mesh is necessary to obtain an optimum of 66 percent iron. Semicontinuous pilot-plant testing with the wet magnetic drum using the recycled middling technique indicates that as much as 83 percent of the acid-soluble iron can be recovered into a concentrate containing 66 percent iron, with minimum deleterious elements. This represents 27 weight percent of the original ore. Further tests will continue when the Maden Tetkik ve Arama Enstitusu (MTA) receives 24 tons of bulk sample from an exploratory drift and cross-cut now being driven through a section of the major reserve area.

  7. Wet milling versus co-precipitation in magnetite ferrofluid preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almásy László

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various uses of ferrofluids for technical applications continuously raise the interest in improvement and optimization of preparation methods. This paper deals with preparation of finely granulated magnetite particles coated with oleic acid in hydrocarbon suspensions following either chemical co-precipitation from iron salt precursors or wet milling of micron size magnetite powder with the goal to compare the benefits and disadvantages of each method. Microstructural measurements showed that both methods gave similar magnetite particle size of 10-15 nm. Higher saturation magnetization was achieved for the wet-milled magnetite suspension compared to relatively rapid co-precipitation synthesis. Different efficacies of ferrophase incorporation into kerosene could be related to the different mechanisms of oleic acid bonding to nanoparticle surface. The comparative data show that wet milling represents a practicable alternative to the traditional co-precipitation since despite of longer processing time, chemicals impact on environment can be avoided as well as the remnant water in the final product.

  8. Correlation Study of Magnetite Dissolution in Hybrid Decontamination Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon-Byeong; Won, Hui-Jun; Park, Jung-Sun; Park, Sang-Yoon; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Choi, Wang-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In the operating plants, the localized corrosion on SG tubes which are transporters of thermal energy to the secondary side lowers the reduction heat transfer efficiency as well as degrades the lifetime of SG. Magnetite, Fe3O4, is a commonly found corrosion product on the inner surface of reactor coolant system. Simply magnetite can be reduced to hematite, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and further to iron when oxygen is limited or ample reducing agents are supplied. Along this line, number of decontamination processes has been developed since 1970s and most of them contain organic acid and additive chelating agents. However, many reports have pointed out the negative environmental effect of those chemicals, and currently there are new approaches to overcome the limited decontamination efficiency and large volume of secondary waste from other alternate processes without using such those organic chemicals. In present study, we investigated the magnetite dissolution in HyBRID solution as newly developing decontamination process. As a preliminary study for empirical modeling of decontamination by HyBRID solution, simply correlation study between variable and magnetite dissolution was introduced with studied mechanism and experimental results.

  9. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles obtained by the thermal decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Renilma de Sousa Pinheiro; Sinfronio, Francisco Savio Mendes; Menezes, Alan Silva de; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Silva, Fernando Carvalho, E-mail: renilma.ufma@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Moscoso-Londono, Oscar; Muraca, Diego; Knobel, Marcelo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Magnetite nanoparticles have found numerous applications in biomedicine such as magnetic separation, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia agents [1]. These features are related to their superparamagnetic behavior, low toxicity and high functionalization [2]. Thus, this work aims to obtain oleylamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles by means of thermal decomposition method at different temperatures and reaction time. All samples were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SQUID magnetometer. The infrared spectra showed two vibrational modes at 2920 and 2850 cm{sup -1}, assigned to the asymmetrical and symmetrical stretching of C-H groups of the oleic acid and oleylamine, respectively. The XRD pattern of the samples confirmed the formation of magnetite phase (ICSD 36314) at all temperatures. The average size of the crystallites was determined by Debye-Scherrer equation with values in the range of 1.1-1.5 nm. Field-cooled and zero field-cooled analysis demonstrate that the blocking temperature (T{sub B}) is below room temperature in all cases, indicating that all magnetite nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature and ferrimagnetic at low temperature. (author)

  10. Gelatine-assisted synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, André F.; Mendo, Sofia G. [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Ferreira, Liliana P. [Universidade de Lisboa, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Mendonça, Maria Helena [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Ferreira, Paula [University of Aveiro, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Godinho, Margarida; Cruz, Maria Margarida [Universidade de Lisboa, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Carvalho, Maria Deus, E-mail: mdcarvalho@ciencias.ulisboa.pt [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal)

    2016-01-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method exploring the use of gelatine and agar as additives. For comparison, magnetite nanoparticles were also prepared by standard co-precipitation, by co-precipitation with the addition of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Their magnetic properties were studied by SQUID magnetometry and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The nanoparticles potential for applications in magnetic hyperthermia was evaluated through heating efficiency under alternating magnetic field. The results show that all synthesis methods produce Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with similar sizes. The nanoparticles synthesized in the gelatine medium display the narrowest particle size distribution, the lowest oxidation degree, one of the highest saturation magnetization values and the best hyperthermia efficiency, proving that this gelatine-assisted synthesis is an efficient, environmental friendly, and low-cost method to produce magnetite nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract: A new gelatine-assisted method is an efficient and low-cost way to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic hyperthermia.

  11. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles obtained by the thermal decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Renilma de Sousa Pinheiro; Sinfronio, Francisco Savio Mendes; Menezes, Alan Silva de; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Silva, Fernando Carvalho; Moscoso-Londono, Oscar; Muraca, Diego; Knobel, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Magnetite nanoparticles have found numerous applications in biomedicine such as magnetic separation, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia agents [1]. These features are related to their superparamagnetic behavior, low toxicity and high functionalization [2]. Thus, this work aims to obtain oleylamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles by means of thermal decomposition method at different temperatures and reaction time. All samples were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SQUID magnetometer. The infrared spectra showed two vibrational modes at 2920 and 2850 cm -1 , assigned to the asymmetrical and symmetrical stretching of C-H groups of the oleic acid and oleylamine, respectively. The XRD pattern of the samples confirmed the formation of magnetite phase (ICSD 36314) at all temperatures. The average size of the crystallites was determined by Debye-Scherrer equation with values in the range of 1.1-1.5 nm. Field-cooled and zero field-cooled analysis demonstrate that the blocking temperature (T B ) is below room temperature in all cases, indicating that all magnetite nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature and ferrimagnetic at low temperature. (author)

  12. Magnetostatic interactions in a natural magnetite-ulvospinel intergrowth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. E.; Krasa, D.; Williams, W.; Winklhofer, M.

    2005-12-01

    The difficult problem of magnetostatic interactions in naturally-occurring minerals has a long history but a renewed attack on it is currently being driven by recent advances in instrumentation and computing power. We report a new investigation of a finely exsolved magnetite/ulvöspinel intergrowth first studied magnetically by Evans & Wayman (1974) and more recently by Harrison et al. (2002). Transmission electron micrographs reveal a rectilinear pattern of tiny magnetite blocks separated by ulvöspinel sheets. The magnetite blocks have a gaussian size distribution with mean and standard deviation of 193 and 46 nm, respectively (n ~ 500), with the separation between nearest neighbours being typically 40 nm, but often much less. Thermomagnetic analysis yields a well-defined Curie point of 548°C indicating that the ``magnetite" actually has a compostion of Fe2.9Ti0.1O4. Routine hysteresis measurements immediately reflect the interaction between neighbouring ``magnetite" regions, with Mrs/Ms = 0.22, well below the expected value for non-interacting single-domain particles. The corresponding FORC diagram clearly reveals the interaction fields with Hi = 30 mT (full-width at half-maximum, FWHM) centred on a well-defined Hc peak at 20 mT. Furthermore, the maximum interaction field observed (~50 mT) agrees well with that expected from simple theory and micromagnetic calculations. Elimination of the intergrowth structure by heating in an evacuated quartz vial for 2 hours at 1000 °C leads to marked changes in the magnetic properties: Mrs/Ms drops to 0.11, Hcr/Hc increases from 1.98 to 2.73, the main peak on the FORC diagram shifts to 6 mT and the interaction field profile drastically narrows (FWHM Hi = 14 mT).

  13. The effect of cobalt substitution on magnetic hardening of magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, M., E-mail: mozafari@sci.ui.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadian, Y. [Physics Department, Razi University, Taghebostan, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aftabi, A. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj 66177-15175 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oveisy Moakhar, M. [Physics Department, Razi University, Taghebostan, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this work cobalt-substituted magnetite (Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, x=0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction was carried out and the results show that all of the samples have single phase spinel structure. Microstructure of the samples was studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope and the results show that particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were uniform and in the 50–55 nm range. Room temperature magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were measured by an alternating gradient force magnetometer and the results revealed that substituting cobalt for iron in magnetite structure, changes the magnetite from a soft magnetic material to a hard one. So that coercivity changes from 0 (a superparamagnetic state) to 337 Oe (a hard magnetic material), which is a remarkable change. Curie temperatures of the samples were determined by recording their susceptibility-temperature (χ–T) curves and the results show that by increasing cobalt content, Curie temperature of the samples also increases. Also χ–T curves of the samples were recorded from above Curie temperature to room temperature (first cooling), while the curves in the second heating and second cooling have the same behaviour as the first cooling curve. The results depict that all samples have different behaviour in the first cooling and in the first heating processes. This shows remarkable changes of the cation distribution in the course of first heating. - Highlights: • It is possible to get Co substituted magnetite nanoparticles by coprecipitation method. • Prepared nanoparticles have different cation distribution in comparison with that of bulk counterparts. • Co substitution increases coercivity of the magnetite.

  14. Identification and paleoclimatic significance of magnetite nanoparticles in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imad A. M.; Maher, Barbara A.

    2018-02-01

    In the world-famous sediments of the Chinese Loess Plateau, fossil soils alternate with windblown dust layers to record monsoonal variations over the last ˜3 My. The less-weathered, weakly magnetic dust layers reflect drier, colder glaciations. The fossil soils (paleosols) contain variable concentrations of nanoscale, strongly magnetic iron oxides, formed in situ during the wetter, warmer interglaciations. Mineralogical identification of the magnetic soil oxides is essential for deciphering these key paleoclimatic records. Formation of magnetite, a mixed Fe2+/Fe3+ ferrimagnet, has been linked to soil redox oscillations, and thence to paleorainfall. An opposite hypothesis states that magnetite can only form if the soil is water saturated for significant periods in order for Fe3+ to be reduced to Fe2+, and suggests instead the temperature-dependent formation of maghemite, an Fe3+-oxide, much of which ages subsequently into hematite, typically aluminum substituted. This latter, oxidizing pathway would have been temperature, but not rainfall dependent. Here, through structural fingerprinting and scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis, we prove that magnetite is the dominant soil-formed ferrite. Maghemite is present in lower concentrations, and shows no evidence of aluminum substitution, negating its proposed precursor role for the aluminum-substituted hematite prevalent in the paleosols. Magnetite dominance demonstrates that magnetite formation occurs in well-drained, generally oxidizing soils, and that soil wetting/drying oscillations drive the degree of soil magnetic enhancement. The magnetic variations of the Chinese Loess Plateau paleosols thus record changes in monsoonal rainfall, over timescales of millions of years.

  15. Novel humic acid-bonded magnetite nanoparticles for protein immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrakci, Mevlut, E-mail: mevlutbayrakci@gmail.com [Ulukisla Vocational School, Nigde University, 51100 Ulukisla, Nigde (Turkey); Gezici, Orhan [Department of Chemistry, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey); Bas, Salih Zeki; Ozmen, Mustafa; Maltas, Esra [Department of Chemistry, Selcuk University, 42031 Konya (Turkey)

    2014-09-01

    The present paper is the first report that introduces (i) a useful methodology for chemical immobilization of humic acid (HA) to aminopropyltriethoxysilane-functionalized magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles (APS-MNPs) and (ii) human serum albumin (HSA) binding to the obtained material (HA-APS-MNPs). The newly prepared magnetite nanoparticle was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Results indicated that surface modification of the bare magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and HA was successfully performed. The protein binding studies that were evaluated in batch mode exhibited that HA-APS-MNPs could be efficiently used as a substrate for the binding of HSA from aqueous solutions. Usually, recovery values higher than 90% were found to be feasible by HA-APS-MNPs, while that value was around 2% and 70% in the cases of MNPs and APS-MNPs, respectively. Hence, the capacity of MNPs was found to be significantly improved by immobilization of HA. Furthermore, thermal degradation of HA-APS-MNPs and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs was evaluated in terms of the Horowitz–Metzger equation in order to determine kinetic parameters for thermal decomposition. Activation energies calculated for HA-APS-MNPs (20.74 kJ mol{sup −1}) and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs (33.42 kJ mol{sup −1}) implied chemical immobilization of HA to APS-MNPs, and tight interactions between HA and HA-APS-MNPs. - Highlights: • A new magnetite nanoparticle based humic acid was prepared for the first time. • Protein binding studies of magnetite nanoparticle based humic acid were performed. • Kinetic parameters of protein and/or humic acid bonded nanoparticles were evaluated.

  16. Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Pallab; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Banerjee, Rinti; Bellare, Jayesh; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2007-01-01

    In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles

  17. Investigating the Early Carbon Cycle Using Carbonaceous Inclusions and Dissolved Carbon in Detrital Zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E. A.; Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Mao, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Because the terrestrial rock record extends only to ~4 Ga and older materials thus far identified are limited to detrital zircons, information about volatile abundances and cycles on early Earth is limited. Carbon, for instance, plays an important role not only in the modern biosphere but also in deep recycling of materials between the crust and mantle. We are investigating the record of carbon abundance and origin in Hadean zircons from Jack Hills (W. Australia) using two main approaches. First, carbon may partition into the zircon structure at trace levels during crystallization from a magma, and better understanding of this partitioning behavior will allow for zircon's use as a monitor of magmatic carbon contents. We have measured carbon abundances in zircon from a variety of igneous rocks (gabbro; I-, A-, and S-type granitoids) via SIMS and found that although abundances are typically low (average raw 12C/30Si ~ 1x10-6), S-type granite zircons can reach a factor of 1000 over this background. Around 10% of Hadean zircons investigated show similar enrichments, consistent with other evidence for the derivation of many Jack Hills zircons from S-type granitoids and with the establishment of modern-level carbon abundances in the crust by ca. 4.2 Ga. Diamond and graphite inclusions reported in the Jack Hills zircons by previous studies proved to be contamination by polishing debris, leaving the true abundance of these materials in the population uncertain. On a second front, we have identified and investigated primary carbonaceous inclusions in these zircons. From a population of over 10,000 Jack Hills zircons, we identified one concordant 4.10±0.01 Ga zircon that contains primary graphite inclusions (so interpreted due to their enclosure in a crack-free zircon host as shown by transmission X-ray microscopy and their crystal habit). Their δ13CPDB of -24±5‰ is consistent with a biogenic origin and, in the absence of a likely inorganic mechanism to produce such a

  18. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility.

  19. FeII induced mineralogical transformations of ferric oxyhydroxides into magnetite of variable stoichiometry and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, M.; Abdelmoula, M.; Hanna, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to monitor the mineralogical transformations of ferrihydrite (F), lepidocrocite (L) and goethite (G) into magnetite as a function of aging time. Ferric oxyhydroxides were reacted with soluble Fe II and OH – in stoichiometric amounts to form magnetite at an initial pH of ∼9.7. Observed transformation extent into magnetite followed the order: F>L>G with almost 30% of untransformed G after 1 month. The departure from stoichiometry, δ, of magnetite (Fe 3−δ O 4 ) generated from F (δ∼0.04) and L (δ∼0.05) was relatively low as compared to that in magnetite from G (δ∼0.08). The analysis by transmission electron microscopy and BET revealed that generated magnetite was also different in terms of morphology, particle size and surface area depending on the nature of initial ferric oxyhydroxide. This method of preparation is a possible way to form nano-sized magnetite. - Graphical abstract: Mössbauer spectrum of the early stage of magnetite formation formed from the interaction of adsorbed Fe II species with goethite. Highlights: ► Ferric oxides were reacted with hydroxylated Fe II to form magnetite. ► Magnetite formation was quantified as a function of aging time. ► Complete transformation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite was achieved. ► Almost 70% of initial goethite was transformed. ► Resulting magnetites have differences in stoichiometry and morphological properties.

  20. The electrochemical property of the electrodeposited magnetite electrode with different pH values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong-Jin; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is influenced by many factors such as the water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in a solution, and etc.), chemical composition of carbon steel, and fluid dynamics. Magnetite is formed at the inner surface of carbon steel, and protects the integrity of pipes from damage. The magnetite has a stable state at each equilibrium condition, so that it can be dissolved into the fluid under conditions that satisfy the equilibrium state. The iron solubility can be calculated by considering the reaction equilibrium constants for prediction of the change in the magnetite layer. On the other hand, it is necessary to measure the experimental solubility to compare the theoretical data and the experimental data. In addition, the solubility of magnetite can be predicted by measuring the electrochemical experiments. However, there are few studies related to the electrochemical property of magnetite owing to the difficulty of the electrode fabrication. In the present work, a magnetite electrode was prepared using the electrochemical-assisted precipitation method, and the electrochemical property of the fabricated magnetite electrode was measured in an alkaline solution. The magnetite electrode was fabricated by using the electrochemical-assisted precipitation method for the measurement of the solubility of the magnetite. The prepared magnetite electrode showed the characteristic of the magnetite by an XRD spectrum

  1. A new estimate of detrital redox-sensitive metal concentrations and variability in fluxes to marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Devon B.; Zhang, Shuang; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2017-10-01

    The enrichment and depletion of redox sensitive trace metals in marine sediments have been used extensively as paleoredox proxies. The trace metals in shale are comprised of both detrital (transported or particulate) and authigenic (precipitated, redox-driven) constituents, potentially complicating the use of this suite of proxies. Untangling the influence of these components is vital for the interpretation of enrichments, depletions, and isotopic signals of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), uranium (U), and vanadium (V) observed in the rock record. Traditionally, a single crustal average is used as a cutoff for detrital input, and concentrations above or below this value are interpreted as redox derived authigenic enrichment or depletion, while authigenic isotopic signals are frequently corrected for an assumed detrital contribution. Building from an extensive study of soils across the continental United States - which upon transport will become marine sediments - and their elemental concentrations, we find large deviations from accepted crustal averages in redox-sensitive metals (Fe, Cr, U, V) compared to typical detrital tracers (Al, Ti, Sc, Th) and provide new estimates for detrital contributions to the ocean. The variability in these elemental ratios is present over large areas, comparable to the catchment-size of major rivers around the globe. This heterogeneity in detrital flux highlights the need for a reevaluation of how the detrital contribution is assessed in trace metal studies, and the use of confidence intervals rather than single average values, especially in local studies or in the case of small authigenic enrichments.

  2. Effect of the concentration of magnetite on the structure, electrical and magnetic properties of a polyester resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Peña-Rodriguez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effect of the concentration of magnetite powders (Fe3O4 on the electrical and magnetic properties of a resin-based composite of thermoset polyester. The samples were prepared by the casting method at different concentrations: 60-40, 70-30, 80-20, 90-10 and 100-0 (% in weight, where the primary phase was resin and the secondary, Fe3O4 powders. The crystalline structure was studied using X-ray diffraction and surface characterization was carried out applying the scanning electron microscopy technique. The electrical response was measured by electric polarization curves as a function of the electric field; and the volumetric electrical resistivity, by an electrometer. The magnetic response was determined by magnetization curves as a function of temperature and intensity of the applied magnetic field. The structural analysis indicates that crystallinity increases as higher concentrations of Fe3O4 are added to the samples. The electrical characterization of the material reveals that the volumetric resistivity decreases as the content of magnetite increases. These reactions indicate an insulation-conductor transition with increasing dielectric constant values. The magnetic characterization presents a linear increase of the saturation of magnetization and magnetic moment as a function of the amount of magnetite added to the polymer matrix, whereas the coercivity shows behaviors of soft magnetic materials for T ˃ Tv and for T < Tv, where Tv represents the temperature of Verwey.

  3. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-01-01

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe 2+ have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by γ-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH ∼ 12.5) were γ-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of ∼22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of γ-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of γ-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite (∼Fe 2.71 O 4 ) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e aq - ), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe 3+ → Fe 2+ . Upon 18 h of γ-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of γ-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form (∼Fe 2.93 O 4 ). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of γ-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of ∼22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe 3+ → Fe 2+ resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe 2+ → Fe 3+ . The Fe 3+ was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed and recrystallised as goethite. The γ-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure

  4. Mineral chemistry of magnetite from magnetite-apatite mineralization and their host rocks: examples from Kiruna, Sweden, and El Laco, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughm, Shannon G.; Hanchar, John M.; Tornos, Fernando; Westhues, Anne; Attersley, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    Interpretation of the mineralizing environment of magnetite-apatite deposits remains controversial with theories that include a hydrothermal or magmatic origin or a combination of those two processes. To address this controversy, we have analyzed the trace element content of magnetite from precisely known geographic locations and geologic environments from the Precambrian magnetite-apatite ore and host rocks in Kiruna, Sweden, and the Pliocene-Holocene El Laco volcano in the Atacama desert of Chile. Magnetite samples from Kiruna have low trace element concentrations with little chemical variation between the ore, host, and related intrusive rocks. Magnetite from andesite at El Laco, and dacite from the nearby Láscar volcano, has high trace element concentrations typical of magmatic magnetite. El Laco ore magnetite have low trace element concentrations and displays growth zoning in incompatible elements (Si, Ca, and Ce), compatible elements (Mg, Al, and Mn), large-ion lithophile element (Sr), and high field strength element (Y, Nb, and Th). The El Laco ore magnetite are similar in composition to magnetite that has been previously interpreted to have crystallized from hydrothermal fluids; however, there is a significant difference in the internal zoning patterns. At El Laco, each zoned element is either enriched or depleted in the same layers, suggesting the magnetite crystallized from a volatile-rich, iron-oxide melt. In general, the compositions of magnetite from these two deposits plot in very wide fields that are not restricted to the proposed fields in published discriminant diagrams. This suggests that the use of these diagrams and genetic models based on them should be used with caution.

  5. Detrital zircon ages from southern Norway - implications for the Proterozoic evolution of the southwestern Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, T.-L.; Andersen, T.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Vestin, J.

    An ion-microprobe (SIMS) U-Pb zircon dating study on four samples of Precambrian metasediments from the high-grade Bamble Sector, southern Norway, gives the first information on the timing of discrete crust-forming events in the SW part of the Baltic Shield. Recent Nd and Pb studies have indicated that the sources of the clastic metasediments in this area have crustal histories extending back to 1.7 to 2.1Ga, although there is no record of rocks older than 1.6Ga in southern Norway. The analysed metasediments are from a sequence of intercalated, centimetre to 10-metre wide units of quartzites, semi-metapelites, metapelites and mafic granulites. The zircons can be grouped in two morphological populations: (1) long prismatic; (2) rounded, often flattened. The BSE images reveal that both populations consist of oscillatory zoned, rounded and corroded cores (detrital grains of magmatic origin), surrounded by homogeneous rims (metamorphic overgrowths). The detrital zircons have 207Pb/206Pb ages between 1367 and 1939Ma, with frequency maxima in the range 1.85 to 1.70Ga and 1.60 to 1.50Ga. There is no correlation between crystal habit and age of the zircon. One resorbed, inner zircon core in a detrital grain is strongly discordant and gives a composite inner core-magmatic outer core 207Pb/206Pb age of 2383 Ma. Two discrete, unzoned zircons have 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1122 and 1133Ma, representing zircon growth during the Sveconorwegian high-grade metamorphism. Also the μm wide overgrowths, embayments in the detrital cores and apparent ``inner cores'' which represent secondary metamorphic zircon growth in deep embayments in detrital grains, are of Sveconorwegian age. The composite-detrital-metamorphic zircon analyses give generally discordant 206Pb/238U versus 207Pb/235U ratios and maximum 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1438Ma. These data demonstrate the existence of a protocrust of 1.7 to 2.0Ga in the southwestern part of the Baltic Shield, implying a break in the overall westward

  6. Detrital K-feldspar thermochronology of the Nanaimo Group: Characterization of Basement and Extraregional Basin Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isava, V.; Grove, M.; Mahoney, J. B.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Early Paleogene Nanaimo Group covers the contact between Triassic basement Wrangellia terrane and the Jurassic-Cretaceous Coast Plutonic Complex (CPC) in southern British Columbia. Prior detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf studies indicate a change in sediment source for the Nanaimo basin, from the primitive CPC in Santonian-Early Campanian time to an isotopically evolved continental extraregional source during the late Campanian/Maastrictian. Two notably different areas have been proposed as potential source regions: (1) the Idaho/Boulder batholith and Belt Supergroup, and (2) the Mojave/Salinia segment of structurally disrupted late Cretaceous southern California margin. Single crystal 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion of ca. 100-200 grains apiece from seven detrital K-feldspar samples from Santonian-Maastrichtian strata of the northern Nanaimo Group constrain the history of the sediments' source regions. The two oldest samples, from the K-feldspar poor Comox and Extension Fms., display a monotonic increasing distribution of cooling ages 80-125 Ma that reflects shallow erosion of the CPC. In contrast, Late Campanian strata of the Cedar District and De Courcy Fms. exhibit a more pronounced cluster of cooling ages 80-95 Ma as well as a greater proportion of Jurassic ages that represent progressively deeper erosion of the CPC. Evidence for an extraregional sediment source appears abruptly in the Geoffrey Fm. by 72 Ma, matching the time of local-to-extraregional shift indicated in detrital zircon U-Pb studies. Over 90% of the detrital K-feldspars from these arkosic sandstones yield cooling ages of 70-80 Ma, with sparse older ages associated with the CPC. Samples from the successively younger Spray and Gabriola Fms. also yield >90% K-feldspar ages younger than 80 Ma and exhibit age maxima of 68 Ma and 65 Ma, respectively. These results are distinct from detrital zircon U-Pb and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages of the southern Sierra Nevada, Mojave/Salina, and northern

  7. UV pulsed laser deposition of magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parames, M.L.; Mariano, J.; Rogalski, M.S.; Popovici, N.; Conde, O.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetite thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in O 2 reactive atmosphere from Fe 3 O 4 targets. The ablated material was deposited onto Si(1 0 0) substrates at various temperatures up to 623 K. The temperature dependence of structure and stoichiometry was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The XRD results show that films grown between 483 and 623 K are obtained as pure phase magnetite with an estimated average crystallite size increasing from 14 to 35 nm, respectively. This is in agreement with the CEMS spectra analysis, indicating isomer shift and internal field values for both the T d and O h sites close to those reported for the bulk material and a random orientation of the magnetic moments. The influence of the deposition temperature on the estimated Fe (9-x)/3 O 4 stoichiometry is related to an increase in the vacancy concentration from 483 to 623 K

  8. Relaxometry imaging of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Amit; Schmid-Lorch, Dominik; Häberle, Thomas; Reinhard, Friedemann; Zappe, Andrea; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    We present a novel technique to image superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via their fluctuating magnetic fields. The detection is based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond, which allows optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements on its electron spin structure. In combination with an atomic-force-microscope, this atomic-sized color center maps ambient magnetic fields in a wide frequency range from DC up to several GHz, while retaining a high spatial resolution in the sub-nanometer range. We demonstrate imaging of single 10 nm sized magnetite nanoparticles using this spin noise detection technique. By fitting simulations (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) to the data, we are able to infer additional information on such a particle and its dynamics, like the attempt frequency and the anisotropy constant. This is of high interest to the proposed application of magnetite nanoparticles as an alternative MRI contrast agent or to the field of particle-aided tumor hyperthermia.

  9. UO2/magnetite concrete interaction and penetration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    The concrete structure represents a line of defense in safety assessment of containment integrity and possible minimization of radiological releases following a reactor accident. The penetration study of hot UO 2 particles into limestone concrete and basalt concrete highlighted some major differences between the two concretes. These included penetration rate, melting and dissolution phenomena, released gases, pressurization of the UO 2 chamber, and characteristics of post-test concrete. The present study focuses on the phenomena associated with core debris interaction with and penetration into magnetite type concrete. The real material experiment was carried out with UO 2 particles and magnetite concrete in a test apparatus similar to the one utilized in the UO 2 /limestone experiment

  10. Uniaxial anisotropy in magnetite thin film-Magnetization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechec, A.; Korecki, J.; Handke, B.; Kakol, Z.; Owoc, D.; Antolak, D.A.; Kozlowski, A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on a stoichiometric single crystalline magnetite Fe 3 O 4 thin film (thickness of ca. 500 nm) MBE deposited on MgO (1 0 0) substrate. The aim of these studies was to check the influence of preparation method and sample form (bulk vs. thin film) on magnetic anisotropy properties in magnetite. The film magnetization along versus applied magnetic field has been determined both in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the film surface, and at temperatures above and below the Verwey transition. We have found, in agreement with published results, that the in-plane field of 10 kOe was not sufficient to saturate the sample. This can be understood if some additional factor, on top of the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy, is taken into account

  11. Thermomagnetic analysis of the initial permeability in magnetite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniquez, J.; Francisco, C. de; Munoz, J.M.; Sanchez, O.

    1987-01-01

    A study on the thermomagnetic analysis of the initial permeability in magnetite samples and its dependence with the sintering conditions is presented. The measurements, for temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen to the Curie temperature, were performed with the help of a very simple system which is also described here. The experimental results allow us to consider this study as a sensitive test of the sintering conditions (author) 21 refs

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Magnetite Nanoparticle Block Copolymer Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian

    2007-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized and complexed with carboxylate-functionalized block copolymers, and aqueous dispersions of the complexes were investigated as functions of their chemical and morphological structures. The block copolymer dispersants possessed either poly(ethylene oxide), poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide), or poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide) outer blocks, and all contained a polyurethane center block with pendant carboxylate functi...

  13. Interactions between magnetite and humic substances: redox reactions and dissolution processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, Anneli; Byrne, James M; Bauer, Iris; Menguy, Nicolas; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-10-19

    Humic substances (HS) are redox-active compounds that are ubiquitous in the environment and can serve as electron shuttles during microbial Fe(III) reduction thus reducing a variety of Fe(III) minerals. However, not much is known about redox reactions between HS and the mixed-valent mineral magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) that can potentially lead to changes in Fe(II)/Fe(III) stoichiometry and even dissolve the magnetite. To address this knowledge gap, we incubated non-reduced (native) and reduced HS with four types of magnetite that varied in particle size and solid-phase Fe(II)/Fe(III) stoichiometry. We followed dissolved and solid-phase Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentrations over time to quantify redox reactions between HS and magnetite. Magnetite redox reactions and dissolution processes with HS varied depending on the initial magnetite and HS properties. The interaction between biogenic magnetite and reduced HS resulted in dissolution of the solid magnetite mineral, as well as an overall reduction of the magnetite. In contrast, a slight oxidation and no dissolution was observed when native and reduced HS interacted with 500 nm magnetite. This variability in the solubility and electron accepting and donating capacity of the different types of magnetite is likely an effect of differences in their reduction potential that is correlated to the magnetite Fe(II)/Fe(III) stoichiometry, particle size, and crystallinity. Our study suggests that redox-active HS play an important role for Fe redox speciation within minerals such as magnetite and thereby influence the reactivity of these Fe minerals and their role in biogeochemical Fe cycling. Furthermore, such processes are also likely to have an effect on the fate of other elements bound to the surface of Fe minerals.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Cu{sup 2+} substituted magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, A. L. [Universidad de Antioquia, Grupo de Estado Solido, Instituto de Fisica (Colombia); Velasquez, A. A., E-mail: avelas26@eafit.edu.co [Universidad EAFIT, Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado (Colombia); Urquijo, J. P. [Universidad de Antioquia, Grupo de Estado Solido, Instituto de Fisica (Colombia); Baggio, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Samples of magnetite, both pure and doped with divalent copper, Fe{sub 3 - x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 4}, with x = 0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 atm.%, were synthesized hydrothermally. The samples were characterized by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Moessbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The analyses made by the above techniques showed that as the Cu{sup 2+} concentration increases, a simultaneous reduction in the magnetic and structural parameters takes place, namely: magnetic hyperfine interactions at octahedral sites, particle size and lattice constant. Degradation in the particles morphology as well as a distribution of their size were also observed. Our study points two important effects of Cu{sup 2+} in magnetite, the first one is its incorporation within the structure, replacing Fe{sup 2+} ions and decreasing both the magnetic hyperfine interactions at octahedral sites and the bulk magnetization, the second one is the contraction of the crystalline lattice of magnetite, because incorporation of Cu{sup 2+} within the structure, generation of vacancies or both simultaneous effects.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Cu2+ substituted magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A. L.; Velásquez, A. A.; Urquijo, J. P.; Baggio, E.

    2011-01-01

    Samples of magnetite, both pure and doped with divalent copper, Fe 3 − x Cu x O 4 , with x = 0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 atm.%, were synthesized hydrothermally. The samples were characterized by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Mössbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The analyses made by the above techniques showed that as the Cu 2+ concentration increases, a simultaneous reduction in the magnetic and structural parameters takes place, namely: magnetic hyperfine interactions at octahedral sites, particle size and lattice constant. Degradation in the particles morphology as well as a distribution of their size were also observed. Our study points two important effects of Cu 2+ in magnetite, the first one is its incorporation within the structure, replacing Fe 2+ ions and decreasing both the magnetic hyperfine interactions at octahedral sites and the bulk magnetization, the second one is the contraction of the crystalline lattice of magnetite, because incorporation of Cu 2+ within the structure, generation of vacancies or both simultaneous effects.

  16. "Clickable", trifunctional magnetite nanoparticles and their chemoselective biofunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manasmita; Bandyopadhyay, Debarati; Mishra, Debasish; Datir, Satyajit; Dhak, Prasanta; Jain, Sanyog; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Basak, Amit; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-06-15

    A multifunctional iron oxide based nanoformulation for combined cancer-targeted therapy and multimodal imaging has been meticulously designed and synthesized using a chemoselective ligation approach. Novel superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles simultaneously functionalized with amine, carboxyl, and azide groups were fabricated through a sequence of stoichiometrically controllable partial succinylation and Cu (II) catalyzed diazo transfer on the reactive amine termini of 2-aminoethylphosphonate grafted magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs). Functional moieties associated with MNP surface were chemoselectively conjugated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC), propargyl folate (FA), and paclitaxel (PTX) via tandem nucleophic addition of amine to isothithiocyanates, Cu (I) catalyzed azide--alkyne click chemistry and carbodiimide-promoted esterification. An extensive in vitro study established that the bioactives chemoselectively appended to the magnetite core bequeathed multifunctionality to the nanoparticles without any loss of activity of the functional molecules. Multifunctional nanoparticles, developed in the course of the study, could selectively target and induce apoptosis to folate-receptor (FR) overexpressing cancer cells with enhanced efficacy as compared to the free drug. In addition, the dual optical and magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles aided in the real-time tracking of their intracellular pathways also as apoptotic events through dual fluorescence and MR-based imaging.

  17. Growth of magnetite films by a hydrogel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velásquez, A.A., E-mail: avelas26@eafit.edu.edu.co [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Universidad EAFIT, A.A. 3300, Medellín (Colombia); Marín, C.C. [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Universidad EAFIT, A.A. 3300, Medellín (Colombia); Urquijo, J.P. [Grupo de Estado Sólido, Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia)

    2017-06-15

    Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) films were grown on glass substrates by formation and condensation of complex of iron oxides in an agarose hydrogel. The obtained films were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Room Temperature Mössbauer Spectroscopy (TMS), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Voltage vs. Current measurements by the four-point method. FTIR and TGA measurements showed that some polymer chains of agarose remain linked to the surface of the magnetic particles of the films after heat treatment. SEM measurements showed that the films are composed by quasi spherical particles with sizes around 55 nm. Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements showed two sextets with broaden lines, which were assigned to magnetite with a distributed particle size, and two doublets, which were assigned to superparamagnetic phases of magnetite. For the specific dimensions of the films prepared, measurements of Voltage vs. Current showed an ohmic behavior for currents between 0 and 200 nA, with a resistance of 355 kΩ.

  18. Growth of magnetite films by a hydrogel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velásquez, A.A.; Marín, C.C.; Urquijo, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) films were grown on glass substrates by formation and condensation of complex of iron oxides in an agarose hydrogel. The obtained films were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Room Temperature Mössbauer Spectroscopy (TMS), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Voltage vs. Current measurements by the four-point method. FTIR and TGA measurements showed that some polymer chains of agarose remain linked to the surface of the magnetic particles of the films after heat treatment. SEM measurements showed that the films are composed by quasi spherical particles with sizes around 55 nm. Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements showed two sextets with broaden lines, which were assigned to magnetite with a distributed particle size, and two doublets, which were assigned to superparamagnetic phases of magnetite. For the specific dimensions of the films prepared, measurements of Voltage vs. Current showed an ohmic behavior for currents between 0 and 200 nA, with a resistance of 355 kΩ.

  19. Development of Antibody-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles for Biomarker Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Chapa Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have great potential in biomedical applications because of their magnetic response offers the possibility to direct them to specific areas and target biological entities. Magnetic separation of biomolecules is one of the most important applications of MNPs because their versatility in detecting cancer biomarkers. However, the effectiveness of this method depends on many factors, including the type of functionalization onto MNPs. Therefore, in this study, magnetite nanoparticles have been developed in order to separate the 5′-nucleotidase enzyme (5eNT. The 5eNT is used as a bio-indicator for diagnosing diseases such as hepatic ischaemia, liver tumor, and hepatotoxic drugs damage. Magnetic nanoparticles were covered in a core/shell type with silica, aminosilane, and a double shell of silica-aminosilane. A ScFv (fragment antibody and anti-CD73 antibody were attached to the coated nanoparticles in order to separate the enzyme. The magnetic separation of this enzyme with fragment antibody was found to be 28% higher than anti-CD73 antibody and the enzyme adsorption was improved with the double shell due to the increased length of the polymeric chain. Magnetite nanoparticles with a double shell (silica-aminosilane were also found to be more sensitive than magnetite with a single shell in the detection of biomarkers.

  20. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with alkyne-containing polyacrylates for click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socaci, Crina; Rybka, Miriam; Magerusan, Lidia; Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    New magnetic core shell nanoparticles were synthesized consisting of magnetite cores and poly-( O-propargyl acrylate) shells. Strong fixing of the shells was achieved by primary anchoring phosphates or α-dihydroxydiphosphonates containing acrylate or methacrylate functionalities. The magnetic nanoparticles are attractive as supports for a variety of function which can be easily introduced by Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). In this way, also the loading of the magnetic nanoparticles with propargyl units was determined by reaction with 4-azidoacetophenone and analysis of the supernatant. In order to demonstrate the attractiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles a novel azido-containing conjugate with biotin as recognition function and dansyl as fluorescence marker was introduced by CuAAC reaction. All NP show superparamagnetic behavior with high-saturation magnetization values and were further characterized by FTIR, photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.

  1. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with alkyne-containing polyacrylates for click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socaci, Crina; Rybka, Miriam; Magerusan, Lidia; Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    New magnetic core shell nanoparticles were synthesized consisting of magnetite cores and poly-(O-propargyl acrylate) shells. Strong fixing of the shells was achieved by primary anchoring phosphates or α-dihydroxydiphosphonates containing acrylate or methacrylate functionalities. The magnetic nanoparticles are attractive as supports for a variety of function which can be easily introduced by Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). In this way, also the loading of the magnetic nanoparticles with propargyl units was determined by reaction with 4-azidoacetophenone and analysis of the supernatant. In order to demonstrate the attractiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles a novel azido-containing conjugate with biotin as recognition function and dansyl as fluorescence marker was introduced by CuAAC reaction. All NP show superparamagnetic behavior with high-saturation magnetization values and were further characterized by FTIR, photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.

  2. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with alkyne-containing polyacrylates for click chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socaci, Crina [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies (Romania); Rybka, Miriam [Humboldt-University Berlin, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Magerusan, Lidia; Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Juergen, E-mail: liebscher@chemie.hu-berlin.de [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies (Romania)

    2013-06-15

    New magnetic core shell nanoparticles were synthesized consisting of magnetite cores and poly-(O-propargyl acrylate) shells. Strong fixing of the shells was achieved by primary anchoring phosphates or {alpha}-dihydroxydiphosphonates containing acrylate or methacrylate functionalities. The magnetic nanoparticles are attractive as supports for a variety of function which can be easily introduced by Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). In this way, also the loading of the magnetic nanoparticles with propargyl units was determined by reaction with 4-azidoacetophenone and analysis of the supernatant. In order to demonstrate the attractiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles a novel azido-containing conjugate with biotin as recognition function and dansyl as fluorescence marker was introduced by CuAAC reaction. All NP show superparamagnetic behavior with high-saturation magnetization values and were further characterized by FTIR, photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.

  3. Refinement of the ferri and paramagnetic phases of magnetite measured by neutron multiple diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzochi, V.L.; Parente, C.B.R.

    1989-10-01

    Structural parameters of the ferri and paramagnetic phases of magnetite have been refined from neutron multiple diffraction data. Experimental patterns were obtained by measuring the III primary reflection of a natural single crystal of this compound, at room temperature for the ferrimagnetic phase and 703 0 C for the paramagnetic phase. Theoretical multiple diffraction patterns for both phases have been calculated by the program MULTI which uses the iterative method. In this method intensities are caluclated as Taylor series expansions summed up to a order sufficient for a good approximation. A step by step process has been used in the refinements similarly to the parameter-shift method. Final values for the discrepancy factor found for the ferri and paramagnetic phases were R = 3.96% and R = 3.46%, respectively. (author) [pt

  4. Study of the ferrimagnetic and paramagnetic phases of magnetite measured by multiple neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocchi, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Structural parameters of the ferrimagnetic and paramagnetic phases of magnetite have been refined from neutron multiple diffraction data. Experimental multiple diffraction patterns used in the refinement, were obtained by measuring the 111 primary reflection of a natural single crystal of this compound, at room temperature for the ferrimagnetic phase and 703 0 C for the paramagnetic phase. Corresponding theoretical patterns for both phases have been calculated by the program MULTI which uses the iterative method for the intensity calculations in neutron multiple diffraction. In this method intensities are calculated as Taylor series expansions summed up to a order sufficient for a good approximation. A step by step process has been used in the refinements according to the parameter-shift method. Both isotropic and anisotropic thermal parameters were used in the calculation of the temperature factor. (author)

  5. Detrital zircon geochronology and provenance of the Chubut Group in the northeast of Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Edgardo L.; Astini, Ricardo A.; Belousova, Elena; Guler, M. Verónica; Gehrels, George

    2015-11-01

    The Chubut Group constitutes the most widespread sedimentary unit in NE Patagonia, characterized by variable-energy fluvial deposits. U-Pb analysis of detrital zircons from two sections of the Chubut Group constraint the age of the oldest sedimentary rocks in the northeast of the Somuncurá - Cañadón Asfalto Basin. In the Cañadón Williams area, at San Jorge section, 20 km NW of Telsen locality, dating of 56 detrital zircons from a medium to coarse sandstone indicated a maximum depositional age of 109 ± 1 Ma (n = 4). These sandstones were interpreted to represent shallow channels, associated with a lacustrine system. In the Telsen locality, a laser ablation analysis of 115 detrital zircons from a medium to coarse-grained sandstone, from fluvial channel facies, yielded a maximum depositional age of ca. 106 ± 1 Ma (n = 8). Both ages are consistent with volcanic events of the Barremian to Albian age in the central Patagonian Andes Region. Cathodoluminescence images of zircons from the San Jorge sample suggest an igneous origin, which is further supported by Th/U values above 0.5 in most of the grains. The distribution of the statistical modes of the main age populations of detrital zircons for the two samples [182, 185 and 189 Ma for Telsen sample (T2S) and 181 ± 1 Ma for San Jorge sample (SJS)] matches the age of the volcanic Marifil Formation. The rocks of the Marifil Formation of these ages are exposed NE to SE of the study area. The abundance of zircons of similar Jurassic ages (n = 52 for SJS and n = 105 for T2S) and the external morphology of the zircons in the sample SJS, implies a close proximity of the source area. Suggestion that the Marifil Formation was the main provenance source is also supported by northeast-southeasterly paleocurrents measured at the San Jorge and Telsen sections.

  6. Detrital illite crystals identified from crystallite thickness measurements in siliciclastic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldega, L.; Eberl, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    Illite crystals in siliciclastic sediments are heterogeneous assemblages of detrital material coming from various source rocks and, at paleotemperatures >70 ??C, of superimposed diagenetic modification in the parent sediment. We distinguished the relative proportions of 2M1 detrital illite and possible diagenetic 1Md + 1M illite by a combined analysis of crystal-size distribution and illite polytype quantification. We found that the proportions of 1Md + 1M and 2M1 illite could be determined from crystallite thickness measurements (BWA method, using the MudMaster program) by unmixing measured crystallite thickness distributions using theoretical and calculated log-normal and/or asymptotic distributions. The end-member components that we used to unmix the measured distributions were three asymptotic-shaped distributions (assumed to be the diagenetic component of the mixture, the 1Md + 1M polytypes) calculated using the Galoper program (Phase A was simulated using 500 crystals per cycle of nucleation and growth, Phase B = 333/cycle, and Phase C = 250/ cycle), and one theoretical log-normal distribution (Phase D, assumed to approximate the detrital 2M1 component of the mixture). In addition, quantitative polytype analysis was carried out using the RockJock software for comparison. The two techniques gave comparable results (r2 = 0.93), which indicates that the unmixing method permits one to calculate the proportion of illite polytypes and, therefore, the proportion of 2M1 detrital illite, from crystallite thickness measurements. The overall illite crystallite thicknesses in the samples were found to be a function of the relative proportions of thick 2M1 and thin 1Md + 1M illite. The percentage of illite layers in I-S mixed layers correlates with the mean crystallite thickness of the 1Md + 1M polytypes, indicating that these polytypes, rather than the 2M1 polytype, participate in I-S mixed layering.

  7. Groundwater budgets for Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys, Mohave County, Arizona, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bradley D.; Truini, Margot

    2011-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources, initiated an investigation of the hydrogeology and water resources of Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys in northwestern Arizona in 2005, and this report is part of that investigation. Water budgets were developed for Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys to provide a generalized understanding of the groundwater systems in this rural area that has shown some evidence of human-induced water-level declines. The valleys are within the Basin and Range physiographic province and consist of thick sequences of permeable alluvial sediment deposited into basins bounded by relatively less permeable igneous and metamorphic rocks. Long-term natural recharge rates (1940-2008) for the alluvial aquifers were estimated to be 1,400 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) for Detrital Valley, 5,700 acre-ft/yr for Hualapai Valley, and 6,000 acre-ft/yr for Sacramento Valley. Natural discharge rates were assumed to be equal to natural recharge rates, on the basis of the assumption that all groundwater withdrawals to date have obtained water from groundwater storage. Groundwater withdrawals (2007-08) for the alluvial aquifers were less than 300 acre-ft/yr for Detrital Valley, about 9,800 acre-ft/yr for Hualapai Valley, and about 4,500 acre-ft/yr for Sacramento Valley. Incidental recharge from leaking water-supply pipes, septic systems, and wastewater-treatment plants accounted for about 35 percent of total recharge (2007-08) across the study area. Natural recharge and discharge values in this study were 24-50 percent higher than values in most previously published studies. Water budgets present a spatially and temporally "lumped" view of water resources and incorporate many sources of uncertainty in this study area where only limited data presently are available.

  8. The Origin of DIRT (Detrital Input and Removal Treatments): the Legacy of Dr. Francis D. Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, K. L.; Lajtha, K.; Caldwell, B.; Sollins, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays a key role in the cycling and retention of nitrogen and carbon within soil. Both above and belowground detrital inputs determine the nature and quantity of SOM. Studies on detrital impacts on SOM dynamics are underway at several LTER, ILTER and LTER-affiliated sites using a common experimental design, Detrital Input and Removal Treatments (DIRT). The concept for DIRT was originally based on experimental plots established at the University of Wisconsin Arboretum by Dr. Francis D. Hole in 1956 to study the effects of detrital inputs on pedogenesis. These plots are located on two forested sites and two prairie sites within the arboretum. Manipulations of the forested sites include double litter, no litter and removal of the O and A horizons. Manipulations of the prairie sites include harvest, mulch, bare and burn. These original treatments have largely been maintained since 1956. After 40 years of maintenance, there were significant differences in soil carbon between the double and no litter plots. The double litter plots had increased by nearly 30% while the no litter plots had decreased over 50%. The original DIRT plots are now 50 years old and have been re-sampled, where possible, for total carbon and nitrogen, labile and recalcitrant carbon fractions, net and gross nitrogen mineralization rates, and SOM bioavailability through CO2 respiration. The soils were fractionated by density to examine the role of carbon in each density fraction. The mean age of carbon in each fraction was determined by radiocarbon dating. This sampling and analysis is of special significance because it provides a glimpse into the future SOM trajectories for the new DIRT sites: Harvard Forest (MA), Bousson (PA), Andrews Experimental Forest (OR) and Sikfokut (Hungary).

  9. Geochemistry of the furnace magnetite bed, Franklin, New Jersey, and the relationship between stratiform iron oxide ores and stratiform zinc oxide-silicate ores in the New Jersey highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.A.; Skinner, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    buried sediments is uncertain. The iron deposits formed at interfaces between anoxic and oxygenated waters. The Furnace magnetite bed resulted from seawater oxidation of hydrothermally transported iron near a brine conduit. Iron deposits also formed regionally on the basin floor at the interface betveen anoxic deep waters and oxygenated shallower waters. These deposits include not only manganiferous magnetite + calcite bodies similar to the Furnace magnetite bed but also silicate-facies deposits that formed by iron oxide accumulation where detrital sediment was abundant. A basin margin model can be extended to Grenvillian stratiform deposits in the northwest Adirondacks of New York and the Mont Laurier basin of Quebec. In these areas iron deposits (pyrite or magnetite) are found basinward of marble-hosted sphalerite deposits, such as those in the Balmat-Edwards district. Whether the iron and zinc precipitated as sulfide assemblages or carbonate-oxide-silicate assemblages depended on whether sufficient organic matter or other reductants were available in local sediments or bottom waters to stabilize H2S.

  10. Macroalgal-dominated coastal detritic communities from the Western Mediterranean and the Northeastern Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. JOHER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative comparison of the distribution of macroalgal-dominated coastal detritic communities from the Western Mediterranean and the Northeastern Atlantic, based on our own data from the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean and available data from literature. The macroalgal-dominated coastal detritic bottoms from both regions could be distinguished by the presence of a high number of regional exclusive non-carbonated species, and the presence of a high number of maërl-forming species in the Mediterranean. Further, regional differences in the distribution of some exclusive species allowed the distinction of three zones in the Northeastern Atlantic (United Kingdom, French Brittany and Galicia, while no differences were found within the Western Mediterranean. However, the algal communities considered in the selected literature could not be qualitatively distinguished, and all the samples should be considered as maërl beds. Lithothamnion corallioides and Phymatolithon calcareum were the most widespread maërl forming species in the two regions, while in the Western Mediterranean Spongites fruticulosus was also very frequent. According to the differences in the species composition of the basal and erect strata of these beds, and also in their species richness, five different morphologies of macroalgal-dominated detritic bottoms could be distinguished. Their main characteristic species and their biogeographical distribution are detailed.

  11. Zeolite/magnetite composites as catalysts on the Synthesis of Methyl Esters (MES) from cooking oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriatun; Darmawan, Adi; Sriyanti; Cahyani, Wuri; Widyandari, Hendri

    2018-05-01

    The using of zeolite/magnetite composite as a catalyst for the synthesis of methyl esters (MES) of cooking oil has been performed. In this study the natural magnetite was extracted from the iron sand of Semarang marina beach and milled by high energy Milling (HEM) with ball: magnetite ratio: 1:1. The composites prepared from natural zeolite and natural magnetite with zeolite: magnetite ratio 1:1; 2:1; 3:1 and 4:1. Preparation of methyl ester was catalyzed by composite of zeolite/magnetite through transeserification reaction, it was studied on variation of catalyst concentration (w/v) 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% to feed volume. The reaction product are mixture of methyl Oleic (MES), methyl Palmitic (MES) and methyl Stearic (MES). Character product of this research include density, viscosity, acid number and iodine number has fulfilled to SNI standard 7182: 2015.

  12. The Desulfurization of Magnetite Ore by Flotation with a Mixture of Xanthate and Dixanthogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of sulfur emanating from pyrrhotite in magnetite concentrates has been a problem in iron ore processing. This study utilized froth flotation to float pyrrhotite away from magnetite using collectors of xanthate and dixanthogen. It was found that xanthate or dixanthogen alone could not achieve selective separation between pyrrhotite and magnetite in flotation. A high loss of magnetite was obtained with xanthate, while a low desulfurization degree was obtained with dixanthogen. It was interesting that a high desulfurization ratio was achieved with little loss of magnetite when xanthate was mixed with dixanthogen as the collector. The synergistic effect of the mixed collector on pyrrhotite was studied by electrokinectic studies and FTIR measurements. It was found that xanthate was the anchor on pyrrhotite and determined its selectivity against magnetite, while dixanthogen associated with xanthate, enhancing its hydrophobicity. This study provides new insights into the separation of iron minerals.

  13. Mechanism of magnetite formation in high temperature corrosion by model naphthenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetite scales were found in naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion. • Magnetite scales were formed due to thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates. • Formation and protectiveness of magnetite scales depended on structure of NAP. • Carboxylic acids confirm corrosion observations for commercial NAP. - Abstract: Naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion is a major concern for refineries. The complexity of NAP in crude oil and the sulfidation process hinder a fundamental knowledge of their corrosive behavior. Studies with model acids were performed to explore the corrosion mechanism and magnetite scales were found on carbon steel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction methods detected differences in the quantity and quality of magnetite formed by model acids. These scales exhibited different resistance to higher severity NAP corrosion in a flow through apparatus. Magnetite is proposed to be formed by thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates.

  14. Environmentally Compatible Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Magnetite (Fe3O4 Nanoparticles with Prehydrolysate from Corn Stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Zheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An environmentally compatible and size-controlled method has been employed for synthesis of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with prehydrolysate from corn stover. Various characterizations involving X-ray diffraction (XRD, standard and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA have integrally confirmed the formation of magnetite nanoparticles with homogeneous morphology and the formation mechanism of magnetite only from ferric precursor. Organic materials in the prehydrolysate act as a bifunctional agent: (1 a reducing agent to reduce ferric ions to prepare magnetite with the coexistence of ferric and ferrous ions; and (2 a coating agent to prevent particle growth and agglomeration and to promote the formation of nanoscale and superparamagnetic magnetite. The size of the magnetite nanoparticles can be easily controlled by tailoring the reducing sugar concentration, reaction time, or hydrothermal temperature.

  15. Synthesis, magnetic and ethanol gas sensing properties of semiconducting magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Al-Hazmi, Faten; Al-Tuwirqi, R. M.; Alnowaiser, F.; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.; El-Tantawy, Farid; Yakuphanoglu, F.

    2013-05-01

    The superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with an average size of 7 nm were synthesized using a rapid and facile microwave hydrothermal technique. The structure of the magnetite nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction (X-ray), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared Fe3O4 was shown to have a cubic phase of pure magnetite. Magnetization hysteresis loop shows that the synthesized magnetite exhibits no hysteretic features with a superparamagnetic behavior. The ethanol gas sensing properties of the synthesized magnetite were investigated, and it was found that the responsibility time is less than 10 s with good reproducibility for ethanol sensor. Accordingly, it is evaluated that the magnetite nanoparticles can be effectively used as a solid state ethanol sensor in industrial commercial product applications.

  16. Removal of Cr (VI) for the handling of industrial effluent using the magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Camilo, Ruth L.; Cohen, Victor H.; Goncalves, Maria A.

    2000-01-01

    This work deals of Cr (VI) adsorption behaviour on synthetic magnetite. Magnetite was prepared by adding an alkaline solution in an aqueous solution containing both Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. Characterization by X-ray diffraction analysis was verified. Distribution coefficients and adsorption isotherms of chromium on magnetite were studied and magnetic field influence from 0 to 0.35 Tesla on adsorption capacity is also verified. (author)

  17. Ionic Copolymer-Magnetite Complexes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the design, synthesis and characterization of magnetite-ionic copolymer complexes as nanocarriers for drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. The polymers included phosphonate and carboxylate-containing graft and block copolymers. Oleic-acid coated magnetite nanoparticles (8-nm and 16-nm diameters) were investigated. Cisplatin and carboplatin were used as sample drugs. The potentials of the magnetite-ionomer complexes as dual drug delivery carriers and magneti...

  18. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    OpenAIRE

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D.; Kopp, Robert E.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Sears, S. Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M.; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, New Jersey. Aside from previously-described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 μm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 μm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical...

  19. Preparation and characterization of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, M.; Camilo, R.L.; Sampaio, L.C.; Macedo, M.A.; Nakamura, M.; Toma, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles coated with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, NH 2 (CH 2 ) 3 Si(OC 2 H 5 ) 3 , were prepared by silanization reaction and characterized by X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. Both uncoated and organosilane-coated magnetite exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and strong magnetization at room temperature. Basic groups anchored on the external surface of the coated magnetite were observed. The superparamagnetic particles of coated magnetite are able to bind to biological molecules, drugs and metals and in this way remove them from medium by magnetic separation procedures

  20. Synthesis of magnetite octahedrons from iron powders through a mild hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Baodong; Kang Zhenhui; Wang Enbo; Lian Suoyuan; Gao Lei; Tian Chungui; Wang Chunlei

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) octahedral particles were fabricated from iron powders through a simple one-step alkali-assisted hydrothermal process. The crystallinity, morphology, and structural features of the as-prepared magnetite particles were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The values of saturation magnetization (M s ) and coercivity (H) of the magnetite octahedrons characterized on a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) are 89.81 emu/g and 70.6 Oe, respectively. The concentration of NaOH and the reaction temperature played a key role in the formation of the magnetite octahedrons

  1. Seawater and Detrital Marine Pb Isotopes as Monitors of Antarctic Weathering Following Ice Sheet Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, C.; Martin, E. E.; Basak, C.

    2011-12-01

    Comparisons of seawater and detrital Pb isotopes from sites proximal to Antarctica at the Eocene/Oligocene transition (EOT) are being used to understand variations in continental weathering associated with the development of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Previous work has shown that seawater and detrital archives yield similar isotopic values during Eocene warmth, which is interpreted to record congruent chemical weathering of the continent. In contrast, distinct isotopic values for the two phases at the EOT represents increased incongruent mechanical weathering during growth of the ice sheet. For this study we expanded beyond the initial glaciation at the EOT to determine whether less dramatic changes in ice volume and climate also produce variations in weathering and intensity that are recorded by seawater and detrital Pb isotopes. We collected Nd and Pb isotope data from extractions of Fe-Mn oxide coatings of bulk decarbonated marine sediments, which preserve seawater isotopic values, and from complete dissolutions of the remaining silicate fraction for Ocean Drilling Program Site 748 on Kerguelen Plateau (1300 m modern water depth). The data spans an interval of deglaciation from ~23.5-27 Ma documented by δ18O that has been equated to a ~30% decrease in ice volume on Antarctica (Pekar and Christie-Blick, 2008, Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclim., Palaeoecol.). Initial results from Site 748 include the first ɛNd values for intermediate waters in the Oligocene Southern Ocean and reveal a value of ~-8 over the entire 3.5 my interval, which is consistent with values reported for deep Indian Ocean sites at this time and similar to deeper Southern Ocean sites. Corresponding detrital ɛNd values are less radiogenic and decrease from -9 to -13 during the study interval. Detrital 206Pb/204Pb values also decrease during the warming interval, while seawater 206Pb/204Pb values increase. The decrease in detrital values indicates the composition of source materials entering

  2. Magnetite Dissolution Performance of HYBRID-II Decontamination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seonbyeong; Lee, Woosung; Won, Huijun; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Wangkyu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted the magnetite dissolution performance test of HYBRID-II (Hydrazine Based Reductive metal Ion Decontamination with sulfuric acid) as a part of decontamination process development. Decontamination performance of HYBRID process was successfully tested with the results of the acceptable decontamination factor (DF) in the previous study. While following-up studies such as the decomposition of the post-decontamination HYBRID solution and corrosion compatibility on the substrate metals of the target reactor coolant system have been continued, we also seek for an alternate version of HYBRID process suitable especially for decommissioning. Inspired by the relationship between the radius of reacting ion and the reactivity, we replaced the nitrate ion in HYBRID with bigger sulfate ion to accommodate the dissolution reaction and named HYBRID-II process. As a preliminary step for the decontamination performance, we tested the magnetite dissolution performance of developing HYBRID-II process and compared the results with those of HYBRID process. HYBRID process developed previously is known have the acceptable decontamination performance, but the relatively larger volume of secondary waste induced by anion exchange resin to treat nitrate ion is the one of the problems related in the development of HYBRID process to be applicable. Therefore we alternatively devised HYBRID-II process using sulfuric acid and tested its dissolution of magnetite in numerous conditions. From the results shown in this study, we can conclude that HYBRID-II process improves the decontamination performance and potentially reduces the volume of secondary waste. Rigorous tests with metal oxide coupons obtained from reactor coolant system will be followed to prove the robustness of HYBRID-II process in the future

  3. Contributions of detrital subsidies to aboveground spiders during secondary succession, revealed by radiocarbon and stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Takashi F; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2013-04-01

    Prey subsidies originating from detritus add nutrients and energy to arboreal communities. Measurement of this subsidy is required in the understanding of how food web dynamics respond to changes in surrounding environments. Shrub spiders are one of the key predators involved in food web coupling. We evaluate the effects of potential changes in prey availabilities during secondary succession on the contribution of subsidy from detrital food webs to shrub spiders and how different spider feeding guilds used the subsidy of prey from detrital food webs. We measured the relative importance of the subsidy for the spider feeding guilds, using the ratios of stable isotopes of C (δ(13)C), and N (δ(15)N) and C isotope discrimination (Δ(14)C). Diet age was calculated from Δ(14)C values, because old diet ages of spiders indicate that the spiders consume prey from detrital food sources. Dominant aerial prey (Diptera) had a distinctively old diet age compared with arboreal prey, which indicates that aerial prey were subsidized from detrital food webs. Sit-and-wait spiders tended to have an older diet age than active hunting spiders, which indicates that sit-and-wait spiders depended more on subsidies. Diet age varied only slightly for spiders in stands of different ages, indicating that rates at which spiders use grazing and detrital prey are probably determined more by foraging strategies and not by stand age. A dominance of sit-and-wait predators will lead to higher detrital subsidy inputs in shrub habitats. This study highlights the effect of shrub spider community structure (feeding guild composition) on the volume of the subsidy received from the detrital food web.

  4. Patterned magnetite films prepared via soft lithography and thermal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Lijuan; Li, Zhaoqiang; Li Wei; Nie Yaru; Chen Zhimin; Wang Yanping; Yang Bai

    2006-01-01

    A method for the fabrication of patterned magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) films is presented. We first prepared an ordered 2D array of Fe(acac) 3 through a selective deposition technique on patterned self-assembled monolayers. Using thermal decomposition at elevated temperature (300 o C), we transformed the patterned Fe(acac) 3 into patterned Fe 3 O 4 films in a short reaction time. These patterned films have been confirmed by using optical photographs, field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

  5. Surface modification of magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Carola; Herrera, Adriana; Zayas, Yashira; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of magnetite nanoparticles with narrow size distributions using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-COOH) or carboxymethyl dextran (CMDx) chains covalently attached to the particle surface using carbodiimide chemistry is described. Particles were synthesized by thermal decomposition and modified with 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APS) to render particles with reactive amine groups (-NH 2 ) on their surface. Amines were then reacted with carboxyl groups in PEG-COOH or CMDx using carbodiimide chemistry in water. The size and stability of the functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was studied as a function of pH and ionic strength using dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements.

  6. Recognition of primary and diagenetic magnetizations to determine the magnetic polarity record and timing of deposition of the moat-fill rocks of the Oligocene Creede Caldera, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Robert, Andrew P.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks of the Oligocene Creede Formation fill the moat of the Creede caldera, which formed at about 26.9 Ma during the eruption of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic studies of two cores (418 and 703 m long) that penetrated the lower half of the Creede Formation, in addition to paleomagnetic and isotopic dating studies of stratigraphically bracketing volcanic units, provide information on the age and the time span of sedimentation of the caldera fill. Normal polarity magnetization are found in Snowshoe Mountain Tuff beneath the moat sediments; in detrital-magnetite-bearing graded tuffs near the bottom of the moat fill; in an ash-fall deposit about 200 m stratigraphically about the top of core 2; and in postcaldera lava flows of the Fisher Dacite that overlie the Creede Formation. Normal polarity also characterizes detrital-magnetite-bearing tuff and sandstone unites within the caldera moat rocks that did not undergo severe sulfidic alteration. The combination of initially low magnitude of remanent magnetization and the destructive effects of subsequent diagenetic sulfidization on detrital iron oxides results in a poor paleomagnetic record for the fine-grained sedimentary rocks of the Creede Formation. these fine-grained rocks have either normal or revered polarity magnetizations that are carried by magnetite and/or maghemite. Many more apparent reversals are found that can be accommodated by any geomagnetic polarity time scale over the interval spanned by the ages of the bracketing extrusive rocks. Moreover, opposite polarity magnetization are found in specimens separated by only a few centimeters, without intervening hiatuses, and by specimens in several tuff beds, each of which represents a single depositional event. These polarity changes cannot, therefore, be attributed to detrital remanent magnetization. Many polarity changes are apparently related to chemical remanent magnetizations carried by

  7. Geochemistry and provenance of some detrital heavy minerals of alluvial sediments from Neagra Şarului River, Eastern Carpathians, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciortescu, Catalina; Iancu, Ovidiu Gabriel; Bulgariu, Dumitru; Popa, Ciprian

    2014-05-01

    . Manganese oxides are present only in grain fractions greater than 0.25 mm due to higher susceptibility to weathering and dissolution of the Mn aggregates in the river bed. Despite low distribution of the metamorphic units in the river's studied basin, the garnets almandine (Alm 13-88%) and spessartine (Sps 0.5-87%), specific to the medium grade metamorphic rocks, have a relative high frequency. In this study, heavy mineral assemblages generally reflect the composition of primary (augite, almandine) and accessory minerals present in source rocks. The last ones are both primary (apatite) and secondary, which are mainly derived from hydrothermal deposition (e. g. pyrite) and from supergene alterations (e. g. manganese, iron oxides/ hydroxides, and other altered product of magnetite). Therefore, the mineral analyses were not limited to only tracking the source of each mineral species, but they also revealed the characteristics of their parent rocks.

  8. Detrital rutile geochemistry and thermometry from the Dabie orogen: Implications for source-sediment links in a UHPM terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Xiao, Yilin; Wörner, G.; Kronz, A.; Simon, K.; Hou, Zhenhui

    2014-08-01

    This study explores the potential of detrital rutile geochemistry and thermometry as a provenance tracer in rocks from the Central Dabie ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) zone in east-central China that formed during Triassic continental collision. Trace element data of 176 detrital rutile grains selected from local river sediments and 91 rutile grains from distinct bedrocks in the Shuanghe and Bixiling areas, obtained by both electron microprobe (EMP) and in situ LA-ICP-MS analyses, suggest that geochemical compositions and thermometry of detrital rutiles are comparable to those from their potential source rocks. After certification of the Cr-Nb discrimination method for the Central Dabie UHPM zone, we show that 29% of the detrital rutiles in the Shuanghe area were derived from metamafic sources whereas in the Bixiling area that it is up to 76%. Furthermore, the proportion of distinct types of detrital rutiles combined with modal abundances of rutile in metapelites and metamafic bedrocks can be used to estimate the proportion of different source lithologies. Based on this method the proportion of mafic source rocks was estimated to ∼10% at Shuanghe and >60% at Bixiling, respectively, which is consistent with the proportions of eclogite (the major rutile-bearing metamafic rock) distribution in the field. Therefore, the investigation of detrital rutiles is a potential way to evaluate the proportion of metamafic rocks and even to prospect for metamafic bodies in UHPM terranes. Zr-in-rutile temperatures were calculated at different pressures and compared with temperatures derived from rock-in rutiles and garnet-clinopyroxene Fe-Mg thermometers. Temperatures calculated for detrital rutiles range from 606 °C to 707 °C and 566 °C to 752 °C in Shuanghe and Bixiling, respectively, at P = 3 GPa with an average temperatures of ca. 630 °C for both areas. These temperature averages and ranges are similar to those calculated for rutiles from surrounding source rocks

  9. Characterization of magnetite particles in shocked quartz by means of electron- and magnetic force microscopy: Vredefort, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cloete, M

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available , orientation contrast imagery and magnetic force microscopy. The opaque particles have been identified as nano- to micro-sized magnetite that occurs in several distinct modes. III one sample magnetite occurs along relict planar deformation features (PDF...

  10. Corrosion Behavior of SA508 Coupled with and without Magnetite in Chemical Cleaning Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Yeong-Ho; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Song, Geun Dong; Hur, Do Haeng; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    To mitigate these problems, chemical cleaning process has been widely used. However, the chemical cleaning solution can affect the corrosion of SG structural materials as well as the magnetite dissolution. During the chemical cleaning process, the galvanic corrosion between SG materials and magnetite is also anticipated because they are in electrical connection. However, the corrosion measurement or monitoring for the materials has been performed without consideration of galvanic effect coupled with magnetite during the chemical cleaning process. In this study, the effect of temperature and EDTA concentration on the corrosion behavior of SA508 tubesheet material with and without magnetite was studied in chemical cleaning solutions. The galvanic corrosion behavior between SA508 and magnetite is predicted by using the mixed potential theory and its effect on the corrosion rate of SA508 is also discussed. By newly designed immersion test, it was confirmed that the extent of galvanic corrosion effect between SA508 and magnetite increased with increasing temperature and EDTA concentration. The galvanic corrosion behavior of SA508 coupled with magnetite in chemical cleaning environments was predicted by the mixed potential theory and verified by ZRA and LP technique. Galvanic coupling increased the corrosion rate of SA508 due to the shift in its potential to the anodic direction. Therefore, the galvanic corrosion effect between SA508 and magnetite should be considered when the corrosion measurement is performed during the chemical cleaning process in steam generators.

  11. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF ANIONIC SURFACTANT-DIRECTED SYNTHESIS OF MAGNETITE NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharali Malik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized a variety of magnetite nanoparticles which appear to have biogenic signatures and could give insights into how the nanomagnetite particles form in biological systems, and how they are associated with Alzheimer’s disease. We have also synthesized mesoporous magnetite nanoparticles which have potential use in the targeted drug delivery.

  12. Investigation on the effects of milling atmosphere on synthesis of barium ferrite/magnetite nanocomposite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molaei, M.J.; Ataie, A.; Raygan, S.; Picken, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, barium ferrite /magnetite nanocomposites synthesized via a mechano-chemical route. Graphite was used in order to reduce hematite content of barium ferrite to magnetite to produce a magnetic nanocomposite. The effects of processing conditions on the powder characteristics were

  13. Roles of magnetite and granular activated carbon in improvement of anaerobic sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Zhang, Yaobin; Tan, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie

    2018-02-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) or magnetite could promote methane production from organic wastes, but their roles in enhancing anaerobic sludge digestion have not been clarified. GAC, magnetite and their combination were complemented into sludge digesters, respectively. Experimental results showed that average methane production increased by 7.3% for magnetite, 13.1% for GAC, and 20% for the combination of magnetite and GAC, and the effluent TCOD of the control, magnetite, GAC and magnetite-GAC digesters on day 56 were 53.2, 49.6, 48.0 and 46.6 g/L, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and microbial analysis indicated that magnetite enriched iron-reducing bacteria responsible for sludge hydrolysis while GAC enhanced syntrophic metabolism between iron-reducing bacteria and methanogens due to its high electrical conductivity and large surface area. Supplementing magnetite and GAC together into an anaerobic digester simultaneously accelerated sludge hydrolysis and methane production, resulting in better sludge digestion performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of interactions between dendrimer-coated magnetite nanoparticles and bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Bifeng; Gao Feng; Ao Limei

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the interactions between dendrimer-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and the protein serum albumin. The investigation was based on the fluorescence quenching of tryptophan residue of serum albumin after binding with the dendrimer-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The extent of the interactions between bovine serum albumin and dendrimer-coated MNPs strongly depends on their surface groups and pH value

  15. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles coated with lauric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamani, J.B., E-mail: javierbm@einstein.br [Instituto do Cérebro-InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein-HIAE, 05651-901 São Paulo (Brazil); Costa-Filho, A.J. [Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto (Brazil); Cornejo, D.R. [Instituto de Física Universidade de São Paulo, USP, São Paulo (Brazil); Vieira, E.D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia (Brazil); Gamarra, L.F. [Instituto do Cérebro-InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein-HIAE, 05651-901 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Understanding the process of synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is important for its implementation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In this work we report the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles made from ferrous oxide through coprecipitation chemical process. The nanostructured material was coated with lauric acid and dispersed in aqueous medium containing surfactant that yielded a stable colloidal suspension. The characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with distinct physico-chemical configurations is fundamental for biomedical applications. Therefore magnetic nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphology by means of TEM and DLS, which showed a polydispersed set of spherical nanoparticles (average diameter of ca. 9 nm) as a result of the protocol. The structural properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD pattern showed the presence of peaks corresponding to the spinel phase of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The relaxivities r{sub 2} and r{sub 2}* values were determined from the transverse relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* at 3 T. Magnetic characterization was performed using SQUID and FMR, which evidenced the superparamagnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Thermal characterization using DSC showed exothermic events associated with the oxidation of magnetite to maghemite. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles coated with lauric acid • Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles • Morphological, structural, magnetic, calorimetric and relaxometric characterization.

  16. Neutron diffuse scattering in magnetite due to molecular polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Wakabayashi, N.; Nicklow, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed neutron diffuse scattering study has been carried out in order to verify a model which describes the property of valence fluctuations in magnetite above T/sub V/. This model assumes the existence of a complex which is composed of two excess electrons and a local displacement mode of oxygens within the fcc primitive cell. The complex is called a molecular polaron. It is assumed that at sufficiently high temperatures there is a random distribution of molecular polarons, which are fluctuating independently by making hopping motions through the crystal or by dissociating into smaller polarons. The lifetime of each molecular polaron is assumed to be long enough to induce an instantaneous strain field around it. Based on this model, the neutron diffuse scattering cross section due to randomly distributed dressed molecular polarons has been calculated. A precise measurement of the quasielastic scattering of neutrons has been carried out at 150 K. The observed results definitely show the characteristics which are predicted by the model calculation and, thus, give evidence for the existence of the proposed molecular polarons. From this standpoint, the Verwey transition of magnetite may be viewed as the cooperative ordering process of dressed molecular polarons. Possible extensions of the model to describe the ordering and the dynamical behavior of the molecular polarons are discussed

  17. Magnetic concentration of a retroviral vector using magnetite cationic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Kameyama, Yujiro; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2009-03-01

    For tissue engineering purposes, retroviral vectors represent an efficient method of delivering exogenous genes such as growth factors to injured tissues because gene-transduced cells can produce stable and constant levels of the gene product. However, retroviral vector technology suffers from low yields. In the present study, we used magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force to concentrate the retroviral vectors to enhance the transduction efficiency and to enable their magnetic manipulation. Magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic liposomes were added to a solution containing a retroviral vector pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The magnetic particles that captured the viral vectors were collected using a magnetic force and seeded into mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells. The viral titer was up to 55 times greater (up to 3 x 10(8) infectious units/mL). Additionally, the magnetically labeled retroviral vectors can be directed to the desired regions for infection by applying magnetic fields, and micro-patterns of gene-transduced cell regions could be created on a cellular monolayer using micro-patterned magnetic concentrators. These results suggest that this technique provides a promising approach to capturing and concentrating viral vectors, thus achieving high transduction efficiency and the ability to deliver genes to a specific injured site by applying a magnetic field.

  18. Surfactant effects in magnetite nanoparticles of controlled size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia, P.; Batlle-Brugal, B.; Roca, A.G.; Iglesias, O.; Morales, M.P.; Serna, C.J.; Labarta, A.; Batlle, X.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles of controlled size within 6 and 20 nm in diameter were synthesised by thermal decomposition of an iron organic precursor in an organic medium. Particles were coated with oleic acid. For all samples studied, saturation magnetisation M s is size-independent, and reaches a value close to that expected for bulk magnetite, in contrast to results in small particle systems for which M s is usually much smaller due to surface spin disorder. The coercive field for the 6 nm particles is in agreement with coherent rotation, taking the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account. Both results suggest that the oleic acid molecules covalently bonded to the nanoparticle surface yield a strong reduction in the surface spin disorder. However, although the saturated state may be similar, the approach to saturation is different and, in particular, the high-field differential susceptibility is one order of magnitude larger than in bulk materials. The relevance of these results in biomedical applications is discussed

  19. Moessbauer Characterization of Magnetite/Polyaniline Magnetic Nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Anselmo F. R.; Faria, Fernando S. E. D. V.; Lopez, Jorge L.; Mesquita, Antonio G. G.; Coaquira, Jose A. H.; Oliveira, Aderbal C.; Morais, Paulo C.; Azevedo, Ricardo B.; Araujo, Ana C. V. de; Alves, Severino Jr.; Azevedo, Walter M. de

    2010-01-01

    Aniline surface coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by UV irradiation varying the time and the acid media (HCl, HNO 3 , or H 2 SO 4 ). The synthesized material represents a promising platform for application in nerve regeneration. XRD patterns are consistent with the crystalline structure of magnetite. Nevertheless, for UV irradiation times longer than 2 h, extra XRD lines reveal the presence of goethite. The mean crystallite size of uncoated particles is estimated to be 25.4 nm, meanwhile that size is reduced to 19.9 nm for the UV irradiated sample in HCl medium for 4 h. Moessbauer spectra of uncoated nanoparticles reveal the occurrence of thermal relaxation at room temperature, while the 77 K-Moessbauer spectrum suggests the occurrence of electron localization effects similar to that expected in bulk magnetite. The Mossbauer spectra of UV irradiated sample in HCl medium during 4 h, confirms the presence of the goethite phase. For this sample, the thermal relaxation is more evident, since the room temperature spectrum shows larger spectral area for the nonmagnetic component due to the smaller crystallite size. Meanwhile, the 77 K-Moessbauer spectrum suggests the absence of the electron localization effect above 77 K.

  20. Structural and magnetic domains characterization of magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Castellanos-Roman, M.A.; Beatriz Gomez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, important advances have been achieved in application, reproducibility and response ability of magnetic materials due to the relationships among processing, structure and nanometric size particle. Features like homogeneity of compounds and nanoparticle-sizing have improved some magnetic properties of materials and their field application. Of particular interest is the study of magnetic materials at the atomic and microstuctural level because the orientation and magnetic domains (large numbers of atoms moments coupled together in a preferential direction) can be observed. In this work, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) powders which were obtained by precipitation route in alkaline medium are analyzed to identify the structure and mechanism formation of domains over the core and border of nanoparticles. Results obtained by XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) showed a structural phase corresponding to Fe 3 O 4 and nanoparticles in a range of 20-40 nm. Samples scanned by MFM in nanometric resolution and profile images showed orientation of magnetic domains in the border and cores of the material. Finally, an analysis of repulsion and attraction in magnetic field and direction changes of domains formed by magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) powders were done

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of magnetite particles with uncommon crystal facets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junki Sato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe3O4 (magnetite particles was carried out using organic compounds as morphology control agents to obtain magnetite crystals with uncommon facets. It was established that the morphology of Fe3O4 crystals obtained by hydrothermal treatment of an aqueous solution containing Fe2+ and organic compounds depended on the organic compound used. The shape of the Fe3O4 particles obtained when no additives were used was quasi-octahedral. In contrast, the addition of picolinic acid, citric acid or pyridine resulted in the formation of polyhedral crystals, indicating the presence of not only {1 1 1}, {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} facets but also high-index facets including at least {3 1 1} and {3 3 1}. When citric acid was used as an additive, octahedral crystals with {1 1 1} facets also appeared, and their size decreased as the amount of citric acid was increased. Thus, control of Fe3O4 particle morphology was achieved by a simple hydrothermal treatment using additives.

  2. Phase separation in the nonequilibrium Verwey transition in magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randi, F.; Vergara, I.; Novelli, F.; Esposito, M.; Dell'Angela, M.; Brabers, V. A. M.; Metcalf, P.; Kukreja, R.; Dürr, H. A.; Fausti, D.; Grüninger, M.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-02-01

    We present equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium studies of the Verwey transition in magnetite. In the equilibrium optical conductivity, we find a steplike change at the phase transition for photon energies below about 2 eV. The possibility of triggering a nonequilibrium transient metallic state in insulating magnetite by photo excitation was recently demonstrated by an x-ray study. Here we report a full characterization of the optical properties in the visible frequency range across the nonequilibrium phase transition. Our analysis of the spectral features is based on a detailed description of the equilibrium properties. The out-of-equilibrium optical data bear the initial electronic response associated to localized photoexcitation, the occurrence of phase separation, and the transition to a transient metallic phase for excitation density larger than a critical value. This allows us to identify the electronic nature of the transient state, to unveil the phase transition dynamics, and to study the consequences of phase separation on the reflectivity, suggesting a spectroscopic feature that may be generally linked to out-of-equilibrium phase separation.

  3. Quantifying the influence of sediment source area sampling on detrital thermochronometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, D. M., Jr.; Ehlers, T. A.; Coutand, I.; Bookhagen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Detrital thermochronology offers a unique advantage over traditional bedrock thermochronology because of its sensitivity to sediment production and transportation to sample sites. In mountainous regions, modern fluvial sediment is often collected and dated to determine the past (105 to >107 year) exhumation history of the upstream drainage area. Though potentially powerful, the interpretation of detrital thermochronometer data derived from modern fluvial sediment is challenging because of spatial and temporal variations in sediment production and transport, and target mineral concentrations. Thermochronometer age prediction models provide a quantitative basis for data interpretation, but it can be difficult to separate variations in catchment bedrock ages from the effects of variable basin denudation and sediment transport. We present two examples of quantitative data interpretation using detrital thermochronometer data from the Himalaya, focusing on the influence of spatial and temporal variations in basin denudation on predicted age distributions. We combine age predictions from the 3D thermokinematic numerical model Pecube with simple models for sediment sampling in the upstream drainage basin area to assess the influence of variations in sediment production by different geomorphic processes or scaled by topographic metrics. We first consider a small catchment from the central Himalaya where bedrock landsliding appears to have affected the observed muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age distributions. Using a simple model of random landsliding with a power-law landslide frequency-area relationship we find that the sediment residence time in the catchment has a major influence on predicted age distributions. In the second case, we compare observed detrital apatite fission-track age distributions from 16 catchments in the Bhutan Himalaya to ages predicted using Pecube and scaled by various topographic metrics. Preliminary results suggest that predicted age distributions scaled

  4. What is the correct Fe L{sub 23} X-ray absorption spectrum of magnetite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaohui; Kalirai, Samanbir S. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Hitchcock, Adam P., E-mail: aph@mcmaster.ca [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Bazylinski, Dennis A. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada at Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4004 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Fe L{sub 3} X-ray absorption spectra of biological (MV-1 magnetotactic bacteria) and abiotic (Sigma–Aldrich) nano-magnetite are reported. • An inconsistency in the literature for this spectrum is documented. • Powder diffraction shows the abiotic sample is partly oxidized, toward maghemite. • H{sub 2} thermal reduction converts the Fe L{sub 3} spectrum of the abiotic sample to that of the biotic. • Strong oxidation (air, 600 °C) is needed to convert the spectrum of the biotic magnetite to that of maghemite; magnetosome chains are protected by an air-impervious membrane. - Abstract: Various groups have reported Fe L{sub 23} X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), each claiming to be that of magnetite, but which contradict each other. Here we report an XAS study of two kinds of magnetite: one is biogenic magnetite nanocrystals extracted from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetovibrio blakemorei strain MV-1; the other is synthetic, abiogenically produced nano-magnetite. We see significantly different XAS spectra of these two materials. Only when the abiogenic magnetite was reduced under H{sub 2} did it give the same spectrum as the biogenic sample. Extensive heating of the biogenic magnetite in air produced spectra similar to that of the abiogenic magnetite. These two spectra are typical of the range of published Fe L{sub 23} spectra of magnetite. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the biogenic material is stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and showed that the as-received or partly reduced abiogenic material is a non-stoichiometric oxide, intermediate between magnetite and maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). When the membrane which surrounds magnetosome chains was intact, the biotic magnetite single crystals were surprisingly resistant to oxidation. This study clarifies a significant confusion existing in the literature as to the correct Fe L{sub 23} X-ray absorption spectra of magnetite and maghemite.

  5. Crystallography of Magnetite Plaquettes and their Significance as Asymmetric Catalysts for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  6. Effects of common groundwater ions on chromate removal by magnetite: importance of chromate adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Amanda H; Arai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Reductive precipitation of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) with magnetite is a well-known Cr(VI) remediation method to improve water quality. The rapid (important as the reductive precipitation of Cr(III) in describing the removal of Cr(VI) by magnetite, and these interfacial adsorption processes could be impacted by common groundwater ions like sulfate and nitrate. The results of this study highlight new information about the large quantity of adsorbed Cr(VI) surface complexes at the magnetite-water interface. It has implications for predicting the long-term stability of Cr at the magnetite-water interface.Graphical abstractEffects of background anions (sulfate and nitrate) on the Cr(VI) surface coverage at the magnetite-water interface at pH 4 and 9.

  7. In situ immobilized, magnetite nanoplatelets over holey graphene nanoribbons for high performance solid state supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalwani, Shubra; Sahu, Vikrant; Marichi, Ram Bhagat; Singh, Gurmeet; Sharma, Raj Kishore

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Hexagonal platelet morphology of magnetite offers efficient material utilization. • Enhanced electronic conductivity of Fe 3 O 4 /GNR nanocomposites via GNR-GNR network. • Exploring the best optimized 30 wt. (%) Fe 3 O 4 on GNR as solid state supercapacitor. - ABSTRACT: Among major phases of iron oxide, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) is potential candidate for pseudocapacitors. Yet, the clustering of magnetite nanoparticles confines them from being exploited as charge storage material. Herein, magnetite hexagonal nanoplatelets are synthesized on holey graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by hydrothermal route and tested for charge storage performance in solid-state supercapacitor incorporating gel electrolyte (PVA-H 2 SO 4 ). GNR besides providing large surface for adsorption of magnetite platelets also improved the charge collection ability of nanocomposite through interconnected nanoribbon network. Mass loading over GNR is optimized to a maximum of 30 wt. (%) by ensuring mono dispersion of magnetite nanoplatelets and high conductivity (14.0 S m −1 ) of nanocomposite. Above 50 wt. (%) magnetite loading, structural identity of nanoribbon is tempered and as a consequence increased network resistivity depletion in charge storage capacity is observed. Mass loading of magnetite over nanoribbon showed an inverse relationship with ion diffusion and electronic conduction. Balanced ionic and electronic conduction in 30 wt. (%) magnetite loaded nanoribbon results in a supercapacitor cell delivering 1241.5 W kg −1 while maintaining 26.9 Wh kg −1 energy density. About 95% capacitance retention over 3000 charge discharge cycles at 2.3 A g −1 demonstrate magnetite as a high performance supercapacitor electrode.

  8. Influence of magnetite deposit on operational result. Exposition of fuel loading at 3rd unit in the 18th cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szecsenyi, Z.; Beliczai, B.

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays the magnetite deposit on the surface of pins causes lot of problem in the NPP of Paks. In this paper there are presented the influence of magnetite deposit on safety and production at a profit. Wit an example will be illustrated that what could be caused by the magnetite deposit (Authors)

  9. PALEOTECTONIC AND PALEOGEOGRAPHIC CONDITIONS FOR THE ACCUMULATION OF THE LOWER RIPHEAN AI FORMATION IN THE BASHKIR UPLIFT (SOUTHERN URALS: THE TERRANECHRONE® DETRITAL ZIRCON STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Romanyuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The TerraneChrone® (LA-ICP-MS technique has been applied to carry out an integrated study of detrital zircons in sandstones sampled from the basal horizons of the stratotypical Riphean sequence in the Southern Urals, specifically the Navysh and Chudin suites of the Ai Formation of the Burzyan Group in the Bashkir Uplift. The concentrations of trace elements in the detrital zircons suggest that the role of oceanic or marginal-marine complexes among the primary sources of zircons was insignificant, and show a better agreement with the intra-continental rather than passive-margin origin of the Riphean basin, whose basal levels are composed by the Ai Formation. The U/Pb ages of zircons from samples K13-206 and M08-16-1 are generally similar: the Paleoproterozoic zircons predominate (the dominant peaks are actually coincident, 2063 and 2055 Ma, and only a few grains of the Archean age are present. Despite the similar U/Pb ages of the detrital zircons, these two samples considerably differ in their Hf isotopic features and the concentrations of trace elements, which means that the zircons in the studied sandstones are of different geodynamic origin. The characteristics of these zircons can be explained by a model showing the Ai Formation in the Navysh graben that is a rift structure and a predecessor of the Kama-Belaya aulacogene in the inner Volga-Ural region of the Paleoproterozoic supercontinent Columbia. At the initial stage of rifting, the granitoid complexes with a lower total silicic acidity, which composed the graben walls, had been eroded; as a result of erosion, coarse clastic rocks accumulated within the Navysh graben and formed the Navysh suite. A specific “carbonatitic” complex containing zircons (about 2.0, 2.5, 2.85 and 3.6 Ga and the Palaeoarchean crustal material in the substrate of their parent rocks was also eroded. In the final stage of rifting, already at the initial stages of the development of the Kama-Belaya aulacogen

  10. Magnetite as the indicator of ore genesis for the Huangshaping polymetallic deposit, southern Hunan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, T.; Ma, D.; Lu, J.; Zhang, R.

    2017-12-01

    Huangshaping polymetallic deposit, located in southern Hunan Province, China, hosts abundant W-Mo-Pb-Zn mineralization which linked with the skarn system located between late Mesozoic high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic granitoids and the Carboniferous carbonate in this deposit. In this study, concentrations of trace and minor elements of the magnetites from different skarn stages are obtained by in situ LA-ICP-MS analysis, in order to further understand the polymetallic mineralization processes within this deposit. The generally high concentrations of spinel elements, including Mg, Al, Ti, Mn, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Ga, Ge, and Sn, in all magnetites from this deposit suggest that these elements are incorporated into magnetite lattice by substituting Fe3+ and/or Fe2+. However, the various concentrations of Na, Si, K, Ca, and W elements in magnetites, combining the abnormal time-resolved analytical signals of LA-ICP-MS analyses, suggest that these elements are significantly affected by the fluid inclusions in magnetites. Two groups of magnetites can be further distinguished based on their trace and minor elements concentrations: Group-1 magnetites, including those in medium grain garnets and calcite, have obvious lower Na, Si, K, Ca, Sn, W, but higher Mg, Al, Ti, V, Co, Ni, Zn concentrations compared with Group-2 magnetites, which including those in coarse grain garnets, tremolite, and bulk magnetite ores. This suggests that the hydrothermal fluids where Group-2 magnetites precipitated are evolved magmatic fluids which have undergone the crystal fractionation during the early skarn stages (eg. Garnet and tremolite), the high Na, Si, K, and Ca in the hydrothermal fluids probably result from the dissolution of the host rocks, such as limestone, sandstone, and evaporite horizons in this deposit. However, the Group-1 magnetites probably precipitated in the hydrothermal fluids with low salinity, which result the low Na, Si, K, and Ca in these magnitites. Furthermore, these

  11. Crayfish impact desert river ecosystem function and litter-dwelling invertebrate communities through association with novel detrital resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Moody

    Full Text Available Shifts in plant species distributions due to global change are increasing the availability of novel resources in a variety of ecosystems worldwide. In semiarid riparian areas, hydric pioneer tree species are being replaced by drought-tolerant plant species as water availability decreases. Additionally, introduced omnivorous crayfish, which feed upon primary producers, allochthonous detritus, and benthic invertebrates, can impact communities at multiple levels through both direct and indirect effects mediated by drought-tolerant plants. We tested the impact of both virile crayfish (Orconectes virilis and litter type on benthic invertebrates and the effect of crayfish on detrital resources across a gradient of riparian vegetation drought-tolerance using field cages with leaf litter bags in the San Pedro River in Southeastern Arizona. Virile crayfish increased breakdown rate of novel drought-tolerant saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, but did not impact breakdown of drought-tolerant seepwillow (Baccharis salicifolia or hydric Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii and Gooding's willow (Salix goodingii. Effects on invertebrate diversity were observed at the litter bag scale, but no effects were found at the cage scale. Crayfish decreased alpha diversity of colonizing macroinvertebrates, but did not affect beta diversity. In contrast, the drought-tolerant litter treatment decreased beta diversity relative to hydric litter. As drought-tolerant species become more abundant in riparian zones, their litter will become a larger component of the organic matter budget of desert streams which may serve to homogenize the litter-dwelling community and support elevated populations of virile crayfish. Through impacts at multiple trophic levels, crayfish have a significant effect on desert stream ecosystems.

  12. Brownian rotational relaxation and power absorption in magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goya, G.F.; Fernandez-Pacheco, R.; Arruebo, M.; Cassinelli, N.; Ibarra, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the power absorption efficiency in several magnetite-based colloids, to asses their potential as magnetic inductive hyperthermia (MIH) agents. Relaxation times τ were measured through the imaginary susceptibility component χ ' '(T), and analyzed within Debye's theory of dipolar fluid. The results indicated Brownian rotational relaxation and allowed to calculate the hydrodynamic radius close to the values obtained from photon correlation. The study of the colloid performances as power absorbers showed no detectable increase of temperature for dextran-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles, whereas a second Fe 3 O 4 -based dispersion of similar concentration could be heated up to 12K after 30min under similar experimental conditions. The different power absorption efficiencies are discussed in terms of the magnetic structure of the nanoparticles

  13. Brownian rotational relaxation and power absorption in magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goya, G.F. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: goya@unizar.es; Fernandez-Pacheco, R. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Arruebo, M. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cassinelli, N. [Electronics Division, Bauer and Associates, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, UNLP (Argentina); Ibarra, M.R. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    We present a study of the power absorption efficiency in several magnetite-based colloids, to asses their potential as magnetic inductive hyperthermia (MIH) agents. Relaxation times {tau} were measured through the imaginary susceptibility component {chi}{sup '}'(T), and analyzed within Debye's theory of dipolar fluid. The results indicated Brownian rotational relaxation and allowed to calculate the hydrodynamic radius close to the values obtained from photon correlation. The study of the colloid performances as power absorbers showed no detectable increase of temperature for dextran-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, whereas a second Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based dispersion of similar concentration could be heated up to 12K after 30min under similar experimental conditions. The different power absorption efficiencies are discussed in terms of the magnetic structure of the nanoparticles.

  14. Hydrocolloid-Stabilized Magnetite for Efficient Removal of Radioactive Phosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Vellora Thekkae Padil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid radioactive waste is a common by-product when using radioactive isotopes in research and medicine. Efficient remediation of such liquid waste is crucial for increasing safety during the necessary storage of the material. Herein, we present a novel Gum Karaya stabilized magnetite for the efficient removal of radioactive phosphorus 32P from liquid radioactive waste. This environmentally friendly material is well suited to be used as a nanohydrogel for the removal of liquid waste, which can then be stored in a smaller space and without the risk of the spills inherent to the initial liquid material. The maximum adsorption capacity of the GK/M in this study was found to be 15.68 GBq/g. We present a thorough morphological characterization of the synthesised GK/M, as well as a discussion of the possible phosphorus adsorption mechanisms.

  15. Carbon deposition on nickel ferrites and nickel-magnetite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Jutson, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    Carbon deposition on Commercial Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (CAGR) fuel cladding and heat exchanger surfaces lowers heat transfer efficiency and increases fuel pin temperatures. Several types of deposit have been identified including both thin dense layers and also low density columnar deposits with filamentary or convoluted laminar structure. The low-density types are often associated with particles containing iron, nickel or manganese. To identify the role of nickel in the deposition process surfaces composed of nickel-iron spinels or metallic nickel/magnetite mixtures have been exposed to γ radiation in a gas environment simulating that in the reactor. Examination of these surfaces by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have shown that while metallic nickel (Ni(O)) catalyses the formation of filamentary low density carbon deposits, the presence of divalent nickel (Ni(II)) sites in spinel type oxides is associated only with dense deposits. (author)

  16. Photoemission electronic states of epitaxially grown magnetite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalecki, R.; Kolodziejczyk, A.; Korecki, J.; Spiridis, N.; Zajac, M.; Kozlowski, A.; Kakol, Z.; Antolak, D.

    2007-01-01

    The valence band photoemission spectra of epitaxially grown 300 A single crystalline magnetite films were measured by the angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) at 300 K. The samples were grown either on MgO(0 0 1) (B termination) or on (0 0 1) Fe (iron-rich A termination), thus intentionally presenting different surface stoichiometry, i.e. also different surface electronic states. Four main features of the electron photoemission at about -1.0, -3.0, -5.5 and -10.0 eV below a chemical potential show systematic differences for two terminations; this difference depends on the electron outgoing angle. Our studies confirm sensitivity of angle resolved PES technique on subtleties of surface states

  17. Adsorption of organic layers over electrodeposited magnetite (Fe3O4) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, M.; Gomez, E.; Sadler, J.; Valles, E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Adherent low roughness magnetite films ranging from 80 nm to 3.75 μm-thick were electrodeposited on Au/glass substrates under galvanostatic control. → X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements corroborates the purity of the electrodeposited magnetite. → Both dodecanethiol and oleic acid are shown to adsorb on the magnetite prepared at low temperature, significantly inducing the hydrophobicity of the surface. → Contact angle and voltammetric measurements, as well as XPS confirm the monolayers formation. - Abstract: The formation of monolayers of two organic compounds (oleic acid and dodecanethiol) over magnetite films was studied. Magnetite films ranging from 80 nm to 3.75 μm-thick were electrodeposited on Au on glass substrates under galvanostatic control, with deposition parameters optimized for minimum surface roughness. Films were characterised by SEM and AFM, showing granular deposits with a low rms roughness of 5-40 nm measured over an area of 1 μm 2 . The growth rate was estimated by measuring cross-sections of the thin films. Pure magnetite with an fcc structure is observed in XRD diffractograms. The adsorption of both oleic acid and dodecanethiol on the magnetite films was tested by immersing them in ethanol solutions containing the organic molecules, for different deposition time, temperature and cleaning procedure. Monolayer formation in both cases was studied by contact angle and voltammetric measurements, as well as XPS.

  18. The construction of a magnetite electrode for measurement of the electrochemical property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myongjin; Kim, Hong Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) causes severe damage to secondary piping systems. An accident from FAC occurred at the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant (NPP) in 1978. Other NPPs such as Surry 2 and Mihama 3 have also experienced an FAC that induced damage to the carbon steel piping. FAC is influenced by many factors such as the water chemistry (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (D. O.) in a solution, and etc.), chemical composition of carbon steel, and fluid dynamics. Magnetite is formed at the inner surface of carbon steel, and protects the integrity of pipes from damage. The magnetite has a stable state at each equilibrium condition, so that it can be dissolved into the fluid under conditions that satisfy the equilibrium state. The iron solubility can be calculated by considering the reaction equilibrium constants for prediction of the change in the magnetite layer. On the other hand, it is necessary to measure the experimental solubility to compare the theoretical data and the experimental data. In addition, the solubility of magnetite can be predicted by measuring the electrochemical experiments. However, there are few studies related to the electrochemical property of magnetite owing to the difficulty of the electrode fabrication. In the present work, a magnetite electrode was prepared using a dipping method, and the electrochemical property of the magnetite electrode was measured in an alkaline solution.

  19. Evidence for artificial magnetite coating on Iberian armoury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A metallographic study of two pre-roman Iberian arms, affected by a cremation process, revealed the presence of an outer magnetite layer, providing highly protective properties. This layer is extraordinarily tenacious and of very homogeneous thickness, indicating an intentional manufacturing process rather than an accidental formation during the severe heating/cooling cycles the artefact suffered. Up to date, the intentional production of these types of layers has been attributed to a welding process of three different metallic sheets, here an alternative model is proposed, allowing, as could be simulated in the laboratory, the virtually exclusive formation of a magnetite coating.

    Se presenta un estudio metalográficos de dos armas prerromanas afectadas por un proceso de cremación. Las armas poseen un recubrimiento exterior de magnetita que las confieren unas altas propiedades de protección frente a la corrosión. Esta capa es extraordinariamente tenaz y posee un espesor muy homogéneo, indicando que son producto de un proceso de fabricación intencionado más que una formación accidental durante los varios ciclos de calentamiento/ enfriamiento que han sufrido los objetos. Hasta la fecha, la producción intencional de este tipo de recubrimientos ha sido atribuida a un proceso de soldadura de tres láminas metálicas diferentes. En este trabajo se propone un modelo alternativo de formación, el cual permite una simulación en el laboratorio en la que se forma exclusivamente una capa de magnetita.

  20. U-Pb ages of detrital zircon from Pegasus Group, Stewart Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, N.; Tulloch, A.J.; Allibone, A.

    1998-01-01

    Stewart Island (New Zealand) is relatively unaffected by Cenozoic deformation related to the present-day plate boundary and has thus been a locale of investigations that focus on the relationship between Mesozoic continental margin magmatic rocks and the Western Province (WP) of NZ. Pegasus Group metasedimentary rocks represent the only candidate for WP equivalents on Stewart Island. We measured U-Pb and 207 Pb / 206 Pb ages of detrital zircons from the Pegasus Group in an effort to validate the correlation with the WP. On SI, Pegasus Group is exposed over a small area in the southern Tin Range where it forms amphibolite facies roof pendants and screens among plutons of mid Paleozoic to mid Cretaceous age. Mica schists predominate, with lesser amounts of psammite and metaquartzite and rare calcareous schist and amphibolite. Zircons were extracted from metaquarzite and 24 grains were chosen on the basis of morphology for geochronologic investigation. Sixteen single crystals were dated by U-Pb TIMS; 8 additional grains were studied by the total evaporation method described by Kober. Despite vigorous air abrasion prior to processing, the 16 grains measured by conventional U-Pb TIMS yielded slightly normally discordant ages that we interpret to reflect minor Pb-loss. The 8 grains studied by the total evaporation method yielded more than four analytically identical /sup 207 Pb / 206 Pb ages within each grain at progressively higher temperatures (1515-1580 degrees C) of evaporation. The results permit the following general conclusions: 1) the age range of 420-2700 Ma is grossly similar to that reported from the Greenland Group/Victoria Paragneiss (Ireland 1992) of the Buller Terrane, WP; 2) the zircon population is dominantly 530-680 Ma but a subsidiary population is 900-1100 Ma; 3) no zircons with ages that match the timing of the Ross Orogen (530-480 Ma) were identified; 4) two grains of 420 Ma and a 453 Ma are probably too young for the paleontogically

  1. Provenance of the lower Miocene of the Gulf of Mexico from detrital zircon double dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The lower Miocene interval of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) has recently gained increasing attention from oil and gas industry due to its hydrocarbon potential below the salt canopy. However, it has been less well studied than both the underlying Oligocene and overlying middle Miocene strata. The lower Miocene worldwide is a transitional period of tectonic, climatic, and oceanographic change. In particular, it is a period of major tectonic reorganization in the western interior of North America (Rocky Mountains), involving a shift from the Oligocene thermal phase, with abundant volcanic activity recorded in the thick Frio/Vicksburg succession of the GOM, to the Miocene Basin-Range extensional phase. Climatic conditions also changed from a relatively arid Oligocene to wetter Miocene, resulting in increased sediment yields from exhumed tectonic structures. Previous provenance studies used proportions of quartz, feldspar and lithic fragments and consideration of likely river courses through known paleogeomorphological elements. Only limited detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb studies on Paleocene strata have been undertaken and there has been no previous U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double dating in the GOM. In this study we apply the latest analytical approaches, such as DZ U-Pb dating to gain robust source terranes ages and more fully elucidate the complex sediment provenance and dispersal history of GOM. We also employ DZ (U-Th)/He (ZHe) dating, combined with DZ U-Pb, to not only define sedimentary provenance but also the exhumation histories of detrital source regions. Samples of lower Miocene outcrop exposures in Texas and Louisiana have been collected to discriminate the varied tectonic and drainage system changes across the basin in lateral. In addition, samples from the Eocene, Oligocene and middle Miocene have been obtained to reveal vertical shift of source terranes contributions. Our initial age data show detrital zircons of lower Miocene sediments come from a wide range of source

  2. Spatial distribution of detrital resources determines the outcome of competition between bacteria and a facultative detritivorous worm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nugteren, P.; Herman, P.M.J.; Moodley, L.; Middelburg, J.J.; Vos, M.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2009-01-01

    Macrobenthic deposit feeders and bacteria compete for the same detrital food resources. We hypothesize that the spatial scale at which food is distributed in the sediment is an important factor determining the outcome of this competition. Macrobenthic deposit feeders are better adapted for fast

  3. Bacterial traits, organism mass, and numerical abundance in the detrital soil food web of Dutch agricultural grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, C.; Cohen, J.E.; Setälä, H.; Bloem, J.; Breure, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares responses to environmental stress of the ecophysiological traits of organisms in the detrital soil food webs of grasslands in the Netherlands, using the relationship between average body mass M and numerical abundance N. The microbial biomass and biodiversity of belowground fauna

  4. Storage and export of organic matter in a headwater stream: responses to long-term detrital manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue L. Eggert; J. Bruce Wallace; Judy L. Meyer; Jackson R. Webster

    2012-01-01

    Riparian habitats provide organic matter inputs that influence stream biota and ecosystem processes in forested watersheds. Over a 13-yr period, we examined the effects of litter exclusion, small- and large-wood removal, and the addition of leaf species of varying detrital quality on organic matter standing crop and export of organic and inorganic particles in a high-...

  5. Detrital processing in streams exposed to acidic precipitation in the Central Appalachian Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, S.K.; Perry, S.A.; Perry, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Continuing high rates of acidic deposition in the eastern United States may lead to long-term effects on stream communities, because sensitive catchments are continuing to lose anions and cations. A two-year study of the effects of pH and associated water chemistry variables on detrital processing in three streams with different bedrock geology in the Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia were investigated. Leaf pack processing rates and macroinvertebrate colonization and microbial biomass (ATP concentration) on the packs in the three stream were compared. It was found that macroinvertebrate and microbial communities differed both among streams that differed in their capacity to buffer the effects of acidic precipitation and among years in the same stream; these differences in biotic communities were not large enough to affect rates of leaf processing between the two years of the study, but they did significantly affect processing rates between acidic and circumneutral streams

  6. Changes in biogenic and detrital fluxes across the last two glacial terminations at the Shatsky Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradtmiller, L. I.; Kinsley, C. W.; McGee, D.; Ford, H. L.; Perala-Dewey, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Shatsky Rise is located within strong gradients in SST and biological productivity between the subtropical and subarctic Pacific gyres. The region is highly sensitive to changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales, which affect the delivery of Fe-bearing dust and other major nutrients, respectively. Here we use a range of proxies in an attempt to determine the effects of changes in westerly winds and gyre boundaries on dust delivery and biological productivity. We present 230Th-normalized fluxes of opal, Corg, CaCO3, and detrital material at ODP Site 1208 over the last two glacial terminations, extending to 145ka. Opal, Corg, and carbonate are products of surface biological productivity, while most detrital material at this site arrives in the form of windborne East Asian dust. In addition, we calculate the concentration of authigenic U as an indicator of relative oxygenation of the sediment water interface. We observe elevated opal and dust fluxes during the last two glacial maxima, and a decrease in both components during deglaciations. Authigenic U shows distinct peaks at the onset of both terminations. The peak at the penultimate deglaciation is also associated with a large peak in opal flux, while the peak in authigenic U during the last termination does not appear to be associated with any large changes in biogenic fluxes. We compare our records with other data from the subtropical-subarctic transition zone, and suggest that our data are consistent with northward shift of the mean position of the westerly jet and subarctic front during deglaciations.

  7. Preparation of lumen-loaded kenaf pulp with magnetite (Fe3O4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, S.; Ong, B.H.; Ahmad, S.H.; Abdullah, M.; Yamauchi, T.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic pulps were prepared from unbleached kenaf (hibiscus cannabinus L.) kraft pulps. Fe 3 O 4 or magnetite powder was used to load into the pulp's lumen and pit. Aluminum sulphate [Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 ] (alum) and polyethylenimine (PEI), both mainly function as retention aid were used throughout the experiment and found to be beneficial in the preparation of this magnetic pulps. The ash content method was used to determine the amount of magnetite retained in the lumen and pit. The utilization of PEI up to 2% per pulp fibres was found to be the best result on lumen loading. The deposition of magnetite powder in lumen and pit is found decrease as the addition of PEI used is more than 2% per pulp fibres. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) clearly shows the distribution of magnetite deposited in the lumen. Tensile index and folding endurance of the loaded fibre decreased slightly as the percentage of loading pigment increased

  8. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency. - Highlights: • A biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions are investigated. • A comparison between ultrasonic properties and heat effects is presented. • Magnetosomes and abiotic magnetite nanoparticles exhibit good heating efficiency.

  9. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Razavi, Mehdi; E Bahrololoom, Mohammad; Bazargan-Lari, Reza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Kotturi, Hari; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe3O4) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The preparation of magnetite from iron(III) and iron(II) salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, D.L.

    1980-10-01

    Methods are described for the preparation of magnetite from iron(III) and iron(II) salt solutions at temperatures between 295 to 373 K. The effect of the reagent concentration, a chelating agent and different alkali-metal cations on the formation of magnetite has been investigated. The magnetite samples have been examined by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by determination of the point of zero charge. A review of previous work on the preparation of magnetite in an aqueous environment is also included. This work is relevant to the corrosion processes which can occur in the water coolant circuits of nuclear reactors. (author)

  11. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D; Kopp, Robert E; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V; Sears, S Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-11-18

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 microm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 microm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability--a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming--drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes.

  12. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcharoen, K.; Sirivat, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Size-controlled magnetite nanoparticles were prepared via the chemical co-precipitation method in the range of 10–40 nm. ► The electrical conductivity of the smallest particle size is 1.3 × 10 −3 S/cm which belongs to the semiconductor material group. ► The surface modification of magnetite nanoparticles can provide the suspension stability over 1 week. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the chemical co-precipitation method using ammonium hydroxide as the precipitating agent. The size of the magnetite nanoparticles was carefully controlled by varying the reaction temperature and through the surface modification. Herein, the hexanoic acid and oleic acid were introduced as the coating agents during the initial crystallization phase of the magnetite. Their structure and morphology were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Moreover, the electrical and magnetic properties were studied by using a conductivity meter and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), respectively. Both of the bare magnetite and the coated magnetite were of the cubic spinel structure and the spherical-shaped morphology. The reaction temperature and the surface modification critically affected the particle size, the electrical conductivity, and the magnetic properties of these particles. The particle size of the magnetite was increased through the surface modification and reaction temperature. In this study, the particle size of the magnetite nanoparticles was successfully controlled to be in the range of 10–40 nm, suitable for various biomedical applications. The electrical conductivity of the smallest particle size was 1.3 × 10 −3 S/cm, within the semi-conductive materials range, which was higher than that of the largest particle by about 5 times. All of the magnetite nanoparticles showed the superparamagnetic behavior with

  14. The enhanced coercivity for the magnetite/silica nanocomposite at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Mingzai; Xiong Ying; Peng Zhenmeng; Jiang Nan; Qi Haiping; Chen Qianwang

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite/silica nanocomposite was synthesized by a facile solvothermal processing at 150 deg. C for about 10 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the effect of annealing on the crystallinity of silica. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed the good dispersion of magnetite in the silica matrix. Magnetic properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by vibration sample magnetometer (VSM), and the enhanced coercivity was explained by the intrinsic anisotropy of the particles enhanced by the interparticle dipolar fields

  15. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidari, Fatemeh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Yasouj University, Yasuj 75918-74934 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Mehdi [BCAST, Institute of Materials and Manufacturing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Brunel Institute for Bioengineering, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Bahrololoom, Mohammad E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazargan-Lari, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vashaee, Daryoosh [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Kotturi, Hari [Department of Biology, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034 (United States); Tayebi, Lobat, E-mail: lobat.tayebi@marquette.edu [Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan. - Highlights: • Chitosan (CS)/magnetite composite presented the maximum bending strength. • Adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the CS enhances its mechanical properties. • Magnetic does not have reverse effect on the cyto-compatibility of samples.

  16. Characterizing and quantifying superparamagnetic magnetite particles in serpentinized mantle peridotite observed in continental ophiolite complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, E.; Vento, N. F. R.; Tominaga, M.; Beinlich, A.; Einsle, J. F.; Buisman, I.; Ringe, E.; Schrenk, M. O.; Cardace, D.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinization of mantle peridotite has been recognized as one of the most important energy factories for the deep biosphere. To better evaluate the habitability of the deep biosphere, it is crucial to understand the link between in situ peridotite serpentinization processes and associated magnetite and hydrogen production. Previous efforts in correlating magnetite and hydrogen production during serpentinization processes are based primarily on laboratory experiments and numerical modeling, being challenged to include the contribution of superparamagnetic-sized magnetites (i.e., extremely fine-grained magnetite, petrographically observed as a "pepper flake" like texture in many natural serpentinized rock samples). To better estimate the abundance of superparamagnetic grains, we conducted frequency-dependent susceptibility magnetic measurements at the Institute of Rock Magnetism on naturally serpentinized rock samples from the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in California, USA and the Atlin Ophiolite (British Columbia). In addition, we conducted multiscale EDS phase mapping, BackScattered Electron (BSE) scanning, FIB-nanotomography and STEM-EELS to identify and quantify the superparamagnetic minerals that contribute to the measured magnetic susceptibility signals in our rock samples. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, we aim to improve the estimation of hydrogen production based on the abundance of magnetite, that includes the contribution of superparamagnetic particle size magnetite, to ultimately provide a more accurate estimation of bulk deep-biomass hosted by in situ serpentinization processes.

  17. Analysis of magnetite crystals and inclusion bodies inside magnetotactic bacteria from different environmental locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreicher, Z.; Lower, B.; Lower, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Biomineralization occurs throughout the living world; a few common examples include iron oxide in chiton teeth, calcium carbonate in mollusk shells, calcium phosphate in animal bones and teeth, silica in diatom shells, and magnetite crystals inside the cells of magnetotactic bacteria. Biologically controlled mineralization is characterized by biominerals that have species-specific properties such as: preferential crystallographic orientation, consistent particle size, highly ordered spatial locations, and well-defined composition and structure. It is well known that magnetotactic bacteria synthesize crystals of magnetite inside of their cells, but how they mineralize the magnetite is poorly understood. Magnetosomes have a species-specific morphology that is due to specific proteins involved in the mineralization process. In addition to magnetite crystals, magnetotactic bacteria also produce inclusion bodies or granules that contain different elements, such as phosphorus, calcium, and sulfur. In this study we used the transmission electron microscope to analyze the structure of magnetite crystals and inclusion bodies from different species of magnetotactic bacteria in order to determine the composition of the inclusion bodies and to ascertain whether or not the magnetite crystals contain elements other than iron and oxygen. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy we found that different bacteria from different environments possess inclusion bodies that contain different elements such as phosphorus, calcium, barium, magnesium, and sulfur. These differences may reflect the conditions of the environment in which the bacteria inhabit.

  18. Characteristics of Crushing Energy and Fractal of Magnetite Ore under Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Gan, D. Q.; Zhang, Y. B.

    2018-03-01

    The crushing mechanism of magnetite ore is a critical theoretical problem on the controlling of energy dissipation and machine crushing quality in ore material processing. Uniaxial crushing tests were carried out to research the deformation mechanism and the laws of the energy evolution, based on which the crushing mechanism of magnetite ore was explored. The compaction stage and plasticity and damage stage are two main compression deformation stages, the main transitional forms from inner damage to fracture are plastic deformation and stick-slip. In the process of crushing, plasticity and damage stage is the key link on energy absorption for that the specimen tends to saturate energy state approaching to the peak stress. The characteristics of specimen deformation and energy dissipation can synthetically reply the state of existed defects inner raw magnetite ore and the damage process during loading period. The fast releasing of elastic energy and the work done by the press machine commonly make raw magnetite ore thoroughly broken after peak stress. Magnetite ore fragments have statistical self-similarity and size threshold of fractal characteristics under uniaxial squeezing crushing. The larger ratio of releasable elastic energy and dissipation energy and the faster energy change rate is the better fractal properties and crushing quality magnetite ore has under uniaxial crushing.

  19. Precipitation synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled magnetite-chitosan nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Vasylkiv, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.vasylkiv@nims.go.jp

    2017-04-15

    This paper reports the synthesis and magnetic properties of unique magnetite-chitosan nanostructures synthesized by the chemical precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. The influence of varying synthesis parameters on the morphology of the magnetic composites is determined. Depending on the synthesis parameters, magnetite-chitosan nanostructures of spherical (9–18 nm), rice-seed-like (75–290 nm) and lumpy (75–150 nm) shapes were obtained via self-assembly. Spherical nanostructures encapsulated by a 9–15 nm chitosan layer were assembled as well. The prospective morphology of the nanostructures is combined with their excellent magnetic characteristics. It was found that magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferromagnetic and pseudo-single domain. Rice-seed-like nanostructures exhibited a coercivity of 140 Oe and saturation magnetization of 56.7 emu/g at 300 K. However, a drop in the magnetic properties was observed for chitosan-coated spherical nanostructures due to the higher volume fraction of chitosan. - Highlights: • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are synthesized via self-assembly. • Different morphology can be obtained by adjusting the synthesis parameters. • An attractive combination of magnetic properties and morphology is obtained. • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferrimagnetic and pseudo-single domain.

  20. Precipitation synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled magnetite-chitosan nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Vasylkiv, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and magnetic properties of unique magnetite-chitosan nanostructures synthesized by the chemical precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. The influence of varying synthesis parameters on the morphology of the magnetic composites is determined. Depending on the synthesis parameters, magnetite-chitosan nanostructures of spherical (9–18 nm), rice-seed-like (75–290 nm) and lumpy (75–150 nm) shapes were obtained via self-assembly. Spherical nanostructures encapsulated by a 9–15 nm chitosan layer were assembled as well. The prospective morphology of the nanostructures is combined with their excellent magnetic characteristics. It was found that magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferromagnetic and pseudo-single domain. Rice-seed-like nanostructures exhibited a coercivity of 140 Oe and saturation magnetization of 56.7 emu/g at 300 K. However, a drop in the magnetic properties was observed for chitosan-coated spherical nanostructures due to the higher volume fraction of chitosan. - Highlights: • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are synthesized via self-assembly. • Different morphology can be obtained by adjusting the synthesis parameters. • An attractive combination of magnetic properties and morphology is obtained. • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferrimagnetic and pseudo-single domain.

  1. Progress in the synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles with amino groups on the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdureanu-Angheluta, A.; Dascalu, A.; Fifere, A.; Coroaba, A.; Pricop, L.; Chiriac, H.; Tura, V.; Pinteala, M.; Simionescu, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript deals with the synthesis of new hydrophilic magnetite particles by employing a two-step method: in the first step magnetite particles with hydrophobic shell formed in presence of oleic acid–oleylamine complex through a synthesis in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle were obtained; while in the second step the hydrophobic shell was interchanged with an aminosilane monomer. The influence of the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ molar ratio on the dimension of the particles of high importance for their potential applications was carefully investigated. This paper, also presents an alternative method of synthesis of new core-shell magnetite particles and the complete study of their structure and morphology by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, ESEM and TEM techniques. The rheological properties and magnetization analysis of high importance for magnetic particles were also investigated. - Highlights: ► Magnetite particles are superparamagnetic materials. ► Magnetite has significant role in nanotechnology due to surface properties and applicability in physical and chemical processes. ► We used an ecological method of synthesis, a reaction in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle. ► We prepared hydrophilic magnetite particles, precursors for biomedical applications.

  2. Progress in the synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles with amino groups on the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durdureanu-Angheluta, A.; Dascalu, A.; Fifere, A.; Coroaba, A.; Pricop, L. [Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, ' ' Petru Poni' ' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of Romanian Academy, 41A Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Chiriac, H. [National Institute of Research and Development in Technical Physics, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Tura, V. [Faculty of Physics, ' ' Al. I. Cuza' ' University, B-dul Carol I, no. 11, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Pinteala, M., E-mail: pinteala@icmpp.ro [Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, ' ' Petru Poni' ' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of Romanian Academy, 41A Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Simionescu, B.C. [Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, ' ' Petru Poni' ' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of Romanian Academy, 41A Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Department of Natural and Synthetic Polymers, ' ' Gh. Asachi' ' Technical University of Iasi, 73 Mangeron Blvd, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2012-05-15

    This manuscript deals with the synthesis of new hydrophilic magnetite particles by employing a two-step method: in the first step magnetite particles with hydrophobic shell formed in presence of oleic acid-oleylamine complex through a synthesis in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle were obtained; while in the second step the hydrophobic shell was interchanged with an aminosilane monomer. The influence of the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} molar ratio on the dimension of the particles of high importance for their potential applications was carefully investigated. This paper, also presents an alternative method of synthesis of new core-shell magnetite particles and the complete study of their structure and morphology by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, ESEM and TEM techniques. The rheological properties and magnetization analysis of high importance for magnetic particles were also investigated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite particles are superparamagnetic materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite has significant role in nanotechnology due to surface properties and applicability in physical and chemical processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used an ecological method of synthesis, a reaction in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared hydrophilic magnetite particles, precursors for biomedical applications.

  3. Magnetic and structural properties of magnetite in radular teeth of chiton Acanthochiton rubrolinestus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yunan; Liu, Chuanlin; Zhou, Dong; Li, Fashen; Wang, Yong; Han, Xiufeng

    2011-04-01

    The teeth of the Polyplacophora Chiton Acanthochiton Rubrolinestus contain biomineralized magnetite crystallites whose biological functions in relation to structure and magnetic properties are not well understood. Here, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, we find that the saturation magnetization (σ(s)) and the Verwey transition temperature (T(v)) of tooth particles are 78.4 emu/g and 105 K, respectively. These values are below those of the stoichiometric magnetite. An in situ examination of the structure of the magnetite-bearing region within an individual tooth using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates magnetite microcrystals form electron dense polycrystalline sheets with typical lengths of about 800 nm and widths of about 150 nm. These polycrystalline sheets are arranged regularly along the longitudinal direction of the tooth cutting surface. In addition, the crystallites in polycrystalline sheets take on generally good crystallinity. The magnetic microstructures of in situ magnetic force microscopy demonstrate that the [111] easy direction of magnetite microcrystals are aligned along the length of the tooth, whereas the [111] direction is parallel to the thickness of the tooth. Both Mössbauer spectra and magnetization versus temperature measurements under field cooled and zero-field cooled conditions do not detect superparamagnetic magnetite crystallites in the mature major lateral tooth particles of this chiton.

  4. Stability of magnetite nanoparticles with different coatings in a simulated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favela-Camacho, Sarai E.; Pérez-Robles, J. Francisco [Center for Research and Advanced Studies of National Polytechnic Institute, CINVESTAV-Querétaro Unit (Mexico); García-Casillas, Perla E. [Autonomous University of Juarez, Department of Materials Science, Institute of Engineering and Technology (Mexico); Godinez-Garcia, Andrés, E-mail: andgodinez@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Ingeniería de Procesos e Hidráulica (Mexico)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have demonstrated to be a potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, magnetite is unstable at the blood plasma conditions. Therefore, to study their stability in a broad range of particle size, the MNPs were synthesized using two methods, the fast injection co-precipitation method (FIC) and the reflux co-precipitation method (RC). The MNPs obtained by the RC and the FIC methods have an average size of agglomerates of 200 and 45 nm respectively. They were dispersed using sodium citrate as surfactant and were coated with silica and chitosan. A total of four kind of coated MNPs were synthesized: magnetite/sodium citrate, magnetite/silica, magnetite/sodium citrate/silica and magnetite/sodium citrate/silica/chitosan. Different samples of the coated MNPs were immersed in a simulated blood plasma solution (Phosphate-Buffered Saline, PBS, Gibco{sup ®}), for periods of 24, 48 and 72 h. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique was used to analyze the composition of the simulated plasma after those periods of time. The obtained results suggest that the uncoated samples showed an appreciable weight loss, and the iron composition in the simulated plasma increased. This last means that the used coatings avoid iron dissolution from the MNPs.Graphical abstract.

  5. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-01-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures

  6. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E., E-mail: stephen.russek@nist.gov; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Geiss, Roy H. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Arenholz, Elke [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  7. Magnetite nanoparticles as reporters for microcarrier processing in cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reibetanz, Uta, E-mail: uta.reibetanz@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM) Leipzig, Universitaet Leipzig, Philipp-Rosenthal-Strasse 55, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Institute for Medical Physics and Biophysics, Medical Faculty, Universitaet Leipzig, Haertelstrasse 16-18, 04107 Leipzig (Germany); Jankuhn, Steffen, E-mail: jankuhn@uni-leipzig.de [Division of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Geosciences, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Office for Environmental Protection and Occupational Safety, Universitaet Leipzig, Ritterstrasse 24, 04109 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    The development and therapeutic application of drug delivery systems based on colloidal microcarriers layer-by-layer coated with biopolyelectrolytes requires the investigation of their processing inside the cell for the successful and efficient transport and release of the active agents. The present study is focused on the time-dependent multilayer decomposition and the subsequent release of active agents to the cytoplasm. Magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) were used as reporter agents integrated into the protamine sulfate/dextran sulfate basis multilayer on colloidal SiO{sub 2} cores. This functionalization allows the monitoring of the multilayer decomposition due to the detection of the MNP release, visualized by means of proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) by elemental distribution of Si and Fe. The direct correlation between the microcarrier localization in endolysosomes and cytoplasm of HEK293T/17 cells via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the elemental distribution (PIXE) allows tracing the fate of the MNP-coated microcarriers in cytoplasm, and thus the processing of the multilayer. Microcarrier/cell co-incubation experiments of 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h show that a MNP release and a slight expansion into the cytoplasm occurs after a longer co-incubation of 72 h.

  8. Practical cell labeling with magnetite cationic liposomes for cell manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Nonogaki, Yurika; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-01

    Personalization of the cell culture process for cell therapy is an ideal strategy to obtain maximum treatment effects. In a previous report, we proposed a strategy using a magnetic manipulation device that combined a palm-top size device and a cell-labeling method using magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) to enable feasible personalized cell processing. In the present study, we focused on optimizing the MCL-labeling technique with respect to cell manipulation in small devices. From detailed analysis with different cell types, 4 pg/cell of MCL-label was found to be obtained immediately after mixing with MCLs, which was sufficient for magnetic cell manipulation. The amount of label increased within 24 h depending on cell type, although in all cases it decreased along with cell doubling, indicating that the labeling potential of MCLs was limited. The role of free MCLs not involved in labeling was also investigated; MCLs' role was found to be a supportive one that maximized the manipulation performance up to 100%. We also determined optimum conditions to manipulate adherent cells by MCL labeling using the MCL dispersed in trypsin solution. Considering labeling feasibility and practical performance with 10(3)-10(5) cells for personalized cell processing, we determined that 10 microg/ml of label without incubation time (0 h incubation) was the universal MCL-labeling condition. We propose the optimum specifications for a device to be combined with this method. 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Recyclable magnetite-silver heterodimer nanocomposites with durable antibacterial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant need for magnetite-silver nanocomposites that exhibit durable and recyclable antimicrobial activity. In this study, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs coated with ethylenediamine-modified chitosan/polyacrylic acid copolymeric layer (Fe3O4@ECS/PAA were fabricated. Subsequently, directly deposited silver (Ag NPs procedure was carried out to form the antibacterial heterodimers of Fe3O4@ECS/PAA-Ag NPs. The composition and morphology of the resultant nanostructures were confirmed by FT-IR, XRD, TEM and TGA. The overall length of the heterodimers was approximately 45 nm, in which the mean diameter of Fe3O4@ECS/PAA NPs reached up to 35 nm, and that of Ag NPs was around 15 nm. The mass fraction of silver NPs in the nanocomposites was about 63.1%. The obtained Fe3O4@ECS/PAA NPs exhibited good colloidal stability, and excellent response to additional magnetic field, making the NPs easy to recover after antibacterial tests. In particular, the Fe3O4@ECS/PAA-Ag NPs retained nearly 100% biocidal efficiency (106–107 CFU/mg nanoparticles for both Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus throughout ten cycles without washing with any solvents or water, exhibiting potent and durable antibacterial activity.

  10. Reduced Magnetism in Core–Shell Magnetite@MOF Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Sinnwell, Michael A.; Banerjee, Debasis; Devaraj, Arun; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Nie, Zimin; Kovarik, Libor; Murugesan, Vijayakumar; Manandhar, Sandeep; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; McGrail, Bernard P.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2017-10-17

    Rare-earth elements (REEs) have significant commercial and military uses.1-3 However, REE extraction through conventional mining processes is expensive and feasible at only a few locations worldwide. Alternative methods are needed to produce REEs from more geographically disperse resources and in a cost effective, environmental friendly manner.4,5 Among various sources, geothermal brine, used for generating geothermal energy can possess attractive concentrations (ppb to ppm level) of REEs along with other dissolved metal ions.6 A system that can selectively trap the REEs using an existing geothermal power plant infrastructure would be an attractive additional revenue stream for the plant operator that could accelerate the development and deployment of geothermal plants in the United States and rest of the world.7,8 Here, we demonstrate a magnetic core-shell approach that can effectively extract REEs in their ionic form from aqueous solution with up to 99.99% removal efficiency. The shell, composed of thermally and chemically stable functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF), is grown over a synthesized Fe3O4 magnetic core. Magnetic susceptibility of the particles was found to decline significantly after in situ growth of a MOF shell, which resulted from oxidation of Fe2+ species of the magnetite (Fe3O4) to Fe3+ species (maghemite). The core-shell particles can be completely removed from the mixture under an applied magnetic field, offering a practical, economic, and efficient REE-removal process.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-01-01

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe 3 O 4 thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe 3 O 4 thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7 nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210 K. After post-annealing in H 2 /Ar at 400 °C, the as-grown α−Fe 2 O 3 sample is reduced to Fe 3 O 4 phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications

  12. Studies on antimony absorption on Carbon steel (CS) and magnetite coated CS at high temperature to investigate the problem of out of core Sb activity in PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Gokhale, B.K.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Bera, Santanu; Velmurugan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sb from PHT (primary heat transfer) pump bearings of PHWRs (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors) goes to the reactor core and gets activated to 121 Sb and 123 Sb. Subsequently, it deposits on out of core surface resulting in radiation exposure to station personnel's apparent high decontamination factors. Sb, thus deposited can't be impassivated by normal decontamination process. Earlier studies indicates lattice substitution of Sb +3 for Fe +2 in magnetite at low doping levels (≤5%). This process, at reactor conditions is yet to be well understood. To formulate an adequate decontamination formulation and methodology and for having insight at Sb deposition mechanism under rector conditions studies are performed

  13. Antimony (Sb) sorption studies on zircaloy, carbon steel (CS) and magnetite coated CS (MCS) surfaces in aqueous medium at pH 10.2 and 280℃

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Achary, S.N.; Basu, Saibal

    2014-01-01

    Antimony sorption studies on zircaloy, CS and magnetite coated carbon steel (MCS) at primary heat transport temperature (290℃) of pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) are of direct relevance in investigating Sb activity problem faced in Indian PHWRs. Sb impregnated PHT pump carbon bearing releases Sb to reactor core. This Sb activates, and redeposit on out-of-core surfaces and results in exposure and apparent high decontamination factors. This Sb is not amenable to normal decantation. The form and state of deposited Sb is not yet fully known. This works attempts for this

  14. Magnetite-apatite mineralization in Khanlogh iron deposit, northwest of Neyshaboor, NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafzadeh Tehrani, Parvin; Asghar Calagari, Ali; Velasco Roldan, Francisco; Simmonds, Vartan; Siahcheshm, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    Khanlogh iron deposit lies on Sabzehvar-Ghoochan Cenozoic magmatic belt in northwest of Neyshaboor, NE Iran. The lithologic units in this area include a series of sub-volcanic intrusive rocks like diorite porphyry, quartz-diorite porphyry, and micro-granodiorite of Oligocene age. Mineralization in this area occurred as veins, dissemination, and open space filling in brecciated zones within the host sub-volcanic intrusive bodies. Three distinct types of mineral associations can be distinguished, (1) diopside-magnetite, (2) magnetite-apatite, and (3) apatite-calcite. Microscopic examinations along with SEM and EPMA studies demonstrated that magnetite is the most common ore mineral occurring as solitary crystals. The euhedral magnetite crystals are accompanied by lamellar destabilized ilmenite and granular fluorapatite in magnetite-apatite ores. The results of EPMA revealed that the lamellar ilmenite, relative to host magnetite crystal, is notably enriched in MgO and MnO (average of 3.3 and 2.6 wt%, respectively; n=5), whereas magnetite is slighter enriched in Ti (TiO2 around 1.8 wt%) being average of MgO, MnO and V2O3 of 0.6wt%, 0.2wt%, and 0.6 wt% (respectively; n=20). Minerals such as chlorapatite, calcite, and chalcedony are also present in the magnetite-apatite ores. The samples from apatite-calcite ores contain coarse crystals of apatite and rhomboedral calcite. The plot of the EPMA data of Khanlogh iron ore samples on diagram of TiO2-V2O5 (Hou et al, 2011) illustrated that the data points lies between the well-known Kiruna and El Laco (Chile) iron deposits. The magnetite crystals in the sub-volcanic host rocks were possibly formed by immiscible iron oxide fluids during magmatic stage. However, the magnetite and apatite existing in the veins and breccia zones may have developed by high temperature hydrothermal fluids. Studies done by Purtov and Kotelnikova (1993) proved that the proportion of Ti in magnetite is related to fluoride complex in the hydrothermal

  15. Study of the influence of magnetite preparation parameters in the metals adsorption efficiency in the effluents treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Wada, Luciana Yukie; Hauy Junior, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Ferrites have been used to remove and concentrate heavy metals of aqueous waste. This work describes the obtaining of the magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) varying the pH, the temperature and the drying time. The performance of magnetite was evaluated by values of distribution coefficient of Eu 3+ from nitric solution. The kinetic reaction, the adsorption isotherm of Eu 3+ and the adsorption capacity of the synthetic magnetite were studied. (author)

  16. Trace-element and Nd-isotope systematics in detrital apatite of the Po river catchment: Implications for provenance discrimination and the lag-time approach to detrital thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malusà, Marco G.; Wang, Jiangang; Garzanti, Eduardo; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Villa, Igor M.; Wittmann, Hella

    2017-10-01

    Detrital thermochronology is often employed to assess the evolutionary stage of an entire orogenic belt using the lag-time approach, i.e., the difference between the cooling and depositional ages of detrital mineral grains preserved in a stratigraphic succession. The impact of different eroding sources to the final sediment sink is controlled by several factors, including the short-term erosion rate and the mineral fertility of eroded bedrock. Here, we use apatite fertility data and cosmogenic-derived erosion rates in the Po river catchment (Alps-Apennines) to calculate the expected percentage of apatite grains supplied to the modern Po delta from the major Alpine and Apenninic eroding sources. We test these predictions by using a cutting-edge dataset of trace-element and Nd-isotope signatures on 871 apatite grains from 14 modern sand samples, and we use apatite fission-track data to validate our geochemical approach to provenance discrimination. We found that apatite grains shed from different sources are geochemically distinct. Apatites from the Lepontine dome in the Central Alps show relative HREE enrichment, lower concentrations in Ce and U, and higher 147Sm/144Nd ratios compared to apatites derived from the External Massifs. Derived provenance budgets point to a dominant apatite contribution to the Po delta from the high-fertility Lepontine dome, consistent with the range independently predicted from cosmonuclide and mineral-fertility data. Our results demonstrate that the single-mineral record in the final sediment sink can be largely determined by high-fertility source rocks exposed in rapidly eroding areas within the drainage. This implies that the detrital thermochronology record may reflect processes affecting relatively small parts of the orogenic system under consideration. A reliable approach to lag-time analysis would thus benefit from an independent provenance discrimination of dated mineral grains, which may allow to proficiently reconsider many

  17. Magnetite nanoparticle (NP) uptake by wheat plants and its effect on cadmium and chromium toxicological behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Luna, J., E-mail: jlol_24@hotmail.com [Instituto de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad de la Sierra Juárez, Ixtlán de Juárez 68725, Oaxaca (Mexico); Silva-Silva, M.J. [Instituto de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad de la Sierra Juárez, Ixtlán de Juárez 68725, Oaxaca (Mexico); Martinez-Vargas, S. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Carmen, Ciudad del Carmen 24115, Campeche (Mexico); Mijangos-Ricardez, O.F. [Instituto de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad de la Sierra Juárez, Ixtlán de Juárez 68725, Oaxaca (Mexico); González-Chávez, M.C. [Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agrícolas, Carr. México–Texcoco km 36.5, Montecillo 56230, Estado de México (Mexico); Solís-Domínguez, F.A. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali 21280, Baja California Norte (Mexico); Cuevas-Díaz, M.C. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Coatzacoalcos 96535, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work was to assess the uptake of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) by wheat plants and its effect on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of individual and joint Cd{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 6+} levels. Seven-day assays were conducted using quartz sand as the plant growth substrate. The endpoints measured were seed germination, root and shoot lengths, and heavy metal accumulation. Magnetite exhibited very low toxicity, regardless of the wheat seedling NP uptake and distribution into roots and shoots. The seed germination and shoot length were not sensitive enough, while the root length was a more sensitive toxicity endpoint. The root length of wheat seedlings exposed to individual metals decreased by 50% at 2.67 mg Cd{sup 2+} kg{sup −1} and 5.53 mg Cr{sup 6+} kg{sup −1}. However, when magnetite NPs (1000 mg kg{sup −1}) were added, the root length of the plants increased by 25 and 50%. Cd{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 6+} showed similar and noninteractive joint action, but strongly impaired the wheat seedlings. In contrast, an interactive infra-additive or antagonistic effect was observed upon adding magnetite NPs. Thus, cadmium and chromium accumulation in vegetable tissues was considerately diminished and the toxicity alleviated. - Highlights: • We assessed the effect of nanomagnetite on heavy metal toxicity in wheat plants. • Citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) exerted very low toxicity to plants. • Cadmium was more toxic than chromium and toxicity was mitigated by magnetite NPs. • Cadmium and chromium had a similar and noninteractive joint action on plants. • Metals showed an interactive infra-additive joint effect by adding magnetite NPs.

  18. Trichloroethylene degradation by persulphate with magnetite as a heterogeneous activator in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaoxin; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide-magnetite (Fe3O4) as a heterogeneous activator to activate persulphate anions (S2O8(2-)) for trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation was investigated in this study. The experimental results showed that TCE could be completely oxidized within 5 h by using 5 g L(-1) magnetite and 63 mM S2O8(2-), indicating the effectiveness of the process for TCE removal. Various factors of the process, including. (S2O8(2-) and magnetite dosages, and initial solution pH, were evaluated, and TCE degradation fitted well to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The calculated kinetic rate constant was increased with increasing S2O8(2-) and magnetite dosages, but it was independent of solution pH. In addition, the changes of magnetite morphology examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, respectively, confirmed the slight corrosion with α-Fe2O3 coated on the magnetite surface. The probe compounds tests clearly identified the generation of the reactive oxygen species in the system. While the free radical quenching studies further demonstrated that •SO4- and •OH were the major radicals responsible for TCE degradation, whereas •O2- contributed less in the system, and therefore the roles of reactive oxygen species on TCE degradation mechanisms were proposed accordingly. To our best knowledge, this is the first time the performance and mechanism of magnetite-activated persulphate oxidation for TCE degradation are reported. The findings of this study provided a new insight into the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism and showed a great potential for the practical application of this technique in in situ TCE-contaminated groundwater remediation.

  19. Solubility of cobalt in primary circuit solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.; Joyer, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) was measured in PWR primary circuit conditions, in the temperature range 250-350 deg C, and the results were compared with the ones obtained on magnetite and nickel ferrite. As in the former cases, it was found that, in the prevailing primary circuit conditions, the solubility of the cobalt ferrite was minimum at temperatures around 300 deg C, for cobalt as well as for iron. The equilibrium iron concentration is significantly lower than in the case of magnetite. The results are discussed in relation with the POTHY code, based only on thermodynamic laws and data, used for the prediction of the primary circuit chemistry

  20. Iron and oxygen isotope signatures of the Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite deposits, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Tristan; Simon, Adam C.; Day, Warren C.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Bindeman, Ilya N.

    2016-01-01

    New O and Fe stable isotope ratios are reported for magnetite samples from high-grade massive magnetite of the Mesoproterozoic Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite ore deposits and these results are compared with data for other iron oxide-apatite deposits to shed light on the origin of the southeast Missouri deposits. The δ18O values of magnetite from Pea Ridge (n = 12) and Pilot Knob (n = 3) range from 1.0 to 7.0 and 3.3 to 6.7‰, respectively. The δ56Fe values of magnetite from Pea Ridge (n = 10) and Pilot Knob (n = 6) are 0.03 to 0.35 and 0.06 to 0.27‰, respectively. These δ18O and the δ56Fe values suggest that magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt (typical igneous δ56Fe ranges 0.06–0.49‰) and grew in equilibrium with a magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. We propose that the δ18O and δ56Fe data for the Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite deposits are consistent with the flotation model recently proposed by Knipping et al. (2015a), which invokes flotation of a magmatic magnetite-fluid suspension and offers a plausible explanation for the igneous (i.e., up to ~15.9 wt % TiO2 in magnetite) and hydrothermal features of the deposits.

  1. Removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions by the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Peng, E-mail: yuanpeng@gig.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu Dong; Fan Mingde; Yang Dan [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhu Runliang; Ge Fei [College of Chemical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Zhu Jianxi; He Hongping [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol methods, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the unsupported and supported magnetite nanoparticles are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the unsupported ones. The uptake of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The supported magnetite showed a better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite than unsupported magnetite, and was more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These results indicate that the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  2. Removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions by the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Fan, Mingde; Yang, Dan; Zhu, Runliang; Ge, Fei; Zhu, JianXi; He, Hongping

    2010-01-15

    Diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol methods, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the unsupported and supported magnetite nanoparticles are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the unsupported ones. The uptake of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The supported magnetite showed a better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite than unsupported magnetite, and was more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These results indicate that the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  3. The effect of nanocrystalline magnetite size on arsenic removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Mayo et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher environmental standards have made the removal of arsenic from water an important problem for environmental engineering. Iron oxide is a particularly interesting sorbent to consider for this application. Its magnetic properties allow relatively routine dispersal and recovery of the adsorbent into and from groundwater or industrial processing facilities; in addition, iron oxide has strong and specific interactions with both As(III and As(V. Finally, this material can be produced with nanoscale dimensions, which enhance both its capacity and removal. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential arsenic adsorption by nanoscale iron oxides, specifically magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We focus on the effect of Fe3O4 particle size on the adsorption and desorption behavior of As(III and As(V. The results show that the nanoparticle size has a dramatic effect on the adsorption and desorption of arsenic. As particle size is decreased from 300 to 12 nm the adsorption capacities for both As(III and As(V increase nearly 200 times. Interestingly, such an increase is more than expected from simple considerations of surface area and suggests that nanoscale iron oxide materials sorb arsenic through different means than bulk systems. The desorption process, however, exhibits some hysteresis with the effect becoming more pronounced with small nanoparticles. This hysteresis most likely results from a higher arsenic affinity for Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This work suggests that Fe3O4 nanocrystals and magnetic separations offer a promising method for arsenic removal.

  4. The White Nile as a source for Nile sediments: Assessment using U-Pb geochronology of detrital rutile and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'eri-Shlevin, Yaron; Avigad, Dov; Gerdes, Axel

    2018-04-01

    Basement terranes exposed at the headwaters of the White Nile include Archean-Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Congo Craton, whose northern sectors were severely reworked during Neoproterozoic orogeny. New U-Pb analyses of detrital rutile and monazite from early Quaternary to Recent coastal quartz sands of Israel, at the northeast extension of the Nile sedimentary system, yield mostly late Neoproterozoic ages, with a dominant peak at ca. 600 Ma. While derivation from the reworked sectors of the Craton cannot be negated, the absence of pre-Neoproterozoic rutile and monazite indicates that the detrital contribution from the Congo cratonic nuclei into the main Nile was insignificant. The near absence of White Nile basement-derived heavy minerals from the Nile sands arriving at the Eastern Mediterranean may be explained by a number of factors such as relatively minor erosion of the Cratonic basement nuclei during the Quaternary, late connection of the White Nile to the main Nile system with a possibility that northern segments connected prior to more southerly ones, and a long-term effective sediment blockage mechanism at the mouth of White Nile. Likewise, our previous study demonstrated that Nile sands display a detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf pattern consistent with significant recycling of NE African Paleozoic sediments. It is thus plausible that any detrital contribution from White Nile basement rocks was thoroughly diluted by eroded Paleozoic sediments, or their recycled products, which were likely the greatest sand reservoir in the region. This study adds to previous studies showing the advantage of a multi mineral U-Pb geochronology strategy in constraining sediment provenance patterns.

  5. Late Permian rivers draining the uplifted Cape Fold Belt: magnetostratigraphy and detrital thermochronology of Karoo Basin sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohver, E.; Schmieder, M.; Arosio, R.; Lanci, L.; Jourdan, F.; Wilson, A.; Ratcliffe, K.; Payenberg, T.; Flint, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Cape Fold Belt and Karoo Basin of southern Africa formed during the Permian orogeny that affected the 13,000 km southern margin of the Gondwanan continent. In this report, we synthesize new and recent magnetostratigraphic and geochronologic data to establish a chronostratigraphic framework for Karoo Basin sedimentation for comparison with the thermal/exhumation history of the Cape Fold Belt. The source-sink model is evaluated using new data from detrital muscovite and zircon from 2 km composite section of fluvial sandstone and mudstones deposited at ca.275 - 260 Ma. Coherent age populations of detrital zircon grains indicate rapid incorporation of contemporary volcanic ashbeds into the sedimentary record. In contrast, cooling age distributions of detrital muscovite are typically ca. 5 - 10 Ma older than the age of deposition; similar lag times are observed from modern sediments in active mountain belts. Trace element geochemical signatures demonstrate a clear shift towards crustal recycling via headland erosion in the Beaufort Group relative to the underlying Ecca Group. These observations pinpoint the age of uplift for the Cape Fold Belt, which began to function as the major sediment source for the foreland Karoo Basin with the deposition of the uppermost Ecca Group and basal Beaufort Group.

  6. Detrital microbial community development and phosphorus dynamics in a stream ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.E.; Elwood, J.W.; Sayler, G.S.

    1986-06-01

    Detrital microbial community development and phosphorus dynamics in a lotic system were investigated in non-recirculating laboratory streams contains leaf detritus. Temporal patterns of microbial colonization, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, indicate leaf species dependency and that bacteria were the first colonizers followed by fungi. An extensive glycocalyx layer developed. Phosphorus incorporation rates of both the whole community and intracellular components were determined by time-course measurements of /sup 33/PO/sub 4/ or /sup 32/PO/sub 4/. Phosphorus turnover rates were determined by a sequential double-labeling procedure using /sup 33/PO/sub 4/ and /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, in which the microbiota were labeled with /sup 33/P until in isotopic equilibrium, then /sup 32/P was added. The turnover rate was determined by time-course measurements of the ratio /sup 32/P to /sup 33/P. Snail grazing resulted in an increase in phosphorus metabolism per unit microbial biomass; however, per unit area of leaf surface no increase was observed. Grazing also caused a two-fold reduction in microbial biomass. The results indicate that microbiota associated with decomposing leaves slowly recycle phosphorus, are slowly growing, and have a low metabolic activity. The spiraling length is shortened by microbiota on a short-term basis; however, it may increase on a long-term basis due to hydrological transport of detritus downstream.

  7. Detrital zircon ages in Buller and Takaka terranes, New Zealand : constraints on early Zealandia history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, C.J.; Mortimer, N.; Campbell, H.J.; Griffin, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Detrital zircon ages are presented for 34 early Palaeozoic sandstones from Buller and Takaka terranes, New Zealand, and formerly adjacent parts of Australia-Antarctica. The Buller-Takaka datasets always have two major groups: Ordovician-late Neoproterozoic, 444-700 Ma (but mainly 540-700 Ma), termed 'Gondwana Assembly' (GA), and early Neoproterozoic-Mesoproterozoic, 700-1600 Ma (but mainly 900-1200 Ma), termed 'Rodinia Assembly' (RA). In both terranes, significant age components within these groups are strikingly similar and also have RA/GA ratios, 0.6-1.8. The Cambrian volcanic arc of the Takaka Terrane has contributed little to the zircon patterns. Proportions of Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician zircons, characteristic of granitoid sources in the Ross-Delamerian Orogen are low. The zircons are predominantly reworked with contemporary zircons only evident in a few Buller datasets. The zircon patterns suggest that two major sources (late Mesoproterozoic and late Neoproterozoic), enduring over 120 Ma, were widely distributed and it is postulated they form Precambrian basement beneath southern Zealandia. (author).

  8. Detrital microbial community development and phosphorus dynamics in a stream ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R.E.; Elwood, J.W.; Sayler, G.S.

    1986-06-01

    Detrital microbial community development and phosphorus dynamics in a lotic system were investigated in non-recirculating laboratory streams contains leaf detritus. Temporal patterns of microbial colonization, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, indicate leaf species dependency and that bacteria were the first colonizers followed by fungi. An extensive glycocalyx layer developed. Phosphorus incorporation rates of both the whole community and intracellular components were determined by time-course measurements of 33 PO 4 or 32 PO 4 . Phosphorus turnover rates were determined by a sequential double-labeling procedure using 33 PO 4 and 32 PO 4 , in which the microbiota were labeled with 33 P until in isotopic equilibrium, then 32 P was added. The turnover rate was determined by time-course measurements of the ratio 32 P to 33 P. Snail grazing resulted in an increase in phosphorus metabolism per unit microbial biomass; however, per unit area of leaf surface no increase was observed. Grazing also caused a two-fold reduction in microbial biomass. The results indicate that microbiota associated with decomposing leaves slowly recycle phosphorus, are slowly growing, and have a low metabolic activity. The spiraling length is shortened by microbiota on a short-term basis; however, it may increase on a long-term basis due to hydrological transport of detritus downstream

  9. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  10. Novel environmentally friendly synthesis of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles using mechanochemical effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Kosaka, Kazunori; Watano, Satoru; Yanagida, Takeshi; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for synthesizing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles in water system via coprecipitation under an environmentally friendly condition has been developed. In this method, an almost neutral suspension containing ferrous hydroxide and goethite is used as the starting suspension and subjected to a ball-milling treatment. The product was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The mechanochemical effect generated by the ball-milling treatment promoted the reaction between ferrous hydroxide and goethite even at room temperature, resulting in the formation of homogeneous magnetite nanoparticles. Simultaneously, it also contributed to crystallize the formed magnetite nanoparticles while inhibiting the particle growth. This resulted in the formation of ultrafine magnetite nanoparticles of about 10 nm having a single crystal structure. This method could provide ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetism under the moderate condition without neither heating nor any additives such as surfactant and organic solvent.

  11. Nanocrystalline magnetite thin films grown by dual ion-beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, Pilar; Ruiz, Patricia; Ferrer, Isabel J.; Figuera, Juan de la; Marco, José F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We have grown tensile and compressive strained nanocrystalline magnetite thin films by dual ion beam sputtering. • The magnetic and thermoelectric properties can be controlled by the deposition conditions. • The magnetic anisotropy depends on the crystalline grain size. • The thermoelectric properties depend on the type of strain induced in the films. • In plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy develops in magnetite thin films with grain sizes ⩽20 nm. - Abstract: We have explored the influence of an ion-assisted beam in the thermoelectric and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline magnetite thin films grown by ion-beam sputtering. The microstructure has been investigated by XRD. Tensile and compressive strained thin films have been obtained as a function of the parameters of the ion-assisted beam. The evolution of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy was attributed to crystalline grain size. In some films, magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements reveal the existence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy induced by the deposition process related with a small grain size (⩽20 nm). Isotropic magnetic properties have observed in nanocrystalline magnetite thin film having larger grain sizes. The largest power factor of all the films prepared (0.47 μW/K 2 cm), obtained from a Seebeck coefficient of −80 μV/K and an electrical resistivity of 13 mΩ cm, is obtained in a nanocrystalline magnetite thin film with an expanded out-of-plane lattice and with a grain size ≈30 nm

  12. Doping of magnetite nanoparticles facilitates clean harvesting of diatom oil as biofuel for sustainable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Ramesh; Thakur, Shipra; Ballabh Joshi, Khashti; Vinayak, Vandana

    2018-04-01

    Photosynthetic unicellular brown algae diatoms are considered as photobioreactors (PBRs) that synthesize and store oil in the form of lipid droplets and the much of the crude oil we use comes from fossil diatoms. The clean extraction of this crude oil from diatoms is difficult task. The construction of green chemical protocols for the clean separation of diatom oil from cells without killing or to harm the diatom cells is still in its primitive stage. In this report we would like to propose that facile doping of magnetite on diatoms can be used for clean oil separation in PBRs. We doped magnetite nanoparticles onto the surface of diatom Diadesmis confervaceae a diatom which oozes oil naturally. Doping magnetite onto diatoms can also facilitate easy separation of oil when cells are kept in an electromagnetic field. The cell wall of diatom besides having SiOH group has 281 amino acids of which 187–188 amino acids are conserved and are known for metal binding sites. The magnetite nanoparticles bind to the SiOH groups and metal binding sites of amino acids. The presence of appropriate amine functionalized linkers forming peptide aminosilane shells can further facilitate the binding of peptide/polypeptides which can be used in drug delivery. Besides this the magnetite doped diatoms have wide applications in removal of phosphates and chromium from waste water too.

  13. Mineralogy and electron microprobe studies of magnetite in the Sarab-3 iron Ore deposit, southwest of the Shahrak mining region (east Takab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2018-04-01

    intruded into host rocks. Skarnification occurred at the two stages of progressive and regressive. At the progressive stage, the reaction of fluids and host rocks turned to the formation of anhydrous calc-silicate minerals such as garnet and clinopyroxene. At the regressive stage with the change of physicochemical conditions like decreasing temperature, these minerals converted to hydrous silicates (tremolite-actinolite, epidote and phyllosilcates (chlorite, serpentine, talk, and phlogopite. Also, minerals such as oxides (magnetite and hematite, sulfides (pyrite and chalcopyrite and calcite were formed. At a late stage, with activations of fluids, quartz-calcite mineralized veins formed. At the supergene stage, the oxidation process leads to the formation of alteration minerals from the main mineralization. Although there are magnesian minerals in the skarn, its main composition is calcic. The shape of the deposit is lentoid to horizontal and in some places bed formed along with some alteration halos. The ore minerals include low Ti-magnetite (with an average of 0.02 wt % Ti, hematite and sulfide minerals such as pyrite, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite. Magnetite is the most important mineral with disseminated, vein, open-space filling, aggregate, accumulation, island and cataclastic textures. The magnetite at Sarab-3 is generated in 2 stages: At the first stage, magnetite has mass to mosaic textures that indicate the first phase of deposition in the area and at the second stage magnetite is gray magnetites that are placed as narrow bands around hematite or on the primary magnetite. Hematite in the area is formed either as hypogene hematite with plate or blade texture that is formed before the formation of early magnetite or supergene hematite that itself is formed due to alteration and weathering of magnetite in the superficial and shallow part of the deposit. In the surface area of the deposit, ore minerals are strongly altered to mixtures of oxide and hydroxide minerals

  14. Ion-probe U–Pb dating of authigenic and detrital opal from Neogene-Quaternary alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid; Paces, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Knowing depositional ages of alluvial fans is essential for many tectonic, paleoclimatic, and geomorphic studies in arid environments. The use of U–Pb dating on secondary silica to establish the age of Neogene-Quaternary clastic sediments was tested on samples of authigenic and detrital opal and chalcedony from depths of ∼25 to 53 m in boreholes at Midway Valley, Nevada. Dating of authigenic opal present as rinds on rock clasts and in calcite/silica cements establishes minimum ages of alluvium deposition; dating of detrital opal or chalcedony derived from the source volcanic rocks gives the maximum age of sediment deposition.Materials analyzed included 12 samples of authigenic opal, one sample of fracture-coating opal from bedrock, one sample of detrital opal, and two samples of detrital chalcedony. Uranium–lead isotope data were obtained by both thermal ionization mass spectrometry and ion-microprobe. Uranium concentrations ranged from tens to hundreds of μg/g. Relatively large U/Pb allowed calculation of 206Pb/238U ages that ranged from 1.64±0.36 (2σ) to 6.16±0.50 Ma for authigenic opal and from 8.34±0.28 to 11.2±1.3 Ma for detrital opal/chalcedony. Three samples with the most radiogenic Pb isotope compositions also allowed calculation of 207Pb/235U ages, which were concordant with 206Pb/238U ages from the same samples.These results indicate that basin development at Midway Valley was initiated between about 8 and 6 Ma, and that the basin was filled at long-term average deposition rates of less than 1 cm/ka. Because alluvium in Midway Valley was derived from adjacent highlands at Yucca Mountain, the low rates of deposition determined in this study may imply a slow rate of erosion of Yucca Mountain. Volcanic strata underlying the basin are offset by a number of buried faults to a greater degree than the relatively smooth-sloping bedrock/alluvium contact. These geologic relations indicate that movement on most faults ceased prior to erosional

  15. Chemical and thermal stability of core-shelled magnetite nanoparticles and solid silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sikora, Pawel; Zielinska, Beata; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    Pristine nanoparticles of magnetite were coated by solid silica shell forming core/shell structure. 20 nm thick silica coating significantly enhanced the chemical and thermal stability of the iron oxide. Chemical and thermal stability of this structure has been compared to the magnetite coated by mesoporous shell and pristine magnetite nanoparticles. It is assumed that six-membered silica rings in a solid silica shell limit the rate of oxygen diffusion during thermal treatment in air and prevent the access of HCl molecules to the core during chemical etching. Therefore, the core/shell structure with a solid shell requires a longer time to induce the oxidation of iron oxide to a higher oxidation state and, basically, even strong concentrated acid such as HCl is not able to dissolve it totally in one month. This leads to the desired performance of the material in potential applications such as catalysis and environmental protection.

  16. Study on the pelletizing of sulfate residue with magnetite concentrate in grate-kiln system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Y.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment on the feasibility of pelletizing with magnetite concentrate and the wasted sulfate residue was carried out, to research the performance of pellet in grate-kiln system and simulate the grate-kiln pelletizing process in the micro-pellet roasting simulation system in laboratory, and the process experiments on preheating and roasting sections were conducted. The results show that in order to obtain pellet with good performance and the magnetite concentrate should be over 20 in mass percent, the suitable pelletizing time is about 10 min and moisture is around 12.5%. Also, according to the process parameters of drying and preheating sections obtained from experiment, it will be successful to use magnetite concentrate and the wasted sulfate residue for pelletizing, which exploits a new way for the use of sulfate residue.

  17. Reduction of Magnetite in the Presence of Activated Carbon Using Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledwaba Harry Moloto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction behaviour of magnetite using graphite under ball-milling conditions (using a planetary mono mill, Fritsch Pulverisette 6 has been investigated. The reaction of magnetite and graphite at different milling conditions leads to the formation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ species, the former increasing at the expense of Fe3O4. Fe3O4 completely disappeared after a ball to powder ratio of 50 : 1 and beyond. The Fe2+ species were confirmed to be due to FeO using Mössbauer Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses confirm the reduction of magnetite to wüstite.

  18. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh.kumar@juit.ac.in [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, District Solan (H.P.)- 173 234 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R{sup 2} = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification.

  19. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R 2 = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification

  20. Hybrid Organometallic-Inorganic Nanomaterial: Acetyl Ferrocene Schiff base Immobilized on Silica Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Masteri-Farahani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In  this  work,  a  new  hybrid  organometallic-inorganic  hybrid nanomaterial was prepared by immobilization of acetyl ferrocene on the  surface  of magnetite  nanoparticles. Covalent  grafting of silica coated magnetite nanoparticles (SCMNPs with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane gave aminopropyl-modified magnetite nanoparticles (AmpSCMNPs. Then, Schiff base condensation  of AmpSCMNPs with acetyl  ferrocene resulted in the preparation of acferro-SCMNPs hybrid nanomaterial. Characterization of the prepared nanomaterial was performed with different physicochemical methods such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. VSM analysis showed superparamagnetic properties of the prepared nanomaterial and TEM and SEM analyses indicated the relatively spherical nanoparticles with 15 nm average size.

  1. Galvanic Corrosion between Alloy 690 and Magnetite in Alkaline Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hyeok Jeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 coupled with magnetite has been investigated in an alkaline solution at 30 °C and 60 °C using a potentiodynamic polarization method and a zero resistance ammeter. The positive current values were recorded in the galvanic couple and the corrosion potential of Alloy 690 was relatively lower. These results indicate that Alloy 690 behaves as the anode of the pair. The galvanic coupling between Alloy 690 and magnetite increased the corrosion rate of Alloy 690. The temperature increase led to an increase in the extent of galvanic effect and a decrease in the stability of passive film. Galvanic effect between Alloy 690 and magnetite is proposed as an additional factor accelerating the corrosion rate of Alloy 690 steam generator tubing in secondary water.

  2. Bench-scale testing of a micronized magnetite, fine-coal cleaning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suardini, P.J. [Custom Coals, International, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Custom Coals, International has installed and is presently testing a 500 lb/hr. micronized-magnetite, fine-coal cleaning circuit at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). The cost-shared project was awarded as part of the Coal Preparation Program`s, High Efficiency Preparation Subprogram. The project includes design, construction, testing, and decommissioning of a fully-integrated, bench-scale circuit, complete with feed coal classification to remove the minus 30 micron slimes, dense medium cycloning of the 300 by 30 micron feed coal using a nominal minus 10 micron size magnetite medium, and medium recovery using drain and rinse screens and various stages and types of magnetic separators. This paper describes the project circuit and goals, including a description of the current project status and the sources of coal and magnetite which are being tested.

  3. CIRCUMSTELLAR MAGNETITE FROM THE LAP 031117 CO3.0 CHONDRITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zega, Thomas J. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Haenecour, Pierre; Floss, Christine [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1105, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Stroud, Rhonda M., E-mail: tzega@lpl.arizona.edu [Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6366, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave, SW Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We report the first microstructural confirmation of circumstellar magnetite, identified in a petrographic thin section of the LaPaz Icefield 031117 CO3.0 chondrite. The O-isotopic composition of the grain indicates an origin in a low-mass (∼2.2 M{sub ⊙}), approximately solar metallicity red/asymptotic giant branch (RGB/AGB) star undergoing first dredge-up. The magnetite is a single crystal measuring 750 × 670 nm, is free of defects, and is stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. We hypothesize that the magnetite formed via oxidation of previously condensed Fe dust within the circumstellar envelope of its progenitor star. Using an empirically derived rate constant for this reaction, we calculate that such oxidation could have occurred over timescales ranging from approximately ∼9000–500,000 years. This timescale is within the lifetime of estimates for dust condensation within RGB/AGB stars.

  4. Sustained release of doxorubicin from zeolite-magnetite nanocomposites prepared by mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruebo, Manuel; Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Irusta, Silvia; Arbiol, Jordi; Ibarra, M Ricardo; SantamarIa, Jesus

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of magnetite and FAU zeolite with a high surface area and adsorption capacity have been prepared by mechanical activation using high-energy milling at room temperature. FTIR results, as well as HRTEM, EFTEM, and XPS measurements, show that the resulting magnetic nanoparticles are covered by a thin aluminosilicate coating. A saturation magnetization as high as 16 emu g -1 and 94.2 Oe of coercivity were observed for the obtained composites. The main advantages of this synthesis procedure are (i) simplicity of the preparation procedure (ii) prevention of agglomeration of the magnetite nanoparticles to a large extent, and (iii) absence of free magnetite outside the zeolitic matrix. In addition, in vitro experiments revealed that the nanoparticles prepared were able to store and release substantial amounts of doxorubicin. In view of these advantages, these magnetic nanoparticles can be considered as potential candidates for drug-delivery applications

  5. pH-responsive poly(aspartic acid) hydrogel-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Chacón, Jaime; Arbeláez, María Isabel Amaya; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Marques, Rodrigo Fernando C; Jafelicci, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    A novel multifunctional nanosystem formed by magnetite nanoparticles coated with pH-responsive poly(aspartic acid) hydrogel was developed. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 ) have been intensively investigated for biomedical applications due to their magnetic properties and dimensions similar to the biostructures. Poly(aspartic acid) is a water-soluble, biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, which features makes it a potential candidate for biomedical applications. The nanoparticles surface modification was carried out by crosslinking polysuccinimide on the magnetite nanoparticles surface and hydrolyzing the succinimide units in mild alkaline medium to obtain the magnetic poly(aspartic acid) hydrogel. The surface modification in each step was confirmed by DRIFTS, TEM and zeta potential measurements. The hydrodynamic diameter of the nanosystems decreases as the pH value decreases. The nanosystems showed high colloidal stability in water and no cytotoxicity was detected, which make these nanosystems suitable for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Progress in the synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles with amino groups on the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdureanu-Angheluta, A.; Dascalu, A.; Fifere, A.; Coroaba, A.; Pricop, L.; Chiriac, H.; Tura, V.; Pinteala, M.; Simionescu, B. C.

    2012-05-01

    This manuscript deals with the synthesis of new hydrophilic magnetite particles by employing a two-step method: in the first step magnetite particles with hydrophobic shell formed in presence of oleic acid-oleylamine complex through a synthesis in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle were obtained; while in the second step the hydrophobic shell was interchanged with an aminosilane monomer. The influence of the Fe2+/Fe3+ molar ratio on the dimension of the particles of high importance for their potential applications was carefully investigated. This paper, also presents an alternative method of synthesis of new core-shell magnetite particles and the complete study of their structure and morphology by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, ESEM and TEM techniques. The rheological properties and magnetization analysis of high importance for magnetic particles were also investigated.

  7. Nanoengineering of methylene blue loaded silica encapsulated magnetite nanospheres and nanocapsules for photodynamic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andhariya, Nidhi [Bhavnagar University, Department of Physics (India); Chudasama, Bhupendra, E-mail: bnchudasama@gmail.com [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science (India); Mehta, R. V. [Bhavnagar University, Department of Physics (India); Upadhyay, R. V. [Charotar University of Science and Technology, P.D. Patel Institute of Applied Sciences (India)

    2011-09-15

    Core-shell nanostructures have emerged as an important class of functional materials with potential applications in diverse fields, especially in health sciences. In this article, nanoengineering of novel magnetic colloidal dispersion containing surface modifiable silica with a core of single domain magnetite nanoparticles loaded with photosensitizer (PS) drug 'Methylene blue' (MB) has been described. Magnetite core is produced by the well-established chemical coprecipitation technique and silica shell is formed over it by the modified hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS (tetraethyl orthosilicate). Conditions for reaction kinetics have been established to tailor the core-shell structures in the form of nanospheres and nanocapsules. MB is loaded into the nanostructures by demethylation reaction. The major conclusion drawn from this study is that the synthesis route yields stable, non-aggregated MB loaded superparamagnetic magnetite-silica nanostructures with tailored morphology, tunable loading, and excellent magnetic properties.

  8. Decreasing Ni, Cu, Cd, and Zn heavy metal magnetite-bentonite nanocomposites and adsorption isotherm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, M.; Zakeri Khatir, M.; Khodadadi Darban, A.; Meshkini, M.

    2018-04-01

    This present study was conducted to investigate the effect of magnetite-bentonite nanocomposite on heavy metal removal from an effluent. For this purpose, magnetite-bentonite nanocomposite was prepared through the chemical method and characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, followed by studying the effect of produced nanocomposite on the removal of Ni2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ heavy metal ions. The results showed that adsorption capacity of magnetite-bentonite nanocomposites for the studied ions is in the order of Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Cu2+ > Ni2+. Adsorption isotherms were drawn for Ni2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ cations and found that cations adsorption on nanocomposite fit into Langmuir model.

  9. Particle characteristics and reduction behavior of synthetic magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadan, Wegdan [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21511 (Egypt); Zaki, Mohamed I., E-mail: mizaki@link.net [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, El-Minia 61519 (Egypt); Fouad, Nasr E.; Mekhemer, Gamal A.H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, El-Minia 61519 (Egypt)

    2014-04-15

    Two samples (S1 and S2) of magnetite were synthesized, using two different methods, and characterized by means of X-ray powder diffractometry, infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorptiometry and electron microscopy. Particles of sample-S1 were found to be loosely agglomerated, micro-sized spheroids (200–350 nm) composed almost solely of highly aggregated (fused) crystallites (size averaged at 35 nm) of cubic-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. In contrast, particles of sample-S2 were strongly agglomerated, nano-sized spheroids (25–30 nm) composed of slightly aggregated crystallites (size averaged at 11 nm) of cubic-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and noncrystalline domains made-up of FeO(OH) species. Temperature-programed reduction (TPR) profiles obtained for the two samples were similar in monitoring two peaks at >450 °C assignable to a two-step reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (→FeO→Fe), but different in monitoring a peak at<450 °C only for the reduction of FeO(OH) (→Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) contained in sample-S2. However, curve fitting analysis of the TPR profiles and molecular stoichiometry calculations based on amounts of hydrogen consumed revealed that the two-step reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is not straightforward. That is by resolving two consecutive pathways for each step and, hence, nonstoichiometric intermediate products whose composition was found to be critically controlled by the composition of the reducing gas atmosphere (5 or 80% H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) and characteristics of the starting sample particles (chemical and phase composition, and, but to lesser extents, the agglomeration and average size). - Highlights: • Nano or micro, pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are H{sub 2}-reduced in two steps (→FeO→Fe) at >450 °C. • FeO(OH)-impure particles exhibit a third reduction step (FeO(OH)→Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at <450 °C. • FeO disproportion and related autocatalytic effects complicate the reduction course. • Consequently, each of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4

  10. Particle characteristics and reduction behavior of synthetic magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, Wegdan; Zaki, Mohamed I.; Fouad, Nasr E.; Mekhemer, Gamal A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Two samples (S1 and S2) of magnetite were synthesized, using two different methods, and characterized by means of X-ray powder diffractometry, infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy, N 2 sorptiometry and electron microscopy. Particles of sample-S1 were found to be loosely agglomerated, micro-sized spheroids (200–350 nm) composed almost solely of highly aggregated (fused) crystallites (size averaged at 35 nm) of cubic-Fe 3 O 4 . In contrast, particles of sample-S2 were strongly agglomerated, nano-sized spheroids (25–30 nm) composed of slightly aggregated crystallites (size averaged at 11 nm) of cubic-Fe 3 O 4 and noncrystalline domains made-up of FeO(OH) species. Temperature-programed reduction (TPR) profiles obtained for the two samples were similar in monitoring two peaks at >450 °C assignable to a two-step reduction of Fe 3 O 4 (→FeO→Fe), but different in monitoring a peak at 3 O 4 ) contained in sample-S2. However, curve fitting analysis of the TPR profiles and molecular stoichiometry calculations based on amounts of hydrogen consumed revealed that the two-step reduction of Fe 3 O 4 is not straightforward. That is by resolving two consecutive pathways for each step and, hence, nonstoichiometric intermediate products whose composition was found to be critically controlled by the composition of the reducing gas atmosphere (5 or 80% H 2 /N 2 ) and characteristics of the starting sample particles (chemical and phase composition, and, but to lesser extents, the agglomeration and average size). - Highlights: • Nano or micro, pure Fe 3 O 4 particles are H 2 -reduced in two steps (→FeO→Fe) at >450 °C. • FeO(OH)-impure particles exhibit a third reduction step (FeO(OH)→Fe 3 O 4 ) at 3 O 4 reduction steps resolves two consecutive pathways. • Moreover, various nonstoichiometric reduction intermediate products are genesized

  11. The effect of yttrium substitution on the magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozaffari, M.; Amighian, J.; Tavakoli, R.

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Y-substituted magnetite (Y x Fe 3–x O 4 ,with x=0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.40) nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal reduction route in the presence of citric acid. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and gradient field thermomagnetic measurement. The results showed that a minimum amount of citric acid is required to obtain single phase Y-substituted magnetite nanoparticles. Citric acid acts as a modulator and reducing agent in the formation of spinel structure and controls nanoparticle size and crystallinity. Mean crystallite sizes of the single-phase powders were estimated by Williamson–Hall method. Curie temperature measurement of the samples shows that as yttrium content increases, the Curie temperature decreases. Magnetic measurements show that the saturation magnetization of the samples decreases as x increases up to 0.15 and then increases to x=0.20 and finally decreases again for x=0.40. - Highlights: • Single phase yttrium substituted magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. • Citric acid plays a key role in reduction of Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ , which is necessary for the formation of magnetite phase. • It is possible to substitute yttrium ions for iron ones as high as x=0.4 by hydrothermal reduction route. • Pure magnetite nanoparticles prepared by this route has a high saturation magnetization. • Yttrium substituted magnetite nanoparticles are superparamagnet at room temperature

  12. Magnetite production and transformation in the methanogenic consortia from coastal riverine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiling; Wang, Bingchen; Liu, Fanghua; Wang, Oumei

    2017-11-01

    Minerals that contain ferric iron, such as amorphous Fe(III) oxides (A), can inhibit methanogenesis by competitively accepting electrons. In contrast, ferric iron reduced products, such as magnetite (M), can function as electrical conductors to stimulate methanogenesis, however, the processes and effects of magnetite production and transformation in the methanogenic consortia are not yet known. Here we compare the effects on methanogenesis of amorphous Fe (III) oxides (A) and magnetite (M) with ethanol as the electron donor. RNA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism with a clone library was used to analyse both bacterial and archaeal communities. Iron (III)-reducing bacteria including Geobacteraceae and methanogens such as Methanosarcina were enriched in iron oxide-supplemented enrichment cultures for two generations with ethanol as the electron donor. The enrichment cultures with A and non-Fe (N) dominated by the active bacteria belong to Veillonellaceae, and archaea belong to Methanoregulaceae and Methanobacteriaceae, Methanosarcinaceae (Methanosarcina mazei), respectively. While the enrichment cultures with M, dominated by the archaea belong to Methanosarcinaceae (Methanosarcina barkeri). The results also showed that methanogenesis was accelerated in the transferred cultures with ethanol as the electron donor during magnetite production from A reduction. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that magnetite was generated from microbial reduction of A and M was transformed into siderite and vivianite with ethanol as the electron donor. Our data showed the processes and effects of magnetite production and transformation in the methanogenic consortia, suggesting that significantly different effects of iron minerals on microbial methanogenesis in the iron-rich coastal riverine environment were present.

  13. Signatures in magnetites formed by (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 thermal decomposition: Terrestrial and extraterrestrial implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lauer, Howard V.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2012-06-01

    It has never been demonstrated whether magnetite synthesized through the heat-dependent decomposition of carbonate precursors retains the chemical and structural features of the carbonates. In this study, synthetic (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 was thermally decomposed by heating from 25 to 700 °C under 1 atm CO2, and by in situ exposure under vacuum to the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope. In both cases, the decomposition of the carbonate was topotactic and resulted in porous pseudomorphs composed of oriented aggregates of magnetite nanocrystals. Both calcium and magnesium were incorporated into nanophase magnetite, forming (Ca,Mg)-magnetites and (Ca,Mg)-ferrites when these elements were present in the parent material, thus preserving the chemical signature of the precursor. These results show that magnetites synthesized in this way acquire a chemical and structural inheritance from their carbonate precursor that indicates how they were produced. These results are not only important in the determination of the origin of chemically-impure, oriented nanophase magnetite crystals in general, but they also provide important insights into the origin of the large, euhedral, chemically-pure, [111]-elongated magnetites found within Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Based on our experimental results, the chemically-pure magnetites within ALH84001 cannot be genetically related to the Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonate matrix within which they are embedded, and an alternative explanation for their occurrence is warranted.

  14. Arsenate and Arsenite Sorption on Magnetite: Relations to Groundwater Arsenic Treatment Using Zerovalent Iron and Natural Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a zerovalent iron corrosion product; it is also formed in natural soil and sediment. Sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on magnetite is an important process of arsenic removal from groundwater using zerovalent iron-based permeable reactive ba...

  15. Magnetite synthesis from ferrous iron solution at pH 6.8 in a continuous stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mos, Yvonne M; Zorzano, Karin Bertens; Buisman, Cees J N; Weijma, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Partial oxidation of defined Fe 2+ solutions is a well-known method for magnetite synthesis in batch systems. The partial oxidation method could serve as basis for an iron removal process in drinking water production, yielding magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) as a compact and valuable product. As a first step toward such a process, a series of experiments was carried out, in which magnetite was synthesized from an Fe 2+ solution in a 2 L continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at atmospheric pressure and 32 °C. In four experiments, elevating the pH from an initial value of 5.5 or 6.0 to a final value of 6.8, 7.0 or 7.5 caused green rust to form, eventually leading to magnetite. Formation of NH 4 + in the reactor indicated that NO 3 - and subsequently NO 2 - served as the oxidant. However, mass flow analysis revealed an influx of O 2 to the reactor. In a subsequent experiment, magnetite formation was achieved in the absence of added nitrate. In another experiment, seeding with magnetite particles led to additional magnetite precipitation without the need for a pH elevation step. Our results show, for the first time, that continuous magnetite formation from an Fe 2+ solution is possible under mild conditions, without the need for extensive addition of chemicals.

  16. Magnetite Compensates for the Lack of a Pilin-Associated c-Type Cytochrome in Extracellular Electron Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    investigation revealed that magnetite attached to the electrically conductive pili of Geobacter species in a manner reminiscent of the association of the multi-heme c-type cytochrome OmcS with the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Magnetite conferred extracellular electron capabilities on an Omc...

  17. High stable suspension of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol by using sono-synthesized nanomagnetite in polyol medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastami, Tahereh Rohani; Entezari, Mohammad H.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out in EG without any surfactant. • The nanoparticles with sizes ∼24 nm were composed of small building blocks with sizes ∼2 nm. • The hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles were stable in ethanol even after 8 months. • Ultrasonic intensity showed a crucial role on the obtained high stable magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol. - Abstract: The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out at relatively low temperature (80 °C) in ethylene glycol (EG) as a polyol solvent. The particle size was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 24 nm were composed of small building blocks with an average size of 2–3 nm and the particles exhibited nearly spherical shape. The surface characterization was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The stability of magnetite nanoparticles was studied in ethanol as a polar solvent. The nanoparticles showed an enhanced stability in ethanol which is due to the hydrophilic surface of the particles. The colloidal stability of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol was monitored by UV–visible spectrophotometer. According to the results, the nanoparticles synthesized in 30 min of sonication with intensity of 35 W/cm 2 (50%) led to a maximum stability in ethanol as a polar solvent with respect to the other applied intensities. The obtained magnetite nanoparticles were stable for more than12 months

  18. Influence of Surface Roughness and Agitation on the Morphology of Magnetite Films Electrodeposited on Carbon Steel Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hyeok Jeon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the effects of surface roughness and agitation on the morphology of magnetite films electrodeposited from alkaline Fe(III-triethanolamine (TEA solutions on carbon steel substrates. The surface roughness of the carbon steel substrates was maintained in the range of 1.64–0.06 μm by using mechanical grinding and polishing methods. The agitation speed was set at 0 and 900 rpm during the electrodeposition process. The particle size and surface roughness value of the magnetite films gradually decreased with decreasing substrate roughness. However, the influence of the substrate roughness on the thickness of the magnetite film was negligible. The morphology of the magnetite film fabricated at 900 rpm appeared to be highly faceted compared to that of the magnetite film produced at 0 rpm. The thickness and surface roughness of the magnetite film significantly increased with the agitation speed, which also significantly affected the electrodeposition efficiency. The effects of substrate surface roughness and agitation on the morphology of magnetite films electrodeposited on carbon steel substrates were also discussed. The obtained results provide critical information for the simulation of magnetite deposits on carbon steel pipes in the secondary systems of nuclear power plants.

  19. Fabrication of magnetite-based core–shell coated nanoparticles with antibacterial properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grumezescu, A M; Ficai, A; Vasile, O R; Cristescu, R; Dorcioman, G; Socol, G; Mihailescu, I N; Chifiriuc, M C; Mihaiescu, D E; Enculescu, M; Chrisey, D B

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of biofunctionalized magnetite core/sodium lauryl sulfate shell/antibiotic adsorption-shell nanoparticles assembled thin coatings by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for antibacterial drug-targeted delivery. Magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized and subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The obtained thin coatings have been investigated by FTIR and scanning electron microscope, and tested by in vitro biological assays, for their influence on in vitro bacterial biofilm development and cytotoxicity on human epidermoid carcinoma (HEp2) cells. (paper)

  20. Formation of magnetite nanoparticles at low temperature: from superparamagnetic to stable single domain particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Baumgartner

    Full Text Available The room temperature co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric iron under alkaline conditions typically yields superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles below a size of 20 nm. We show that at pH  =  9 this method can be tuned to grow larger particles with single stable domain magnetic (> 20-30 nm or even multi-domain behavior (> 80 nm. The crystal growth kinetics resembles surprisingly observations of magnetite crystal formation in magnetotactic bacteria. The physicochemical parameters required for mineralization in these organisms are unknown, therefore this study provides insight into which conditions could possibly prevail in the biomineralizing vesicle compartments (magnetosomes of these bacteria.

  1. Physical and arsenic adsorption properties of maghemite and magnetite sub-microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Santillan, M. E.; Pariona, N.; Bravo-C., J.; Herrera-Trejo, M.; Montejo-Alvaro, F.; Zarate, A.; Perry, D. L.; Mtz-Enriquez, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The topotactic transformation from magnetite to maghemite sub-microparticles was demonstrated by a variety of techniques that include X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and vis-NIR diffuse reflectance. The physical, chemical, and morphological properties of the particles were correlated with their adsorptive properties in water with respect to arsenic (V). The adsorptive properties of the iron oxide are increased by changing the crystal phases involved, specifically, the transformation of magnetite to maghemite. Maghemite sub-microparticles are capable of efficiently decreasing the arsenic content in water from 100 ppb to below the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline of 10 ppb.

  2. Influence of Na doping on the magnetic relaxation processes of magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, C.; Arias, A. Gonzalez; Hisatake, K.; Francisco, C. de; Hernandez-Gomez, P.; Kim, C.O.; Kim, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation of the initial magnetic permeability was measured in polycrystalline Na-doped magnetite samples, with nominal composition Na x Fe 3- x O 4 (x ranging from 0 to 0.05), by means of the magnetic disaccommodation (DA) technique. We found that the increasing amount of Na ions modifies the DA spectra and a very different behaviour depending on the sintering atmosphere. These results were discussed in terms of the presence of Na ions in the magnetite lattice, giving rise to certain modifications in their neighbourhood

  3. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of detrital zircons in metamorphic rocks from northern Kyushu, western Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu; Yokoyama, Kazumi; Terada, Kentaro; Sano, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    Radiometric ages of detrital zircons in psammitic schists from the Nagasaki, Kurume, Konoha and Kiyama areas, northern Kyushu, were obtained from 238 U/ 206 Pb ratio and isotopic compositions of Pb using a Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP II). Zircons from the Nagasaki, Kurume and Konoha areas show bimodal age distribution with peaks at ca. 1900 Ma and 250 Ma. It is suggested from this study that the older zircons were derived from Proterozoic landmass and the Korean Peninsula. Zircons from the Kiyama metamorphic rock show a different pattern with ages concentrated at 380-590 Ma. Such zircons are rare in rock samples from the Nagasaki, Kurume and Konoha areas, indicating that Kiyama rocks and a different origin than those from the other three areas. The youngest zircons from the Kiyama, Nagasaki, Kurume and Konoha areas show ages of 382±23 Ma, 238±13 Ma, 249±13 Ma, and 175±4 Ma, respectively, These data mark the upper age limit of their deposition. Since a continuous igneous activity occurred during the period from 300 to 170 Ma in Far East Asia, and the metamorphic age has been close to the zircon age of each area, these youngest ages for the Nagasaki, Kurume and Konoha areas are considered nearly contemporary to the depositional ages. An evaluation of the nature of metamorphism and available ages suggest the possibility that the Nagasaki metamorphic rocks as well as the schist from the Kurume area belong to the Suo zone of the Sangun belt, whereas the metamorphic rocks in the Konoha area may belong to the Ryoke belt or Suo zone of the Sangun belt. (author)

  4. Detrital phosphorus as a proxy of flooding events in the Changjiang River Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Jia [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Qingdao 266100 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Yao, Peng, E-mail: yaopeng@mail.ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Qingdao 266100 (China); Qingdao Collaborative Innovation Center of Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266100 (China); Institute of Marine Organic Geochemistry, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Bianchi, Thomas S. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Li, Dong; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Bochao [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Qingdao 266100 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Yu, Zhigang [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Qingdao 266100 (China); Institute of Marine Organic Geochemistry, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-06-01

    In this study, sediment grain size (MGS), specific surface area (SSA), total organic carbon (TOC) contents, C/N molar ratios, stable carbon isotope, and P species in a sediment core, collected from the East China Sea (ECS) inner-shelf were measured to explore the applicability of detrital phosphorus (De-P) as a potential indicator of past flooding events in the Changjiang River Basin (CRB). In particular, we examined the linkages between the evolution of floods with regional climate changes and anthropogenic activities in the CRB. Peaks of De-P concentrations in sediments corresponded well with the worst flooding events of the CRB over the past two centuries (e.g., 1850s, 1860s, 1900s, 1920s, 1950s, 1980s, and 2000s). Moreover, De-P also corresponded well with the extreme hypoxic events in 1981 and 1998 in the Changjiang Estuary as indicated by Mo/Al ratios, indicating potential linkages between De-P as a flooding proxy to flood-induced hypoxia events in this region. In addition, a robust relationship was found among De-P, the floods in 1950s, 1980s, and 2000s of the CRB, the intensive El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the abnormally weak East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) and the warm phase of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), suggesting that De-P also provided insights to linkages between regional climate change and flooding events in this region. - Highlights: • De-P was used to track past floods in the Changjiang River Basin (CRB). • De-P may serve as a proxy for flood-induced hypoxia events in the Changjiang Estuary. • De-P may be a proxy for examining linkages between floods and climatic drivers.

  5. Detrital phosphorus as a proxy of flooding events in the Changjiang River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Jia; Yao, Peng; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Li, Dong; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Bochao; Yu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, sediment grain size (MGS), specific surface area (SSA), total organic carbon (TOC) contents, C/N molar ratios, stable carbon isotope, and P species in a sediment core, collected from the East China Sea (ECS) inner-shelf were measured to explore the applicability of detrital phosphorus (De-P) as a potential indicator of past flooding events in the Changjiang River Basin (CRB). In particular, we examined the linkages between the evolution of floods with regional climate changes and anthropogenic activities in the CRB. Peaks of De-P concentrations in sediments corresponded well with the worst flooding events of the CRB over the past two centuries (e.g., 1850s, 1860s, 1900s, 1920s, 1950s, 1980s, and 2000s). Moreover, De-P also corresponded well with the extreme hypoxic events in 1981 and 1998 in the Changjiang Estuary as indicated by Mo/Al ratios, indicating potential linkages between De-P as a flooding proxy to flood-induced hypoxia events in this region. In addition, a robust relationship was found among De-P, the floods in 1950s, 1980s, and 2000s of the CRB, the intensive El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the abnormally weak East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) and the warm phase of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), suggesting that De-P also provided insights to linkages between regional climate change and flooding events in this region. - Highlights: • De-P was used to track past floods in the Changjiang River Basin (CRB). • De-P may serve as a proxy for flood-induced hypoxia events in the Changjiang Estuary. • De-P may be a proxy for examining linkages between floods and climatic drivers

  6. Incorporating detrital conditioning in outdoor microcosms dosed with JP-8 jet fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.A.; Markiewicz, A.; Harter, V.; Landis, W.G.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have developed an outdoor microcosm system that incorporates detrital conditioning to test the hypothesis that microbiota play a critical role in altering the community response to hydrocarbon toxicants. The microcosms were constructed using 568 L tanks, arranged in 6 units of 4 tanks, with each unit equidistant from a central conditions tank (CT). During pre-treatment, the microcosms and CT were filled with nutrient-amended well water, artificial sediment, leaf packs containing dried maple leaves, elodea fragment, and unglazed tiles for periphyton growth. Water circulation was maintained at the rate of 24 exchanges per day. After four weeks, invertebrates from local ponds were added to the CT. Leafpacks were added to the CT and microcosms every two weeks; eight week old packs were discarded after returning invertebrates to the CT. On a weekly basis, 25% of the sediments, leaf packs, tiles, and elodea from each microcosms were transferred to another microcosm; the CT walls and tiles were scraped; an the water quality was monitored. Circulation was discontinued one week prior to dosing. On 4/12/96, the microcosms were dosed to contain 0--0.25 microg/L of JP-8 jet fuel. Within two weeks the GC/MS hydrocarbon concentrations were very low in the water column of the highest treatment group. There has been little acute toxicity, despite selecting doses that caused severe, acute toxicity in laboratory microcosm studies. The presence of a complex, detritus-based microbial community appears to mitigate the influences of the toxicant on the microcosms

  7. Rock magnetic and geochemical evidence for authigenic magnetite formation via iron reduction in coal-bearing sediments offshore Shimokita Peninsula, Japan (IODP Site C0020)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephen C.; Johnson, Joel E.; Clyde, William C.; Setera, Jacob B.; Maxbauer, Daniel P.; Severmann, Silke; Riedinger, Natascha

    2017-06-01

    Sediments recovered at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0020, in a fore-arc basin offshore Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, include numerous coal beds (0.3-7 m thick) that are associated with a transition from a terrestrial to marine depositional environment. Within the primary coal-bearing unit (˜2 km depth below seafloor) there are sharp increases in magnetic susceptibility in close proximity to the coal beds, superimposed on a background of consistently low magnetic susceptibility throughout the remainder of the recovered stratigraphic sequence. We investigate the source of the magnetic susceptibility variability and characterize the dominant magnetic assemblage throughout the entire cored record, using isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), thermal demagnetization, anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), iron speciation, and iron isotopes. Magnetic mineral assemblages in all samples are dominated by very low-coercivity minerals with unblocking temperatures between 350 and 580°C that are interpreted to be magnetite. Samples with lower unblocking temperatures (300-400°C), higher ARM, higher-frequency dependence, and isotopically heavy δ56Fe across a range of lithologies in the coal-bearing unit (between 1925 and 1995 mbsf) indicate the presence of fine-grained authigenic magnetite. We suggest that iron-reducing bacteria facilitated the production of fine-grained magnetite within the coal-bearing unit during burial and interaction with pore waters. The coal/peat acted as a source of electron donors during burial, mediated by humic acids, to supply iron-reducing bacteria in the surrounding siliciclastic sediments. These results indicate that coal-bearing sediments may play an important role in iron cycling in subsiding peat environments and if buried deeply through time, within the subsequent deep biosphere.

  8. A genetic link between magnetite mineralization and diorite intrusion at the El Romeral iron oxide-apatite deposit, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Paula A.; Barra, Fernando; Reich, Martin; Deditius, Artur; Simon, Adam; Uribe, Francisco; Romero, Rurik; Rojo, Mario

    2018-01-01

    El Romeral is one of the largest iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile. The Cerro Principal magnetite ore body at El Romeral comprises massive magnetite intergrown with actinolite, with minor apatite, scapolite, and sulfides (pyrite ± chalcopyrite). Several generations of magnetite were identified by using a combination of optical and electron microscopy techniques. The main mineralization event is represented by zoned magnetite grains with inclusion-rich cores and inclusion-poor rims, which form the massive magnetite ore body. This main magnetite stage was followed by two late hydrothermal events that are represented by magnetite veinlets that crosscut the massive ore body and by disseminated magnetite in the andesite host rock and in the Romeral diorite. The sulfur stable isotope signature of the late hydrothermal sulfides indicates a magmatic origin for sulfur (δ34S between - 0.8 and 2.9‰), in agreement with previous δ34S data reported for other Chilean IOA and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits. New 40Ar/39Ar dating of actinolite associated with the main magnetite ore stage yielded ages of ca. 128 Ma, concordant within error with a U-Pb zircon age for the Romeral diorite (129.0 ± 0.9 Ma; mean square weighted deviation = 1.9, n = 28). The late hydrothermal magnetite-biotite mineralization is constrained at ca. 118 Ma by 40Ar/39Ar dating of secondary biotite. This potassic alteration is about 10 Ma younger than the main mineralization episode, and it may be related to post-mineralization dikes that crosscut and remobilize Fe from the main magnetite ore body. These data reveal a clear genetic association between magnetite ore formation, sulfide mineralization, and the diorite intrusion at El Romeral (at 129 Ma), followed by a late and more restricted stage of hydrothermal alteration associated with the emplacement of post-ore dikes at ca. 118 Ma. Therefore, this new evidence supports a magmatic-hydrothermal model for the

  9. Dependence of magnetization on crystal fields and exchange interactions in magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouaissa, Mohamed, E-mail: m.ouaissa@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Génie Physique et Environnement, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Tofail, Campus Universitaire BP 133, Kénitra 14000 (Morocco); Benyoussef, Abdelilah [Laboratory of Magnetism and Physics of High Energy, Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Abo, Gavin S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and MINT Center, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Ouaissa, Samia; Hafid, Mustapha [Laboratoire de Génie Physique et Environnement, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Tofail, Campus Universitaire BP 133, Kénitra 14000 (Morocco); Belaiche, Mohammed [Laboratoire de Magnétisme, Matériaux Magnétiques, Microonde et Céramique, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, B.P. 9235, Océan, Rabat (Morocco)

    2015-11-15

    In this work, we study the magnetization of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) with different exchange interactions and crystal fields using variational method based on the Bogoliubov inequality for the Gibbs free energy within the mean field theory. The magnetic behavior was investigated in the absence and presence of crystal fields. The investigations also revealed that the transition temperature depends on the crystal fields of the octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Magnetite exhibits ferrimagnetic phase with second order transition to paramagnetic phase at 850 K. This result is confirmed using the mean field theory within the Heisenberg model. Important factors that can affect the magnetic behavior of the system are exchange interactions and crystal field. Indeed, a new magnetic behavior was observed depending on these parameters. A first order phase transition from ferrimagnetic to ferromagnetic was found at low temperature, and a second order transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic was observed at high temperature. - Highlights: • Magnetization of magnetite versus temperature was studied by mean field theory. • The critical temperature of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was approximately obtained. • Effect of sublattice crystal fields on the magnetization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was investigated.

  10. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attallah, Olivia A., E-mail: olivia.adly@hu.edu.eg [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt); Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department, Heliopolis University, 11777 El Salam, Cairo (Egypt); Girgis, E. [Solid State Physics Department, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Lab, CEAS, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M.S.A. [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt)

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20–30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications. - Highlights: • We synthesize nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique • Effect of nicotinic acid concentration on the nanorods properties was significant • Nanorods maintained uniform shape with increased concentration of nicotinic acid • Alterations occurred in particle size, mineral phases and magnetics of coated samples.

  11. Ultrafine Magnetite Nanopowder: Synthesis, Characterization, and Preliminary Use as Filler of Polymethylmethacrylate Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Russo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis have been characterized in terms of morphological and structural features. Electron micrographs collected in both scanning (SEM and transmission (TEM modes and evaluations of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD patterns have indicated the achievement of a monodispersed crystallite structure with particles having an average size around 15–20 nm. Structural investigations by Micro-Raman spectroscopy highlighted the obtainment of magnetite nanocrystals with a partial surface oxidation to maghemite (γ-Fe3O4. Preliminary attention has been also paid to the use of these magnetite nanoparticles as filler for a commercial polymethylmethacrylate resin. Hybrid formulations containing up to 3 wt% of nanoparticles were prepared by melt blending and characterized by calorimetric and thermogravimetric tests. For sake of comparison, same formulations containing commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles are also reported. Calorimetric characterization indicates an increase of both glass transition temperature and thermal stability of the nanocomposite systems when loaded with the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles rather then loaded with the same amount of commercial Fe3O4. This first observation represents just one aspect of the promising potentiality offered by the novel magnetic nanoparticles when mixed with PMMA.

  12. Morphological analysis of mouse lungs after treatment with magnetite-based magnetic fluid stabilized with DMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Garcia, Monica; Miranda Parca, Renata; Braun Chaves, Sacha; Paulino Silva, Luciano; Djalma Santos, Antonio; Guerrero Marques Lacava, Zulmira; Cesar Morais, Paulo; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2005-01-01

    Mouse lungs injected with magnetic fluids based on magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid were studied. We observed clusters of magnetic nanoparticles inside blood vessels, within the organ parenchyma and cells, as well as increased numbers of leukocytes in the organ. Both the particle concentration and organ inflammation diminished in a time-dependent manner

  13. Electrochemical and dissolution studies on coated film and magnetite pellet in PDCA and NTA based formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.P.; Sumathi, S.; Rangarajan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors magnetite often exists as both mobile particulate protective film on the inner surface of the PHT system. To determine the mechanism and kinetics of dissolution from a film coated on carbon steel (CS) and magnetite pellet electrochemical measurements were carried out in 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA) and nitrilo-triacetic acid (NTA) based formulations containing ascorbic acid (AA) and citric acid (CA) at 28 degC and 60 degC. The solution redox potential arises based on the release of relative amounts of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ . Complexation, adsorption and reduction affect the concentration of these species in solutions. On coated specimen, the pore size and rate of formation via auto reduction contribute to the observed potential. In PDCA based formulation higher percentage of magnetite dissolution with lower base metal corrosion was observed as compared to that in NTA based formulation. The base metal aided dissolution due to the pores and microcracks in the film (Auto reduction) was observed for coated film. The dominant role of surface adsorption characteristics of PDCA, AA and CA were evident in magnetite pellet dissolution studies. (author)

  14. The magnetic introduction of magnetite nanoparticles into live cells for radiosensibility enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurenya, Anton Y., E-mail: antonyurenya@gmail.com [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, Mikhail A. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chukalova, Aynur A. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moskaleva, Elizaveta Y.; Taldenkov, Alexander N. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Panchenko, Vladislav Y. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    Earlier we proposed a new radiotherapy enhancement method that entails the administration of {sup 57}Fe iron-oxide nanoparticles into the cells . Within this work we were prompt to investigate the capability of iron oxide nanoparticles with monolayer coating to penetrate into live cells. Magnetite particle samples were synthesized and stabilized with HCl or citric acid. The cells were incubated in the presence of nanoparticles for 1 h, washed and dried. To distinguish inside-cell particles from outside ones a set of experiments with low temperature incubation was carried out. Several cell samples were prepared in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to study the possibility of the nanoparticle uptake enhancement. To evaluate the amount of particles in each cell sample we used a SQUID-magnetometer. The nanoparticle suspension with HCl stabilization turned to be inadequate for intracellular introduction. Approximately 2·10{sup 5} particles with citric acid covering conjugated with each cell after incubation at normal conditions. An application of an external magnetic field increased this amount up to 10{sup 7} particles/cell. Most probably much of these particles penetrated into cells. - Highlights: • Uncoated magnetite nanoparticle suspension is unusable for intracellular introduction. • Magnetite particles stabilized with citric acid penetrate into cells via endocytosis. • An application of a magnetic field enhances cellular uptake of magnetite particles. • The amount of particles in cell samples can be evaluated with a SQUID-magnetometer.

  15. Improvement of interaction between PVA and chitosan via magnetite nanoparticles for drug delivery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagholani, Hamidreza; Ghoreishi, Sayed Mehdi; Mousazadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation under ultrasonication followed by coating with chitosan. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is then combined with the chitosan that coated the magnetite nanoparticles. The combination occurs by hydrogen binding and ionic cross-linking of the amino and hydroxyl groups of chitosan and PVA respectively. The magnetite nanoparticles have an average size of 10.62 nm that was confirmed by TEM. The VSM measurements showed that nanoparticles were superparamagnetic. The coatings on the core nanoparticles were estimated by AAS and the attachments of coating to the nanoparticles were confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were measured by DLS and zeta potential. Naked magnetite, chitosan and PVA coating have zeta potential of +36.4, +48.1 and -12.5 mV respectively. The unspecific adsorption and interaction between nanoparticles and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated systematically by UV-vis spectroscopy method. The nanoparticles that were modified by PVA present low protein adsorption, which makes them a practical choice for preventing opsonization in clinical application and drug delivery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  17. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe_3O_4–SiO_2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r_2 relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  18. Direct observation of ferrimagnetic/ferroelastic domain interactions in magnetite below the Verwey transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, Takeshi; Church, Nathan S.; Feinberg, Joshua M.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic behaviour of magnetite at low temperatures is dominated by its transformation to a monoclinic crystal structure that is simultaneously ferrimagnetic, ferroelastic and ferroelectric below similar to 125 K (the Verwey transition). Here we use electron microscopy to reveal the relations...

  19. Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of magnetic vortex structures in nonideal magnetite recorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kovács, András

    2016-01-01

    The thermal demagnetization of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, which govern the magnetic signal in many igneous rocks, is examined using off-axis electron holography. Visualization of a vortex structure held by an individual Fe3O4 particle (~250nm in diameter) during in situ...

  20. Understanding the Mossbauer spectrum of magnetite below the Verwey transition: ab initio calculations, simulation, and experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezníček, R.; Chlan, V.; Štěpánková, H.; Novák, Pavel; Żukrowski, J.; Kozlowski, A.; Kakol, Z.; Tarnawski, Z.; Honig, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 19 (2017), s. 1-10, č. článku 195124. ISSN 2469-9950 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetite * Mossbauer effect * density functional theory * modelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  1. Novel methods for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles with special morphologies and textured assemblages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiro-Kosa, Ilona, E-mail: kosaili@gmail.com [University of Pannonia, Department of Material Engineering (Hungary); Recnik, Aleksander [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Nanostructured Materials (Slovenia); Posfai, Mihaly [University of Pannonia, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Hungary)

    2012-10-15

    There is an increasing technological demand for magnetic nanocrystals with special morphologies and controlled sizes. Several approaches are used for the synthesis of magnetite crystals with irregular or octahedral shapes; however, the room-temperature synthesis of nanocrystals with specific morphologies is not yet established. Here, we describe the synthesis of magnetite crystals (100-300 nm) at a relatively low temperature ({approx}70 Degree-Sign C) from organic precursors, including Fe(II) oxalate or Fe(II) sulfate, and study the effects of ethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol on the final physical and chemical properties of the crystals. The magnetite crystals formed from different precursor materials (sulfate or oxalate green rust) show specific morphological and textural features. We show that octahedral magnetite crystals can be produced from Fe(II) oxalate via a simple co-precipitation process. Using different kinds and amounts of polyols, various types of particle morphologies and nanocrystal textures can be produced, including hexagonal-shaped clusters of elongated crystals and porous and solid, large, rounded polycrystalline aggregates.

  2. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M.S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20–30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications. - Highlights: • We synthesize nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique • Effect of nicotinic acid concentration on the nanorods properties was significant • Nanorods maintained uniform shape with increased concentration of nicotinic acid • Alterations occurred in particle size, mineral phases and magnetics of coated samples.

  3. Effects of AC magnetic field and carboxymethyldextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles on mice peritoneal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Guedes, Maria Helena; Sadeghiani, Neda; Lima Guedes Peixoto, Danielle; Poubel Coelho, Julia; Santos Barbosa, Luzirlane; Bentes Azevedo, Ricardo; Kueckelhaus, Selma; Silva, Maria de Fatima da; Morais, Paulo Cesar; Guerrero Marques Lacava, Zulmira

    2005-01-01

    A portable apparatus was developed to perform magnetohyperthermia (MHT) assays. In order to investigate its efficiency on cell lysis, biological effects of the AC magnetic field exposure after carboxymethyldextran-coated magnetite-nanoparticles (CMDC) treatment were investigated. Phagocyte capacity, cell viability, and morphology data evidenced that the CMDC sample and the apparatus are useful to further investigate MHT in cancer therapy

  4. Cranberry magnetite deposits Avery County, N.C., and Carter County, Tenn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, M.H.; Ballard, T.J.

    1948-01-01

    The Cranberry magnetite deposits occur in pre-Cambrian granite-gneiss in a belt extending from 3 miles southeast of Cranberry, N.C., to about 6 miles southwest of Magnetic City, Tenn. The belt forms a curve, elongated to the north, approximately 26 miles in length.

  5. Study on reduction reactions of neptunium(V) on magnetite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Kamei, Gento; Nakata, Kotaro; Tanaka, Satoru; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions between neptunium(V) (Np(V)) and magnetite (Fe(II) 1 Fe(III) 2 O 4 ) surface were investigated in N 2 gas atmosphere. A batch method was applied to the experiment. A magnetite sample and a 0.1 M NaCl solution were mixed in a polypropylene tube, and pH, redox potential and concentration of dissolved neptunium were measured as a function of shaking time, temperature and liquid/solid ratio. The concentration of dissolved neptunium was reduced rapidly within a day, due to the reducing reaction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and the precipitation of Np(IV). The rate constant of the redox reaction and the activation energy for the rate constant were preliminarily obtained. On the other hand, redox reactions between Np(V) and aqueous Fe(II) were hardly observed. Considering the number of transferred electrons, it was suggested that the redox reaction was promoted by not only Fe(II) on the magnetite surface, but also Fe(II) inside the magnetite. (author)

  6. A study of the barrier properties of polyethylene coated with a nanocellulose/magnetite composite film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological, thermal and barrier properties of low-density polyethylene/polycaprolactone-modified nanocellulose hybrid materials were investigated in this paper. Nanonocelulose/magnetite (NC-Fe3O4 nanocomposite and maleic acid functionalized NC/magnetite (NCMA-Fe3O4 nanocomposite were prepared and used as filler at various concentrations (5, 10 and 15 wt. % in polycaprolactone (PCL layer. PE was coated with PCL/NC/magnetite layer. The addition of the filler did not unfavorably affect the inherent properties of the polymer, especially its barrier properties. Oxygen permeation measurements show that the oxygen barrier properties of magnetite enriched PCL film were improved due to chemical activity of added material. The highest level of barrier capacity was observed for PE samples coated with PCL based composite with NCMA-Fe3O4 micro/-nanofiller, which implies the significant contribution of nanocellulose surface modification with maleic anhydride residue to improved barrier properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45019 i br. OI172013

  7. Novel methods for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles with special morphologies and textured assemblages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Rečnik, Aleksander; Pósfai, Mihály

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing technological demand for magnetic nanocrystals with special morphologies and controlled sizes. Several approaches are used for the synthesis of magnetite crystals with irregular or octahedral shapes; however, the room-temperature synthesis of nanocrystals with specific morphologies is not yet established. Here, we describe the synthesis of magnetite crystals (100–300 nm) at a relatively low temperature (∼70 °C) from organic precursors, including Fe(II) oxalate or Fe(II) sulfate, and study the effects of ethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol on the final physical and chemical properties of the crystals. The magnetite crystals formed from different precursor materials (sulfate or oxalate green rust) show specific morphological and textural features. We show that octahedral magnetite crystals can be produced from Fe(II) oxalate via a simple co-precipitation process. Using different kinds and amounts of polyols, various types of particle morphologies and nanocrystal textures can be produced, including hexagonal-shaped clusters of elongated crystals and porous and solid, large, rounded polycrystalline aggregates.

  8. Shock experiments in range of 10–45 GPa with small multidomain magnetite in porous targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, Tomáš; Pesonen, L. J.; Deutsch, A.; Wünnemann, K.; Nowka, D.; Hornemann, U.; Heikinheimo, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 10 (2012), s. 1671-1680 ISSN 1086-9379 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : shock * magnetite * magnetism * magnetic properties * density porosity Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.800, year: 2012

  9. Experimental evidence for a Mott-Wigner glass phase of magnetite above the Verwey temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Chan, K.C.B.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    New muon-spin-relaxation (µSR) results on magnetite are reported and discussed in light of earlier Mössbauer, neutron, and µSR results. Modification of the µSR anomaly (observed at 247 K in zero field), when an external magnetic field is applied, provides evidence that the anomaly results from cross

  10. A new polaronic order-disorder phase transition in magnetite as observed through μSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Denison, A.B.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent μSr measurements on the Mott-Wigner glass magnetite, as a function of temperature and external magnetic field have shown the existence of two inequivalent magnetic sites below T A = 247 K. These data are being interpreted in terms of the onset or destruction of local order manifested as local atomic correlations (molecular polarons). (orig.)

  11. The role of polymer films on the oxidation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letti, C. J.; Paterno, L. G.; Pereira-da-Silva, M. A.; Morais, P. C.; Soler, M. A. G.

    2017-02-01

    A detailed investigation about the role of polymer films on the oxidation process of magnetite nanoparticles (∼7 nm diameter), under laser irradiation is performed employing micro Raman spectroscopy. To support this investigation, Fe3O4-np are synthesized by the co-precipitation method and assembled layer-by-layer with sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS). Polymer films (Fe3O4-np/PSS)n with n=2,3,5,7,10 and 25 bilayers are employed as a model system to study the oxidation process under laser irradiation. Raman data are further processed by principal component analysis. Our findings suggest that PSS protects Fe3O4-np from oxidation when compared to powder samples, even for the sample with the greater number of bilayers. Further, the oxidation of magnetite to maghemite occurs preferably for thinner films up to 7 bilayers, while the onset for the formation of the hematite phase depends on the laser intensity for thicker films. Water takes part on the oxidation processes of magnetite, the oxidation/phase transformation of Fe3O4-np is intensified in films with more bilayers, since more water is included in those films. Encapsulation of Fe3O4-np by PSS in layer-by-layer films showed to be very efficient to avoid the oxidation process in nanosized magnetite.

  12. Detrital zircon provenance of the Hartselle Sandstone Unit, Southeastern USA: Insights into sediment source, paleogeography, and setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harthy, M. A.; Gifford, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Hartselle sandstone is an excellent example of an Oil sand, a resource rich in bitumen. The unit is a light-colored thick-bedded to massive quartzose sandstone, that is widespread across an area from Georgia in the east to Mississippi in the west, and south from Alabama to Kentucky as a northern border. Formation thickness ranges from 0 to more than 150 feet. The unit has been stratigraphically dated to the Middle-Upper Mississippian age. One hypothesis suggests that the sandstone unit formed from the geological remains of barrier islands located in the ocean between Gondwana and Laurentia. The Hartselle is thought to have formed by the movement waves and currents along the shoreline, which carried sand and concentrated it into a set of northwest to southeast trending barrier islands. Transgression-regression events shifted the islands back and forth in relation to the position of the shoreline, leading to the large areal extent of the unit. However, the current data are not enough to explain the geographical position of the Hartselle sandstone unit as it is not running parallel to the ancient shoreline. Another mystery is the source of the sand, some believing the source was from the south (Gondwana) and others that erosion was from the north (Laurentia). Detrital zircon provenance analysis will address the uncertainty in sediment source. We will compare zircon U-Pb age spectra to possible Laurentian and Gondwanan source areas to discriminate between these possibilities. In addition, the age of the youngest detrital zircon population will provide additional constraints on the maximum age of deposition for the unit. These detrital ages will also help us to understand the tectonic setting at the time of Hartselle deposition. Lastly, we aim to explain the widespread nature of the unit and the processes involved in the formation of the Hartselle sandstone. When taken together, these interpretations will illuminate the age, depositional and tectonic setting of a

  13. Enhancing phosphate adsorption capacity of SDS-based magnetite by surface modification of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhigang; Zhang, Chang; Zheng, Zuhong; Hu, Liang; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Zhongzhu; Ma, Chi; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Citric acid (CA) was used to modify the surface structures of SDS-based magnetite. • Dosage of CA, pH values, ion strength, isotherms and dynamics were analyzed. • High CA dissolved anionic SDS and Fe n+ but increased the stability of magnetite. • 0.05 and 0.1 M CA-modified iron oxide removed about 100% phosphorus. • Precipitation of phosphate and Fe n+ was the main removal mechanism. - Abstract: In this study, citric acid (CA) was employed as a low-molecule organic acid to influence the adsorption performance of phosphorus by as-obtained magnetite. The factors including initial phosphate concentrations, dosage of citric acid, pH value, ion strength, contact time and temperature were examined in detail. Results indicated that the dissolution of anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) covering on surface of magnetite, a slight decrease of Fe level and a superior structure of magnetite after CA modification occurred. The pH-dependence of phosphate adsorption was impeded and the surface potential of magnetite positively increased at pH > 5.0 when CA was added. Non-linear regression Langmuir-Freundlich model was fitted well in thermodynamics, and the opposite adsorption process as a function of temperatures with or without CA addition was due to the decrease of active energy and active mobility of phosphate ion. Finally, the declining adsorption efficiency with increasing cycles was observed while phosphate removal was approximately finished and had small change with 0.05 and 0.1 M of CA addition. Those improvements of removal efficiency of phosphorus by modified iron oxide were because of the removal of anionic SDS that increased the surface positive charge, and especially the dissolution of element Fe into solution to form precipitate with phosphorus ions. The enhanced stability of magnetite by CA also promoted the high removal efficiency of phosphorus. These implications of CA on phosphate removal can be extended to the field where phosphate

  14. Enhancing phosphate adsorption capacity of SDS-based magnetite by surface modification of citric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhigang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Chang, E-mail: zhangchang@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zheng, Zuhong [College of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan 432000, Hubei Province (China); Hu, Liang; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Zhongzhu; Ma, Chi; Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Citric acid (CA) was used to modify the surface structures of SDS-based magnetite. • Dosage of CA, pH values, ion strength, isotherms and dynamics were analyzed. • High CA dissolved anionic SDS and Fe{sup n+} but increased the stability of magnetite. • 0.05 and 0.1 M CA-modified iron oxide removed about 100% phosphorus. • Precipitation of phosphate and Fe {sup n+} was the main removal mechanism. - Abstract: In this study, citric acid (CA) was employed as a low-molecule organic acid to influence the adsorption performance of phosphorus by as-obtained magnetite. The factors including initial phosphate concentrations, dosage of citric acid, pH value, ion strength, contact time and temperature were examined in detail. Results indicated that the dissolution of anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) covering on surface of magnetite, a slight decrease of Fe level and a superior structure of magnetite after CA modification occurred. The pH-dependence of phosphate adsorption was impeded and the surface potential of magnetite positively increased at pH > 5.0 when CA was added. Non-linear regression Langmuir-Freundlich model was fitted well in thermodynamics, and the opposite adsorption process as a function of temperatures with or without CA addition was due to the decrease of active energy and active mobility of phosphate ion. Finally, the declining adsorption efficiency with increasing cycles was observed while phosphate removal was approximately finished and had small change with 0.05 and 0.1 M of CA addition. Those improvements of removal efficiency of phosphorus by modified iron oxide were because of the removal of anionic SDS that increased the surface positive charge, and especially the dissolution of element Fe into solution to form precipitate with phosphorus ions. The enhanced stability of magnetite by CA also promoted the high removal efficiency of phosphorus. These implications of CA on phosphate removal can be extended to the field where

  15. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  16. Extracting information on the spatial variability in erosion rate stored in detrital cooling age distributions in river sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jean; Gemignani, Lorenzo; van der Beek, Peter

    2018-03-01

    One of the main purposes of detrital thermochronology is to provide constraints on the regional-scale exhumation rate and its spatial variability in actively eroding mountain ranges. Procedures that use cooling age distributions coupled with hypsometry and thermal models have been developed in order to extract quantitative estimates of erosion rate and its spatial distribution, assuming steady state between tectonic uplift and erosion. This hypothesis precludes the use of these procedures to assess the likely transient response of mountain belts to changes in tectonic or climatic forcing. Other methods are based on an a priori knowledge of the in situ distribution of ages to interpret the detrital age distributions. In this paper, we describe a simple method that, using the observed detrital mineral age distributions collected along a river, allows us to extract information about the relative distribution of erosion rates in an eroding catchment without relying on a steady-state assumption, the value of thermal parameters or an a priori knowledge of in situ age distributions. The model is based on a relatively low number of parameters describing lithological variability among the various sub-catchments and their sizes and only uses the raw ages. The method we propose is tested against synthetic age distributions to demonstrate its accuracy and the optimum conditions for it use. In order to illustrate the method, we invert age distributions collected along the main trunk of the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra river system in the eastern Himalaya. From the inversion of the cooling age distributions we predict present-day erosion rates of the catchments along the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra river system, as well as some of its tributaries. We show that detrital age distributions contain dual information about present-day erosion rate, i.e., from the predicted distribution of surface ages within each catchment and from the relative contribution of any given catchment to the

  17. Extracting information on the spatial variability in erosion rate stored in detrital cooling age distributions in river sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Braun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main purposes of detrital thermochronology is to provide constraints on the regional-scale exhumation rate and its spatial variability in actively eroding mountain ranges. Procedures that use cooling age distributions coupled with hypsometry and thermal models have been developed in order to extract quantitative estimates of erosion rate and its spatial distribution, assuming steady state between tectonic uplift and erosion. This hypothesis precludes the use of these procedures to assess the likely transient response of mountain belts to changes in tectonic or climatic forcing. Other methods are based on an a priori knowledge of the in situ distribution of ages to interpret the detrital age distributions. In this paper, we describe a simple method that, using the observed detrital mineral age distributions collected along a river, allows us to extract information about the relative distribution of erosion rates in an eroding catchment without relying on a steady-state assumption, the value of thermal parameters or an a priori knowledge of in situ age distributions. The model is based on a relatively low number of parameters describing lithological variability among the various sub-catchments and their sizes and only uses the raw ages. The method we propose is tested against synthetic age distributions to demonstrate its accuracy and the optimum conditions for it use. In order to illustrate the method, we invert age distributions collected along the main trunk of the Tsangpo–Siang–Brahmaputra river system in the eastern Himalaya. From the inversion of the cooling age distributions we predict present-day erosion rates of the catchments along the Tsangpo–Siang–Brahmaputra river system, as well as some of its tributaries. We show that detrital age distributions contain dual information about present-day erosion rate, i.e., from the predicted distribution of surface ages within each catchment and from the relative contribution of

  18. The Origin of the Chinese Central Tianshan Block in the Southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Evidence from Detrital Zircon Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Long, X.; Yuan, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Chinese Central Tianshan Block (CTB) is one of the oldest continental fragments in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Although it is vital for understanding the evolution of the CAOB, its origin has been poorly studied. The CTB was previously suggested to have been originated from the North China, the South China, the Tarim cratons or the East European Craton (Baltica). A total of 165 concordant U-Pb and Hf isotopic analyses of detrital zircon are obtained from three meta-sediments in the CTB, including one meta-sandstone from Xingxingxia formation and one meta-sandstone as well as one quartzite from Kawabulake formation. Detrital zircon grains from the Xingxingxia and Kawabulake formations are dominated by respective youngest age populations at 1002 Ma and 930-960 Ma, providing constraints on the maximum depositional ages for these two formations. Zircon grains from the meta-sediments have very similar age distributions, with two dominant peaks at 0.93-1.0 Ga and 1.0-1.6 Ga and a minor peak at 2.3-2.7 Ga. They have similar Hf isotopic signatures, suggesting that the meta-sediments in the CTB share similar sedimentary provenance. The early Neoproterozoic detrital zircon grains are mainly local-derived, whereas the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic grains are both autochthonous and allochthonous. The occurrence of these Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic zircon grains are coincident with the Nuna breakup and the Rodinia assembly. This suggests that the CTB might experience the tectonic switching of the Nuna to the Rodinia. The distinct Meso-Neoproterozoic age patterns and Hf isotopic compositions of these detrital grains from the CTB and the surrounding blocks indicate that the CTB was not located close to the North China, the South China or the Tarim cratons in Precambrian. Our new data suggest that the CTB was most likely once a part of the East European Craton before the Neoproterozoic. This study was supported by National Basic Research Program of China

  19. The lower Mesozoic record of detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Sonora, Mexico, and its paleogeographic implications

    OpenAIRE

    González-León, Carlos M.; Valencia, Víctor A.; Lawton, Timothy F.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Gehrels, George E.; Leggett, William J.; Montijo-Contreras, Óscar; Fernández, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology from each of the formations of the Triassic-Lower Jurassic Barranca and El Antimonio groups of central and northwestern Sonora and from the Lower Jurassic Basomari and Middle Jurassic Lily formations of northern Sonora indicate they contain distinctive zircon populations. A Proterozoic population has peak ages near 1.8, 1.7, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.1 Ga. A population of Permo-Triassic grains with important peak ages near 269, 254, 245, 234 and 227 Ma. A third popula...

  20. Detrital thermochronology of Rhine, Elbe and Meuse river sediment (Central Europe): implications for provenance, erosion and mineral fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, C.; Busschers, F. S.; Winsemann, J.

    2018-03-01

    Here we present detrital apatite fission track (AFT), zircon fission track (ZFT) and a few apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) data of Middle Pleistocene to modern Rhine, Meuse and Elbe river sediments in order to resolve processes that control detrital age distributions (provenance, erosion and mineral fertility). We used a modelling approach to compare observed with theoretically predicted age distributions from an interpolated in situ AFT and ZFT age map. In situ cooling ages do show large differences in the Rhine drainage basin, facilitating the differentiation between different source regions. Inconsistencies between observed and theoretical age distributions of the Meuse and Elbe samples can be explained by mixing and reworking of sediments with different provenances (Meuse Middle Pleistocene terrace sediment) and a yet unexplored source region with old AFT ages (Elbe samples). Overall, the results show that detrital thermochronology is capable of identifying the provenance of Middle Pleistocene to modern sediments. The AFT age distributions of Rhine sediments are dominated ( 70%) by AFT ages representing the Alps. A possible explanation is higher erosion rates in the Alps as compared to areas outside the Alps. A Late Pleistocene sample from the Upper Rhine Graben contains apatite grains from the Molasse and Hegau volcanics, which we explain with a shift of the headwaters of the Rhine to the north as a result of intense Middle Pleistocene Riss glaciation. Contrary to the observed dominance of Alpine-derived AFT ages in Rhine sediments, the relative contribution of zircon ages with sources in the Alps is lower and significantly decreases downstream, suggesting a major source of zircons outside the Alps. This can be explained by increased zircon fertility of sediments derived from the Rhenish massif. Therefore, we conclude that erosion and mineral fertility are the main processes controlling detrital AFT and ZFT age distributions of the sampled river sediment. In case of

  1. First local electrode atom probe analysis of magnetite (Fe3O4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, K.R.; Kelly, T.F.; Miller, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We have successfully fabricated atom probe samples of a metamorphic magnetite and performed an analysis of one of these samples using a local electrode atom probe (LEAP). This particular magnetite, previously designated LP204-1, was extracted from a polymetamorphosed, granulite-facies marble and contains grain scale heterogeneity in its oxygen isotope ratios. Crystals of LP204-1 contain a high number density of nanometer-scale, disk-shaped Al-Mn-Fe-spinel precipitates making this magnetite particularly attractive for demonstrating the capabilities of the LEAP with regard to geological materials. Field ion microscope images of these magnetite crystals show precipitate size and morphology that agrees with previous results. A sample of LP-204-1 was analyzed in the LEAP, resulting in a cylindrical analyzed volume approx. 26 nm in diameter and 21 nm high. The mass spectrum contained nearly 106,000 atoms, 97.1 % of which were identified. Peaks for singly, doubly and triply ionized species were fully resolved. The analysis volume appeared to be purely magnetite, i.e. no precipitates were observed. If it is assumed that 77 % of the ions in the peak at 16 are O 2 ++ rather than O+, the stoichiometry measured for this sample using electron probe microanalysis is achieved. The high fraction of O 2 ++ can be explained by lack of a peak for O ++ and significant peaks for FeO x indicating a relatively low field strength, which in turn favors molecular ions. This work is an encouraging beginning for analysis of geological materials in atom probes. Refs. 4 (author)

  2. Efficient synthesis of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles under air for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Namita, E-mail: saxenanamita@yahoo.com [School of Nano Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar 382030 (India); Singh, Man, E-mail: mansingh50@hotmail.com [School of Chemical Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar 382030 (India)

    2017-05-01

    The facile co-precipitation process of synthesising Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) especially magnetite was investigated and simplified, to develop a reproducible and scaled up synthesis process under air, for producing particles with enhanced percentage of magnetite, thus eliminating the crucial and complicated need of using the inert atmosphere. Presence of magnetite was confirmed by XRD, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. Efficiency of synthesising magnetite was increased up to approx. ∼58 wt%, under air with no other phases but maghemite present. Alkali concentration was optimised, and particles with better magnetisation values were synthesised. The approximate weight percentage of magnetite was calculated using the simple and rapid XRD peak deconvolution method. Higher pH values from 13 to14 were investigated in the study while alkali concentration was varied from 0.5 to 4 M. 1Molar NaOH with a final pH of 13.4 was found to be optimum. Well crystallised particles with approx. 6–12 nm size, narrow size distribution and cubo-spheroidal shape were synthesised. Particles were Superparamagnetic with high values of saturation magnetisation of up to 68 emu/g and negligible values of remanence and coercivity. A reaction yield of up to 62% was obtained. Hydrophilic coated particles were produced in a single, one step facile process for biomedical applications, using optimised parameters of pH and alkali concentration obtained in the study. Single domain particles with good magnetisation formed stable aqueous dispersions. FTIR, UV-Visible and DLS were used to confirm the coating and dispersion stabilities of the particles. These particles have the requisite properties required for application in different biomedical fields.

  3. The Stability of Magnetite and its Significance as a Passivating Film in the Repository Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, Hans-Peter

    2004-01-01

    A literature review was made in order to highlight if magnetite could be formed as a passivating film on iron in the expected repository environment. The possibility to form other types of passivating films has also been regarded, e.g. other iron oxides or mixed oxides of iron and copper and also sulfides. The conditions for the formation of different types of films have been discussed as well as their compositions and properties. It is concluded that magnetite could certainly be formed on iron at repository combinations of Eh and pH in the absence of sulphide and chloride. However, magnetite could easily be outnumbered by other solid phases that could be formed at the simultaneous presence of copper. CuFeO 2 is such a phase that could appear in a simple Fe-Cu-O-H system. As soon as sulphide and chloride are present other phases like CuFeS 2 could also be responsible for the passivation of iron. The probability that magnetite is the passivating film on cast iron at the actual conditions is therefore not very large. It is more likely that the passivating film instead consists of CuFeO 2 and/or CuFeS 2 , the latter depending on the concentration of sulphur in the system. The protective ability of the alternate compounds as passivating films could be discussed. A suggested ranking order of the protective ability is given in the discussion part. If magnetite is not stable, the integrity of the cast iron insert could therefore in such cases be dependent on the protection by less effective passivating substances. The hypothesis of the formation and nature of alternative passivating films should be tested at relevant conditions in laboratory experiments

  4. The effect of magnetite nanoparticles synthesis conditions on their ability to separate heavy metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobik Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetite nanoparticles have become a promising material for scientific research. Among numerous technologies of their synthesis, co-precipitation seems to be the most convenient, less time-consuming and cheap method which produces fine and pure iron oxide particles applicable to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to investigate how the co-precipitation synthesis parameters, such as temperature and base volume, influence the magnetite nanoparticles ability to separate heavy metal ions. The synthesis were conducted at nine combinations of different ammonia volumes - 8 cm3, 10 cm3, 15 cm3 and temperatures - 30°C, 60°C, 90°C for each ammonia volume. Iron oxides synthesized at each combination were examined as an adsorbent of seven heavy metals: Cr(VI, Pb(II, Cr(III, Cu(II, Zn(II, Ni(II and Cd(II. The representative sample of magnetite was characterized using XRD, SEM and BET methods. It was observed that more effective sorbent for majority of ions was produced at 30°C using 10 cm3 of ammonia. The characterization of the sample produced at these reaction conditions indicate that pure magnetite with an average crystallite size of 23.2 nm was obtained (XRD, the nanosized crystallites in the sample were agglomerated (SEM and the specific surface area of the aggregates was estimated to be 55.64 m2·g-1 (BET. The general conclusion of the work is the evidence that magnetite nanoparticles have the ability to adsorb heavy metal ions from the aqueous solutions. The effectiveness of the process depends on many factors such as kind of heavy metal ion or the synthesis parameters of the sorbent.

  5. Synthesis of environmentally friendly highly dispersed magnetite nanoparticles based on rosin cationic surfactants as thin film coatings of steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2014-04-22

    This work presents a new method to prepare monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles capping with new cationic surfactants based on rosin. Core/shell type magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using bis-N-(3-levopimaric maleic acid adduct-2-hydroxy) propyl-triethyl ammonium chloride (LPMQA) as capping agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was employed to characterize the nanoparticles chemical structure. Transmittance electron microscopies (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were used to examine the morphology of the modified magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite dispersed aqueous acid solution was evaluated as an effective anticorrosion behavior of a hydrophobic surface on steel. The inhibition effect of magnetite nanoparticles on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results obtained from both potentiodynamic polarisation and EIS measurements reveal that the magnetite nanoparticle is an effective inhibitor for the corrosion of steel in 1.0 M HCl solution. Polarization data show that magnetite nanoparticles behave as a mixed type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiencies obtained from potentiodynamic polarization and EIS methods are in good agreement.

  6. Synthesis of Environmentally Friendly Highly Dispersed Magnetite Nanoparticles Based on Rosin Cationic Surfactants as Thin Film Coatings of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M. Atta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method to prepare monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles capping with new cationic surfactants based on rosin. Core/shell type magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using bis-N-(3-levopimaric maleic acid adduct-2-hydroxy propyl-triethyl ammonium chloride (LPMQA as capping agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was employed to characterize the nanoparticles chemical structure. Transmittance electron microscopies (TEM and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD were used to examine the morphology of the modified magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite dispersed aqueous acid solution was evaluated as an effective anticorrosion behavior of a hydrophobic surface on steel. The inhibition effect of magnetite nanoparticles on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Results obtained from both potentiodynamic polarisation and EIS measurements reveal that the magnetite nanoparticle is an effective inhibitor for the corrosion of steel in 1.0 M HCl solution. Polarization data show that magnetite nanoparticles behave as a mixed type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiencies obtained from potentiodynamic polarization and EIS methods are in good agreement.

  7. Co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins define the surface structure of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Ayana; Fukuyo, Ayumi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetosomes comprised of membrane-enveloped single crystalline magnetite (Fe3 O4 ). The size and morphology of the nano-sized magnetite crystals (Mms (Mms5, Mms6, Mms7, and Mms13), was previously isolated from the surface of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Analysis of an mms6 gene deletion mutant suggested that the Mms6 protein plays a major role in the regulation of magnetite crystal size and morphology. In this study, we constructed various mms gene deletion mutants and characterized the magnetite crystals formed by the mutant strains. Comparative analysis showed that all mms genes were involved in the promotion of crystal growth in different manners. The phenotypic characterization of magnetites also suggested that these proteins are involved in controlling the geometries of the crystal surface structures. Thus, the co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins regulate the morphology of the cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Charge-Orbital Ordering and Verwey Transition in Magnetite Measured by Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, D.J.; Lin, H.-J.; Okamoto, J.; Hsu, C.-H.; Huang, C.-M.; Yang, C.S.; Chao, K.S.; Wu, W.B.; Jeng, H.-T.; Guo, G.Y.; Ling, D.C.; Chen, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    We report experimental evidence for the charge-orbital ordering in magnetite below the Verwey transition temperature T V . Measurements of O K-edge resonant x-ray scattering on magnetite reveal that the O 2p states in the vicinity of the Fermi level exhibit a charge-orbital ordering along the c axis with a spatial periodicity of the doubled lattice parameter of the undistorted cubic phase. Such a charge-orbital ordering vanishes abruptly above T V and exhibits a thermal hysteresis, correlating closely with the Verwey transition in magnetite

  9. Surface properties of magnetite in high temperature aqueous electrolyte solutions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidojkovic, Sonja M; Rakin, Marko P

    2017-07-01

    Deposits and scales formed on heat transfer surfaces in power plant water/steam circuits have a significant negative impact on plant reliability, availability and performance, causing tremendous economic consequences and subsequent increases in electricity cost. Consequently, the improvement of the understanding of deposition mechanisms on power generating surfaces is defined as a high priority in the power industry. The deposits consist principally of iron oxides, which are steel corrosion products and usually present in colloidal form. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) is the predominant and most abundant compound found in water/steam cycles of all types of power plants. The crucial factor that governs the deposition process and influences the deposition rate of magnetite is the electrostatic interaction between the metal wall surfaces and the suspended colloidal particles. However, there is scarcity of data on magnetite surface properties at elevated temperatures due to difficulties in their experimental measurement. In this paper a generalized overview of existing experimental data on surface characteristics of magnetite at high temperatures is presented with particular emphasis on possible application in the power industry. A thorough analysis of experimental techniques, mathematical models and results has been performed and directions for future investigations have been considered. The state-of-the-art assessment showed that for the characterization of magnetite/aqueous electrolyte solution interface at high temperatures acid-base potentiometric titrations and electrophoresis were the most beneficial and dependable techniques which yielded results up to 290 and 200°C, respectively. Mass titrations provided data on magnetite surface charge up to 320°C, however, this technique is highly sensitive to the minor concentrations of impurities present on the surface of particle. Generally, fairly good correlation between the isoelectric point (pH iep ) and point of zero charge

  10. Crustal growth history of the Korean Peninsula:Constraints from detrital zircon ages in modern river sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taejin Choi; Yong Il Lee; Yuji Orihashi

    2016-01-01

    U-Pb analyses were carried out on detrital zircon grains from major river-mouth sediments draining South Korea to infer provenance characteristics and the crustal growth history of the southern Korean Peninsula, using a laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS). The Korean Peninsula is located in the East Asian continental margin and mainly comprises three Precambrian massifs and two metamorphic belts in between them. We obtained 515 concordant to slightly discordant zircon ages ranging from ca. 3566 to ca. 48 Ma. Regardless of river-mouth location, predominance of Mesozoic (249e79 Ma) and Paleoproterozoic (2491e1691 Ma) ages with subordinate Archean ages in-dicates that the zircon ages reflect present exposures of plutonic/metamorphic rocks in the drainage basins of the South Korean rivers and the crustal growth of the southern Korean Peninsula was focused in these two periods. Comparison of detrital zircon-age data between the North and South Korean river sediments reveals that the Paleoproterozoic zircon age distributions of both regions are nearly identical, while the NeoproterozoicePaleozoic ages exist and the Mesozoic ages are dominant in southern Korean Peninsula. This result suggests that Precambrian terrains in Korea record the similar pre-Mesozoic magmatic history and that the influence of Mesozoic magmatism was mainly focused in South Korea.

  11. Triassic North American paleodrainage networks and sediment dispersal of the Chinle Formation: A quantitative approach utilizing detrital zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, M. D.; Umbarger, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Triassic Chinle Formation is a fluvial succession deposited in a backarc setting across the present-day Colorado Plateau of the southwestern United States. Existing studies have proposed various mechanisms responsible for the unique stratigraphic architecture and depositional sequences of the Chinle. However, these studies lack necessary age control to correlate stratigraphic patterns with contemporaneous mechanisms. This study will collect new samples for detrital zircon analysis, as well as upgrade existing samples (to n=300) from Dickinson and Gehrels (2008), to improve the resolution of Triassic sediment provenance from source-to-sink. The improved dataset allows appraisal of the multiple provenance terranes that contributed to the Chinle depositional system to delineate and reconstruct paleodrainage patterns. The additional samples will be collected systematically from the base of the Chinle, and vertically throughout the section to capture a regional story of how the continental scale drainage reorganized through time. U-Pb ages of detrital zircons will be utilized to provide quantitative fingerprinting information to constrain interpretations for the origin and transport history of the Chinle fluvial succession in time and space.

  12. Breeding Westland petrels as providers of detrital carbon and nitrogen for soil arthropods : a stable isotope study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, D.J.; Clark, J.M.; Vallance, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Seabirds deposit large quantities of marine detritus on land, but little is known of the soil arthropods processing this material. Burrow-nesting seabirds concentrate their activities within their burrows, so we tested the hypothesis that burrow arthropod fauna is more marine-like in its isotopic enrichment ( 13 C/ 12 C, 15 N/ 14 N); expressed as δ 13 C and δ 15 N) than the arthropods on the adjacent forest floor. Results from a Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony on the South Island of New Zealand did not support the hypothesis. Instead, δ 15 N was universally marine (13-22 per mil). While δ 13 C separated into two clusters, the distribution was not according to arthropod provenance. Most taxa had a terrestrial δ 13 C; only two taxa (a leiodid beetle and the mesostigmatic mite Ayersacarus woodi) incorporated marine C. The leiodid beetle occurs both in burrows and on the forest floor; beetles from both habitats had a marine δ 13 C. Ayersacarus woodi is found only in burrows. We conclude that, in this system, marine and terrestrial detrital C is processed separately, and that marine detrital C enters the terrestrial ecosystem through a very few arthropod taxa. (author). 33 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Frequent Prescribed Burning as a Long-term Practice in Longleaf Pine Forests Does Not Affect Detrital Chemical Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, T Adam; Chow, Alex T; Hagan, Donald L; Wang, G Geoff; Bridges, William C; Dozier, James H

    2017-09-01

    The O horizon, or detrital layer, of forest soils is linked to long-term forest productivity and health. Fuel reduction techniques, such as prescribed fire, can alter the thickness and composition of this essential ecosystem component. Developing an understanding of the changes in the chemical composition of forest detritus due to prescribed fire is essential for forest managers and stakeholders seeking sustainable, resilient, and productive ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated fuel quantity, fuel structure, and detrital chemical composition in longleaf pine ( Miller) forests that have been frequently burned for the last 40 yr at the Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center in Georgetown, SC. Our results suggest that frequent prescribed fire reduces forest fuel quantity ( burned detritus. Our burning activities varied in the short term, consisting of annual dormant, annual growing, and biennial dormant season burns. Seasonal distinctions were present for fuel quantity and vertical fuel structure, but these differences were not noted for the benzene/phenol ratio. These results are significant as more managers consider burning existing longleaf stands while determining effective management practices for longleaf stands yet to be established. Managers of such stands can be confident that frequent, low-intensity, low-severity prescribed burns in longleaf pine forests do little to affect the long-term chemical composition of forest detritus. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Life cycle assessment of sustainable raw material acquisition for functional magnetite bionanoparticle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Jhuma; Joshi, Nimisha; Shemfe, Mobolaji; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2017-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have several applications, including use in medical diagnostics, renewable energy production and waste remediation. However, the processes for MNP production from analytical-grade materials are resource intensive and can be environmentally damaging. This work for the first time examines the life cycle assessment (LCA) of four MNP production cases: (i) industrial MNP production system; (ii) a state-of-the-art MNP biosynthesis system; (iii) an optimal MNP biosynthesis system and (iv) an MNP biosynthesis system using raw materials sourced from wastewaters, in order to recommend a sustainable raw material acquisition pathway for MNP synthesis. The industrial production system was used as a benchmark to compare the LCA performances of the bio-based systems (cases ii-iv). A combination of appropriate life cycle impact assessment methods was employed to analyse environmental costs and benefits of the systems comprehensively. The LCA results revealed that the state-of-the-art MNP biosynthesis system, which utilises analytical grade ferric chloride and sodium hydroxide as raw materials, generated environmental costs rather than benefits compared to the industrial MNP production system. Nevertheless, decreases in environmental impacts by six-fold were achieved by reducing sodium hydroxide input from 11.28 to 1.55 in a mass ratio to MNPs and replacing ferric chloride with ferric sulphate (3.02 and 2.59, respectively, in a mass ratio to MNPs) in the optimal biosynthesis system. Thus, the potential adverse environmental impacts of MNP production via the biosynthesis system can be reduced by minimising sodium hydroxide and substituting ferric sulphate for ferric chloride. Moreover, considerable environmental benefits were exhibited in case (iv), where Fe(III) ions were sourced from metal-containing wastewaters and reduced to MNPs by electrons harvested from organic substrates. It was revealed that 14.4 kJ and 3.9 kJ of primary fossil resource

  15. Optimal size for heating efficiency of superparamagnetic dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles for application in magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-06-01

    Dextran-coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with average particle sizes of 4 and 19 nm were synthesized through in situ and semi-two-step co-precipitation methods, respectively. The experimental results confirm the formation of pure phase of magnetite as well as the presence of dextran layer on the surface of modified magnetite nanoparticles. The results also reveal that both samples have the superparamagnetic behavior. Furthermore, calorimetric measurements show that the dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with an average size of 4 nm cannot produce any appreciable heat under a biologically safe alternating magnetic field used in hyperthermia therapy; whereas, the larger ones (average size of 19 nm) are able to increase the temperature of their surrounding medium up to above therapeutic range. In addition, measured specific absorption rate (SAR) values confirm that magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 19 nm are very excellent candidates for application in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

  16. Trace Element Geochemistry of Magnetite and Accesory Phases from El Romeral Iron Oxide-Apatite Deposit, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, F.; Rojas, P.; Reich, M.; Deditius, A.; Simon, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) or "Kiruna-type" deposits are an important source of Fe, P, REE, among other essential elements for society. Three main hypotheses have been proposed to explain the genesis of these controversial deposits, which invoke liquid immiscibility, hydrothermal replacement or a magmatic-hydrothermal origin driven by flotation of magnetite-bubble pairs. Here we focus on the El Romeral, one of the largest IOA deposits located in the southernmost part of the Cretaceous Chilean Iron Belt. We combined SEM observations and EMPA analyses of magnetite, actinolite, pyrite, and apatite, with micro-Raman determinations of mineral inclusions within magnetite grains. Two textural types of magnetite were identified at El Romeral: (i) inclusion-rich magnetite (Mag I), and (ii) inclusion-poor magnetite (Mag II) that are commonly surrounding the inclusion-rich Mag I grains. Mag I is characterized by high V ( 2500-2800 ppm) and Ti (300-1000 ppm) contents with high-temperature mineral inclusions such as ilmenite, Ti-pargasite and clinochlore at depth, and quartz and phlogopite inclusions in shallower samples. These characteristics are consistent with a magmatic origin for Mag I. Inclusion-poor magnetite (Mag II) have high V (2400-2600 ppm) and lower Ti (70-200 ppm) contents than Mag I, which point to chemical changes of the mineralizing fluid(s). An increase in thermal gradient with depth is evidenced by the presence of high-temperature (low #Fe) actinolite, as well as F-rich apatite and pyrite with high Co:Ni (>1) in the deep zones. In contrast, lower Co:Ni ratios (<0.5) in pyrite and higher Cl contents in OH-rich apatite are detected in samples from shallower levels. This vertical chemical variation supports a magmatic-hydrothermal origin for the El Romeral deposit, and point to compositional changes driven by decompression of a magnetite-fluid suspension.

  17. Atomic scale study of thermal reduction of nano goethite coexisting with magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    singh, L. Herojit; Govindaraj, R.; Mythili, R.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2013-02-01

    Evolution of the local structure and magnetic properties of nano particles of goethite having magnetite as a composite due to controlled annealing treatments in vacuum has been studied using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Importance of size, defect associated with structural OH- for the observed structural and magnetic properties of goethite has been emphasized in this study. Present Mossbauer results show that thermal annealing at low temperatures (420-550 K) lead to a partial conversion / reduction of orthorhombic goethite to cubic spinel oxides such as maghemite and off-stochiometric magnetite. This study further establishes that annealing treatments beyond 650 K predominantly results in topotactic conversion of goethite to haematite. Underlying physics of the transitions of goethite to iron oxides and the important role of desorbed hydrogen for the orthorhombic to cubic structural transitions has been elucidated in this study.

  18. Atomic scale study of thermal reduction of nano goethite coexisting with magnetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Herojit singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the local structure and magnetic properties of nano particles of goethite having magnetite as a composite due to controlled annealing treatments in vacuum has been studied using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Importance of size, defect associated with structural OH- for the observed structural and magnetic properties of goethite has been emphasized in this study. Present Mossbauer results show that thermal annealing at low temperatures (420-550 K lead to a partial conversion / reduction of orthorhombic goethite to cubic spinel oxides such as maghemite and off-stochiometric magnetite. This study further establishes that annealing treatments beyond 650 K predominantly results in topotactic conversion of goethite to haematite. Underlying physics of the transitions of goethite to iron oxides and the important role of desorbed hydrogen for the orthorhombic to cubic structural transitions has been elucidated in this study.

  19. Preparation and characterization of ω-functionalized polystyrene-magnetite nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Liming; Sun Weilin; Kim, Jungahn

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles were prepared by in situ precipitation and oxidation of ferrous ions in the presence of ω-functionalized polystyrenes having carboxylate, sulfonate, thiol, and thiolated groups. Based on the results for the orthogonal experimental design, both the ratio of the concentration of iron precursor to polymer and the reaction temperature were the major factors controlling the particle size and its shape morphology. By adjusting the reaction conditions, the iron oxide particle size can be effectively controlled in the range between 2 and 20 nm. The magnetite-based polymer composite was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Magnetization measurements revealed that the nanocomposite materials exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature

  20. Preparation and characterization of {omega}-functionalized polystyrene-magnetite nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Liming [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)]. E-mail: cejlm@zju.edu.cn; Sun Weilin [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kim, Jungahn [Polymer Hybrids Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by in situ precipitation and oxidation of ferrous ions in the presence of {omega}-functionalized polystyrenes having carboxylate, sulfonate, thiol, and thiolated groups. Based on the results for the orthogonal experimental design, both the ratio of the concentration of iron precursor to polymer and the reaction temperature were the major factors controlling the particle size and its shape morphology. By adjusting the reaction conditions, the iron oxide particle size can be effectively controlled in the range between 2 and 20 nm. The magnetite-based polymer composite was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Magnetization measurements revealed that the nanocomposite materials exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  1. Fabrication of amine-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles for water treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Candace C. P. [University of South Australia, Ian Wark Research Institute (Australia); Gallard, Herve [Universite de Poitiers, Laboratoire de Chimie et Microbiologie de l' Eau (LCME)-UMR CNRS 6008 (France); Majewski, Peter, E-mail: peter.majewski@unisa.edu.au [Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, School of Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering (Australia)

    2012-03-15

    Amine-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized by a one pot water based process using N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine (TRIS) as surfactant. The prepared functionalised nanoparticles are characterised by BET surface area measurements, X-ray diffraction, zeta potential measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The results clearly show the presence of TRIS on the surface of the nanoparticles. XPS analysis indicates the presence of very small amounts of maghemite on the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles. Water treatment test shows that the prepared nanoparticles are capable to remove natural organic matter (NOM) from natural water samples. The removal of NOM by the prepared particles is characterized by analysing the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV{sub 254}) after the treatment of the water samples at various doses and treatment times.

  2. Definitive identification of magnetite nanoparticles in the abdomen of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desoil, M [Biological Physics Department, University of Mons-Hainaut (Belgium); Gillis, P [Biological Physics Department, University of Mons-Hainaut (Belgium); Gossuin, Y [Biological Physics Department, University of Mons-Hainaut (Belgium); Pankhurst, Q A [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1E 7HN (United Kingdom); Hautot, D [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1E 7HN (United Kingdom); Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-en-Trent, ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    The biogenic magnetic properties of the honeybee Apis mellifera were investigated with a view to understanding the bee's physiological response to magnetic fields. The magnetisations of bee abdomens on one hand, and heads and thoraxes on the other hand, were measured separately as functions of temperature and field. Both the antiferromagnetic responses of the ferrihydrite cores of the iron storage protein ferritin, and the ferrimagnetic responses of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) particles, were observed. Relatively large magnetite particles (ca. 30 nm or more), capable of retaining a remanent magnetisation at room temperature, were found in the abdomens, but were absent in the heads and thoraxes. In both samples, more than 98% of the iron atoms were due to ferritin.

  3. Fabrication of amine-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles for water treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Candace C. P.; Gallard, Hervé; Majewski, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Amine-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized by a one pot water based process using N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine (TRIS) as surfactant. The prepared functionalised nanoparticles are characterised by BET surface area measurements, X-ray diffraction, zeta potential measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The results clearly show the presence of TRIS on the surface of the nanoparticles. XPS analysis indicates the presence of very small amounts of maghemite on the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles. Water treatment test shows that the prepared nanoparticles are capable to remove natural organic matter (NOM) from natural water samples. The removal of NOM by the prepared particles is characterized by analysing the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV 254 ) after the treatment of the water samples at various doses and treatment times.

  4. Detecting bacterial magnetite in sediments: strengths and limitations of FMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) is increasingly being used as a diagnostic tool for identifying bacterial magnetite in sediments [e.g., Kopp et al. 2007; Kind et al. 2011, Roberts et al. 2011 ], the reason being that magnetic bacteria have a characteristic FMR fingerprint which is not known from inorganic geological samples [Kopp & Kirschvink, 2008]. The diagnostic FMR features of single-stranded magnetite chains are a g-value 2, quite opposite to what we know from single-stranded chains. Therefore, in order to better understand possible biogenic FMR fingerprints and to refine the screen, there is a clear need to acquire FMR spectra of magnetic bacteria with different chain configurations and, in particular, of greigite producing bacteria.

  5. A study on the effect of chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles on earthworm: Eudrilus eugeniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrot, Antony V.; Justin, C.; Padmanaban, S.; Burman, Ujjala

    2017-02-01

    Most look into the benefits of the nanoparticles, but keeping aside the benefits; this study focuses on the impacts of nanoparticles on living systems. Improper disposal of nanoparticles into the environment is a subject of pollution or nano-pollution which in turn affects the flora and fauna in the ecosystem, particularly soil ecosystem. Thus, this study was done to understand the impacts of chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles on earthworm— Eudrilus eugeniae, a soil-dependent organism which acquires food and nutrition from decaying matters. The chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Earthworms were allowed to interact with different concentrations of synthesized nanoparticles and the effect of the nanoparticles was analysed by studying the phenotypic changes followed by histology and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analyses.

  6. Preparation of size-controlled (30-100 nm) magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, K.; Ikeda, M.; Gokon, N.; Tsubouchi, S.; Narimatsu, H.; Mochizuki, Y.; Sakamoto, S.; Sandhu, A.; Abe, M.; Handa, H.

    2007-01-01

    Size-controlled magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with several dozen nanometers (nm) were synthesized for biomedical applications. Nanoparticles of single-phase magnetite, as revealed by X-ray analyses and magnetic measurements, were prepared by oxidizing ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH) 2 ) with a weak oxidant NaNO 3 in an N 2 -deaerated aqueous NaOH solution (pH=12-13) at various temperatures below 37 deg. C. As the synthesis temperature increases from 4 to 37 deg. C, the MNPs are decreased in size (d) from 102±5.6 to 31.7±4.9 nm and widened in size distribution, Δd/d increases from 5.5% to 15%. Prepared without using any surfactant, the MNPs are advantageous for immobilizing functional molecules stably on the surfaces for biomedical applications

  7. Magnetite Fe3O4 (111) Surfaces: Impact of Defects on Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-04

    We present a comprehensive investigation, via first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, of various surface terminations of magnetite, Fe3O4 (111), a major iron oxide which has also a number of applications in electronics and spintronics. We compare the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure among the different surfaces terminations. Interestingly, we find that surfaces modified with point defects and adatoms can be more stable than bulk-like terminations. These surfaces show different surface chemistry, electronic structures and distinctive spin polarization features near the Fermi level from those previously considered in the literature. Our studies provide an atomic level insight for magnetite surfaces, which is a necessary step to understanding their interfaces with organic layers in OLED and spintronic devices.

  8. Magnetite Nanoparticles Coated with Rifampicin and Chlortetracycline for Drug Delivery Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadejde, Claudia; Ciurlica, Ecaterina Foca-nici; Creanga, Dorina; Carlescu, Aurelian; Badescu, Vasile

    2010-01-01

    Four types of biocompatible magnetic fluids based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles with Fe 3 O 4 cores were functionalized with antibiotics (rifampicin or chlortetracycline) as potential candidates for in vivo biomedical applications, such as magnetically controlled drug delivery. The synthesis consisted in coprecipitation of iron oxide in basic, as well as in acid medium, followed by the dispersion of the resulted magnetite nanoparticles in aqueous solution containing the antibiotic. The chosen method to prepare the magnetite-core/drug-shell systems avoided intermediate organic coating of the magnetic nanoparticles. Comparative analysis of the rheological features of the aqueous magnetic fluid samples was performed. The structural features of the coated magnetic particles were investigated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM). Good crystallinity and adequate stability in time were evidenced. Drug delivery curves were spectrophotometrically provided.

  9. Solubility of magnetite in high temperature water and an approach to generalized solubility computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinov, K.; Ishigure, K.; Matsuura, C.; Hiroishi, D.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetite solubility in pure water was measured at 423 K in a fully teflon-covered autoclave system. A fairly good agreement was found to exist between the experimental data and calculation results obtained from the thermodynamical model, based on the assumption of Fe 3 O 4 dissolution and Fe 2 O 3 deposition reactions. A generalized thermodynamical approach to the solubility computations under complex conditions on the basis of minimization of the total system Gibbs free energy was proposed. The forms of the chemical equilibria were obtained for various systems initially defined and successfully justified by the subsequent computations. A [Fe 3+ ] T -[Fe 2+ ] T phase diagram was introduced as a tool for systematic understanding of the magnetite dissolution phenomena in pure water and under oxidizing and reducing conditions. (orig.)

  10. Contribution to the thermodynamics of the solubilisation of magnetite in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.; Montel, J.; Beslu, P.; Lalet, A.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetite is solubilized in the presence of hydrogen according to three reactions. The variations of its solubility as a function of temperature and pH can be calculated on the basis of thermodynamic data for every species used. Solubility measurements have been carried out under autoclave conditions between 25 0 C and 300 0 C in aqueous potassium solution 10 -2 N. The measurements have helped to determine the solubility factor. They have also shown the variation of the mean magnetite crystal size with the experimental conditions and its influence on solubility. At higher temperatures, solubility is reduced with time and the crystals become larger while the reverse phenomenon occurs at normal temperature. (orig.) [de

  11. Definitive identification of magnetite nanoparticles in the abdomen of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoil, M.; Gillis, P.; Gossuin, Y.; Pankhurst, Q. A.; Hautot, D.

    2005-01-01

    The biogenic magnetic properties of the honeybee Apis mellifera were investigated with a view to understanding the bee's physiological response to magnetic fields. The magnetisations of bee abdomens on one hand, and heads and thoraxes on the other hand, were measured separately as functions of temperature and field. Both the antiferromagnetic responses of the ferrihydrite cores of the iron storage protein ferritin, and the ferrimagnetic responses of nanoscale magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, were observed. Relatively large magnetite particles (ca. 30 nm or more), capable of retaining a remanent magnetisation at room temperature, were found in the abdomens, but were absent in the heads and thoraxes. In both samples, more than 98% of the iron atoms were due to ferritin.

  12. Definitive identification of magnetite nanoparticles in the abdomen of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desoil, M; Gillis, P; Gossuin, Y; Pankhurst, Q A; Hautot, D

    2005-01-01

    The biogenic magnetic properties of the honeybee Apis mellifera were investigated with a view to understanding the bee's physiological response to magnetic fields. The magnetisations of bee abdomens on one hand, and heads and thoraxes on the other hand, were measured separately as functions of temperature and field. Both the antiferromagnetic responses of the ferrihydrite cores of the iron storage protein ferritin, and the ferrimagnetic responses of nanoscale magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) particles, were observed. Relatively large magnetite particles (ca. 30 nm or more), capable of retaining a remanent magnetisation at room temperature, were found in the abdomens, but were absent in the heads and thoraxes. In both samples, more than 98% of the iron atoms were due to ferritin

  13. Magnetite Fe3O4 (111) Surfaces: Impact of Defects on Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Jung Hyun; Osman, Osman I; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Winget, Paul; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation, via first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, of various surface terminations of magnetite, Fe3O4 (111), a major iron oxide which has also a number of applications in electronics and spintronics. We compare the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure among the different surfaces terminations. Interestingly, we find that surfaces modified with point defects and adatoms can be more stable than bulk-like terminations. These surfaces show different surface chemistry, electronic structures and distinctive spin polarization features near the Fermi level from those previously considered in the literature. Our studies provide an atomic level insight for magnetite surfaces, which is a necessary step to understanding their interfaces with organic layers in OLED and spintronic devices.

  14. High pressure in-situ X-ray diffraction study on Zn-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, S.; Bilovol, V.; Pampillo, L. G.; Grinblat, F.; Errandonea, D.

    2018-03-01

    We have performed high pressure synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction experiments on two different samples of Zn-doped magnetite nanoparticles (formula Fe(3-x)ZnxO4; x = 0.2, 0.5). The structural behavior of then a noparticles was studied up to 13.5 GPa for x = 0.2, and up to 17.4 GPa for x = 0.5. We have found that both systems remain in the cubic spinel structure as expected for this range of applied pressures. The analysis of the unit cell volume vs. pressure results in bulk modulus values lower than in both end-members, magnetite (Fe3O4) and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), suggesting that chemical disorder may favor compressibility, which is expected to improve the increase of the Neel temperature under compression.

  15. Experimental evidence for a Mott-Wigner glass phase of magnetite above the Verwey temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Chan, K.C.B.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    New muon-spin-relaxation (μSR) results on magnetite are reported and discussed in light of earlier Moessbauer, neutron, and μSR results. Modification of the μSR anomaly (observed at 247 K in zero field), when an external magnetic field is applied, provides evidence that the anomaly results from cross relaxation between the muon Larmor precession and the electron-correlation process in the B sublattice. The combined results strongly indicate that phonon-assisted electron hopping is the principal conduction mechanism above the Verwey transition temperature (T/sub V/). Together with theoretical evidence, these data support Mott's suggestion that above T/sub V/ magnetite is in the Wigner-glass state

  16. Carboxylic acid effects on the size and catalytic activity of magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan; Parchegani, Fatemeh; Alavi, Sohaila

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) were successfully synthesized in diethylene glycol in the presence of carboxylic acids. They were characterized using XRD, SEM and FTIR. Carboxylic acid plays a critical role in determining the morphology, particle size and size distribution of the resulting particles. The results show that as-prepared magnetite nanoparticles are monodisperse and highly crystalline. The nanoparticles can be easily dispersed in aqueous media and other polar solvents due to coated by a layer of hydrophilic polyol and carboxylic acid ligands in situ. Easily prepared Fe3O4-NPs have been shown to be an active, recyclable, and highly selective catalyst for the epoxidation of cyclic olefins with aqueous 30% H2O2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Squid measurement of the Verwey transition on epitaxial (1 0 0) magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dediu, V.; Arisi, E.; Bergenti, I.; Riminucci, A.; Solzi, M.; Pernechele, C.; Natali, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report results on epitaxial magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) thin films grown by electron beam ablation on (1 0 0) MgAl 2 O 4 substrates. At 120 K magnetite undergoes a structural and electronic transition, the so-called Verwey transition, at which magnetic and conducting properties of the material change. We observed the Verwey transition on epitaxial films with a thickness of 50 nm by comparing zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) curves measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Observation of the Verwey transition by SQUID measurements in the films is sign of their high crystalline quality. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been found by magneto-optical Kerr rotation (MOKE) and confirmed by SQUID measurements, with a hysteresis loop showing a coercive field of hundreds of Oe

  18. Micromagnetism in (001) magnetite by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figuera, Juan de la; Vergara, Lucía; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Quesada, Adrian; Schmid, Andreas K.

    2013-01-01

    Spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy was used to image a magnetite crystal with (001) surface orientation. Sets of spin-dependent images of magnetic domain patterns observed in this surface were used to map the direction of the magnetization vector with high spatial and angular resolution. We find that domains are magnetized along the surface directions, and domain wall structures include 90° and 180° walls. A type of unusually curved domain walls are interpreted as Néel-capped surface terminations of 180° Bloch walls. - Highlights: ► The (001) surface of magnetite is imaged by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy. ► The magnetic domain microstructure is resolved. ► Magnetic easy axes in this surface are found to be along directions. ► Magnetic domain wall structures include wide Néel-caps

  19. Micromagnetism in (001) magnetite by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figuera, Juan de la, E-mail: juan.delafiguera@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química-Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Vergara, Lucía [Instituto de Química-Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); N' Diaye, Alpha T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Quesada, Adrian [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Calle Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Schmid, Andreas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy was used to image a magnetite crystal with (001) surface orientation. Sets of spin-dependent images of magnetic domain patterns observed in this surface were used to map the direction of the magnetization vector with high spatial and angular resolution. We find that domains are magnetized along the surface <110> directions, and domain wall structures include 90° and 180° walls. A type of unusually curved domain walls are interpreted as Néel-capped surface terminations of 180° Bloch walls. - Highlights: ► The (001) surface of magnetite is imaged by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy. ► The magnetic domain microstructure is resolved. ► Magnetic easy axes in this surface are found to be along <110> directions. ► Magnetic domain wall structures include wide Néel-caps.

  20. The contribution of vanadium and titanium on improving methylene blue decolorization through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction catalyzed by their co-doped magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Zhong, Yuanhong; Zhu, Sanyuan; Ma, Lingya; Yuan, Peng; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping; Jiang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ti-V co-doped magnetite has strong catalytic activity in UV-Fenton reaction. ► Ti 4+ is more positive to adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite than V 3+ . ► Mechanism of substitution increasing the adsorption and catalytic activity. ► The obtained results are benefit for application of magnetite in treating wastewater. - Abstract: This study investigated the methylene blue (MB) decolorization through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction catalyzed by V-Ti co-doped magnetites, with emphasis on comparing the contribution of V and Ti cations on improving the adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite. In the well crystallized spinel structure, both Ti 4+ and V 3+ occupied the octahedral sites. Ti 4+ showed a more obvious effect on increasing specific surface area and superficial hydroxyl amount than V 3+ did, resulting in a significant improvement of the adsorption ability of magnetite to MB. The UV introduction greatly accelerated MB degradation. And magnetite with more Ti and less V displayed better catalytic activity in MB degradation through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction. The transformation of degradation products and individual contribution from vanadium and titanium on improving adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite were also investigated. These new insights are of high importance for well understanding the interface interaction between contaminants and metal doped magnetites, and the environmental application of natural and synthetic magnetites.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of nanometric magnetite coated by oleic acid and the surfactant CTAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celis, J. Almazán, E-mail: jony-jac-5@hotmail.com; Olea Mejía, O. F., E-mail: oleaoscar@yahoo.com [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEMéx-UNAM (Mexico); Cabral-Prieto, A., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.mx; García-Sosa, I., E-mail: irma.garcia@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Derat-Escudero, R., E-mail: escu@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigación de materiales de la UNAM (Mexico); Baggio Saitovitch, E. M., E-mail: esaitovitch@yahoo.com.br; Alzamora Camarena, M., E-mail: mariella.alzamora@gmail.com [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquizas Físicas (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Nanometric magnetite (nm-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) particles were prepared by the reverse co-precipitation synthesis method, obtaining particle sizes that ranged from 4 to 8.5 nm. In their synthesis, the concentration of iron salts of ferric nitrate, Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}⋅9H{sub 2}O, and ferrous sulfate, FeSO{sub 4}⋅7H{sub 2}O, were varied relative to the chemical reaction volume and by using different surfactants such as oleic acid (OA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The nm-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), magnetic and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Typical asymmetrical and/or broad lines shapes appeared in all Mössbauer spectra of the as prepared samples suggesting strong magnetic inter-particle interactions, reducing these interactions to some extent by gentle mechanical grinding. For the smallest particles, maghemite instead of magnetite was the main preparation product as low temperature Mössbauer and magnetic measurements indicated. For the intermediate and largest particles a mixture of magnetite and maghemite phases were produced as the saturation magnetization values of M{sub S} ∼ 60 emu/g indicated; these values were measured for most samples, independently of the coating surfactant concentration, and according to the ZFC-FC curves the blocking temperatures were 225K and 275K for the smallest and largest magnetite nanoparticles, respectively. The synthesis method was highly reproducible.

  2. Magnetic control of heterogeneous ice nucleation with nanophase magnetite: Biophysical and agricultural implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Horikawa, Masamoto; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Golash, Harry N

    2018-05-22

    In supercooled water, ice nucleation is a stochastic process that requires ∼250-300 molecules to transiently achieve structural ordering before an embryonic seed crystal can nucleate. This happens most easily on crystalline surfaces, in a process termed heterogeneous nucleation; without such surfaces, water droplets will supercool to below -30 °C before eventually freezing homogeneously. A variety of fundamental processes depends on heterogeneous ice nucleation, ranging from desert-blown dust inducing precipitation in clouds to frost resistance in plants. Recent experiments have shown that crystals of nanophase magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) are powerful nucleation sites for this heterogeneous crystallization of ice, comparable to other materials like silver iodide and some cryobacterial peptides. In natural materials containing magnetite, its ferromagnetism offers the possibility that magneto-mechanical motion induced by external oscillating magnetic fields could act to disrupt the water-crystal interface, inhibiting the heterogeneous nucleation process in subfreezing water and promoting supercooling. For this to act, the magneto-mechanical rotation of the particles should be higher than the magnitude of Brownian motions. We report here that 10-Hz precessing magnetic fields, at strengths of 1 mT and above, on ∼50-nm magnetite crystals dispersed in ultrapure water, meet these criteria and do indeed produce highly significant supercooling. Using these rotating magnetic fields, we were able to elicit supercooling in two representative plant and animal tissues (celery and bovine muscle), both of which have detectable, natural levels of ferromagnetic material. Tailoring magnetic oscillations for the magnetite particle size distribution in different tissues could maximize this supercooling effect. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Redox reactions of Tc{sup VII} with magnetite and mackinawite. Solving an old enigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcintas, E.; Gaona, X.; Altmeier, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    While the reduction of heptavalent technetium, Tc(VII), by magnetite and mackinawite under anoxic conditions is well known, the identification of the resulting Tc(IV) species shows substantial disagreement between different studies. Here we use a systematic variation of initial Tc concentration, loading and pH to decipher the Tc species by EXAFS spectroscopy and to shine light on their formation pathways.

  4. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications. -- Graphical abstract: A large amount of Lewis acid sites were found in the highly dispersed magnetite which is supported on the SWCNT outer surface. Display Omitted Research highlights: → The obtained materials were completely characterized with XRD, Raman and SEM-TEM. → DRIFT, TGA and adsorption of the composites allowed understand the material formation. → This is the first report of a study of Lewis sites by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  5. Atomistic model application to the problem of magnetite adhesion on iron BCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forti; M; Alonso, P; Gargano, P; Rubiolo, G

    2012-01-01

    Oxide scale adhesion on a metal substrate has been investigated in the Magnetite - BCC Iron system. An Universal Binding Energy Relation (UBER) has been applied to obtain the interface energy from a fitting parameter. The interface energy thus calculated is in a reasonable order of magnitude when compared to experimental data for similar systems. This result allows this technique to be used to develop a comparative scale based on quantitative data which otherwise would require complex experiments to be obtained (author)

  6. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  7. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  8. Physicochemical characteristics of gamma irradiation crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol)/magnetite ferrogel composite

    OpenAIRE

    Marinović-Cincović, Milena T.; Radosavljević, Aleksandra N.; Krstić, Jelena I.; Spasojević, Jelena P.; Bibić, Nataša M.; Mitrić, Miodrag N.; Kačarević-Popović, Zorica M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field sensitive gels, ferrogels are new promising class of hydrogels. The coupling of hydrogels and magnetic particles has potential application in soft actuators such as artificial muscles or for hyperthermia application. Here a composite of magnetite particles (Fe3O4) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel is developed using gamma irradiation as a crosslinking agent. PVA and Fe3O4 were chosen because of their well-established biocompatibility, ra...

  9. TCE degradation in groundwater by chelators-assisted Fenton-like reaction of magnetite: Sand columns demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Daqing; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Wu, Zhangxiong; Wang, Na; Jin, Yaoyao; Dong, Weiyang; Chen, Xiao Dong; Ke, Qiang

    2018-03-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in sand columns has been investigated to evaluate the potential of chelates-enhanced Fenton-like reaction with magnetite as iron source for in situ treatment of TCE-contaminated groundwater. The results showed that successful degradation of TCE in sand columns was obtained by nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-assisted Fenton-like reaction of magnetite. Addition of ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) resulted in an inhibitory effect on TCE degradation in sand columns. Similar to EDDS, addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) also led to an inhibition of TCE degradation in sand column with small content of magnetite (0.5 w.t.%), but enhanced TCE degradation in sand column with high content of magnetite (7.0 w.t.%). Additionally, the presence of NTA, EDDS and EDTA greatly decreased H 2 O 2 uptake in sand columns due to the competition between chelates and H 2 O 2 for surface sites on magnetite (and sand). Furthermore, the presented results show that magnetite in sand columns remained stable in a long period operation of 230 days without significant loss of performance in terms of TCE degradation and H 2 O 2 uptake. Moreover, it was found that TCE was degraded mainly to formic acid and chloride ion, and the formation of chlorinated organic intermediates was minimal by this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidences of the stability of magnetite in soil from Northeastern Argentina by Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causevic, H.; Morras, H.; Mijovilovich, A.; Saragovi, C.

    2004-01-01

    In red soils from southern Brazil magnetite was reported to be pedogenically unstable, weathering to maghemite. However, in similar soils from northeastern Argentina magnetite was found in all size fractions. This finding motivates the mineralogical study of an Ultisol at different depths in order to understand the influence of anthropic and natural factors in the weathering of the magnetic minerals of these subtropical soils. The sand fraction of the B t22 horizon (105-155 cm depth) of a clayey red Ultisol from the subtropical forest of Misiones, Argentina, was studied by X-ray diffraction, saturation magnetization σ s , optical microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Saturation magnetization for the whole sand fraction (wsf), the non-magnetic sand fraction (nmsf) and the magnetic sand fraction (msf) are 10.79, 1.50 and 16.92 JT -1 kg -1 , respectively. Mainly quartz, ilmenite, Al-substituted hematite, goethite, maghemite and magnetite are found. Magnetite-maghemite contents are high, and magnetite is predominant in the msf. Results are compared with those from the upper B 1 horizon (10-35 cm depth) of the same soil in which a lower σ s(wsf) value, and higher values of σ s(msf) and of (σ s(msf) -σ s(wsf) ) were measured. These results confirm the stability of magnetite in this soil contrasting with other results on soils from neighbouring areas

  11. Oriented growth of magnetite along the carbon nanotubes via covalently bonded method in a simple solvothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan Yingqing; Zhao Rui; Meng Fanbing; Lei Yajie; Zhong Jiachun; Yang Xulin [Research Branch of Functional Materials, Institute of Microelectronic and Solid State Electronic, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Liu Xiaobo, E-mail: liuxb@uestc.edu.cn [Research Branch of Functional Materials, Institute of Microelectronic and Solid State Electronic, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Novel CNTs/magnetite hybrid materials were prepared via covalently bonded method. > Stable interaction between nitriles and iron ion promoted the oriented growth of magnetite. > The hybrid material exhibited higher magnetism and electromagnetic properties - Abstract: A new type of CNTs/magnetite hybrid material was prepared via covalently bonded method in a simple solvothermal system using FeCl{sub 3} as iron source, ethylene glycol as the reducing agent, and 4-aminophenoxyphthalonitrile-grafted CNTs as templates. The magnetite nanoparticles, with the diameters of 70-80 nm, were self-assembled along the CNTs. The FTIR, UV-vis and DSC revealed that a stable covalent bond between nitriles group and iron ion promoted the oriented growth of magnetite nanoparticles along the CNTs, resulting in good dispersibility and solution storage stability. The magnetic properties measurements indicated that a higher saturated magnetization (70.7 emu g{sup -1}) existed in the CNTs/magnetite hybrid material, which further enhanced the electromagnetic properties. The magnetic loss was caused mainly by natural resonance, which is in good agreement with the Kittel equation results. The novel electromagnetic hybrid material is believed to have potential applications in the microwave absorbing performances.

  12. Oriented growth of magnetite along the carbon nanotubes via covalently bonded method in a simple solvothermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Yingqing; Zhao Rui; Meng Fanbing; Lei Yajie; Zhong Jiachun; Yang Xulin; Liu Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Novel CNTs/magnetite hybrid materials were prepared via covalently bonded method. → Stable interaction between nitriles and iron ion promoted the oriented growth of magnetite. → The hybrid material exhibited higher magnetism and electromagnetic properties - Abstract: A new type of CNTs/magnetite hybrid material was prepared via covalently bonded method in a simple solvothermal system using FeCl 3 as iron source, ethylene glycol as the reducing agent, and 4-aminophenoxyphthalonitrile-grafted CNTs as templates. The magnetite nanoparticles, with the diameters of 70-80 nm, were self-assembled along the CNTs. The FTIR, UV-vis and DSC revealed that a stable covalent bond between nitriles group and iron ion promoted the oriented growth of magnetite nanoparticles along the CNTs, resulting in good dispersibility and solution storage stability. The magnetic properties measurements indicated that a higher saturated magnetization (70.7 emu g -1 ) existed in the CNTs/magnetite hybrid material, which further enhanced the electromagnetic properties. The magnetic loss was caused mainly by natural resonance, which is in good agreement with the Kittel equation results. The novel electromagnetic hybrid material is believed to have potential applications in the microwave absorbing performances.

  13. The effect of magnetite on corrosion of stainless steel (SUS309S) in deaerated synthetic sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, N.; Honda, A.

    1999-10-01

    The assessment of lifetime of carbon steel overpack needs to clear the effects of corrosion products on the corrosion rate of carbon steel. It is reported that the corrosion of carbon steel was accelerated under the presence of magnetite as simulated corrosion products. Therefore, it is important to clear the mechanism of the acceleration of corrosion under the presence of magnetite. If carbon steel overpack will not be able to avoid the acceleration of corrosion under repository condition, some countermeasures have to be taken. One of the countermeasures against the effect of magnetite is considered to be the addition of alloying elements to a steel. The immersion test of stainless steel (SUS309S) as the extreme case of alloying was conducted under the presence of magnetite on the metal surface in synthetic sea water. As the result of this test, the corrosion of stainless steel (SUS309S) was not accelerated by the presence of magnetite. Therefore, it is expected that the susceptibility to the effect of magnetite is able to be reduced by addition of alloying elements to a steel. (author)

  14. Box-Behnken experimental design for chromium(VI) ions removal by bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Mihalache, Nicoleta; Botez, Adriana; Matei, Cristian; Berger, Daniela; Damian, Celina Maria; Ionita, Valentin

    2016-10-01

    In this study bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites were synthesised for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites and to reveal the uniform dispersion of nanomagnetite in the BC matrix. Magnetic properties were also measured to confirm the magnetite immobilization on bacterial cellulose membrane. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration, solution pH and solid/liquid ratio upon chromium removal were examined using the statistical Box-Behnken Design. Because of the possibility of magnetite dissolution during chromium(VI) adsorption, the degree of iron leaching was also analysed in the same conditions as Cr(VI) adsorption. From the factors affecting chromium(VI) adsorption the most important was solution pH. The highest Cr(VI) removal efficiency was observed at pH 4, accompanied by the lowest iron leaching in the solution. The adsorption experiments also indicated that the adsorption process of chromium(VI) is well described by Freundlich adsorption model. Our results proved that the BC-magnetite composites could be used for an efficient removal of chromium(VI) from diluted solutions with a minimum magnetite dissolution during operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis, structure, morphology and stoichiometry characterization of cluster and nano magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, L. Herojit; Pati, S.S. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Guimarães, Edi M. [Institute of Geoscience, University of Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Rodrigues, P.A.M.; Oliveira, Aderbal C. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Garg, V.K., E-mail: vijgarg@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, 70919-970, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the stoichiometry of magnetite nanoparticles using three spectroscopic techniques: Mössbauer, photoacoustic and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). By varying the weight ratio of the Fe precursor to the reducing agent (sodium acetate) and a post-synthesis annealing, we were able to synthesize samples with different amounts of Fe vacancies, from stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. By synthesizing magnetite in the presence of zeolite we obtained nanoparticles within the 3–10 nm diameter range. The spectroscopic results show that there is a correlation between the amount of Fe vacancies and (i) the optical absorption and (ii) the g-values from the Electron paramagnetic resonance EPR spectra of the nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Magnetite nanoparticles and cluster synthesized. • Photoacoustic spectroscopy is effective in determining the stoichiometry. • Particles with 9 nm size has 0 < δ < 0.14. • Less than 9 nm gives 0.14 < δ < 0.3 and size <3 nm have δ = 0.33 (i.e. γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

  16. PLA-b-PEG/magnetite hyperthermic agent prepared by Ugi four component condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Icart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ugi four component condensation (UFCC, is an important tool for the synthesis of different types of bioconjugate species. In this study, a PLA-PEG/magnetite magnetic composite was prepared by a synthetic-route approach based on UFCC. In particular, poly(lactic acid (PLA was synthesized by autocatalytic polycondensation. Also, poly(ethyleneglycol bis-amine (bis-amine PEG was synthesized by two different methods: via carbonyldiimidazol (CDI/ethylenediamine (ED (75% yield and via chlorate monochlorated acetyl (CCA/ED (95% yield. All products were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR 1H, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. In addition, magnetite was prepared and modified to generate aldehyde groups which are also necessary for UFCC. This product was characterized by DSC, TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD and magnetic force (MF techniques. Also, the magnetic composite PLA-PEG/magnetite was synthesized by UFCC. The calculated yield was equal to 80%. Furthermore, magnetic microspheres were prepared by the procedure of emulsion solvent-evaporation and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and magnetic induction hyperthermia (MIH. The main contribution of these results is to propose a new application for UFCC in the preparation of biomasked magnetic drug delivery systems able to improve the cancer treatment and even the welfare of the patients.

  17. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of magnetite based MRI contrast agent using cysteine as the biocapping coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Reza; Malek, Mahrooz; Hosseini, Hamid Reza Madaah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Masoudi, Afshin; Gu Ning; Zhang Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used cysteine as surfactant to synthesize stable magnetite-based ferrofluids. ► pH increase from 11 to 12 led to particle size decrease from 19.58 to 10.02 nm. ► Cytotoxicity assay showed that synthesized particles were biocompatible. ► MRI results showed that magnetite particles were accumulated in lymph nodes. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles (mean particle size ranging from 10 to 20 nm) were prepared by a biomolecule-assisted solution-phase approach under ultrasonic irradiation. Cysteine was used as the capping agent in the solution. The results show that cysteine could be an efficient biocapping agent in producing Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were characterized by XRD and VSM techniques, respectively. FT-IR was used to investigate the presence of cysteine on the nanoparticles surface. The influence of pH value of the solution on the size distribution and hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles were studied by TEM and DLS methods, respectively. The MTT assay performed by incubation of L929 cells, showed the good biocompability of synthesized ferrofluids. In vitro T1 and T2 relaxivity measurements along with in vivo studies, which were conducted on rats, demonstrate that synthesized nanoparticles are applicable as the contrast agents, especially for imaging of the lymphatic system.

  18. Spectroscopic and magnetic studies of highly dispersible superparamagnetic silica coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadyszak, Krzysztof [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Mariana Smo.luchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Kertmen, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmet.kertmen@pg.gda.pl [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Coy, Emerson [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Andruszkiewicz, Ryszard; Milewski, Sławomir [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Kardava, Irakli; Scheibe, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Chybczyńska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.chybczynska@ifmpan.poznan.pl [Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Mariana Smo.luchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Silica were obtained. • Magnetic response was studied by DC, AC magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy. • Nanoparticles show magnetite structure with a well-defined Verwey transition. • Samples show no inter particle magnetic interactions or agglomeration. - Abstract: Superparamagnetic behavior in aqueously well dispersible magnetite core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is presented. The magnetic properties of core-shell nanoparticles were measured with use of the DC, AC magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy. Particles where characterized by HR-TEM and Raman spectroscopy, showing a crystalline magnetic core of 11.5 ± 0.12 nm and an amorphous silica shell of 22 ± 1.5 nm in thickness. The DC, AC magnetic measurements confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of nanoparticles, additionally the EPR studies performed at much higher frequency than DC, AC magnetometry (9 GHz) have confirmed the paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles. Our results show the excellent magnetic behavior of the particles with a clear magnetite structure, which are desirable properties for environmental remediation and biomedical applications.

  19. Enhanced heterogeneous photo-Fenton process modified by magnetite and EDDS: BPA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenyu; Luo, Mengqi; Wei, Chaoshuai; Wang, Yinghui; Hanna, Khalil; Mailhot, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    In this research, magnetite and ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) are used in a heterogeneous photo-Fenton system in order to find a new way to remove organic contaminants from water. Influence of different parameters including magnetite dosage, EDDS concentration, H 2 O 2 concentration, and pH value were evaluated. The effect of different radical species including HO · and HO 2 · /O 2 ·- was investigated by addition of different scavengers into the system. The addition of EDDS improved the heterogeneous photo-Fenton degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) through the formation of photochemically efficient Fe-EDDS complex. This effect is dependent on the H 2 O 2 and EDDS concentrations and pH value. The high performance observed at pH 6.2 could be explained by the ability of O 2 ·- to generate Fe(II) from Fe(III) species reduction. GC-MS analysis suggested that the cleavage of the two benzene rings is the first degradation step followed by oxidation leading to the formation of the benzene derivatives. Then, the benzene ring was opened due to the attack of HO · radicals producing short-chain organic compounds of low molecular weight like glycerol and ethylene glycol. These findings regarding the capability of EDDS/magnetite system to promote heterogeneous photo-Fenton oxidation have important practical implications for water treatment technologies.

  20. Survival of Verwey transition in gadolinium-doped ultrasmall magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sunmog; Choi, Hyunkyung; Kim, Chul Sung; Lee, Gyeong Tae; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon; Park, Jeong Chan

    2017-09-28

    We have demonstrated that the Verwey transition, which is highly sensitive to impurities, survives in anisotropic Gd-doped magnetite nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the nanoparticles are uniformly distributed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and EDS mapping analysis confirm Gd-doping on the nanoparticles. The Verwey transition of the Gd-doped magnetite nanoparticles is robust and the temperature dependence of the magnetic moment (zero field cooling and field cooling) shows the same behaviour as that of the Verwey transition in bulk magnetite, at a lower transition temperature (∼110 K). In addition, irregularly shaped nanoparticles do not show the Verwey transition whereas square-shaped nanoparticles show the transition. Mössbauer spectral analysis shows that the slope of the magnetic hyperfine field and the electric quadrupole splitting change at the same temperature, meaning that the Verwey transition occurs at ∼110 K. These results would provide new insights into understanding the Verwey transition in nano-sized materials.

  1. Oxygen pressure-tuned epitaxy and magnetic properties of magnetite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junran [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Wenqing [York-Nanjing Joint Centre (YNJC) for Spintronics and Nanoengineering, Department of Electronics, The University of York, YO10 3DD (United Kingdom); Zhang, Minhao; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Niu, Wei; Gao, Ming [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Xuefeng, E-mail: xfwang@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Du, Jun [School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Rong [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Yongbing, E-mail: ybxu@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); York-Nanjing Joint Centre (YNJC) for Spintronics and Nanoengineering, Department of Electronics, The University of York, YO10 3DD (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Quasi-2D Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films were obtained by PLD. • RHEED under different oxygen pressure were observed. • Influence of oxygen pressure on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films were investigated. • Epitaxy and magnetic properties were tuned by oxygen pressure. • The ratio of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} fitted by XPS is the tuned factor of M{sub s}. - Abstract: Quasi-two-dimensional magnetite epitaxial thin films have been synthesized by pulsed laser deposition technique at various oxygen pressures. The saturation magnetizations of the magnetite films were found to decrease from 425 emu/cm{sup 3}, which is close to the bulk value, to 175 emu/cm{sup 3} as the growth atmospheres varying from high vacuum (∼1 × 10{sup −8} mbar) to oxygen pressure of 1 × 10{sup −3} mbar. The ratio of the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+} increases from 2 to 2.7 as oxygen pressure increasing shown by XPS fitting, which weakens the net magnetic moment generated by Fe{sup 2+} at octahedral sites as the spins of the Fe{sup 3+} ions at octahedral and tetrahedral sites are aligned in antiparallel. The results offer direct experimental evidence of the influence to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio and the magnetic moment in magnetite epitaxy films by oxygen pressure, which is significant for spintronic applications.

  2. Magnetite/CdTe magnetic-fluorescent composite nanosystem for magnetic separation and bio-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, Anup; Yadav, Prasad; Gholap, Haribhau; Jog, J P; Ogale, Satishchandra; Kale, Sonia; Shastry, Padma; Pasricha, Renu; Lefez, Benoit; Hannoyer, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    A new synthesis protocol is described to obtain a CdTe decorated magnetite bifunctional nanosystem via dodecylamine (DDA) as cross linker. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and fluorescence microscopy are used to characterize the constitution, size, composition and physical properties of these superparamagnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles. These CdTe decorated magnetite nanoparticles were then functionalized with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody to specifically target cells expressing this receptor. The EGFR is a transmembrane glycoprotein and is expressed on tumor cells from different tissue origins including human leukemic cell line Molt-4 cells. The magnetite-CdTe composite nanosystem is shown to perform excellently for specific selection, magnetic separation and fluorescent detection of EGFR positive Molt-4 cells from a mixed population. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy results show that this composite nanosystem has great potential in antibody functionalized magnetic separation and imaging of cells using cell surface receptor antibody.

  3. Preparation and adsorption properties of nano magnetite chitosan films for heavy metal ions from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasheen, M.R., E-mail: ragaei24@link.net [Water Pollution Research Department, Environmental Research Division, National Research Centre, 33-El Buhoth St., Dokki, Cairo, 12311 (Egypt); El-Sherif, Iman Y., E-mail: iman57us@yahoo.com [Water Pollution Research Department, Environmental Research Division, National Research Centre, 33-El Buhoth St., Dokki, Cairo, 12311 (Egypt); Tawfik, Magda E., E-mail: magdaemileta@yahoo.com [Polymers and Pigments Department, National Research Centre, 33-El Buhoth St., Dokki, Cairo, 12311 (Egypt); El-Wakeel, S.T., E-mail: shaimaa_tw@yahoo.com [Water Pollution Research Department, Environmental Research Division, National Research Centre, 33-El Buhoth St., Dokki, Cairo, 12311 (Egypt); El-Shahat, M.F., E-mail: elshahatmf@hotmail.com [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Khalifa El-Maamon St., Abbasiya Sq., 11566, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nano magnetite–chitosan films were prepared by casting method. • The efficiency of the prepared films for removing heavy metals was investigated. • The adsorption mechanism was studied using different isotherm and kinetic models. • Films reuse and metals recovery were studied. - Abstract: Nano magnetite chitosan (NMag–CS) film was prepared and characterized with different analytical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the formation of a pure magnetite structure and NMag–CS nanocomposite. TEM image of the film, revealed the uniform dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles inside chitosan matrix. The adsorption properties of the prepared film for copper, lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel metal ions were evaluated. Different factors affecting the uptake behavior by the composite films such as time, initial pH and film dose were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium attained using 2 g/L of the film after 120 min of reaction. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation for all metals. The metals regenerated from films with an efficiency greater than 95% using 0.1 M ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and films were successfully reused for adsorption.

  4. Long-term clearance of inhaled magnetite and polystyrene latex from the lung: a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, R.B.; Halpern, M.; Lippmann, M. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Inst. of Environmental Medicine)

    1982-01-01

    As part of a larger study evaluating the applicability of a magnetic detection technique for monitoring lung retention of inhaled particles, simultaneous radiological measurements of the retention of magnetite and polystyrene latex particles in four donkeys were performed. The radiometric measurements were performed using a scintillation detector series modified for separation of the higher energy ..gamma..-emissions of /sup 59/Fe and /sup 85/Sr. In all animals, after 24 hr post-exposure, both polystyrene and magnetite exhibited a relatively rapid phase for 80 days (Tsub(1/2) = 15-22 days) which, in three donkeys, was clearly followed by a slower phase (Tsub(1/2) = 42-173 days); activity levels after 80 days in the fourth donkey were too low to permit determination of clearance rate. During the second phase, a deviation in pattern was clearly observed between the two aerosols, the polystyrene being cleared consistently faster than the magnetite. It is suggested that this deviation implies that, beginning at this time, there were functional differences between the dominant clearance mechanisms for the two aerosols. Exactly what these mechanisms were, or whether the difference was attributable to specific differences in particle characteristics, could not be determined.

  5. Long-term clearance of inhaled magnetite and polystyrene latex from the lung: a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, R.B.; Halpern, M.; Lippmann, M.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a larger study evaluating the applicability of a magnetic detection technique for monitoring lung retention of inhaled particles, simultaneous radiological measurements of the retention of magnetite and polystyrene latex particles in four donkeys were performed. The radiometric measurements were performed using a scintillation detector series modified for separation of the higher energy γ-emissions of 59 Fe and 85 Sr. In all animals, after 24 hr post-exposure, both polystyrene and magnetite exhibited a relatively rapid phase for 80 days (Tsub(1/2) = 15-22 days) which, in three donkeys, was clearly followed by a slower phase (Tsub(1/2) = 42-173 days); activity levels after 80 days in the fourth donkey were too low to permit determination of clearance rate. During the second phase, a deviation in pattern was clearly observed between the two aerosols, the polystyrene being cleared consistently faster than the magnetite. It is suggested that this deviation implies that, beginning at this time, there were functional differences between the dominant clearance mechanisms for the two aerosols. Exactly what these mechanisms were, or whether the difference was attributable to specific differences in particle characteristics, could not be determined. (U.K.)

  6. Experimental determination of viscosity of water based magnetite nanofluid for application in heating and cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toghraie, Davood; Alempour, Seyed Mohammadbagher; Afrand, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, experimental determination of dynamic viscosity of water based magnetite nanofluid (Fe 3 O 4 /water) was performed. The viscosity was measured in the temperature range of 20–55 °C for various samples with solid volume fractions of 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 1%, 2% and 3%. The results showed that the viscosity considerably decreases with increasing temperature. Moreover, the viscosity enhances with an increase in the solid volume fraction, remarkably. The calculated viscosity ratios showed that the maximum viscosity enhancement was 129.7%. Using experimental data, a new correlation has been proposed to predict the viscosity of magnetite nanofluid (Fe 3 O 4 /water). A comparison between the experimental results and the correlation outputs showed that the proposed model has a suitable accuracy. - Highlights: • Preparing Magnetite nanofluids with solid volume fractions up to 3%. • Measuring viscosity in temperature range of 20–55 °C using Brookfield Viscometer. • Maximum viscosity enhancement occurred at volume fraction of 3% and was 129.7%. • Proposing new correlation to predict the viscosity of Fe3O4/water nanofluid.

  7. Simultaneous hyperthermia and doxorubicin delivery from polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, G.R., E-mail: iglesias@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Delgado, A.V.; González-Caballero, F. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Ramos-Tejada, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Jaén, Linares 23700 (Spain)

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the hyperthermia response, (i.e., heating induced by an externally applied alternating magnetic field) and the simultaneous release of an anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin) by polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles have been investigated. After describing the setup for hyperthermia measurements in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles, the hyperthermia (represented by the rate of suspension heating and, ultimately, by the specific absorption rate or SAR) of magnetite nanoparticles (both bare and polymer-coated as drug nanocarriers) is discussed. The effect of the applied ac magnetic field on doxorubicin release is also studied, and it is concluded that the field does not interfere with the release process, demonstrating the double functionality of the investigated particles. - Highlights: • Magnetite NPs coated with polymers are used for drug delivery and hyperthermia. • The SAR of polyelectrolyte-coated NPs is larger because of their improved stability. • The antitumor drug doxorubicin is adsorbed on the coated particles. • The release rate of the drug is not affected by the ac magnetic field used in hyperthermia.

  8. Preparation and characterization of chondroitin‐sulfate‐A‐coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Illés, Erzsébet; Szekeres, Márta; Tombácz, Etelka

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharides are promising candidates for manufacturing biocompatible core–shell nanoparticles with potential in vivo use. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have prospective application in both diagnosis and therapy, and so developing a novel polysaccharide shell on MNP core is of great challenge. MNPs were prepared by co-precipitation, then the surface of purified MNPs was coated with chondroitin-sulfate-A (CSA) to obtain core–shell structured magnetite nanoparticles (CSA@MNP). The effect of the added amount of CSA on the surface charging and the aggregation state of MNPs at various pHs and 10 mM NaCl was measured by electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The amphoteric behavior of MNPs was fundamentally modified by adsorption of CSA polyanions. A very low CSA-loading induces the aggregation of MNPs, while four times more stabilizes the dispersions over the whole pH-range studied. The coagulation kinetics experiments measured at pH=6.3±0.3 showed that salt tolerance of CSA@MNPs rises up to ~150 mM NaCl. - Highlights: • Novel CSA-coated core–shell magnetite nanoparticles were prepared successfully. • The aggregation range of MNPs was shifted gradually to the lower pHs by CSA-loading. • CSA stabilizes electrosterically the MNPs over wide pH-range relevant to biosystems. • The salt tolerance of CSA@MNP enables them to use under physiological condition

  9. Preparation and characterization of chondroitin‐sulfate‐A‐coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tóth, Ildikó Y., E-mail: Ildiko.Toth@chem.u-szeged.hu; Illés, Erzsébet; Szekeres, Márta; Tombácz, Etelka, E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu

    2015-04-15

    Polysaccharides are promising candidates for manufacturing biocompatible core–shell nanoparticles with potential in vivo use. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have prospective application in both diagnosis and therapy, and so developing a novel polysaccharide shell on MNP core is of great challenge. MNPs were prepared by co-precipitation, then the surface of purified MNPs was coated with chondroitin-sulfate-A (CSA) to obtain core–shell structured magnetite nanoparticles (CSA@MNP). The effect of the added amount of CSA on the surface charging and the aggregation state of MNPs at various pHs and 10 mM NaCl was measured by electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The amphoteric behavior of MNPs was fundamentally modified by adsorption of CSA polyanions. A very low CSA-loading induces the aggregation of MNPs, while four times more stabilizes the dispersions over the whole pH-range studied. The coagulation kinetics experiments measured at pH=6.3±0.3 showed that salt tolerance of CSA@MNPs rises up to ~150 mM NaCl. - Highlights: • Novel CSA-coated core–shell magnetite nanoparticles were prepared successfully. • The aggregation range of MNPs was shifted gradually to the lower pHs by CSA-loading. • CSA stabilizes electrosterically the MNPs over wide pH-range relevant to biosystems. • The salt tolerance of CSA@MNP enables them to use under physiological condition.

  10. Interaction of uranium with in situ anoxically generated magnetite on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Miquel; El Aamrani, Souad; Duro, Lara; Gimenez, Javier; Pablo, Joan de; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-01-01

    In the high level nuclear waste repository concept, spent nuclear fuel is designed to be encapsulated in steel canisters. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the behaviour of the radionuclides released from the fuel. In this sense, the main objective of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the uranium(VI) retention. To this aim, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) has been generated by anaerobic steel corrosion in an autoclave reactor at an overpressure of 8 atm of H 2 (g). After characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), the obtained corroded steel coupons were contacted, at two different H 2 (g) pressures (1 atm and 7.6 atm), with a U(VI) solution. The evolution of the uranium concentration in solution is determined and a study of the composition of the coupons at the end of the experiments is carried out. The main conclusion obtained from this work is that magnetite generated on a steel coupon is able not only to retain uranium via sorption, but also to reduce hexavalent to tetravalent uranium in a higher extent than commercial magnetite, thus, providing an effective retardation path to the migration of uranium (and, potentially, other actinides) out of the repository

  11. U-Pb SHRIMP ages of detrital zircons from Hiriyur formation in Chitradurga Greenstone belt and its implication to the Neoarchean evolution of Dharwar craton, South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasheeth, A.; Okudaira, T.; Horie, K.; Hokada, T.; Satish Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report newly obtained U-Pb SHRIMP ages of detrital zircons from metagreywackes in the Hiriyur Formation (Chitradurga Group, Dharwar Supergroup) from the central eastern part of the Chitradurga greenstone belt. U-Pb analyses yield three major Neoarchean age populations ranging from 2.70 - 2.54 Ga with some minor age population of Mesoarchean. The maximum age of deposition is constrained by the youngest detrital zircon population at 2546 Ma. This is the first report of the occurrence of supracrustal rocks less than 2.58 Ga in the central part of Chitradurga greenstone belt. Close evaluation of detrital ages with the published ages of surrounding igneous rocks suggest that the youngest detrital zircons might be derived from rocks of the Eastern Dharwar craton and the inferred docking of the western and eastern Dharwar cratons happened prior to the deposition of the Hiriyur Formation. The Chitradurga shear zone, dividing the Dharwar craton into western and eastern blocks, probably developed after the deposition. Furthermore, the lower intercept is interpreted as evidence for the Pan-African overprints in the study area. (author)

  12. Detrital zircon without detritus: a result of 496-Ma-old fluid-rock interaction during the gold-lode formation of Passagem, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Zeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Zircon and xenotime occur in tourmaline-rich hydrothermal pockets in the auriferous lode of Passagem de Mariana, a world-class gold deposit. Zircon grains show pristine oscillatory zoning, but many of them are altered, exhibiting porous domains filled with graphite. Uranium-Pb dating of zircon, using in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, yields ages between 3.2 and 2.65 Ga, which match those for detrital zircon of the footwall quartzite of the > 2.65-Ga-old Moeda Formation. Discordant analyses point to zircon-age resetting during the Brasiliano orogeny at ca. 500 Ma. This interpretation is supported by U-Pb dating of euhedral xenotime immediately adjacent to altered zircon within the same tourmaline pocket. The xenotime grains give a Concordia age of 496.3 ± 2.0 Ma, which is identical to that determined for monazite of a quartz-hematite vein-type deposit (i.e., jacutinga lode) in the region (Itabira), another important mineralisation style of gold. The occurrence of relatively abundant inherited detrital zircon, but absence of rock fragments in the tourmaline pocket investigated here, implies that detrital material was completely replaced by tourmaline. The graphite overprint on the altered detrital zircon attests to a reducing fluid, which was likely formed by fluid-rock interaction with carbonaceous phyllite of the Batatal Formation, the host rock of the Passagem lode.

  13. Significance of detrital zircons in upper Devonian ocean-basin strata of the Sonora allochthon and Lower Permian synorogenic strata of the Mina Mexico foredeep, central Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, F.G.; Gehrels, G.E.; Stewart, John H.

    2008-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic dating of detrital zircons from a conglomeratic barite sandstone in the Sonora allochthon and a calciclastic sandstone in the Mina Mexico foredeep of the Minas de Barita area reveals two main age groups in the Upper Devonian part of the Los Pozos Formation, 1.73-1.65 Ga and 1.44-1.42 Ga; and three main age groups in the Lower Permian part of the Mina Mexico Formation, 1.93-1.91 Ga, 1.45-1.42 Ga, and 1.1-1.0 Ga. Small numbers of zircons with ages of 2.72-2.65 Ga, 1.30-1.24 Ga, ca. 2.46 Ga, ca. 1.83 Ga, and ca. 0.53 Ga are also present in the Los Pozos sandstone. Detrital zircons ranging in age from 1.73 to 1.65 Ga are considered to have been derived from the Yavapai, Mojave, and Mazatzal Provinces and their transition zones of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. The 1.45-1.30 Ga detrital zircons were probably derived from scattered granite bodies within the Mojave and Mazatzal basement rocks in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, and possibly from the Southern and Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Provinces of the southern United States. The 1.24-1.0 Ga detrital zircons are believed to have been derived from the Grenville (Llano) Province to the east and northeast or from Grenvilleage intrusions or anatectites to the north. Several detrital zircon ages ranging from 2.72 to 1.91 Ga were probably derived originally from the Archean Wyoming Province and Early Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Lake Superior region. These older detrital zircons most likely have been recycled one or more times into the Paleozoic sandstones of central Sonora. The 0.53 Ga zircon is believed to have been derived from a Lower Cambrian granitoid or meta-morphic rock northeast of central Sonora, possibly in New Mexico and Colorado, or Oklahoma. Detrital zircon geochronology suggests that most of the detritus in both samples was derived from Laurentia to the north, whereas some detritus in the Permian synorogenic foredeep sequence was derived from the

  14. The role of polymer films on the oxidation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letti, C.J. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, 70910-000 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Paterno, L.G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Quimica, 70910-000 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Pereira-da-Silva, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica de São Carlos, USP, 13560-9700 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro Universitario Central Paulista – UNICEP, 13563-470 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Morais, P.C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, 70910-000 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Soler, M.A.G., E-mail: soler@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, 70910-000 Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    A detailed investigation about the role of polymer films on the oxidation process of magnetite nanoparticles (∼7 nm diameter), under laser irradiation is performed employing micro Raman spectroscopy. To support this investigation, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np are synthesized by the co-precipitation method and assembled layer-by-layer with sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS). Polymer films (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np/PSS){sub n} with n=2,3,5,7,10 and 25 bilayers are employed as a model system to study the oxidation process under laser irradiation. Raman data are further processed by principal component analysis. Our findings suggest that PSS protects Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np from oxidation when compared to powder samples, even for the sample with the greater number of bilayers. Further, the oxidation of magnetite to maghemite occurs preferably for thinner films up to 7 bilayers, while the onset for the formation of the hematite phase depends on the laser intensity for thicker films. Water takes part on the oxidation processes of magnetite, the oxidation/phase transformation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np is intensified in films with more bilayers, since more water is included in those films. Encapsulation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np by PSS in layer-by-layer films showed to be very efficient to avoid the oxidation process in nanosized magnetite. - Graphical abstract: Encapsulation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np by PSS in layer-by-layer films avoids the oxidation and phase transformation of nanosized magnetite. - Highlights: • (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np/PSS){sub n} nanofilms, with n=2 up to 25, where layer-by-layer assembled. • The influence of film architecture on the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np oxidation was investigated through Raman spectroscopy. • Encapsulation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np by PSS showed to be very efficient to avoid the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-np oxidation.

  15. Faulting and erosion in the Argentine Precordillera during changes in subduction regime: Reconciling bedrock cooling and detrital records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, Julie C.; Carrapa, Barbara; Ortíz, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    The Argentine Precordillera is an archetypal retroarc fold-and-thrust belt that records tectonics associated with changing subduction regimes. The interactions between exhumation and faulting in the Precordillera were investigated using apatite and zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He and apatite fission track thermochronometry from the Precordillera and adjacent geologic domains. Inverse modeling of thermal histories constrains eastward in-sequence rock cooling associated with deformation and erosion from 18 to 2 Ma across the Central Precordillera tracking thrusting during this time. The youngest AHe ages (5-2 Ma) and highest erosion rates are located in the eastern and western extremities of the Precordillera and indicate that recent denudation is concentrated at its structural boundaries. Moreover, synchronous rapid Pliocene cooling of the Frontal Cordillera, Eastern Precordillera, and Sierra del Valle Fértil was coeval with initiation of basement-involved faulting in the foreland. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology from the ca. 16-8.1 Ma Bermejo foreland basin strata suggests fluvial connectivity westward beyond the Frontal Cordillera to the Main Cordillera and Coast Range followed by an important shift in sediment provenance at ca. 10 Ma. At this time, we suggest that a substantial decrease in Permo-Triassic igneous sources in the Frontal Cordillera and concurrent increase in recycled zircons signatures of Paleozoic strata are best explained by uplift and erosion of the Precordillera during widening of the thrust-belt. Bedrock thermochronology and modeling indicate a 2-6 Myr lag time between faulting-related cooling in the hinterland and the detrital record of deformation in the foreland basin, suggesting that for tectonically active semi-arid settings, bedrock cooling may be more sensitive to onset of faulting. We suggest that high erosion rates in the Frontal Cordillera and Eastern Precordillera are associated with increased interplate coupling during shallowing of the

  16. Cenozoic exhumation and tectonic evolution of the Qimen Tagh Range, northern Tibetan Plateau: Insights from the heavy mineral compositions, detrital zircon U-Pb ages and seismic interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Wu, C.; Wang, J.; Zhou, T.; Zhang, C.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin is the largest intermountain basin within the Tibetan Plateau. The Cenozoic sedimentary flling characteristics of the basin was significantly influenced by the surrounding tectonic belt, such as the Altyn Tagh Range to the north-west and Qimen Tagh Range to the south. The tectonic evolution of the Qimen Tagh Range and the structural relationship between the Qaidam Basin and Qimen Tagh Range remain controversial. To address these issues, we analyzed thousands of heavy mineral data, 720 detrital zircon ages and seismic data of the Qaidam Basin. Based on the regional geological framework and our kinematic analyses, the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Qimen Tagh Range can be divided into two stages. From the Early Eocene to the Middle Miocene, the Devonian (400-360 Ma) and Permian to Triassic (300-200 Ma) zircons which were sourced from the Qimen Tagh Range and the heavy mineral assemblage of zircon-leucoxene-garnet-sphene on the north flank of the Qimen Tagh Range indicated that the Qimen Tagh Range has been exhumed before the Eocene and acted as the primary provenance of the Qaidam Basin. The Kunbei fault system (i.e. the Kunbei, Arlar and Hongliuquan faults) in the southwest of the Qaidam Basin, which can be seen as a natural study window of the Qimen Tagh Range, was characterized by left-lateral strike-slip faults and weak south-dipping thrust faults based on the seismic sections. This strike-slip motion was generated by the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau caused by the onset of the Indian-Eurasian collision. Since the Middle Miocene, the primary mineral assemblages along the northern flank of the Qimen Tagh Range changed from the zircon-leucoxene-garnet-sphene assemblage to the epidote-hornblende-garnet-leucoxene assemblage. Simultaneously, the Kunbei fault system underwent intense south-dipping thrusting, and a nearly 2.2-km uplift can be observed in the hanging wall of the Arlar fault. We attributed these variations to the rapid uplift event of

  17. Surface modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles: Interaction with fibroblasts in primary cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapa Gonzalez, Christian; Roacho Pérez, Jorge A.; Martínez Pérez, Carlos A.; Olivas Armendáriz, Imelda [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); Jimenez Vega, Florinda [Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Anillo envolvente del PRONAF y Estocolmo, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); Castrejon Parga, Karen Y. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); Garcia Casillas, Perla E., E-mail: pegarcia@uacj.mx [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ave. Del Charro #610 norte, Col. Partido Romero, C.P. 32320 Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • An inorganic layer before an organic material shell onto MNPs improves cell viability. • The coating type and the concentration of nanoparticles directly affect cell viability. • Modified magnetite nanoparticles with organic and inorganic materials was developed. - Abstract: The development of a variety of medical applications such as drug delivery, cell labeling, and medical imaging have been possible owing to the unique features exhibited by magnetic nanoparticles. Nanoparticle–cell interaction is related to the surface aspects of nanoparticle, which may be described based on their chemistry or inorganic/organic characteristics. The coating on particle surface reduces the inter-particle interactions and provides properties such as biocompatibility. Among the coating materials used for nanoparticles employed in biomedical applications, oleic acid is one of the most utilized due to its biocompatibility. However, a major drawback with this naturally occurring fatty acid is that it is easily oxidized by cells and this reduces their performance in biomedical applications. In order to avoid the direct contact of the cell with the magnetite particle, coating with an inorganic material prior to the oleic acid shell would be effective. This would retard the magnetite dissociation thereby improve the cell viability. Here we report our investigation on the effect of surface modified magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) on the cell viability using primary cultures incubated with those particles. We prepared magnetite nanoparticles by chemical co-precipitation method; nanoparticle surface was first modified by silanol condensation followed by chemisorption of oleic acid. All nanostructures have a particle size less than 100 nm, depending on the material coating and superparamagnetic behavior. The saturated magnetizations (M{sub s}) of the magnetite samples coated with oleic acid (MAO; 49.15 emu/g) and double shell silica-oleic acid (MSAO; 46.16 emu/g) are

  18. Composition of coarse-grained magnetite from pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, William C.; Mousa, Hassan; Matzko, John J.

    1985-01-01

    Crystals of magnetite as large as 30 mm long and 7 mm thick are locally present in quartz-rich zones of interior and exterior pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area. Niobium, tin, and yttrium are strongly enriched in six specimens of magnetite from interior pegmatite dikes in a small pluton where these elements form geochemical anomalies in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates from wadi sediment. Less abundant anomalous elements in the magnetite are molybdenum, lead, and zirconium, which also tend to be present in anomalous amounts in the nonmagnetic concentrates from the niobium-bearing pluton. The most anomalous trace element in the magnetite is zinc, which is at least 10 times as abundant as it is in the quartz monzonite plutons or in the nonmagnetic concentrates. The capacity of magnetite to scavenge molybdenum, zinc, niobium, lead, tin, yttrium, and zirconium suggests the possible utility of magnetite as a geochemical sample medium.

  19. Dissolution of nickel ferrite and rare earths containing magnetites in citric acid - EDTA - gallic acid (CEG) formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhar, A.G.; Kishore, K.; Venkateswaran, G.; Balaji, V.

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown by us earlier that gallic acid can be used as a reductant in dilute chemical decontaminant formulations containing EDTA as chelant. The results on the dissolution of magnetite in such a formulation were quite promising. Moreover, the superior radiation stability of gallic acid vis-a-vis other reductants such as ascorbic acid or oxalic acid is another plus point for this formulation. Besides having an inherent stability against radiation degradation, it is able to protect even EDTA against radiation induced decomposition to a great extent unlike the case of ascorbic acid. In an extension of that work, dissolution experiments have now been carried out on nickel ferrite and magnetites containing rare earths like La, Ce and Zr This is to simulate the presence of fission product oxides in magnetite resulting from a possible phase of operation with leaky fuel. The rate constants have been determined using the inverse cubic rate law. In the case of nickel ferrite, although there is an initial induction period, the rate constants for the dissolution were determined to be at 1.6 x 10 -2 and 3.6 x 10 -3 min -1 at 353 K and 333 K respectively. Presence of Ce in particular either alone or in combination with Zr/La at a level of 1 at.% equivalent each in magnetite is seen to increase the surface area of the oxide. The rate constants for the dissolution at 353 K in a 11:44:4 mM CEG formulation taken with magnetite and rare earth containing magnetites equivalent to yielding 22 mM Fe upon complete dissolution are as follows: 5.09 x 10 -2 min -1 (magnetite), 7.06 x 10 -2 min -1 (Ce 2 O 3 containing magnetite), 6.33 x 10 -2 min -1 (Ce 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 containing magnetite), 1 x 10 -1 min -1 (Ce 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , La 2 O 3 containing magnetite). The presence of Ce, Zr and La at 1 at.% level each has not resulted in any turbidity in solution at the end of magnetite dissolution suggesting chemical dissolution of these rare earth oxides in the formulation. Simple magnetite

  20. Dissolution of nickel ferrite and rare earths containing magnetites in citric acid - EDTA - gallic acid (CEG) formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumbhar, A.G.; Kishore, K.; Venkateswaran, G.; Balaji, V. [Applied Chemistry Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2002-07-01

    It has been shown by us earlier that gallic acid can be used as a reductant in dilute chemical decontaminant formulations containing EDTA as chelant. The results on the dissolution of magnetite in such a formulation were quite promising. Moreover, the superior radiation stability of gallic acid vis-a-vis other reductants such as ascorbic acid or oxalic acid is another plus point for this formulation. Besides having an inherent stability against radiation degradation, it is able to protect even EDTA against radiation induced decomposition to a great extent unlike the case of ascorbic acid. In an extension of that work, dissolution experiments have now been carried out on nickel ferrite and magnetites containing rare earths like La, Ce and Zr This is to simulate the presence of fission product oxides in magnetite resulting from a possible phase of operation with leaky fuel. The rate constants have been determined using the inverse cubic rate law. In the case of nickel ferrite, although there is an initial induction period, the rate constants for the dissolution were determined to be at 1.6 x 10{sup -2} and 3.6 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} at 353 K and 333 K respectively. Presence of Ce in particular either alone or in combination with Zr/La at a level of 1 at.% equivalent each in magnetite is seen to increase the surface area of the oxide. The rate constants for the dissolution at 353 K in a 11:44:4 mM CEG formulation taken with magnetite and rare earth containing magnetites equivalent to yielding 22 mM Fe upon complete dissolution are as follows: 5.09 x 10{sup -2} min{sup -1} (magnetite), 7.06 x 10{sup -2} min{sup -1} (Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing magnetite), 6.33 x 10{sup -2} min{sup -1} (Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2} containing magnetite), 1 x 10{sup -1} min{sup -1} (Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing magnetite). The presence of Ce, Zr and La at 1 at.% level each has not resulted in any turbidity in solution at the end of magnetite dissolution

  1. Postmagmatic magnetite-apatite assemblage in mafic intrusions: a case study of dolerite at Olympic Dam, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apukhtina, Olga B.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Ehrig, Kathy; Kamenetsky, Maya B.; McPhie, Jocelyn; Maas, Roland; Meffre, Sebastien; Goemann, Karsten; Rodemann, Thomas; Cook, Nigel J.; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.

    2016-01-01

    An assemblage of magnetite and apatite is common worldwide in different ore deposit types, including disparate members of the iron-oxide copper-gold (IOCG) clan. The Kiruna-type iron oxide-apatite deposits, a subtype of the IOCG family, are recognized as economic targets as well. A wide range of competing genetic models exists for magnetite-apatite deposits, including magmatic, magmatic-hydrothermal, hydrothermal(-metasomatic), and sedimentary(-exhalative). The sources and mechanisms of transport and deposition of Fe and P remain highly debatable. This study reports petrographic and geochemical features of the magnetite-apatite-rich vein assemblages in the dolerite dykes of the Gairdner Dyke Swarm (~0.82 Ga) that intruded the Roxby Downs Granite (~0.59 Ga), the host of the supergiant Olympic Dam IOCG deposit. These symmetrical, only few mm narrow veins are prevalent in such dykes and comprise besides usually colloform magnetite and prismatic apatite also further minerals (e.g., calcite, quartz). The genetic relationships between the veins and host dolerite are implied based on alteration in the immediate vicinity (~4 mm) of the veins. In particular, Ti-magnetite-ilmenite is partially to completely transformed to titanite and magmatic apatite disappears. We conclude that the mafic dykes were a local source of Fe and P re-concentrated in the magnetite-apatite veins. Uranium-Pb ages for vein apatite and titanite associated with the vein in this case study suggest that alteration of the dolerite and healing of the fractures occurred shortly after dyke emplacement. We propose that in this particular case the origin of the magnetite-apatite assemblage is clearly related to hydrothermal alteration of the host mafic magmatic rocks.

  2. Four magnetite generations in the Precambrian Varena Iron Ore deposit, SE Lithuania, as a result of rock-fluid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Prusinskiene, Sabina; Siliauskas, Laurynas

    2017-04-01

    Iron ores in Precambrian crystalline basement of the Varena area, SE Lithuania, were discovered during the detail geological-geophysical exploration in 1982-1992. They are covered with 210-500 m thick sediments. The Varena Iron Ore deposit (VIOD) may yield from 71 to 219.6 million tons of iron ore according to different economic evaluations (Marfin, 1996). They were assumed to be of metasomatic and hydrothermal origin, however several other hypotheses explaining the VIOZ origin, e.g. as a layered mafic or carbonatite intrusions were also suggested. Magnetites of the VIOD were thoroughly investigated by the Cameca SX100 microprobe at the Warsaw University and by the Quanta 250 Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) at the Nature Research Centre in Vilnius, Lithuania. Four generations of magnetite were distinguished in the studied serpentine-magnetite ores (D8 drilling) and were compared with the earlier studied and reference magnetites. The earliest, spinel inclusion-rich magnetite cores (Mag-1) have the highest trace element contents (in wt%): Si (0.032), Al (0.167-0.248), Mg (0.340-0.405), Ti (0.215-0.254), V (0.090-0.138) etc. They might have formed during an early metamorphism and/or related skarn formation. Voluminous second magnetite (Mag-2) replacing olivine, pyroxenes, spinel and other skarn minerals at c. 540o C (Magnetite-Ilmenite geothermometer) has much lower trace element abundances, probably washed out by hydrothermal fluids. The latest magnetites (Mag-3 and Mag-4) overgrow the earlier ones and occur near or within the sulfide veins (Mag-4). As was observed from microtextures, the Mag-3 and Mag-4 have originated from the late thermal reworking by dissolution-reprecipitation processes. To imply an origin of the studied magnetites, they were compared to the earlier studied magmatic-metamorphic (1058 drilling), presumably skarn (982 drilling) magnetites from the studied area and plotted in the major magnetite ore type fields according to Dupuis and Beaudoin

  3. I-Xe dating of aqueous alteration in the CI chondrite Orgueil: I. Magnetite and ferromagnetic separates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdivtseva, O.; Krot, A. N.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    2018-04-01

    The I-Xe system was studied in a ferromagnetic sample separated from the Orgueil CI carbonaceous chondrite with a hand-held magnet and in two magnetite samples, one chemically separated before and the other one after neutron irradiation. This work was done in order to investigate the effects of chemical separation by LiCl and NaOH on the I-Xe system in magnetite. Our test demonstrated that the chemical separation of magnetite before irradiation using either LiCl or NaOH, or both, does not contaminate the sample with iodine and thus cannot lead to erroneous I-Xe ages due to introduction of uncorrelated 128∗Xe. The I-Xe ages of two Orgueil magnetite samples are mutually consistent within experimental uncertainties and, when normalized to an absolute time scale with the reevaluated Shallowater aubrite standard, place the onset of aqueous alteration on the CI parent body at 4564.3 ± 0.3 Ma, 2.9 ± 0.3 Ma after formation of the CV Ca-AI-rich inclusions (CAIs). The I-Xe age of the ferromagnetic Orgueil separate is 3.4 Ma younger, corresponding to a closure of the I-Xe system at 4560.9 ± 0.2 Ma. These and previously published I-Xe data for Orgueil (Hohenberg et al., 2000) indicate that aqueous alteration on the CI parent body lasted for at least 5 Ma. Although the two magnetite samples gave indistinguishable I-Xe ages, their temperature release profiles differed. One of the two Orgueil magnetites released less radiogenic Xe than the other, 80% of it corresponding to the low-temperature peak of the release profile, compared to only 6% in case of the second Orgueil magnetite sample. This could be due to the difference in iodine trapping efficiencies for magnetite grains of different morphologies. Alternatively, the magnetite grains with the lower radiogenic Xe concentrations may have formed at a later stage of alteration when iodine in an aqueous solution was depleted.

  4. Growth Inhibition of Re-Challenge B16 Melanoma Transplant by Conjugates of Melanogenesis Substrate and Magnetite Nanoparticles as the Basis for Developing Melanoma-Targeted Chemo-Thermo-Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Takada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanogenesis substrate, N-propionyl-cysteaminylphenol (NPrCAP, is selectively incorporated into melanoma cells and inhibits their growth by producing cytotoxic free radicals. Magnetite nanoparticles also disintegrate cancer cells and generate heat shock protein (HSP upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF. This study tested if a chemo-thermo-immunotherapy (CTI therapy strategy can be developed for better management of melanoma by conjugating NPrCAP on the surface of magnetite nanoparticles (NPrCAP/M. We examined the feasibility of this approach in B16 mouse melanoma and evaluated the impact of exposure temperature, frequency, and interval on the inhibition of re-challenged melanoma growth. The therapeutic protocol against the primary transplanted tumor with or without AMF exposure once a day every other day for a total of three treatments not only inhibited the growth of the primary transplant but also prevented the growth of the secondary, re-challenge transplant. The heat-generated therapeutic effect was more significant at a temperature of 43∘C than either 41∘C or 46∘C. NPrCAP/M with AMF exposure, instead of control magnetite alone or without AMF exposure, resulted in the most significant growth inhibition of the re-challenge tumor and increased the life span of the mice. HSP70 production was greatest at 43∘C compared to that with 41∘C or 46∘C. CD+T cells were infiltrated at the site of the re-challenge melanoma transplant.

  5. Oligocene-Miocene magnetic stratigraphy carried by biogenic magnetite at sites U1334 and U1335 (equatorial Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Ohneiser, C.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kesler, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    AbstractSediments from the equatorial Pacific Ocean, at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program sites U1334 and U1335, record reliable magnetic polarity stratigraphies back to ~26.5 Ma (late Oligocene) at sedimentation rates usually in the 5-20 m/Myr range. Putative polarity subchrons that do not appear in current polarity timescales occur within Chrons C5ACr, C5ADn, and C5Bn.1r at Site U1335; and within Chrons C6AAr.2r, C6Br, C7Ar, and C8n.1n at Site U1334. Subchron C5Dr.1n (~17.5 Ma) is recorded at both sites, supporting its apparent recording in the South Atlantic Ocean, and has an estimated duration of ~40 kyr. The Oligocene-Miocene calcareous oozes have magnetizations carried by submicron magnetite, as indicated by thermal demagnetization of magnetic remanences, the anhysteretic remanence to susceptibility ratio, and magnetic hysteresis parameters. Transmission electron microscopy of magnetic separates indicates the presence of low-titanium iron oxide (magnetite) grains with size (50-100 nm) and shape similar to modern and fossil bacterial magnetite, supporting other evidence that biogenic submicron magnetite is the principal remanence carrier in these sediments. In the equatorial Pacific Ocean, low organic-carbon burial arrests microbial pore-water sulfate reduction, thereby aiding preservation of bacterial magnetite.

  6. Structural Modification and Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Magnetite Synthesised in the Presence of an Anionic Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The earliest reported medical use of magnetite powder for internal applications was in the 10th century A.D. by the Persian physician and philosopher Avicenna of Bokhara [1,2]. Today magnetic nanoparticles are used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and are potential colloidal mediators for cancer magnetic hyperthermia [3]. Twenty years ago magnetite (Fe3O4 was found to be present in the human brain [4] and more recently it has been reported that nanoscale biogenic magnetite (origin and formation uncertain is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s [5]. Here we show that the synthesis of magnetite in the presence of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS gives rise to a variety of nanoscale morphologies, some of which look remarkably similar to magnetite found in organisms, suggesting that similar processes may be involved. Furthermore, these 1D materials with diameters of quantum confined size are of interest in the areas of biosensors [6] and biomedical imaging [7].

  7. Study of Cr(VI) adsorption onto magnetite nanoparticles using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Liu, Dian-Yu; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Cr(VI) adsorption onto nano-magnetite was examined by batch experiments, and the Cr(VI) adsorption mechanism was investigated using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 10 nm were synthesized using an inexpensive and simple co-precipitation method. It shows a saturation magnetization of 54.3 emu/g, which can be recovered with an external magnetic field. The adsorption data fitted the Langmuir adsorption isotherm well, implying a monolayer adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) onto nano-magnetite. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that the adsorption mechanism involves electron transfer between Fe(II) in nano-magnetite (Fe2+OFe3+ 2O3) and Cr(VI) to transform into Cr(III), which may exist as an Fe(III)-Cr(III) mixed solid phase. Moreover, the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) ratio in the final products can be determined by the characteristic pre-edge peak area of Cr(VI) in the Cr K-edge spectrum. These findings suggest that nano-magnetite is effective for Cr(VI) removal from wastewater because it can transform highly poisonous Cr(VI) species into nontoxic Cr(III) compounds, which are highly insoluble and immobile under environmental conditions.

  8. 2D Cross Sectional Analysis and Associated Electrochemistry of Composite Electrodes Containing Dispersed Agglomerates of Nanocrystalline Magnetite, Fe₃O₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, David C; Kirshenbaum, Kevin C; Wang, Jiajun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jun; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-06-24

    When electroactive nanomaterials are fully incorporated into an electrode structure, characterization of the crystallite sizes, agglomerate sizes, and dispersion of the electroactive materials can lend insight into the complex electrochemistry associated with composite electrodes. In this study, composite magnetite electrodes were sectioned using ultramicrotome techniques, which facilitated the direct observation of crystallites and agglomerates of magnetite (Fe3O4) as well as their dispersal patterns in large representative sections of electrode, via 2D cross sectional analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Further, the electrochemistry of these electrodes were recorded, and Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) was used to determine the distribution of oxidation states of the reduced magnetite. Unexpectedly, while two crystallite sizes of magnetite were employed in the production of the composite electrodes, the magnetite agglomerate sizes and degrees of dispersion in the two composite electrodes were similar to each other. This observation illustrates the necessity for careful characterization of composite electrodes, in order to understand the effects of crystallite size, agglomerate size, and level of dispersion on electrochemistry.

  9. Synthesis of Magnetic Rattle-Type Silica with Controllable Magnetite and Tunable Size by Pre-Shell-Post-Core Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Tan, Longfei; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have developed the pre-shell-post-core route to synthesize the magnetic rattle-type silica. This method has not only simplified the precursor's process and reduced the reacting time, but also ameliorated the loss of magnetite and made the magnetite content and the inner core size controllable and tunable. The magnetite contents and inner core size can be easily controlled by changing the type and concentration of alkali, reaction system and addition of water. The results show that alkali aqueous solution promotes the escape of the precursor iron ions from the inner space of rattle-type silica and results in the loss of magnetite. In this case, NaOH ethanol solution is better for the formation of magnetite than ammonia because it not only offers an appropriate alkalinity to facilitate the synthesis of. magnetic particles, but also avoids the escape of the iron ions from the mesopores of rattle-type silica. The synthesis process is very simple and efficient, and it takes no more than 2 hours to complete the total preparation and handling of the magnetic rattle-type silica. The end-product Fe3O4@SiO2 nanocomposites also have good magnetic properties which will perform potential application in biomedical science.

  10. Why magnetite is not the only indicator of past rainfall in the Chinese loess plateau?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuelian; Banerjee, Subir K.; Wang, Ronghua; Zhao, Guoyong; Song, Hong; Lü, Bin; Li, Qian; Liu, Xiuming

    2018-03-01

    The study investigates the magnetic mineralogy of paleosol S5 from Xifeng (XF), Linyou (LY) and Baoji (BJ) sections with increasing annual precipitation from north to the south on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Paleosol S5 samples from these three localities are further prepared as magnetic extracts and separation residues. Low temperature magnetic measurements including field cooled and zero field cooled (FC/ZFC) remanence, in-phase magnetic susceptibility, thermal remanent magnetization and room temperature saturation isothermal remanence magnetization (RTSIRM), with X-ray diffraction measurements are carried out for all magnetic extracts and separation residues samples. The asymmetric rounded `hump' in cooling curves on RTSIRM and the `tilted' Verwey transition on ZFC/FC curves suggest that partially oxidized magnetite is the dominant magnetic contributor, not pure maghemite or magnetite. Furthermore, The Verwey transitions on cooling curves slightly decrease and the increased slope of `tilted' Verwey transition on ZFC remanence curves show that the degree of oxidation of magnetite between localities increases in the order XF-LY-BJ. Hard isothermal remanent magnetization, X-ray diffraction data and the difference of magnetization in warming curves of RTSIRM suggest that both hematite concentration in magnetic extracts and goethite concentration in separation residues increase from XF to BJ. Frequency dependent susceptibility and ZFC/FC curves show that BJS5 layer formed under high paleoprecipitation has less superparamagnetic (SP) but more single domain to pseudo-single domain particles, because SP maghemite was dissolved and transformed into goethite by temporary water-logging. The increase in hematite concentration is interpreted as due to SP maghemite oxidation or original goethite dehydration within dry soil environment. Therefore, transformation of maghemite to goethite in waterlogged phases of the S5 paleosol led to the loss of magnetization.

  11. Growth and characterization of magnetite-maghemite thin films by the dip coating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velásquez, A. A., E-mail: avelas26@eafit.edu.edu.co; Arnedo, A. [Universidad EAFIT, Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado (Colombia)

    2017-11-15

    We present the process of growth and characterization of magnetite-maghemite thin films obtained by the dip coating method. The thin films were deposited on glass substrates, using a ferrofluid of nanostructured magnetite-maghemite particles as precursor solution. During the growth of the films the following parameters were controlled: number of dips of the substrates, dip velocity of the substrates and drying times. The films were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Elelectron Microscopy, four-point method for resistance measurement, Room Temperature Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Hall effect. Mössbauer measurements showed the presence of a sextet attributed to maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and two doublets attributed to superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), indicating a distribution of oxidation states of the iron as well as a particle size distribution of the magnetic phases in the films. Atomic force microscopy measurements showed that the films cover quasi uniformly the substrates, existing in them some pores with sub-micron size. Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements showed a uniform structure in the films, with spherical particles with size around 10 nm. Voltage versus current measurements showed an ohmic response of the films for currents between 0 and 100 nA. On the other hand, Hall effect measurements showed a nonlinear response of the Hall voltage with the magnetic flux density applied perpendicular to the plane of the films, however the response is fairly linear for magnetic flux densities between 0.15 and 0.35 T approximately. The results suggest that the films are promising for application as magnetic flux density sensors.

  12. Effect of cerium substitution on structural and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalia, Diwakar, E-mail: Padalia.diwakar@gmail.com [Department of Physics, G.B.Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttrakhand (India); Johri, U.C. [Department of Physics, G.B.Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttrakhand (India); Zaidi, M.G.H. [Supercritical Fluid Processing Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, G.B.Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttrakhand (India)

    2016-02-01

    The current work presents the synthesis and properties of cerium doped magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized by standard chemical co-precipitation method using NH{sub 4}OH as co-precipitating agent. The effects of cerium ion substitution on structural and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were reported. These materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The cerium content has a significant influence on structural and magnetic properties. The X-ray diffraction study confirmed the formation of single-phase magnetite with space group Fd3m and crystallite size ranging from 39 to 58 nm. The addition of cerium resulted in a reduction of crystallite size and an increase of cell parameters. FTIR measurements confirmed the formation of different samples and suggested that the reduction of Fe{sup +3} to Fe{sup +2} preferred on a site adjacent to Ce{sup +4}. Magnetic measurements revealed that the saturation magnetization (Ms) and remanence (M{sub r}) decreased while the coercivity (H{sub C}) and squareness (M{sub r}/M{sub S}) increased with increasing cerium content. - Highlights: • There is an increase in cell parameters and strain with Ce-content. • Samples show the presence of secondary phase after 1.0% doping level. • Ce-ions prefer octahedral sites and charge neutrality is accompanied by Fe{sup +3} → Fe{sup +2}. • Magnetization decreases due to weakening of the super exchange interactions. • Squareness and coercivity start to increase with Ce content.

  13. Boosting the catalytic activity of natural magnetite for wet peroxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Torrellas, Silvia; Munoz, Macarena; Mondejar, Victor; de Pedro, Zahara M; Casas, Jose A

    2018-06-02

    This work explores the modification of naturally occurring magnetite by controlled oxidation (200-400 °C, air atmosphere) and reduction (300-600 °C, H 2 atmosphere) treatments with the aim of boosting its activity in CWPO. The resulting materials were fully characterized by XRD, XPS, TGA, TPR, SEM, and magnetization measurements, allowing to confirm the development of core-shell type structures. The magnetite core of the solid remained unchanged upon the treatment whereas the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of the shell was modified (e.g. 0.42, 0.11 and 0.63 values were calculated for pristine Fe 3 O 4 , Fe 3 O 4 -O400, and Fe 3 O 4 -R400, respectively). The performance of the catalysts was tested in the CWPO of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) (5 mg L -1 ) under ambient conditions and circumneutral pH (pH 0  = 5), using the stoichiometric dose of H 2 O 2 (25 mg L -1 ) and a catalyst load of 1 g L -1 . The key role of the ferrous species on the mineral shell was evidenced. Whereas the oxidation of magnetite led to significantly slower degradation rates of the pollutant, its reduction gave rise to a dramatic increase, achieving the complete removal of SMX in 1.5 h reaction time with the optimum catalyst (Fe 3 O 4 -R400) compared to the 3.5 h required with the pristine mineral. A reaction mechanism was proposed for SMX degradation, and a kinetic equation based on the Eley-Rideal model was accordingly developed. This model successfully fitted the experimental results. The stability of Fe 3 O 4 -R400 was evaluated upon five sequential runs. Finally, the versatility of the catalytic system was proved in real environmentally relevant water matrices.

  14. Biosynthesis and the conjugation of magnetite nanoparticles with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obayemi, J.D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State (Nigeria); Dozie-Nwachukwu, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Danyuo, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Electronics and Electricals Engineering, Nigerian Turkish Nile University, Abuja (Nigeria); Odusanya, O.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Anuku, N. [Department of Chemistry, Bronx Community College, New York, NY 10453 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Malatesta, K. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Soboyejo, W.O., E-mail: soboyejo@princeton.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (BMNPs) with particle sizes between 10 nm and 60 nm. The biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are produced from Magnetospirillum magneticum (M.M.) bacteria that respond to magnetic fields. M.M. bacteria were cultured and used to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles. This was done in an enriched magnetic spirillum growth medium (EMSGM) at different pH levels. The nanoparticle concentrations were characterized with UV–Visible (UV–Vis) spectroscopy, while the particle shapes were elucidated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure of the particles was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Carbodiimide reduction was also used to functionalize the BMNPs with a molecular recognition unit (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH) that attaches specifically to receptors that are over-expressed on the surfaces of most breast cancer cell types. The resulting nanoparticles were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quantitative image analysis. The implications of the results are then discussed for the potential development of magnetic nanoparticles for the specific targeting and treatment of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Biosynthesis of MNPs with clinically relevant sizes between 10 and 60 nm. • New insights into the effects of pH and processing time on nanoparticle shapes and sizes. • Successful conjugation of biosynthesized magnetite nanoparticles to LHRH ligands. • Conjugated BMNPs that are monodispersed with potential biomedical relevance. • Magnetic properties of biosynthesized MNPs suggest potential for MRI enhancement.

  15. Why magnetite is not the only indicator of past rainfall in the Chinese Loess Plateau?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuelian; Banerjee, Subir K.; Wang, Ronghua; Zhao, Guoyong; Song, Hong; Lü, Bin; Li, Qian; Liu, Xiuming

    2018-06-01

    This study investigates the magnetic mineralogy of palaeosol S5 from Xifeng (XF), Linyou (LY) and Baoji (BJ) sections with increasing annual precipitation from north to the south on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Palaeosol S5 samples from these three localities are further prepared as magnetic extracts and separation residues. Low-temperature magnetic measurements including field cooled and zero field cooled (FC/ZFC) remanence, in-phase magnetic susceptibility, thermal remanent magnetization and room temperature saturation isothermal remanence magnetization (RTSIRM), with X-ray diffraction measurements are carried out for all magnetic extracts and separation residues samples. The asymmetric rounded `hump' in cooling curves on RTSIRM and the `tilted' Verwey transition on ZFC/FC curves suggest that partially oxidized magnetite is the dominant magnetic contributor, not pure maghemite or magnetite. Furthermore, The Verwey transitions on cooling curves slightly decrease and the increased slope of `tilted' Verwey transition on ZFC remanence curves show that the degree of oxidation of magnetite between localities increases in the order XF-LY-BJ. Hard isothermal remanent magnetization, X-ray diffraction data and the difference of magnetization in warming curves of RTSIRM suggest that both hematite concentration in magnetic extracts and goethite concentration in separation residues increase from XF to BJ. Frequency-dependent susceptibility and ZFC/FC curves show that BJS5 layer formed under high palaeoprecipitation has less superparamagnetic (SP) but more single domain to pseudo-single domain particles, because SP maghemite was dissolved and transformed into goethite by temporary waterlogging. The increase in hematite concentration is interpreted as due to SP maghemite oxidation or original goethite dehydration within dry soil environment. Therefore, transformation of maghemite to goethite in waterlogged phases of the S5 palaeosol led to the loss of magnetization.

  16. Biosynthesis and the conjugation of magnetite nanoparticles with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obayemi, J.D.; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S.; Danyuo, Y.; Odusanya, O.S.; Anuku, N.; Malatesta, K.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (BMNPs) with particle sizes between 10 nm and 60 nm. The biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are produced from Magnetospirillum magneticum (M.M.) bacteria that respond to magnetic fields. M.M. bacteria were cultured and used to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles. This was done in an enriched magnetic spirillum growth medium (EMSGM) at different pH levels. The nanoparticle concentrations were characterized with UV–Visible (UV–Vis) spectroscopy, while the particle shapes were elucidated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure of the particles was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Carbodiimide reduction was also used to functionalize the BMNPs with a molecular recognition unit (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH) that attaches specifically to receptors that are over-expressed on the surfaces of most breast cancer cell types. The resulting nanoparticles were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quantitative image analysis. The implications of the results are then discussed for the potential development of magnetic nanoparticles for the specific targeting and treatment of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Biosynthesis of MNPs with clinically relevant sizes between 10 and 60 nm. • New insights into the effects of pH and processing time on nanoparticle shapes and sizes. • Successful conjugation of biosynthesized magnetite nanoparticles to LHRH ligands. • Conjugated BMNPs that are monodispersed with potential biomedical relevance. • Magnetic properties of biosynthesized MNPs suggest potential for MRI enhancement

  17. Growth and characterization of magnetite-maghemite thin films by the dip coating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velásquez, A. A.; Arnedo, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the process of growth and characterization of magnetite-maghemite thin films obtained by the dip coating method. The thin films were deposited on glass substrates, using a ferrofluid of nanostructured magnetite-maghemite particles as precursor solution. During the growth of the films the following parameters were controlled: number of dips of the substrates, dip velocity of the substrates and drying times. The films were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Elelectron Microscopy, four-point method for resistance measurement, Room Temperature Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Hall effect. Mössbauer measurements showed the presence of a sextet attributed to maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3) and two doublets attributed to superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe_3O_4), indicating a distribution of oxidation states of the iron as well as a particle size distribution of the magnetic phases in the films. Atomic force microscopy measurements showed that the films cover quasi uniformly the substrates, existing in them some pores with sub-micron size. Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements showed a uniform structure in the films, with spherical particles with size around 10 nm. Voltage versus current measurements showed an ohmic response of the films for currents between 0 and 100 nA. On the other hand, Hall effect measurements showed a nonlinear response of the Hall voltage with the magnetic flux density applied perpendicular to the plane of the films, however the response is fairly linear for magnetic flux densities between 0.15 and 0.35 T approximately. The results suggest that the films are promising for application as magnetic flux density sensors.

  18. Magnetoresistance and Microstructure of Magnetite Nanocrystals Dispersed in Indium−Tin Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Koichi; Kohiki, Shigemi; Mitome, Masanori; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Arai, Masao; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Epitaxial indium−tin oxide (ITO) thin films were fabricated on a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate by pulsed-laser deposition using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle dispersed ITO powders as a target. Magnetoresistance of the film at a field of 1 T was 39% at 45 K, and it stayed at 3% above 225 K. The film demonstrated cooling hysteresis in the temperature dependence of direct-current magnetization. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phase-separated Fe3O4 nanocrystals with w...

  19. XAS signatures of Am(III) adsorbed onto magnetite and maghemite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finck, N.; Radulescu, L.; Schild, D.

    2016-01-01

    Trivalent americium was adsorbed on magnetite and maghemite under similar chemical conditions and the local environment probed by EXAFS spectroscopy. In both samples, partially hydrated Am(III) binds the surface but slightly different surface complexes were identified. On Fe3O4, Am(III) forms...... monomeric tridentate surface complexes similar to that reported for Pu(III) at the (111) surface. In contrast, the lower number of detected Fe atoms may suggest that Am(III) forms monomeric bidentate surface complexes on γ-Fe2O3. Alternatively, the lower Fe coordination number can also be due...

  20. Niobium substituted magnetite as a strong heterogeneous Fenton catalyst for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim Pouran, Shima, E-mail: rahimpooran@yahoo.com [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Abdul Aziz, A.R., E-mail: azizraman@um.edu.my [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri, E-mail: ashri@um.edu.my [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Embong, Zaidi, E-mail: zembong@gmail.com [Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • A series of Nb substituted magnetite samples were prepared and characterized. • Samples had inverse spinel structure, good magnetic property, and durability. • Increased surface area resulted in higher adsorption capacity of the samples. • Nb incorporation enhanced degradation of methylene blue through Fenton reaction. • The activity of the catalysts increased by increment in Nb content of the samples. - Abstract: In this study, a series of Nb substituted magnetites; Fe{sub 3−x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.022, 0.049, 0.099, and 0.19) were prepared and characterized by XRD, BET surface area, TEM, VSM, XPS, and chemical experiments. The magnetite inverse spinel structure and magnetic property were maintained in all the synthetized samples. A significant decrease in crystal size (≈two times) and increase in specific surface area (≈three times) were observed with increased Nb content, resulting in higher adsorption capacity of the samples. In addition, the reactivity of the synthetized samples was examined through degradation of methylene blue solution using Fenton-like reaction. It was found that the incorporation of niobium significantly improved the degradation of methylene blue of which total MB removal was achieved within 180 min at higher molar ratios of Nb (x = 0.19). This could be attributed to the generated oxygen vacancies on the surface of catalysts, the contribution of the introduced Nb cations in Fenton oxidation cycle for regeneration of Fe{sup 2+} cations, and increase in adsorption capacity of the samples due to larger surface area. The MB degradation through Fe{sub 2.79}Nb{sub 0.19}O{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system was well described by the pseudo-first-order equation in kinetics. All samples showed good stability under the studied pH conditions. The amount of niobium leached was not detectable in neutral and basic solutions and the samples could be reused in oxidation process for several times without a significant

  1. Three dimensional radiative flow of magnetite-nanofluid with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Rashid, Madiha; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Present communication deals with the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in flow of nanofluid by non-linear stretching sheet. Water based nanofluid containing magnetite nanoparticles is considered. Non-linear radiation and non-uniform heat sink/source effects are examined. Non-linear differential systems are computed by Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM). Convergent solutions of nonlinear systems are established. The optimal data of auxiliary variables is obtained. Impact of several non-dimensional parameters for velocity components, temperature and concentration fields are examined. Graphs are plotted for analysis of surface drag force and heat transfer rate.

  2. Deposition of magnetite particles from high velocity water onto isothermal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1977-02-01

    The deposition rate of magnetite particles from a high velocity water slurry onto isothermal metal tubes was measured. The effects of velocity (5 to 100 m/s), slurry concentration (200 to 1000 mg Fe/kg H 2 O), temperature (25 0 to 90 0 C), pH (4 to 10 at 25 0 C), and tube material (nickel, Zircaloy-4) on deposition rate were studied. The data are interpreted in terms of two steps in series for deposition: a mass transfer step followed by a deposition or inertial coasting step. Mass transfer of particles through the bulk water phase apparently limits the deposition of particles at high Reynolds number

  3. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Effects on the Agglomeration of Magnetite Nanoparticles by Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Daeseong; Kim, Hackjin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of agglomeration of magnetite nanoparticles studied by measuring the magnetic weight shows the kinetics of stretched exponential. During the growth of the magnetic weight, the structure of agglomerate fluctuates by temperature change. This fast relaxation that can be interpreted in terms of Boltzmann distribution indicates that the thermal equilibration is established promptly with the temperature change. Agglomerate of nanoparticles resembles protein in that both of them exist in complex structures of various conformations with different formation energies, which requires the energy landscape for understanding of dynamics in detail

  4. Size and surface effects on the magnetism of magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, V. N., E-mail: pppnvn@yandex.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Ignatenko, A. N.; Irkhin, V. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The size effects of magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles on their magnetic properties (magnetic moment, Curie temperature, blocking temperature, etc.) have been investigated. Magnetic separation and centrifugation of an aqueous solution of nanoparticles were used for their separation into fractions; their sizes were measured by atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy. A change in the size leads to a change in the Curie temperature and magnetic moment per formula unit. Both native nanoparticles and those covered with a bioresorbable layer have been considered. The magnetic properties have been calculated by the Monte Carlo method for the classical Heisenberg model with various bulk and surface magnetic moments.

  5. Influence of nanodispersed modifications of magnetite powders on spray nozzle efficiency of diesel engine injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidov, M. A.; Perekrestov, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents data on the impact of new environmental requirements relating to the quality of diesel fuel on the anti-wear properties of fuel. Anti-wear additive is proposed as a material for increasing the tribotechnical characteristics of diesel fuel. This additive consists of diesel fuel with micelles contained in it, formed on the basis of molecules of solid plasticity lubrication of iron oxide (Fe3O4) - magnetite, and with surrounding molecules of oleic acid (C18H34O2). The additive has low shear resistance and increased lubricity of diesel fuel when this additive is introduced into it.

  6. Iron site occupancies in magnetite-ulvospinel solid solution: A new approach using XMCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, C. I.; Henderson, C. M. B.; Telling, N. D.; Pattrick, R. A.D.; Vaughan, D. J.; Charnock, J. M.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Coker, V.S.; Laan, G. van der

    2009-06-22

    Ordering of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} between octahedral (Oh) and tetrahedral (Td) sites in synthetic members of the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) - ulvoespinel (Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) solid-solution series was determined using Fe L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) coupled with electron microprobe and chemical analysis, Ti L-edge spectroscopy, Fe K-edge EXAFS and XANES, Fe{sub 57} Moessbauer spectroscopy, and unit cell parameters. Microprobe analysis, cell edges and chemical FeO determinations showed that the bulk compositions of the samples were stoichiometric magnetite-ulvoespinel solid-solutions. Surface sensitive XMCD showed that the surfaces of these oxide minerals were more sensitive to redox conditions and some samples required re-equilibration with suitable solid-solid buffers. Detailed site-occupancy analysis of these samples gave XMCD-Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratios very close to stoichiometric values. L{sub 2,3}-edge spectroscopy showed that Ti{sup 4+} was restricted to Oh sites. XMCD results showed that significant Fe{sup 2+} only entered Td when the Ti content was > 0.40 apfu while Fe{sup 2+} in Oh increased from 1 a.p.f.u in magnetite to a maximum of {approx}1.4 apfu in USP45. As the Ti content increased from this point, the steady increase in Fe{sup 2+} in Td sites was clearly observable in the XMCD spectra, concurrent with a slow decrease in Fe{sup 2+} in Oh sites. Calculated magnetic moments showed a steady decrease from magnetite (4.06 {mu}{sub B}) to USP45 (1.5 {mu}{sub B}) and then a slower decrease towards the value for ulvoespinel (0 {mu}{sub B}). Two of the synthesized samples were also partially maghemitized by re-equilibrating with an oxidizing Ni-NiO buffer and XMCD showed that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation only occurred at Oh sites, with concomitant vacancy formation restricted to this site. This study shows the advantage of using XMCD as a direct measurement of Fe oxidation state in these complex magnetic spinels. These results

  7. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of Cambrian to Triassic miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal strata of Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, G.E.; Stewart, John H.

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and eighty two individual detrital zircon grains from Cambrian through Permian miogeoclinal strata, Ordovician eugeoclinal rocks, and Triassic post-orogenic sediments in northwestern Sonora have been analyzed. During Cambrian, Devonian, Permian, and Triassic time, most zircons accumulating along this part of the Cordilleran margin were shed from 1.40-1.45 and 1.62-1.78 Ga igneous rocks that are widespread in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Zircons with ages of approximately 1.11 Ga are common in Cambrian strata and were apparently shed from granite bodies near the sample site. The sources of 225-280 Ma zircons in our Triassic sample are more problematic, as few igneous rocks of these ages are recognized in northwestern Mexico. Such sources may be present but unrecognized, or the grains could have been derived from igneous rocks of the appropriate ages to the northwest in the Mojave Desert region, to the east in Chihuahua and Coahuila, or to the south in accreted(?) arc-type terranes. Because the zircon grains in our Cambrian and Devonian to Triassic samples could have accumulated in proximity to basement rocks near their present position or in the Death Valley region of southern California, our data do not support or refute the existence of the Mojave-Sonora megashear. Ordovician strata of both miogeoclinal and eugeoclinal affinity are dominated by >1.77 Ga detrital zircons, which are considerably older than most basement rocks in the region. Zircon grains in the miogeoclinal sample were apparently derived from the Peace River arch area of northwestern Canada and transported southward by longshore currents. The eugeoclinal grains may also have come from the Peace River arch region, with southward transport by either sedimentary or tectonic processes, or they may have been shed from off-shelf slivers of continents (perhaps Antarctica?) removed from the Cordilleran margin during Neoproterozoic rifting. It is also possible that the

  8. Room Temperature Co-Precipitation Synthesis of Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Large pH Window with Different Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, Maria Cristina; Pei, Yongbing; Ring, Terry A

    2013-11-28

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄) represent the most promising materials in medical applications. To favor high-drug or enzyme loading on the nanoparticles, they are incorporated into mesoporous materials to form a hybrid support with the consequent reduction of magnetization saturation. The direct synthesis of mesoporous structures appears to be of interest. To this end, magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized using a one pot co-precipitation reaction at room temperature in the presence of different bases, such as NaOH, KOH or (C₂H₅)₄NOH. Magnetite shows characteristics of superparamagnetism at room temperature and a saturation magnetization (Ms) value depending on both the crystal size and the degree of agglomeration of individual nanoparticles. Such agglomeration appears to be responsible for the formation of mesoporous structures, which are affected by the pH, the nature of alkali, the slow or fast addition of alkaline solution and the drying modality of synthesized powders.

  9. Room Temperature Co-Precipitation Synthesis of Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Large pH Window with Different Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Mascolo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 represent the most promising materials in medical applications. To favor high-drug or enzyme loading on the nanoparticles, they are incorporated into mesoporous materials to form a hybrid support with the consequent reduction of magnetization saturation. The direct synthesis of mesoporous structures appears to be of interest. To this end, magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized using a one pot co-precipitation reaction at room temperature in the presence of different bases, such as NaOH, KOH or (C2H54NOH. Magnetite shows characteristics of superparamagnetism at room temperature and a saturation magnetization (Ms value depending on both the crystal size and the degree of agglomeration of individual nanoparticles. Such agglomeration appears to be responsible for the formation of mesoporous structures, which are affected by the pH, the nature of alkali, the slow or fast addition of alkaline solution and the drying modality of synthesized powders.

  10. Sr and Ar isotope studies of detrital smectites from the Atlantic Ocean (D.S.D.P., Legs 43, 48 and 50)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.; Lucas, J.

    1984-01-01

    Mineralogical, morphological and isotopic (Rb-Sr and K-Ar) determinations were made on some detrital smectites of Palaeocene and Cenomanian ages from D.S.D.P. drillings in the Atlantic Ocean. These minerals are not inert in their depositional environment; authigenic laths grow on detrital sheets with sharp borders. This authigenesis could occur slightly after deposition in a closed system, for some of these smectites. It has been tentatively quantified by the Rb-Sr and K-Ar isotopic methods, which seem also well suited to evaluate the chemical extent of this authigenesis. At least, no preferential loss of 40 Ar vs. 87 Sr could be detected in the minerals, even in those which are smaller than 0.2 μm. (Auth.)

  11. Contribution to the study of deep coastal detritic bottoms: the algal communities of the continental shelf off the Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. JOHER

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three main algal-dominated coastal detritic communities from the continental shelf off Mallorca and Menorca (Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean are described herein: maërl beds dominated by Spongites fruticulosus and forests of Laminaria rodriguezii located in the Menorca channel, and Peyssonnelia inamoena beds found along the Southern coast of Menorca. There seems to be a gradient of disturbance from the highly disturbed Peyssonnelia beds to the almost undisturbed L. rodriguezii forests. Whether this gradient is the result of current and past anthropogenic pressure (e.g. trawling intensity or is driven by natural environmental factors needs further assessment. Finally, the location of the target communities by means of ROV dives combined with the use of a Box-Corer dredge and beam trawl proved to be a good methodology in the study of the composition and structure of these deep water detritic communities.

  12. In-situ Diffraction Study of Magnetite at Simultaneous High Pressure and High Temperature Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetite intertwined with the evolution of human civilizations, and remains so today. It is technologically and scientifically important by virtue of its unique magnetic and electrical properties. Magnetite is a common mineral found in a variety of geologic environments, and plays an important role in deciphering the oxygen evolution in the Earth's atmosphere and its deep interiors. The latter application asks for the knowledge of the thermal and elastic properties of magnetite at high pressures and temperatures, which is currently not available in literature. We have carried out a few in-situ diffraction experiments on magnetite using white synchrotron radiation at beamline X17B2 of National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). A DIA module in an 1100-ton press and WC anvils were employed for compression, and diffraction spectra were collected at simultaneous high pressures (P) and temperatures (T) (up to 9 GPa and 900 oC). Mixture of amorphous boron and epoxy resin was used as pressure medium, and NaCl as pressure marker. Temperature was recorded by W-Re thermocouples. Commercially purchased magnetite powder and a mixture of the said powder and NaCl (1:1) were used as starting material in separate experiments. Preliminary data analyses have yielded following observations: (1) Charge disordering seen at ambient pressure remains active in current experiments, especially at lower pressures (reversibility and degree of cation disordering depend on the starting material and/or experimental P-T path; and (4) cation disordering notably reduces the apparent bulk moduli of magnetite.

  13. A new parameterization for surface ocean light attenuation in Earth System Models: assessing the impact of light absorption by colored detrital material

    OpenAIRE

    G. E. Kim; M.-A. Pradal; A. Gnanadesikan

    2015-01-01

    Light limitation can affect the distribution of biota and nutrients in the ocean. Light absorption by colored detrital material (CDM) was included in a fully coupled Earth System Model using a new parameterization for shortwave attenuation. Two model runs were conducted, with and without light attenuation by CDM. In a global average sense, greater light limitation associated with CDM increased surface chlorophyll, biomass and nutrients together. These changes can be attribut...

  14. Elucidating tectonic events and processes from variably tectonized conglomerate clast detrital geochronology: examples from the Hongliuhe Formation in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleven, Nathan; Lin, Shoufa; Davis, Donald; Xiao, Wenjiao; Guilmette, Carl

    2017-04-01

    This work expands upon detrital zircon geochronology with a sampling and analysis strategy dating granitoid conglomerate clasts that exhibit differing degrees of internal ductile deformation. As deformation textures within clastic material reflect the variation and history of tectonization in the source region of a deposit, we outline a dating methodology that can provide details of the provenance's tectonomagmatic history from deformation-relative age distributions. The method involves bulk samples of solely granitoid clasts, as they are representative of the magmatic framework within the provenance. The clasts are classified and sorted into three subsets: undeformed, slightly deformed, and deformed. LA-ICPMS U-Pb geochronology is performed on zircon separates of each subset. Our case study, involving the Permian Hongliuhe Formation in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt, analyzes each of the three clast subsets, as well as sandstone detrital samples, at three stratigraphic levels to yield a profile of the unroofed provenance. The age spectra of the clast samples exhibit different, wider distributions than sandstone samples, considered an effect of proximity to the respective provenance. Comparisons of clast data to sandstone data, as well as comparisons between stratigraphic levels, yield indications of key tectonic processes, in addition to the typical characteristics provided by detrital geochronology. The clast data indicates a minimal lag time, implying rapid exhumation rates, whereas sandstone data alone would indicate a 90 m.y. lag time. Early Paleozoic arc building episodes appear as Ordovician peaks in sandstone data, and Silurian-Devonian peaks in clast data, indicating a younging of magmatism towards the proximal provenance. A magmatic hiatus starts in the Devonian, correlating with the latest age of deformed clasts, interpreted as timing of collisional tectonics. Provenance interpretation using the correlations seen between the clast and sandstone

  15. Effect of pH on the Structural and Magnetic Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles Synthesised by Co-Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, W.; Kareem, M.; Hannoyer, B.; Saha, Sh.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4, nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation aqueous method at room temperature and at different pH, from 8 to 12.5. The pH value was found to influence greatly the resulting phases and has no significant effect on the particle size. In all cases, magnetite was found to be the main phase but the contribution of Goethite phase was identified clearly with the increase in pH. Significant reduction in saturation magnetization was evident. Structural and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were examined using; XRD, TEM, Raman Spectroscopy and SQUID. (author)

  16. Hf and Nd Isotopic and REE Investigations of Magnetite in a Proterozoic IOCG system: Fingerprinting Sources and Timing of Mineralisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, B. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Stuart Shelf on the margin of the Gawler Craton, South Australia, contains numerous economic and sub-econmic IOCG mineralised systems, including the giant Olympic Dam Cu-Au-U deposit. Hematite and magnetite have played a critical in the genesis of all of these deposits, and increasingly it appears that magnetite has been in equilibrium with either the final mineralised assemblage or was critical in transporting metals during the ore forming event. 14 magnetites and one hematite from three separate styles of iron oxide mineralisation associated with the Prominent Hill Cu-Au deposit were selected for detailed analysis. The REE and isotopic separations were all conducted by low blank wet chemistry and isotopes determined by TIMS (Nd) and MC-ICPMS (Hf). Magnetites associated with skarn style mineralsiation proximal to the ore body are unformly depleted in REE, whereas hematite within the ore and magmatic magmatites and whole rock gabbros from the nearby 1590Ma White Hill Gabbro intrusion are all relatively LREE enriched and display a comparable range in REE. Significantly however, magnetite separates almost invariably display more evolved Hf isotopic signatures than the host lithologies adjacent the economic mineralisation (dacites and metasediments at Prominent Hill mine) implying that the magnetites were sourcing their REE inventory dominantly from the local crust rather than a mantle derived source. In contrast, the magmatic magnetites from the White Hill Complex display Nd and Hf isotopes which are slightly more primitive, recording a greater relative mantle component, however still requiring a significant crustal input. Significantly, the hematite which contains the Au mineralisation preserves ɛNd (1590) = -4.04 and ɛHf (1590) = -6.05 essentially identical to the magmatic magnetites and their host gabbros in the White Hill complex and the basalts and dacites of the host Gawler Range Volcanics (ɛNd (1590) = -7.10 - -3.72 and ɛHf (1590) = -7.69 - -1

  17. Plasmid DNA transfection using magnetite cationic liposomes for construction of multilayered gene-engineered cell sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Kosuke; Kawasumi, Tamayo; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-01

    Modification of cellular functions by overexpression of genes is being increasingly practiced for tissue engineering. In the present study, we