WorldWideScience

Sample records for primary design goal

  1. Tougher containment design goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Farrelly, C.

    1978-01-01

    Present day LWR containment design goals are reviewed, together with their potential failure modes. Rasmussen's estimates of failure probabilities are discussed and the concept of ''delayed failure'' is seen to be a valuable safety goal for hypothetical accidents. The paper investigates the inherent coremelt resistance capability of various containment designs and suggests improvements, with special emphasis on increasing the failure delay times. (author)

  2. Goal conflict, goal facilitation, and health professionals' provision of physical activity advice in primary care: an exploratory prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presseau, Justin; Francis, Jill J; Campbell, Neil C; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2011-07-15

    The theory of planned behaviour has well-evidenced utility in predicting health professional behaviour, but focuses on a single behaviour isolated from the numerous potentially conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours performed alongside. Goal conflict and goal facilitation may influence whether health professionals engage in guideline-recommended behaviours, and may supplement the predictive power of the theory of planned behaviour. We hypothesised that goal facilitation and goal conflict contribute to predicting primary care health professionals' provision of physical activity advice to patients with hypertension, over and above predictors of behaviour from the theory of planned behaviour. Using a prospective predictive design, at baseline we invited a random sample of 606 primary care health professionals from all primary care practices in NHS Grampian and NHS Tayside (Scotland) to complete postal questionnaires. Goal facilitation and goal conflict were measured alongside theory of planned behaviour constructs at baseline. At follow-up six months later, participants self-reported the number of patients, out of those seen in the preceding two weeks, to whom they provided physical activity advice. Forty-four primary care physicians and nurses completed measures at both time points (7.3% response rate). Goal facilitation and goal conflict improved the prediction of behaviour, accounting for substantial additional variance (5.8% and 8.4%, respectively) in behaviour over and above intention and perceived behavioural control. Health professionals' provision of physical activity advice in primary care can be predicted by perceptions about how their conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours help and hinder giving advice, over and above theory of planned behaviour constructs. Incorporating features of multiple goal pursuit into the theory of planned behaviour may help to better understand health professional behaviour.

  3. Goal conflict, goal facilitation, and health professionals' provision of physical activity advice in primary care: An exploratory prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Neil C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The theory of planned behaviour has well-evidenced utility in predicting health professional behaviour, but focuses on a single behaviour isolated from the numerous potentially conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours performed alongside. Goal conflict and goal facilitation may influence whether health professionals engage in guideline-recommended behaviours, and may supplement the predictive power of the theory of planned behaviour. We hypothesised that goal facilitation and goal conflict contribute to predicting primary care health professionals' provision of physical activity advice to patients with hypertension, over and above predictors of behaviour from the theory of planned behaviour. Methods Using a prospective predictive design, at baseline we invited a random sample of 606 primary care health professionals from all primary care practices in NHS Grampian and NHS Tayside (Scotland to complete postal questionnaires. Goal facilitation and goal conflict were measured alongside theory of planned behaviour constructs at baseline. At follow-up six months later, participants self-reported the number of patients, out of those seen in the preceding two weeks, to whom they provided physical activity advice. Results Forty-four primary care physicians and nurses completed measures at both time points (7.3% response rate. Goal facilitation and goal conflict improved the prediction of behaviour, accounting for substantial additional variance (5.8% and 8.4%, respectively in behaviour over and above intention and perceived behavioural control. Conclusions Health professionals' provision of physical activity advice in primary care can be predicted by perceptions about how their conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours help and hinder giving advice, over and above theory of planned behaviour constructs. Incorporating features of multiple goal pursuit into the theory of planned behaviour may help to better

  4. Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) - Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the aims of the NEA's Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is to work towards greater harmonisation of regulatory requirements. To achieve this aim, it is necessary that there is a degree of convergence on the safety goals that are required to be met by designers and operators. The term 'safety goals' is defined to cover all health and safety requirements which must be met: these may be deterministic rules and/or probabilistic targets. They should cover the safety of workers, public and the environment in line with the IAEA's Basic Safety Objective; encompassing safety in normal operation through to severe accidents. MDEP is also interested in how its work can be extended to future reactors, which may use significantly different technology to the almost ubiquitous LWRs used today and in the next generation, building on the close co-operation within MDEP between the regulators who are currently engaged in constructing or carrying out design reviews on new designs. For two designs this work has involved several regulators sharing their safety assessments and in some cases issuing statements on issues that need to be addressed. Work is also progressing towards joint regulatory position statements on specific assessment areas. Harmonisation of safety goals will enhance the cooperation between regulators as further developments in design and technology occur. All regulators have safety goals, but these are expressed in many different ways and exercises in comparing them frequently are done at a very low level eg specific temperatures in the reactor vessel of a specific reactor type. The differences in the requirements from different regulators are difficult to resolve as the goals are derived using different principles and assumptions and are often for a specific technology. Therefore a different approach is being investigated, starting with the top-level safety goals and try to derive a structure and means of deriving lower tier

  5. [Primary health care and the millennium development goals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, A; Bob, M; Fall, A; Fall, C

    2012-01-01

    Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) met in Alma Ata (8-12 September 1978) to define and advocate the implementation of primary health care (PHC) worldwide, above all, in developing countries, which had a real need to review their strategies for meeting the health needs of their populations. They did not suspect that 20 years later the vision they displayed would remain undeniably relevant. Here we examine the similarities and points of convergence of their declaration about PHC with the Millennium Development Goals that seek today to reduce poverty across the world. An exhaustive and analytic literature review was conducted to collect those similarities. Further analysis of the definitions, objectives, principles and recommendations of the Alma Ata Declaration and the Millennium Declaration reveals multiple dependencies and fundamental points of similarity between these two representations. Almost all states have pledged to achieve the eight MDG by 2015: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as essential health care, based on practical methods and techniques that are both scientifically sound and socially acceptable, universally accessible to all individuals and all families of the community, through their full participation and at a cost that the community and countries can afford at all stages of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination. It is an integral part of economic and social development. The following principles are involved in the achievement of both primary health care and the MDG: social equity, community participation, and intersectorality. Public health is an essential condition of poverty

  6. Designs of goal-free problems for trigonometry learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnowati, E.; Maulidya, S. R.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes the designs of goal-free problems particularly for trigonometry, which may be considered a difficult topic for high school students.Goal-free problem is an instructional design developed based on a Cognitive load theory (CLT). Within the design, instead of asking students to solve a specific goal of a mathematics problem, the instruction is to solve as many Pythagoras as possible. It was assumed that for novice students, goal-free problems encourage students to pay attention more to the given information and the mathematical principles that can be applied to reveal the unknown variables. Hence, students develop more structured knowledge while solving the goal-free problems. The resulted design may be used in regular mathematics classroom with some adjustment on the difficulty level and the allocated lesson time.

  7. Helically symmetric experiment, (HSX) goals, design and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, F.S.B.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, D.T.; Matthews, P.G.; Talmadge, J.N.; Shohet, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    HSX is a quasi-helically symmetric (QHS) stellarator currently under construction at the Torsatron-Stellarator Laboratory of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This device is unique in its magnetic design in that the magnetic field spectrum possesses only a single dominant (helical) component. This design avoids the large direct orbit losses and the low-collisionality neoclassical losses associated with conventional stellarators. The restoration of symmetry to the confining magnetic field makes the neoclassical confinement in this device analogous to an axisymmetric q=1/3 tokamak. The HSX device has been designed with a clear set of primary physics goals: demonstrate the feasibility of construction of a QHS device, examine single particle confinement of injected ions with regard to magnetic field symmetry breaking, compare density and temperature profiles in this helically symmetric system to those for axisymmetric tokamaks and conventional stellarators, examine electric fields and plasma rotation with edge biasing in relation to L-H transitions in symmetric versus non-symmetric stellarator systems, investigate QHS effects on 1/v regime electron confinement, and examine how greatly-reduced neoclassical electron thermal conductivity compares to the experimental χ e profile. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Imbalance between Goals and Organizational Structure in Primary Health Care in Iran- a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanganeh Baygi, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, the main focus of health sector reforms in Iran is the family physician and referral system plan. Fundamental changes in the goals and strategies, has increased the necessity of the need to reform the organizational structure. This study tries to review and summarize all cases about the organizational structure of Iran and its challenges in primary health care system. This study was a systematic review of published and grey literature. We searched the relevant databases, bibliography of related papers, and laws, using appropriate search strategies and key words. The CASP tool was used by two experts to evaluate the quality of retrieved papers and inconsistencies were resolved by discussion. After removal of duplicate citations, a total of 52 titles were identified through database searching, among which 30 met the inclusion criteria. Considering the research quality criteria, 14 papers were recognized qualified, which were categorized into two groups of: articles and policies. The results showed ineffectiveness of the current organizational structure at different level. The majority of the papers recommend performing reforms in the system because of changes in goals and strategies. Also, some suggest an appropriate information system to be designed in the current structures. Centralization and delegation process are the main discussions for the studies. Because of fundamental changes in goals and strategies, reforms in the organizational structure of primary health system in Iran especially in peripheral levels are highly recommended.

  9. Seismic design and evaluation criteria based on target performance goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Kennedy, R.P.; Short, S.A.

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy utilizes deterministic seismic design/evaluation criteria developed to achieve probabilistic performance goals. These seismic design and evaluation criteria are intended to apply equally to the design of new facilities and to the evaluation of existing facilities. In addition, the criteria are intended to cover design and evaluation of buildings, equipment, piping, and other structures. Four separate sets of seismic design/evaluation criteria have been presented each with a different performance goal. In all these criteria, earthquake loading is selected from seismic hazard curves on a probabilistic basis but seismic response evaluation methods and acceptable behavior limits are deterministic approaches with which design engineers are familiar. For analytical evaluations, conservatism has been introduced through the use of conservative inelastic demand-capacity ratios combined with ductile detailing requirements, through the use of minimum specified material strengths and conservative code capacity equations, and through the use of a seismic scale factor. For evaluation by testing or by experience data, conservatism has been introduced through the use of an increase scale factor which is applied to the prescribed design/evaluation input motion

  10. Perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services on the meaning and goals of clinical governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwedza, Ruyamuro K; Larkins, Sarah; Johnson, Julie K; Zwar, Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Definitions of clinical governance are varied and there is no one agreed model. This paper explored the perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services, located in North Queensland, Australia, on the meaning and goals of clinical governance. The study followed an embedded multiple case study design with semi-structured interviews, document analysis and non-participant observation. Participants included clinicians, non-clinical support staff, managers and executives. Similarities and differences in the understanding of clinical governance between health centre and committee case studies were evident. Almost one-third of participants were unfamiliar with the term or were unsure of its meaning; alongside limited documentation of a definition. Although most cases linked the concept of clinical governance to key terms, many lacked a comprehensive understanding. Similarities between cases included viewing clinical governance as a management and administrative function. Differences included committee members' alignment of clinical governance with corporate governance and frontline staff associating clinical governance with staff safety. Document analysis offered further insight into these perspectives. Clinical governance is well-documented as an expected organisational requirement, including in rural and remote areas where geographic, workforce and demographic factors pose additional challenges to quality and safety. However, in reality, it is not clearly, similarly or comprehensively understood by all participants.

  11. Ethnography by Design: On Goals and Mediating Artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelström, Fabian; Holmlid, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Design ethnography is the appropriation of ethnography for the purposes of informing design. This paper investigates the effects of these appropriations, through a comparative study of how designers and anthropologists approach the same field site and by a review of new techniques introduced by designers to do ethnography. The techniques reviewed…

  12. The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krist, Alex H; Glasgow, Russell E; Heurtin-Roberts, Suzanne; Sabo, Roy T; Roby, Dylan H; Gorin, Sherri N Sheinfeld; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Estabrooks, Paul A; Ory, Marcia G; Glenn, Beth A; Phillips, Siobhan M; Kessler, Rodger; Johnson, Sallie Beth; Rohweder, Catherine L; Fernandez, Maria E

    2016-06-01

    Patient-centered health risk assessments (HRAs) that screen for unhealthy behaviors, prioritize concerns, and provide feedback may improve counseling, goal setting, and health. To evaluate the effectiveness of routinely administering a patient-centered HRA, My Own Health Report, for diet, exercise, smoking, alcohol, drug use, stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep, 18 primary care practices were randomized to ask patients to complete My Own Health Report (MOHR) before an office visit (intervention) or continue usual care (control). Intervention practice patients were more likely than control practice patients to be asked about each of eight risks (range of differences 5.3-15.8 %, p set goals for six risks (range of differences 3.8-16.6 %, p goal setting.Trial RegistrationClinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01825746.

  13. Can We Improve Indicator Design for Complex Sustainable Development Goals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burford, Gemma; Tamas, P.A.; Harder, Marie K.

    2016-01-01

    A conceptual framework was constructed for United Nations’ complex Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 4.7 focusing on education for sustainable development (ESD), and used to analyse the usefulness and character of indicators produced from a values-based approach called ESDinds, compared to a

  14. The Ionospheric Connection Explorer Mission: Mission Goals and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immel, T. J.; England, S. L.; Mende, S. B.; Heelis, R. A.; Englert, C. R.; Edelstein, J.; Frey, H. U.; Korpela, E. J.; Taylor, E. R.; Craig, W. W.; Harris, S. E.; Bester, M.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Gérard, J.-C.; Harlander, J. M.; Huba, J. D.; Hubert, B.; Kamalabadi, F.; Makela, J. J.; Maute, A. I.; Meier, R. R.; Raftery, C.; Rochus, P.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stephan, A. W.; Swenson, G. R.; Frey, S.; Hysell, D. L.; Saito, A.; Rider, K. A.; Sirk, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    The Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, is a new NASA Explorer mission that will explore the boundary between Earth and space to understand the physical connection between our world and our space environment. This connection is made in the ionosphere, which has long been known to exhibit variability associated with the sun and solar wind. However, it has been recognized in the 21st century that equally significant changes in ionospheric conditions are apparently associated with energy and momentum propagating upward from our own atmosphere. ICON's goal is to weigh the competing impacts of these two drivers as they influence our space environment. Here we describe the specific science objectives that address this goal, as well as the means by which they will be achieved. The instruments selected, the overall performance requirements of the science payload and the operational requirements are also described. ICON's development began in 2013 and the mission is on track for launch in 2018. ICON is developed and managed by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, with key contributions from several partner institutions.

  15. LUTE primary mirror materials and design study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthven, Greg

    1993-02-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) Primary Mirror Materials and Design Study is to investigate the feasibility of the LUTE telescope primary mirror. A systematic approach to accomplish this key goal was taken by first understanding the optical, thermal, and structural requirements and then deriving the critical primary mirror-level requirements for ground testing, launch, and lunar operations. After summarizing the results in those requirements which drove the selection of material and the design for the primary mirror are discussed. Most important of these are the optical design which was assumed to be the MSFC baseline (i.e. 3 mirror optical system), telescope wavefront error (WFE) allocations, the telescope weight budget, and the LUTE operational temperature ranges. Mechanical load levels, reflectance and microroughness issues, and options for the LUTE metering structure were discussed and an outline for the LUTE telescope sub-system design specification was initiated. The primary mirror analysis and results are presented. The six material substrate candidates are discussed and four distinct mirror geometries which are considered are shown. With these materials and configurations together with varying the location of the mirror support points, a total of 42 possible primary mirror designs resulted. The polishability of each substrate candidate was investigated and a usage history of 0.5 meter and larger precision cryogenic mirrors (the operational low end LUTE temperature of 60 K is the reason we feel a survey of cryogenic mirrors is appropriate) that were flown or tested are presented.

  16. Emergency planning simplification: Why ALWR designs shall support this goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripputi, I.

    2004-01-01

    Emergency Plan simplification, could be achieved only if it can proved, in a context of balanced national health protection policies, that there is a reduced or no technical need for some elements of it and that public protection is assured in all considered situations regardless of protective actions outside the plant. These objectives may be technically supported if one or more of the following conditions are complied with: 1. Accidents potentially releasing large amounts of fission products can be ruled out by characteristics of the designs 2. Plant engineered features (and the containment system in particular) are able to drastically mitigate the radioactive releases under all conceivable scenarios. 3. A realistic approach to the consequence evaluation can reduce the expected consequences to effects below any concern. Unfortunately no one single approach is either technically feasible or justified in a perspective of defense in depth and only a mix of them may provide the necessary conditions. It appears that most or all proposed ALWR designs address the technical issues, whose solutions are the bases to eliminate the need for a number of protective actions (evacuation, relocation, sheltering, iodine tablets administration, etc.) even in the case of a severe accident. Some designs are mainly oriented to prevent the need for short term protective actions; they credit simplified Emergency Plans or the capabilities of existing civil protection organizations for public relocation in the long term, if needed. Others take also into account the overall releases to exclude or minimize public relocation and land contamination. Design targets for population individual doses and for land contamination proposed in Italy are discussed in the paper. It is also shown that these limits, while challenging, appear to be within the reach of the next generation proposed designs currently studied in Italy. (author)

  17. Nova control system: goals, architecture, and system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suski, G.J.; Duffy, J.M.; Gritton, D.G.; Holloway, F.W.; Krammen, J.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Severyn, J.R.; Van Arsdall, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    The control system for the Nova laser must operate reliably in a harsh pulse power environment and satisfy requirements of technical functionality, flexibility, maintainability and operability. It is composed of four fundamental subsystems: Power Conditioning, Alignment, Laser Diagnostics, and Target Diagnostics, together with a fifth, unifying subsystem called Central Controls. The system architecture utilizes a collection of distributed microcomputers, minicomputers, and components interconnected through high speed fiber optic communications systems. The design objectives, development strategy and architecture of the overall control system and each of its four fundamental subsystems are discussed. Specific hardware and software developments in several areas are also covered

  18. Developmental dynamics between mathematical performance, task motivation, and teachers' goals during the transition to primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunola, Kaisa; Leskinen, Esko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2006-03-01

    It has been suggested that children's learning motivation and interest in a particular subject play an important role in their school performance, particularly in mathematics. However, few cross-lagged longitudinal studies have been carried out to investigate the prospective relationships between academic achievement and task motivation. Moreover, the role that the classroom context plays in this development is largely unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the developmental dynamics of maths-related motivation and mathematical performance during children's transition to primary school. The role of teachers' pedagogical goals and classroom characteristics on this development was also investigated. A total of 196 Finnish children were examined four times: (0) in October during their preschool year; (1) in October and (2) April during their first grade of primary school; and (3) in October during their second grade. Children's mathematical performance was tested at each measurement point. Task motivation was examined at measurement points 2, 3, and 4 using the Task-value scale for children. First-grade teachers were interviewed in November about their pedagogical goals and classroom characteristics. The results showed that children's mathematical performance and related task motivation formed a cumulative developmental cycle: a high level of maths performance at the beginning of the first grade increased subsequent task motivation towards mathematics, which further predicted a high level of maths performance at the beginning of the second grade. The level of maths-related task motivation increased in those classrooms where the teachers emphasized motivation or self-concept development as their most important pedagogical goal.

  19. The Genome of the Netherlands: design, and project goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Dorret I; Wijmenga, Cisca; Slagboom, Eline P; Swertz, Morris A; Karssen, Lennart C; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor; Vermaat, Martijn; van Dijk, Freerk; Francioli, Laurent C; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Laros, Jeroen F J; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Ruoyan; Du, Yuanping; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; van Setten, Jessica; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Beekman, Marian; Elbers, Clara C; Byelas, Heorhiy; de Craen, Anton J M; Deelen, Patrick; Dijkstra, Martijn; den Dunnen, Johan T; de Knijff, Peter; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Koval, Vyacheslav; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Enckevort, David van; Mai, Hailiang; Kattenberg, Mathijs; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Neerincx, Pieter B T; Oostra, Ben; Rivadeneira, Fernanodo; Suchiman, Eka H D; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H; Wang, Jun; de Bakker, Paul I W; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    Within the Netherlands a national network of biobanks has been established (Biobanking and Biomolecular Research Infrastructure-Netherlands (BBMRI-NL)) as a national node of the European BBMRI. One of the aims of BBMRI-NL is to enrich biobanks with different types of molecular and phenotype data. Here, we describe the Genome of the Netherlands (GoNL), one of the projects within BBMRI-NL. GoNL is a whole-genome-sequencing project in a representative sample consisting of 250 trio-families from all provinces in the Netherlands, which aims to characterize DNA sequence variation in the Dutch population. The parent–offspring trios include adult individuals ranging in age from 19 to 87 years (mean=53 years; SD=16 years) from birth cohorts 1910–1994. Sequencing was done on blood-derived DNA from uncultured cells and accomplished coverage was 14–15x. The family-based design represents a unique resource to assess the frequency of regional variants, accurately reconstruct haplotypes by family-based phasing, characterize short indels and complex structural variants, and establish the rate of de novo mutational events. GoNL will also serve as a reference panel for imputation in the available genome-wide association studies in Dutch and other cohorts to refine association signals and uncover population-specific variants. GoNL will create a catalog of human genetic variation in this sample that is uniquely characterized with respect to micro-geographic location and a wide range of phenotypes. The resource will be made available to the research and medical community to guide the interpretation of sequencing projects. The present paper summarizes the global characteristics of the project. PMID:23714750

  20. Project Design Concept - Primary Ventilation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation (TFRSO), Project W-3 14 was established to provide upgrades that would improve the reliability and extend the system life of portions of the waste transfer, electrical, ventilation, instrumentation and control systems for the Hanford Site Tank Farms. An assessment of the tank farm system was conducted and the results are documented in system assessment reports. Based on the deficiencies identified in the tank farm system assessment reports, and additional requirements analysis performed in support of the River Protection Project (RPP), an approved scope for the TFRSO effort was developed and documented in the Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), WHC-SD-W314-RPT-003, Rev. 4. The USSR establishes the need for the upgrades and identifies the specific equipment to be addressed by this project. This Project Design Concept (PDC) is in support of the Phase 2 upgrades and provides an overall description of the operations concept for the W-314 Primary Ventilation Systems. Actual specifications, test requirements, and procedures are not included in this PDC. The PDC is a ''living'' document, which will be updated throughout the design development process to provide a progressively more detailed description of the W-314 Primary Ventilation Systems design. The Phase 2 upgrades to the Primary Ventilation Systems shall ensure that the applicable current requirements are met for: Regulatory Compliance; Safety; Mission Requirements; Reliability; and Operational Requirements

  1. Combining economic and social goals in the design of production systems by using ergonomics standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Dul (Jan); H.J. de Vries (Henk); S. Verschoof (Sandra); W. Eveleens (Wietske); A. Feilzer (Albert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn designing of production systems, economic and social goals can be combined, if ergonomics is integrated into the design process. More than 50 years of ergonomics research and practice have resulted in a large number of ergonomics standards for designing physical and organizational

  2. Tacit and transitionary: an exploration of patients' and primary care health professionals' goals in relation to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian; Steven, Karen; Sullivan, Frank M

    2011-04-01

    Goal setting is recommended in UK health policy to make health care more patient-centred, to enhance the likelihood of behaviour change and to improve health outcomes. Patient-centred care is thought to be particularly important in the management of long term conditions such as asthma. We therefore explored and compared the asthma goals of both health professionals and people with asthma within the primary care clinical consultation, and identified the potential barriers to achieving shared goals and more patient-centred care provision. We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with 15 people with asthma, 7 general practitioners and 6 primary care asthma nurses from Tayside, UK. The data were analysed using the 'Framework' methodology. Four potential barriers to the identification of goals were located. The first stemmed from the status and nature of patients' goals, while the remaining three related to the beliefs and practices of health professionals. These findings are discussed in relation to relevant sociological literature around the potential tensions between lay and professional knowledge, and also tensions in the relationship between knowledge and values. We conclude that barriers need to be recognised and addressed where possible before the achievement of shared asthma goals can become common practice. In particular, health professionals may require training in how to elicit goals with patients and how to differentiate between end states and goals that are in fact assumed to mediate the achievement of such desired end states. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimal dietary patterns designed from local foods to achieve maternal nutritional goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jofrey; Kassim, Neema; Rose, Jerman W; Agaba, Morris

    2018-04-04

    Achieving nutritional requirements for pregnant and lactating mothers in rural households while maintaining the intake of local and culture-specific foods can be a difficult task. Deploying a linear goal programming approach can effectively generate optimal dietary patterns that incorporate local and culturally acceptable diets. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether a realistic and affordable diet that achieves nutritional goals for rural pregnant and lactating women can be formulated from locally available foods in Tanzania. A cross sectional study was conducted to assess dietary intakes of 150 pregnant and lactating women using a weighed dietary record (WDR), 24 h dietary recalls and a 7-days food record. A market survey was also carried out to estimate the cost per 100 g of edible portion of foods that are frequently consumed in the study population. Dietary survey and market data were then used to define linear programming (LP) model parameters for diet optimisation. All LP analyses were done using linear program solver to generate optimal dietary patterns. Our findings showed that optimal dietary patterns designed from locally available foods would improve dietary adequacy for 15 and 19 selected nutrients in pregnant and lactating women, respectively, but inadequacies remained for iron, zinc, folate, pantothenic acid, and vitamin E, indicating that these are problem nutrients (nutrients that did not achieve 100% of their RNIs in optimised diets) in the study population. These findings suggest that optimal use of local foods can improve dietary adequacy for rural pregnant and lactating women aged 19-50 years. However, additional cost-effective interventions are needed to ensure adequate intakes for the identified problem nutrients.

  4. A performance goal-based seismic design philosophy for waste repository facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Q.A.

    1994-02-01

    A performance goal-based seismic design philosophy, compatible with DOE's present natural phenomena hazards mitigation and ''graded approach'' philosophy, has been proposed for high level nuclear waste repository facilities. The rationale, evolution, and the desirable features of this method have been described. Why and how the method should and can be applied to the design of a repository facility are also discussed

  5. The Impact of Group Design Projects in Engineering on Achievement Goal Orientations and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.; Atadero, Rebecca A.; Balgopal, Meena

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the impact of incorporating group design projects into a second-year engineering class on achievement goal orientations and two academic outcomes: concept inventory and final exam scores. In this study, two sections were taught using lecture format, but one section also completed three group design projects as part of their…

  6. A performance goal-based seismic design philosophy for waste repository facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Q.A.

    1994-01-01

    A performance goal-based seismic design philosophy, compatible with DOE's present natural phenomena hazards mitigation and open-quotes graded approachclose quotes philosophy, has been proposed for high level nuclear waste repository facilities. The rationale, evolution, and the desirable features of this method have been described. Why and how the method should and can be applied to the design of a repository facility are also discussed

  7. Four Weeks of Goal-Directed Learning in Primary Physical Education Classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platvoet, Sebastiaan W. J.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Kannekens, Rianne; de Niet, Mark; Visscher, Chris

    Relatively little is known about how practice relates to children's improvement in gross motor skill performance. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent 6- and 7-year-old children improve their gross motor skill performance in a four-week period, in which goal-directed learning is

  8. Academic goals, student homework engagement, and academic achievement in Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eValle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be a general consensus in the literature that doing homework is beneficial for students. Thus, the current challenge is to examine the process of doing homework to find which variables may help students to complete the homework assigned. To address this goal, a path analysis model was fit. The model hypothesized that the way students engage in homework is explained by the type of academic goals set, and it explains the amount of time spend on homework, the homework time management, and the amount of homework done. Lastly, the amount of homework done is positively related to academic achievement. The model was fit using a sample of 535 Spanish students from the last three courses of elementary school (aged 9 to 13. Findings show that: (a academic achievement was positively associated with the amount of homework completed, (b the amount of homework completed was related to the homework time management, (c homework time management was associated with the approach to homework; (d and the approach to homework, like the rest of the variables of the model (except for the time spent on homework, was related to the student's academic motivation (i.e., academic goals.

  9. Public Investment and the Goal of Providing Universal Access to Primary Education by 2015 in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwami, Edith Mukudi; Omwami, Raymond K.

    2010-01-01

    The authors use population census data to project school enrolment for Kenya. They also employ current education sector budget and national revenue base statistics to model the sector budget and to forecast the revenue base growth required to sustain universal primary education (UPE). The 2003 fiscal year unit cost of education is used as the base…

  10. Improved OSC Amtec generator design to meet goals of JPL's candidate Europa Orbiter mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, A.; Noravian, H.; Or, C.; Kumar, V.

    1998-01-01

    The preceding paper (Paper IECEC.98.244) described OSC's initial designs of AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electrical Conversion) power systems, consisting of one or two generators, each with 2, 3, or 4 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules and with 16 refractory AMTEC cells containing 5 Beta Alumina Solid Electrolyte (BASE) tubes; and presented the effect of heat input and voltage output on the generator's BOM evaporator and clad temperatures and on its EOM system efficiency and power output. Comparison of the computed results with JPL's goals for the Europa Orbiter mission showed that all of the initial 16-cell design options yielded either excessive evaporator and clad temperatures or insufficient EOM power to satisfy the JPL-specified mission goals. The present paper describes modified OSC generator designs with different numbers of AMTEC cells, cell diameters, cell lengths, cell materials, BASE tube lengths, and number of tubes per cell. These efforts succeeded in identifying generator designs with only half the number of AMTEC cells which -- for the same assumptions -- can produce EOM power outputs substantially in excess of JPL's goals for NASA's Europa Orbiter mission while operating well below the prescribed BOM limits on evaporator and clad temperature; and revealed that lowering the emissivity of the generator's housing to raise the cells' condenser temperatures can achieve substantial additional performance improvement. Finally, the paper culminates in programmatic recommendations

  11. Design of price incentives for adjunct policy goals in formula funding for hospitals and health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duckett Stephen J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital policy involves multiple objectives: efficiency of service delivery, pursuit of high quality care, promoting access. Funding policy based on hospital casemix has traditionally been considered to be only about promoting efficiency. Discussion Formula-based funding policy can be (and has been used to pursue a range of policy objectives, not only efficiency. These are termed 'adjunct' goals. Strategies to incorporate adjunct goals into funding design must, implicitly or explicitly, address key decision choices outlined in this paper. Summary Policy must be clear and explicit about the behaviour to be rewarded; incentives must be designed so that all facilities with an opportunity to improve have an opportunity to benefit; the reward structure is stable and meaningful; and the funder monitors performance and gaming.

  12. GOAL AS A FORM OF REPRESENTING THE CONCEPTUAL APPROACHES TO THE PROCESS OF TEACHING NATIVE LANGUAGE TO PRIMARY SCHOOL PUPILS IN THE MOUNTAIN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Kotyk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the goal of language teaching, historical legacy of Pedagogy in the field of establishing the content of primary education and conceptual grounds for defining the goal and content of language teaching for primary school pupils with the emphasis on the Carpathians location have been developed.

  13. Identifying Personal Goals of Patients With Long Term Condition: A Service Design Thinking Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunji; Gammon, Deede

    2017-01-01

    Care for patients with long term conditions is often characterized as fragmented and ineffective, and fails to engage the resources of patients and their families in the care process. Information and communication technology can potentially help bridge the gap between patients' lives and resources and services provided by professionals. However, there is little attention on how to identify and incorporate the patients' individual needs, values, preferences and care goals into the digitally driven care settings. We conducted a case study with healthcare professionals and patients participated applying a service design thinking approach. The participants could elaborate some personal goals of patients with long term condition which can potentially be incorporated in digitally driven care plans using examples from their own experiences.

  14. Remission of proteinuria in primary glomerulonephritis: we know the goal but do we know the price?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, David; Cattran, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and IgA nephropathy are the most commonly recognized types of primary glomerulonephritis that progress to end-stage renal disease. Persistent proteinuria is a major determinant of such progression. Reduction of proteinuria slows progression of renal disease and improves renal survival, but many of the agents used to reduce proteinuria carry a considerable risk of toxicity. The assessment of benefit versus risk of these medications can be further complicated by the temporal disconnect between the onset of benefit and of serious adverse events. In addition, relapses are common in these disorders and there is often a need for retreatment. Such retreatment might lead to repeated and/or prolonged drug exposure and to the oversight or underestimation of the cumulative dose of these agents because of the potentially extended interval between relapses. Consequently, it is very important to constantly review each patient's status and take into account their age, comorbid conditions and cumulative drug exposure when assessing treatment options. The potentially delayed development of adverse events also emphasizes the need for long-term surveillance of patients who receive immunosuppressive treatment for glomerular disease, often well beyond their drug exposure period and even when the treatment has been successful.

  15. 78 FR 75442 - Designation of the Primary Freight Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ...] Designation of the Primary Freight Network AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... period for the Designation of the highway Primary Freight Network (PFN) notice, which was published on... the complete National Freight Network (NFN), and to solicit comments on aspects of the NFN. The five...

  16. Development of quantitative goals for inherent safety feature design and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.

    1987-01-01

    There is now considerable interest in the development of advanced fast reactors whose major focus is inherent safety. The achievement of inherent safety can be viewed from several aspects. In the Integral Fast Reactor Concept the approach is to utilize the intrinsic characteristics of pool-type liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) and the properties of metal fuels to integrate a high degree of inherent safety into the design. The PRISM and SAFR concepts focus on other inherent safety features. The reactors discussed above represent a radical departure from existing LWR designs as well as previous LMFBR designs (e.g., CRBRP) which are based, for the most part, on the General Design Criteria found in 10CFR50 Appendix. In view of these parallel developments (advanced reactors exploiting inherent safety and the use of quantitative goals to augment licensing), there appears to be a need to perform research on the development of methods for designing, assessing, and licensing inherent safety features in advanced reactors. The objectives of such research are outlined

  17. Performance of OSC's initial Amtec generator design, and comparison with JPL's Europa Orbiter goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, A.; Noravian, H.; Or, C.; Kumar, V.

    1998-01-01

    The procedure for the analysis (with overpotential correction) of multitube AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electrical Conversion) cells described in Paper IECEC 98-243 was applied to a wide range of multicell radioisotope space power systems. System design options consisting of one or two generators, each with 2, 3, or 4 stacked GPHS (General Purpose Heat Source) modules, identical to those used on previous NASA missions, were analyzed and performance-mapped. The initial generators analyzed by OSC had 8 AMTEC cells on each end of the heat source stack, with five beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) tubes per cell. The heat source and converters in the Orbital generator designs are embedded in a thermal insulation system consisting of Min-K fibrous insulation surrounded by graded-length molybdenum multifoils. Detailed analyses in previous Orbital studies found that such an insulation system could reduce extraneous heat losses to about 10%. For the above design options, the present paper presents the system mass and performance (i.e., the EOM system efficiency and power output and the BOM evaporator and clad temperatures) for a wide range of heat inputs and load voltages, and compares the results with JPL's preliminary goals for the Europa Orbiter mission to be launched in November 2003. The analytical results showed that the initial 16-cell generator designs resulted in either excessive evaporator and clad temperatures and/or insufficient power outputs to meet the JPL-specified mission goals. The computed performance of modified OSC generators with different numbers of AMTEC cells, cell diameters, cell lengths, cell materials, BASE tube lengths, and number of tubes per cell are described in Paper IECEC.98.245 in these proceedings

  18. The components of shoulder and elbow movements as goals of primary reconstructive operation in obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszawski, Jerzy; Marcol, Wiesław; Mandera, Marek

    Most of the cases of obstetric brachial plexus lesions (OBPL) show satisfactory improvement with conservative management, but in about 25% some surgical treatment is indicated. The present paper analyzes the effects of primary reconstructive surgeries in aspect of achieving delineated intraoperatively goals. Children operated before the age of 18 months with follow-up period longer than 1 year were selected. Therapeutic goals established during the operation were identified by analysis of initial clinical status and operative protocols. The elementary movement components in shoulder and elbow joints were classified by assessing range of motion, score in Active Movement Scale and modified British Medical Research Council scale of muscle strength. The effect was considered satisfactory when some antigravity movement was possible, and good when strength exceeded M3 or antigravity movement exceeded half of range of passive movement. In 13 of 19 patients most of established goals were achieved at good level, in 2 at satisfactory level. Remaining 4 patients showed improvement only in some aspects of extremity function. In 2 patients improvement in some movements was accompanied by worsening of other movements. The analysis of results separated into individual components of movements showed that goals were achieved in most of the cases, simultaneously clearly indicating which damaged structures failed to provide satisfactory function despite being addressed intraoperatively. The good results were obtained mainly by regeneration through grafts implanted after resection of neuroma in continuity, which proves that this technique is safe in spite of unavoidable temporary regression of function postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Designing and optimising anaerobic digestion systems: A multi-objective non-linear goal programming approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for optimising the design parameters of an anaerobic digestion (AD) system by using first-order kinetics and multi-objective non-linear goal programming. A model is outlined that determines the ideal operating tank temperature and hydraulic retention time, based on objectives for minimising levelised cost of electricity, and maximising energy potential and feedstock mass reduction. The model is demonstrated for a continuously stirred tank reactor processing food waste in two case study locations. These locations are used to investigate the influence of different environmental and economic climates on optimal conditions. A sensitivity analysis is performed to further examine the variation in optimal results for different financial assumptions and objective weightings. The results identify the conditions for the preferred tank temperature to be in the psychrophilic, mesophilic or thermophilic range. For a tank temperature of 35 °C, ideal hydraulic retention times, in terms of achieving a minimum levelised electricity cost, were found to range from 29.9 to 33 days. Whilst there is a need for more detailed information on rate constants for use in first-order models, multi-objective optimisation modelling is considered to be a promising option for AD design. - Highlights: • Nonlinear goal programming is used to optimise anaerobic digestion systems. • Multiple objectives are set including minimising the levelised cost of electricity. • A model is developed and applied to case studies for the UK and India. • Optimal decisions are made for tank temperature and retention time. • A sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate different model objectives.

  20. Diabetes treatment patterns and goal achievement in primary diabetes care (DiaRegis - study protocol and patient characteristics at baseline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeg Evelin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for disease and treatment related complications after the initial approach of oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. Data from clinical practice with respect to this patient group are however scarce. Therefore we set up a registry in primary care documenting the course and outcomes of this patient group. Methods Diabetes Treatment Patterns and Goal Achievement in Primary Diabetes Care (DiaRegis is a prospective, observational, German, multicenter registry including patients with type-2 diabetes in which oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. Data were recorded at baseline and will be prospectively documented during visits at 6 ± 1, 12 ± 2 and 24 ± 2 months. The primary objective is to estimate the proportion of patients with at least 1 episode of severe hypoglycemia within one year. Results 313 primary care offices included 4,048 patients between June 2009 and March 2010 of which 3,810 patients fulfilled the in- and exclusion criteria. 46.7% of patients were female; patients had a median diabetes duration of 5.5 years and most were obese with respect to BMI or waist circumference. HbA1c at baseline was 7.4%, fasting plasma glucose 142 mg/dl and postprandial glucose 185 mg/dl. Co-morbidity in this patient population was substantial with 17.9% having coronary artery disease, 14.4% peripheral neuropathy, 9.9% heart failure and 6.0% peripheral arterial disease. 68.6% of patients received oral monotherapy, 31.4% dual oral combination therapy. The most frequent antidiabetic agent used as monotherapy was metformin (79.0% followed by sulfonylureas (14.8%. Conclusions DiaRegis is a large, prospective registry in primary diabetes care to document the course and outcomes of patients with type-2 diabetes in which the initial approach of oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. The two year follow-up will allow for a prospective evaluation of these patients

  1. Feedback GAP: pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial of goal setting and action plans to increase the effectiveness of audit and feedback interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Noah M; Tu, Karen; Young, Jacqueline; Francis, Jill J; Barnsley, Jan; Shah, Baiju R; Upshur, Ross E; Moineddin, Rahim; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2013-12-17

    Audit and feedback to physicians is a commonly used quality improvement strategy, but its optimal design is unknown. This trial tested the effects of a theory-informed worksheet to facilitate goal setting and action planning, appended to feedback reports on chronic disease management, compared to feedback reports provided without these worksheets. A two-arm pragmatic cluster randomized trial was conducted, with allocation at the level of primary care clinics. Participants were family physicians who contributed data from their electronic medical records. The 'usual feedback' arm received feedback every six months for two years regarding the proportion of their patients meeting quality targets for diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease. The intervention arm received these same reports plus a worksheet designed to facilitate goal setting and action plan development in response to the feedback reports. Blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) values were compared after two years as the primary outcomes. Process outcomes measured the proportion of guideline-recommended actions (e.g., testing and prescribing) conducted within the appropriate timeframe. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Outcomes were similar across groups at baseline. Final analysis included 20 physicians from seven clinics and 1,832 patients in the intervention arm (15% loss to follow up) and 29 physicians from seven clinics and 2,223 patients in the usual feedback arm (10% loss to follow up). Ten of 20 physicians completed the worksheet at least once during the study. Mean BP was 128/72 in the feedback plus worksheet arm and 128/73 in the feedback alone arm, while LDL was 2.1 and 2.0, respectively. Thus, no significant differences were observed across groups in the primary outcomes, but mean haemoglobin A1c was lower in the feedback plus worksheet arm (7.2% versus 7.4%, ptheory-informed goal setting and action planning worksheet to an externally produced audit and

  2. The development of a patient-specific method for physiotherapy goal setting: a user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Anita; Köke, Albère; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2018-08-01

    To deliver client-centered care, physiotherapists need to identify the patients' individual treatment goals. However, practical tools for involving patients in goal setting are lacking. The purpose of this study was to improve the frequently used Patient-Specific Complaints instrument in Dutch physiotherapy, and to develop it into a feasible method to improve physiotherapy goal setting. An iterative user-centered design was conducted in co-creation with the physiotherapists and patients, in three phases. Their needs and preferences were identified by means of group meetings and questionnaires. The new method was tested in several field tests in physiotherapy practices. Four main objectives for improvement were formulated: clear instructions for the administration procedure, targeted use across the physiotherapy process, client-activating communication skills, and a client-centered attitude of the physiotherapist. A theoretical goal-setting framework and elements of shared decision making were integrated into the new-called, Patient-Specific Goal-setting method, together with a practical training course. The user-centered approach resulted in a goal-setting method that is fully integrated in the physiotherapy process. The new goal-setting method contributes to a more structured approach to goal setting and enables patient participation and goal-oriented physiotherapy. Before large-scale implementation, its feasibility in physiotherapy practice needs to be investigated. Implications for rehabilitation Involving patients and physiotherapists in the development and testing of a goal-setting method, increases the likelihood of its feasibility in practice. The integration of a goal-setting method into the physiotherapy process offers the opportunity to focus more fully on the patient's goals. Patients should be informed about the aim of every step of the goal-setting process in order to increase their awareness and involvement. Training physiotherapists to use a patient

  3. Qualitative study of depression management in primary care: GP and patient goals, and the value of listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Olwyn; Kumar, Satinder; Kendall, Kathleen; Peveler, Robert; Gabbay, John; Kendrick, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines for depression management have been developed but little is known about GP and patient goals, which are likely to influence treatment offers, uptake, and adherence. Aim To identify issues of importance to GPs, patients, and patients' supporters regarding depression management. GP and patient goals for depression management became a focus of the study. Design of study Grounded theory-based qualitative study. Setting GPs were drawn from 28 practices. The majority of patients and supporters were recruited from 10 of these practices. Method Sixty-one patients (28 depressed, 18 previously depressed, 15 never depressed), 18 supporters, and 32 GPs were interviewed. Results GPs described encouraging patients to view depression as separate from the self and ‘normal’ sadness. Patients and supporters often questioned such boundaries, rejecting the notion of a medical cure and emphasising self-management. The majority of participants who were considering depression-management strategies wanted to ‘get out’ of their depression. However, a quarter did not see this as immediately relevant or achievable. They focused on getting by from day to day, which had the potential to clash with GP priorities. GP frustration and uncertainty could occur when depression was resistant to cure. Participants identified the importance of GPs listening to patients, but often felt that this did not happen. Conclusion Physicians need greater awareness of the extent to which their goals for the management of depression are perceived as relevant or achievable by patients. Future research should explore methods of negotiating agreed strategies for management. PMID:17976282

  4. Goals and strategies in the global control design of the OAJ Robotic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes-Díaz, A.; Rueda-Teruel, S.; Antón, J. L.; Rueda-Teruel, F.; Moles, M.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Ederoclite, A.; Gruel, N.; Varela, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Chueca, S.; Díaz-Martín, M. C.; Guillén, L.; Luis-Simoes, R.; Maícas, N.; Lamadrid, J. L.; López-Sainz, A.; Hernández-Fuertes, J.; Valdivielso, L.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Penteado, P.; Schoenell, W.; Kanaan, A.

    2012-09-01

    There are many ways to solve the challenging problem of making a high performance robotic observatory from scratch. The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located in the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys. The OAJ control system has been designed from a global point of view including astronomical subsystems as well as infrastructures and other facilities. Three main factors have been considered in the design of a global control system for the robotic OAJ: quality, reliability and efficiency. We propose CIA (Control Integrated Architecture) design and OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) as a key performance indicator in order to improve operation processes, minimizing resources and obtaining high cost reduction whilst maintaining quality requirements. The OAJ subsystems considered for the control integrated architecture are the following: two wide-field telescopes and their instrumentation, active optics subsystems, facilities for sky quality monitoring (seeing, extinction, sky background, sky brightness, cloud distribution, meteorological station), domes and several infrastructure facilities such as water supply, glycol water, water treatment plant, air conditioning, compressed air, LN2 plant, illumination, surveillance, access control, fire suppression, electrical generators, electrical distribution, electrical consumption, communication network, Uninterruptible Power Supply and two main control rooms, one at the OAJ and the other remotely located in Teruel, 40km from the observatory, connected through a microwave radio-link. This paper presents the OAJ strategy in control design to achieve maximum quality efficiency for the observatory processes and operations, giving practical examples of our approach.

  5. Design criteria of primary coolant chemistry in SMART-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Seon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2005-01-01

    SMART-P differs significantly from commercially designed PWRs. Materials inventories used in SMART-P differ from that at PWRs. All surfaces of the primary circuit with the primary coolant are either made from or plated with stainless steel. The material of steam generator (SG) is also different from that of the standard material of the commercially operating PWRs: titanium alloy for the steam generator tubes. Also, SMART-P primary coolant technology differs from that in PWRs: ammonia is used as a pH raising agent and hydrogen formed due to radiolytic processes is kept in specific range by ammonia dosing. Nevertheless, main objectives of the SMART-P primary coolant are the same as at PWRs: to assure primary system pressure boundary integrity, fuel cladding integrity and to minimize out-of-core radiation buildup. The objective of this work is to introduce the design criteria for the primary water chemistry for SMART-P from the viewpoint of the system characteristics and the chemical design concept

  6. A nationwide quality improvement project to accelerate Ghana's progress toward Millennium Development Goal Four: design and implementation progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twum-Danso, Nana A Y; Akanlu, George B; Osafo, Enoch; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi; Boadu, Richard O; Atinbire, Solomon; Adondiwo, Ane; Amenga-Etego, Isaac; Ashagbley, Francis; Boadu, Eric A; Dasoberi, Ireneous; Kanyoke, Ernest; Yabang, Elma; Essegbey, Ivan T; Adjei, George A; Buckle, Gilbert B; Awoonor-Williams, J Koku; Nang-Beifubah, Alexis; Twumasi, Akwasi; McCannon, C Joseph; Barker, Pierre M

    2012-12-01

    The gap between evidence-based guidelines and practice of care is reflected, in low- and middle-income countries, by high rates of maternal and child mortality and limited effectiveness of large-scale programing to decrease those rates. We designed a phased, rapid, national scale-up quality improvement (QI) intervention to accelerate the achievement of Millennium Development Goal Four in Ghana. Our intervention promoted systems thinking, active participation of managers and frontline providers, generation and testing of local change ideas using iterative learning from transparent district and local data, local ownership and sustainability. After 50 months of implementation, we have completed two prototype learning phases and have begun regional spread phases to all health facilities in all 38 districts of the three northernmost regions and all 29 Catholic hospitals in the remaining regions of the country. To accelerate the spread of improvement, we developed 'change packages' of rigorously tested process changes along the continuum of care from pregnancy to age 5 in both inpatient and outpatient settings. The primary successes for the project so far include broad and deep adoption of QI by local stakeholders for improving system performance, widespread capacitation of leaders, managers and frontline providers in QI methods, incorporation of local ideas into change packages and successful scale-up to approximately 25% of the country's districts in 3 years. Implementation challenges include variable leadership uptake and commitment at the district level, delays due to recruiting and scheduling barriers, weak data systems and repeated QI training due to high staff turnover.

  7. Design of the RTO/RC ITER primary pumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, P.; Ibbott, C; Janeschitz, G.; Martin, E.

    2000-01-01

    The primary pumping system is needed not only to exhaust helium ash resulting from the DT reaction but also excess fuelling gas injected during the fusion burn, which can extend for 100's to 1000's of seconds, and to perform a variety of other functions. The prevailing environmental conditions, principally nuclear radiation, tritium exposure, magnetic fields, and the need for containment, have a significant impact on the design and selection of equipment. This paper presents the design of the Reduced Technical Objectives/Reduced Cost (RTO/RC) ITER primary pumping system with particular emphasis on the nuclear aspects of the design. Component selection and equipment layout issues to meet established requirements for the system are reviewed together with the R and D that is being undertaken to support the design. In addition, serviceability and maintainability issues related to this system are also discussed

  8. Design development of graphite primary structures enables SSTO success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, V. A.; Yahiro, J. S.; Suh, Daniel E.; Hodges, Eric R.; Prior, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a graphite composite wing and a graphite composite intertank primary structure for application toward Single-Stage to Orbit space vehicles such as those under development in NASA's X-33/Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program. The trade study and designs are based on a Rockwell vertical take-off and horizontal landing (VTHL) wing-body RLV vehicle. Northrop Grumman's approach using a building block development technique is described. Composite Graphite/Bismaleimide (Gr/BMI) material characterization test results are presented. Unique intertank and wing composite subcomponent test article designs are described and test results to date are presented. Wing and intertank Full Scale Section Test Article (FSTA) objectives and designs are outlined. Trade studies, supporting building block testing, and FSTA demonstrations combine to develop graphite primary structure composite technology that enables developing X-33/RLV design programs to meet critical SSTO structural weight and operations performance criteria.

  9. Feedback GAP: study protocol for a cluster-randomized trial of goal setting and action plans to increase the effectiveness of audit and feedback interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Noah M; Tu, Karen; Francis, Jill; Barnsley, Jan; Shah, Baiju; Upshur, Ross; Kiss, Alex; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2010-12-17

    Audit and feedback to physicians is commonly used alone or as part of multifaceted interventions. While it can play an important role in quality improvement, the optimal design of audit and feedback is unknown. This study explores how feedback can be improved to increase acceptability and usability in primary care. The trial seeks to determine whether a theory-informed worksheet appended to feedback reports can help family physicians improve quality of care for their patients with diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease. Two-arm cluster trial was conducted with participating primary care practices allocated using minimization to simple feedback or enhanced feedback group. The simple feedback group receives performance feedback reports every six months for two years regarding the proportion of their patients with diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease who are meeting quality targets. The enhanced feedback group receives these same reports as well as a theory-informed worksheet designed to facilitate goal setting and action plan development in response to the feedback reports. Participants are family physicians from across Ontario who use electronic medical records; data for rostered patients are used to produce the feedback reports and for analysis. The primary disease outcomes are the blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels. The primary process measure is a composite score indicating the number of recommended activities (e.g., tests and prescriptions) conducted by the family physicians for their patients with diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease within the appropriate timeframe. Secondary outcomes are the proportion of patients whose results meet targets for glucose, LDL, and BP as well as the percent of patients receiving relevant prescriptions. A qualitative process evaluation using semi-structured interviews will explore perceived barriers to behaviour change in response to feedback reports and preferences with regard to

  10. A goal management intervention for polyarthritis patients: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, Roos; Bode, Christina; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Background A health promotion intervention was developed for inflammatory arthritis patients, based on goal management. Elevated levels of depression and anxiety symptoms, which indicate maladjustment, are found in such patients. Other indicators of adaptation to chronic disease are positive affect,

  11. A Curriculum and Software Design Scaffolding Goal Directed Teaching in Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    , the tool itself, and selected findings from qualitative and quantitative studies in the project. 2. International trends in goal oriented and data driven teaching The Danish curriculum reform builds on recent trends in school development and curriculum research suggesting the importance of a competence...... development and curriculum research suggesting the importance of a competence framework, learning goals and aggregation of classroom data to efficient teaching (Earl & Fullan 2003). Learning goals are supposed to support the student’s pace and sense of progression, inform classroom decisions, structure...... student has knowledge of text structure”). The curriculum can be presented in a number of graphical modes, e.g. in a matrix or in a hypertext structure. The curriculum reform was implemented in order to promote a goal oriented teaching and learning practice based heavily on research around data driven...

  12. Thermal hydraulic tradeoffs in the design of IRIS primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriani, L.; Lombardi, C.; Ricotti, M.E.; Paramonov, D.; Carelli, M.; Conway, L.

    2001-01-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is currently being developed by an international consortium, led by Westinghouse and including universities. In order to achieve high level of safety, reduce complexity and capital cost, and enhance proliferation resistance, an integral primary circuit configuration has been selected. The integral configuration (the core, steam generators, coolant pumps, pressurizer and control rods are all contained within the reactor vessel) has no loop piping and thereby eliminates the possibility of large loss of coolant accidents. If the reactor vessel and components are designed for a very high level of natural circulation, which is promoted by an integral design, the consequence of loss of flow accidents can be significantly reduced or even completely eliminated. Core and integral primary circuit design optimization has been performed using the OSCAR computer code, a specialized tool for the analyses of the IRIS primary system developed at POLIMI. Results of trade-off studies of various in-vessel configurations explored to achieve tight packaging and high serviceability and/or replacement of components such as steam generators and pumps are reported. Effects of changes in secondary side parameters and steam generator design on system efficiency were explored together with the optimization of the vessel and steam generator dimensions and costs. The aim of the trade-off analyses was to limit the design space, and select a reference configuration for the IRIS reactor. (author)

  13. Didactital design of mathematics teaching in primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur’aeni, E.; Muharram, M. R. W.

    2018-05-01

    The fact that the low ability of geometrical understanding of primary school students is what triggers this study to be conducted. Thus, this research aimed to find out how to create a didactical design of students' mathematical understanding, particularly on one of geometry materials that is unit of length. A qualitative approach promoting Didactical Design Research (DDR) was administered in this study. Participants of the study were primary school students in Tasikmalaya, an city in West Java Province, Indonesia. The results show that there was a learning design based on learning obstacles found in the mathematics teaching and learning processes. The learning obstacles comprised students' difficulties in memorizing, relating, and operating the standards of unit of lengths. It has been proven that the most influential factor in the success of mathematics teaching and learning processes is the use of creative media.

  14. Designing a mixed methods study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W; Fetters, Michael D; Ivankova, Nataliya V

    2004-01-01

    Mixed methods or multimethod research holds potential for rigorous, methodologically sound investigations in primary care. The objective of this study was to use criteria from the literature to evaluate 5 mixed methods studies in primary care and to advance 3 models useful for designing such investigations. We first identified criteria from the social and behavioral sciences to analyze mixed methods studies in primary care research. We then used the criteria to evaluate 5 mixed methods investigations published in primary care research journals. Of the 5 studies analyzed, 3 included a rationale for mixing based on the need to develop a quantitative instrument from qualitative data or to converge information to best understand the research topic. Quantitative data collection involved structured interviews, observational checklists, and chart audits that were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical procedures. Qualitative data consisted of semistructured interviews and field observations that were analyzed using coding to develop themes and categories. The studies showed diverse forms of priority: equal priority, qualitative priority, and quantitative priority. Data collection involved quantitative and qualitative data gathered both concurrently and sequentially. The integration of the quantitative and qualitative data in these studies occurred between data analysis from one phase and data collection from a subsequent phase, while analyzing the data, and when reporting the results. We recommend instrument-building, triangulation, and data transformation models for mixed methods designs as useful frameworks to add rigor to investigations in primary care. We also discuss the limitations of our study and the need for future research.

  15. Designing Tasks to Examine Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Statistics for Primary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswono, T. Y. E.; Kohar, A. W.; Hartono, S.

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) is viewed as fuel resources for conducting an orchestra in a teaching and learning process. By understanding MKT, especially for primary teachers, it can predict the success of a goal of an instruction and analyze the weaknesses and improvements of it. To explore what teachers think about subject matters, pedagogical terms, and appropriate curriculum, it needs a task which can be identified the teachers’ MKT including the subject matter knowledge (SMK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This study aims to design an appropriate task for exploring primary teachers’ MKT for statistics in primary school. We designed six tasks to examine 40 primary teachers’ MKT, of which each respectively represents the categories of SMK (common content knowledge (CCK) and specialised content knowledge (SCK)) and PCK (knowledge of content and students (KCS), knowledge of content and teaching (KCT), and knowledge of content and curriculum (KCC)). While MKT has much attention of numbers of scholars, we consider knowledge of content and culture (KCCl) to be hypothesized in the domains of MKT. Thus, we added one more task examining how the primary teachers used their knowledge of content (KC) regarding to MKT in statistics. Some examples of the teachers’ responses on the tasks are discussed and some refinements of MKT task in statistics for primary teachers are suggested.

  16. Do the symptoms of language disorder align with treatment goals? An exploratory study of primary-grade students' IEPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Mary Beth; Justice, Laura M; Logan, Jessica A R; Schatschneider, Christopher; Bartlett, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Individual Education Plans (IEPs) are legal documents that guide the treatment of students with language disorder (LD). This exploratory study investigated the extent to which students' symptoms of LD align with goals on their IEPs. A total of 99 kindergarten and first-grade students receiving treatment for LD in the public schools participated. IEPs were collected and coded for each student and norm-referenced measures were used to assess students' grammar, vocabulary, listening comprehension, and literacy skills in the fall of the academic year. Results showed there to be alignment between students' symptoms and IEP goals only in the area of vocabulary, such that students who had an IEP goal for vocabulary had lower scores on a vocabulary assessment than those without a goal. In general, there is limited alignment between observed symptoms of LD and treated symptoms as identified on students' IEPs. The limited alignment found in this study suggests more investigation is needed to understand the extent to which IEP goals, as potential indicators of treatment foci, should map on to students' symptoms. Readers will be able to: (1) explain the theoretical and practical relevance of treatment goals aligning to symptoms for children with language impairment; (2) identify three analytic methods used to investigate alignment between treatment goals and symptoms; and (3) describe the extent to which IEP goals align to children's symptoms in a sample of children receiving services in the public schools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MYRRHA/XT-ADS primary system design and experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, D.

    2009-01-01

    The EUROTRANS project is an integrated project in the Sixth European Framework Program in the context of Partitioning and Transmutation. The objective of this project is to work towards an ETD (European Transmutation Demonstration) in a step-wise manner. The first step is to carry out an advanced design of a small-scale XT-ADS (eXperimental Transmutation in an Accelerator Driven System) for realisation in a short-term (about 10 years) as well as to accomplish a generic conceptual design of EFIT (European Facility for Industrial Transmutation) for realisation in the long-term. The MYRRHA-2005 design served as a starting basis for the XT-ADS. Many options have been revisited and the framework is now set up. While the MYRRHA-2005 design was still a conceptual design, the intention is to get at the end of the EUROTRANS project (March 2009) an advanced design of the XT-ADS, albeit a first advanced design. While the design work performed during the first years of the project (2005-2006) was mainly devoted to optimise and enhance the primary and secondary system configuration according to the suggestions and contributions of our industrial partners (Ansaldo Nucleare, Areva, Suez-Tractebel) within the DM1 (Domain 1 D ESIGN ) , the last year work objectives mainly consisted of (1) the release of the Remote Handling Design Catalogue for XT-ADS and (2) the formulation of the specification of the experimental devices according to the XT-ADS objectives and adapted to the actual XT-ADS core and core support structure design; (3) the detailed calculations of the main XT-ADS primary and secondary system components

  18. Improving Awareness of Health Hazards Associated with Air Pollution in Primary School Children: Design and Test of Didactic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, Annalaura; Casini, Beatrice; Donzelli, Gabriele; Verani, Marco; Bruni, Beatrice; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Zani, Claudia; Carraro, Elisabetta; Bonetta, Sara; Bagordo, Francesco; Grassi, Tiziana; Villarini, Milena; Bonizzoni, Silvia; Zagni, Licia; Gelatti, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    One of the objectives of the MAPEC-Life project is raising children's awareness on air quality and its health effects. To achieve this goal, we designed didactic tools for primary school students, including leaflets with more information for teachers, a cartoon, and three educational videogames. The tools were then tested with 266 children who…

  19. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Edward F.; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  20. Structure design of primary heat-exchanger for the MHWRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanshui; Cao Zhibin

    1999-01-01

    Primary heat-exchanger is one of the key equipment in the Multi-application Heavy Water Research Reactor (MHWRR). Its structure design ought to meet as much possible as the demands for safety, feasibility and economy. To reduce the liquid resistance, the locating structure between inner tube and outer tube is distributed spirally. The edge of outer tube is processed in the shape of hexahedron and then splice-welded into honeycomb structure thereby the heat-exchanger has the smallest outer diameter compared with that with the same heat-exchanging area according to 'Normal Design', 'Anabasis Design' is applied to the design for parts with Safety Class I, to ensure safety of the heat-exchanger

  1. Aligning Game Activity with Educational Goals: Following a Constrained Design Approach to Instructional Computer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Brett E.; Scoresby, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design, creation and implementation of an instructional game for use in a high school poetry class following a commitment to an educational game design principle of "alignment". We studied groups of instructional designers and an interactive fiction computer game they built. The game was implemented in a 9th grade English classroom…

  2. Designing A Mixed Methods Study In Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Fetters, Michael D.; Ivankova, Nataliya V.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mixed methods or multimethod research holds potential for rigorous, methodologically sound investigations in primary care. The objective of this study was to use criteria from the literature to evaluate 5 mixed methods studies in primary care and to advance 3 models useful for designing such investigations. METHODS We first identified criteria from the social and behavioral sciences to analyze mixed methods studies in primary care research. We then used the criteria to evaluate 5 mixed methods investigations published in primary care research journals. RESULTS Of the 5 studies analyzed, 3 included a rationale for mixing based on the need to develop a quantitative instrument from qualitative data or to converge information to best understand the research topic. Quantitative data collection involved structured interviews, observational checklists, and chart audits that were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical procedures. Qualitative data consisted of semistructured interviews and field observations that were analyzed using coding to develop themes and categories. The studies showed diverse forms of priority: equal priority, qualitative priority, and quantitative priority. Data collection involved quantitative and qualitative data gathered both concurrently and sequentially. The integration of the quantitative and qualitative data in these studies occurred between data analysis from one phase and data collection from a subsequent phase, while analyzing the data, and when reporting the results. DISCUSSION We recommend instrument-building, triangulation, and data transformation models for mixed methods designs as useful frameworks to add rigor to investigations in primary care. We also discuss the limitations of our study and the need for future research. PMID:15053277

  3. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F.

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries

  4. Designing planning and reporting for good governance of the EU's post-2020 climate and energy goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Oliver; Colombier, Michel; Spencer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The European Union has agreed climate and energy goals for 2030. These objectives include, among others: reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40%; increase the share of renewable energy to at least 27% of total final energy consumption; improve the efficiency of energy consumption by at least 27-30%. But while the targets are clear, what remains less clear is how the EU is to ensure that they are collectively achieved by its 28 Member States and how the actions Member States take to meet their goals by 2030 can be made consistent with Europe's more ambitious, climate objectives to reduce emissions by 80-95% by 2050. This paper puts forward a proposal for a new European Energy Union 'governance mechanism' that attempts to answer these questions, taking into account the priorities of different Member States in the current European context. The EU's 2020 Climate and Energy Package could assign legally-binding national targets to Member States for different aspects of their energy systems, such as for renewable energy, because these targets, although ambitious, remained at the margins of the national energy mix. But as the low-carbon transition makes progress, the changes required to national energy mixes become more fundamental and structural, and national competencies become increasingly important in defining the strategic direction of the energy sector and decarbonization strategies. However, it is also crucial that Member State's nationally determined strategies are consistent with the EU's overarching climate and energy goals, both to 2030 and 2050, and that their progress on key areas of EU relevance and competency can be effectively monitored. Doing this will require a more nuanced approach to governing EU climate policy than the two extremes that are currently presented in the debate: either a) a set of top-down, legally binding targets for all aspects of Energy Union, or b) a harmonised but ultimately very weak planning and reporting instrument with no

  5. Community participation to design rural primary healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jane; Nimegeer, Amy

    2014-03-21

    This paper explores how community participation can be used in designing rural primary healthcare services by describing a study of Scottish communities. Community participation is extolled in healthcare policy as useful in planning services and is understood as particularly relevant in rural settings, partly due to high social capital. Literature describes many community participation methods, but lacks discussion of outcomes relevant to health system reconfiguration. There is a spectrum of ideas in the literature on how to design services, from top-down standard models to contextual plans arising from population health planning that incorporates community participation. This paper addresses an evidence gap about the outcomes of using community participation in (re)designing rural community health services. Community-based participatory action research was applied in four Scottish case study communities in 2008-10. Data were collected from four workshops held in each community (total 16) and attended by community members. Workshops were intended to produce hypothetical designs for future service provision. Themes, rankings and selections from workshops are presented. Community members identified consistent health priorities, including local practitioners, emergency triage, anticipatory care, wellbeing improvement and health volunteering. Communities designed different service models to address health priorities. One community did not design a service model and another replicated the current model despite initial enthusiasm for innovation. Communities differ in their receptiveness to engaging in innovative service design, but some will create new models that fit in a given budget. Design diversity indicates that context influences local healthcare planning, suggesting community participation impacts on design outcomes, but standard service models maybe useful as part of the evidence in community participation discussions.

  6. Prospective analysis of LDL-C goal achievement and self-reported medication adherence among statin users in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bermingham, Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Improvements in the control of LDL-C levels have occurred in the past decade due to the introduction of increasingly potent statins, such as atorvastatin and rosuvastatin. Many patients, however, do not achieve their LDL-C goals, which presents a practical dilemma for clinicians and highlights the need to identify adherence problems in a clinically relevant manner.

  7. Process Evaluation of a Lifestyle Intervention in Primary Care: Implementation Issues and the Participants' Satisfaction of the GOAL Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barte, Jeroen C. M.; ter Bogt, Nancy C. W.; Beltman, Frank W.; van der Meer, Klaas; Bemelmans, Wanda J. E.

    2012-01-01

    The Groningen Overweight and Lifestyle (GOAL) intervention effectively prevents weight gain. The present study describes a process evaluation in which 214 participants in the intervention group received a structured questionnaire within 7 months (a median of 5 months) after the end of the intervention. The authors investigated the content of the…

  8. Goal Attainment Scaling: A Primary Method of Treatment and Program Evaluation in Project SAIL - A Special Education Dropout Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Linda Hall; Thompson, John L.

    The manual discusses Project SAIL's (a special dropout prevention program) use of Goal Attainment Scaling as part of individualized education plans in the treatment of troubled adolescents and in overall program evaluation. The scaling is characterized as an explicit, respectful treatment contact through which the adolescent can learn to set…

  9. Design of an online health-promoting community: negotiating user community needs with public health goals and service capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Joakim; Timpka, Toomas; Angbratt, Marianne; Frank, Linda; Norén, Anna-Maria; Hedin, Lena; Andersen, Emelie; Gursky, Elin A; Gäre, Boel Andersson

    2013-07-04

    An online health-promoting community (OHPC) has the potential to promote health and advance new means of dialogue between public health representatives and the general public. The aim of this study was to examine what aspects of an OHPC that are critical for satisfying the needs of the user community and public health goals and service capabilities. Community-based participatory research methods were used for data collection and analysis, and participatory design principles to develop a case study OHPC for adolescents. Qualitative data from adolescents on health appraisals and perspectives on health information were collected in a Swedish health service region and classified into categories of user health information exchange needs. A composite design rationale for the OHPC was completed by linking the identified user needs, user-derived requirements, and technical and organizational systems solutions. Conflicts between end-user requirements and organizational goals and resources were identified. The most prominent health information needs were associated to food, exercise, and well-being. The assessment of the design rationale document and prototype in light of the regional public health goals and service capabilities showed that compromises were needed to resolve conflicts involving the management of organizational resources and responsibilities. The users wanted to discuss health issues with health experts having little time to set aside to the OHPC and it was unclear who should set the norms for the online discussions. OHPCs can be designed to satisfy both the needs of user communities and public health goals and service capabilities. Compromises are needed to resolve conflicts between users' needs to discuss health issues with domain experts and the management of resources and responsibilities in public health organizations.

  10. The impact of goal-oriented task design on neurofeedback learning for brain-computer interface control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, S R; Tremblay, A; Boe, S G; Bardouille, T

    2018-02-01

    Neurofeedback training teaches individuals to modulate brain activity by providing real-time feedback and can be used for brain-computer interface control. The present study aimed to optimize training by maximizing engagement through goal-oriented task design. Participants were shown either a visual display or a robot, where each was manipulated using motor imagery (MI)-related electroencephalography signals. Those with the robot were instructed to quickly navigate grid spaces, as the potential for goal-oriented design to strengthen learning was central to our investigation. Both groups were hypothesized to show increased magnitude of these signals across 10 sessions, with the greatest gains being seen in those navigating the robot due to increased engagement. Participants demonstrated the predicted increase in magnitude, with no differentiation between hemispheres. Participants navigating the robot showed stronger left-hand MI increases than those with the computer display. This is likely due to success being reliant on maintaining strong MI-related signals. While older participants showed stronger signals in early sessions, this trend later reversed, suggesting greater natural proficiency but reduced flexibility. These results demonstrate capacity for modulating neurofeedback using MI over a series of training sessions, using tasks of varied design. Importantly, the more goal-oriented robot control task resulted in greater improvements.

  11. Choose Your Own Adventure: Designing an Environment that Supports NASA Scientists' Goals in Education, Outreach, and Inreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, S.

    2015-12-01

    What is your communication goal? That is the opening question asked in NASA's first agency-wide science communication leadership development program. Many scientists know what they want to communicate, some know to whom they'd like to communicate, but few can clearly express why they want to do it. So what? First, being clear about one's goal is critical in being able to measure success. Second, when asked to think critically about communication goals, some scientists may shift their communication behaviors and practices to better achieve those goals. To that end, NASA has designed a deep learning experience for scientists (and engineers and others) to: critically examine their communication goals; learn techniques for getting to know their intended audience; and develop and apply specific communication skills to a project of their choice. Participants in this program come into the classroom with projects that span a wide spectrum including: formal and informal education, public outreach, media interviews, public speaking, stakeholder briefings, and internal awareness-building. Through expert advisors, professional coaches and peer networks, this program provides a supportive environment for individuals to workshop their project in the classroom and receive feedback before, during, and after the project is complete. This program also provides an opportunity for scientists and other participants to learn more about communication at NASA, and to directly influence the agency's science communication culture through action learning. In this presentation, I will summarize NASA's dual-design science communication leadership development program and present some lessons-learned, participant feedback and evaluation data from the initial course offerings.

  12. THE APPLICATION OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS IN MODERN AVIATION AND CONTROL OF ITS CONDITION DURING DESIGN SERVICE GOAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zibitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article has a purpose to give a brief review of usage of composite materials in the structure of modern civil aircraft. The current condition of civil aviation was analyzed, serious problems were determined and possible achievements in the future were discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of composite materials were analyzed, non-destructive methods of control were reviewed and the necessity to design new method, which allows to control the integrity of structure in real time during design service goal of the aircraft (the concept of “clever material” was shown.

  13. Design Guideline for Primary Heat Exchanger in a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sunil; Seo, Kyoung-Woo; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Chi, Dae-Young; Park, Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, analytical study is conducted to track the variation of the PCS outlet temperature in conditions of the constant core power and constant SCS inlet temperature. The PCS circulates demineralized water to remove the heat generated in reactor core. The heat is transferred to the cold water of the SCS through the primary heat exchanger. In JRTR, Plate-type Heat Exchanger (PHE) was used as the primary heat exchanger. The cooling tower automatically sets the SCS inlet temperature constant by fan speed control. The flow rate of SCS is adjusted to be identical with the PCS flow rate. To design the PHE, the inlet and outlet temperatures and the flow rates for both systems should be determined. The flow rate has the allowable band for the safe operation from the lower limit to upper limit resulting in different temperature distribution in the PHE. Specially, the PCS outlet temperature which is the core inlet temperature is used for a safety parameter for the reactor shutdown. Therefore, we need to figure out which limit for the flow rate should be used from the conservative point of view. At 200 kg/s of PCS and SCS flow rates, the inlet and outlet temperatures are 41.3℃and 34℃, respectively. With increase of the flow rate, both of PCS inlet and outlet temperatures decrease to 33.6℃ and 39.9℃. This result means the low limit of the allowable flow band should be used for the conservative design of primary heat exchanger. If the upper limit of the allowable flow band is used, the PCS outlet temperature which is the safety parameter used for the reactor shutdown increases with decrease of the flow rate.

  14. Design Guideline for Primary Heat Exchanger in a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sunil; Seo, Kyoung-Woo; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Chi, Dae-Young; Park, Cheol

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, analytical study is conducted to track the variation of the PCS outlet temperature in conditions of the constant core power and constant SCS inlet temperature. The PCS circulates demineralized water to remove the heat generated in reactor core. The heat is transferred to the cold water of the SCS through the primary heat exchanger. In JRTR, Plate-type Heat Exchanger (PHE) was used as the primary heat exchanger. The cooling tower automatically sets the SCS inlet temperature constant by fan speed control. The flow rate of SCS is adjusted to be identical with the PCS flow rate. To design the PHE, the inlet and outlet temperatures and the flow rates for both systems should be determined. The flow rate has the allowable band for the safe operation from the lower limit to upper limit resulting in different temperature distribution in the PHE. Specially, the PCS outlet temperature which is the core inlet temperature is used for a safety parameter for the reactor shutdown. Therefore, we need to figure out which limit for the flow rate should be used from the conservative point of view. At 200 kg/s of PCS and SCS flow rates, the inlet and outlet temperatures are 41.3℃and 34℃, respectively. With increase of the flow rate, both of PCS inlet and outlet temperatures decrease to 33.6℃ and 39.9℃. This result means the low limit of the allowable flow band should be used for the conservative design of primary heat exchanger. If the upper limit of the allowable flow band is used, the PCS outlet temperature which is the safety parameter used for the reactor shutdown increases with decrease of the flow rate

  15. A GOAL QUESTION METRIC (GQM APPROACH FOR EVALUATING INTERACTION DESIGN PATTERNS IN DRAWING GAMES FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Sulistiyo Kusumo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest to use smart devices’ drawing games for educational benefit. In Indonesia, our government classifies children age four to six years old as preschool children. Not all preschool children can use drawing games easily. Further, drawing games may not fulfill all Indonesia's preschool children’s drawing competencies. This research proposes to use Goal-Question Metric (GQM to investigate and evaluate interaction design patterns of preschool children in order to achieve the drawing competencies for preschool children in two drawing Android-based games: Belajar Menggambar (in English: Learn to Draw and Coret: Belajar Menggambar (in English: Scratch: Learn to Draw. We collected data from nine students of a preschool children education in a user research. The results show that GQM can assist to evaluate interaction design patterns in achieving the drawing competencies. Our approach can also yield interaction design patterns by comparing interaction design patterns in two drawing games used.

  16. Tritium technology development in EEC laboratories contributions to design goals for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinner, P.; Chazalon, M.; Leger, D.; Rohrig, H.D.; Penzhorn, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    An overview is given of the tritium technology activities carried out in the European national laboratories associated with the European Fusion Programme and in the European Joint Research Center. The relationship of these activities to the Next European Torus (NET) design priorities is discussed, and the current status of the research is summarised. Future developments, required for NET, which will be addressed in the definition of the next 5-year programme are also presented

  17. Atmospheric River Tracking Method Intercomparison Project (ARTMIP: project goals and experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Shields

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric River Tracking Method Intercomparison Project (ARTMIP is an international collaborative effort to understand and quantify the uncertainties in atmospheric river (AR science based on detection algorithm alone. Currently, there are many AR identification and tracking algorithms in the literature with a wide range of techniques and conclusions. ARTMIP strives to provide the community with information on different methodologies and provide guidance on the most appropriate algorithm for a given science question or region of interest. All ARTMIP participants will implement their detection algorithms on a specified common dataset for a defined period of time. The project is divided into two phases: Tier 1 will utilize the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2 reanalysis from January 1980 to June 2017 and will be used as a baseline for all subsequent comparisons. Participation in Tier 1 is required. Tier 2 will be optional and include sensitivity studies designed around specific science questions, such as reanalysis uncertainty and climate change. High-resolution reanalysis and/or model output will be used wherever possible. Proposed metrics include AR frequency, duration, intensity, and precipitation attributable to ARs. Here, we present the ARTMIP experimental design, timeline, project requirements, and a brief description of the variety of methodologies in the current literature. We also present results from our 1-month proof-of-concept trial run designed to illustrate the utility and feasibility of the ARTMIP project.

  18. Designing the Monitoring of Water-Related Sustainable Development Goals Based on Value of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; Levy, M. A.; de Sherbinin, A. M.; Fischer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent an unprecedented international commitment to collective action and targeted interventions at global, regional, and national scales. Existing monitoring and data infrastructures are inadequate for producing the variety of environmental and socioeconomic information needed to ensure efficient and effective outcomes across the range of interlinked SDGs and targets. The scientific community needs to take a lead in developing new tools and approaches that, at reasonable cost, provide monitoring data of sufficient quality and spatial and temporal coverage to support informed decision making by diverse stakeholders. The expanded SDGs related to water offer the opportunity to explore potential new monitoring approaches and data system architectures in a key sector, building on existing water monitoring capabilities and incorporating new technologies and methods. Since additional investments in monitoring will undoubtedly be limited, it is important to assess carefully the value of information produced by different options and their associated risks and tradeoffs. We review here the existing set of water monitoring systems, known gaps and limitations, stakeholder inputs on data needs, and the potential value of information in light of alternative water sector interventions. Of particular interest are opportunities to share investments in monitoring across sectors and stakeholders (e.g., public and private entities) and to identify where incremental improvements in water monitoring could have significant benefits for other SDGs (e.g., related to health, energy, agriculture, and climate change). Value of information is also driven by the numbers of people affected by decisions or able to take advantage of improved data, which implies the need not only to collect and archive data, but also to invest in making data accessible and usable to diverse and geographically dispersed users.

  19. Developing Mobile Clinical Decision Support for Nursing Home Staff Assessment of Urinary Tract Infection using Goal-Directed Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Wallace; Drake, Cynthia; Mack, David; Reeder, Blaine; Trautner, Barbara; Wald, Heidi

    2017-06-20

    Unique characteristics of nursing homes (NHs) contribute to high rates of inappropriate antibiotic use for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a benign condition. A mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) may support NH staff in differentiating urinary tract infections (UTI) from ASB and reducing antibiotic days. We used Goal-Directed Design to: 1) Characterize information needs for UTI identification and management in NHs; 2) Develop UTI Decide, a mobile CDSS prototype informed by personas and scenarios of use constructed from Aim 1 findings; 3) Evaluate the UTI Decide prototype with NH staff. Focus groups were conducted with providers and nurses in NHs in Denver, Colorado (n= 24). Qualitative descriptive analysis was applied to focus group transcripts to identify information needs and themes related to mobile clinical decision support for UTI identification and management. Personas representing typical end users were developed; typical clinical context scenarios were constructed using information needs as goals. Usability testing was performed using cognitive walk-throughs and a think-aloud protocol. Four information needs were identified including guidance regarding resident assessment; communication with providers; care planning; and urine culture interpretation. Design of a web-based application incorporating a published decision support algorithm for evidence-based UTI diagnoses proceeded with a focus on nursing information needs during resident assessment and communication with providers. Certified nursing assistant (CNA) and registered nurse (RN) personas were constructed in 4 context scenarios with associated key path scenarios. After field testing, a high fidelity prototype of UTI Decide was completed and evaluated by potential end users. Design recommendations and content recommendations were elicited. Goal-Directed Design informed the development of a mobile CDSS supporting participant-identified information needs for UTI assessment and communication

  20. 75 FR 52860 - Final Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 21 Final Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando Helicopter Airways (OHA), Inc... Existence of Proposed Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando...

  1. Update of ZTH physics and design issues and physics goals of ZTH and role in the Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiMarco, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    The ZTH construction program is scheduled for completion in December of 1992. Some design features are still amenable to changes directed by new physics or computational information. Numerical results for the ZTH tapered poloidal field gap show that a relatively simple linear taper results in substantial reduction in field error. This design is simpler to manufacture compared with the compound curve predicted by analytical calculations. Also, ongoing analysis of ZT-40M data indicates that the fluctuation levels of magnetic fields and x-rays at high θ (1.7), can be reduced to the fluctuation levels at ''standard'' operational θ (1.4) by changing the winding configuration of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The effect is thought to depend on the shell-like action of the TF coils when they consist of many turns in parallel. Magnetic-field effects, such as field errors, at the unshielded toroidal-field butt-joint gap in the shell can be reduced by this effective external shell. Design implications for installing a second low-current TF coil on ZTH are presented. ZTH has the capability of operating at 4 MA with the addition of power supplies. The projected parameters of ZTH are discussed in the context of various conceptual design. The sensitivity of the conceptual design to the physics results from machines like RFX and ZTH is reviewed. It is shown that the 4 MA ZTH physics results will make a significant advance for the RFP program toward the programmatic RFP fusion goals. Finally, the influence of RFP and tokamak physics on the conceptual design of high mass-power-density (MPD) fusion reactors is investigated through the TITAN and ARIES studies. The confinement characteristics required of these conceptual designs are compared; physics issues are identified that are required to bring the MPD and fusion-power-core of the tokamak designs into coincidence with the RFP designs

  2. Group therapy for somatization disorders in primary care: maintenance of treatment goals of short cognitive-behavioural treatment one-and-a-half-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidbeck, J

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the maintenance of treatment goals of a short cognitive-behavioural group treatment programme for the management of somatization disorders in primary care. In a previous controlled 6-month follow-up study, patients with somatization disorders (n=32) improved with respect to illness and somatic preoccupation, hypochondriasis, and medication usage. In the present report the same group of patients were also investigated one-and-a-half year after initial treatment. The long-term follow-up manifested maintained improvement with respect to hypochondriasis. There was additional reduction of anxiety and psychosocial preoccupation, whereas somatization and depression-anxiety scores improved progressively. A short cognitive-behavioural group treatment of psychosomatic patients can be useful in primary care and may manifest maintained or progressive beneficial outcome.

  3. Pre elementary design of primary reformer for hydrogen plant coupled with HTGR type NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedy Priambodo; Erlan Dewita; Sudi Ariyanto

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has a high potent for new energy, because of it availability. Steam reforming is a fully developed commercial technology and is the most economical method for production of hydrogen. Steam reforming uses an external source of hot gas to heat tubes in which a catalytic reaction takes place that converts steam and lighter hydrocarbons such as natural gas (methane) or refinery feedstock into hydrogen and carbon monoxide (syngas) at high temperature on primary reformer (800-900°C). Utilization of helium from HTGR as heating medium for primary reformer has consequence to type and shape of its reactor. The main goal of this paper is to determine type/shape and pre elementary design of chemical reactor for the cogeneration system of Hydrogen Plant and HTGR The primary reformer for this system is Fixed Bed Multitube reactor with specification tube: NPS 3,5 Sch 40 ST 40S, 0.281 in thickness, number of tube 849 pieces and ASTM HH 30 for tube material. Tube arrangement is 'triangular pitch' on shell Split-Ring Floating Head from Steel Alloy SA 301 Grade B equipted with 8 baffles. (author)

  4. MOTIVATION: Goals and Goal Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Goal setting has great impact on a team's performance. Goals enable a team to synchronize their efforts to achieve success. In this article, the author talks about goals and goal setting. This articles complements Domain 5--Teaching and Communication (p.14) and discusses one of the benchmarks listed therein: "Teach the goal setting process and…

  5. A goal programming approach for a joint design of macroeconomic and environmental policies: a methodological proposal and an application to the Spanish economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Francisco J; Cardenete, M Alejandro; Romero, Carlos

    2009-05-01

    The economic policy needs to pay increasingly more attention to the environmental issues, which requires the development of methodologies able to incorporate environmental, as well as macroeconomic, goals in the design of public policies. Starting from this observation, this article proposes a methodology based upon a Simonian satisficing logic made operational with the help of goal programming (GP) models, to address the joint design of macroeconomic and environmental policies. The methodology is applied to the Spanish economy, where a joint policy is elicited, taking into consideration macroeconomic goals (economic growth, inflation, unemployment, public deficit) and environmental goals (CO(2), NO( x ) and SO( x ) emissions) within the context of a computable general equilibrium model. The results show how the government can "fine-tune" its policy according to different criteria using GP models. The resulting policies aggregate the environmental and the economic goals in different ways: maximum aggregate performance, maximum balance and a lexicographic hierarchy of the goals.

  6. Designing an electricity tax system in presence of international regulations and multiple public goals: An empirical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjertnaes, Geir H.; Faehn, Taran; Aasness, Jorgen

    2008-01-01

    The European competition rules restrict governments' opportunity to differentiate terms of energy accessibility among firms and industries. This easily runs counter with regional and industrial goals of national energy policies. Norway levies a tax on use of electricity, but exempts main industrial usages. This analysis assesses alternative, internationally legal, designs of the system in terms of their effects on efficiency and distribution, including industrial objectives. Among the reforms we explore, removing the exemptions would be the most effective way of raising revenue, but it would be politically costly by deteriorating the competitiveness of today's favoured industries. An entire abolishment of the electricity tax, and replacing revenue by increased VAT, would generate a more equal distribution of standard of living and, at the same time, avoid the trade-off between efficiency and competitiveness

  7. Design Of Pump Monitoring Of Primary Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrakoesoema, Koes; Sujarwono

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring of 3 primary cooling pumps done visually by operator on the spot. The operator must be check oil in a sight glass, oil leakage during pump operation and water leakage. If reaktor power increase about more than 3 MW, the radiation exposure also increase in the primary cell and that's way the operator can not check the pumps. To continuing monitor all pump without delay, one system has been added I.e Closed Circuit Television (CCTV). This system using 3 video camera to monitor 3 pumps and connected to one receiver video monitor by coaxial cable located in Main Control Room. The sequence monitoring can be done by sequential switcher

  8. A Survey of Structural Design of Diagnostic X-ray Imaging Facilities and Compliance to Shielding Design Goals in a Limited Resource Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavious B. Nkubli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To survey structural designs of x-ray rooms and compliance to shielding design goals of three x-ray imaging facilities. Methods and Materials: The survey was conducted in three radiodiagnostic centers in South East Nigeria, labeled X, Y and Z for anonymity. A stretchable non-elastic meter rule was used to measure x-ray room dimensions. A Vernier caliper was used to measure lead thickness while a calibrated digital survey meter Radalert 100x was used for radiation survey of controlled and uncontrolled areas. Simple statistical tools such as mean and standard deviation were used for analysis with the aid of Microsoft Excel version 2007. Results: Center X had a room dimension of 2.4 m × 2.1 m, Center Y had an x-ray room dimension of 3.6 m × 3.3 m, and Center Z had two x-ray rooms with identical dimensions of 6.3 m × 3.6 m. Measured exit radiation doses for controlled areas in all the centers were: 0.00152 mSv/wk; 0.00496 mSv/wk; 0.00168 mSv/wk; 0.00224 mSv/wk respectively. Lead was the common shielding material used. Conclusion: Based on the parameters studied, Center Z had the ideal room size and layout. Relative distances from the x-ray tubes to the nearest walls were not optimized in all the centers except in Center Z. Measured exit doses were within recommended limits except in Center Y. The location of the control consoles and measured doses were appropriate and within recommended design goals.

  9. Can We Improve Indicator Design for Complex Sustainable Development Goals? A Comparison of a Values-Based and Conventional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Burford

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual framework was constructed for United Nations’ complex Sustainable Development Goal (SDG Target 4.7 focusing on education for sustainable development (ESD, and used to analyse the usefulness and character of indicators produced from a values-based approach called ESDinds, compared to a UN process. The analysis shows that the latter generated very few indicators concerning the wider aspects of knowledge such as ‘critical thinking’ or ‘learning to learn’. The values-based approach, created for a different purpose, produced complementary if not better coverage of Target 4.7, including finely-developed concepts for competencies and less tangible aspects. It is suggested that the UN process would benefit from ESDinds design elements such as intersubjective and slightly disruptive elements, purposeful contextualisation at group level, and a holistic and inductive consideration of values. The use of a reference ‘fuzzy framework’ of slightly generalised proto-indicators suited for deep contextualisation locally is recommended, rather than any rigid global-level indicator with unclear local value. It is recommended that ESD practitioners immediately develop localised interpretations of valid measures for whatever final Target 4.7 indicator is selected by the UN, as this localisation process will itself cause important learning towards local ESD achievements.

  10. Using multimedia cases for educating the primary school mathematics teacher educator: a design study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, M.L.A.M.; Hertog, den J.B.; Gravemeijer, K.P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The overarching goal of this chapter is to better understand how multimedia video case studies can support the professionalization of primary-school-mathematics teacher educators. We investigate the use of multimedia cases to support teacher educators in learning to mathematize and didactize and to

  11. Primary Cosmic Rays Composition: Simulations and Detector Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supanitsky, D.; Etchegoyen, A.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector system for the detection of very high energy cosmic rays. A most difficult and important problem in these studies is the determination of the primary cosmic ray composition for which muon content in air showers appears to be one of the best parameters to discriminate between different composition types.Although the Pierre Auger surface detectors, which consist of water Cherenkov tanks, are sensitive to muon content they are not able to measure the number of muons directly. In this work we study using simulations the information that can be gained by adding muon detectors to the Auger surface detectors. We consider muon counters with two alternative areas

  12. Improving Primary Care with Human-Centered Design and Partnership-Based Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May-Lynn Andresen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to empower and activate first-line staff (FLS to improve the six-month depression remission rate in a primary care clinic. Background: Lack of workforce engagement has been identified as an emerging national problem in health care and health care leaders have urged practice redesign to foster the Triple Aim of improved population health, improved care experience, and reduced cost of care (Berwick et al., 2008. Depression is difficult to manage and often exacerbates chronic illnesses and shortens lifespans, yet despite known effective treatments, six-month remission rates are low and care practices are often inadequate. Engaging in empowering leadership behaviors has demonstrated improvement in motivation, work outcomes, and empowerment in various industry settings across the world. Core approaches include: enhancing staff self-determination, encouraging participation in decision-making, and ensuring that staff have the knowledge and tools to achieve their performance goals, in addition to leadership communications that increase confidence in staff’s potential to perform at high levels, and their recognition that their efforts have an impact on improving organizational effectiveness. Methods: In this outpatient setting, care was siloed, staff were disengaged and a hierarchical paradigm was evident. Human-centered design principles were employed to intensively explore stakeholders’ experiences and to deeply engage end users in improving depression remission rates by creating, participating, and partnering in solutions. Leadership was educated in and deployed empowering leadership behaviors, which were synergistic with design thinking, and fostered empowerment. Results: Pre- and post-surveys demonstrated statistically significant improvement in empowerment. The six-month depression remission rate increased 167%, from 7.3% (N=261 to 19.4% (N=247. Conclusion: The convergence of

  13. Goal Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Laurent, Alexis; Owsianiak, Mikołaj

    2018-01-01

    The goal definition is the first phase of an LCA and determines the purpose of a study in detail. This chapter teaches how to perform the six aspects of a goal definition: (1) Intended applications of the results, (2) Limitations due to methodological choices, (3) Decision context and reasons...... for carrying out the study, (4) Target audience , (5) Comparative studies to be disclosed to the public and (6) Commissioner of the study and other influential actors. The instructions address both the conduct and reporting of a goal definition and are largely based on the ILCD guidance document (EC...

  14. Primary energy implications of different design strategies for an apartment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tettey, Uniben Yao Ayikoe; Dodoo, Ambrose; Gustavsson, Leif

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of different design strategies on final and primary energy use for production and operation of a newly constructed apartment building. We analysed alternatives of the building “As built” as well as to energy efficiency levels of the Swedish building code and passive house criteria. Our approach is based on achieving improved versions of the building alternatives from combination of design strategies giving the lowest space heating and cooling demand and primary energy use, respectively. We found that the combination of design strategies resulting in the improved building alternatives varies depending on the approach. The improved building alternatives gave up to 19–34% reduction in operation primary energy use compared to the initial alternatives. The share of production primary energy use of the improved building alternatives was 39–54% of the total primary energy use for production, space heating, space cooling and ventilation over 50-year lifespan, compared to 31–42% for the initial alternatives. This study emphasises the importance of incorporating appropriate design strategies to reduce primary energy use for building operation and suggests that combining such strategies with careful choice of building frame materials could result in significant primary energy savings in the built environment. - Highlights: • Primary energy implications of different design strategies were analysed. • The improved building alternatives had 19–34% lower operation primary energy use. • The improved building alternatives had higher production primary energy use. • Still, the improved building alternatives had lower overall primary energy use. • Design strategies should be combined with careful building frame material choice.

  15. Does the operations of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana align with the goals of Primary Health Care? Perspectives of key stakeholders in northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; Tindana, Paulina; Dalinjong, Philip Ayizem; Nartey, Harry; Akazili, James

    2016-09-05

    In 2005, the World Health Assembly (WHA) of the World Health Organization (WHO) urged member states to aim at achieving affordable universal coverage and access to key promotive, preventive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative health interventions for all their citizens on the basis of equity and solidarity. Since then, some African countries, including Ghana, have taken steps to introduce national health insurance reforms as one of the key strategies towards achieving universal health coverage (UHC). The aim of this study was to get a better understanding of how Ghana's health insurance institutions interact with stakeholders and other health sector programmes in promoting primary health care (PHC). Specifically, the study identified the key areas of misalignment between the operations of the NHIS and that of PHC. Using qualitative and survey methods, this study involved interviews with various stakeholders in six selected districts in the Upper East region of Ghana. The key stakeholders included the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA), district coordinators of the National Health Insurance Schemes (NHIS), the Ghana Health Service (GHS) and District Health Management Teams (DHMTs) who supervise the district hospitals, health centers/clinics and the Community-based Health and Planning Services (CHPS) compounds as well as other public and private PHC providers. A stakeholders' workshop was organized to validate the preliminary results which provided a platform for stakeholders to deliberate on the key areas of misalignment especially, and to elicit additional information, ideas and responses, comments and recommendations from respondents for the achievement of the goals of UHC and PHC. The key areas of misalignments identified during this pilot study included: delays in reimbursements of claims for services provided by health care providers, which serves as a disincentive for service providers to support the NHIS; inadequate coordination among

  16. Towards Primary School Physics Teaching and Learning: Design Research Approach. Research Report 256

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a project to design a primary school physics learning environment which takes into account teachers' needs, design procedures, properties of the learning environment, and pupil learning outcomes. The project's design team has wide experience in research and development work in relation to science education, the use of ICT in…

  17. Design considerations of fission and corrosion product in primary system of MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Akagane, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    General influence of fission and corrosion products in primary system on MONJU plant design is reviewed. Various research and development works are now in progress to decrease the generation rate, to remove the products more effectively and to develop the methods of evaluation the behaviour of radioactive products. The inventory and distribution of fission and corrosion products in the primary circuit of MONJU are given. The radiation levels on the primary components are estimated to be several roentgens per hour. (author)

  18. Primary design and operation analysis of ITER air transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haitian; Li Ge; Qin Shijun

    2010-01-01

    Air transfer system (ATS) is a remote handling transfer, which can work in the nuclear radiation environment and can be driven by the electricity fully. Its motion power is provided by several servo motors. The remote control technology of ATS, which is China taking part in the plan of international Tokamak experimental reactor (ITER) and grasping this technology, is one of key technologies of ITER. The remote handling technology can lay the foundation for developing demonstration nuclear fusion power plant in China on self-reliance. Because there is gamma irradiation and hazard material in these ITER parts, all required maintenance of port plugs and inner components are been transmitted by ATS. The pick-up or drop-off these components are completed by means of a remotely controlled TCS system between the Vacuum Vessel and the Hot Cell through the bridge-gallery. Tokamak building includes three floors, including upper port, equatorial port and lower port, linked by a lift. According to each port level configuration and safety requirement, the radius of curvature with ATS trajectory is optimized, and a trajectory of each level is determined by positioned guidance beacons. At last, the results of computer aided design (CAD) show single trajectory guidance of ATS in each level is available. (authors)

  19. A Staff Development Program Designed To Reach the Partnership School's Goals: Cooperative Learning Strategies, Coaching Sessions and a Narrowed Academic Performance Gap among Student Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kathy; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a staff-development program at Vivian Field Junior High School in Carrollton, Texas. The school is a member of the Texas Partnership School Initiative, which was created to give schools latitude in raising student achievement. The goal of the staff-development program was to identify gains in…

  20. Designing instruction and learning for cognitively gifted pupils in preschool and primary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Mooij, T. (2013). Designing education and learning for cognitively gifted pupils in preschool and primary school. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 17(6), 597-613. doi:10.1080/13603116.2012.696727

  1. Impact of implant design on primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, Benedict; Ottenstreuer, Stephanie; Su, Yu-Yu; Drescher, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal anchorage with mini-implants has greatly broadened the treatment possibilities in orthodontics over the last few years. To reduce implant failure rates, it is advisable to obtain adequate primary stability. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the impact of implant design and dimension on primary stability. Forty-two porcine iliac bone segments were prepared and embedded in resin. To evaluate the primary stability, we documented insertion torques of the following mini-implants: Aarhus Screw, AbsoAnchor, LOMAS, Micro-Anchorage-System, ORLUS and Spider Screw. In each bone, five Dual Top Screws were inserted for reference purposes to achieve comparability among the specimens. We observed wide variation in insertion torques and hence primary stability, depending on mini-implant design and dimension; the great impact that mini-implant diameter has on insertion torques was particularly conspicuous. Conical mini-implants achieved higher primary stabilities than cylindrical designs. The diameter and design of the mini-implant thread have a distinctive impact on primary stability. Depending on the region of insertion and local bone quality, the choice of the mini-implant design and size is crucial to establish sufficient primary stability.

  2. Testing Map Features Designed to Convey the Uncertainty of Cancer Risk: Insights Gained From Assessing Judgments of Information Adequacy and Communication Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severtson, Dolores J

    2015-02-01

    Barriers to communicating the uncertainty of environmental health risks include preferences for certain information and low numeracy. Map features designed to communicate the magnitude and uncertainty of estimated cancer risk from air pollution were tested among 826 participants to assess how map features influenced judgments of adequacy and the intended communication goals. An uncertain versus certain visual feature was judged as less adequate but met both communication goals and addressed numeracy barriers. Expressing relative risk using words communicated uncertainty and addressed numeracy barriers but was judged as highly inadequate. Risk communication and visual cognition concepts were applied to explain findings.

  3. Goal pursuit, goal adjustment, and affective well-being following lower limb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre; Ryall, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the relationships between tenacious goal pursuit (TGP), flexible goal adjustment (FGA), and affective well-being in a sample of individuals with lower limb amputations. Design. Cross-sectional, quantitative. Methods. Ninety-eight patients recently admitted to a primary prosthetic rehabilitation programme completed measures of TGP, FGA, positive affect, and negative affect. Results. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that TGP and FGA accounted fo...

  4. The introduction of Greek Central Health Fund: Has the reform met its goal in the sector of Primary Health Care or is there a new model needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzos, Nikos; Karakolias, Stefanos; Dikeos, Costas; Theodorou, Mamas; Kastanioti, Catherine; Mama, Kalomira; Polizoidis, Periklis; Skamnakis, Christoforos; Tsairidis, Charalampos; Thireos, Eleutherios

    2014-11-25

    The National Organization for Healthcare Provision (EOPYY) originates from the recent reform in Greek healthcare, aiming amidst economic predicament, at the rationalization of health expenditure and reactivation of the pivotal role of Primary Health Care (PHC). Health funding (public/private) mix is examined, alongside the role of pre-existing health insurance funds. The main pursuit of this paper is to evaluate whether EOPYY has met its goals. The article surveys for best practices in advanced health systems and similar sickness funds. The main benchmarks focus on PHC provision and providers' reimbursement. It then turns to an analysis of EOPYY, focusing on specific questions and searching the relevant databases. It compares the best practice examples to the EOPYY (alongside further developments set by new legislation in L 4238/14), revealing weaknesses relevant to non-integrated PHC network, unbalanced manpower, non-gatekeeping, under-financing and other funding problems caused by the current crisis. Finally, a new model of medical procedures cost accounting was tested in health centers. An alternative operation of EOPYY functioning primarily as an insurer whereas its proprietary units are integrated with these of the NHS is proposed. The paper claims it is critical to revise the current induced demand favorable reimbursement system, via per capita payments for physicians combined with extra pay-for-performance payments, while cost accounting corroborates a prospective system for NHS's and EOPYY's units, under a combination of global budgets and Ambulatory Patient Groups (APGs) Self-critical points on the limitations of results due to lack of adequate data (not) given by EOPYY are initially raised. Then the issue concerning the debate between 'copying' benchmarks and 'a la cart' selectively adopting and adapting best practices from wider experience is discussed, with preference to the latter. The idea of an 'a la cart' choice of international examples is proposed

  5. Practical goal programming

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Dylan

    2010-01-01

    This book and its treatment of goal programming will help organizations meet targets and objectives. The book includes many worked-out examples and tutorial exercises, and is designed to demostrate and teach its readers good modeling practice.

  6. Physical models and primary design of reactor based slow positron source at CMRR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanbo; Li, Rundong; Qian, Dazhi; Yang, Xin

    2018-07-01

    Slow positron facilities are widely used in material science. A high intensity slow positron source is now at the design stage based on the China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR). This paper describes the physical models and our primary design. We use different computer programs or mathematical formula to simulate different physical process, and validate them by proper experiments. Considering the feasibility, we propose a primary design, containing a cadmium shield, a honeycomb arranged W tubes assembly, electrical lenses, and a solenoid. It is planned to be vertically inserted in the Si-doping channel. And the beam intensity is expected to be 5 ×109

  7. Upgradation of design features of primary coolant pumps of Indian 220 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.S.; Mhetre, S.G.; Manna, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Evolution in the design features of Primary Coolant Pump (PCP) had started in fifties for catering to stringent specification requirements of reactor coolant systems of larger capacity reactors of various kinds. Primary coolant pumps of PWR and PHWR are employed for circulating radioactive, pressurized hot water in a circuit consisting of reactor (heat source) and steam generator (heat sink). As primary coolant pump capacity decides the station capacity, larger capacity primary coolant pumps have been evolved. Since primary coolant pump pressure containing parts are part of Primary Heat Transport system envelope, the parts are designed, manufactured, inspected and tested in accordance with the applicable system guidelines. Flywheel is mounted on the motor shaft for increasing mass moment of inertia of pump motor rotor to meet the coast down requirements of reactor cooling system under Class-IV electrical power supply failure. Due to limited accessibility of the PCP (PCP installed in shut down accessible area), quick maintenance, condition monitoring, reliable shaft seal system/bearing system aspects have been of great concern to reactor owners and pump manufacturers. In this paper upgradation of design features of RAPS, MAPS and NAPS primary coolant pumps have been covered. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Designing optimal food intake patterns to achieve nutritional goals for Japanese adults through the use of linear programming optimization models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Hitomi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Murakami, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Hirota, Naoko; Notsu, Akiko; Fukui, Mitsuru; Date, Chigusa

    2015-06-06

    Simultaneous dietary achievement of a full set of nutritional recommendations is difficult. Diet optimization model using linear programming is a useful mathematical means of translating nutrient-based recommendations into realistic nutritionally-optimal food combinations incorporating local and culture-specific foods. We used this approach to explore optimal food intake patterns that meet the nutrient recommendations of the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) while incorporating typical Japanese food selections. As observed intake values, we used the food and nutrient intake data of 92 women aged 31-69 years and 82 men aged 32-69 years living in three regions of Japan. Dietary data were collected with semi-weighed dietary record on four non-consecutive days in each season of the year (16 days total). The linear programming models were constructed to minimize the differences between observed and optimized food intake patterns while also meeting the DRIs for a set of 28 nutrients, setting energy equal to estimated requirements, and not exceeding typical quantities of each food consumed by each age (30-49 or 50-69 years) and gender group. We successfully developed mathematically optimized food intake patterns that met the DRIs for all 28 nutrients studied in each sex and age group. Achieving nutritional goals required minor modifications of existing diets in older groups, particularly women, while major modifications were required to increase intake of fruit and vegetables in younger groups of both sexes. Across all sex and age groups, optimized food intake patterns demanded greatly increased intake of whole grains and reduced-fat dairy products in place of intake of refined grains and full-fat dairy products. Salt intake goals were the most difficult to achieve, requiring marked reduction of salt-containing seasoning (65-80%) in all sex and age groups. Using a linear programming model, we identified optimal food intake patterns providing practical food choices and

  9. Industrial goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the third seminar on pellet-clad interaction, which held at Aix en Provence (France) from 9-11 march 2004, was to draw a comprehensive picture of current understanding of pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod under the widest possible conditions. This document provides the summaries of the five sessions: opening and industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in-pile rod behaviour, modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  10. Children Designing & Engineering: Contextual Learning Units in Primary Design and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Children Designing & Engineering (CD&E) Project at the College of New Jersey is a collaborative effort of the College's Center for Design and Technology and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce. The Project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), has been charged to develop instructional materials for grades K-5. The twelve…

  11. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  12. Design Thinkers Can Save the World: How Understanding Their Interests, Goals, and Motivation Can Inform Engineering Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Jacqualyn

    2013-01-01

    The need for more engineers equipped with new skill sets is essential for ensuring our national security, climate sustainability, and maintaining our position as a global leader in innovation and as an economic world power. The design challenges engineers face increasingly require a human-centered, creative, practical, and systems-based approach…

  13. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  14. Designing a Mathematical Model for Allocating Budget to University Research and Educational Goals: A Case Study in Shahed University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Safari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Institutions of higher education, both public and private, are among the most important institutions of a country. Several economic factors have forced them to act for improving the cost-effectiveness of their activities and the quality of their products (outputs is strongly expected. Such issues have led universities to focus on profit-making activities and commercialization like manufacturing industries. This propensity is grounded in the fact that manufacturing industries working under an efficient management system can produce very high-quality products. As a matter of fact, there is no such a model for academic contexts. Therefore, this paper is aimed at offering such a model. The coefficients and constants used in this model have all been extracted based on analyzing research and educational aspects of Shahed University. The proposed model is a lexicographic model which has thirty six decision variables that are broken down into two classes of university sources variables (fifteen and university products variables. The model also includes forty nine goals, seven structural constraints and twenty integer variables. At the end of the paper, the current situation is compared with the recommended one and it shows that many of the variables are suboptimal except variables of research and educational officials (S9, graduate (P7 and PhD (P9 night course students number. The comprehensiveness of this model enables managers to plan the smallest research and educational activities and the solutions can be used by managers as applied guidelines.

  15. Interim design status and operational report for remote handling fixtures: primary and secondary burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgoyne, R.M.

    1976-12-01

    The HTGR reprocessing flowsheet consists of two basic process elements: (1) spent fuel crushing and burning and (2) solvent extraction. Fundamental to these elements is the design and development of specialized process equipment and support facilities. A major consideration of this design and development program is equipment maintenance: specifically, the design and demonstration of selected remote maintenance capabilities and the integration of these into process equipment design. This report documents the current status of the development of remote handling and maintenance fixtures for the primary and secondary burners

  16. Effect of implant macro-design on primary stability: A prospective clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Carrascal, Naroa; Salom?-Coll, Oscar; Gilabert-Cerd?, Marta; Farr?-Pag?s, Nuria; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Hern?ndez-Alfaro, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background Implant restorations have become a high predictable treatment option. Several caracteristics such as surgical technique and implant design can influence the treatment outcomes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of implant macro-design on primary stability measured with resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and insertion torque (IT). Material and Methods A total of 47 implants divided in two groups: Test group (TI): 22 Tapered MIS? Seven implants; Control group...

  17. Design and Development of a Geography Module for First-year Primary Student Teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankman, M.; van der Schee, J.; Boogaard, M.; Volman, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the result of a design study in which a geography course was developed and tested aiming to develop the Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) of first-year primary student teachers. This resulted in a course called ‘Consciously Teaching Geography’ with characteristics as (1)

  18. Design and Development of a Geography Module for First-Year Primary Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, Marian; van der Schee, Joop; Boogaard, Marianne; Volman, Monique

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the result of a design study in which a geography course was developed and tested aiming to develop the Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) of first-year primary student teachers. This resulted in a course called "Consciously Teaching Geography" with characteristics as (1) starting from students' preconceptions and…

  19. Design considerations for primary neutron beam collimation on the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, W.S.

    1980-09-01

    A scheme for the design of primary neutron beam collimation is presented which is based on ray diagrams. The practical application of the ideas is outlined and the influence of various constraints such as beam shutters is discussed. The ideas are illustrated with examples which include the layouts for some typical instruments. (author)

  20. Reliability and validity of the rey visual design learning test in primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Rey Visual Design Learning Test (Rey, 1964, in Spreen & Strauss, 1991) assesses immediate memory span, new learning and recognition for non-verbal material. Three studies are presented that focused on the reliability and validity of the RVDLT in primary school children. Test-retest reliability

  1. Validity of the rey visual design test in primary and secondary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, P.; van Klink, M.; van Klink, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Rey Visual Design Learning Test (Rey, 1964, cited in Spreen & Strauss, 1991, Wilhelm, 2004) assesses immediate memory span, new learning, delayed recall and recognition for nonverbal material. Two studies are presented that focused on the construct validity of the RVDLT in primary and secondary

  2. DESIGN OF EXPERT SYSTEM AS A SUPPORT TOOL FOR EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF PRIMARY HEADACHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahwa Arsy Azzahra

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion. The design of early detection of primary headaches with the input parameters as mentioned before derived from the raw data as electronic medical records to be analyzed based on methods Naïve Bayes classifier resulted in the decision diagnosis of migraine, cluster and TTH have accuracy values by 92 %.

  3. Health effects of freshwater bathing among primary school children; Design for a randomised exposure study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asperen IA van; Medema GJ; Havelaar AH; Borgdorff MW; CIE; MGB

    1997-01-01

    To study the health effects of bathing in freshwaters that meet current water quality standard, large epidemiological studies are needed. A design is presented of a study among primary school children, that aims to evaluate current water quality standard. The study concerns a randomised exposure

  4. Wildlife preservation and recreational use: Conflicting goals of wildland management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Richard L. Knight

    1991-01-01

    Large tracts of wildland in North America have been set aside as wilderness areas and national parks. More than 200 million acres (88 million ha) of such lands have been formally designated in Canada and the United States (Eidsvik 1989). The primary goal of these designations is the preservation of undisturbed natural conditions and processes.

  5. Design evaluation of the 40-cm (16-inch) primary burner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.S.

    1977-06-01

    An evaluation is given of the design of the existing 40-cm (16-in.) engineering-scale primary burner system in the HTGR reprocessing cold pilot plant at General Atomic Co. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the suitability of the existing design as a prototype of the HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF) primary burner system and to recommend alternatives where the existing design is thought to be unsuitable as a prototype. This evaluation has led to recommendations for the parallel development of two integrated design concepts for a prototype primary burner system. One concept utilizes the existing burner heating and cooling sub-systems in order to minimize development risk, but simplifies a number of other features associated with remote maintenance and burner operation. The other concept, which offers maximum cost reduction, utilizes direct contact hot gas heating and internal gas cooling of the burner, but requires considerable development to reduce the risk to acceptable limits. These concepts, as well as other design alternatives, are described and evaluated

  6. Design on Hygrometry System of Primary Coolant Circuit of HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yanfei; Zhong Shuoping; Huang Xiaojin

    2014-01-01

    Helium is the primary coolant in HTR-PM. If vapor get into the helium in primary coolant circuit because of some special reasons, such as the broken of steam-generator tube, chemical reaction will take effect between the graphite in reactor core and vapor in primary coolant circuit, and the safety of the reactor operation will be influenced. So the humidity of the helium in primary coolant circuit is one key parameter of HTR-PM to be monitored in-line. Once the humidity is too high, trigger signal of turning off the reactor must be issued. The hygrometry system of HTR-PM is consisting of filter, cooler, hygrometry sensor, flow meter, and some valves and tube. Helium with temperature of 250℃ is lead into the hygrometry system from the outlet of the main helium blower. After measuring, the helium is re-injected back to the primary circuit. No helium loses in this processing, and no other pump is needed. Key factors and calculations in design on hygrometry system of HTR-PM are described. A sample instrument has been made. Results of experiments proves that this hygrometry system is suitable for monitoring the humidity of the primary coolant of HTR-PM. (author)

  7. Components of the LWR primary circuit. Pt. 2. Design, construction and calculation. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This standard is to be applied to components made of metallic materials, operated at design temperatures of up to 673 K (400 deg C). The primary circuit as the pressure containment of the reactor coolant comprises: Reactor pressure vessel (without internals), steam generator (primary loop), pressurizer, reactor coolant pump housing, interconnecting pipings between the components mentioned above and appropriate various valve and instrument casings, pipings branding from the above components and interconnecting pipings, including the appropriate instrument casings, up to and including the first isolating valve, pressure shielding of control rod drives. (orig.) [de

  8. Development of model pump for establishing hydraulic design of primary sodium pumps in PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, R.J.; Sahasrabudhe, H.G.; Rao, A.S.L.K.; Balchander, K.; Kale, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam indicated requirement of indigenous development of primary sodium pump, handling liquid sodium as coolant in Fast Breeder Reactor. The primary sodium pump concept selected in its preliminary design is a vertical, single stage, with single suction impeller, suction facing downwards. The pump is having diffuser, discharge casing and discharge collector. The 1/3 rd size model pump is developed to establish the hydraulic performance of the prototype primary sodium pump. The main objectives were to verify the hydraulic design to operate on low net positive suction head available (NPSHA), no evidence of visible cavitation at available NPSHA, the pump should be designed with a diffuser etc. The model pump PSP 250/40 was designed and successfully developed by Research and Development Division of M/s Kirloskar Brothers Ltd., Kirloskarvadi. The performance testing using model pump was successfully carried out on a closed circuit test rig. The performance of a model pump at three different speeds 1900 rpm, 1456 rpm and 975 rpm was established. The values of hydraulic axial thrust with and without balancing holes on impeller at 1900 rpm was measured. Visual cavitation study at 1900 rpm was carried out to establish the NPSH at bubble free operation of the pump. The tested performance of the model pump is converted to the full scale prototype pump. The predicted performance of prototype pump at 700 rpm was found to be meeting fully with the expected duties. (author). 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Effect of implant macro-design on primary stability: A prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Carrascal, Naroa; Salomó-Coll, Oscar; Gilabert-Cerdà, Marta; Farré-Pagés, Nuria; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico

    2016-03-01

    Implant restorations have become a high predictable treatment option. Several caracteristics such as surgical technique and implant design can influence the treatment outcomes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of implant macro-design on primary stability measured with resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and insertion torque (IT). Material and Mehods: A total of 47 implants divided in two groups: Test group (TI): 22 Tapered MIS® Seven implants; Control group (CI): 25 cylindrical Astra® Osseospeed implants. All implants were inserted following the manufacturers' standard protocols. Implant primary stability was measured at the moment of implant placement by registering insertion torque values (ITv) and ISQ values by means of Osstell™ Mentor (ISQv) (Integration Diagnostic Ltd., Goteborg, Sweden). In the mandible, mean ISQv for tapered implants (TI) was 71.67±5.16 and for cylindrical implants (CI) 57.15±4.83 (p=0.01). Mean insertion torque was 46.67±6.85 Ncm for TI and 35.77±6.72 Ncm for CI (p=0.01). In the maxilla, mean ISQ was 67.2±4.42 for tapered implants and 49.17±15.30 for cylindrical implants (p=0.01). Mean insertion torque for TI was 41.5±6.26 Ncm and for CI 39.17±6.34 Ncm (p>0.05). For tapered implants, no correlation could be found between implant diameter and primary stability. But for cylindrical implants there was a statistically significant correlation between implant diameter and primary stability: ITv (p=0.03); ISQv (p=0.04). Within the limits of the present study, tapered shaped implants achieve higher primary stability measured through ISQ and insertion torque values. Moreover, for cylindrical implants positive correlation has been established between implant diameter and primary stability.

  10. Citizen Goals Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give to public institution Web designers a better understanding of the citizens’ objectives when accessing a Web page. Understanding citizen online goals is critical because it gets to the heart of what the public institution website should or could “do.” Approach: The challenge for e-marketers is that for most agencies/institutions, there are likely to be multiple goals that represent the “reason why” citizens could come to the website. For example, a national theatre website might be very effective for people who have already been there, they know effectively what place is the best, who are the actors, etc. Research limitations: The nature of a public institution activity almost dictates the different types of goals that consumers have when visiting the site. It is clear that a citizen has a different goal when accessing a theatre Web page or when he’s accessing a municipality Web page. This is the biggest impediment for drawing a good conceptual model for a public institution Web page. Practical implications: there are likely to be many other goals that could lead people to visit the site, like receiving customer service or leaving a remark. Value: Since citizen online goals represent the starting point for Web design efforts (for public institutions, this article has attempted to highlight the nature and types of goals that e-marketers might consider when planning what their website should do in order to create. Findings: The goal a site visitor has when arriving at a website tends to be very action oriented. If the visitor has never visited the site before, the goal may simply be to evaluate the website and figure out what the site is and if it will help him. On the other hand, if the visitor has reached the site as the result of a directed search or is a repeat visitor, the user goal is likely to be specific and functional. If important citizen goals are not supported by the website, the public

  11. Citizen Goals Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give to public institution Web designers a better understanding of the citizens’ objectives when accessing a Web page. Understanding citizen online goals is critical because it gets to the heart of what the public institution website should or could “do.”Approach: The challenge for e-marketers is that for most agencies/institutions, there are likely to be multiple goals that represent the “reason why” citizens could come to the website. For example, a national theatre website might be very effective for people who have already been there, they know effectively what place is the best, who are the actors, etc.Research limitations: The nature of a public institution activity almost dictates the different types of goals that consumers have when visiting the site. It is clear that a citizen has a different goal when accessing a theatre Web page or when he’s accessing a municipality Web page. This is the biggest impediment for drawing a good conceptual model for a public institution Web page.Practical implications: there are likely to be many other goals that could lead people to visit the site, like receiving customer service or leaving a remark.Value: Since citizen online goals represent the starting point for Web design efforts (for public institutions, this article has attempted to highlight the nature and types of goals that e-marketers might consider when planning what their website should do in order to create.Findings: The goal a site visitor has when arriving at a website tends to be very action oriented. If the visitor has never visited the site before, the goal may simply be to evaluate the website and figure out what the site is and if it will help him. On the other hand, if the visitor has reached the site as the result of a directed search or is a repeat visitor, the user goal is likely to be specific and functional. If important citizen goals are not supported by the website, the public

  12. Design and test of ASME strainer for primary cooling system in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong-Chul; Ryu, Jeong-Soo

    1999-01-01

    The ASME strainers have been newly installed at the suction side of each reactor coolant pump to get rid of the foreign materials which may damage the pump impeller or interfere with the coolant path of fuel flow tube or primary plate type heat exchanger. The strainer was designed in accordance with ASME SEC. III, DIV. 1, ND and the structural integrity was verified by seismic analysis. The screen was designed in accordance with the effective void area from the result of flow analysis for T-type strainer. After installation of the strainer, it was confirmed through the field test that the flow characteristics of primary cooling system were not adversely affected. The pressure loss coefficient was calculated by Darcy equation using the pressure difference through each strainer and the flow rate measured during the strainer performance test. And these are useful data to predict flow variations by the pressure difference. (author)

  13. The integration of occupational therapy into primary care: a multiple case study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background For over two decades occupational therapists have been encouraged to enhance their roles within primary care and focus on health promotion and prevention activities. While there is a clear fit between occupational therapy and primary care, there have been few practice examples, despite a growing body of evidence to support the role. In 2010, the province of Ontario, Canada provided funding to include occupational therapists as members of Family Health Teams, an interprofessional model of primary care. The integration of occupational therapists into this model of primary care is one of the first large scale initiatives of its kind in North America. The objective of the study was to examine how occupational therapy services are being integrated into primary care teams and understand the structures supporting the integration. Methods A multiple case study design was used to provide an in-depth description of the integration of occupational therapy. Four Family Health Teams with occupational therapists as part of the team were identified. Data collection included in-depth interviews, document analyses, and questionnaires. Results Each Family Health Team had a unique organizational structure that contributed to the integration of occupational therapy. Communication, trust and understanding of occupational therapy were key elements in the integration of occupational therapy into Family Health Teams, and were supported by a number of strategies including co-location, electronic medical records and team meetings. An understanding of occupational therapy was critical for integration into the team and physicians were less likely to understand the occupational therapy role than other health providers. Conclusion With an increased emphasis on interprofessional primary care, new professions will be integrated into primary healthcare teams. The study found that explicit strategies and structures are required to facilitate the integration of a new professional group

  14. Designing display primaries with currently available light sources for UHDTV wide-gamut system colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaoka, Kenichiro; Nishida, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Masayuki

    2014-08-11

    The wide-gamut system colorimetry has been standardized for ultra-high definition television (UHDTV). The chromaticities of the primaries are designed to lie on the spectral locus to cover major standard system colorimetries and real object colors. Although monochromatic light sources are required for a display to perfectly fulfill the system colorimetry, highly saturated emission colors using recent quantum dot technology may effectively achieve the wide gamut. This paper presents simulation results on the chromaticities of highly saturated non-monochromatic light sources and gamut coverage of real object colors to be considered in designing wide-gamut displays with color filters for the UHDTV.

  15. An Ethnographically Informed Participatory Design of Primary Healthcare Information Technology in a Developing Country Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidende, Nima Herman; Igira, Faraja Teddy; Mörtberg, Christina Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Ethnography, with its emphasis on understanding activities where they occur, and its use of qualitative data gathering techniques rich in description, has a long tradition in Participatory Design (PD). Yet there are limited methodological insights in its application in developing countries. This paper proposes an ethnographically informed PD approach, which can be applied when designing Primary Healthcare Information Technology (PHIT). We use findings from a larger multidisciplinary project, Health Information Systems Project (HISP) to elaborate how ethnography can be used to facilitate participation of health practitioners in developing countries settings as well as indicating the importance of ethnographic approach to participatory Health Information Technology (HIT) designers. Furthermore, the paper discusses the pros and cons of using an ethnographic approach in designing HIT.

  16. The impact of a primary care e-communication intervention on the participation of chronic disease patients who had not reached guideline suggested treatment goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Marie-Thérèse; Richard, Claude; Glaser, Emma; Roberge, Denis

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of two web-based educational approaches on doctor-patient communication. The study focused on chronic disease (CD) patients in a lengthy relationship with their family physician (FP) who had not reached guideline suggested treatment goals (off-target) for their CDs. 322 hypertensive, diabetic, or dyslipidemic patients of 18 FPs were randomised into three groups: Usual Care (UC), e-Learning (e-L) and e-Learning+Workshop (e-L+W). Interventions were based on Cegala's PACE system: Prepare, Ask questions, Check understanding, Express concerns. Communication was evaluated using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), MEDICODE and questionnaires. Encounter length was similar across groups. RIAS showed that e-L+W group engaged in more socio-emotional talk and PACE-like utterances. MEDICODE showed that interventions increased frequency, initiative and dialogue for selected CD medication themes. Quality of communication was perceived as satisfactory at baseline and did not change. Following interventions, CD patients were more activated even in well-established doctor-patient relationships. PACE web-based interventions are accessible and effective at increasing CD patients' participation. They increase legitimacy to express the patient experience. FPs should present this type of training to CD patients as an integral part of their routine practice and consider referring patients to complete it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High Behavioral Approach System (BAS) sensitivity, reward responsiveness, and goal-striving predict first onset of bipolar spectrum disorders: a prospective behavioral high-risk design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, Lauren B; Bender, Rachel E; Whitehouse, Wayne G; Wagner, Clara A; Liu, Richard T; Grant, David A; Jager-Hyman, Shari; Molz, Ashleigh; Choi, James Y; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Abramson, Lyn Y

    2012-05-01

    A prospective, behavioral high-risk design provided a theoretically guided examination of vulnerability to first onset of bipolar spectrum disorder based on the Behavioral Approach System (BAS) model. Adolescents (ages 14-19) at an "age of risk" for bipolar disorder onset were screened on BAS sensitivity by interviewers blind to current symptoms, lifetime history, and family history of psychopathology. Participants were selected with high versus moderate levels of BAS sensitivity and administered a lifetime diagnostic interview. Those with a bipolar spectrum disorder, psychosis, or hypomanic episode with onset prior to the BAS sensitivity assessment were excluded. High BAS (n = 171) and moderate BAS (n = 119) sensitivity participants in the final sample completed baseline measures of symptoms, goal-setting, and reward responsiveness and were followed prospectively with semistructured diagnostic interviews every 6 months. Consistent with the vulnerability hypothesis of the BAS model of bipolar disorder, high BAS participants had a greater likelihood, and shorter time to onset, of bipolar spectrum disorder than moderate BAS participants across an average of 12.8 months of follow-up (12.9% vs. 4.2%), controlling for baseline depressive and hypomanic symptoms, and family history of bipolar disorder. High reward responsiveness on a behavioral task and ambitious goal-striving for popular fame and financial success (but not impulsivity) also predicted first onset of bipolar spectrum disorder controlling for the covariates and BAS risk group, and ambitious goal-striving partially mediated the BAS risk group effect. We discuss implications of the findings for the BAS model of bipolar disorder and early intervention efforts.

  18. Model and system learners, optimal process constructors and kinetic theory-based goal-oriented design: A new paradigm in materials and processes informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abisset-Chavanne, Emmanuelle; Duval, Jean Louis; Cueto, Elias; Chinesta, Francisco

    2018-05-01

    Traditionally, Simulation-Based Engineering Sciences (SBES) has relied on the use of static data inputs (model parameters, initial or boundary conditions, … obtained from adequate experiments) to perform simulations. A new paradigm in the field of Applied Sciences and Engineering has emerged in the last decade. Dynamic Data-Driven Application Systems [9, 10, 11, 12, 22] allow the linkage of simulation tools with measurement devices for real-time control of simulations and applications, entailing the ability to dynamically incorporate additional data into an executing application, and in reverse, the ability of an application to dynamically steer the measurement process. It is in that context that traditional "digital-twins" are giving raise to a new generation of goal-oriented data-driven application systems, also known as "hybrid-twins", embracing models based on physics and models exclusively based on data adequately collected and assimilated for filling the gap between usual model predictions and measurements. Within this framework new methodologies based on model learners, machine learning and kinetic goal-oriented design are defining a new paradigm in materials, processes and systems engineering.

  19. 78 FR 47191 - Air Quality Designations for the 2010 Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Primary National Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... Air Quality Designations for the 2010 Sulfur Dioxide (SO[bdi2]) Primary National Ambient Air Quality... air quality designations for certain areas in the United States for the 2010 primary Sulfur Dioxide (SO 2 ) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). The EPA is issuing this rule to identify areas...

  20. Designing Excellence and Quality Model for Training Centers of Primary Health Care: A Delphi Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar-Sadegh; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Shahgoli, Javad; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Ahadi, Hamid-Reza; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2015-10-01

    Excellence and quality models are comprehensive methods for improving the quality of healthcare. The aim of this study was to design excellence and quality model for training centers of primary health care using Delphi method. In this study, Delphi method was used. First, comprehensive information were collected using literature review. In extracted references, 39 models were identified from 34 countries and related sub-criteria and standards were extracted from 34 models (from primary 39 models). Then primary pattern including 8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards was developed as a Delphi questionnaire and evaluated in four stages by 9 specialists of health care system in Tabriz and 50 specialists from all around the country. Designed primary model (8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards) were concluded with 8 criteria, 45 sub-criteria, and 192 standards after 4 stages of evaluations by specialists. Major criteria of the model are leadership, strategic and operational planning, resource management, information analysis, human resources management, process management, costumer results, and functional results, where the top score was assigned as 1000 by specialists. Functional results had the maximum score of 195 whereas planning had the minimum score of 60. Furthermore the most and the least sub-criteria was for leadership with 10 sub-criteria and strategic planning with 3 sub-criteria, respectively. The model that introduced in this research has been designed following 34 reference models of the world. This model could provide a proper frame for managers of health system in improving quality.

  1. Estimation on the Pressure Loss of the Conceptual Primary Cooling System and Design of the Primary Cooling Pump for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyoung Woo; Oh, Jae Min; Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek; Seo, Jae Kwang; Park, Cheon Tae; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Doo Jeong

    2009-01-01

    A new conceptual primary cooling system (PCS) for a research reactor has been designed for an adequate cooling to the reactor core which has various powers ranging from 30MW through 80MW. The developed primary cooling system consisted of decay tanks, pumps, heat exchangers, vacuum breakers, some isolation and check valves, connection piping, and instruments. Because the system flow rate should be determined by the thermal hydraulic design analysis for the core, the heads to design the primary cooling pumps (PCPs) in a PCS will be estimated by the variable system flow rates. The heads of the part of a research reactor vessel was evaluated by the previous study. The various pressure losses of the PCS can be calculated by the dimensional analysis of the pipe flow and the head loss coefficient of the components. The purpose of this research is to estimate the various pressure losses and to design the PCPs

  2. Incorporating the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence, into compensator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, P.J.; Hoban, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In this study we extended ideas developed by Faddegon and Pfalzner on the construction of patient specific compensating filters. Their research was essentially focused on formulating a general method for creating compensators using a 3D planning system. In their work Faddegon and Pfalzner utilized a simple attenuation model to convert transmission arrays into filter thickness arrays. The compensators constructed from these arrays produce the primary fluence required to give a uniform dose distribution at a specified depth. This technique does not account for local geometric variations hi compensator scattering conditions. Therefore we have devised a method to incorporate the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence passing through the compensating filter. A 2D Gaussian kernel, generated from Monte Carlo measurements, was used to model the spread of the primary fluence in the compensating filter. A 'maximum likelihood' optimisation algorithm was employed to deconvolve the kernel from the desired primary fluence to produce a more realistic incident fluence and compensator thickness array. The CMS FOCUS planning system was used to generate transmission maps corresponding to the desired influence of the compensating filter. Two compensating filters were constructed for each map, one using the standard attenuation method and the other with our method. For each method, an assessment was made using film dosimetry, on the degree of correlation between the desired primary fluence and the primary fluence produced by the compensating filter. Our results indicate that for compensating filters which are relatively uniform in thickness, there is good agreement between desired and delivered fluence maps for both methods. For non-uniform compensating filters the attenuation method deviates more notably from the desired fluence map. As expected, both methods also show significant deviations around the edges of the filter. It is anticipated that the work done here

  3. COMPARISON OF RESORT SIGN SYSTEM BASED ON EFFECTIVENESS IN VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN GOAL (Case Study: Kuta Beach Bali-Indonesia and Haeundae Beach Busan-Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listia Natadjaja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As we know there are many resorts in Indonesia especially in Bali. Each resort needs a sign system for information and safety. We need a field study from other countries to compare our sign system condition%2C so we can get some description of how to create an effective sign system and what we should do to make a better environment. This case study represents two famous beaches in two countries which are Kuta Beach in Bali–Indonesia and Haeundae Beach in Busan-Korea. Through a study of another sign system%2C hopefully we can create an effective sign system that meets the Visual Communication Design Goal. Each area has a unique character%2C so a sign system can be developed by looking at the environment and local culture to reach a global understanding. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Seperti yang kita ketahui ada begitu banyak tempat rekreasi di Indonesia utamanya di Bali. Tiap-tiap tempat rekreasi memerlukan sistem tanda untuk informasi dan keselamatan. Diperlukan suatu studi lapangan untuk membandingkan kondisi sistem tanda antar negara%2C sehingga didapatkan beberapa gambaran bagaimana menciptakan suatu sistem tanda yang efektif dan apa yang perlu dilakukan untuk membuat lingkungan yang lebih baik. Studi kasus yang diambil mewakili dua tempat rekreasi yaitu pantai yang terkenal di masing-masing negara yaitu pantai Kuta Bali-Indonesia dan pantai Haeundae di Busan-Korea. Dengan mempelajari sistem tanda yang berbeda%2C diharapkan dapat diciptakan suatu sistem tanda yang efektif untuk mencapai tujuan desain komunikasi visual. Tiap-tiap lokasi memiliki karakter yang unik%2C jadi sistem tanda dapat dikembangkan dengan melihat lingkungan dan budaya lokal untuk mencapai pengertian secara global. resort%2C sign system%2C effective%2C visual communication design goal.

  4. THE TECHNOLOGIES OF DESIGNING THE DISTANCE COURSE FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliia Katasonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays distance education became one of the main forms of studying and became popular in many countries of the world. The rash development of technologies, increasing of the education significance and global informatization makes distance learning one of the foreground directions of the modern education. Nowadays distance learning became an essential part of Primary school teachers professional preparation. There is an actual question of the creation and the implementation of distance courses to the preparation of the future primary school teachers, that will significantly increase the quality of studying. During the process of analyzing the literature, it was identified, that distance learning – is a pedagogical technology. That`s why, before beginning the designing of a distance course, you should remember the main components of a pedagogical technology. In the work «The components of the pedagogical technology», written by V. Bespalko, the foundation of the pedagogical techoogy is considered to be didactics. Modern scientists (V. Kremen, Ye. Rybalko, S. Sysoieva, A. Khutorskyi support the position of V.Bespalko and connect didactic principles with the organization of distance learning.The closest to our understanding appeared some theoretical positions of the work by V. Bikov, V. Kuharenko e.tc., that is called «The technologies of developing of the distance course:tutorial»,in which they offer five stages of designing of the online course: analysis, designing, development, implementation, valuation. During designing of a course, you also should remember about technical methods of realization of the distance education. V. Vishnivsky mentions, that a choice of the e-learning platform is a very important step. Modern platforms divide into two big categories: commercial and free. Try to determine basic steps of designing and creating of a distance course for the future Primary school teachers and use the result during the creation of the

  5. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kones R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Richard KonesThe Cardiometabolic Research Institute, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: A recent explosion in the amount of cardiovascular risk and incipient, undetected subclinical cardiovascular pathology has swept across the globe. Nearly 70% of adult Americans are overweight or obese; the prevalence of visceral obesity stands at 53% and continues to rise. At any one time, 55% of the population is on a weight-loss diet, and almost all fail. Fewer than 15% of adults or children exercise sufficiently, and over 60% engage in no vigorous activity. Among adults, 11%–13% have diabetes, 34% have hypertension, 36% have prehypertension, 36% have prediabetes, 12% have both prediabetes and prehypertension, and 15% of the population with either diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia are undiagnosed. About one-third of the adult population, and 80% of the obese, have fatty livers. With 34% of children overweight or obese, prevalence having doubled in just a few years, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and fatty livers in children are at their highest levels ever. Half of adults have at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Not even 1% of the population attains ideal cardiovascular health. Despite falling coronary death rates for decades, coronary heart disease (CHD death rates in US women 35 to 54 years of age may now be increasing because of the obesity epidemic. Up to 65% of patients do not have their conventional risk biomarkers under control. Only 30% of high risk patients with CHD achieve aggressive low density lipoprotein (LDL targets. Of those patients with multiple risk factors, fewer than 10% have all of them adequately controlled. Even when patients are titrated to evidence-based targets, about 70% of cardiac events remain unaddressed. Undertreatment is also common. About two-thirds of high risk primary care patients are not taking needed medications for dyslipidemia. Poor patient adherence, typically below 50%, adds further difficulty

  6. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A recent explosion in the amount of cardiovascular risk and incipient, undetected subclinical cardiovascular pathology has swept across the globe. Nearly 70% of adult Americans are overweight or obese; the prevalence of visceral obesity stands at 53% and continues to rise. At any one time, 55% of the population is on a weight-loss diet, and almost all fail. Fewer than 15% of adults or children exercise sufficiently, and over 60% engage in no vigorous activity. Among adults, 11%-13% have diabetes, 34% have hypertension, 36% have prehypertension, 36% have prediabetes, 12% have both prediabetes and prehypertension, and 15% of the population with either diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia are undiagnosed. About one-third of the adult population, and 80% of the obese, have fatty livers. With 34% of children overweight or obese, prevalence having doubled in just a few years, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and fatty livers in children are at their highest levels ever. Half of adults have at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Not even 1% of the population attains ideal cardiovascular health. Despite falling coronary death rates for decades, coronary heart disease (CHD) death rates in US women 35 to 54 years of age may now be increasing because of the obesity epidemic. Up to 65% of patients do not have their conventional risk biomarkers under control. Only 30% of high risk patients with CHD achieve aggressive low density lipoprotein (LDL) targets. Of those patients with multiple risk factors, fewer than 10% have all of them adequately controlled. Even when patients are titrated to evidence-based targets, about 70% of cardiac events remain unaddressed. Undertreatment is also common. About two-thirds of high risk primary care patients are not taking needed medications for dyslipidemia. Poor patient adherence, typically below 50%, adds further difficulty. Hence, after all such fractional reductions are multiplied, only a modest portion of total

  7. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A recent explosion in the amount of cardiovascular risk and incipient, undetected subclinical cardiovascular pathology has swept across the globe. Nearly 70% of adult Americans are overweight or obese; the prevalence of visceral obesity stands at 53% and continues to rise. At any one time, 55% of the population is on a weight-loss diet, and almost all fail. Fewer than 15% of adults or children exercise sufficiently, and over 60% engage in no vigorous activity. Among adults, 11%–13% have diabetes, 34% have hypertension, 36% have prehypertension, 36% have prediabetes, 12% have both prediabetes and prehypertension, and 15% of the population with either diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia are undiagnosed. About one-third of the adult population, and 80% of the obese, have fatty livers. With 34% of children overweight or obese, prevalence having doubled in just a few years, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and fatty livers in children are at their highest levels ever. Half of adults have at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Not even 1% of the population attains ideal cardiovascular health. Despite falling coronary death rates for decades, coronary heart disease (CHD) death rates in US women 35 to 54 years of age may now be increasing because of the obesity epidemic. Up to 65% of patients do not have their conventional risk biomarkers under control. Only 30% of high risk patients with CHD achieve aggressive low density lipoprotein (LDL) targets. Of those patients with multiple risk factors, fewer than 10% have all of them adequately controlled. Even when patients are titrated to evidence-based targets, about 70% of cardiac events remain unaddressed. Undertreatment is also common. About two-thirds of high risk primary care patients are not taking needed medications for dyslipidemia. Poor patient adherence, typically below 50%, adds further difficulty. Hence, after all such fractional reductions are multiplied, only a modest portion of total

  8. Design and Selection of Innovative Primary Circulation Pumps for GEN-IV Lead Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Borreani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR is not a new concept, it continues to be an example of innovation in the nuclear field. Recently, there has been strong interest in liquid lead (Pb or liquid lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE both critical and subcritical systems in a relevant number of Countries, including studies performed in the frame of GENERATION-IV initiative. In this paper, the theoretical and computational findings for three different designs of Primary Circulation Pump (PCP evolving liquid lead (namely the jet pump, the Archimedean pump and the blade pump are presented with reference to the ALFRED (Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator design. The pumps are first analyzed from the theoretical point of view and then modeled with a 3D CFD code. Required design performance of the pumps are approximatively around an effective head of 2 bar with a mass flow rate of 5000 kg/s. Taking into account the geometrical constraints of the reactor and the fluid dynamics characteristics of the molten lead, the maximum design velocity for molten lead fluid flow of 2 m/s may be exceeded giving rise to unacceptable erosion phenomena of the blade or rotating component of the primary pumping system. For this reason a deep investigation of non-conventional axial pumps has been performed. The results presented shows that the design of the jet pump looks like beyond the current technological feasibility while, once the mechanical challenges of the Archimedean (screw pump and the fluid-dynamic issues of the blade pump will be addressed, both could represent viable solutions as PCP for ALFRED. Particularly, the blade pump shows the best performance in terms of pressure head generated in normal operation conditions as well as pressure drop in locked rotor conditions. Further optimizations (mainly for what the geometrical configuration is concerned are still necessary.

  9. In-service English language training for Italian Primary School Teachers An experience in syllabus design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dawes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report on an in-service English Language Teacher Training Programme devised for the Government project to equip Italian primary school teachers  with the skills to teach English. The paper focuses on the first phase of the project which envisaged research into the best training models and the preparation of appropriate  English Language syllabuses. In  the first three sections of the paper we report on the experience of designing the language syllabus. In the last section we suggest ways of using the syllabus as a tool for self reflective professional development.

  10. Optical design and performance analysis of a 25 m class telescope with a segmented spherical primary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owner-Petersen, Mette

    1996-01-01

    The basic design and an analysis of the performance possibilities of a 25 m class optical telescope are presented here. The configuration consists of a 28 m segmented spherical primary M1 followed by three highly aspherical corrective mirrors M2, M3 and M4 which also deviate from cartesian shape...... sag and windbuffeting. Several types of aspherical figuring of M2, M3 and M4 all resulting in a field performance better than characterized by a RMS spotradius smaller than 0.1 arcseconds within a full FOV of 21 arcminutes are presented....

  11. Designing a water calorimeter as primary standard of gamma rays at IPEN/CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra, Felipe B. de; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to describe the present stage and the next steps of the development of a water calorimeter of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN/CNEN. This calorimeter will be used as a primary standard of gamma ray sources at the laboratory. Between the design and the construction step it will be shown how this model was chosen and how it is modeled virtually with computer simulation. The two main codes used, MCNP and Fluent, to characterize the prototype before its construction are presented. (author)

  12. Trabeculoperforation? Trabeculoretraction? Trabeculoplasty? Review of the various designations used for laser treatment in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, F; Haut, J; Abboud, E

    1985-01-01

    A historical recall and an attempt to simplify the numerous terms used to designate laser treatments for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) are presented. There are two main types of laser treatment for POAG involving two entirely different procedures. The first one, contemporary with the beginning of laser photocoagulation, imitates the action of the scalpel, namely goniotomy ab interno or trabeculotomy ab externo. The goal of this early procedure was to produce a through and through trabecular hole but instead of the cutting edge of the knife, it uses the explosive effect of the laser. This procedure has been given numerous names. Among the most frequent ones, we find: 'laser trabeculopuncture', 'laseropuncture', 'goniopuncture', 'laser trabeculectomy', 'laser trabeculotomy', 'laser trabeculopexy'. We prefer to gather them under an explicit generic term: 'laser trabeculoperforation'. The results of this procedure have been very disappointing until now, particularly with conventional lasers, e.g. continuous-wave argon laser, owing to the predominance of their thermal effect over their explosive effect and also to the great scarring property of the trabecular meshwork. In the second type of glaucoma laser treatment, instead of trying to make a patent hole in the trabecular meshwork, the surgeon seeks to reshape the inner trabecular surface by means of argon laser microscars in order to produce a reversal of the trabecular collapse, which is now considered to be one of the major etiologies of POAG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. [Design of an educational tool for Primary Care patients with chronic non-specific low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cerrillo, Juan Luis; Rondón-Ramos, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Current scientific evidence on the management of chronic non-specific low back pain highlights the benefits of physical exercise. This goal is frequently undermined due to lack of education of the subjects on the multifactorial, benign, and non-specific nature of low back pain, which can lead to a chronic disease with genuine psychosocial risk factors. Its influence may not only interfere with individual decision to adopt more adaptive coping behaviors, but also with the endogenous mechanisms of pain neuromodulation. Thus, the educational strategies and control of these factors have become important objectives to be incorporated into the management of the disorder and research guidelines. This paper presents the theoretical models and the scientific basis on which it has based the design of an educational tool for patients with chronic non-specific low back pain treated in Primary Care physiotherapy. Structure, content and objectives are also presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Shield design of concrete wall between decay tank room and primary pump room in TRIGA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. J. H.; Rahman, M.; Haque, A.; Zulquarnain, A.; Ahmed, F. U.; Bhuiyan, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to recommend the radiation protection design parameters from the shielding point of view for concrete wall between the decay tank room and the primary pump room in TRIGA Mark-II research reactor facility. The shield design for this concrete wall has been performed with the help of Point-kernel Shielding Code Micro-Shield 5.05 and this design was also validated based on the measured dose rate values with Radiation Survey Meter (G-M Counter) considering the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendations for occupational dose rate limit (10 μSv/hr). The recommended shield design parameters are: (i) thickness of 114.3 cm Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 129.54 cm Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for concrete wall A (ii) thickness of 66.04 cm Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 78.74 cm Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for concrete wall B and (iii) door thickness of 3.175 cm Mild Steel (MS) on the entrance of decay tank room. In shielding efficiency analysis, the use of I-M concrete in the design of this concrete wall shows that it reduced the dose rate by a factor of at least 3.52 times approximately compared to ordinary reinforced concrete

  15. User-centered design to improve clinical decision support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Julian; Chuang, Emmeline; Goldzweig, Caroline; Cain, Cindy L; Sugar, Catherine; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2017-08-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated the ability of user-centered design to make clinical decision support systems more effective and easier to use. However, studies of user-centered design have rarely examined more than a handful of sites at a time, and have frequently neglected the implementation climate and organizational resources that influence clinical decision support. The inclusion of such factors was identified by a systematic review as "the most important improvement that can be made in health IT evaluations." (1) Identify the prevalence of four user-centered design practices at United States Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinics and assess the perceived utility of clinical decision support at those clinics; (2) Evaluate the association between those user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support. We analyzed clinic-level survey data collected in 2006-2007 from 170 VA primary care clinics. We examined four user-centered design practices: 1) pilot testing, 2) provider satisfaction assessment, 3) formal usability assessment, and 4) analysis of impact on performance improvement. We used a regression model to evaluate the association between user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support, while accounting for other important factors at those clinics, including implementation climate, available resources, and structural characteristics. We also examined associations separately at community-based clinics and at hospital-based clinics. User-centered design practices for clinical decision support varied across clinics: 74% conducted pilot testing, 62% conducted provider satisfaction assessment, 36% conducted a formal usability assessment, and 79% conducted an analysis of impact on performance improvement. Overall perceived utility of clinical decision support was high, with a mean rating of 4.17 (±.67) out of 5 on a composite measure. "Analysis of impact on performance

  16. Designing Geometry 2.0 learning environments: a preliminary study with primary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglar Prieto, Nuria; María Sordo Juanena, José; Star, Jon R.

    2014-04-01

    The information and communication technologies of Web 2.0 are arriving in our schools, allowing the design and implementation of new learning environments with great educational potential. This article proposes a pedagogical model based on a new geometry technology-integrated learning environment, called Geometry 2.0, which was tested with 39 sixth grade students from a public school in Madrid (Spain). The main goals of the study presented here were to describe an optimal role for the mathematics teacher within Geometry 2.0, and to analyse how dynamic mathematics and communication might affect young students' learning of basic figural concepts in a real setting. The analyses offered in this article illustrate how our Geometry 2.0 model facilitates deeply mathematical tasks which encourage students' exploration, cooperation and communication, improving their learning while fostering geometrical meanings.

  17. Anthropometric evaluation and recommendation for primary schools classroom furniture design in Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lim Shaiu; Jing, Ewe Hui; Effendi, M. S. M.; Rosli, Muhamad Farizuan

    2017-09-01

    This study was carried out with the objective to obtain the anthropometric data of primary school children from Year 1 to Year 6 and evaluate the children's anthropometry with the current dimensions of classroom furniture (i.e. chair and table). In addition, this study also proposed the design dimensions for the improvement in classroom furniture design with the consideration of children's anthropometric data. A total of 390 children selected from 13 primary schools in Perlis, Malaysia were participated in this study. There were 11 anthropometric measurements of children have been measured in this study, which include stature (St), popliteal height (PH), knee height (KH), thigh thickness (TT), buttock popliteal length (BPL), hip breadth (HB), sitting shoulder height (SSH), sitting elbow height (SEH), forearm-hand length (FHL), height of lumbar point (HLP) and buttock clearance (BC). Besides that, 7 dimensions relating to current classroom chair have been measured, such as seat height (SH), seat depth (SD), seat width (SW), upper edge of backrest (UEB), lower edge of backrest (LEB), S point (SP), overall chair height (OCH). Another 5 dimensions of the existing classroom table have been measured too, which involve table height (TH), table depth (TD), table width (TW), under table height (UH) and seat to table clearance (STC). All the measurements were performed by using metal measuring tape. The anthropometric data of the children were analyzed with the help of Microsoft Excel 2013. Several equations with associated with the anthropometric data and furniture dimensions have been applied in this research. The new design dimensions for classroom furniture that proposed in this paper which based on the collected anthropometric data can be referred as a guideline for classroom furniture design. The implementation of these data may help to create comfortability, safety, suitability and improve performance of children in the classroom.

  18. Design and implementation of pay-for-quality in primary healthcare: A case study from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The common methods of payment to healthcare providers such as capitation and salary are not designed to be stimulation for high quality healthcare. The pay-for -quality (P4Q programs are designed to provide the financial incentives to the service providers in order to improve quality of services based on specified criteria. Aims This study describes the design and implementation of a P4Q program in the primary healthcare (PHc in East Azerbaijan Province, Iran. Methods The present study is a case study that describes the process of designing and implementing the P4Q program in PHC in East-Azerbaijan province in 2015. To design the P4Q program, after identifying core components of the program through literature review and Focus Group Discussion (FGD, final decision about each component was made by achieving consensus from a panel of recognised experts in the area of PHc. Altogether two FGD and seven expert panel sessions were hold in EAPHC in order to design the P4Q program. Results Key components of P4Q program were selected by qualitative studies and the results were categorized in five headings including P4Q formula, quality measures, payment strategy, data reporting and performance evaluation. The formula consists of five elements including fixed payment, individual, team and organization performance and managerial appraisal. A total of 37 measures, which covers the domains of quality of PHc, human resource development and responsibility were selected. ‘Improvement’ and ‘absolute level of measures’ were selected as the payment strategy. The methods of data reporting included valid questionnaire, organization’s documents and medical records. The final P4Q program was used for paying incentives to all primary health care providers in public health centres affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Conclusion Designing and implementing the P4Q program led to a shift in paying the incentives to healthcare providers

  19. Design Study for the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) Composite Primary Bulkhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressman, Thomas O.; Paddock, David A.

    2017-01-01

    A design study was undertaken of a carbon fiber primary bulkhead for a large solar electric propulsion (SEP) spacecraft. The bulkhead design, supporting up to 16 t of xenon propellant, progressed from one consisting of many simple parts with many complex joints, to one consisting of a few complex parts with a few simple joints. The unique capabilities of composites led to a topology that transitioned loads from bending to in-plane tension and shear, with low part count. This significantly improved bulkhead manufacturability, cost, and mass. The stiffness-driven structure utilized high-modulus M55J fiber unidirectional prepregs. A full-scale engineering demonstration unit (EDU) of the concept was used to demonstrate manufacturability of the concept. Actual labor data was obtained, which could be extrapolated to a full bulkhead. The effort demonstrated the practicality of using high-modulus fiber (HMF) composites for unique shape topologies that minimize mass and cost. The lessons are applicable to primary and secondary aerospace structures that are stiffness driven.

  20. First results of the wind evaluation breadboard for ELT primary mirror design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes García-Talavera, Marcos; Viera, Teodora; Núñez, Miguel

    2010-07-01

    The Wind Evaluation Breadboard (WEB) is a primary mirror and telescope simulator formed by seven aluminium segments, including position sensors, electromechanical support systems and support structures. WEB has been developed to evaluate technologies for primary mirror wavefront control and to evaluate the performance of the control of wind buffeting disturbance on ELT segmented mirrors. For this purpose WEB electro-mechanical set-up simulates the real operational constrains applied to large segmented mirrors. This paper describes the WEB assembly, integration and verification, the instrument characterisation and close loop control design, including the dynamical characterization of the instrument and the control architecture. The performance of the new technologies developed for position sensing, acting and controlling is evaluated. The integration of the instrument in the observatory and the results of the first experiments are summarised, with different wind conditions, elevation and azimuth angles of incidence. Conclusions are extracted with respect the wind rejection performance and the control strategy for an ELT. WEB has been designed and developed by IAC, ESO, ALTRAN and JUPASA, with the integration of subsystems of FOGALE and TNO.

  1. Designing Math Trails for Enhanced by Mobile Learning Realistic Mathematics Education in Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Fesakis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Seeking a systematic combination of the pedagogical model of m-learning with the Realistic Mathematics Education (RME approach, this study concerns the use of math trail as a learning activity model that can take the advantages of mobile computing devices for the design of effective learning experiences in an authentic context. The paper presents the design and the case study of the first pilot implementation of a math trail, using mobile devices for primary school students. In this math trail, the students are guided, through a digital map, to a sequence of preselected sites of a park where they solve specially designed math problems using data from the environmental context. The students measure real objects’ dimensions either with conventional instruments or by measurement applications of their tablet. According to the findings of the study, students solved the puzzles by applying mathematical knowledge, discussion and collaboration. The students applied and reinforced their knowledge through an effective and engaging learning activity. Moreover, the students were puzzled about the differences of the measurements by conventional and digital instruments and this confusion triggered social negotiation. Further research is needed for a grounded theory development about m-learning design for RME.

  2. Children's Health and Indoor Air Quality in Primary Schools and Homes in Portugal-Study Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Ramos, Elisabete; Barros, Henrique; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; Fernandes, Eduardo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the research project "On the Contribution of Schools to Children's Overall Indoor Air Exposure" is to study associations between adverse health effects, namely, allergy, asthma, and respiratory symptoms, and indoor air pollutants to which children are exposed to in primary schools and homes. Specifically, this investigation reports on the design of the study and methods used for data collection within the research project and discusses factors that need to be considered when designing such a study. Further, preliminary findings concerning descriptors of selected characteristics in schools and homes, the study population, and clinical examination are presented. The research project was designed in two phases. In the first phase, 20 public primary schools were selected and a detailed inspection and indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements including volatile organic compounds (VOC), aldehydes, particulate matter (PM2.5, PM10), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), bacteria, fungi, temperature, and relative humidity were conducted. A questionnaire survey of 1600 children of ages 8-9 years was undertaken and a lung function test, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), and tear film stability testing were performed. The questionnaire focused on children's health and on the environment in their school and homes. One thousand and ninety-nine questionnaires were returned. In the second phase, a subsample of 68 children was enrolled for further studies, including a walk-through inspection and checklist and an extensive set of IAQ measurements in their homes. The acquired data are relevant to assess children's environmental exposures and health status.

  3. Partnership effectiveness in primary community care networks: A national empirical analysis of partners' coordination infrastructure designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Yung-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical and managerial studies have ignored the effectiveness of integrated health networks. It has been argued that the varying definitions and strategic imperatives of integrated organizations may have complicated the assessment of the outcomes/performance of varying models, particularly when their market structures and contexts differed. This study aimed to empirically verify a theoretical perspective on the coordination infrastructure designs and the effectiveness of the primary community care networks (PCCNs) formed and funded by the Bureau of National Health Insurance since March 2003. The PCCNs present a model to replace the traditional fragmented providers in Taiwan's health care. The study used a cross-sectional mailed survey designed to ascertain partnership coordination infrastructure and integration of governance, clinical care, bonding, finances, and information. The outcome indicators were PCCNs' perceived performance and willingness to remain within the network. Structural equation modeling examined the causal relationships, controlling for organizational and environmental factors. Primary data collection occurred from February through December 2005, via structured questionnaires sent to 172 PCCNs. Using the individual PCCN as the unit of analysis, the results found that a network's efforts regarding coordination infrastructures were positively related to the PCCN's perceived performance and willingness to remain within the network. In addition, PCCNs practicing in rural areas and in areas with higher density of medical resources had better perceived effectiveness and willingness to cooperate in the network.Practical Implication: The lack of both an operational definition and an information about system-wide integration may have obstructed understanding of integrated health networks' organizational dynamics. This study empirically examined individual PCCNs and offers new insights on how to improve networks' organizational design and

  4. Conceptual design and related R and D on ITER mechanical based primary pumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Hiroki, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Katsusuke; Inoue, Masahiko; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Iguchi, Masashi; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Inohara, Takashi; Nakamura, Jun-ichi

    2008-12-01

    The primary vacuum pumping system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) exhausts a helium (He) ash resulting from the DT-burn with excess DT fueling gas, as well as performing a variety of functions such as pump-down, leak testing and wall conditioning. A mechanical based vacuum pumping system has some merits of a continuous pumping, a much lower tritium inventory, a lower operational cost and easy maintenance, comparing with a cryopump system, although demerits of an indispensable magnetic shield and insufficient performance for hydrogen (H 2 ) pumping is are well recognized. To overcome the demerits, we newly fabricated and tested a helical grooved pump (HGP) unit suitable for H 2 pumping at the ITER divertor pressure of 0.1-10 Pa. Through this R and D, we successfully established many design and manufacturing databases of large HGP units for the lightweight gas pumping. Based on the databases, we conceptually designed the ITER vacuum pumping system mainly comprising the HGP with an optimal pump unit layout and a magnetic shield. We also designed conceptually the reduced cost (RC)-ITER pumping system, where a compound molecular pump combining turbine bladed rotors and helical grooved ones was mainly used. The ITER mechanical based primary pumping system proposed has eventually been a back-up solution, whereas a cryopump based one was formally selected to the ITER for construction. The mechanical pumps are increasingly used in many areas with well sophisticated performance, so we believe that fusion reactors of subsequent prototype ones will select the mechanical based pumping system due to primarily a high operational reliability and a cost melt. (author)

  5. Proposed goals for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.P.; Hoos, I.R.; McGrath, P.E.; Metlay, D.S.; Stoneman, W.C.

    1978-05-01

    A special, seven member, interdisciplinary task group of consultants was established in January 1976 to propose goals for the national waste management program. This is the report of that group. The proposed goals are intended as a basis for the NRC to establish a policy by which to guide and coordinate the activities of government, business, and academic organizations whose responsibility it will be to manage radioactive wastes. The report is based on findings, interpretations and analysis by the authors who examined selected primary literature and interviewed many individuals concerned with waste management. The authors extended the scope of their inquiry and proposed goals to cover 'all technical and societal aspects necessary to an operating waste management system, rather than dealing with the regulatory process alone.' The waste management goals as developed are simple statements of principles which appear to the authors to be important conditions to insure the proper establishment and operation of a system to manage radioactive wastes.' In brief, the goals are designed to protect people and things of value in an equitable manner

  6. [Design and validation of a questionnaire for psychosocial nursing diagnosis in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Cristobalina; Sierra-López, Antonio; Rodríguez-Gómez, José Ángel; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando

    2012-01-01

    To develop a valid, reliable and easy-to-use questionnaire for a psychosocial nursing diagnosis. The study was performed in two phases: first phase, questionnaire design and construction; second phase, validity and reliability tests. A bank of items was constructed using the NANDA classification as a theoretical framework. Each item was assigned a Likert scale or dichotomous response. The combination of responses to the items constituted the diagnostic rules to assign up to 28 labels. A group of experts carried out the validity test for content. Other validated scales were used as reference standards for the criterion validity tests. Forty-five nurses provided the questionnaire to the patients on three separate occasions over a period of three weeks, and the other validated scales only once to 188 randomly selected patients in Primary Care centres in Tenerife (Spain). Validity tests for construct confirmed the six dimensions of the questionnaire with 91% of total variance explained. Validity tests for criterion showed a specificity of 66%-100%, and showed high correlations with the reference scales when the questionnaire was assigning nursing diagnoses. Reliability tests showed agreement of 56%-91% (PQuestionnaire for Psychosocial Nursing Diagnosis was called CdePS, and included 61 items. The CdePS is a valid, reliable and easy-to-use tool in Primary Care centres to improve the assigning of a psychosocial nursing diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. A Dynamic Design Space for Primary Drying During Batch Freeze-Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Van Bockstal, Pieter Jan; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceutical products are emerging within the pharmaceutical industry. However, biopharmaceuticals are often unstable in aqueous solution. Freeze-drying (lyophilisation) is the preferred method to achieve a stable product with an increased shelf-life. During batch freeze-drying, there are only...... two adaptable process variables, i.e. the shelf temperature and the pressure in the drying chamber. The value of both should be optimized, preferably in a dynamic way, to minimise the primary drying time while respecting process and equipment constraints and ensuring end product quality. A mechanistic...... model is used to determine the optimal values for the adaptable variables, hereby accounting for the uncertainty in all involved model parameters. A dynamic Design Space was constructed with a risk of failure acceptance level of 0.01%, i.e. a 'zero-failure' situation. Even for a risk of failure of 0...

  8. Geographical and organisational variation in the structure of primary care services: implications for study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Geoffrey; Gulliford, Martin; Ukoumunne, Obioha; Chinn, Susan; Campbell, Michael

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the extent to which structural variation between English general practices is accounted for at higher organisational levels in the National Health Service (NHS). We analysed data for 11 structural characteristics of all general practices in England. These included characteristics of general practitioners (GPs), the practice list and the services provided by practices. A four-level random effects model was used for analysis and components of variance were estimated at the levels of practice, primary care group (PCG), health authority and region. The proportion of single-handed practices ranged from 0% to 74% at PCG level and from 14% to 43% in different regions. The proportion of practices providing diabetes services ranged from 0% to 100% at PCG level and from 71% to 96% in different regions. The list size per GP ranged from 1314 to 2704 patients per GP at PCG level and from 1721 to 2225 at regional level. Across the 11 variables analysed, components of variance at general practice level accounted for between 43% and 95% of the total variance. The PCG level accounted for between 1% and 29%, the health authority level for between 2% and 15% and the regional level for between 0% and 13% of the total variance. Adjusting for an index of deprivation and the supply of GPs gave a median 8% decrease in the sum of variance components. Geographical and organisational variation in the structure of primary care services should be considered in designing studies in health systems such as the English NHS. Stratified designs may be used to increase study efficiency, but variation between areas may sometimes compromise generalisability.

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, This dataset contains imagery of Prince George's County in RGB format. The primary goal was to acquire Countywide Digital Orthoimagery at 6" ground pixel resolution., Published in 2009, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Non-Profit | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2009. This dataset contains imagery of Prince George's County in RGB format. The primary goal...

  10. The design of trachea-main bronchial covered embranchment stent and the primary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xinwei; Wu Gang; Gao Xuemei; Li Yongdong; Wang Yanli; Ma Nan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To design the trachea-main bronchus covered embranchment stent and study the primary treatment for thoracostomach main bronchial fistula and main bronchial stenosis. Methods: The stent was designed on the bases of the peculiar anatomic structure and the pathological changes of thoracostomach-main bronchial fistula and main bronchial stenosis. Under the fluoroscopic guidance, implantations were carried out in thoracostomach-carina fistula 1 case thoracostomach-left main bronchial fistula 1, thoracostomach-right main bronchial fistula and left main bronchial stenosis 1 case, altogether with 5 stents. Results: Stents were placed successfully, not only improving the breathing and living quality but also completing the closure of the ora of the thoracostomach-airway fistula with further vanishing of the choke after drinking and eating together with the inhalation pneumonia. The bronchus became normal in a main bronchial stenosis after the stent was taken out. Conclusions: Trachea-main bronchial covered embranchment stent could be used to close thoracostomach-airway fistula and to treat main bronchial benign/malignant stenosis. The procedure is simple and safe. (authors)

  11. Designing a Primary Science Curriculum in a Globalizing World: How Do Social Constructivism and Vietnamese Culture Meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    H?ng, Ngô Vu Thu; Meijer, Marijn Roland; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Pilot, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of social constructivist approaches to learning science in primary education in Vietnamese culture as an example of Confucian heritage culture remains challenging and problematic. This theoretical paper focuses on the initial phase of a design-based research approach; that is, the description of the design of a formal, written…

  12. Seismic analysis - what goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagart, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    The seismic analysis of nuclear components is characterized today by extensive engineering computer calculations in order to satisfy both the component standard codes such as ASME III as well as federal regulations and guides. The current nuclear siesmic design procedure has envolved in a fragmented fashion and continues to change its elements as improved technology leads to changing standards and guides. The dominant trend is a monotonic increase in the overall conservation with time causing a similar trend in costs of nuclear power plants. Ironically the improvements in the state of art are feeding a process which is eroding the very incentives that attracted us to nuclear power in the first place. This paper examines the cause of this process and suggests that what is needed is a realistic goal which appropriately addresses the overall uncertainty of the seismic design process. (Auth.)

  13. MindSurf: a pilot study to assess the usability and acceptability of a smartphone app designed to promote contentment, wellbeing, and goal achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Timothy A; Haviland, Jennifer; Tai, Sara J; Vanags, Thea; Mansell, Warren

    2016-12-12

    The Method of Levels (MOL) is a transdiagnostic cognitive therapy that promotes contentment, wellbeing, and goal achievement through the resolution of internal conflicts underlying psychological distress. MOL, based on Perceptual Control Theory (PCT), was developed in routine clinical practice and has been used effectively across different health services by different practitioners. Access to MOL-style questions through a smartphone app could, potentially, help both the general public maintain robust mental health, and also be a useful adjunct to therapy for clinical populations. The app is called MindSurf because of its focus on helping people explore their thinking. Prior to developing the app and using it with different populations it was necessary to determine whether such an idea would be usable for and acceptable to potential app users. Therefore, a pilot study was conducted with a non-clinical sample to assess the usability and acceptability of the app including monitoring whether the questions delivered in this way were associated with any adverse events. A pilot study using quantitative as well as qualitative methods and incorporating a repeated measures, A-B design was conducted. The 23 participants were healthy adult volunteers who were all either undergraduate students, postgraduate students, or staff of the University of Manchester. They received MOL-style questions on their mobile phones over a 1-week period. Qualitative results were encouraging and indicated that the format and style of questioning were acceptable to participants and did not lead to increased worry or concern. A one-way, repeated measures ANOVA indicated that there was a nonsignificant decrease in scores on the 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS21) over a 2 week period. The results of the pilot study justified development of MindSurf and further testing once it is available for use. A power analysis indicated that the pilot study was underpowered to detect

  14. Conceptual Design on Primary Control Rod Drive Mechanism of a Prototype Gen-IV SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Han; Koo, Gyeong Hoi

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the key concept of the drive mechanism, and suggests a required motor power and reducer gears to meet the functional design requirements, and a seismic response analysis of CRDM housing is performed to check its structural integrity. An AC servo motor is selected as a CRA driving power because it uses permanent magnets and is brushless type while DC motor needs a brush and a coil rotates. The control shim motor size is constrained by a housing diameter of 250mm. The driving system has several design requirements. To calculate the motor power, the drive shaft torque is needed. One part of the drive shaft has a lead screw, driving by a ball-nut. The ball screw driver torque (Tr) is calculated by some equations as follow; A servo motor with a nominal power of 100W, a nominal torque of 0.32 N-m (max. 0.48N-m) is selected considering a safety margin. Its diameter is about 50mm. The fast drive-in motor needs a strong power to insert enforcedly the stuck CRA into core within a required time. The motor sizes are calculated by the same procedure. The diameters are in the range of 80mm to 110mm by the insertion time (10 ∼ 24 seconds). The prototype Gen-IV SFR (sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) is of 150MWe capacity. The reactor has six primary control rod assemblies(CRAs). The primary control rod is used for power control, burn-up compensation and reactor shutdown in response to demands from the plant control or protection systems. The control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) consists of the drive motor assembly, the driveline, and its housing. The driveline consists of three concentric members of a drive shaft, a tension tube, and a position indicator rod, and it connects the drive motor assembly to the CRA. Main issue is that these many driving parts shall be enclosed within a limited housing diameter because the available pitch of CRDMs is limited by 300mm

  15. Conceptual Design on Primary Control Rod Drive Mechanism of a Prototype Gen-IV SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Koo, Gyeong Hoi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper describes the key concept of the drive mechanism, and suggests a required motor power and reducer gears to meet the functional design requirements, and a seismic response analysis of CRDM housing is performed to check its structural integrity. An AC servo motor is selected as a CRA driving power because it uses permanent magnets and is brushless type while DC motor needs a brush and a coil rotates. The control shim motor size is constrained by a housing diameter of 250mm. The driving system has several design requirements. To calculate the motor power, the drive shaft torque is needed. One part of the drive shaft has a lead screw, driving by a ball-nut. The ball screw driver torque (Tr) is calculated by some equations as follow; A servo motor with a nominal power of 100W, a nominal torque of 0.32 N-m (max. 0.48N-m) is selected considering a safety margin. Its diameter is about 50mm. The fast drive-in motor needs a strong power to insert enforcedly the stuck CRA into core within a required time. The motor sizes are calculated by the same procedure. The diameters are in the range of 80mm to 110mm by the insertion time (10 ∼ 24 seconds). The prototype Gen-IV SFR (sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) is of 150MWe capacity. The reactor has six primary control rod assemblies(CRAs). The primary control rod is used for power control, burn-up compensation and reactor shutdown in response to demands from the plant control or protection systems. The control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) consists of the drive motor assembly, the driveline, and its housing. The driveline consists of three concentric members of a drive shaft, a tension tube, and a position indicator rod, and it connects the drive motor assembly to the CRA. Main issue is that these many driving parts shall be enclosed within a limited housing diameter because the available pitch of CRDMs is limited by 300mm.

  16. The design and rationale of the primary angioplasty registry of Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabir A

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: The primary angioplasty registry of Kerala would help analyze the quality and outcomes of primary PCI services in Kerala, thereby yielding insights that can help limit unacceptable procedural variations in the performance of primary PCI. Identifying deviations from guideline based therapies can form the basis of quality improvement programs, which in turn will enable hospitals to achieve better patient outcomes.

  17. The development of a mobile monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity of people with a chronic disease in primary care: a user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weegen, Sanne; Verwey, Renée; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Tange, Huibert; van der Weijden, Trudy; de Witte, Luc

    2013-07-02

    Physical activity is an important aspect in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type-2 diabetes. A monitoring and feedback tool combined with guidance by a primary care provider might be a successful method to enhance the level of physical activity in these patients. As a prerequisite for useful technology, it is important to involve the end-users in the design process from an early stage. The aim of this study was to investigate the user requirements for a tool to stimulate physical activity, embedded in primary care practice. The leading principle of this tool is to change behavior by self-monitoring, goal-setting, and feedback. The research team collected qualitative data among 15 patients, 16 care professionals, and several experts. A prototype was developed in three stages. In stage 1, the literature was searched to identify end-users and context. In stage 2, the literature, experts and patient representatives were consulted to set up a use case with the general idea of the innovation. In stage 3, individual interviews and focus groups were held to identify the end-user requirements. Based on these requirements a prototype was built by the engineering team. The development process has led to a tool that generally meets the requirements of the end-users. A tri-axial activity sensor, worn on the hip, is connected by Bluetooth to a smartphone. In an app, quantitative feedback is given about the amount of activity and goals reached by means of graphical visualization, and an image shows a sun when the goal is reached. Overviews about activity per half an hour, per day, week, and month are provided. In the menu of the app and on a secured website, patients can enter information in individual sessions or read feedback messages generated by the system. The practice nurse can see the results of all patients on a secure webpage and can then discuss the results and set personalized goals in consultation with the patient. This study

  18. Designing a primary science curriculum in a globalizing world: How do social constructivism and Vietnamese culture meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hằng, Ngô Vũ Thu; Meijer, Marijn Roland; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Pilot, Albert

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of social constructivist approaches to learning science in primary education in Vietnamese culture as an example of Confucian heritage culture remains challenging and problematic. This theoretical paper focuses on the initial phase of a design-based research approach; that is, the description of the design of a formal, written curriculum for primary science education in which features of social constructivist approaches to learning are synthesized with essential aspects of Vietnamese culture. The written design comprises learning aims, a framework that is the synthesis of learning functions, learning settings and educational expectations for learning phases, and exemplary curriculum units. Learning aims are formulated to comprehensively develop scientific knowledge, skills, and attitudes toward science for primary students. Derived from these learning aims, the designed framework consists of four learning phases respectively labeled as Engagement, Experience, Exchange, and Follow-up. The designed framework refers to knowledge of the "nature of science" education and characteristics of Vietnamese culture as an example of Confucian heritage culture. The curriculum design aims to serve as an educational product that addresses previously analyzed problems of primary science education in the Vietnamese culture in a globalizing world.

  19. Design choices made by target users for a pay-for-performance program in primary care: an action research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirschner Kirsten

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background International interest in pay-for-performance (P4P initiatives to improve quality of health care is growing. Current programs vary in the methods of performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. One may assume that involvement of health care professionals in the goal setting and methods of quality measurement and subsequent payment schemes may enhance their commitment to and motivation for P4P programs and therefore the impact of these programs. We developed a P4P program in which the target users were involved in decisions about the P4P methods. Methods For the development of the P4P program a framework was used which distinguished three main components: performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. Based on this framework design choices were discussed in two panels of target users using an adapted Delphi procedure. The target users were 65 general practices and two health insurance companies in the South of the Netherlands. Results Performance measurement was linked to the Dutch accreditation program based on three domains (clinical care, practice management and patient experience. The general practice was chosen as unit of assessment. Relative standards were set at the 25th percentile of group performance. The incentive for clinical care was set twice as high as the one for practice management and patient experience. Quality scores were to be calculated separately for all three domains, and for both the quality level and the improvement of performance. The incentive for quality level was set thrice as high as the one for the improvement of performance. For reimbursement, quality scores were divided into seven levels. A practice with a quality score in the lowest group was not supposed to receive a bonus. The additional payment grew proportionally for each extra group. The bonus aimed at was on average 5% to 10% of the practice income. Conclusions Designing a P4P program for primary care with involvement of

  20. Design choices made by target users for a pay-for-performance program in primary care: an action research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background International interest in pay-for-performance (P4P) initiatives to improve quality of health care is growing. Current programs vary in the methods of performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. One may assume that involvement of health care professionals in the goal setting and methods of quality measurement and subsequent payment schemes may enhance their commitment to and motivation for P4P programs and therefore the impact of these programs. We developed a P4P program in which the target users were involved in decisions about the P4P methods. Methods For the development of the P4P program a framework was used which distinguished three main components: performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. Based on this framework design choices were discussed in two panels of target users using an adapted Delphi procedure. The target users were 65 general practices and two health insurance companies in the South of the Netherlands. Results Performance measurement was linked to the Dutch accreditation program based on three domains (clinical care, practice management and patient experience). The general practice was chosen as unit of assessment. Relative standards were set at the 25th percentile of group performance. The incentive for clinical care was set twice as high as the one for practice management and patient experience. Quality scores were to be calculated separately for all three domains, and for both the quality level and the improvement of performance. The incentive for quality level was set thrice as high as the one for the improvement of performance. For reimbursement, quality scores were divided into seven levels. A practice with a quality score in the lowest group was not supposed to receive a bonus. The additional payment grew proportionally for each extra group. The bonus aimed at was on average 5% to 10% of the practice income. Conclusions Designing a P4P program for primary care with involvement of the target users gave us an

  1. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10 13 protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10 13 ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10 13 ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10 13 ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found

  2. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10{sup 13} ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10{sup 13} ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10{sup 13} ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found.

  3. Goals are not selfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hippel, William; von Hippel, Frank A

    2014-04-01

    The metaphor of selfish goals is misguided. Organisms can be considered vessels that further the interests of their genes, but not vessels that further the interests of their goals. Although goals can act at cross-purposes to each other and to longevity, such trade-offs are predicted by evolutionary theory. The metaphor of selfish goals provides no purchase on this problem.

  4. Comparing Three Models of Achievement Goals: Goal Orientations, Goal Standards, and Goal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, Corwin; Tropiano, Katie L.

    2016-01-01

    Achievement goal theory (Dweck, 1986) initially characterized mastery goals and performance goals as opposites in a good-bad dualism of student motivation. A later revision (Harackiewicz, Barron, & Elliot, 1998) contended that both goals can provide benefits and be pursued together. Perhaps both frameworks are correct: Their contrasting views…

  5. Development and Use of a Goal Setting/Attainment Process Designed To Measure a Teacher's Ability To Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minix, Nancy; And Others

    The process used to evaluate progress in identifying the goals to be used in evaluating teacher performance under the Kentucky Career Ladder Program is described. The process pertains to two areas of teacher development: (1) professional growth and development, and (2) professional leadership and initiative. A total of 1,650 individuals were asked…

  6. Identifying Estonian Stakeholder Views as the Bases for Designing Science Teachers' In-Service Course Which Support Promotion of Competence Based Curriculum Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laius, A.; Post, A.; Rannikmäe, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study solicits views about the goals of science education from a range of stakeholders within the science education community and society. It also compares students' needs, expressed through stakeholder expectations, with the current learning situation of gymnasium graduates. The study uses a Delphi method to solicit views with 111…

  7. DESIGNING EDUCATIONAL PROCESS OF FORMING SOCIAL AND PEDAGOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN INCLUSIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoia Shevtsiv

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the issue of social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary schools. The aim of the article is to define the concept “design” and “pedagogical design”; to disclose methodological approaches and main features of pedagogical design of forming of social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary schools; to identify structural elements of social and pedagogical competence. The article analyzes the essence of the concept “design”. The process of designing educational system of social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary school is based on several interrelated methodological approaches, including systematic, axiological, active, person-centered, contextual acmeological, and competential ones. Important factors and theoretical starting positions are designing general principles of education: humanism and democracy; principles of teaching, scientific, professional orientation, integrity, communication theory and practice, consistency and systematic, variability, pedagogical creativity. The special principles are the following: problematic, technologizing, dialogization, and competence ones. Social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teachers in inclusive secondary school is structured by the cognitive, active, professional and personal components. Structure components are defined as a synthesis of social and pedagogical competences, educational and developmental, communicative, diagnostic, organizational, predictive, preventive, security and defense, correctional and rehabilitation, adaptation items. Established continuity of the educational process of forming social and pedagogical competence of future primary school teacher in inclusive secondary school takes place during the period of study in higher education establishments. The following conclusions are drawn that

  8. Implementation and evaluation of the 5As framework of obesity management in primary care: design of the 5As Team (5AsT) randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise L; Asselin, Jodie; Osunlana, Adedayo M; Fielding, Sheri; Anderson, Robin; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Ogunleye, Ayodele A; Cave, Andrew; Manca, Donna; Sharma, Arya M

    2014-06-19

    Obesity is a pressing public health concern, which frequently presents in primary care. With the explosive obesity epidemic, there is an urgent need to maximize effective management in primary care. The 5As of Obesity Management™ (5As) are a collection of knowledge tools developed by the Canadian Obesity Network. Low rates of obesity management visits in primary care suggest provider behaviour may be an important variable. The goal of the present study is to increase frequency and quality of obesity management in primary care using the 5As Team (5AsT) intervention to change provider behaviour. The 5AsT trial is a theoretically informed, pragmatic randomized controlled trial with mixed methods evaluation. Clinic-based multidisciplinary teams (RN/NP, mental health, dietitians) will be randomized to control or the 5AsT intervention group, to participate in biweekly learning collaborative sessions supported by internal and external practice facilitation. The learning collaborative content addresses provider-identified barriers to effective obesity management in primary care. Evidence-based shared decision making tools will be co-developed and iteratively tested by practitioners. Evaluation will be informed by the RE-AIM framework. The primary outcome measure, to which participants are blinded, is number of weight management visits/full-time equivalent (FTE) position. Patient-level outcomes will also be assessed, through a longitudinal cohort study of patients from randomized practices. Patient outcomes include clinical (e.g., body mass index [BMI], blood pressure), health-related quality of life (SF-12, EQ5D), and satisfaction with care. Qualitative data collected from providers and patients will be evaluated using thematic analysis to understand the context, implementation and effectiveness of the 5AsT program. The 5AsT trial will provide a wide range of insights into current practices, knowledge gaps and barriers that limit obesity management in primary practice

  9. Academic goals in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, Joshua I S; Kann, Brian

    2013-12-01

    The development of an academic surgical career can be an overwhelming prospect, and one that is not intuitive. Establishing a structured plan and support structure is critical to success. Starting a successful academic surgical career begins with defining one's academic goals within several broad categories: personal goals, academic goals, research goals, educational goals, and financial goals. Learning the art of self-promotion is the means by which many of these goals are achieved. It is important to realize that achieving these goals requires a delicate personal balance between work and home life, and the key ways in which to achieve success require establishment of well thought-out goals, a reliable support structure, realistic and clear expectations, and frequent re-evaluation.

  10. Classroom observation data and instruction in primary mathematics education: improving design and rigour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.; Davis, Sandra B.

    2014-06-01

    The use of formal observation in primary mathematics classrooms is supported in the literature as a viable method of determining effective teaching strategies and appropriate tasks for inclusion in the early years of mathematics learning. The twofold aim of this study was to (a) investigate predictive relationships between primary mathematics classroom observational data and student achievement data, and (b) to examine the impact of providing periodic classroom observational data feedback to teachers using a Relational-Feedback-Intervention (RFI) Database Model. This observational research effort focused on an empirical examination of student engagement levels in time spent on specific learning activities observed in primary mathematics classrooms as predictors of student competency outcomes in mathematics. Data were collected from more than 2,000 primary classroom observations in 17 primary schools during 2009-2011 and from standardised end-of-year tests for mathematics achievement. Results revealed predictive relationships among several types of teaching and learning tasks with student achievement. Specifically, the use of mathematics concepts, technology and hands-on materials in primary mathematics classrooms was found to produce substantive predictors of increased student mathematics achievement. Additional findings supported the use of periodic classroom observation data reporting as a positive influence on teachers' decisions in determining instructional tasks for inclusion in primary mathematics classrooms. Study results indicate classroom observational research involving a RFI Database Model is a productive tool for improving teaching and learning in primary mathematics classrooms.

  11. Designing a primary science curriculum in a globalizing world: how do social constructivism and Vietnamese culture meet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Thu Hang, N.; Meijer, M.R.; Bulte, A.M.W.; Pilot, A.

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of social constructivist approaches to learning science in primary education in Vietnamese culture as an example of Confucian heritage culture (CHC) remains challenging and problematic. This theoretical paper focuses on the initial phase of a design-based research approach; that

  12. Goals and Psychological Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander Karl; Nafziger, Julia

    We model how people formulate and evaluate goals to overcome self-control problems. People often attempt to regulate their behavior by evaluating goal-related outcomes separately (in narrow psychological accounts) rather than jointly (in a broad account). To explain this evidence, our theory...... of endogenous narrow or broad psychological accounts combines insights from the literatures on goals and mental accounting with models of expectations-based reference-dependent preferences. By formulating goals the individual creates expectations that induce reference points for task outcomes. These goal......-induced reference points make substandard performance psychologically painful and motivate the individual to stick to his goals. How strong the commitment to goals is depends on the type of psychological account. We provide conditions when it is optimal to evaluate goals in narrow accounts. The key intuition...

  13. Rationale, design and goals of the HeartFlow assessing diagnostic value of non-invasive FFRCT in Coronary Care (ADVANCE) registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M; Akasaka, Takashi; Amano, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    ) optimal medical therapy, (b) percutaneous coronary intervention, (c) coronary artery bypass graft surgery, or (d) more information required. The primary endpoint of the registry is the reclassification rate between the management plan based on coronary CTA alone versus CTA plus FFRCT. The secondary...

  14. Components of the primary circuit of LWRs. Design, construction and calculation. Komponenten des Primaerkreises von Leichtwasserreaktoren. Auslegung, Konstruktion und Berechnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This standard is to be applied to components made of metallic materials, operated at design temperatures of up to 673 K (400 C). The primary circuit as the pressure containment of the reactor coolant comprises: Reactor pressure vessel (without internals), steam generator (primary loop), pressurizer, reactor coolant pump housing, interconnecting pipings between the components mentioned above and appropriate various valve and instrument casings, pipings branding from the above components and interconnecting pipings, including the appropriate instrument casings, up to and including the first isolating valve, pressure shielding of control rod drives.

  15. Brief cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care: a hybrid type 2 patient-randomized effectiveness-implementation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A; Armento, Maria E A; Mott, Juliette; Nadorff, Michael R; Naik, Aanand D; Stanley, Melinda A; Sorocco, Kristen H; Kunik, Mark E; Petersen, Nancy J; Kauth, Michael R

    2012-07-11

    Despite the availability of evidence-based psychotherapies for depression and anxiety, they are underused in non-mental health specialty settings such as primary care. Hybrid effectiveness-implementation designs have the potential to evaluate clinical and implementation outcomes of evidence-based psychotherapies to improve their translation into routine clinical care practices. This protocol article discusses the study methodology and implementation strategies employed in an ongoing, hybrid, type 2 randomized controlled trial with two primary aims: (1) to determine whether a brief, manualized cognitive behavioral therapy administered by Veterans Affairs Primary Care Mental Health Integration program clinicians is effective in treating depression and anxiety in a sample of medically ill (chronic cardiopulmonary diseases) primary care patients and (2) to examine the acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes of a focused implementation strategy on improving adoption and fidelity of brief cognitive behavioral therapy at two Primary Care-Mental Health Integration clinics. The study uses a hybrid type 2 effectiveness/implementation design to simultaneously test clinical effectiveness and to collect pilot data on a multifaceted implementation strategy that includes an online training program, audit and feedback of session content, and internal and external facilitation. Additionally, the study engages the participation of an advisory council consisting of stakeholders from Primary Care-Mental Health Integration, as well as regional and national mental health leaders within the Veterans Administration. It targets recruitment of 320 participants randomized to brief cognitive behavioral therapy (n = 200) or usual care (n = 120). Both effectiveness and implementation outcomes are being assessed using mixed methods, including quantitative evaluation (e.g., intent-to-treat analyses across multiple time points) and qualitative methods (e.g., focus interviews

  16. Brief cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care: a hybrid type 2 patient-randomized effectiveness-implementation design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cully Jeffrey A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the availability of evidence-based psychotherapies for depression and anxiety, they are underused in non-mental health specialty settings such as primary care. Hybrid effectiveness-implementation designs have the potential to evaluate clinical and implementation outcomes of evidence-based psychotherapies to improve their translation into routine clinical care practices. Methods This protocol article discusses the study methodology and implementation strategies employed in an ongoing, hybrid, type 2 randomized controlled trial with two primary aims: (1 to determine whether a brief, manualized cognitive behavioral therapy administered by Veterans Affairs Primary Care Mental Health Integration program clinicians is effective in treating depression and anxiety in a sample of medically ill (chronic cardiopulmonary diseases primary care patients and (2 to examine the acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes of a focused implementation strategy on improving adoption and fidelity of brief cognitive behavioral therapy at two Primary Care-Mental Health Integration clinics. The study uses a hybrid type 2 effectiveness/implementation design to simultaneously test clinical effectiveness and to collect pilot data on a multifaceted implementation strategy that includes an online training program, audit and feedback of session content, and internal and external facilitation. Additionally, the study engages the participation of an advisory council consisting of stakeholders from Primary Care-Mental Health Integration, as well as regional and national mental health leaders within the Veterans Administration. It targets recruitment of 320 participants randomized to brief cognitive behavioral therapy (n = 200 or usual care (n = 120. Both effectiveness and implementation outcomes are being assessed using mixed methods, including quantitative evaluation (e.g., intent-to-treat analyses across multiple time points and

  17. Quantitative HTGR safety and forced outage goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, W.J.; Parme, L.L.; Silady, F.A.

    1985-05-01

    A key step in the successful implementation of the integrated approach is the definition of the overall plant-level goals. To be effective, the goals should provide clear statements of what is to be achieved by the plant. This can be contrasted to the current practice of providing design-prescriptive criteria which implicitly address some higher-level objective but restrict the designer's flexibility. Furthermore, the goals should be quantifiable in such a way that satisfaction of the goal can be measured. In the discussion presented, two such plant-level goals adopted for the HTGR and addressing the impact of unscheduled occurrences are described. 1 fig

  18. Parental goals and talk with toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Meredith Lee; Casillas, Allison

    2010-01-01

    Myriad studies support a relation between parental beliefs and behaviours. This study adds to the literature by focusing on the specific relationship between parental goals and their communication with toddlers. Do parents with different goals talk about different topics with their children? Parents’ goals for their 30-month olds were gathered using semi-structured interviews with 47 primary caregivers, whereas the topics of conversations that took place during interactio...

  19. Design Elements and Feasibility of an Organized Multiplayer Mobile Active Videogame for Primary School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Sophie; Bangay, Shaun; Barnett, Lisa M; Ridgers, Nicola D; Salmon, Jo

    2014-12-01

    This article describes the design, development, and implementation feasibility of a purpose-built mobile active videogame (M-AVG) named "Pirate Adventure," which was designed for primary school-aged children to engage in physical activity (PA) and fundamental movement skills (FMS), such as hopping, sidestepping, jumping, or running, in an afterschool setting. The design of "Pirate Adventure" was the result of a collaboration between games designers and health researchers. "Pirate Adventure" was designed and developed using Android(®) (Google, Mountain View, CA) phone sensors to respond to player actions within a playground environment. Using an interactive game framework, players solve clues and complete PA and FMS challenges via sensing the physical world through marked-out key game locations. Fourteen primary school-aged children participated in the feasibility evaluation, which took place in four afternoon sessions. The game was evaluated using Android phone telemetry data and a post-gameplay survey for children on their opinions and enjoyment of the game. The "Pirate Adventure" game design facilitated an enjoyable treasure hunt game (average of 11 minutes of activity per game) with narrative elements supporting children's engagement with movement activities. The majority of children (n=9/13) reported that they would like to play the game again. Combining real world and virtual world content through "Pirate Adventure" was moderately successful, with multiple gameplay sessions occurring. Further implementation feasibility testing, under more controlled conditions, needs to be conducted to assert the benefits of using a M-AVG for children's PA and FMS.

  20. Collaborative stepped care for anxiety disorders in primary care: aims and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinhoven Philip

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panic disorder (PD and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD are two of the most disabling and costly anxiety disorders seen in primary care. However, treatment quality of these disorders in primary care generally falls beneath the standard of international guidelines. Collaborative stepped care is recommended for improving treatment of anxiety disorders, but cost-effectiveness of such an intervention has not yet been assessed in primary care. This article describes the aims and design of a study that is currently underway. The aim of this study is to evaluate effects and costs of a collaborative stepped care approach in the primary care setting for patients with PD and GAD compared with care as usual. Methods/design The study is a two armed, cluster randomized controlled trial. Care managers and their primary care practices will be randomized to deliver either collaborative stepped care (CSC or care as usual (CAU. In the CSC group a general practitioner, care manager and psychiatrist work together in a collaborative care framework. Stepped care is provided in three steps: 1 guided self-help, 2 cognitive behavioral therapy and 3 antidepressant medication. Primary care patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of PD and/or GAD will be included. 134 completers are needed to attain sufficient power to show a clinically significant effect of 1/2 SD on the primary outcome measure, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. Data on anxiety symptoms, mental and physical health, quality of life, health resource use and productivity will be collected at baseline and after three, six, nine and twelve months. Discussion It is hypothesized that the collaborative stepped care intervention will be more cost-effective than care as usual. The pragmatic design of this study will enable the researchers to evaluate what is possible in real clinical practice, rather than under ideal circumstances. Many requirements for a high quality trial are being met. Results of

  1. Design of a social constructivism-based curriculum for primary science education in Confucian heritage culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Thu Hang, N.

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the application of social constructivism in primary science curriculum in Confucian heritage culture. It was found that the implementation of social constructivism in Confucian heritage culture was low and influenced by cultural divergences between Confucian cultural philosophy

  2. Development of new design mechanical seal tester for Primary Loop Recirculation Pump (PLR Pump)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Naoki; Koshiba, Koremutsu

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical seal for a Primary Loop Recirculation Pump (PLR Pump) is an important part of a BWR plant. This study describes a new mechanical seal tester developed to certify mechanical seal performance before installation in a PLR Pump on site. (author)

  3. Assertion based verification methodology for HDL designs of primary sodium pump speed and eddy current flow measurement systems of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, M.K.; Menon, Saritha P.; Thirugnana Murthy, D.

    2013-01-01

    With the growing complexity and size of digital designs, functional verification has become a huge challenge. The validation and testing process accounts for a significant percentage of the overall development effort and cost for electronic systems. Many studies have shown that up to 70% of the design development time and resources are spent on functional verification. Functional errors manifest themselves very early in the design flow, and unless they are detected upfront, they can result in severe consequences - both financially and from a safety viewpoint. This paper covers the various types of verification methodologies and focuses on Assertion Based Verification Methodology for HDL designs, taking as case studies, the Primary Sodium Pump Speed and Eddy Current Flow Measurement Systems of PFBR. (author)

  4. AN EVALUATION OF PRIMARY DATA-COLLECTION MODES IN AN ADDRESS-BASED SAMPLING DESIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Ashley; Leclere, Felicia; Carris, Kari; Liao, Youlian

    2015-01-01

    As address-based sampling becomes increasingly popular for multimode surveys, researchers continue to refine data-collection best practices. While much work has been conducted to improve efficiency within a given mode, additional research is needed on how multimode designs can be optimized across modes. Previous research has not evaluated the consequences of mode sequencing on multimode mail and phone surveys, nor has significant research been conducted to evaluate mode sequencing on a variety of indicators beyond response rates. We conducted an experiment within the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health across the U.S. Risk Factor Survey (REACH U.S.) to evaluate two multimode case-flow designs: (1) phone followed by mail (phone-first) and (2) mail followed by phone (mail-first). We compared response rates, cost, timeliness, and data quality to identify differences across case-flow design. Because surveys often differ on the rarity of the target population, we also examined whether changes in the eligibility rate altered the choice of optimal case flow. Our results suggested that, on most metrics, the mail-first design was superior to the phone-first design. Compared with phone-first, mail-first achieved a higher yield rate at a lower cost with equivalent data quality. While the phone-first design initially achieved more interviews compared to the mail-first design, over time the mail-first design surpassed it and obtained the greatest number of interviews.

  5. Setting goals in psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliussen, Jakob; Wagoner, Brady

    2013-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the ethical dilemmas of setting goals in therapy. The main questions that it aims to answer are: who is to set the goals for therapy and who is to decide when they have been reached? The study is based on four semi-­‐structured, phenomenological interviews...

  6. Shared goals and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2015-01-01

    undemanding for children to engage in, and therefore has the potential to play a part in fostering their understanding of other minds. Part of the functional role of shared goals is to enable agents to choose means that are appropriate to realising a goal with others rather than individually. By offering...

  7. Comparing the achievement goal orientation of mathematics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A quantitative, exploratory research design was used. ... Goals affect how learners approach mathematics learning activities, which could ... research on academic success and ADHD has focused on reading ... from the data analysis process. ... Achievement goal orientation is based on a ...... Research design: Qualitative,.

  8. Trial evaluations in comparison with the 1983 safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggs, R.; Sege, G.

    1985-06-01

    This report provides retrospective comparisons of selected generic regulatory actions to the 1983 NRC safety goals, which had been issued for evaluation during a two-year period. The issues covered are those analyzed by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) (assisted in some cases by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory). The issues include auxiliary feedwater reliability, pressurized thermal shock, power-operated relief valve isolation, asymmetric blowdown loads on PWR primary systems, pool dynamic loads for BWR containments, and steam generator tube rupture. Calculated core-melt frequencies, mortality risks, and cost-benefit ratios are compared with the corresponding safety-goal quantitative design objectives. Considerations that should influence interpretation of the comparisons are discussed. Comments are included on whether and how the safety goals may have helped in the regulatory decision process and on problems encountered

  9. A Human-Automation Interface Model to Guide Automation Design of System Functions: A Way to Achieve Manning Goals in New Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Manual (Army) FoS Family of Systems FRMV FCS Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle GDLS General Dynamics Land Systems HFE Human Factors Engineering...Thanks goes to our CRADA partners at BAE Systems (formerly UDLP) in Santa Clara, CA. Jeff Powers, Doug Neil, Gene Brennan, and Ron Natividad were eager...above in the HFE implications, MWL can be modeled during system design to assess if it is reasonable throughout system functional flow. Besides

  10. Motivational Goal Bracketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafziger, Julia; Koch, Alexander

    It is a puzzle why people often evaluate consequences of choices separately (narrow bracketing) rather than jointly (broad bracketing). We study the hypothesis that a present-biased individual, who faces two tasks, may bracket his goals narrowly for motivational reasons. Goals motivate because th...... of the tasks. Narrow goals have a stronger motivational force and thus can be optimal. In particular, if one task outcome becomes known before working on the second task, narrow bracketing is always optimal.......It is a puzzle why people often evaluate consequences of choices separately (narrow bracketing) rather than jointly (broad bracketing). We study the hypothesis that a present-biased individual, who faces two tasks, may bracket his goals narrowly for motivational reasons. Goals motivate because...

  11. Primary healthcare-based diabetes registry in Puducherry: Design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subitha Lakshminarayanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes registries monitor the population prevalence and incidence of diabetes, monitor diabetes control program, provide information of quality of care to health service providers, and provide a sampling frame for interventional studies. This study documents the process of establishing a prospective diabetes registry in a primary health-care setting in Puducherry. Methods: This is a facility-based prospective registry conducted in six randomly selected urban health centers in Puducherry, with enrollment of all known patients with diabetes attending chronic disease clinics. Administrative approvals were obtained from Government Health Services. Manuals for training of medical officers, health-care workers, and case report forms were developed. Diabetes registry was prepared using Epi Info software. Results: In the first phase, demographic characteristics, risk factors, complications, coexisting chronic conditions, lifestyle and medical management, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Around 2177 patients with diabetes have been registered in six Primary Health Centres out of a total of 2948 participants seeking care from chronic disease clinic. Registration coverage ranges from 61% to 105% in these centers. Conclusion: This study has documented methodological details, and learning experiences gained while developing a diabetes registry at the primary health care level and the scope for upscaling to a Management Information System for Diabetes and a State-wide Registry. Improvement in patient care through needs assessment and quality assurance in service delivery is an important theme envisioned by this registry.

  12. 30 CFR 250.916 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Stress analyses; (vi) Material designations; (vii) Soil and foundation conditions; (viii) Safety factors... center of gravity, etc., have been met. The CVA must also consider: (i) Drilling, production, and...

  13. Analysis and primary design of the I and C system architecture for HTGR-10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zijue; Zhao Guoji

    1993-01-01

    The consideration of making good use of the-state-of-the-arts technology in designing advanced Instrumentation and Control System architecture is discussed. A fully distributed and fully micro-computerized, local network based Instrumentation and Control System is designed for the HTR-10 reactor. The advantages of the system architecture include high reliability and availability, flexibility, economics, etc. It also fits for other production processes

  14. On the design and operation of primary settling tanks in state of the art wastewater treatment and water resources recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patziger, Miklos; Günthert, Frank Wolfgang; Jardin, Norbert; Kainz, Harald; Londong, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    In state of the art wastewater treatment, primary settling tanks (PSTs) are considered as an integral part of the biological wastewater and sludge treatment process, as well as of the biogas and electric energy production. Consequently they strongly influence the efficiency of the entire wastewater treatment plant. However, in the last decades the inner physical processes of PSTs, largely determining their efficiency, have been poorly addressed. In common practice PSTs are still solely designed and operated based on the surface overflow rate and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) as a black box. The paper shows the results of a comprehensive investigation programme, including 16 PSTs. Their removal efficiency and inner physical processes (like the settling process of primary sludge), internal flow structures within PSTs and their impact on performance were investigated. The results show that: (1) the removal rates of PSTs are generally often underestimated in current design guidelines, (2) the removal rate of different PSTs shows a strongly fluctuating pattern even in the same range of the HRT, and (3) inlet design of PSTs becomes highly relevant in the removal efficiency at rather high surface overflow rates, above 5 m/h, which is the upper design limit of PSTs for dry weather load.

  15. Designing Clinical Space for the Delivery of Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Rose; Davis, Melinda M; Hall, Jennifer; Heintzman, John; Muench, John; Smeds, Brianna; Miller, Benjamin F; Miller, William L; Gilchrist, Emma; Brown Levey, Shandra; Brown, Jacqueline; Wise Romero, Pam; Cohen, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to describe features of the physical space in which practices integrating primary care and behavioral health care work and to identify the arrangements that enable integration of care. We conducted an observational study of 19 diverse practices located across the United States. Practice-level data included field notes from 2-4-day site visits, transcripts from semistructured interviews with clinicians and clinical staff, online implementation diary posts, and facility photographs. A multidisciplinary team used a 4-stage, systematic approach to analyze data and identify how physical layout enabled the work of integrated care teams. Two dominant spatial layouts emerged across practices: type-1 layouts were characterized by having primary care clinicians (PCCs) and behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) located in separate work areas, and type-2 layouts had BHCs and PCCs sharing work space. We describe these layouts and the influence they have on situational awareness, interprofessional "bumpability," and opportunities for on-the-fly communication. We observed BHCs and PCCs engaging in more face-to-face methods for coordinating integrated care for patients in type 2 layouts (41.5% of observed encounters vs 11.7%; P < .05). We show that practices needed to strike a balance between professional proximity and private work areas to accomplish job tasks. Private workspace was needed for focused work, to see patients, and for consults between clinicians and clinical staff. We describe the ways practices modified and built new space and provide 2 recommended layouts for practices integrating care based on study findings. Physical layout and positioning of professionals' workspace is an important consideration in practices implementing integrated care. Clinicians, researchers, and health-care administrators are encouraged to consider the role of professional proximity and private working space when creating new facilities or redesigning existing space to foster

  16. Conceptual design of primary coolant purification system using cylindrical membrane for nuclear energy system base on HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piping Supriatna

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress of reactor technology design for next generation reactor will be implemented on cogeneration reactor, which the aim of reactor operation not only for generating electrical energy, but also for other application like desalination, industrial manufacturing process, hydrogen production, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), etc. The cogeneration reactor concept developed for generate energy effectively, efficiently and sustainable, which reserve of uranium and thorium nuclear fuel for cogeneration reactor is supply able for world energy demand until next thousand years. The cogeneration reactor produce temperature output higher than commonly Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), and need special Heat Exchanger with helium gas as coolant. In order to preserve heat transfer with high efficiency, constant purity of the gas must be maintained as well as possible, especially contamination from its impurities. In this research has been designed modeling and assessment of primary coolant gas purification system with purify and fill up helium gas continuously, by using Cylindrical Helium Splitting Membrane and helium gas inventory system. The result of flow rate helium assessment for the purification system is 0.844x10 -3 kg/sec, where helium flow rate of reactor primary coolant is 120 kg/sec. The result of study show that the Primary Coolant Gas Purification System is enable to be implemented on Cogeneration Reactor HTGR200C. (author)

  17. The Design and Development of a Simulation to Teach Water Conservation to Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays a dominant role in enhancing teaching and learning. Similar advances have been made in the use of multimedia in the classroom. These advances are coupled with newer developmental tools and techniques. This paper examines the design and development of a simulation on water conservation. Science…

  18. Engineering Design in the Primary School: Applying STEM Concepts to Build an Optical Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; English, Lyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Internationally there is a need for research that focuses on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education to equip students with the skills needed for a rapidly changing future. One way to do this is through designing engineering activities that reflect real-world problems and contextualise students' learning of STEM concepts.…

  19. 30 CFR 285.707 - What are the CVA's primary duties for facility design review?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) The CVA must conduct an independent assessment of all proposed: (1) Planning criteria; (2) Operational requirements; (3) Environmental loading data; (4) Load determinations; (5) Stress analyses; (6) Material designations; (7) Soil and foundation conditions; (8) Safety factors; and (9) Other pertinent...

  20. The Design of English Elementary and Primary Schools. A Select Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, John, Comp.

    School building design in this publication is interpreted as meaning layout and arrangement of rooms rather than as architectural style. Citations are organized under (1) central authority publications, (2) local authority publications, (3) general works, (4) articles in periodicals, and (5) unpublished theses. (Author/MLF)

  1. An Intervention Framework Designed to Develop the Collaborative Problem-Solving Skills of Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Shan; Zhu, Wenbo; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Considerable effort has been invested in innovative learning practices such as collaborative inquiry. Collaborative problem solving is becoming popular in school settings, but there is limited knowledge on how to develop skills crucial in collaborative problem solving in students. Based on the intervention design in social interaction of…

  2. Physics goals of future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    These lectures describe some of the physics goals that future colliders are designed to achieve. Emphasis is on the SSC, but its capabilities are compared to those of other machines, and set in a context of what will be measured before the SSC is ready. Physics associated with the Higgs sector is examined most thoroughly, with a survey of the opportunities to find evidence of extended gauge theories

  3. Model-based and design-based inference goals frame how to account for neighborhood clustering in studies of health in overlapping context types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovasi, Gina S; Fink, David S; Mooney, Stephen J; Link, Bruce G

    2017-12-01

    Accounting for non-independence in health research often warrants attention. Particularly, the availability of geographic information systems data has increased the ease with which studies can add measures of the local "neighborhood" even if participant recruitment was through other contexts, such as schools or clinics. We highlight a tension between two perspectives that is often present, but particularly salient when more than one type of potentially health-relevant context is indexed (e.g., both neighborhood and school). On the one hand, a model-based perspective emphasizes the processes producing outcome variation, and observed data are used to make inference about that process. On the other hand, a design-based perspective emphasizes inference to a well-defined finite population, and is commonly invoked by those using complex survey samples or those with responsibility for the health of local residents. These two perspectives have divergent implications when deciding whether clustering must be accounted for analytically and how to select among candidate cluster definitions, though the perspectives are by no means monolithic. There are tensions within each perspective as well as between perspectives. We aim to provide insight into these perspectives and their implications for population health researchers. We focus on the crucial step of deciding which cluster definition or definitions to use at the analysis stage, as this has consequences for all subsequent analytic and interpretational challenges with potentially clustered data.

  4. Model-based and design-based inference goals frame how to account for neighborhood clustering in studies of health in overlapping context types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina S. Lovasi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accounting for non-independence in health research often warrants attention. Particularly, the availability of geographic information systems data has increased the ease with which studies can add measures of the local “neighborhood” even if participant recruitment was through other contexts, such as schools or clinics. We highlight a tension between two perspectives that is often present, but particularly salient when more than one type of potentially health-relevant context is indexed (e.g., both neighborhood and school. On the one hand, a model-based perspective emphasizes the processes producing outcome variation, and observed data are used to make inference about that process. On the other hand, a design-based perspective emphasizes inference to a well-defined finite population, and is commonly invoked by those using complex survey samples or those with responsibility for the health of local residents. These two perspectives have divergent implications when deciding whether clustering must be accounted for analytically and how to select among candidate cluster definitions, though the perspectives are by no means monolithic. There are tensions within each perspective as well as between perspectives. We aim to provide insight into these perspectives and their implications for population health researchers. We focus on the crucial step of deciding which cluster definition or definitions to use at the analysis stage, as this has consequences for all subsequent analytic and interpretational challenges with potentially clustered data.

  5. [Design of a supervision model for administration of the Child Development Evaluation Test at primary care facilities in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Mares-Serratos, Blanca Berenice; Martell-Valdez, Liliana; Sánchez-Velázquez, Olivia; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Antillón-Ocampo, Fátima Adriana; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Pizarro-Castellanos, Mariel; Martain-Pérez, Itzamara Jacqueline; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Vargas-López, Guillermo; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (CDE) test designed and validated in Mexico has been used as a screening tool for developmental problems in primary care facilities across Mexico. Heterogeneous results were found among those states where these were applied, despite using the same standardized training model for application. The objective was to evaluate a supervision model for quality of application of the CDE test at primary care facilities. A study was carried out in primary care facilities from three Mexican states to evaluate concordance of the results between supervisor and primary care personnel who administered the test using two different methods: direct observation (shadow study) or reapplication of the CDE test (consistency study). There were 380 shadow studies applied to 51 psychologists. General concordance of the shadow study was 86.1% according to the supervisor: green 94.5%, yellow 73.2% and red 80.0%. There were 302 re-test evaluations with a concordance of 88.1% (n=266): green 96.8%, yellow 71.7% and red 81.8%. There were no differences between CDE test subgroups by age. Both shadow and re-test study were adequate for the evaluation of the quality of the administration of the CDE Test and may be useful as a model of supervision in primary care facilities. The decision of which test to use relies on the availability of supervisors. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Japanese contribution to the design of primary module of shielding blanket in ITER-FEAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Toshimasa; Hatano, Toshihisa; Miki, Nobuharu; Hiroki, Seiji; Enoeda, Mikio; Ohmori, Junji; Akiba, Masato

    2003-02-01

    Japanese contributions to the design activity on the shielding blanket module consisting of the separable first wall and the shield block for ITER-FEAT are compiled. Temperature and stress distributions in the first wall and the shield block are analyzed and evaluated with 2-D and 3-D models for steady state and also for transient condition according to plasma ramp-up and ramp-down. While temperatures and stresses in the first wall satisfy their allowable values, those in a front part of the shield block exceed the allowable guideline. Based on this result, design improvements are suggested. Coolant flow and pressure distributions along the complicated coolant channel in the shield block are preliminary analyzed. Though heat removal is satisfactory in all coolant channels, back flows due to choking in coolant collectors are found. Design improvements to avoid the choking are suggested. Electromagnetic forces acting on blanket modules are analyzed with detailed 3-D models of solid elements for different disruption scenarios. The maximum moment around radial axis is 1.36 MNm on module no.5 under fast upward VDE, and the maximum moment around vertical axis is 1.47 MNm on module no.1 under fast downward VDE. The supporting beam of the first wall with welded attachment to the shield block is designed. Required welding thickness and support conditions to withstand electromagnetic forces are estimated. Strength of the shield block at the region mating the flexible cartridge is also estimated. Though the shield block surface attached by the flexible cartridge shows sufficient strength, the internal thread mating the Inconel bolt would need more length. In addition, water-to-water leak detection system in case main supply/return manifolds are located within the vacuum vessel is designed. By using Kr as the tracer material, the possibility of water-to-water leak detection and the concept of the detection system are shown. The design of the shielding blanket of ITER-FEAT has

  7. Cockpit control system conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide a means for operating the ailerons, elevator, elevator trim, rudder, nosewheel steering, and brakes in the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate system and subsystem integration, control function ability, and producibility. Weight and maintenance goals were addressed.

  8. Towards an advanced design for MYRRHA. Development of the primary system is progressively taking shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has been developing a versatile irradiation facility, which will replace the current BR2 research reactor in the future. This 'Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications', MYRRHA for short, is designed to be a system driven by an accelerator (Advanced Nuclear System or ADS). Such an ADS consists of a particle accelerator linked to a subcritical reactor. MYRRHA is also able to operate in critical mode like a classic reactor. Scientists and engineers have been working on the development of the MYRRHA reactor without interruption since 1998. A new revision in 2014 again brought them a step closer to completion. The article discusses the current status and several challenges, related to both the budget and the technical aspects of the design.

  9. Supporting primary-level mathematics teachers’ collaboration in designing and using technology-based scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Zacho, Lis

    2016-01-01

    development and testing through qualitative means, aiming to describe the teachers’ appropriation of (1) GeoGebra as a tool for doing and teaching mathematics, and (2) game as a metaphor supporting open-ended projects addressing creativity and innovation in the classroom. The data from the project suggest......In this article, we address how the design of educational scenarios can support teachers’ adoption of both technology and open-ended projects indorsing creativity and innovation. We do that by describing how groups of teachers develop digital learning environments supporting using a combination...... of GeoGebra and Google sites. Both teachers and pupils work with the concept of “game” as something they design, and furthermore, the pupils immerse themselves into the scenarios that the teachers create in a way similar to “playing a game.” We investigate teachers participation in collaborative...

  10. Research and Development Projects with ICT and students as learning designers in Primary Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Tosca, Susana

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present some methodological challenges that emerged during the process of shaping the research design for the comprehensive and complex research project Children as learning designers in a digital school. The project is the realization of our proposal to a research call from...... to the need to strengthen the populations’ digital literacy and 21st century competencies. The call’s scope was research and development projects as pilot school experiments in relation to five selected areas. The selected projects should contribute with new generalizable and practice oriented knowledge...... of how: • ICT supports students learning, • ICT release time for more teaching, and • teachers digital literacy impact on the role of ICT in the educational practice. Further the call required collaboration between universities and university colleges in order to disseminate knowledge and new practices...

  11. Primary heat transfer loop design for the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-05-01

    This study investigates a heat exchanger and balance of plant design to accompany the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber concept. The concept uses solid Li 2 O or other lithium-ceramic granules, held to the wall of a rotating reaction chamber by centrifugal action, as a tritium breeding blanket and first wall protection. The Li 2 O granules enter the chamber at 800 K and exit at 1200 K after absorbing the thermal energy produced by the fusion process

  12. Topics in Analysis and Design of Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sen, Gokhan

    Efficient power processing through power electronics circuits has been a popular academic field for the past decades, especially after “green” vehicle applications based on fuel cells, batteries and super-capacitors emerged as alternative sources of propulsion for transportation. Dc-to-dc convert......Efficient power processing through power electronics circuits has been a popular academic field for the past decades, especially after “green” vehicle applications based on fuel cells, batteries and super-capacitors emerged as alternative sources of propulsion for transportation. Dc...... for such applications due to its simplicity and ability to handle higher currents. Design of magnetic structures like transformers and inductors is part of power electronics engineering in which trade-offs exist between size, price and losses. In higher currents this becomes even more challenging since conventional...... wire wound design approach has some shortcomings. It is possible to use copper foil in windings however this will increase the amount of handcraft during manufacturing; so academic attention was needed for this part of low voltage high current switching converter design. Planar magnetics...

  13. Sources of variation in primary care clinical workflow: implications for the design of cognitive support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Laura G; Arbuckle, Nicole B; Saleem, Jason J; Patterson, Emily; Flanagan, Mindy; Haggstrom, David; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2014-03-01

    This article identifies sources of variation in clinical workflow and implications for the design and implementation of electronic clinical decision support. Sources of variation in workflow were identified via rapid ethnographic observation, focus groups, and interviews across a total of eight medical centers in both the Veterans Health Administration and academic medical centers nationally regarded as leaders in developing and using clinical decision support. Data were reviewed for types of variability within the social and technical subsystems and the external environment as described in the sociotechnical systems theory. Two researchers independently identified examples of variation and their sources, and then met with each other to discuss them until consensus was reached. Sources of variation were categorized as environmental (clinic staffing and clinic pace), social (perception of health information technology and real-time use with patients), or technical (computer access and information access). Examples of sources of variation within each of the categories are described and discussed in terms of impact on clinical workflow. As technologies are implemented, barriers to use become visible over time as users struggle to adapt workflow and work practices to accommodate new technologies. Each source of variability identified has implications for the effective design and implementation of useful health information technology. Accommodating moderate variability in workflow is anticipated to avoid brittle and inflexible workflow designs, while also avoiding unnecessary complexity for implementers and users.

  14. Improving Usefulness of Automated Driving by Lowering Primary Task Interference through HMI Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Naujoks

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During conditionally automated driving (CAD, driving time can be used for non-driving-related tasks (NDRTs. To increase safety and comfort of an automated ride, upcoming automated manoeuvres such as lane changes or speed adaptations may be communicated to the driver. However, as the driver’s primary task consists of performing NDRTs, they might prefer to be informed in a nondistracting way. In this paper, the potential of using speech output to improve human-automation interaction is explored. A sample of 17 participants completed different situations which involved communication between the automation and the driver in a motion-based driving simulator. The Human-Machine Interface (HMI of the automated driving system consisted of a visual-auditory HMI with either generic auditory feedback (i.e., standard information tones or additional speech output. The drivers were asked to perform a common NDRT during the drive. Compared to generic auditory output, communicating upcoming automated manoeuvres additionally by speech led to a decrease in self-reported visual workload and decreased monitoring of the visual HMI. However, interruptions of the NDRT were not affected by additional speech output. Participants clearly favoured the HMI with additional speech-based output, demonstrating the potential of speech to enhance usefulness and acceptance of automated vehicles.

  15. Design and evaluation of a foam-filled hat-stiffened panel concept for aircraft primary structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambur, Damodar R.

    1995-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as stiffener core has been designed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept utilizes a manufacturing process that can be adapted readily to grid-stiffened structural configurations which possess inherent damage tolerance characteristics due to their multiplicity of load paths. The foam-filled hat-stiffener concept in a prismatically stiffened panel configuration is more efficient than most other stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The prismatically stiffened panel concept investigated here has been designed using AS4/3502 preimpregnated tape and Rohacell foam core and evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimens suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has good damage tolerance characteristics.

  16. Welded joints engineering design of the primary circuit, surge line and main steam piping of the Angra 2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volta, Angelo Roberto; Couto, Jose Gonzalo Villaverde

    1995-01-01

    The erection of nuclear systems of a Nuclear Power Station is under international requests, that results in a detailed elaboration of documents for the performance of welds. NUCLEN as an engineering design company, responsible for the erection of Angra 2, developed a suitable software program for the elaboration of welding procedure qualifications, tests and examination sequence plans and heat treatment plans applied to primary circuit, surgeline and main steam piping. The paper shows the employed methodology for the elaboration of these documents, as well as the requested engineering design of welding technology and testability in order to assure the stipulated quality level, according to requirements of the specifications, codes and norms. (author). 6 refs

  17. The effect of pump cavitation on the design of the primary pumps for C.F.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worster, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    In the design appraisal of the sodium pumps for the primary circuit of the proposed 1300 MW(e) CFR it has been recognised that cavitation, its effects and its control, is the outstanding hydraulic design problem. Careful consideration of this problem and of the possible effects of pump cavitation on the performance of other reactor systems has led to the conclusion that it is more prudent at present to specify pumps with zero cavitation at normal full speed operating conditions. Under abnormal operation it may be necessary to reduce the pumps' speed to prevent cavitation in the pumps or associated equipment. The principal reasons for this decision were uncertainties concerning the possibility of erosion due to limited cavitation in sodium and the possibility of pump cavitation noise interfering with acoustic detection of malfunctioning of reactor components or of boiling in the reactor core

  18. Designing Reflection and Symmetry Learning by Using Math Traditional Dance in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yullys Helsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innovation of education is an important point of Pendidikan Matematika Realistik Indonesia (PMRI, one of them through traditional dance as a context of national cultural. Dance that collaborated with concept of mathematics, it is called Math Traditional Dance. This research aims to produce learning line (specific the material of reflection and symmetry. The research method used is design research that consisted of preparing for the experiments, teaching experiments, and retrospective analysis. Data collected through observation, interviews, documentation and field notes. This research was conducted with 22 students in MIN 2 Palembang. From the try out that is obtained from the formal to the informal learning described in the learning process, so that support learning process of mirroring and symmetry for the students in grade four in elementary school.Key words: PMRI, math traditional dance, design research, learning path, mirroring and symmetry DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.782.79-94

  19. DESIGN STUDY: INTEGER SUBTRACTION OPERATION TEACHING LEARNING USING MULTIMEDIA IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendi Muhammad Aris

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a learning trajectory to help students understand concept of subtraction of integers using multimedia in the fourth grade. This study is thematic integrative learning in Curriculum 2013 PMRI based. The method used is design research consists of three stages; preparing for the experiment, design experiment, retrospective analysis. The studied was conducted on 20 students of grade four SDN 1 Muara Batun, OKI. The activities of students in this study consisted of six learning trajectories. The first activity asks the students to classify heroism and non-heroism acts, summarize, and classify integers and non-integer. The second activity asks the students to answer the questions in the film given. The third activity asks students to count the remaining gravel in the film. The fourth activity asks students to count remaining spent money in the film. The fifth activity invites students to play rubber seeds in the bag. The last activity asks students to answer the questions in the student worksheet. The media used along the learning activities are a ruler, rubber seed, student worksheet, money, gravel, and film. The results indicate that the learning trajectory using multimedia help students understand the concept of integer subtraction integer. Keywords: Subtraction Integer, PMRI, Multimedia DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.8.1.3233.95-102

  20. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in the Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manniën Judith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes the research design and methodology of the multicenter multidisciplinary prospective DELIVER study which is the first large-scale study evaluating the quality and provision of primary midwifery care. Methods/Design Between September 2009 and April 2011, data were collected from clients and their partners, midwives and other healthcare professionals across the Netherlands. Clients from twenty midwifery practices received up to three questionnaires to assess the expectations and experiences of clients (e.g. quality of care, prenatal screening, emotions, health, and lifestyle. These client data were linked to data from the Netherlands Perinatal Register and electronic client records kept by midwives. Midwives and practice assistants from the twenty participating practices recorded work-related activities in a diary for one week, to assess workload. Besides, the midwives were asked to complete a questionnaire, to gain insight into collaboration of midwives with other care providers, their tasks and attitude towards their job, and the quality of the care they provide. Another questionnaire was sent to all Dutch midwifery practices which reveals information regarding the organisation of midwifery practices, provision of preconception care, collaboration with other care providers, and provision of care to ethnic minorities. Data at client, midwife and practice level can be linked. Additionally, partners of pregnant women and other care providers were asked about their expectations and experiences regarding the care delivered by midwives and in six practices client consults were videotaped to objectively assess daily practice. Discussion In total, 7685

  1. Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, Designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, was designated as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care (POHC) in 2011. This article aimed to describe the following: (1) the background for this nomination, (2) the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC, its terms of reference and 5 activities, (3) the primary health care concept as it was established in Alma-Ata, (4) the oral health situation in Kuwait and in the Middle-East region and, finally, (5) how POHC policy should be implemented in Kuwait and this region. It can be concluded that, because the caries experience is very high in Kuwait and in the other countries of the Eastern Mediterranean region, good POHC programmes should be designed and implemented in this region. The Faculty of Dentistry will strengthen its research tradition and as a WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC will try to collect information and experience from POHC in this region and exchange ideas between POHC experts in this region on how these programmes could be further developed. This will happen according to the terms of reference and activity plans of the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC approved by the WHO Global Oral Health Programme. PMID:24504110

  2. Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J M

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, was designated as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care (POHC) in 2011. This article aimed to describe the following: (1) the background for this nomination, (2) the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC, its terms of reference and 5 activities, (3) the primary health care concept as it was established in Alma-Ata, (4) the oral health situation in Kuwait and in the Middle-East region and, finally, (5) how POHC policy should be implemented in Kuwait and this region. It can be concluded that, because the caries experience is very high in Kuwait and in the other countries of the Eastern Mediterranean region, good POHC programmes should be designed and implemented in this region. The Faculty of Dentistry will strengthen its research tradition and as a WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC will try to collect information and experience from POHC in this region and exchange ideas between POHC experts in this region on how these programmes could be further developed. This will happen according to the terms of reference and activity plans of the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC approved by the WHO Global Oral Health Programme. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Primary headaches in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is a widespread clinical problem; the prevalence is high in all age groups, from which children and teenagers are not spared. It has been reported that, as many as 75% of school-age children may experience headache infrequently, among them 10% have recurrent headaches. [1],[2] The vast majority of headaches are primary and classified as migraine, tension-type headache (TTH, cluster headache, and other trigeminal autonomic cephalgias. The type of primary headaches could usually be diagnosed by a thorough and careful history taking, and physical examination. Once the diagnosis of migraine is established and appropriate reassurance provided, a balanced and individually tailored treatment plan can be instituted. The goal of treatment includes abortive or acute pain treatment, preventive long-term treatment, and biobehavioral therapy. Knowledge of precise impact of primary headaches on child′s quality of life helps to design a proper comprehensive treatment plan.

  4. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: Design of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severens Johan L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental health problem in the general population, associated with a substantial impact on quality of life and societal costs. However, many depressed patients in primary care do not receive the care they need. Reason for this is that pharmacotherapy is only effective in severely depressed patients and psychological treatments in primary care are scarce and costly. A more feasible treatment in primary care might be computerised cognitive behavioural therapy. This can be a self-help computer program based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. Although previous studies suggest that computerised cognitive behavioural therapy is effective, more research is necessary. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to evaluate the (cost- effectiveness of online computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care. Methods/Design In a randomised trial we will compare (a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy with (b treatment as usual by a GP, and (c computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in combination with usual GP care. Three hundred mild to moderately depressed patients (aged 18–65 will be recruited in the general population by means of a large-scale Internet-based screening (N = 200,000. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three treatment groups. Primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is the severity of depression. Other outcomes include psychological distress, social functioning, and dysfunctional beliefs. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective, in which all costs will be related to clinical effectiveness and health-related quality of life. All outcome assessments will take place on the Internet at baseline, two, three, six, nine, and twelve months. Costs are measured on a monthly basis. A time horizon of one year will be used without long-term extrapolation of either costs or quality of life

  5. Primary design of Si cooling arm structure in ICF cryogenic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Yi Yong; Tang Changhuan; Zhang Jicheng

    2013-01-01

    According to the requirement of the cryogenic target system to the Si cooling arm structure, the Si cooling arm was primarily designed based on the USA National Ignition Facility (NIF) target. A new three-dimensional model of Si cooling arm was developed by SolidWorks software, and the simulation and analysis of Si cooling arm in aspect of mechanical property, thermal response and assembly were made based on the model. A law about the effect of the arm length of Si cooling arm and the width and the length of bifurcation on Si cooling arm was achieved. The research may provide the theoretical foundation and reference for the further improvement of cryogenic target. (authors)

  6. Designing Reflection and Symmetry Learning by Using Math Traditional Dance in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yullys Helsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innovation of education is an important point of Pendidikan Matematika Realistik Indonesia (PMRI, one of them through traditional dance as a context of national cultural. Dance that collaborated with concept of mathematics, it is called Math Traditional Dance. This research aims to produce learning line (specific the material of reflection and symmetry. The research method used is design research that consisted of preparing for the experiments, teaching experiments, and retrospective analysis. Data collected through observation, interviews, documentation and field notes. This research was conducted with 22 students in MIN 2 Palembang. From the try out that is obtained from the formal to the informal learning described in the learning process, so that support learning process of mirroring and symmetry for the students in grade four in elementary school.

  7. Design Safety Used in NASA's Human-rated Primary Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, J.

    2013-01-01

    Single cell tests were benign for external short, inadvertent charge and overdischarge into reversal up to 4.5 A. At lower current loads cells die (may be due to excessive dendrite formation) benignly. String level external short circuits lead to an unbalanced overdischarge, with one cell going into reversal. The result is catastrophic violent venting. Unbalanced string overdischarges at different currents causes catastrophic violent venting also. Heat-to-vent is very dramatic displaying violent venting Simulated internal short is also catastrophic and displays violent venting. Battery is not UL-rated; hence does not have dual-fault tolerance or tolerance to inherent cell tolerance to failures Battery Design for NASA JSC's human-rated application for use on ISS was changed to include two bypass diodes per cell to provide for two-failure tolerance to overdischarge into reversal (and external short) hazards.

  8. Perception of future goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina L.; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The current study: a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender and cultural differences in perception of personal goals. Previous studies show that imagined future events are affected by memories of personal...

  9. Materialistic Values and Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasser, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Materialism comprises a set of values and goals focused on wealth, possessions, image, and status. These aims are a fundamental aspect of the human value/goal system, standing in relative conflict with aims concerning the well-being of others, as well as one's own personal and spiritual growth. Substantial evidence shows that people who place a relatively high priority on materialistic values/goals consume more products and incur more debt, have lower-quality interpersonal relationships, act in more ecologically destructive ways, have adverse work and educational motivation, and report lower personal and physical well-being. Experimentally activating materialistic aims causes similar outcomes. Given these ills, researchers have investigated means of decreasing people's materialism. Successful interventions encourage intrinsic/self-transcendent values/goals, increase felt personal security, and/or block materialistic messages from the environment. These interventions would likely be more effective if policies were also adopted that diminished contemporary culture's focus on consumption, profit, and economic growth.

  10. Primary design and operation analysis of the ITER air transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haitian; Li Ge; Qin Shijun

    2010-01-01

    Air transfer system (ATS) is a remote handling transfer, which can work in the nuclear radiation environment and can be driven by the electricity fully. Its motion power is provided by several servo motors. The remote control technology of ATS, which is China taking part in the plan of international Tokamak experimental reactor (ITER) and grasping this technology, is one of key technologies of ITER. The remote handling technology can lay the foundation for developing demonstration nuclear fusion power plant in China on self-reliance. Because there is gamma irradiation and hazard material in these ITER parts, all required maintenance of port plugs and inner components are been transmitted by ATS. The pick-up or drop-off these components are completed by means of a remotely controlled TCS system between the Vacuum Vessel and the Hot Cell through the bridge-gallery. Tokamak building includes three floors, including upper port, equatorial port and lower port, linked by a lift. According to each port level configuration and safety requirement, the radius of curvature with ATS trajectory is optimized, and a trajectory of each level is determined by positioned guidance beacons. At last, the results of computer aided design (CAD) show single trajectory guidance of ATS in each level is available. (authors)

  11. Rationale, design and baseline results of the Treatment Optimisation in Primary care of Heart failure in the Utrecht region (TOPHU) study : a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Mark J.; Hoes, Arno W.; Mosterd, Arend; Landman, Marcel A.; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Rutten, Frans H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is mainly detected and managed in primary care, but the care is considered suboptimal. We present the rationale, design and baseline results of the Treatment Optimisation in Primary care of Heart failure in the Utrecht region (TOPHU) study. In this study we assess the

  12. Assessment of a pay-for-performance program in primary care designed by target users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Kirsten; Braspenning, Jozé; Akkermans, Reinier P; Jacobs, J E Annelies; Grol, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Evidence for pay-for-performance (P4P) has been searched for in the last decade as financial incentives increased to influence behaviour of health care professionals to improve quality of care. The effectiveness of P4P is inconclusive, though some reviews reported significant effects. To assess changes in performance after introducing a participatory P4P program. An observational study with a pre- and post-measurement. Setting and subjects. Sixty-five general practices in the south of the Netherlands. Intervention. A P4P program designed by target users containing indicators for chronic care, prevention, practice management and patient experience (general practitioner's [GP] functioning and organization of care). Quality indicators were calculated for each practice. A bonus with a maximum of 6890 Euros per 1000 patients was determined by comparing practice performance with a benchmark. Quality indicators for clinical care (process and outcome) and patient experience. We included 60 practices. After 1 year, significant improvement was shown for the process indicators for all chronic conditions ranging from +7.9% improvement for cardiovascular risk management to +11.5% for asthma. Five outcome indicators significantly improved as well as patients' experiences with GP's functioning and organization of care. No significant improvements were seen for influenza vaccination rate and the cervical cancer screening uptake. The clinical process and outcome indicators, as well as patient experience indicators were affected by baseline measures. Smaller practices showed more improvement. A participatory P4P program might stimulate quality improvement in clinical care and improve patient experiences with GP's functioning and the organization of care.

  13. Selfish goals serve more fundamental social and biological goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D Vaughn; Kenrick, Douglas T

    2014-04-01

    Proximate selfish goals reflect the machinations of more fundamental goals such as self-protection and reproduction. Evolutionary life history theory allows us to make predictions about which goals are prioritized over others, which stimuli release which goals, and how the stages of cognitive processing are selectively influenced to better achieve the aims of those goals.

  14. Goal setting in paediatric rehabilitation for children with motor disabilities: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard-Wiart, Lesley; Phelan, Shanon K

    2018-02-01

    The three objectives of this scoping review were to (1) identify key conceptual/theoretical frameworks and the extent to which they are used to inform goal setting related to rehabilitation goal setting with children with motor disabilities, (2) describe research that has evaluated goal setting processes and outcomes, and (3) summarize the purposes of goal setting described in paediatric rehabilitation literature. The scoping review process described by Arksey and O'Malley was used to guide article selection and data extraction. A total of 62 articles were included in the final review. While the concept of family-centered care was well represented, theoretical frameworks specific to goal setting (i.e. goal setting theory described by Locke and Latham, mastery motivation, social cognitive, personal construct, and self-determination theories) were rarely addressed. No articles reviewed addressed prominent behavior change theory. With the exception of the description of tools specifically designed for use with children, the role of the child in the goal setting process was generally absent or not well described. Few studies ( n = 6) discussed the linkage between goals and intervention strategies explicitly. Only two studies in the review evaluated outcomes associated with goal setting. The primary purpose for goal setting identified in the literature was to develop goals that are meaningful to families ( n = 49). The results highlight significant gaps in the literature explicating a sound theoretical basis for goal setting in paediatric rehabilitation and research evaluating the effects of goal qualities and goal setting processes on the achievement of meaningful outcomes.

  15. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in The Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manniën, Judith; Klomp, Trudy; Wiegers, Therese; Pereboom, Monique; Brug, Johannes; de Jonge, Ank; van der Meijde, Margreeth; Hutton, Eileen; Schellevis, Francois; Spelten, Evelien

    2012-03-20

    In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes the research design and methodology of the multicenter multidisciplinary prospective DELIVER study which is the first large-scale study evaluating the quality and provision of primary midwifery care. Between September 2009 and April 2011, data were collected from clients and their partners, midwives and other healthcare professionals across the Netherlands. Clients from twenty midwifery practices received up to three questionnaires to assess the expectations and experiences of clients (e.g. quality of care, prenatal screening, emotions, health, and lifestyle). These client data were linked to data from the Netherlands Perinatal Register and electronic client records kept by midwives. Midwives and practice assistants from the twenty participating practices recorded work-related activities in a diary for one week, to assess workload. Besides, the midwives were asked to complete a questionnaire, to gain insight into collaboration of midwives with other care providers, their tasks and attitude towards their job, and the quality of the care they provide. Another questionnaire was sent to all Dutch midwifery practices which reveals information regarding the organisation of midwifery practices, provision of preconception care, collaboration with other care providers, and provision of care to ethnic minorities. Data at client, midwife and practice level can be linked. Additionally, partners of pregnant women and other care providers were asked about their expectations and experiences regarding the care delivered by midwives and in six practices client consults were videotaped to objectively assess daily practice. In total, 7685 clients completed at least one questionnaire, 136 midwives and

  16. The management of dental caries in primary teeth - involving service providers and users in the design of a trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Zoe; Innes, Nicola; Deery, Chris; Hall, Melanie; Speed, Chris; Douglas, Gail; Clarkson, Jan; Rodd, Helen

    2012-08-22

    There is a lack of evidence for the effective management of dental caries in children's primary teeth. The trial entitled 'Filling Children's Teeth: Indicated Or Not?' (FiCTION) was designed to examine the clinical and cost effectiveness, in primary dental care, of three different approaches to the management of caries in primary teeth. However, before the FiCTION main trial commenced, a pilot trial was designed. Service provider (dentists and other members of the team including dental nurses and practice managers) and participant (child participants and their parents) involvement was incorporated into the pilot trial. The aim of this study is to describe service providers' and users' perspectives on the pilot trial to identify improvements to the conduct and design of the FiCTION main trial. Qualitative interviews (individual and group) were held with dentists, dental team members, children and parents involved in the FiCTION pilot trial. Individual interviews were held with four dentists and a group interview was held with 17 dental team members. Face-to-face interviews were held with four parents and children (four- to eight-years old) representing the three arms of the trial and five telephone interviews were conducted with parents. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. Framework analysis was used. Overall, service providers, children and parents found the pilot trial to be well conducted and an interesting experience. Service providers highlighted the challenges of adhering to research protocols, especially managing the documentation and undertaking new clinical techniques. They indicated that the time and financial commitments were greater than they had anticipated. Particular difficulties were found recruiting suitable patients within the timeframe. For parents recruitment was apparently more related to trusting their dentist than the content of information packs. While some of the older children understood what a study was, others did not understand or

  17. Seismic behavior and design of a primary shield structure consisting of steel-plate composite (SC) walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Peter N., E-mail: boothpn@purdue.edu [Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN (United States); Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN (United States); Sener, Kadir C., E-mail: ksener@purdue.edu [Lyles School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN (United States); Mori, Kentaro, E-mail: kentaro_mori@mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Kobe (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an analytical evaluation of the seismic behavior and design of a unique primary shield (PSW) structure consisting of steel-plate composite (SC) walls designed for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. Researchers in Japan have previously conducted a reduced (1/6th) scale test of a PSW structure to evaluate its seismic (lateral) load-deformation behavior. This paper presents the development and benchmarking of a detailed 3D nonlinear inelastic finite element (NIFE) model to predict the lateral load-deformation response and behavior of the 1/6th scale test structure. The PSW structure consists of thick SC wall segments with complex and irregular geometry that surround the central reactor vessel cavity. The wall segments have three layers of steel plates (one each on the interior and exterior surfaces and one embedded in the middle) that are anchored to the concrete infill with stud anchors. The results from the 3D NIFE analyses include: (i) the lateral load-deformation behavior of the PSW structure, (ii) the progression of yielding in the steel plates, concrete cracking, formation of compression struts, and (iii) the final failure mode. These results are compared and benchmarked using experimental measurements and observations reported by Shodo et al. (2003). The analytical results provide significant insight into the lateral behavior and strength of the PSW structure, and are used for developing a design approach. This design approach starts with ACI 349 code equations for reinforced concrete shear walls and modifies them for application to the PSW structure. A simplified 3D linear elastic finite element (LEFE) model of the PSW structure is also proposed as a conventional structural analysis tool for estimating the design force demands for various load combinations.

  18. Seismic behavior and design of a primary shield structure consisting of steel-plate composite (SC) walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Peter N.; Varma, Amit H.; Sener, Kadir C.; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical evaluation of the seismic behavior and design of a unique primary shield (PSW) structure consisting of steel-plate composite (SC) walls designed for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. Researchers in Japan have previously conducted a reduced (1/6th) scale test of a PSW structure to evaluate its seismic (lateral) load-deformation behavior. This paper presents the development and benchmarking of a detailed 3D nonlinear inelastic finite element (NIFE) model to predict the lateral load-deformation response and behavior of the 1/6th scale test structure. The PSW structure consists of thick SC wall segments with complex and irregular geometry that surround the central reactor vessel cavity. The wall segments have three layers of steel plates (one each on the interior and exterior surfaces and one embedded in the middle) that are anchored to the concrete infill with stud anchors. The results from the 3D NIFE analyses include: (i) the lateral load-deformation behavior of the PSW structure, (ii) the progression of yielding in the steel plates, concrete cracking, formation of compression struts, and (iii) the final failure mode. These results are compared and benchmarked using experimental measurements and observations reported by Shodo et al. (2003). The analytical results provide significant insight into the lateral behavior and strength of the PSW structure, and are used for developing a design approach. This design approach starts with ACI 349 code equations for reinforced concrete shear walls and modifies them for application to the PSW structure. A simplified 3D linear elastic finite element (LEFE) model of the PSW structure is also proposed as a conventional structural analysis tool for estimating the design force demands for various load combinations.

  19. Defining safety goals. 2. Basic Consideration on Defining Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakata, T.

    2001-01-01

    cancer and severe hereditary effects are 10 x 10 -2 /Sv and 1.3 x10 -2 /Sv, respectively. The basic safety goals can be expressed by the complementary accumulative distribution function (CCDF) of dose versus frequencies of events: Pc(C > Cp) 5 (Cp/Co) -α . The aversion factor a is here expressed by the following arbitrary equation, which gives a polynomial curve of the order of m on a logarithmic plane: α = a+b(log(Cp/Co)) m , where: Pc = CCDF frequency for Cp (/yr), Cp = dose (mSv), Co = Cp for Pc =1, a, b, m = constants. Figure 1 shows a typical tolerable risk profile (risk limit curve), which is drawn so that all the points obtained in the previous discussions are above the curve (Co=1, a=1, b=0.0772, and m = 2). Safety criteria by ANS (Ref. 2) and SHE (Ref. 3) are shown in Fig. 1 for comparison. An aversion of a factor of 2 is resulted between 1 mSv and 1 Sv. No ALARA is included, which must be considered in defining specific safety goals. The frequency of a single class of events must be lower than the CCDF profile, and a curve lower by a factor of 10 is drawn in Fig. 1. The doses referenced in the current Japanese safety guidelines and site criteria are shown in Fig. 1. The referenced doses seem reasonable, considering the conservatism in the analysis of design-basis accidents. Specific safety goals for each sort of facility can be defined based on the basic safety goals, reflecting the characteristics of the facilities and considering ALARA. The indexes of engineering terms, such as CMF and LERF, are preferable for nuclear power plants, although interpretation from dose to the engineering terms is needed. Other indexes may be used (such as frequency of criticality accidents, etc.) for facilities except for power plants. The applicability of safety goals will thus be improved. Figure 2 shows the relative risk factors (1, 1%, and 0.1%) versus the severity of radiation effects. This might indicate the adequacy of the risk factors. The absolute risk limits, which

  20. IRIS Responsiveness to Generation IV Road-map Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Paramonov, D.V.; Petrovic, B.

    2002-01-01

    The DOE Generation IV road-map process is in its second and final year. Almost one hundred concepts submitted from all over the world have been reviewed against the Generation IV goals of resources sustainability; safety and reliability; and, economics. Advanced LWRs are taken as the reference point. IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure), a 100-335 MWe integral light water reactor being developed by a vast international consortium led by Westinghouse, is one on the concepts being considered in the road-map and is perhaps the most visible representative of the concept set known as Integral Primary System Reactors (IPSR). This paper presents how IRIS satisfies the prescribed goals. The first goal of resource sustainability includes criteria like utilization of fuel resources, amount and toxicity of waste produced, environmental impact, proliferation and sabotage resistance. As a thermal reactor IRIS does not have the same fuel utilization as fast reactors. However, it has a significant flexibility in fuel cycles as it is designed to utilize either UO 2 or MOX with straight burn cycles of 4 to 10 years, depending on the fissile content. High discharge burnup and Pu recycling result in good fuel utilization and lower waste; IRIS has also attractive proliferation resistance characteristics, due to the reduced accessibility of the fuel. The safety and reliability goal include reliability, workers' exposure, robust safety features, models with well characterized uncertainty, source term and mechanisms of energy release, robust mitigation of accidents. IRIS is significantly better than advanced LWRs because of its safety by design which eliminates a variety of accidents such as LOCAs, its containment vessel coupled design which maintains the core safely covered during the accident sequences, its design simplification features such as no (or reduced) soluble boron, internal shielding and four-year refueling/maintenance interval which significantly reduce

  1. Design analysis of a lead–lithium/supercritical CO2 Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger for primary power recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Iván; Sedano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A design for a PbLi/CO 2 (SC) Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger which optimizes the pressure drop performance is proposed. • Numerical analyses have been performed to optimize the airfoil fins shape and arrangement. • SiC is proposed as structural material and tritium permeation barrier for the PCHE. • The integrated flux is larger than expected and allows reducing the CO 2 mass flow in this sector of the power cycle. • A transport model has been developed to evaluate the permeation of tritium from the liquid metal to the secondary CO 2 . -- Abstract: One of the key issues for fusion power plant technology is the efficient, reliable and safe recovery of the power extracted by the primary coolants. An interesting design option for power conversion cycles based on Dual Coolant Breeding Blankets (DCBB) is a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger, which is supported by the advantages of its compactness, thermal effectiveness, high temperature and pressure capability and corrosion resistance. This work presents a design analysis of a silicon carbide Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger for lead–lithium/supercritical CO 2 at DEMO ranges (4× segmentation)

  2. Integrated learning through student goal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Deborah; Tschannen, Dana; Caylor, Shandra

    2013-09-01

    New strategies are emerging to promote structure and increase learning in the clinical setting. Nursing faculty designed a mechanism by which integrative learning and situated coaching could occur more readily in the clinical setting. The Clinical Goals Initiative was implemented for sophomore-, junior-, and senior-level students in their clinical practicums. Students developed weekly goals reflecting three domains of professional nursing practice. Goals were shared with faculty and staff nurse mentors at the beginning of the clinical day to help guide students and mentors with planning for learning experiences. After 6 weeks, faculty and students were surveyed to evaluate project effectiveness. Faculty indicated that goal development facilitated clinical learning by providing more student engagement, direction, and focus. Students reported that goal development allowed them to optimize clinical learning opportunities and track their growth and progress. Faculty and students indicated the goals promoted student self-learning, autonomy, and student communication with nurse mentors and faculty. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Safety goals for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    This talk presents technology goals developed for Generation IV nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier. These goals are defined in the broad areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. Sustainability goals focus on fuel utilization, waste management, and proliferation resistance. Safety and reliability goals focus on safe and reliable operation, investment protection, and essentially eliminating the need for emergency response. Economics goals focus on competitive life cycle and energy production costs and financial risk. Future reactors fall in three categories - those which are: Certified or derivatives; Designed to a reasonable extent and based on available technology; In conceptual form only with potential to most fully satisfy the GENIV goals

  4. Probabilistic safety assessment goals in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    CANDU safety philosphy, both in design and in licensing, has always had a strong bias towards quantitative probabilistically-based goals derived from comparative safety. Formal probabilistic safety assessment began in Canada as a design tool. The influence of this carried over later on into the definition of the deterministic safety guidelines used in CANDU licensing. Design goals were further developed which extended the consequence/frequency spectrum of 'acceptable' events, from the two points defined by the deterministic single/dual failure analysis, to a line passing through lower and higher frequencies. Since these were design tools, a complete risk summation was not necessary, allowing a cutoff at low event frequencies while preserving the identification of the most significant safety-related events. These goals gave a logical framework for making decisions on implementing design changes proposed as a result of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis. Performing this analysis became a regulatory requirement, and the design goals remained the framework under which this was submitted. Recently, there have been initiatives to incorporate more detailed probabilistic safety goals into the regulatory process in Canada. These range from far-reaching safety optimization across society, to initiatives aimed at the nuclear industry only. The effectiveness of the latter is minor at very low and very high event frequencies; at medium frequencies, a justification against expenditures per life saved in other industries should be part of the goal setting

  5. A Verification Logic for GOAL Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindriks, K. V.

    Although there has been a growing body of literature on verification of agents programs, it has been difficult to design a verification logic for agent programs that fully characterizes such programs and to connect agent programs to agent theory. The challenge is to define an agent programming language that defines a computational framework but also allows for a logical characterization useful for verification. The agent programming language GOAL has been originally designed to connect agent programming to agent theory and we present additional results here that GOAL agents can be fully represented by a logical theory. GOAL agents can thus be said to execute the corresponding logical theory.

  6. PATIENT-CENTRED SCREENING FOR PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCY, A MULTI-STAGE DIAGNOSTIC PROTOCOL DESIGNED FOR NONIMMUNOLOGISTS: 2011 UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. de Vries

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Members of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID and other colleagues have updated themulti-stage expert-opinion-based diagnostic protocol for non-immunologists incorporating newly defined primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs. The protocol presented here aims to increase the awareness of PIDs among doctors working in different fields. Prompt identification of PID is important for prognosis, but this may not be an easy task. The protocol therefore starts from the clinical presentation of the patient. Because PIDs may present at all ages, this protocol is aimed at both adult and paediatric physicians. The multi-stage design allows cost-effective screening for PID of the large number of potential cases in the early phases, with more expensive tests reserved for definitive classification in collaboration with a specialist in the field of immunodeficiency at a later stage.

  7. e-Vita: design of an innovative approach to COPD disease management in primary care through eHealth application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom-Kamp, E P W A; Verdijk, N A; Blom, C M G; Harmans, L M; Talboom, I J S H; Numans, M E; Chavannes, N H

    2016-08-16

    COPD is a highly complex disease to manage as patients show great variation in symptoms and limitations in daily life. In the last decade self-management support of COPD has been introduced as an effective method to improve quality and efficiency of care, and to reduce healthcare costs. Despite the urge to change the organisation of health care and the potential of eHealth to support this, large-scale implementation in daily practice remains behind, especially in the Netherlands. We designed a multilevel study, called e-Vita, to investigate different organisational implementation methods of a self-management web portal to support and empower patients with COPD in three different primary care settings. Using a parallel cohort design, the clinical effects of the web portal will be assessed using an interrupted times series (ITS) study design and measured according to changes in health status with the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ). The different implementations and net benefits of self-management through eHealth on clinical outcomes will be evaluated from human, organisational, and technical perspectives. To our knowledge this is the first study to combine different study designs that enable simultaneous investigation of clinical effects, as well as effects of different organisational implementation methods whilst controlling for confounding effects of the organisational characteristics. We hypothesize that an implementation with higher levels of personal assistance, and integrated in an existing care program will result in increased use of and satisfaction with the platform, thereby increasing health status and diminishing exacerbation and hospitalisation. NTR4098 (31-07-2013).

  8. Systems consultation: protocol for a novel implementation strategy designed to promote evidence-based practice in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Andrew; Brown, Randall T; E Zgierska, Aleksandra; A Johnson, Roberta; Robinson, James M; Jacobson, Nora

    2016-01-27

    Adoption of evidence-based practices takes place at a glacial place in healthcare. This research will pilot test an innovative implementation strategy - systems consultation -intended to speed the adoption of evidence-based practice in primary care. The strategy is based on tenets of systems engineering and has been extensively tested in addiction treatment. Three innovations have been included in the strategy - translation of a clinical practice guideline into a checklist-based implementation guide, the use of physician peer coaches ('systems consultants') to help clinics implement the guide, and a focus on reducing variation in practices across prescribers and clinics. The implementation strategy will be applied to improving opioid prescribing practices in primary care, which may help ultimately mitigate the increasing prevalence of opioid abuse and addiction. The pilot test will compare four intervention clinics to four control clinics in a matched-pairs design. A leading clinical guideline for opioid prescribing has been translated into a checklist-based implementation guide in a systematic process that involved experts who wrote the guideline in consultation with implementation experts and primary care physicians. Two physicians with expertise in family and addiction medicine are serving as the systems consultants. Each systems consultant will guide two intervention clinics, using two site visits and follow-up communication by phone and email, to implement the translated guideline. Mixed methods will be used to test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of the implementation strategy in an evaluation that meets standards for 'fully developed use' of the RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance). The clinic will be the primary unit of analysis. The systems consultation implementation strategy is intended to generalize to the adoption of other clinical guidelines. This pilot test is intended to prepare

  9. Effect of 3basic life support training programs in future primary school teachers. A quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Patón, R; Freire-Tellado, M; Basanta-Camiño, S; Barcala-Furelos, R; Arufe-Giraldez, V; Rodriguez-Fernández, J E

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the learning of basic life support (BLS) measures on the part of laypersons after 3different teaching programs. A quasi-experimental before-after study involving a non-probabilistic sample without a control group was carried out. Primary school teacher students from the University of Santiago (Spain). A total of 124 students (68.8% women and 31.2% men) aged 20-39 years (M=22.23; SD=3.79), with no previous knowledge of BLS, were studied. Three teaching programs were used: a traditional course, an audio-visual approach and feedback devices. Chest compressions as sole cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill evaluation: average compression depth, compression rate, chest recoil percentage and percentage of correct compressions. Automated external defibrillator: time needed to apply a shock before and after the course. There were significant differences in the results obtained after 2minutes of chest compressions, depending on the training program received, with feedback devices having a clear advantage referred to average compression depth (p<0.001), compression rate (p<0.001), chest recoil percentage (p<0.001) and percentage of correct compressions (p<0.001). Regarding automated external defibrillator, statistically significant differences were found in T after (p=0.025). The teaching course using feedback devices obtained the best results in terms of the quality of chest compressions, followed by the traditional course and audio-visual approach. These favorable results were present in both men and women. All 3teaching methods reached the goal of reducing defibrillation time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Designing Multimodal User-Interfaces for Effective E-Learning in the School Primary Stages Applied on Real Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheddin Odeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution focuses on the development and design of e-learning tools for school students in primary stages through dealing and considering the math of real fractions, which presents an example of learning material difficult to understand by many school students and a real challenge for e-learning designers and multimedia authoring. Firstly, we will highlight several problems facing school students and teachers caused by the traditional learning approach. Then, we are going to discuss some aspects related to e-learning, the major theoretical issues of educational psychology and e-learning with various modalities related to our work, and the classification of the interactive multimedia methodologies adopted in this work. Furthermore, the software-ergonomic and –architectural features of the developed e-learning tool will be introduced. Finally, the paper will conclude with a brief summary of a usability testing carried out to compare the developed e-learning user-interface with the traditional learning approach.

  11. Self-Management for Primary School Students Demonstrating Problem Behavior in Regular Classrooms: Evidence Review of Single-Case Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Margherita L.; Anderson, Angelika; Moore, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    This review evaluates self-management literature targeting problem behaviors of primary school students in general education settings. Thirty-one single-case design studies met inclusion criteria, of which 16 demonstrated adequate methodological rigor, according to What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) design standards. Visual analysis and WWC…

  12. Maximization of primary energy savings of solar heating and cooling systems by transient simulations and computer design of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calise, F.; Palombo, A.; Vanoli, L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the simulation of the performance of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems is analyzed. Three different plant layouts are considered: (i) the first one consists of evacuated solar collectors and a single-stage LiBr-H 2 O absorption chiller; here in order to integrate the system in case of insufficient solar radiation, an electric water-cooled chiller is activated; (ii) configuration of the secondly considered system is similar to the first one, but the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized for balancing about 30% of the building cooling load only; (iii) the layout of the thirdly considered system differs from the first one since the auxiliary electric chiller is replaced by a gas-fired heater. Such system configurations also include: circulation pumps, storage tanks, feedback controllers, mixers, diverters and on/off hysteresis controllers. All such devices are modelled for maximizing the system energy efficiency. In order to simulate the systems' performance for dynamic heating/cooling loads, a single-lumped capacitance building is also modelled and implemented in the computer code. A cost model is also developed in order to calculate the systems' operating and capital costs. All the models and the relative simulations are carried out by TRNSYS. A design of experiment procedure is also included. By such tool the effects of the system operating parameters' variation on the relative energy efficiency are analyzed. In addition, the set of synthesis/design variables maximizing the system's energetic performance can be also identified. The annual primary energy saving is chosen as the optimization objective function, whereas collector slope, pump flows, set-point temperatures and tank volume are selected as optimizing system design variables. A case study was developed for an office building located in South Italy. Here, the energetic and the economic analysis for all the three considered system layouts are carried out. The

  13. Predicting Subsequent Task Performance From Goal Motivation and Goal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catherine Healy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated that the cognitive processes associated with goal pursuit can continue to interfere with unrelated tasks when a goal is unfulfilled. Drawing from the self-regulation and goal-striving literatures, the present study explored the impact of goal failure on subsequent cognitive and physical task performance. Furthermore, we examined if the autonomous or controlled motivation underpinning goal striving moderates the responses to goal failure. Athletes (75 male, 59 female, Mage = 19.90 years, SDage = 3.50 completed a cycling trial with the goal of covering a given distance in 8 minutes. Prior to the trial, their motivation was primed using a video. During the trial they were provided with manipulated performance feedback, thus creating conditions of goal success or failure. No differences emerged in the responses to goal failure between the primed motivation or performance feedback conditions. We make recommendations for future research into how individuals can deal with failure in goal striving.

  14. Goal setting: an integral component of effective diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K; Bauman, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Goal setting is a widely used behavior change tool in diabetes education and training. Prior research found specific relatively difficult but attainable goals set within a specific timeframe improved performance in sports and at the workplace. However, the impact of goal setting in diabetes self-care has not received extensive attention. This review examined the mechanisms underlying behavioral change according to goal setting theory and evaluated the impact of goal setting in diabetes intervention studies. Eight studies were identified, which incorporated goal setting as the primary strategy to promote behavioral change in individual, group-based, and primary care settings among patients with type 2 diabetes. Improvements in diabetes-related self-efficacy, dietary intake, physical activity, and A1c were observed in some but not all studies. More systematic research is needed to determine the conditions and behaviors for which goal setting is most effective. Initial recommendations for using goal setting in diabetes patient encounters are offered.

  15. Motivational Goal Bracketing: An Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    We study in an online, real-effort experiment how the bracketing of non-binding goals affects performance in a work-leisure self-control problem. We externally induce the goal bracket - daily goals or a weekly goal - and within that bracket let subjects set goals for how much they want to work over...... a one-week period. Our theoretical model predicts (i) that weekly goals create incentives to compensate for a lower than desired performance today with the promise to work harder tomorrow, whereas daily goals exclude such excuses; (ii) that subjects with daily goals set higher goals in aggregate...... and work harder than those with weekly goals. Our data support these predictions. Surprisingly, however, when goals are combined with an externally enforced commitment that requires subjects to spend less than a minute each day on the task to get started working, performance deteriorates because of high...

  16. Achievement goals, self-handicapping, and performance: a 2 x 2 achievement goal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, Nikos; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Smith, Alison L

    2009-11-01

    Elliot and colleagues (2006) examined the effects of experimentally induced achievement goals, proposed by the trichotomous model, on self-handicapping and performance in physical education. Our study replicated and extended the work of Elliot et al. by experimentally promoting all four goals proposed by the 2 x 2 model (Elliot & McGregor, 2001), measuring the participants' own situational achievement goals, using a relatively novel task, and testing the participants in a group setting. We used a randomized experimental design with four conditions that aimed to induce one of the four goals advanced by the 2 x 2 model. The participants (n = 138) were undergraduates who engaged in a dart-throwing task. The results pertaining to self-handicapping partly replicated Elliot and colleagues' findings by showing that experimentally promoted performance-avoidance goals resulted in less practice. In contrast, the promotion of mastery-avoidance goals did not result in less practice compared with either of the approach goals. Dart-throwing performance did not differ among the four goal conditions. Personal achievement goals did not moderate the effects of experimentally induced goals on self-handicapping and performance. The extent to which mastery-avoidance goals are maladaptive is discussed, as well as the interplay between personal and experimentally induced goals.

  17. Property company's sustainability goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormsby, Kim

    2014-11-01

    In a keynote presentation on the second morning of this year's Healthcare Estates conference, Kim Ormsby (pictured), national corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability manager at NHS Property Services, discussed how, as part of its broader goals of 'supporting the NHS in delivering clinical services', and 'helping to enhance the experience' of patients visiting its buildings, the organization would continue to pursue and embed in its activities sustainable policies wherever and whenever possible, encouraging both its staff and tenants to take a similar approach. In an informative address, she highlighted some of the key steps the property company had already taken to encourage a proactive approach. Echoing the sentiments of Day One keynote speaker, Julian Hartley (see pages 55-60), she argued that one of the fundamentals to success was wide-ranging staff engagement.

  18. Different way, same goal

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso & Fabio Capello

    2012-01-01

    Radio-oncologists and radiotherapists represented a large proportion of the doctors and clinicians who attended the ICTR-PHE 2012 conference. With them were also biologists and doctors of nuclear medicine. They presented the state of the art of their research that touches on the genetics and biology of tumours as well as on futuristic drugs that selectively target malignant cells. The future of cancer treatment seems to lie in the personalised approach.   When the members of the life sciences community took over from the physicists, the focus remained basically the same. Just another sign of the fact that the different communities are leading the same battle and have the same goal. However, the methodologies and issues can be very different. The example of hadrontherapy illustrates the situation well: while for physicists this is a relatively well-established concept, medical doctors consider that the amount of patient data available is still very small. Several clinical trials are in progress ...

  19. DOE goals: Excellence, openness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T.H.

    1989-01-01

    The author feels that the benefit of the experience and programmatic resources it has developed since passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1982 and of the sound and flexible policy framework provided by the amendments, DOE is confident that program objectives can be met on a schedule that balances the needs for technical excellence, institutional openness, and timely acceptance. As the program evolves, DOE will continue to assess how effectively policies are serving program objectives. The need for flexibility in developing a first-of-a-kind system is essential. But flexibility does not alter the need for program stability, which, in turn, requires a commonly shared commitment to realizing the program's goals. This commitment must rest upon a pragmatic understanding of the realities of waste-management system development

  20. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondevila, Damian; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Monica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (α max ) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining α max , which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t E ) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL e ) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that α max increases for increasing TVL e (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t E , with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation

  1. Maximum dose angle for oblique incidence on primary beam protective barriers in the design of medical radiation therapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevila, Damián; Arbiser, Silvio; Sansogne, Rosana; Brunetto, Mónica; Dosoretz, Bernardo

    2008-05-01

    Primary barrier determinations for the shielding of medical radiation therapy facilities are generally made assuming normal beam incidence on the barrier, since this is geometrically the most unfavorable condition for that shielding barrier whenever the occupation line is allowed to run along the barrier. However, when the occupation line (for example, the wall of an adjacent building) runs perpendicular to the barrier (especially roof barrier), then two opposing factors come in to play: increasing obliquity angle with respect to the barrier increases the attenuation, while the distance to the calculation point decreases, hence, increasing the dose. As a result, there exists an angle (alpha(max)) for which the equivalent dose results in a maximum, constituting the most unfavorable geometric condition for that shielding barrier. Based on the usual NCRP Report No. 151 model, this article presents a simple formula for obtaining alpha(max), which is a function of the thickness of the barrier (t(E)) and the equilibrium tenth-value layer (TVL(e)) of the shielding material for the nominal energy of the beam. It can be seen that alpha(max) increases for increasing TVL(e) (hence, beam energy) and decreases for increasing t(E), with a range of variation that goes from 13 to 40 deg for concrete barriers thicknesses in the range of 50-300 cm and most commercially available teletherapy machines. This parameter has not been calculated in the existing literature for radiotherapy facilities design and has practical applications, as in calculating the required unoccupied roof shielding for the protection of a nearby building located in the plane of the primary beam rotation.

  2. Cardiovascular disease medication health literacy among Indigenous peoples: design and protocol of an intervention trial in Indigenous primary care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crengle, Sue; Smylie, Janet; Kelaher, Margaret; Lambert, Michelle; Reid, Susan; Luke, Joanne; Anderson, Ian; Harré Hindmarsh, Jennie; Harwood, Matire

    2014-07-12

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are leading causes of mortality and morbidity among Indigenous people in New Zealand, Australia and Canada and are a major driver of the inequities in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in these countries. Evidence-based pharmaceutical management of CVD can significantly reduce mortality and morbidity for persons diagnosed with CVD or for those at intermediate or high risk of CVD. Health literacy has been identified as a major barrier in the communication and implementation of appropriate pharmaceutical management plans for CVD. Addressing health literacy is particularly relevant in Indigenous populations where there are unique health and adult literacy challenges. This study will examine the effect of a customized, structured CVD medication programme, delivered by health professionals, on the health literacy of Indigenous people with, or at risk, of CVD. Primary outcomes are patient's knowledge about CVD medications; secondary outcomes examine changes in health literacy skills and practices. The study will employ a multi-site pre-post design with multiple measurement points to assess intervention efficacy. Participants will be recruited from four Indigenous primary care services in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Three educational sessions will be delivered over four weeks. A tablet application will support the education sessions and produce a customized pill card for each participant. Participants will be provided with written information about CVD medications. Medication knowledge scores, and specific health literacy skills and practices will be assessed before and after the three sessions. Statistical analyses will identify significant changes in outcomes over each session, and from the pre-session one to post-session three time points. This study will make an important contribution to understanding the effect of a structured primary care-based intervention on CVD health literacy in Indigenous

  3. A web-based computer-tailored smoking prevention programme for primary school children: intervention design and study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the number of smokers has declined in the last decade, smoking is still a major health problem among youngsters and adolescents. For this reason, there is a need for effective smoking prevention programmes targeting primary school children. A web-based computer-tailored feedback programme may be an effective intervention to stimulate youngsters not to start smoking, and increase their knowledge about the adverse effects of smoking and their attitudes and self-efficacy regarding non-smoking. Methods & design This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a web-based out-of-school smoking prevention programme for primary school children (age 10-13 years) entitled ‘Fun without Smokes’. It is a transformation of a postal mailed intervention to a web-based intervention. Besides this transformation the effects of prompts will be examined. This web-based intervention will be evaluated in a 2-year cluster randomised controlled trial (c-RCT) with three study arms. An intervention and intervention + prompt condition will be evaluated for effects on smoking behaviour, compared with a no information control condition. Information about pupils’ smoking status and other factors related to smoking will be obtained using a web-based questionnaire. After completing the questionnaire pupils in both intervention conditions will receive three computer-tailored feedback letters in their personal e-mail box. Attitudes, social influences and self-efficacy expectations will be the content of these personalised feedback letters. Pupils in the intervention + prompt condition will - in addition to the personalised feedback letters - receive e-mail and SMS messages prompting them to revisit the ‘Fun without Smokes’ website. The main outcome measures will be ever smoking and the utilisation of the ‘Fun without Smokes’ website. Measurements will be carried out at baseline, 12 months and 24 months of follow-up. Discussion The present study

  4. A web-based computer-tailored smoking prevention programme for primary school children: intervention design and study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremers Henricus-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the number of smokers has declined in the last decade, smoking is still a major health problem among youngsters and adolescents. For this reason, there is a need for effective smoking prevention programmes targeting primary school children. A web-based computer-tailored feedback programme may be an effective intervention to stimulate youngsters not to start smoking, and increase their knowledge about the adverse effects of smoking and their attitudes and self-efficacy regarding non-smoking. Methods & design This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a web-based out-of-school smoking prevention programme for primary school children (age 10-13 years entitled ‘Fun without Smokes’. It is a transformation of a postal mailed intervention to a web-based intervention. Besides this transformation the effects of prompts will be examined. This web-based intervention will be evaluated in a 2-year cluster randomised controlled trial (c-RCT with three study arms. An intervention and intervention + prompt condition will be evaluated for effects on smoking behaviour, compared with a no information control condition. Information about pupils’ smoking status and other factors related to smoking will be obtained using a web-based questionnaire. After completing the questionnaire pupils in both intervention conditions will receive three computer-tailored feedback letters in their personal e-mail box. Attitudes, social influences and self-efficacy expectations will be the content of these personalised feedback letters. Pupils in the intervention + prompt condition will - in addition to the personalised feedback letters - receive e-mail and SMS messages prompting them to revisit the ‘Fun without Smokes’ website. The main outcome measures will be ever smoking and the utilisation of the ‘Fun without Smokes’ website. Measurements will be carried out at baseline, 12 months and 24 months of follow

  5. Medical libraries and achieving sustainable development goals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical libraries and achieving sustainable development goals in Nigeria. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... United Nations 2015 Sustainable Development Goal 3 is designed to achieve good health and well - being for ...

  6. on Goal Framing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulàlia P. Abril

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En respuesta a la enorme y algunas veces conceptualmente inconsistente literatura sobre valence framing,Levin y sus colegas (1998 desarrollaron una tipología de encuadre de valencia que organiza los diferentesresultados a partir de elección arriesgada, atributo, y encuadre de los resultados (goal framing. Este estudiofavorece la literatura sobre encuadre de los resultados mediante (a su aplicación en el contexto de una cuestiónsocial como la pobreza infantil extrema; y (b el examen de los mecanismos afectivos sobre el cual el encuadrede los resultados es de eficacia persuasiva. Los resultados experimentales (N = 197 mostraron que la exposiciónal mensaje de encuadre de pérdida permitió un apoyo mayor hacia las políticas públicas que buscan erradicar lapobreza infantil, en comparación con el mensaje de encuadre de ganancia. Los resultados también revelaronque el afecto negativo sirve como herramienta mediadora de apoyo hacia las políticas públicas. Estos hallazgossugieren que, en el contexto del apoyo social hacia la población pobre, la capacidad de persuasión dentro delencuadre de pérdida se facilita cuando los participantes experimentan afectos negativos.

  7. Iterative design of peptide-based hydrogels and the effect of network electrostatics on primary chondrocyte behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthuvanich, Chomdao; Haines-Butterick, Lisa A; Nagy, Katelyn J; Schneider, Joel P

    2012-10-01

    Iterative peptide design was used to generate two peptide-based hydrogels to study the effect of network electrostatics on primary chondrocyte behavior. MAX8 and HLT2 peptides have formal charge states of +7 and +5 per monomer, respectively. These peptides undergo triggered folding and self-assembly to afford hydrogel networks having similar rheological behavior and local network morphologies, yet different electrostatic character. Each gel can be used to directly encapsulate and syringe-deliver cells. The influence of network electrostatics on cell viability after encapsulation and delivery, extracellular matrix deposition, gene expression, and the bulk mechanical properties of the gel-cell constructs as a function of culture time was assessed. The less electropositive HLT2 gel provides a microenvironment more conducive to chondrocyte encapsulation, delivery, and phenotype maintenance. Cell viability was higher for this gel and although a moderate number of cells dedifferentiated to a fibroblast-like phenotype, many retained their chondrocytic behavior. As a result, gel-cell constructs prepared with HLT2, cultured under static in vitro conditions, contained more GAG and type II collagen resulting in mechanically superior constructs. Chondrocytes delivered in the more electropositive MAX8 gel experienced a greater degree of cell death during encapsulation and delivery and the remaining viable cells were less prone to maintain their phenotype. As a result, MAX8 gel-cell constructs had fewer cells, of which a limited number were capable of laying down cartilage-specific ECM. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Goal conflict and goal facilitation as predictors of daily accelerometer-assessed physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presseau, Justin; Tait, Richard I; Johnston, Derek W; Francis, Jill J; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2013-12-01

    To test whether perceptions of conflicting and facilitating personal goals, and actual daily time spent in their pursuit, predict accelerometer-assessed physical activity (PA). A prospective multilevel design with a daily accelerometer-based assessment of PA over 1 week was used (N = 106). Participants' personal goals were elicited using personal projects analysis. Participants then rated their personal goals in terms of how they were perceived to facilitate and conflict with their regular PA. Items assessing PA-specific intention and perceived behavioral control (PBC) were also embedded within the baseline measures. For the subsequent 7 consecutive days, participants completed a daily diary based on the day reconstruction method, indicating the time spent in daily episodes involving each of their personal goals, and wore an RT3 tri-axial accelerometer. The main outcome was accelerometer-assessed daily time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Random intercept multilevel models indicated that perceived goal facilitation, but not perceived goal conflict, predicted MVPA over and above intention and PBC. Daily time pursuing conflicting goals negatively predicted MVPA when subsequently added to the model and in so doing, attenuated the association between perceived goal facilitation and MVPA. Perceived goal facilitation predicts objectively measured PA over and above intention and PBC, but daily time spent in pursuit of conflicting personal goals provides a better account of how alternative goals relate to engaging in regular PA.

  9. Does monitoring goal progress promote goal attainment? A meta-analysis of the experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Benjamin; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Prestwich, Andrew; Conner, Mark; Kellar, Ian; Benn, Yael; Sheeran, Paschal

    2016-02-01

    Control theory and other frameworks for understanding self-regulation suggest that monitoring goal progress is a crucial process that intervenes between setting and attaining a goal, and helps to ensure that goals are translated into action. However, the impact of progress monitoring interventions on rates of behavioral performance and goal attainment has yet to be quantified. A systematic literature search identified 138 studies (N = 19,951) that randomly allocated participants to an intervention designed to promote monitoring of goal progress versus a control condition. All studies reported the effects of the treatment on (a) the frequency of progress monitoring and (b) subsequent goal attainment. A random effects model revealed that, on average, interventions were successful at increasing the frequency of monitoring goal progress (d+ = 1.98, 95% CI [1.71, 2.24]) and promoted goal attainment (d+ = 0.40, 95% CI [0.32, 0.48]). Furthermore, changes in the frequency of progress monitoring mediated the effect of the interventions on goal attainment. Moderation tests revealed that progress monitoring had larger effects on goal attainment when the outcomes were reported or made public, and when the information was physically recorded. Taken together, the findings suggest that monitoring goal progress is an effective self-regulation strategy, and that interventions that increase the frequency of progress monitoring are likely to promote behavior change. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Goal setting in practice : the effects of personality and perceptions of the goal-setting process on job satisfaction and goal commitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bipp, T.; Kleingeld, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study was to investigate how individual perceptions by employees of a goal-setting program and personality traits influence job satisfaction and goal commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Using the German version of Locke and Latham’s goal-setting questionnaire, 97

  11. Safety goals for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This report presents and discusses the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's, Policy Statement on Safety Goals for the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants. The safety goals have been formulated in terms of qualitative goals and quantitative design objectives. The qualitative goals state that the risk to any individual member of the public from nuclear power plant operation should not be a significant contributor to that individual's risk of accidental death or injury and that the societal risks should be comparable to or less than those of viable competing technologies. The quantitative design objectives state that the average risks to individual and the societal risks of nuclear power plant operation should not exceed 0.1% of certain other risks to which members of the US population are exposed. A subsidiary quantitative design objective is established for the frequency of large-scale core melt. The significance of the goals and objectives, their bases and rationale, and the plan to evaluate the goals are provided. In addition, public comments on the 1982 proposed policy statement and responses to a series of questions that accompanied the 1982 statement are summarized

  12. Proposed goals for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.P.; Frazier, D.H.; Hoos, I.R.; McGrath, P.E.; Metlay, D.S.; Stoneman, W.C.; Watson, R.A.

    1977-04-01

    Goals are proposed for the national radioactive waste management program to establish a policy basis for the guidance and coordination of the activities of government, business, and academic organizations whose responsibility it will be to manage radioactive wastes. The report is based on findings, interpretations, and analyses of selected primary literature and interviews of personnel concerned with waste management. Public concerns are identified, their relevance assessed, and a conceptual framework is developed that facilitates understanding of the dimensions and demands of the radioactive waste management problem. The nature and scope of the study are described along with the approach used to arrive at a set of goals appropriately focused on waste management

  13. Handbook of critical issues in goal programming

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, C

    1991-01-01

    Goal Programming (GP) is perhaps the oldest and most widely used approach within the Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) paradigm. GP combines the logic of optimisation in mathematical programming with the decision maker's desire to satisfy several goals. The primary purpose of this book is to identify the critical issues in GP and to demonstrate different procedures capable of avoiding or mitigating the inherent pitfalls associated with these issues. The outcome of a search of the literature shows many instances where GP models produced misleading or even erroneous results simply because

  14. Design a Solid Waste Management Course for Primary School focus on Reduce-Reuse-Recycle : Project: WastED – Export of Education, Waste Management - Target market: Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Linh

    2014-01-01

    This product-oriented Bachelor’s thesis looks at waste-management education in primary schools. The primary objective of the study was to design a basic wastemanagement course, concisely packed in a booklet, ready-to-use for teachers and trainers. The outcome of the thesis, the booklet (content of the course) is expected to be used as one of the materials for the WastED project – Export of Education in Waste Management. The study is made up of theory sections and a product design se...

  15. Body Image in Primary Schools: A pilot evaluation of a primary school intervention program designed by teachers to improve children's body satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emma; Yager, Zali; Paraskeva, Nicole; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Smith, Hilary; White, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Body Image in the Primary School (Hutchinson & Calland, 2011) is a body image curriculum that is widely available but has not yet been evaluated. This study evaluates a set of 6 of the 49 available lessons from this curriculum. Seventy-four girls and 70 boys aged 9-10 were recruited from four primary schools in the UK. Schools were randomly allocated into the intervention condition, where students received 6hours of body image lessons, or to lessons as normal. Body esteem was significantly higher among girls in the intervention group, compared to the control group, immediately post intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Moreover, girls with lowest levels of body esteem at baseline reported the largest gains. Internalization was significantly lower among boys in the control group compared to the intervention group at 3-month follow-up. The pattern of results among the control group raises interesting issues for intervention evaluation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Goal difficulty and openness to interpersonal goal support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Righetti, F.; Kumashiro, M.; Campbell, S.

    2014-01-01

    When people pursue important goals, they are often surrounded by close others who could provide help and support for the achievement of these goals. The present work investigated whether people are more likely to be open to such interpersonal goal support from a romantic partner when they perceive

  17. The effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and renewable power in support of holistic environmental goals: Part 2 - Design and operation implications for load-balancing resources on the electric grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarroja, Brian; Eichman, Joshua D.; Zhang, Li; Brown, Tim M.; Samuelsen, Scott

    2015-03-01

    A study has been performed that analyzes the effectiveness of utilizing plug-in vehicles to meet holistic environmental goals across the combined electricity and transportation sectors. In this study, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) penetration levels are varied from 0 to 60% and base renewable penetration levels are varied from 10 to 63%. The first part focused on the effect of installing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on the environmental performance of the combined electricity and transportation sectors. The second part addresses impacts on the design and operation of load-balancing resources on the electric grid associated with fleet capacity factor, peaking and load-following generator capacity, efficiency, ramp rates, start-up events and the levelized cost of electricity. PHEVs using smart charging are found to counteract many of the disruptive impacts of intermittent renewable power on balancing generators for a wide range of renewable penetration levels, only becoming limited at high renewable penetration levels due to lack of flexibility and finite load size. This study highlights synergy between sustainability measures in the electric and transportation sectors and the importance of communicative dispatch of these vehicles.

  18. Continuous Biometric Authentication for Authorized Aircraft Personnel: A Proposed Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrillo, Cassandra

    2003-01-01

    .... The primary goal of this thesis is to propose a hypothetical design for the use of a non- intrusive mechanism on the flight deck of an aircraft to provide continuous or periodic authentication...

  19. Path to development of quantitative safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; Houghton, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    There is a growing interest in defining numerical safety goals for nuclear power plants as exemplified by an ACRS recommendation. This paper proposes a lower frequency limit of approximately 10 -4 /reactor-year for design basis events. Below this frequency, down, to a small frequency such as 10 -5 /reactor-year, safety margin can be provided by, say, site emergency plans. Accident sequences below 10 -5 should not impact public safety, but it is prudent that safety research programs examine sequences with significant consequences. Once tentatively agreed upon, quantitative safety goals together with associated implementation tools would be factored into regulatory and design processes

  20. Achievement Goals and their Underlying Goal Motivation: Does it Matter Why Sport Participants Pursue their Goals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Gaudreau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether the good or bad outcomes associated with mastery-approach (MAP and performance-approach (PAP goals depend on the extent to which they are motivated by autonomous or controlled motivation. A sample of 515 undergraduate students who participated in sport completed measures of achievement goals, motivation of achievement goals, perceived goal attainment, sport satisfaction, and both positive and negative affect. Results of moderated regression analyses revealed that the positive relations of both MAP and PAP goals with perceived goal attainment were stronger for athletes pursuing these goals with high level of autonomous goal motivation. Also, the positive relations between PAP goals and both sport satisfaction and positive affect were stronger at high levels of autonomous goal motivation and controlled goal motivation. The shape of all these significant interactions was consistent with tenets of Self-Determination Theory as controlled goal motivation was negatively associated with positive affect and sport satisfaction and positively associated with negative affect. Overall, these findings demonstrated the importance of considering goal motivation in order to better understand the conditions under which achievement goals are associated with better experiential and performance outcomes in the lives of sport participants.

  1. Punishment goals of crime victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Uli

    2003-04-01

    Research on subjective punishment goals has focused on the perspective of third-party observers of criminal offenses and neglected the perspective of victims. This study investigates punishment goals among 174 adult crime victims (rape and nonsexual assault) for each participant's real criminal case. Scales measuring support for punishment goals are constructed by factor analysis of an 18-item list. Results show that 5 highly supported goals can be distinguished: retaliation, recognition of victim status, confirmation of societal values, victim security, and societal security. Analysis of relations between punishment goal scales and personal variables, situational variables, and demanded punishment severity corroborates the view that the punishment goals revealed can be classified according to the two independent dichotomies of moral versus instrumental goals, and micro versus macro goals.

  2. Teachers' goal orientations: Effects on classroom goal structures and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Hall, Nathan C; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C

    2017-03-01

    Prior research has shown teachers' goal orientations to influence classroom goal structures (Retelsdorf et al., 2010, Learning and Instruction, 20, 30) and to also impact their emotions (Schutz et al., 2007, Emotion in education, Academic Press, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). However, empirical research evaluating possible causal ordering and mediation effects involving these variables in teachers is presently lacking. The present 6-month longitudinal study investigated the relations between varied motivational, behavioural, and emotional variables in practising teachers. More specifically, this study examined the reciprocal, longitudinal relations between teachers' achievement goals, classroom goal structures, and teaching-related emotions, as well as cumulative mediational models in which observed causal relations were evaluated. Participants were 495 practising teachers from Canada (86% female, M = 42 years). Teachers completed a web-based questionnaire at two time points assessing their instructional goals, perceived classroom goal structures, achievement emotions, and demographic items. Results from cross-lagged analyses and structural equation modelling showed teachers' achievement goals to predict their perceived classroom goal structures that, in turn, predicted their teaching-related emotions. The present results inform both Butler's (2012, Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 726) theory on teachers' achievement goals and Frenzel's (2014, International handbook of emotions in education, Routledge, New York, NY) model of teachers' emotions in showing teachers' instructional goals to both directly predict their teaching-related emotions, as well as indirectly through the mediating effects of classroom goal structures. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Design of a prototype position actuator for the primary mirror segments of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, A.; Morante, E.; Viera, T.; Núñez, M.; Reyes, M.

    2010-07-01

    European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) based in 984 primary mirror segments achieving required optical performance; they must position relatively to adjacent segments with relative nanometer accuracy. CESA designed M1 Position Actuators (PACT) to comply with demanding performance requirements of EELT. Three PACT are located under each segment controlling three out of the plane degrees of freedom (tip, tilt, piston). To achieve a high linear accuracy in long operational displacements, PACT uses two stages in series. First stage based on Voice Coil Actuator (VCA) to achieve high accuracies in very short travel ranges, while second stage based on Brushless DC Motor (BLDC) provides large stroke ranges and allows positioning the first stage closer to the demanded position. A BLDC motor is used achieving a continuous smoothly movement compared to sudden jumps of a stepper. A gear box attached to the motor allows a high reduction of power consumption and provides a great challenge for sizing. PACT space envelope was reduced by means of two flat springs fixed to VCA. Its main characteristic is a low linear axial stiffness. To achieve best performance for PACT, sensors have been included in both stages. A rotary encoder is included in BLDC stage to close position/velocity control loop. An incremental optical encoder measures PACT travel range with relative nanometer accuracy and used to close the position loop of the whole actuator movement. For this purpose, four different optical sensors with different gratings will be evaluated. Control strategy show different internal closed loops that work together to achieve required performance.

  4. Macrolides for KCNJ5-mutated aldosterone-producing adenoma (MAPA): design of a study for personalized diagnosis of primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolino, Giuseppe; Ceolotto, Giulio; Battistel, Michele; Barbiero, Giulio; Cesari, Maurizio; Amar, Laurence; Caroccia, Brasilina; Padrini, Roberto; Azizi, Michel; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2018-02-06

    Aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) is the main curable cause of endocrine hypertension cause of primary aldosteronism (PA) and it is in up to 66% of all cases investigated with adrenal vein sampling (AVS). Mutations in the KCNJ5 potassium channel involve up to 70% of APA and cause the most florid PA phenotypes. The recent finding that macrolide antibiotics specifically inhibit in vitro the altered function of mutated KCNJ5 channels has opened new horizons for the diagnosis and treatment of APA with KCNJ5 mutations in that it can allow identification and target treatment of PA patients harbouring a mutated APA. Thus, we aimed at investigating if clarithromycin and roxithromycin, two macrolides that potently blunt mutated Kir3.4 channel function in vitro, affect plasma aldosterone concentration in adrenal vein blood during AVS and in peripheral blood, respectively, in PA patients with a mutated APA. We designed two proof of concept studies. In study A: consecutive patients with an unambiguous biochemical evidence of PA will be exposed to a single dose of 250 mg clarithromycin during AVS, to assess its effect on the relative aldosterone secretion index in adrenal vein blood from the gland with and without APA. In study B: consecutive hypertensive patients submitted to the work-up for hypertension will receive a single oral dose of 150 mg roxithromycin. The experimental endpoints will be the change induced by roxithromycin of plasma aldosterone concentration and other steroids, direct active renin concentration, serum K + , systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We expect to prove that: (i) clarithromycin allows identification of mutated APA before adrenalectomy and sequencing of tumour DNA; (ii) the acute changes of plasma aldosterone concentration, direct active renin concentration, and blood pressure in peripheral venous blood after roxithromycin can be a proxy for the presence of an APA with somatic mutations.

  5. Flexible goal attribution in early mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, John; Christensen, Wayne

    2016-03-01

    The 2-systems theory developed by Apperly and Butterfill (2009; Butterfill & Apperly, 2013) is an influential approach to explaining the success of infants and young children on implicit false-belief tasks. There is extensive empirical and theoretical work examining many aspects of this theory, but little attention has been paid to the way in which it characterizes goal attribution. We argue here that this aspect of the theory is inadequate. Butterfill and Apperly's characterization of goal attribution is designed to show how goals could be ascribed by infants without representing them as related to other psychological states, and the minimal mindreading system is supposed to operate without employing flexible semantic-executive cognitive processes. But research on infant goal attribution reveals that infants exhibit a high degree of situational awareness that is strongly suggestive of flexible semantic-executive cognitive processing, and infants appear moreover to be sensitive to interrelations between goals, preferences, and beliefs. Further, close attention to the structure of implicit mindreading tasks--for which the theory was specifically designed--indicates that flexible goal attribution is required to succeed. We conclude by suggesting 2 approaches to resolving these problems. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in the Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, J.; Klomp, T.; Wiegers, T.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; Brug, J.; de Jonge, J.; van der Meijde, M.; Hutton, E.K.; Schellevis, F.; Spelten, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes

  7. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in the Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, J.; Klomp, T.; Wiegers, T.; Pereboom, M.; Brug, J.; Jonge, A. de; Meijde, M. van der; Hutton, E.; Schellevis, F.; Spelten, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes

  8. Teachers' Understanding of Learning Goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog Skott, Charlotte; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard; Carlsen, Dorthe

    will be presented. We expect to deepen our understanding of the relations between the various parameters in the teachers' practice in relation to learning goals and goal-oriented teaching. There is conducted research on the effects of goal-oriented teaching on students' learning both internationally...

  9. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Goedhart, Marc; Spronk, Jaap

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with multiple goal variables. The approach is illustrated by means of an example in financial planning.

  10. A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial of structured goal-setting following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William J; Brown, Melanie; William, Levack; McPherson, Kathryn M; Reed, Kirk; Dean, Sarah G; Weatherall, Mark

    2012-04-01

    To determine the feasibility, the cluster design effect and the variance and minimal clinical importance difference in the primary outcome in a pilot study of a structured approach to goal-setting. A cluster randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation facilities. People who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation following stroke who had sufficient cognition to engage in structured goal-setting and complete the primary outcome measure. Structured goal elicitation using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Quality of life at 12 weeks using the Schedule for Individualised Quality of Life (SEIQOL-DW), Functional Independence Measure, Short Form 36 and Patient Perception of Rehabilitation (measuring satisfaction with rehabilitation). Assessors were blinded to the intervention. Four rehabilitation services and 41 patients were randomized. We found high values of the intraclass correlation for the outcome measures (ranging from 0.03 to 0.40) and high variance of the SEIQOL-DW (SD 19.6) in relation to the minimally importance difference of 2.1, leading to impractically large sample size requirements for a cluster randomized design. A cluster randomized design is not a practical means of avoiding contamination effects in studies of inpatient rehabilitation goal-setting. Other techniques for coping with contamination effects are necessary.

  11. Surgery of Primary Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Rutkowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains the mainstay of melanoma therapy, regardless of the tumor site. Only the early diagnosis combined with proper surgical therapy currently gives patients affected by this malignancy the chance for a full cure. The main goal of surgical therapy is to provide the local control of the disease and to secure long-term survival of the patient without reasonable functional and esthetic impairment. The recommended method of biopsy—excisional biopsy, as an initial diagnostic and, to some extent, therapeutic procedure—is performed under local anesthesia as an elliptical incision with visual clear margins of 1–3 mm and with some mm of subcutaneous tissue. The extent of radical excision of the primary tumor (or scar after excisional biopsy is based on the histopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor and usually consists of 1–2 cm margins with primary closure. The philosophy behind conducted randomized clinical trials has been to find the most conservative surgical approach that is able to guarantee the same results as more demolitive treatment. This has been the background of the trials designed to define the correct margins of excision around a primary cutaneous melanoma. Much less definition can be dedicated to the surgical management of patients with non-cutaneous melanomas.

  12. Surgery of Primary Melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: rutkowskip@coi.waw.pl; Zdzienicki, Marcin; Nowecki, Zbigniew I. [Soft Tissue/Bone Sarcoma and Melanoma Department, M. Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Akkooi, Alexander C. J. van [Erasmus University Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-11

    Surgery remains the mainstay of melanoma therapy, regardless of the tumor site. Only the early diagnosis combined with proper surgical therapy currently gives patients affected by this malignancy the chance for a full cure. The main goal of surgical therapy is to provide the local control of the disease and to secure long-term survival of the patient without reasonable functional and esthetic impairment. The recommended method of biopsy—excisional biopsy, as an initial diagnostic and, to some extent, therapeutic procedure—is performed under local anesthesia as an elliptical incision with visual clear margins of 1–3 mm and with some mm of subcutaneous tissue. The extent of radical excision of the primary tumor (or scar after excisional biopsy) is based on the histopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor and usually consists of 1–2 cm margins with primary closure. The philosophy behind conducted randomized clinical trials has been to find the most conservative surgical approach that is able to guarantee the same results as more demolitive treatment. This has been the background of the trials designed to define the correct margins of excision around a primary cutaneous melanoma. Much less definition can be dedicated to the surgical management of patients with non-cutaneous melanomas.

  13. Surgery of Primary Melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Zdzienicki, Marcin; Nowecki, Zbigniew I.; Akkooi, Alexander C. J. van

    2010-01-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of melanoma therapy, regardless of the tumor site. Only the early diagnosis combined with proper surgical therapy currently gives patients affected by this malignancy the chance for a full cure. The main goal of surgical therapy is to provide the local control of the disease and to secure long-term survival of the patient without reasonable functional and esthetic impairment. The recommended method of biopsy—excisional biopsy, as an initial diagnostic and, to some extent, therapeutic procedure—is performed under local anesthesia as an elliptical incision with visual clear margins of 1–3 mm and with some mm of subcutaneous tissue. The extent of radical excision of the primary tumor (or scar after excisional biopsy) is based on the histopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor and usually consists of 1–2 cm margins with primary closure. The philosophy behind conducted randomized clinical trials has been to find the most conservative surgical approach that is able to guarantee the same results as more demolitive treatment. This has been the background of the trials designed to define the correct margins of excision around a primary cutaneous melanoma. Much less definition can be dedicated to the surgical management of patients with non-cutaneous melanomas

  14. Goal-oriëntation, goal-setting and goal-driven behavior in (minimalist) user instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans

    2007-01-01

    This paper opens with a summary of minimalist design strategies that aim to optimize user instructions. Next, it discusses three recent research efforts to further improve these strategies. The common focus in these efforts is the attention to people’s goal-related management and control of

  15. Contextmapping in Primary Design and Technology Education: A Fruitful Method to Develop Empathy for and Insight in User Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapwijk, Remke; Van Doorn, Fenne

    2015-01-01

    Human-centered design is of growing importance for professional designers and in the past two decades a series of techniques for designers to develop understanding of and empathy with a diversity of users has been developed within this field. In the second half of the twentieth century, intended users were involved late in the design process, i.e.…

  16. Reflections on Andes' Goal-Free User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although the Andes project produced many results over its 18 years of activity, this commentary focuses on its contributions to understanding how a goal-free user interface impacts the overall design and performance of a step-based tutoring system. Whereas a goal-aligned user interface displays relevant goals as blank boxes or empty locations that…

  17. Preparatory Training, States of Goal Orientation, and Mentoring Relationship Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scielzo, Shannon; Neeper, Michael; Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    We used an online academic-advising program to examine the effects of preparatory training designed to elicit high states of learning-goal orientation and low states of avoid goal orientation. Results indicate that training was effective in some cases for manipulating states of goal orientation. The training did not directly affect behaviors as…

  18. Design choices made by target users for a pay-for-performance program in primary care: an action research approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, K.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Jacobs, J.E.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International interest in pay-for-performance (P4P) initiatives to improve quality of health care is growing. Current programs vary in the methods of performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. One may assume that involvement of health care professionals in the goal setting and

  19. The influence of thermal comfort and user control on the design of a passive solar school building-Locksheath Primary School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, N

    1982-12-01

    This article describes the design of a Primary School at Locksheath, Hampshire, England. The design is the result of collaboration between the Hampshire County Council's Architect's Department and the Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies, University of Cambridge. The design has been strongly influenced by considerations of energy conservation, maximum use of solar energy, and thermal comfort. Stress is placed on the role of the occupant in the control of the building. Predictive analysis indicates that the large conservatory incorporated makes a considerable reduction in heating energy demand.

  20. Culturalizing Achievement Goal Theory and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusho, Akane; Clayton, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article is primarily designed to provide a cultural analysis of the literature on achievement goals. First, an overview of the four dominant approaches to the study of culture--namely, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, indigenous psychology, and psychological anthropology--is offered. Second, we analyze the extant body of…

  1. Appalachia: Goals, Objectives and Development Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Goals, objectives, and strategies for development in the 13 states involved in the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) are detailed in this document adopted by ARC in 1977. The regional development plan incorporates earlier evaluation and program design efforts, discussion from an issues report, state comments and development plans, and public…

  2. The Benefit of Ambiguity in Understanding Goals in Requirements Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paay, Jeni; Pedell, Sonja; Sterling, Leon

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the benefit of ambiguity in describing goals in requirements modelling for the design of socio-technical systems using concepts from Agent-Oriented Software Engineering (AOSE) and ethnographic and cultural probe methods from Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The authors’ aim...... ambiguity in the process of elicitation and analysis through the use of empirically informed quality goals attached to functional goals. The authors demonstrate the benefit of articulating a quality goal without turning it into a functional goal. Their study shows that quality goals kept at a high level...... of abstraction, ambiguous and open for conversations through the modelling process add richness to goal models, and communicate quality attributes of the interaction being modelled to the design phase, where this ambiguity is regarded as a resource for design....

  3. LIFE CYCLE OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCT AND PRIMARY STRATEGIC GOALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina\tCIOT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to innovation, production at high standards, market and marketing policy, pharmaceutical companies need strategies that could cope with apparent contradictions, convergences and divergences, centralisation and involution, at the global and local level, focus and liberty, domestic production and external supply, ownership and alliances, networks and hierarchies, science or market orientation, all these being part of the essence of a profitable and expanding pharmaceutical company. Specialists appreciate that the 20 century will remain in the collective memory for its technological achievements, including a better understanding of the atomic structure, „information explosion” encouraged by the progress of the computer technology, the news from space exploration. If one wants to evaluate its importance in terms of impact on people’s lives, the 20 century could be called THE DRUG AREA. Many experts agree that, at the end of this century, pharmaceutical products would have a higher importance for our lives due to the special progress in neurobiology, immunology, molecular biology, cellular differentiation, cell membrane and genetic studies. In the pharmaceutical industry, important funds are directed towards research and development, while few understand and appreciate the contribution brought by the pharmaceutical marketing system and by the professionals in this field. These ones make the drug accessible at the right time and place, in the required quantity, at a reasonable price and with all the information required.

  4. Components of the primary circuit of LWRs. Design, construction and calculation. Draft. Komponenten des Primaerkreises von Leichtwasserreaktoren. Auslegung, Konstruktion und Berechnung. Entwurf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    This standard is to be applied to components made of metallic materials, operated at design temperatures of up to 673/sup 0/K (400/sup 0/C). The primary circuit as the pressure continement of the reactor coolant comprises: Reactor pressure vessel (without internals), steam generator (primary loop), pressurizer, reactor coolant pump housing, interconnecting pipings between the components mentioned above and appropriate various valve and instrument casings, pipings branding off from the above components and interconnecting pipings, including the appropriate instrument casings, up to and including the first isolating valve, pressure shielding of control rod drives.

  5. The Predictiveness of Achievement Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy P. Phan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using the Revised Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ-R (Elliot & Murayama, 2008, we explored first-year university students’ achievement goal orientations on the premise of the 2 × 2 model. Similar to recent studies (Elliot & Murayama, 2008; Elliot & Thrash, 2010, we conceptualized a model that included both antecedent (i.e., enactive learning experience and consequence (i.e., intrinsic motivation and academic achievement of achievement goals. Two hundred seventy-seven university students (151 women, 126 men participated in the study. Structural equation modeling procedures yielded evidence that showed the predictive effects of enactive learning experience and mastery goals on intrinsic motivation. Academic achievement was influenced intrinsic motivation, performance-approach goals, and enactive learning experience. Enactive learning experience also served as an antecedent of the four achievement goal types. On the whole, evidence obtained supports the AGQ-R and contributes, theoretically, to 2 × 2 model.

  6. (Goal Number 8) in achieving the Millennium Development Goals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2000, the United Nations (UN) made a Millennium Declaration that commits governments across the globe to develop the lives of the people by 2015. This declaration is known as Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This paper will examine the role that every government has to play in achieving the goals by focusing ...

  7. Systemic consultation and goal setting

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Over two decades of empirical research conducted within a positivist framework has shown that goal setting is a particularly useful method for influencing task performance in occupational and industrial contexts. The conditions under which goal setting is maximally effective are now clearly established. These include situations where there is a high level of acceptance and commitment, where goals are specific and challenging, where the task is relatively simple rather than ...

  8. APPLICATION OF GOAL SETTING THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtkoru, E. Serra; Bozkurt, Tulay; Bekta, Fatos; Ahmed, Mahir Jibril; Kola, Vehap

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the goal theorymodel originally developed by Locke and Latham in organizational setting inTurkey, and explain its influence on job satisfaction and affective commitment.Also mediating role of task specific strategy and moderating role ofselfefficacy are examined. Locke and Latham’s goal setting measure is adaptedto Turkish. Survey method is employed to collect data from 222 respondents fromautomotive industry. Goal setting dimensions predicted affective co...

  9. Alcohol myopia and goal commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Sevincer, A. Timur; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    According to alcohol myopia theory, acute alcohol consumption leads people to disproportionally focus on the salient rather than the peripheral aspects of a situation. We summarize various studies exploring how myopic processes resulting from acute alcohol intake affect goal commitment. After consuming alcohol student participants felt strongly committed to an important personal goal even though they had low expectations of successfully attaining the goal. However, once intoxicated participan...

  10. Design trade study for a 4-meter off-axis primary mirror substrate and mount for the Habitable-zone Exoplanet Direct Imaging Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William R.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2017-09-01

    An extensive trade study was conducted to evaluate primary mirror substrate design architectures for the HabEx mission baseline 4-meter off-axis telescope. The study's purpose is not to produce a final design, but rather to established a design methodology for matching the mirror's properties (mass and stiffness) with the mission's optical performance specifications (static dynamic wavefront error, WFE). The study systematically compares the effect of proven design elements (closed-back vs open-back vs partial-back; meniscus vs flat back vs shaped back; etc.), which can be implemented with proven space mirror materials (ULE and Zerodur), on static and dynamic WFE. Additionally, the study compares static and dynamic WFE of each substrate point design integrated onto three and six point mounts.

  11. Achievement goals affect metacognitive judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kenji; Yue, Carole L.; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of achievement goals on metacognitive judgments, such as judgments of learning (JOLs) and metacomprehension judgments, and actual recall performance. We conducted five experiments manipulating the instruction of achievement goals. In each experiment, participants were instructed to adopt mastery-approach goals (i.e., develop their own mental ability through a memory task) or performance-approach goals (i.e., demonstrate their strong memory ability through getting a high score on a memory task). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 showed that JOLs of word pairs in the performance-approach goal condition tended to be higher than those in the mastery-approach goal condition. In contrast, cued recall performance did not differ between the two goal conditions. Experiment 3 also demonstrated that metacomprehension judgments of text passages were higher in the performance-approach goal condition than in the mastery-approach goals condition, whereas test performance did not differ between conditions. These findings suggest that achievement motivation affects metacognitive judgments during learning, even when achievement motivation does not influence actual performance. PMID:28983496

  12. Energy Toolbox—Framework for the Development of a Tool for the Primary Design of Zero Emission Buildings in European and Asian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Koller

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the framework for the development of an Energy Toolbox (ETB. The aim of the ETB is to support the design of domestic Zero Emission Buildings (ZEBs, according to the concept of net zero-energy buildings during the early architectural design and planning phases. The ETB concept is based on the calculation of the energy demand for heating, cooling, lighting, and appliances. Based on a building’s energy demand, technologies for the onsite conversion and production of the specific forms and quantities of final and primary energy by means of renewable energy carriers can be identified. The calculations of the ETB are based on the building envelope properties of a primary building design, as well as the physical and climate parameters required for the calculation of heat transfer coefficients, heat gains, and heat losses. The ETB enables the selection and rough dimensioning of technologies and systems to meet, and, wherever possible, reduce the thermal and electric energy demand of a building. The technologies included comprise green facades, adaptable dynamic lighting, shading devices, heat pumps, photovoltaic generators, solar thermal collectors, adiabatic cooling, and thermal storage. The ETB facilitates the balancing of the energy consumption and the production of renewable energies of a primary building design.

  13. Designing a multifaceted quality improvement intervention in primary care in a country where general practice is seeking recognition: the case of Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoffers Henri E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality Improvement Interventions require significant financial investments, and therefore demand careful consideration in their design in order to maximize potential benefits. In this correspondence we present the methodological approach of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention aiming to improve quality of care in primary care, properly tailored for a country such as Cyprus where general practice is currently seeking recognition. Methods Our methodological approach was focused on the design of an open label, community-based intervention controlled trial using all patients from two urban and two rural public primary care centers diagnosed with hypertension and type II diabetes mellitus. The design of our intervention was grounded on a strong theoretical framework that included the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, and the Chronic Care Model, which synthesize evidence-based system changes in accordance with the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Theory of Reasoned Action. The primary outcome measure was improvement in the quality of care for two chronic diseases evaluated through specific clinical indicators, as well as the patient satisfaction assessed by the EUROPEP questionnaire and additional personal interviews. Results We designed a multifaceted quality improvement intervention model, supported by a varying degree of scientific evidence, tailored to local needs and specific country characteristics. Overall, the main components of the intervention were the development and adoption of an electronic medical record and the introduction of clinical guidelines for the management of the targeted chronic diseases facilitated by the necessary model of organizational changes. Conclusion Health planners and policy makers need to be aware of the potential use of certain theoretical models and applied methodology as well as inexpensive tools that may be suitably tailored to the local needs, in order to

  14. Designing a multifaceted quality improvement intervention in primary care in a country where general practice is seeking recognition: the case of Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoutis, George A; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Stoffers, Henri E; Zachariadou, Theodora; Philalithis, Anastasios; Lionis, Christos

    2008-08-27

    Quality Improvement Interventions require significant financial investments, and therefore demand careful consideration in their design in order to maximize potential benefits. In this correspondence we present the methodological approach of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention aiming to improve quality of care in primary care, properly tailored for a country such as Cyprus where general practice is currently seeking recognition. Our methodological approach was focused on the design of an open label, community-based intervention controlled trial using all patients from two urban and two rural public primary care centers diagnosed with hypertension and type II diabetes mellitus. The design of our intervention was grounded on a strong theoretical framework that included the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, and the Chronic Care Model, which synthesize evidence-based system changes in accordance with the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Theory of Reasoned Action. The primary outcome measure was improvement in the quality of care for two chronic diseases evaluated through specific clinical indicators, as well as the patient satisfaction assessed by the EUROPEP questionnaire and additional personal interviews. We designed a multifaceted quality improvement intervention model, supported by a varying degree of scientific evidence, tailored to local needs and specific country characteristics. Overall, the main components of the intervention were the development and adoption of an electronic medical record and the introduction of clinical guidelines for the management of the targeted chronic diseases facilitated by the necessary model of organizational changes. Health planners and policy makers need to be aware of the potential use of certain theoretical models and applied methodology as well as inexpensive tools that may be suitably tailored to the local needs, in order to effectively design quality improvement interventions in primary care

  15. [Magnetotherapy designed to affect cervical sympathetic ganglia for the treatment of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselova, E V; Kamenskikh, T G; Raĭgorodkiĭ, Iu M; Kolbenev, I O; Myshkina, E S

    2010-01-01

    The traveling magnetic field was used to treat primary open-angle glaucoma. The field was applied to the projection of cervical sympathetic ganglia of the patients. Hemodynamic parameters of posterior short ciliary arteries and central retinal artery were analysed along with visual evoked potentials, visual field limits, and visual acuity. It was shown that magnetotherapy with the use of an AMO-ATOS apparatus produces better clinical results in patients with stage I and II primary open-angle glaucoma compared with medicamentous therapy (intake of trental tablets).

  16. Comparison of a one-time educational intervention to a teach-to-goal educational intervention for self-management of heart failure: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeWalt Darren A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure (HF is common, costly and associated with significant morbidity and poor quality of life, particularly for patients with low socioeconomic status. Self-management training has been shown to reduce HF related morbidity and hospitalization rates, but there is uncertainty about how best to deliver such training and what patients benefit. This study compares a single session self-management HF training program against a multiple session training intervention and examines whether their effects differ by literacy level. Methods/Design In this randomized controlled multi-site trial, English and Spanish-speaking patients are recruited from university-affiliated General Internal Medicine and Cardiology clinics at 4 sites across the United States. Eligible patients have HF with New York Heart Association class II-IV symptoms and are prescribed a loop diuretic. Baseline data, including literacy level, are collected at enrollment and follow-up surveys are conducted at 1, 6 and 12 months Upon enrollment, both the control and intervention groups receive the same 40 minute, literacy-sensitive, in-person, HF education session covering the 4 key self-management components of daily self assessment and having a plan, salt avoidance, exercise, and medication adherence. All participants also receive a literacy-sensitive workbook and a digital bathroom scale. After the baseline education was completed, patients are randomly allocated to return to usual care or to receive ongoing education and training. The intervention group receives an additional 20 minutes of education on weight and symptom-based diuretic self-adjustment, as well as periodic follow-up phone calls from the educator over the course of 1 year. These phone calls are designed to reinforce the education, assess participant knowledge of the education and address barriers to success. The primary outcome is the combined incidence of all cause hospitalization and death

  17. Goals and Personality in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga, M. L.; Ugarte, M. D.; Lumbreras, M. Victoria; Sanz de Acedo Baquedano, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of personality factors in the value allotted by adolescents to various groups of goals. For this purpose, the "Cuestionario de Personalidad Situacional, CPS" (Situational Personality Questionnaire) and the "Cuestionario de Metas para Adolescentes, CMA" (Goals for…

  18. Alcohol myopia and goal commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Timur Sevincer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available According to alcohol-myopia theory, acute alcohol consumption leads people to disproportionally focus on the salient rather than the peripheral aspects of a situation. We summarize various studies exploring how myopic processes resulting from acute alcohol intake affect goal commitment. After consuming alcohol student participants felt strongly committed to an important personal goal even though they had low expectations of successfully attaining the goal. However, once intoxicated participants were sober again (i.e., not myopic anymore they failed to act on their goal commitment. In line with alcohol-myopia theory, strong goal commitment as a result of alcohol intake was mediated by intoxicated (vs. sober participants disproportionally focusing on the desirability rather than the feasibility of their goal. Further supporting alcohol-myopia theory, when the low feasibility of attaining a particular goal was experimentally made salient (either explicitly or implicitly by subliminal priming, intoxicated participants felt less committed than those who consumed a placebo. We discuss these effects of acute alcohol intake in the context of research on the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on goal commitment.

  19. Goal Theory and Individual Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Peter J.

    The paper provides a review of goal theory as articulated by Edwin Locke. The theory is evaluated in terms of laboratory and field research and its practical usefulnes is explored as a means to improving individual productivity in "real world" organizations Research findings provide support for some goal theory propositions but suggest also the…

  20. Safety goals for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischhoff, B.

    1984-02-01

    The key policy question in managing hazardous technologies is often some variant of How safe is safe enough. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has recently broached this topic by adopting safety goals defining acceptable risk levels for nuclear power plants. These goals are analyzed here with a general theory of standard setting (Fischhoff, 1983) which asks: (1) Are standards an appropriate policy tool in this case. (2) Can the Commission's safety philosophy be defended. (3) Do the operational goals capture that philosophy. The anlaysis shows the safety goals proposal to be sophisticated in some respects, incomplete in others. More generally, it points to difficulties with the concept of acceptable risk and any attempt to build policy instruments around it. Although focused on the NRC's safety goals, the present analysis is a prototype of what can be learned by similarly detailed consideration of other standards, not only for nuclear power but also for other hazardous technologies, as well as for issues unrelated to safety

  1. The Primary Experiments of an Analysis of Pareto Solutions for Conceptual Design Optimization Problem of Hybrid Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumiya; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Furuhashi, Takeshi

    Recentry, Multi-objective Genetic Algorithm, which is the application of Genetic Algorithm to Multi-objective Optimization Problems is focused on in the engineering design field. In this field, the analysis of design variables in the acquired Pareto solutions, which gives the designers useful knowledge in the applied problem, is important as well as the acquisition of advanced solutions. This paper proposes a new visualization method using Isomap which visualizes the geometric distances of solutions in the design variable space considering their distances in the objective space. The proposed method enables a user to analyze the design variables of the acquired solutions considering their relationship in the objective space. This paper applies the proposed method to the conceptual design optimization problem of hybrid rocket engine and studies the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. The effects of goal variation on adult physical activity behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dal-Hyun; Yun, Joonkoo; McNamee, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of varying levels of goals on increasing daily steps and the frequency of goal achievement among middle-aged adults. Ninety-six adults participated in a randomised control study. Participants were randomly assigned to five different step goal groups: (1) Easy (n = 19), (2) Medium (n = 19), (3) Difficult (n = 19), (4) Do-your-best (n = 19), and (5) No goal (n = 20) based on previous research. The participants wore a pedometer and were asked to reach a pre-established goal during the experimental period. In order to examine the effectiveness of the goal difficulty, (a) an average number of steps taken by different goal conditions and (b) the number of days meeting the assigned goal were tested. A one-way ANCOVA revealed significant step count differences among goal groups. Post hoc analyses indicated that the change in step count in both the Medium and Difficult goal groups was significantly greater than the remaining groups. However, there was no significant difference between the medium and difficult goal conditions. In addition, a one-way ANOVA indicated that there were no significant differences in the frequency of goal achievement among the Easy, Medium, and Difficult goal groups. Results suggest that when promoting physical activity through increasing step counts, researchers and clinicians should design goals that are specific and challenging.

  3. Improvement of the design and generation of highly specific plant knockdown lines using primary synthetic microRNAs (pri-smiRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Leonardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. In plants, they typically show high complementarity to a single sequence motif within their target mRNAs and act by catalyzing specific mRNA cleavage and degradation. miRNAs are processed from much longer primary transcripts via precursor miRNAs containing fold-back structures. Leaving these secondary structures intact, miRNAs can be re-designed experimentally to target mRNAs of choice. Results We designed primary synthetic miRNAs (pri-smiRNAs on the basis of the primary transcript of the Arabidopsis MIR159A gene by replacing the original miR159a and the corresponding miR159a* with novel sequences, keeping the overall secondary structure as predicted by the program RNAfold. We used the program RNAhybrid to optimize smiRNA design and to screen the complete Arabidopsis transcriptome for potential off-targets. To improve the molecular cloning of the pri-smiRNA we inserted restriction sites in the original MIR159A primary transcript to easily accommodate the smiRNA/smiRNA* DNA fragment. As a proof-of-concept, we targeted the single gene encoding chalcone synthase (CHS in Arabidopsis. We demonstrate smiRNA(CHS expression and CHS mRNA cleavage in different transgenic lines. Phenotypic changes in these lines were observed for seed color and flavonol derivatives, and quantified with respect to anthocyanin content. We also tested the effect of mismatches and excess G:U base pairs on knockdown efficiency. Conclusions RNAhybrid-assisted design of smiRNAs and generation of pri-smiRNAs using a novel vector containing restriction sites greatly improves specificity and speed of the generation of stable knockdown lines for functional analyses in plants.

  4. Systematic Multi-variable H-infinity Control Design for Primary Frequency Regulation in Stand-alone Microgrids with High Penetration of Renewable Energy Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Lam , Quang Linh; Bratcu , Antoneta Iuliana; Riu , Delphine

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a systematic design of a robust multi-variable control structure for primary frequency regulation in microgrids with high rate of renewable source penetration is proposed. The considered microgrid represents a diesel-photovoltaic-supercapacitor hybrid power generation system operating in stand-alone mode. The proposed control structure relies on a two-level architecture: classical PI-based current tracking controllers are placed on the low control level ...

  5. Treatment goals in psoriasis routine care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, M A; Reich, K; Spehr, C; Augustin, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The treatment goal algorithm for psoriasis, first originated in 2007, has ever since been adopted into treatment guidelines. It remained unclear how many patients have experienced the use of treatment goals in routine care and how these are perceived. The aim of the pilot study was to get first insight in the use and impact of therapeutic goals in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis in routine care. This study is a multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional health care study in n = 213 dermatology centers across Germany. A standardized physician and patient questionnaire was used, including demographics, disease and treatment characteristics. To evaluate patient treatment perception and satisfaction, a questionnaire (PsoSat) addressing 8 specific items was designed. Consistency and validity of the questionnaire were controlled by factor analyses and reliability tests. In total n = 1,883 patients were included for analysis (54.2% male). Mean age was 52 years, mean disease duration 19 years. In total 45.5% (n = 856) stated an improvement of psoriatic symptoms in the last 4 weeks. In patients including treatment goals, the course of psoriasis in the last 4 weeks was rated significantly better and predicted significantly higher patient satisfaction. Patients reporting periodic outcomes measurement of psoriasis treatment, also had significantly better course of disease, higher satisfaction and a lower psoriasis severity. A majority of patients experienced the use of treatment goals in practice. The association of using treatment goals with clinical outcomes and treatment satisfaction was markedly positive. These findings indicate that the use of treatment goals and outcome measurements in fact improve psoriasis management.

  6. Uncertainty analysis as essential step in the establishment of the dynamic Design Space of primary drying during freeze-drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Severine Therese F. C.; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Corver, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Large molecules, such as biopharmaceuticals, are considered the key driver of growth for the pharmaceutical industry. Freeze-drying is the preferred way to stabilise these products when needed. However, it is an expensive, inefficient, time- and energy-consuming process. During freeze-drying, the......Large molecules, such as biopharmaceuticals, are considered the key driver of growth for the pharmaceutical industry. Freeze-drying is the preferred way to stabilise these products when needed. However, it is an expensive, inefficient, time- and energy-consuming process. During freeze...... for pharmaceutical freeze-drying. Traditionally, the chamber pressure and shelf temperature are kept constant during primary drying, leading to less optimal process conditions. In this paper it is demonstrated how a mechanistic model of the primary drying step gives the opportunity to determine the optimal dynamic...

  7. Career Goals in Young Adults: Personal Resources, Goal Appraisals, Attitudes, and Goal Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haratsis, Jessica M.; Hood, Michelle; Creed, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a model based on the dual-process framework that assessed the relationships among personal resources, career goal appraisals, career attitudes, and career goal management, which have not been previously assessed together. The model (tested on a sample of 486 young adults: 74% female, M[subscript]age = 22 years) proposed that personal…

  8. Systems consultation: protocol for a novel implementation strategy designed to promote evidence-based practice in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Quanbeck, Andrew; Brown, Randall T; E Zgierska, Aleksandra; A Johnson, Roberta; Robinson, James M; Jacobson, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Background Adoption of evidence-based practices takes place at a glacial place in healthcare. This research will pilot test an innovative implementation strategy ? systems consultation ?intended to speed the adoption of evidence-based practice in primary care. The strategy is based on tenets of systems engineering and has been extensively tested in addiction treatment. Three innovations have been included in the strategy ? translation of a clinical practice guideline into a checklist-based im...

  9. GOAL Agents Instantiate Intention Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Hindriks, Koen; van der Hoek, Wiebe

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly believed there is a big gap between agent logics and computational agent frameworks. In this paper, we show that this gap is not as big as believed by showing that GOAL agents instantiate Intention Logic of Cohen and Levesque. That is, we show that GOAL agent programs can be formally related to Intention Logic.We do so by proving that the GOAL Verification Logic can be embedded into Intention Logic. It follows that (a fragment of) Intention Logic can be used t...

  10. Short primary linear drive designed for synchronous and induction operation mode with on-board energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Neto, Tobias Rafael

    2012-06-28

    The idea of a flexible industrial manufacturing system for the transfer of material, tooling, processing/filling, etc., in which several vehicles can travel with high speed, high degree of independency and high precision is proposed in this thesis. Such flexible systems show a meaningful economic potential for modern manufacturing systems. The basic concept is that a linear motor has the secondary part fixed to the track while the primary (moving winding) travels along the track (short primary topology). The same principle can work in the other way around, arranging the primary in segments and letting the secondary (carrier) to move from segment to segment (long primary topology). The concept's implementation involves technical issues, such as: the position measurement, the energy and information transfer, the individual position and speed control of the vehicle in which varying speeds increase the possibility of collision, and the smooth transition between segments or different types of the secondary. Finally, multiple vehicles traveling at high speed, high positioning repeatability and rapid acceleration rates increase the production throughout and the reliability compared to conventional manufacturing conveyor systems. As an example, a transporting and processing system based on linear drives is a continuous and closed structure with multiple loops, which permits the safe transport of fragile loads. Although such solutions often need higher investment costs, the lack of mechanical coupling parts and wearing elements in these motors greatly increases their reliability. The long primary topology allows a passive and lightweight vehicle (secondary), avoiding brushes and cables to transfer energy and information. For long distances, the primary is arranged in several electrical independent segments. On the other hand, the short primary configuration uses the winding mounted on the moving part (active vehicle) to produce the traveling wave, the secondary as

  11. Can children identify and achieve goals for intervention? A randomized trial comparing two goal-setting approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroland-Nordstrand, Kristina; Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Jacobsson, Helén; Johansson, Ulla; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy of two different goal-setting approaches (children's self-identified goals and goals identified by parents) were compared on a goal-directed, task-oriented intervention. In this assessor-blinded parallel randomized trial, 34 children with disabilities (13 males, 21 females; mean age 9y, SD 1y 4mo) were randomized using concealed allocation to one of two 8-week, goal-directed, task-oriented intervention groups with different goal-setting approaches: (1) children's self-identified goals (n=18) using the Perceived Efficacy and Goal-Setting System, or (2) goals identified by parents (n=16) using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Participants were recruited through eight paediatric rehabilitation centres and randomized between October 2011 and May 2013. The primary outcome measure was the Goal Attainment Scaling and the secondary measure, the COPM performance scale (COPM-P). Data were collected pre- and post-intervention and at the 5-month follow-up. There was no evidence of a difference in mean characteristics at baseline between groups. There was evidence of an increase in mean goal attainment (mean T score) in both groups after intervention (child-goal group: estimated mean difference [EMD] 27.84, 95% CI 22.93-32.76; parent-goal group: EMD 21.42, 95% CI 16.16-26.67). There was no evidence of a difference in the mean T scores post-intervention between the two groups (EMD 6.42, 95% CI -0.80 to 13.65). These results were sustained at the 5-month follow-up. Children's self-identified goals are achievable to the same extent as parent-identified goals and remain stable over time. Thus children can be trusted to identify their own goals for intervention, thereby influencing their involvement in their intervention programmes. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Design of a cluster-randomized trial of electronic health record-based tools to address overweight and obesity in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Heather J; Wee, Christina C; DeVito, Katerina; Orav, E John; Frolkis, Joseph P; Williams, Deborah H; Wright, Adam; Bates, David W

    2015-08-01

    Primary care providers often fail to identify patients who are overweight or obese or discuss weight management with them. Electronic health record-based tools may help providers with the assessment and management of overweight and obesity. We describe the design of a trial to examine the effectiveness of electronic health record-based tools for the assessment and management of overweight and obesity among adult primary care patients, as well as the challenges we encountered. We developed several new features within the electronic health record used by primary care practices affiliated with Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, MA. These features included (1) reminders to measure height and weight, (2) an alert asking providers to add overweight or obesity to the problem list, (3) reminders with tailored management recommendations, and (4) a Weight Management screen. We then conducted a pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial in 12 primary care practices. We randomized 23 clinical teams ("clinics") within the practices to the intervention group (n = 11) or the control group (n = 12). The new features were activated only for clinics in the intervention group. The intervention was implemented in two phases: the height and weight reminders went live on 15 December 2011 (Phase 1), and all of the other features went live on 11 June 2012 (Phase 2). Study enrollment went from December 2011 through December 2012, and follow-up ended in December 2013. The primary outcomes were 6-month and 12-month weight change among adult patients with body mass index ≥25 who had a visit at one of the primary care clinics during Phase 2. Secondary outcome measures included the proportion of patients with a recorded body mass index in the electronic health record, the proportion of patients with body mass index ≥25 who had a diagnosis of overweight or obesity on the electronic health record problem list, and the proportion of patients with body mass index ≥25 who had

  13. Design, analysis, and control of a large transport aircraft utilizing selective engine thrust as a backup system for the primary flight control. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerren, Donna S.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the capability to control a very large transport airplane with engine thrust. This study consisted of the design of an 800-passenger airplane with a range of 5000 nautical miles design and evaluation of a flight control system, and design and piloted simulation evaluation of a thrust-only backup flight control system. Location of the four wing-mounted engines was varied to optimize the propulsive control capability, and the time constant of the engine response was studied. The goal was to provide level 1 flying qualities. The engine location and engine time constant did not have a large effect on the control capability. The airplane design did meet level 1 flying qualities based on frequencies, damping ratios, and time constants in the longitudinal and lateral-directional modes. Project pilots consistently rated the flying qualities as either level 1 or level 2 based on Cooper-Harper ratings. However, because of the limited control forces and moments, the airplane design fell short of meeting the time required to achieve a 30 deg bank and the time required to respond a control input.

  14. 3. Workshop for IAEA ICSP on Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    Most advanced nuclear power plant designs adopted several kinds of passive systems. Natural circulation is used as a key driving force for many passive systems and even for core heat removal during normal operation such as NuScale, CAREM, ESBWR and Indian AHWR designs. Simulation of natural circulation phenomena is very challenging since the driving force of it is weak compared to forced circulation and involves a coupling between primary system and containment for integral type reactor. The IAEA ICSP (International Collaborative Standard Problem) on 'Integral PWR Design Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermo-hydraulic Coupling of Containment and Primary System during Accidents' was proposed within the CRP on 'Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling, and Reliability of Passive Systems that utilize Natural Circulation'. Oregon State University (OSU) of USA offered to host this ICSP. This ICSP plans to conduct the following experiments and blind/open simulations with system codes: 1. Quasi-steady state operation with different core power levels: Conduct quasi-steady state operation with step-wise increase of core power level in order to observe single phase natural circulation flow according to power level. The experimental facility and operating conditions for an integral PWR will be used. 2. Thermo-hydraulic Coupling between Primary system and Containment: Conduct a loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS blowdown and long term cooling to determine the progression of a loss of feedwater transient by natural circulation through primary and containment systems. These tests would examine the blowdown phase as well as the long term cooling using sump natural circulation by coupling the primary to containment systems. This data could be used for the evaluation of system codes to determine if they model specific phenomena in an accurate manner. OSU completed planned two ICSP tests in July 2011 and real initial and boundary conditions measured from the

  15. Pengaruh Goal Setting terhadap Performance : Tinjauan Teoritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ginting, Surya Dharma; Ariani, D. Wahyu

    2004-01-01

    This article is the conceptual view of goal setting theory and effects of goal setting on individual performance. Goal setting is recognized, and is a major theory of work motivation. Difficult goals have consistently been shown to lead to higher levels of performance than easy goals. If there is no commitment, a goal can have no motivational effect. Goals are central to current treatments of work motivation, and goal commitment is a necessary condition for difficult goals to result in higher...

  16. Eyes on the prize or nose to the grindstone? The effects of level of goal evaluation on mood and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser-Marko, Linda; Sheldon, Kennon M

    2008-11-01

    These studies tested the hypothesis that evaluating goal feedback in terms of a primary, longer term goal can be risky for future motivation. Study 1 was a 2 x 2 experiment in which framing level (primary goal/subgoal) and feedback valence (success/failure) were manipulated for participants during a verbal skills task. In the primary goal failure condition, there was increased negative mood and decreased positive mood and expectancy for subsequent trials, even while controlling for goal difficulty and importance. Study 2 was an 8-week study throughout which participants were asked to evaluate their progress regarding a primary goal (class grade goal) or subgoal (weekly study hours goal), and success or failure varied naturally. When progress was lacking, participants in the primary goal condition experienced the largest decreases in mood and expectancy. These results suggest that it is optimal to evaluate goal progress at the lower, subgoal level, particularly after failure feedback.

  17. Research on high level radioactive waste repository seismic design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xu

    2012-01-01

    Review seismic hazard analysis principle and method in site suitable assessment process of Yucca Mountain Project, and seismic design criteria and seismic design basis in primary design process. Demonstrated spatial character of seismic hazard by calculated regional seismic hazard map. Contrasted different level seismic design basis to show their differences and relation. Discussed seismic design criteria for preclosure phrase of high level waste repository and preference goal under beyond design basis ground motion. (author)

  18. Orientaciones de Meta y Compromiso Físico-Motor en Educación Física. Un estudio en alumnos de 4º de Educación Primaria. (Goals orientations and level of motor commitment in physical activity in physical education. A study of students in 4th of primary education .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Barbero Alvarez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Partiendo de estudios previos que señalan la influencia que lo realizado en la infancia y adolescencia tiene en etapas vitales posteriores respecto a hábitos de participación en actividades físicas (Pate, Dowda, Baranowski y Puhl, 1993 y la relación existente entre nivel de capacidad física, orientaciones de meta y nivel de compromiso en actividades físicas (Goudas, Biddle y Fox, 1994; Tzetis, Goudas, Kourtesis y Zisi, 2002; Vlachopoulos y Biddle, 1996, en el presente trabajo se describe un estudio que se ha llevado a cabo con alumnos de 4º de Educación Primaria en Educación Física cuyo objetivo es determinar la existencia de relaciones entre orientaciones de meta, variables condicionales físicas (nivel de capacidad física y niveles de compromiso físico-motor en clases de Educación Física, medidas mediante el cuestionario TEOSQ, test deresistencia Shuttle-Run de 20 m y UPG (Unidad de posicionamiento global. Los resultados muestran la inexistencia de relaciones significativas entre orientación de meta y variables cinemáticas y fisiológicas, al considerar de forma global al conjunto de los sujetos. Al realizar el análisis en función del género se han encontrado relaciones significativas en el subgrupo mujeres entre la puntuación alcanzada en el factor orientación a la tarea y algunos parámetros cinemáticos y fisiológicos. Abstract Several previous studies pointed out to the influence of the experience acquired during childhood and adolescence on further vital stages, regarding the habits of taking part in physical activities, as well as therelation between physical capacity level, goal orientations and commitment level in physical activities. Therefore, in this paper we describe a study carried out with 4th-grade students in Primary Education in the Physical Education class. This study aims to determine the relations between goal orientations, physical conditional variables (physical capacity level and physical

  19. Out-of-pocket costs, primary care frequent attendance and sample selection: Estimates from a longitudinal cohort design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pymont, Carly; McNamee, Paul; Butterworth, Peter

    2018-03-20

    This paper examines the effect of out-of-pocket costs on subsequent frequent attendance in primary care using data from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Project, a representative community cohort study from Canberra, Australia. The analysis sample comprised 1197 respondents with two or more GP consultations, and uses survey data linked to administrative health service use (Medicare) data which provides data on the number of consultations and out-of-pocket costs. Respondents identified in the highest decile of GP use in a year were defined as Frequent Attenders (FAs). Logistic regression models that did not account for potential selection effects showed that out-of-pocket costs incurred during respondents' prior two consultations were significantly associated with subsequent FA status. Respondents who incurred higher costs ($15-$35; or >$35) were less likely to become FAs than those who incurred no or low (attenders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Design and construction of a cryogenic facility providing absolute measurements of radon 222 activity for developing a primary standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picolo, Jean-Louis

    1995-06-01

    Radon 222 metrology is required to obtain higher accuracy in assessing human health risks from exposure to natural radiation. This paper describes the development of a cryogenic facility that allows absolute measurements of radon 222 in order to obtain a primary standard. The method selected is the condensation of a radon 222 sample on a geometrically defined cold surface with a constant, well known and adjustable temperature and facing an alpha particles detector. Counting of the alpha particles reaching the detector and the precisely known detection geometry provide an absolute measurement of the source activity. After describing the cryogenic facility, the measurement accuracy and precision are discussed and a comparison made with other measurement systems. The relative uncertainty is below 1 pc (1 σ). The facility can also be used to improve our knowledge of the nuclear properties of radon 222 and to produce secondary standards. (author) [fr

  1. Integral forged pump casing for the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor: Development in design, forging technology, and material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austel, W.; Korbe, H.

    1986-01-01

    Developments in the forging of large casings for primary circuit coolant pumps for light water reactors in Germany are demonstrated beginning with the multiple forging fabricated version and ending with the integral forged type. This version is the result of the joint efforts of the pump manufacturer and the forgemaster after a cost-gain evaluation and represents an optimum solution in view of its functional and economical performance and also considering the high requirements for mechanical-technological properties, including homogeneity of the material. The development from 22 NiMoCr 3 7/A 508 Class 2 to 20 MnMoNi 5 5/A 508 Class 3 and their optimization will be demonstrated. This development is based mainly on minimizing the sulfur content and on vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD), which results in a reduction of the A-segregations, in improving fracture toughness and isotropy, and in the desired fine-grain structure

  2. Goal-Oriented Ethics: Framing the Goal-Setting Concretely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Illathuparampil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Selling, professor emeritus from KU Leuven, Belgium, recently made a significant contribution towards ethical methodology. It is in fact a continuation of the in-house conversations that have been in vogue about methods in moral reasoning since Vatican II in the discipline called theological ethics. What is specific about Selling’s attempt is that he re-orients or reframes the evaluation of the moral event to consider human intentionality or motivation before considering human behavior or human acts. He convincingly establishes his method by a meticulous reading of Thomas Aquinas. This paper is a response to the goal-oriented ethics that he has posited. As illustrated below, this paper evaluates the goal-oriented approach as solid and sufficient. While fully endorsing this approach, this paper argues that the process of ethical goal-setting is to be framed concretely. In a concrete historical context, so that a goal-oriented approach fully serves its purpose, this paper proposes that it is to be reinforced by four supportive pillars, which are in fact assumed by Selling in his work. They are openness to human sciences, conversation among various narratives, positing a theological frame for ethical reasoning, and recourse to non-discursive reasoning.

  3. Quantitative safety goals for the regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; O'Donnell, L.F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper offers a brief summary of the current regulatory background in the USA, emphasizing nuclear, related to the establishment of quantitative safety goals as a way to respond to the key issue of 'how safe is safe enough'. General Atomic has taken a leading role in advocating the use of probabilistic risk assessment techniques in the regulatory process. This has led to understanding of the importance of quantitative safety goals. The approach developed by GA is discussed in the paper. It is centred around definition of quantitative safety regions. The regions were termed: design basis, safety margin or design capability and safety research. The design basis region is bounded by the frequency of 10 -4 /reactor-year and consequences of no identifiable public injury. 10 -4 /reactor-year is associated with the total projected lifetime of a commercial US nuclear power programme. Events which have a 50% chance of happening are included in the design basis region. In the safety margin region, which extends below the design basis region, protection is provided against some events whose probability of not happening during the expected course of the US nuclear power programme is within the range of 50 to 90%. Setting the lower mean frequency to this region of 10 -5 /reactor-year is equivalent to offering 90% assurance that an accident of given severity will not happen. Rare events with a mean frequency below 10 -5 can be predicted to occur. However, accidents predicted to have a probability of less than 10 -6 are 99% certain not to happen at all, and are thus not anticipated to affect public health and safety. The area between 10 -5 and 10 -6 defines the frequency portion of the safety research region. Safety goals associated with individual risk to a maximum-exposed member of public, general societal risk and property risk are proposed in the paper

  4. Coordinating resources for prospective medication risk management of older home care clients in primary care: procedure development and RCT study design for demonstrating its effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivo, Terhi; Dimitrow, Maarit; Puustinen, Juha; Savela, Eeva; Pelkonen, Katariina; Kiuru, Valtteri; Suominen, Tuula; Kinnunen, Sirkka; Uunimäki, Mira; Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa; Leikola, Saija; Airaksinen, Marja

    2018-03-16

    The magnitude of safety risks related to medications of the older adults has been evidenced by numerous studies, but less is known of how to manage and prevent these risks in different health care settings. The aim of this study was to coordinate resources for prospective medication risk management of home care clients ≥ 65 years in primary care and to develop a study design for demonstrating effectiveness of the procedure. Health care units involved in the study are from primary care in Lohja, Southern Finland: home care (191 consented clients), the public healthcare center, and a private community pharmacy. System based risk management theory and action research method was applied to construct the collaborative procedure utilizing each profession's existing resources in medication risk management of older home care clients. An inventory of clinical measures in usual clinical practice and systematic review of rigorous study designs was utilized in effectiveness study design. The new coordinated medication management model (CoMM) has the following 5 stages: 1) practical nurses are trained to identify clinically significant drug-related problems (DRPs) during home visits and report those to the clinical pharmacist. Clinical pharmacist prepares the cases for 2) an interprofessional triage meeting (50-70 cases/meeting of 2 h) where decisions are made on further action, e.g., more detailed medication reviews, 3) community pharmacists conduct necessary medication reviews and each patients' physician makes final decisions on medication changes needed. The final stages concern 4) implementation and 5) follow-up of medication changes. Randomized controlled trial (RCT) was developed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure. The developed procedure is feasible for screening and reviewing medications of a high number of older home care clients to identify clients with severe DRPs and provide interventions to solve them utilizing existing primary care resources

  5. Research and Development Projects with ICT and students as learning designers in Primary Schools: A methodological challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Ellen Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Tosca, Susana

    of how: • ICT supports students learning, • ICT release time for more teaching, and • teachers digital literacy impact on the role of ICT in the educational practice. Further the call required collaboration between universities and university colleges in order to disseminate knowledge and new practices......In this paper we present some methodological challenges that emerged during the process of shaping the research design for the comprehensive and complex research project Children as learning designers in a digital school. The project is the realization of our proposal to a research call from...... the Danish Ministry of Education named Development projects and pilot school experiments (Udviklingsprojekter med demonstrationsskoleforsøg vedr. it i folkeskolen – see Undervisningsministeriet 2013) in the spring 2013. The call was based on a governmental decision to allocate 500 million DKR to increase...

  6. Results of the reliability investigations for the design basis accident 'Rupture of a cold primary coolant system'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoertner, H.; Nieckau, E.; Spindler, H.

    1976-12-01

    This report gives a comprehensive presentation of the detailed reliability investigation carried out for the engineered safety features installed to cope with the design basis accident 'Large LOCA' of a German nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor. The investigation is based on the engineered safety features of the Biblis Nuclear Power Plant, Unit A. The reliability investigation is carried out by means of a fault tree analysis. The influence of common-mode failures is assessed. (orig.) [de

  7. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Mette

    This publication is unique in its demystification and operationalization of the complex and elusive nature of the design process. The publication portrays the designer’s daily work and the creative process, which the designer is a part of. Apart from displaying the designer’s work methods...... and design parameters, the publication shows examples from renowned Danish design firms. Through these examples the reader gets an insight into the designer’s reality....

  8. Goal pursuit, goal adjustment, and affective well-being following lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre; Ryall, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the relationships between tenacious goal pursuit (TGP), flexible goal adjustment (FGA), and affective well-being in a sample of individuals with lower limb amputations. Cross-sectional, quantitative. Ninety-eight patients recently admitted to a primary prosthetic rehabilitation programme completed measures of TGP, FGA, positive affect, and negative affect. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that TGP and FGA accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in both positive and negative affect, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. TGP was significantly positively associated with positive affect, while FGA was significantly negatively associated with negative affect. Moderated regression analyses indicated that the beneficial effect of FGA on negative affect was strongest at high levels of amputation-related pain intensity and low levels of TGP. TGP and FGA appear to influence subjective well-being in different ways, with TGP promoting the experience of positive affect and FGA buffering against negative affect. TGP and FGA may prove useful in identifying individuals at risk of poor affective outcomes following lower limb amputation and represent important targets for intervention in this patient group. What is already known on this subject? The loss of a limb has a significant impact on several important life domains. Although some individuals experience emotional distress following amputation, the majority adjust well to their limb loss, with some achieving positive change or growth as a result of their experiences. Theories of self-regulation propose that disruptions in goal attainment have negative affective consequences. The physical, social, and psychological upheaval caused by limb loss is likely to threaten the attainment of valued goals, which may leave individuals vulnerable to negative psychosocial outcomes if they do not regulate their goals in response to these challenges. According to the dual

  9. Implementation of safety goals in NRC's regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    In May 1983 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a policy statement on Safety Goals For Nuclear Power Plant Operation. The Commission at the same time judged that a two-year evaluation period was necessary to judge the effectiveness of the goals and design objectives, and directed the staff to develop information and understanding as to how to further define and use the design objectives and the cost-benefit guidelines. In carrying out the Commission's mandate, the staff framed three major questions to be addressed during the safety goal evaluation period. These three questions are: 1) to what extent is it practical to use safety goals in the regulatory process. 2) Should the quantitative design objectives be modified or supplemented. If so, how. 3) How should the safety goals be implemented at the end of the evaluation period. The staff's conclusions are discussed

  10. Goal Setting as Teacher Development Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This article explores goal setting as a teacher development practice in higher education. It reports on a study of college teacher goal setting informed by goal setting theory. Analysis of study participants' goal setting practices and their experiences with goal pursuit offers a framework for thinking about the kinds of goals teachers might set…

  11. Goals for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Establishing a publicly, politically, economically, and technologically acceptable waste management system for the fuel cycle is a necessary condition for accepting the nuclear program as a national energy option. Findings are given on the technology, politics, economics, morality, aesthetics, and societal impact of waste management. Proposed goals are outlined for the regulation of waste management

  12. New Goals of Sustainable Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Ursul

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the process of transition from the Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs. The authors have set an objective to demonstrate that SD as a future form of development of civilization from the very beginning had a “target orientation” and from the beginning and anticipated realization and staging of the whole hierarchy of objectives needed for the establishment of an effective global governance. In the future, global development in its “anthropogenic” aspect will be to implement the goals and principles of SD, which will be updated with each new stage of the implementation of this kind of socio-natural evolution. The paper argues the position that the concept of SD should be radically transformed into a “global dimension.” Attention is drawn to the fact that Russia recognized another distant, but very important in the conceptual and theoretical perspective, global goal of “sustainable transition” — formation of the noosphere.

  13. A Goal for Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiw, Karen L.

    2003-01-01

    Culturally competent nurses enable clients to feel respected, valued, and motivated to achieve health goals. A model for nursing education should develop cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills; provide cultural immersion experiences; and foster the desire to work with diverse clients. (Contains 48 references.) (SK)

  14. Planning for Me! Setting Personal Goals. [Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Paul

    This book is designed to help the individual acquire skills in life planning. Part 1 focuses on achieving the most from use of the book. It discusses personal responsibility, personal goals, and possible uses of the book. Part 2 contains the procedures to follow. It begins by listing benefits from setting goals. Exercises that follow assess…

  15. Support and performance improvement for primary health care workers in low- and middle-income countries: a scoping review of intervention design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Ashwin; Mabey, David C; Chaudhri, Simran; Brown Epstein, Helen-Ann; Lawn, Stephen D

    2017-04-01

    Primary health care workers (HCWs) in low- and middle-income settings (LMIC) often work in challenging conditions in remote, rural areas, in isolation from the rest of the health system and particularly specialist care. Much attention has been given to implementation of interventions to support quality and performance improvement for workers in such settings. However, little is known about the design of such initiatives and which approaches predominate, let alone those that are most effective. We aimed for a broad understanding of what distinguishes different approaches to primary HCW support and performance improvement and to clarify the existing evidence as well as gaps in evidence in order to inform decision-making and design of programs intended to support and improve the performance of health workers in these settings. We systematically searched the literature for articles addressing this topic, and undertook a comparative review to document the principal approaches to performance and quality improvement for primary HCWs in LMIC settings. We identified 40 eligible papers reporting on interventions that we categorized into five different approaches: (1) supervision and supportive supervision; (2) mentoring; (3) tools and aids; (4) quality improvement methods, and (5) coaching. The variety of study designs and quality/performance indicators precluded a formal quantitative data synthesis. The most extensive literature was on supervision, but there was little clarity on what defines the most effective approach to the supervision activities themselves, let alone the design and implementation of supervision programs. The mentoring literature was limited, and largely focused on clinical skills building and educational strategies. Further research on how best to incorporate mentorship into pre-service clinical training, while maintaining its function within the routine health system, is needed. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about coaching in this

  16. Support and performance improvement for primary health care workers in low- and middle-income countries: a scoping review of intervention design and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabey, David C.; Chaudhri, Simran; Brown Epstein, Helen-Ann; Lawn, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Primary health care workers (HCWs) in low- and middle-income settings (LMIC) often work in challenging conditions in remote, rural areas, in isolation from the rest of the health system and particularly specialist care. Much attention has been given to implementation of interventions to support quality and performance improvement for workers in such settings. However, little is known about the design of such initiatives and which approaches predominate, let alone those that are most effective. We aimed for a broad understanding of what distinguishes different approaches to primary HCW support and performance improvement and to clarify the existing evidence as well as gaps in evidence in order to inform decision-making and design of programs intended to support and improve the performance of health workers in these settings. We systematically searched the literature for articles addressing this topic, and undertook a comparative review to document the principal approaches to performance and quality improvement for primary HCWs in LMIC settings. We identified 40 eligible papers reporting on interventions that we categorized into five different approaches: (1) supervision and supportive supervision; (2) mentoring; (3) tools and aids; (4) quality improvement methods, and (5) coaching. The variety of study designs and quality/performance indicators precluded a formal quantitative data synthesis. The most extensive literature was on supervision, but there was little clarity on what defines the most effective approach to the supervision activities themselves, let alone the design and implementation of supervision programs. The mentoring literature was limited, and largely focused on clinical skills building and educational strategies. Further research on how best to incorporate mentorship into pre-service clinical training, while maintaining its function within the routine health system, is needed. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about coaching

  17. Design considerations in a clinical trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for the management of low back pain in primary care: Back Skills Training Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Frances E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP is a major public health problem. Risk factors for the development and persistence of LBP include physical and psychological factors. However, most research activity has focused on physical solutions including manipulation, exercise training and activity promotion. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will establish the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a group programme, based on cognitive behavioural principles, for the management of sub-acute and chronic LBP in primary care. Our primary outcomes are disease specific measures of pain and function. Secondary outcomes include back beliefs, generic health related quality of life and resource use. All outcomes are measured over 12 months. Participants randomised to the intervention arm are invited to attend up to six weekly sessions each of 90 minutes; each group has 6–8 participants. A parallel qualitative study will aid the evaluation of the intervention. Discussion In this paper we describe the rationale and design of a randomised evaluation of a group based cognitive behavioural intervention for low back pain.

  18. Primary care physicians' perceived barriers and facilitators to conservative care for older adults with chronic kidney disease: design of a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam-Tham, Helen; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Campbell, David; Thomas, Chandra; Quinn, Robert; Fruetel, Karen; King-Shier, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Guideline committees have identified the need for research to inform the provision of conservative care for older adults with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who have a high burden of comorbidity or functional impairment. We will use both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to provide a comprehensive understanding of barriers and facilitators to care for these patients in primary care. Our objectives are to (1) interview primary care physicians to determine their perspectives of conservative care for older adults with stage 5 CKD and (2) survey primary care physicians to determine the prevalence of key barriers and facilitators to provision of conservative care for older adults with stage 5 CKD. A sequential exploratory mixed methods design was adopted for this study. The first phase of the study will involve fundamental qualitative description and the second phase will be a cross-sectional population-based survey. The research is conducted in Alberta, Canada. The participants are primary care physicians with experience in providing care for older adults with stage 5 CKD not planning on initiating dialysis. The first objective will be achieved by undertaking interviews with primary care physicians from southern Alberta. Participants will be selected purposively to include physicians with a range of characteristics (e.g., age, gender, and location of clinical practice). Interviews will be recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis to generate themes. The second objective will be achieved by undertaking a population-based survey of primary care physicians in Alberta. The questionnaire will be developed based on the findings from the qualitative interviews and pilot tested for face and content validity. Physicians will be provided multiple options to complete the questionnaire including mail, fax, and online methods. Descriptive statistics and associations between demographic factors and barriers and facilitators to

  19. Design of a system for examinations of the history of operation of selected WWER primary circuit facilities. Stage I: requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Kraus, V.; Ruscak, M.; Vejvoda, S.

    1994-01-01

    A survey is presented of data required for the evaluation and control of nuclear power plant aging and service life, and a data acquisition and record-keeping system is proposed. The data fall in 3 classes: (i) information on the initial status, including design data and status data at the beginning of the operational lifetime of the facilities; (ii) data on the history of operation, including operating conditions at the level of the corresponding system and facility, as well as operating test and failure data; and (iii) data on the history of maintenance, including data on the monitoring of the facility condition and on maintenance. Basic information requirements for the evaluation of the service life of the pressure vessel, steam generator, pressurizer, and main circulation pipe are given; the way of processing this information is outlined. (J.B.). 2 figs

  20. Association between women veterans' experiences with VA outpatient health care and designation as a women's health provider in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Lori A; Trentalange, Mark; Murphy, Terrence E; Brandt, Cynthia; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Maisel, Natalya C; Wright, Steven M; Gaetano, Vera S; Allore, Heather; Skanderson, Melissa; Reyes-Harvey, Evelyn; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rose, Danielle; Haskell, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Women veterans comprise a small percentage of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users. Prior research on women veterans' experiences with primary care has focused on VA site differences and not individual provider characteristics. In 2010, the VA established policy requiring the provision of comprehensive women's health care by designated women's health providers (DWHPs). Little is known about the quality of health care delivered by DWHPs and women veterans' experience with care from these providers. Secondary data were obtained from the VA Survey of Healthcare Experience of Patients (SHEP) using the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) survey from March 2012 through February 2013, a survey designed to measure patient experience with care and the DWHPs Assessment of Workforce Capacity that discerns between DWHPs versus non-DWHPs. Of the 28,994 surveys mailed to women veterans, 24,789 were seen by primary care providers and 8,151 women responded to the survey (response rate, 32%). A total of 3,147 providers were evaluated by the SHEP-CAHPS-PCMH survey (40%; n = 1,267 were DWHPs). In a multivariable model, patients seen by DWHPs (relative risk, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04) reported higher overall experiences with care compared with patients seen by non-DWHPs. The main finding is that women veterans' overall experiences with outpatient health care are slightly better for those receiving care from DWHPs compared with those receiving care from non-DWHPs. Our findings have important policy implications for how to continue to improve women veterans' experiences. Our work provides support to increase access to DWHPs at VA primary care clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Relations between Classroom Goal Structures and Students' Goal Orientations in Mathematics Classes: When Is a Mastery Goal Structure Adaptive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Federici, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test possible interactions between mastery and performance goal structures in mathematics classrooms when predicting students' goal orientations. More specifically, we tested if the degree of performance goal structure moderated the associations between mastery goal structure and students' goal orientations.…

  2. Mathematics Education: Student Terminal Goals, Program Goals, and Behavioral Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    Behavioral objectives are listed for the primary, intermediate and junior high mathematics curriculum in the Mesa Public Schools (Arizona). Lists of specific objectives are given by level for sets, symbol recognition, number operations, mathematical structures, measurement and problem solving skills. (JP)

  3. [Treatment goals in FACE philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Domingo; Maté, Amaia; Zabalegui, Paula; Valenzuela, Jaime

    2017-03-01

    The FACE philosophy is characterized by clearly defined treatment goals: facial esthetics, dental esthetics, periodontal health, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The purpose is to establish ideal occlusion with good facial esthetics and an orthopedic stable joint position. The authors present all the concepts of FACE philosophy and illustrate them through one case report. Taking into account all the FACE philosophy concepts increases diagnostic ability and improves the quality and stability of treatment outcomes. The goal of this philosophy is to harmonize the facial profile, tooth alignment, periodontium, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The evaluation and treatment approach to vertical problems are unique to the philosophy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  4. Motivational beliefs, values, and goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Jacquelynne S; Wigfield, Allan

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the recent research on motivation, beliefs, values, and goals, focusing on developmental and educational psychology. The authors divide the chapter into four major sections: theories focused on expectancies for success (self-efficacy theory and control theory), theories focused on task value (theories focused on intrinsic motivation, self-determination, flow, interest, and goals), theories that integrate expectancies and values (attribution theory, the expectancy-value models of Eccles et al., Feather, and Heckhausen, and self-worth theory), and theories integrating motivation and cognition (social cognitive theories of self-regulation and motivation, the work by Winne & Marx, Borkowski et al., Pintrich et al., and theories of motivation and volition). The authors end the chapter with a discussion of how to integrate theories of self-regulation and expectancy-value models of motivation and suggest new directions for future research.

  5. Iterative Goal Refinement for Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Researchers have used a variety of ways to represent such constraints (e.g., as a constraint satisfaction problem ( Scala , to appear), in PDDL (Vaquro...lifecycle to recent models of replanning (Talamadupala et al., 2013) and continual planning ( Scala , to appear). We described goal reasoning in...F., & Barreiro, J. (2013). Towards deliberative control in marine robotics. In Marine Robot Autonomy (pp. 91–175). Springer. Scala , E. (to appear

  6. Treatment goals of pulmonary hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V

    2013-12-24

    With significant therapeutic advances in the field of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the need to identify clinically relevant treatment goals that correlate with long-term outcome has emerged as 1 of the most critical tasks. Current goals include achieving modified New York Heart Association functional class I or II, 6-min walk distance >380 m, normalization of right ventricular size and function on echocardiograph, a decreasing or normalization of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and hemodynamics with right atrial pressure <8 mm Hg and cardiac index >2.5 mg\\/kg\\/min(2). However, to more effectively prognosticate in the current era of complex treatments, it is becoming clear that the "bar" needs to be set higher, with more robust and clearer delineations aimed at parameters that correlate with long-term outcome; namely, exercise capacity and right heart function. Specifically, tests that accurately and noninvasively determine right ventricular function, such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and BNP\\/N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, are emerging as promising indicators to serve as baseline predictors and treatment targets. Furthermore, studies focusing on outcomes have shown that no single test can reliably serve as a long-term prognostic marker and that composite treatment goals are more predictive of long-term outcome. It has been proposed that treatment goals be revised to include the following: modified New York Heart Association functional class I or II, 6-min walk distance ≥ 380 to 440 m, cardiopulmonary exercise test-measured peak oxygen consumption >15 ml\\/min\\/kg and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide <45 l\\/min\\/l\\/min, BNP level toward "normal," echocardiograph and\\/or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating normal\\/near-normal right ventricular size and function, and hemodynamics showing normalization of right ventricular function with right atrial pressure <8 mm Hg and cardiac index >2.5 to 3.0 l\\/min\\/m(2).

  7. A Multi-Criteria Goal Programming Model to Analyze the Sustainable Goals of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikant Gupta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an ever-growing demand for sustainable development (SD plans, in order to foster a country’s economic growth by implementing suitable policies and initiative programs for the development of the primary, the secondary and the tertiary sectors. We present a multi-criteria modeling approach using the linear programming problem (LPP framework for a simultaneous optimization of these three sectors. Furthermore, we develop a fuzzy goal programming (FGP model that provides an optimal allocation of resources by achieving future goals on the gross domestic product (GDP, the electricity consumption (EC and the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Furthermore, a weighted model of FGP is presented to obtain varying solutions according to the priorities set by the decision-maker for achieving future goals of GDP growth, EC and GHG emissions. The presented models provide useful insight for decision-makers when implementing strategies across different sectors. As a model country, we chose India by the year 2030. A study of economic policies and sustainable development goals (SDGs for India is finally carried out.

  8. Designing plants for ALARA-revelation or evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The author traces the Duke Nuclear program from the late 1960s to today. He then looks at the future. The primary goal, he says, should be to continue to reduce individual exposure in order to reduce total station, industry exposure. In order to accomplish this goal in the design process, he recommends continued training of design personnel to reinforce the ALARA concepts and to provide new industry techniques and actual examples

  9. The contribution of goal specificity to goal achievement in collaborative goal setting for the management of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lorraine; Alles, Chehani; Lemay, Kate; Reddel, Helen; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Emmerton, Lynne; Stewart, Kay; Burton, Debbie; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Goal setting was investigated as part of an implementation trial of an asthma management service (PAMS) conducted in 96 Australian community pharmacies. Patients and pharmacists identified asthma-related issues of concern to the patient and collaboratively set goals to address these. Although goal setting is commonly integrated into disease state management interventions, the nature of goals, and their contribution to goal attainment and health outcomes are not well understood. To identify and describe: 1) goals set collaboratively between adult patients with asthma and their pharmacist, 2) goal specificity and goal achievement, and 3) describe the relationships between specificity, achievement, asthma control and asthma-related quality of life. Measures of goal specificity, and goal achievement were developed and applied to patient data records. Goals set were thematically analyzed into goal domains. Proportions of goals set, goals achieved and their specificity were calculated. Correlational and regression analyses were undertaken to determine the relationships between goal specificity, goal achievement, asthma control and asthma-related quality of life. Data were drawn from 498 patient records. Findings showed that patients set a wide range and number of asthma-related goals (N = 1787) and the majority (93%) were either achieved or being working toward by the end of the study. Goal achievement was positively associated with specific and moderately specific goals, but not non-specific goals. However, on closer inspection, an inconsistent pattern of relationships emerged as a function of goal domain. Findings also showed that goal setting was associated with end-of-study asthma control but not to asthma-related quality of life. Pharmacists can help patients to set achievable and specific asthma management goals, and these have the potential to directly impact health outcomes such as asthma control. Goal specificity appears to be an important feature in the

  10. The interaction between dietary and life goals: using goal systems theory to explore healthy diet and life goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Wright, Julie A; Migneault, Jeffrey P; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Objective : To examine the types of life and dietary goals individuals report and how these goal domains interact as framed by goal systems theory. Methods : This work is a cross-sectional survey study. Measures included the incidence of common life and dietary goals and how these goals interact with and facilitate each other. Results : The results of a quantitative survey ( n  = 46 participants), which was informed by two focus groups ( n  = 17 participants), showed that participants are trying to achieve several different life (e.g. achieving financial success) and dietary goals (e.g. eating more fruits and vegetables, drinking more water, and losing weight) and that these two types of goals interact to both facilitate and conflict with each other. Having a life goal of exercising was significantly associated with healthy eating goals when compared with other life goals ( p 's goals may be linked and help to facilitate one another. Being in the maintenance phase with the goal of healthy eating was associated with participants feeling like they were more successful in their other non-diet-related health goals ( p  goals can facilitate success in achieving other goals. Conclusions : Life goals can have an impact on a person's ability to achieve and maintain dietary and other health goals. Health educators may help to facilitate long-term behavior change by examining a person's life goals as well as dietary goals.

  11. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  12. Evaluating a Dutch cardiology primary care plus intervention on the Triple Aim outcomes: study design of a practice-based quantitative and qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjel, Tessa C C; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2017-09-06

    In an attempt to deal with the pressures on the health-care system and to guarantee sustainability, changes are needed. This study focuses on a cardiology primary care plus intervention. Primary care plus (PC+) is a new health-care delivery model focused on substitution of specialist care in the hospital setting with specialist care in the primary care setting. The intervention consists of a cardiology PC+ centre in which cardiologists, supported by other health-care professionals, provide consultations in a primary care setting. The PC+ centre aims to improve the health of the population and quality of care as experienced by patients, and reduce the number of referrals to hospital-based outpatient specialist care in order to reduce health-care costs. These aims reflect the Triple Aim principle. Hence, the objectives of the study are to evaluate the cardiology PC+ centre in terms of the Triple Aim outcomes and to evaluate the process of the introduction of PC+. The study is a practice-based, quantitative study with a longitudinal observational design, and an additional qualitative study to supplement, interpret and improve the quantitative study. The study population of the quantitative part will consist of adult patients (≥18 years) with non-acute and low-complexity cardiology-related health complaints, who will be referred to the cardiology PC+ centre (intervention group) or hospital-based outpatient cardiology care (control group). All eligible patients will be asked to complete questionnaires at three different time points consisting of questions about their demographics, health status and experience of care. Additionally, quantitative data will be collected about health-care utilization and related health-care costs at the PC+ centre and the hospital. The qualitative part, consisting of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and observations, is designed to evaluate the process as well as to amplify, clarify and explain quantitative results. This study

  13. Rationale, design, and implementation protocol of an electronic health record integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR randomized trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnivesky Juan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical prediction rules (CPRs represent well-validated but underutilized evidence-based medicine tools at the point-of-care. To date, an inability to integrate these rules into an electronic health record (EHR has been a major limitation and we are not aware of a study demonstrating the use of CPR's in an ambulatory EHR setting. The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR trial integrates two CPR's in an EHR and assesses both the usability and the effect on evidence-based practice in the primary care setting. Methods A multi-disciplinary design team was assembled to develop a prototype iCPR for validated streptococcal pharyngitis and bacterial pneumonia CPRs. The iCPR tool was built as an active Clinical Decision Support (CDS tool that can be triggered by user action during typical workflow. Using the EHR CDS toolkit, the iCPR risk score calculator was linked to tailored ordered sets, documentation, and patient instructions. The team subsequently conducted two levels of 'real world' usability testing with eight providers per group. Usability data were used to refine and create a production tool. Participating primary care providers (n = 149 were randomized and intervention providers were trained in the use of the new iCPR tool. Rates of iCPR tool triggering in the intervention and control (simulated groups are monitored and subsequent use of the various components of the iCPR tool among intervention encounters is also tracked. The primary outcome is the difference in antibiotic prescribing rates (strep and pneumonia iCPR's encounters and chest x-rays (pneumonia iCPR only between intervention and control providers. Discussion Using iterative usability testing and development paired with provider training, the iCPR CDS tool leverages user-centered design principles to overcome pervasive underutilization of EBM and support evidence-based practice at the point-of-care. The ongoing trial will determine if this collaborative

  14. Case management for the treatment of patients with major depression in general practices – rationale, design and conduct of a cluster randomized controlled trial – PRoMPT (Primary care Monitoring for depressive Patient's Trial [ISRCTN66386086] – Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krauth Christian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a disorder with high prevalence in primary health care and a significant burden of illness. The delivery of health care for depression, as well as other chronic illnesses, has been criticized for several reasons and new strategies to address the needs of these illnesses have been advocated. Case management is a patient-centered approach which has shown efficacy in the treatment of depression in highly organized Health Maintenance Organization (HMO settings and which might also be effective in other, less structured settings. Methods/Design PRoMPT (PRimary care Monitoring for depressive Patients Trial is a cluster randomised controlled trial with General Practice (GP as the unit of randomisation. The aim of the study is to evaluate a GP applied case-management for patients with major depressive disorder. 70 GPs were randomised either to intervention group or to control group with the control group delivering usual care. Each GP will include 10 patients suffering from major depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV criteria. The intervention group will receive treatment based on standardized guidelines and monthly telephone monitoring from a trained practice nurse. The nurse investigates the patient's status concerning the MDD criteria, his adherence to GPs prescriptions, possible side effects of medication, and treatment goal attainment. The control group receives usual care – including recommended guidelines. Main outcome measure is the cumulative score of the section depressive disorders (PHQ-9 from the German version of the Prime MD Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-D. Secondary outcome measures are the Beck-Depression-Inventory, self-reported adherence (adapted from Moriskey and the SF-36. In addition, data are collected about patients' satisfaction (EUROPEP-tool, medication, health care utilization, comorbidity, suicide attempts and days out of work. The study comprises three assessment times: baseline

  15. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  16. Psychological risk factors of micro- and macrovascular outcomes in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes: rationale and design of the DiaDDZoB Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Victor JM

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common psychiatric complication of diabetes, but little is known about the natural course and the consequences of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes. While depression has been related to poor glycemic control and increased risk for macrovascular disease, its association with microvascular complications remains understudied. The predictive role of other psychological risk factors such as Type D (distressed personality and the mechanisms that possibly link depression and Type D personality with poor vascular outcomes are also still unclear. Methods/Design This prospective cohort study will examine: (1 the course of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes; (2 whether depressive symptoms and Type D personality are associated with the development of microvascular and/or macrovascular complications and with the risk of all-cause or vascular mortality; and (3 the behavioral and physiological mechanisms that may mediate these associations. The DiaDDZoB Study is embedded within the larger DIAZOB Primary Care Diabetes study, which covers a comprehensive cohort of type 2 diabetes patients treated by over 200 primary care physicians in South-East Brabant, The Netherlands. These patients will be followed during their lifetime and are assessed annually for demographic, clinical, lifestyle and psychosocial factors. Measurements include an interviewer-administered and self-report questionnaire, regular care laboratory tests and physical examinations, and pharmacy medication records. The DiaDDZoB Study uses data that have been collected during the original baseline assessment in 2005 (M0; N = 2,460 and the 2007 (M1; N = 2,225 and 2008 (M2; N = 2,032 follow-up assessments. Discussion The DiaDDZoB Study is expected to contribute to the current understanding of the course of depression in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes and will also test whether depressed

  17. Designing and development of a nutrition counseling center in for the primary health care system in Ahvaz, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaei, Mina; Zarei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Malnutrition is one of the most important nutritional challenges in Iran and other developing countries. The aim of this study was to improve the quality of nutritional service provided to children under six years old in rural areas in Ahvaz city through designing nutrition counseling centers. Methods: An intervention study was conducted on 660 under six year old children from May to November 2007 in Lali district of Ahvaz. Data was gathered using a general questionnaire and anthropometric measurements filled by trained questioners in the Health house. The anthropometric indicators of participants, the knowledge, attitude and practice of their mothers were re-assessed after the intervention. Results: At the beginning of the study the mean points for knowledge, attitude and practice of mothers on principles of nutrition in children were 71.2%, 68.6% and 69.3% respectively. After the intervention these figures reached 85.6%, 74.4% and 82.1% respectively. The changes were statistically significant (P<0.01, P<0.05 and P<0.05 respectively). The mean points gained by mothers living in suburb villages were lower than mothers living in the main villages before and after the intervention. Mean knowledge, attitude and practice levels in mothers of both healthy and malnourished children was significantly higher after the project compared to its start (p<0.05). About 68.9% of children were referred to nutrition counseling centers for further treatment after the intervention. The intervention was most efficient in children suffering growth retardation, with a cure rate of 91%; only 48.6% of malnourished children referred to the center were cured (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results obtained from this study showed that over 90% of children suffering growth retardation were cured. This means establishing nutrition counseling centers to encourage proper nutrition behaviors, evaluate current issues and find possible solutions, persuade mothers to improve child

  18. Primary care ... where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, G B

    1999-07-01

    Corporate-based nurse managed centers are not the national norm. More prevalent is the use of an occupational health or physician-directed medical model of care. The author describes how a 14-year-old primary care center at a North Carolina computer software company is just "business as usual" when viewed in the context of the company's philosophy, goals, and culture. Included are considerations for nurse practitioners interested in the successful transplantation of this primary care model to other settings.

  19. Lasting impact of an implemented self-management programme for people with type 2 diabetes referred from primary care: a one-group, before-after design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fløde, Mari; Iversen, Marjolein M; Aarflot, Morten; Haltbakk, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    Research interventions in uniform clinical settings and in patients fulfilling well-defined inclusion criteria might show a more pronounced effect than implementing the same intervention in existing practice. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) is complex, and should be assessed in existing practice as it is an intervention widely implemented. To examine the impact of an established group-based DSME in unselected people with type 2 diabetes referred from primary care. A one-group, before-after design was used for assessments before, immediately after, and 3 months after participation in a group-based DSME programme conducted at two Learning and Mastering Centres in Norway between November 2013 and June 2014. Participants completed a questionnaire before (n = 115), immediately after (n = 95) and 3 months after (n = 42) the DSME programme. Primary outcome measure was diabetes knowledge (Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test). Also patient activation (Patient Activation Measure [PAM]) and self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy scale [GSE]) were measured. Changes in outcome measures were analysed using paired t-tests for normally distributed data and Wilcoxon signed-rank test for skewed data. Mean knowledge improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.001). Changes persisted at the 3-month assessment. Mean PAM scores improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.001), and changes persisted for 3 months. Mean GSE scores improved from baseline (p = 0.022) and persisted for 3 months. However, when results were stratified for participants who responded at all three time points, GSE showed no change during the study period. The complexity self-management in the individual is challenging to reflect in DSME. This implemented DSME programme for people with type 2 diabetes improved levels of diabetes knowledge and patient activation, persisting for at least 3 months. Hence, the DSME programme appears to be robust beyond standardised research settings, in educating unselected

  20. Dynamics of multiple-goal pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louro, Maria J; Pieters, Rik; Zeelenberg, Marcel

    2007-08-01

    The authors propose and test a model of multiple-goal pursuit that specifies how individuals allocate effort among multiple goals over time. The model predicts that whether individuals decide to step up effort, coast, abandon the current goal, or switch to pursue another goal is determined jointly by the emotions that flow from prior goal progress and the proximity to future goal attainment, and proximally determined by changes in expectancies about goal attainment. Results from a longitudinal diary study and 2 experiments show that positive and negative goal-related emotions can have diametrically opposing effects on goal-directed behavior, depending on the individual's proximity to goal attainment. The findings resolve contrasting predictions about the influence of positive and negative emotions in volitional behavior, critically amend the goal gradient hypothesis, and provide new insights into the dynamics and determinants of multiple-goal pursuit.

  1. Environment and safety: major goals for MARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maninger, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) is a conceptual design study for a commercial fusion power reactor. One of the major goals of MARS is to develop design guidance so that fusion reactors can meet reasonable expectations for environmental health and safety. One of the first steps in the assessment of health and safety requirements was to examine what the guidelines might be for health and safety in disposal of radioactive wastes from fusion reactors. Then, using these quidelines as criteria, the impact of materials selection upon generation of radioactive wastes through neutron activation of structural materials was investigated. A conclusion of this work is that fusion power systems may need substantial engineering effort in new materials development and selection to meet the probable publicly acceptable levels of radioactivity for waste disposal in the future

  2. Free breakfasts in schools: design and conduct of a cluster randomised controlled trial of the Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative in Wales [ISRCTN18336527].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laurence; Moore, Graham F; Tapper, Katy; Lynch, Rebecca; Desousa, Carol; Hale, Janine; Roberts, Chris; Murphy, Simon

    2007-09-21

    School-based breakfast provision is increasingly being seen as a means of improving educational performance and dietary behaviour amongst children. Furthermore, recognition is growing that breakfast provision offers potential as a means of addressing social inequalities in these outcomes. At present however, the evidence base on the effectiveness of breakfast provision in bringing about these improvements is limited. This paper describes the research design of a large scale evaluation of the effectiveness of the Welsh Assembly Government's Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative. A cluster randomised trial, with school as the unit of randomisation was used for the outcome evaluation, with a nested qualitative process evaluation. Quantitative outcome measures included dietary habits, attitudes, cognitive function, classroom behaviour, and school attendance. The study recruited 111 primary schools in Wales, of which 56 were randomly assigned to control condition and 55 to intervention. Participants were Year 5 and 6 students (aged 9-11 years) in these schools. Data were collected for all 111 schools at each of three time points: baseline, 4 month and 12 month follow-up. This was achieved through a repeated cross-sectional survey of approximately 4350 students on each of these occasions. Of those students in Year 5 at baseline, 1975 provided data at one or both of the follow-ups, forming a nested cohort. The evaluation also included a nested process evaluation, using questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and case studies with students, school staff, and local authority scheme coordinators as key informants. An overview of the methods used for the evaluation is presented, providing an example of the feasibility of conducting robust evaluations of policy initiatives using a randomised trial design with nested process evaluation. Details are provided of response rates and the flow of participants. Reflection is offered on methodological issues encountered at

  3. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Mette

    Design - proces & metode iBog®  er enestående i sit fokus på afmystificering og operationalisering af designprocessens flygtige og komplekse karakter. Udgivelsen går bag om designerens daglige arbejde og giver et indblik i den kreative skabelsesproces, som designeren er en del af. Udover et bredt...... indblik i designerens arbejdsmetoder og designparametre giver Design - proces & metode en række eksempler fra anerkendte designvirksomheder, der gør det muligt at komme helt tæt på designerens virkelighed....

  4. Analysis of primary teacher stress' sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Depolli Steiner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Teachers are subject to many different work stressors. This study focused on differences in intensity and frequency of potential stressors facing primary schoolteachers and set the goal to identify the most important sources of teacher stress in primary school. The study included 242 primary schoolteachers from different parts of Slovenia. We used Stress Inventory that is designed for identification of intensity and frequency of 49 situations that can play the role of teachers' work stressors. Findings showed that the major sources of stress facing teachers are factors related to work overload, factors stemming from pupils' behaviour and motivation and factors related to school system. Results also showed some small differences in perception of stressors in different groups of teachers (by gender and by teaching level.

  5. West End Walkers 65+: A randomised controlled trial of a primary care-based walking intervention for older adults: Study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe David A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Scotland, older adults are a key target group for physical activity intervention due to the large proportion who are inactive. The health benefits of an active lifestyle are well established but more research is required on the most effective interventions to increase activity in older adults. The 'West End Walkers 65+' randomised controlled trial aims to examine the feasibility of delivering a pedometer-based walking intervention to adults aged ≥65 years through a primary care setting and to determine the efficacy of this pilot. The study rationale, protocol and recruitment process are discussed in this paper. Methods/Design The intervention consisted of a 12-week pedometer-based graduated walking programme and physical activity consultations. Participants were randomised into an immediate intervention group (immediate group or a 12-week waiting list control group (delayed group who then received the intervention. For the pilot element of this study, the primary outcome measure was pedometer step counts. Secondary outcome measures of sedentary time and physical activity (time spent lying/sitting, standing or walking; activPAL™ monitor, mood (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, functional ability (Perceived Motor-Efficacy Scale for Older Adults, quality of life (Short-Form (36 Health Survey version 2 and loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale were assessed. Focus groups with participants and semi-structured interviews with the research team captured their experiences of the intervention. The feasibility component of this trial examined recruitment via primary care and retention of participants, appropriateness of the intervention for older adults and the delivery of the intervention by a practice nurse. Discussion West End Walkers 65+ will determine the feasibility and pilot the efficacy of delivering a pedometer-based walking intervention through primary care to Scottish adults aged ≥65 years. The study will also

  6. Referral from primary care to a physical activity programme: establishing long-term adherence? A randomized controlled trial. Rationale and study design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puig-Ribera Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Declining physical activity is associated with a rising burden of global disease. There is little evidence about effective ways to increase adherence to physical activity. Therefore, interventions are needed that produce sustained increases in adherence to physical activity and are cost-effective. The purpose is to assess the effectiveness of a primary care physical activity intervention in increasing adherence to physical activity in the general population seen in primary care. Method and design Randomized controlled trial with systematic random sampling. A total of 424 subjects of both sexes will participate; all will be over the age of 18 with a low level of physical activity (according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, IPAQ, self-employed and from 9 Primary Healthcare Centres (PHC. They will volunteer to participate in a physical activity programme during 3 months (24 sessions; 2 sessions a week, 60 minutes per session. Participants from each PHC will be randomly allocated to an intervention (IG and control group (CG. The following parameters will be assessed pre and post intervention in both groups: (1 health-related quality of life (SF-12, (2 physical activity stage of change (Prochaska's stages of change, (3 level of physical activity (IPAQ-short version, (4 change in perception of health (vignettes from the Cooperative World Organization of National Colleges, Academies, and Academic Associations of Family Physicians, COOP/WONCA, (5 level of social support for the physical activity practice (Social Support for Physical Activity Scale, SSPAS, and (6 control based on analysis (HDL, LDL and glycated haemoglobin. Participants' frequency of visits to the PHC will be registered over the six months before and after the programme. There will be a follow up in a face to face interview three, six and twelve months after the programme, with the reduced version of IPAQ, SF-12, SSPAS, and Prochaska's stages

  7. Identification of cultural determinants of antibiotic use cited in primary care in Europe: a mixed research synthesis study of integrated design "Culture is all around us".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul-Lundgren, Pia; Jensen, Siri; Drai, Johann; Lindbæk, Morten

    2015-09-17

    Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, particularly for respiratory tract infections (RTI) in ambulatory care, has become a worldwide public health threat due to resulting antibiotic resistance. In spite of various interventions and campaigns, wide variations in antibiotic use persist between European countries. Cultural determinants are often referred to as a potential cause, but are rarely defined. To our knowledge, so far no systematic literature review has focused on cultural determinants of antibiotic use. The aim of this study was to identify cultural determinants, on a country-specific level in ambulatory care in Europe, and to describe the influence of culture on antibiotic use, using a framework of cultural dimensions. A computer-based systematic literature review was conducted by two research teams, in France and in Norway. Eligible publications included studies exploring antibiotic use in primary care in at least two European countries based on primary study results, featuring a description of cultural determinants, and published between 1997 and 2015. Quality assessment was conducted independently by two researchers, one in each team, using appropriate checklists according to study design. Each included paper was characterized according to method, countries involved, sampling and main results, and cultural determinants mentioned in each selected paper were extracted, described and categorized. Finally, the influence of Hofstede's cultural dimensions associated with antibiotic consumption within a primary care setting was described. Among 24 eligible papers, 11 were rejected according to exclusion criteria. Overall, 13 papers meeting the quality assessment criteria were included, of which 11 used quantitative methods and two qualitative or mixed methods. The study participants were patients (nine studies) and general practitioners (two studies). This literature review identified various cultural determinants either patient-related (illness perception

  8. Controlled trial of a collaborative primary care team model for patients with diabetes and depression: Rationale and design for a comprehensive evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Jeffrey A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When depression accompanies diabetes, it complicates treatment, portends worse outcomes and increases health care costs. A collaborative care case-management model, previously tested in an urban managed care organization in the US, achieved significant reduction of depressive symptoms, improved diabetes disease control and patient-reported outcomes, and saved money. While impressive, these findings need to be replicated and extended to other healthcare settings. Our objective is to comprehensively evaluate a collaborative care model for comorbid depression and type 2 diabetes within a Canadian primary care setting. Methods/design We initiated the TeamCare model in four Primary Care Networks in Northern Alberta. The intervention involves a nurse care manager guiding patient-centered care with family physicians and consultant physician specialists to monitor progress and develop tailored care plans. Patients eligible for the intervention will be identified using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as a screen for depressive symptoms. Care managers will then guide patients through three phases: 1 improving depressive symptoms, 2 improving blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol, and 3 improving lifestyle behaviors. We will employ the RE-AIM framework for a comprehensive and mixed-methods approach to our evaluation. Effectiveness will be assessed using a controlled “on-off” trial design, whereby eligible patients would be alternately enrolled in the TeamCare intervention or usual care on a monthly basis. All patients will be assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Our primary analyses will be based on changes in two outcomes: depressive symptoms, and a multivariable, scaled marginal model for the combined outcome of global disease control (i.e., A1c, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol. Our planned enrolment of 168 patients will provide greater than 80% power to observe clinically important improvements in all

  9. Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  10. Parenting goals: predictors of parent involvement in disease management of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elizabeth M; Iannotti, Ronald J; Schneider, Stefan; Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Sobel, Douglas O

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of diabetes-specific parenting goals for parents of children with type 1 diabetes and to examine whether parenting goals predict a change in parenting involvement in disease management. An independent sample of primary caretakers of 87 children aged 10 to 16 years with type 1 diabetes completed the measure of parenting goals (diabetes-specific and general goals); both parent and child completed measures of parent responsibility for diabetes management at baseline and 6 months. Parents ranked diabetes-specific parenting goals as more important than general parenting goals, and rankings were moderately stable over time. Parenting goals were related to parent responsibility for diabetes management. The relative ranking of diabetes-specific parenting goals predicted changes in parent involvement over 6 months, with baseline ranking of goals predicting more parental involvement at follow-up. Parenting goals may play an important role in family management of type 1 diabetes.

  11. Goals? What goals? Europeans to hear more about the world's millennium development goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, S.

    2005-01-01

    The European Union (EU) is quickly becoming the front-runner of development aid to regions in Africa and other developing countries. However, over three-quarters of EU citizens are unaware of development efforts being made on the part of the Union to Third World countries, according to a public opinion poll released by Eurobarometer. In light of the low awareness of the EU's development agenda and the United Nations's Millennium Development Goals, the EU Humanitarian Aid and Development Commission has employed a campaign to raise the level of awareness among the EU's 460 million citizens

  12. Goal motives and multiple-goal striving in sport and academia: A person-centered investigation of goal motives and inter-goal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Laura C; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Duda, Joan L

    2016-12-01

    This investigation extended the goal striving literature by examining motives for two goals being pursued simultaneously. Grounded in self-determination theory, we examined how student-athletes' motives for their sporting and academic goals were associated with inter-goal facilitation and interference. Cross-sectional survey. UK university student-athletes (n=204) identified their most important sporting and academic goals. They then rated their extrinsic, introjected, identified and intrinsic motives for these goals and completed questionnaires assessing inter-goal facilitation and interference. Using a person-centered approach via latent profile analysis, we identified three distinct profiles of goal motives. Auxiliary analyses showed that the profile with high identified motives for both goals reported greater inter-goal facilitation. Extending the previous literature, the findings demonstrate the benefits of autonomous motives when simultaneously pursing goals in sport and academia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. COMBINATION OF GOALS STRATEGY REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Yu. Lapigin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the tools to identify strategicallyimportant objectives of regional development is not enough to build a developmentperspective, relying on something special,what distinguishes each region from therest. The article discusses approaches to the formation of the regional developmentstrategy, which is based on goals set by the results of the analysis of the main factors inthe development of the region. The study is based on the methodology of systems theoryand methods of strategic management. The most important results should include tools tobuild the tree of strategic objectives resultingfrom the implementation of the algorithm forconstructing planes of analysis and development of the region. The results can be used to develop a strategy for the developmentof socio-economic systems of various typesand forms.

  14. Meeting 2020 Workforce Goals: The Role of Industry-College Collaboration and Goals for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnall, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, federal programs for workforce training have aimed to transform the role of community colleges from narrow contract training to a broader role that encompasses strategic instructional program planning and innovation to support lifelong learning for a changing workforce and economic development (Jacobs & Teahen, 1996). Yet, to…

  15. Modeling the Development of Goal-Specificity in Mirror Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thill, Serge; Svensson, Henrik; Ziemke, Tom

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiological studies have shown that parietal mirror neurons encode not only actions but also the goal of these actions. Although some mirror neurons will fire whenever a certain action is perceived (goal-independently), most will only fire if the motion is perceived as part of an action with a specific goal. This result is important for the action-understanding hypothesis as it provides a potential neurological basis for such a cognitive ability. It is also relevant for the design of artificial cognitive systems, in particular robotic systems that rely on computational models of the mirror system in their interaction with other agents. Yet, to date, no computational model has explicitly addressed the mechanisms that give rise to both goal-specific and goal-independent parietal mirror neurons. In the present paper, we present a computational model based on a self-organizing map, which receives artificial inputs representing information about both the observed or executed actions and the context in which they were executed. We show that the map develops a biologically plausible organization in which goal-specific mirror neurons emerge. We further show that the fundamental cause for both the appearance and the number of goal-specific neurons can be found in geometric relationships between the different inputs to the map. The results are important to the action-understanding hypothesis as they provide a mechanism for the emergence of goal-specific parietal mirror neurons and lead to a number of predictions: (1) Learning of new goals may mostly reassign existing goal-specific neurons rather than recruit new ones; (2) input differences between executed and observed actions can explain observed corresponding differences in the number of goal-specific neurons; and (3) the percentage of goal-specific neurons may differ between motion primitives.

  16. The goal of ape pointing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halina, Marta; Liebal, Katja; Tomasello, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Captive great apes regularly use pointing gestures in their interactions with humans. However, the precise function of this gesture is unknown. One possibility is that apes use pointing primarily to direct attention (as in "please look at that"); another is that they point mainly as an action request (such as "can you give that to me?"). We investigated these two possibilities here by examining how the looking behavior of recipients affects pointing in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus). Upon pointing to food, subjects were faced with a recipient who either looked at the indicated object (successful-look) or failed to look at the indicated object (failed-look). We predicted that, if apes point primarily to direct attention, subjects would spend more time pointing in the failed-look condition because the goal of their gesture had not been met. Alternatively, we expected that, if apes point primarily to request an object, subjects would not differ in their pointing behavior between the successful-look and failed-look conditions because these conditions differed only in the looking behavior of the recipient. We found that subjects did differ in their pointing behavior across the successful-look and failed-look conditions, but contrary to our prediction subjects spent more time pointing in the successful-look condition. These results suggest that apes are sensitive to the attentional states of gestural recipients, but their adjustments are aimed at multiple goals. We also found a greater number of individuals with a strong right-hand than left-hand preference for pointing.

  17. Free breakfasts in schools: design and conduct of a cluster randomised controlled trial of the Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative in Wales [ISRCTN18336527

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Janine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School-based breakfast provision is increasingly being seen as a means of improving educational performance and dietary behaviour amongst children. Furthermore, recognition is growing that breakfast provision offers potential as a means of addressing social inequalities in these outcomes. At present however, the evidence base on the effectiveness of breakfast provision in bringing about these improvements is limited. Methods/Design This paper describes the research design of a large scale evaluation of the effectiveness of the Welsh Assembly Government's Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative. A cluster randomised trial, with school as the unit of randomisation was used for the outcome evaluation, with a nested qualitative process evaluation. Quantitative outcome measures included dietary habits, attitudes, cognitive function, classroom behaviour, and school attendance. The study recruited 111 primary schools in Wales, of which 56 were randomly assigned to control condition and 55 to intervention. Participants were Year 5 and 6 students (aged 9–11 years in these schools. Data were collected for all 111 schools at each of three time points: baseline, 4 month and 12 month follow-up. This was achieved through a repeated cross-sectional survey of approximately 4350 students on each of these occasions. Of those students in Year 5 at baseline, 1975 provided data at one or both of the follow-ups, forming a nested cohort. The evaluation also included a nested process evaluation, using questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and case studies with students, school staff, and local authority scheme coordinators as key informants. Discussion An overview of the methods used for the evaluation is presented, providing an example of the feasibility of conducting robust evaluations of policy initiatives using a randomised trial design with nested process evaluation. Details are provided of response rates and the flow of participants

  18. Deep Learning in Distance Education: Are We Achieving the Goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Rick L.; Gregg, Andrea; Joo, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    As educators, one of our goals is to help students arrive at deeper levels of learning. However, how is this accomplished, especially in online courses? This design-based research study explored the concept of deep learning through a series of design changes in a graduate education course. A key question that emerged was through what learning…

  19. What are patient goals after an anterior colporrhaphy operation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousgaard, Sabrina J; Bjørk, Jonna; Glavind, Karin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe patient-reported goals after an anterior colporrhaphy operation for anterior vaginal wall prolapse, the fulfilment of goals, and the correlation with subjective patient-reported outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective study involving 100 women....... Preoperatively, patients completed three modified questions from the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Vaginal Symptoms (ICIQ-VS) named ICIQ-VS short form (ICIQ-VS SF) and stated three goals for the operation. A telephone interview was performed 3 months postoperatively. RESULTS......: A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score from one to 10 estimated the extent to which goals were achieved. Goals were divided into eight groups: 1: mechanical symptoms (bulging), 2: voiding symptoms, 3: quality of life (physical), 4: quality of life (emotional), 5: avoidance of urinary tract infection, 6: cure...

  20. Goal-setting in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E H; Bogardus, S T; Tinetti, M E; Inouye, S K

    1999-07-01

    The process of setting goals for medical care in the context of chronic disease has received little attention in the medical literature, despite the importance of goal-setting in the achievement of desired outcomes. Using qualitative research methods, this paper develops a theory of goal-setting in the care of patients with dementia. The theory posits several propositions. First, goals are generated from embedded values but are distinct from values. Goals vary based on specific circumstances and alternatives whereas values are person-specific and relatively stable in the face of changing circumstances. Second, goals are hierarchical in nature, with complex mappings between general and specific goals. Third, there are a number of factors that modify the goal-setting process, by affecting the generation of goals from values or the translation of general goals to specific goals. Modifying factors related to individuals include their degree of risk-taking, perceived self-efficacy, and acceptance of the disease. Disease factors that modify the goal-setting process include the urgency and irreversibility of the medical condition. Pertinent characteristics of the patient-family-clinician interaction include the level of participation, control, and trust among patients, family members, and clinicians. The research suggests that the goal-setting process in clinical medicine is complex, and the potential for disagreements regarding goals substantial. The nature of the goal-setting process suggests that explicit discussion of goals for care may be necessary to promote effective patient-family-clinician communication and adequate care planning.

  1. Illegitimacy Improves Goal Pursuit in Powerless Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Willis , Guillermo B.; Guinote , Ana; Rodríguez-Bailón , Rosa

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The effects of power legitimacy on self-regulation during goal pursuit were examined. Study 1 focused on goal-setting and goal-striving. Specifically, it examined how much time legitimate and illegitimate powerless individuals needed to set goals, and how many means they generated to pursue these goals. Study 2 examined persistence in the face of difficulties. Consistently across these studies illegitimacy improved self-regulation in powerless individuals. Illegitimate pow...

  2. Task complexity and task, goal, and reward interdependence in group performance management : A prescriptive model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vijfeijken, H.; Kleingeld, A.; van Tuijl, H.; Algera, J.A.; Thierry, Hk.

    2002-01-01

    A prescriptive model on how to design effective combinations of goal setting and contingent rewards for group performance management is presented. The model incorporates the constructs task complexity, task interdependence, goal interdependence, and reward interdependence and specifies optimal fit

  3. Task complexity and task, goal, and reward interdependence in group performance : a prescriptive model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijfeijken, van H.T.G.A.; Kleingeld, P.A.M.; Tuijl, van H.F.J.M.; Algera, J.A.; Thierry, H.

    2002-01-01

    A prescriptive model on how to design effective combinations of goal setting and contingent rewards for group performance management is presented. The model incorporates the constructs task complexity, task interdependence, goal interdependence, and reward interdependence and specifies optimal fit

  4. Benchmarking trial between France and Australia comparing management of primary rectal cancer beyond TME and locally recurrent rectal cancer (PelviCare Trial): rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denost, Quentin; Saillour, Florence; Masya, Lindy; Martinaud, Helene Maillou; Guillon, Stephanie; Kret, Marion; Rullier, Eric; Quintard, Bruno; Solomon, Michael

    2016-04-04

    Among patients with rectal cancer, 5-10% have a primary rectal cancer beyond the total mesorectal excision plane (PRC-bTME) and 10% recur locally following primary surgery (LRRC). In both cases, patients 'care remains challenging with a significant worldwide variation in practice regarding overall management and criteria for operative intervention. These variations in practice can be explained by structural and organizational differences, as well as cultural dissimilarities. However, surgical resection of PRC-bTME and LRRC provides the best chance of long-term survival after complete resection (R0). With regards to the organization of the healthcare system and the operative criteria for these patients, France and Australia seem to be highly different. A benchmarking-type analysis between French and Australian clinical practice, with regards to the care and management of PRC-bTME and LRRC, would allow understanding of patients' care and management structures as well as individual and collective mechanisms of operative decision-making in order to ensure equitable practice and improve survival for these patients. The current study is an international Benchmarking trial comparing two cohorts of 120 consecutive patients with non-metastatic PRC-bTME and LRRC. Patients with curative and palliative treatment intent are included. The study design has three main parts: (1) French and Australian cohorts including clinical, radiological and surgical data, quality of life (MOS SF36, FACT-C) and distress level (Distress thermometer) at the inclusion, 6 and 12 months; (2) experimental analyses consisting of a blinded inter-country reading of pelvic MRI to assess operatory decisions; (3) qualitative analyses based on MDT meeting observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups of health professional attendees and conducted by a research psychologist in both countries using the same guides. The primary endpoint will be the clinical resection rate. Secondary end points will

  5. Can an EASYcare based dementia training programme improve diagnostic assessment and management of dementia by general practitioners and primary care nurses? The design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucassen PL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of dementia benefits both patient and caregiver. Nevertheless, dementia in primary care is currently under-diagnosed. Some educational interventions developed to improve dementia diagnosis and management were successful in increasing the number of dementia diagnoses and in changing attitudes and knowledge of health care staff. However, none of these interventions focussed on collaboration between GPs and nurses in dementia care. We developed an EASYcare-based Dementia Training Program (DTP aimed at stimulating collaboration in dementia primary care. We expect this program to increase the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses and to improve attitudes and knowledge of GPs and nurses. Methods The DTP is a complex educational intervention that consists of two workshops, a coaching program, access to an internet forum, and a Computerized Clinical Decision Support System on dementia diagnostics. One hundred duos of GPs and nurses will be recruited, from which 2/3 will be allocated to the intervention group and 1/3 to the control group. The effects of implementation of the DTP will be studied in a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Primary outcomes will be the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses in a period of 9 months following workshop participation. Secondary outcomes are measured on GP and nurse level: adherence to national guidelines for dementia, attitude, confidence and knowledge regarding dementia diagnosis and management; on patient level: number of emergency calls, visits and consultations and patient satisfaction; and on caregiver level: informal caregiver burden and satisfaction. Data will be collected from GPs' electronic medical records, self-registration forms and questionnaires. Statistical analysis will be performed using the MANOVA-method. Also, exploratory analyses will be performed, in order to gain insight into barriers and facilitators for implementation and

  6. Benchmarking trial between France and Australia comparing management of primary rectal cancer beyond TME and locally recurrent rectal cancer (PelviCare Trial): rationale and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denost, Quentin; Saillour, Florence; Masya, Lindy; Martinaud, Helene Maillou; Guillon, Stephanie; Kret, Marion; Rullier, Eric; Quintard, Bruno; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with rectal cancer, 5–10 % have a primary rectal cancer beyond the total mesorectal excision plane (PRC-bTME) and 10 % recur locally following primary surgery (LRRC). In both cases, patients ‘care remains challenging with a significant worldwide variation in practice regarding overall management and criteria for operative intervention. These variations in practice can be explained by structural and organizational differences, as well as cultural dissimilarities. However, surgical resection of PRC-bTME and LRRC provides the best chance of long-term survival after complete resection (R0). With regards to the organization of the healthcare system and the operative criteria for these patients, France and Australia seem to be highly different. A benchmarking-type analysis between French and Australian clinical practice, with regards to the care and management of PRC-bTME and LRRC, would allow understanding of patients’ care and management structures as well as individual and collective mechanisms of operative decision-making in order to ensure equitable practice and improve survival for these patients. The current study is an international Benchmarking trial comparing two cohorts of 120 consecutive patients with non-metastatic PRC-bTME and LRRC. Patients with curative and palliative treatment intent are included. The study design has three main parts: (1) French and Australian cohorts including clinical, radiological and surgical data, quality of life (MOS SF36, FACT-C) and distress level (Distress thermometer) at the inclusion, 6 and 12 months; (2) experimental analyses consisting of a blinded inter-country reading of pelvic MRI to assess operatory decisions; (3) qualitative analyses based on MDT meeting observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups of health professional attendees and conducted by a research psychologist in both countries using the same guides. The primary endpoint will be the clinical resection rate. Secondary end

  7. The sustainable development goals and the financial services industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Peter; Hillier, David; Comfort, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed at a United Nations General Assembly in 2015 embrace an ambitious and wide ranging set of global environmental, social and economic issues designed to effect a transition to a more sustainable future. The United Nations called on all governments to pursue these ambitious goals but also acknowledged the important role of the business community in addressing the SDGs. This paper provides an outline of the SDGs and of the efforts being made to enco...

  8. Goal-based dictator game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaibidi, Nerda Zura; Ibrahim, Adyda; Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal

    2014-12-01

    A considerable number of studies have been conducted to study fairness issues using two-player game. Dictator Game is one of the two-player games that receive much attention. In this paper, we develop an evolutionary approach to the Dictator Game by using Goal programming to build a model of human decision-making for cooperation. The model is formulated based on the theories of cognitive neuroscience that is capable in capturing a more realistic fairness concerns between players in the games. We show that fairness will evolve by taking into account players' aspirations and preferences explicitly in terms of profit and fairness concerns. The model is then simulated to investigate any possible effective strategy for people in economics to deal with fairness coalition. Parallels are drawn between the approach and concepts of human decision making from the field of cognitive neuroscience and psychology. The proposed model is also able to help decision makers to plan or enhance the effective strategies for business purposes.

  9. Amenorrhea - primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of periods - primary Images Primary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  10. Goals of clinical ethics support: perceptions of Dutch healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwerse, L; Abma, T A; Molewijk, B; Widdershoven, G

    2013-12-01

    In previous literature, ethicists mention several goals of Clinical Ethics Support (CES). It is unknown what key persons in healthcare institutions see as main--and sub-goals of CES. This article presents the goals of CES as perceived by board members and members of ethics support staff. This is part of a Dutch national research using a mixed methods design with questionnaires, focus groups and interviews. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed and combined in an iterative process. Four main clusters of goals were found: 1) encouraging an ethical climate, 2) fostering an accountable and transparent organization, 3) developing professionalism and a final goal, overarching the previous three, 4) good care. Most important sub-goals of CES were: attention for ethical issues, raising awareness of ethical issues, fostering ethical reflection and supporting employees. The article ends with a discussion on the desirability to further operationalize the general goal of good care, the context-boundedness of our findings and the need to relate goals of CES to the features of organizational cultures to further improve the integration of CES in healthcare institutions.

  11. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Pettiway, Keon

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, Ole B. Jensen takes a situational approach to mobilities to examine how ordinary life activities are structured by technology and design. Using “staging mobilities” as a theoretical approach, Jensen considers mobilities as overlapping, actions, interactions and decisions by desig...... by providing ideas about future research for investigating mobilities in situ as a kind of “staging,” which he notes is influenced by the “material turn” in social sciences....... with a brief description of how movement is studied within social sciences after the “mobilities turn” versus the idea of physical movement in transport geography and engineering. He then explains how “mobilities design” was derived from connections between traffic and architecture. Jensen concludes...

  12. Comparison of participatively set and assigned goals in the reduction of alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Brian E; Stephens, Robert S

    2010-12-01

    The effects of setting goals on goal commitment, self-efficacy for goal achievement, and goal achievement in the context of an alcohol use intervention were examined using an experimental design in which participants were randomized to participatively set goals, assigned goals, and no goal conditions. One hundred and twenty-six heavy-drinking college students received a single cognitive-behavioral assessment/intervention session and completed measures of goal commitment, self-efficacy for goal achievement, and alcohol use. Results were consistent with, and expanded upon, previous research by demonstrating that having a goal for limiting alcohol consumption was predictive of lower quantity and frequency of alcohol use relative to not having a goal. Participation in goal setting yielded greater goal commitment and self-efficacy for goal achievement than assigned goals, but did not result in significantly greater reductions in alcohol use relative to assigned goals. Goal commitment and self-efficacy explained unique variance in the prediction of alcohol use at follow-up. Findings support the importance of goal setting in alcohol interventions and suggest areas for further research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Goal conflicts, attainment of new goals, and well-being among managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehr, Hugo M

    2003-07-01

    Researchers widely understand that conflicts among goals inhibit the attainment of these goals. However, this notion comes close to tautological reasoning. To avert this problem, this study examined whether preexisting goal conflict also inhibits success in newly set goals. Using the context of management training, in which managers collectively set new goals, the study variables were assessed at 3 testing periods covering 5 months. Results indicate that goal conflicts that persevere over time were associated with inhibited attainment of new goals but not with decreased subjective well-being (SWB). Goal attainment, however, was positively related to SWB. Interactions of residual changes in goal conflict and goal attainment were associated with positive affect.

  14. LEAK study: design of a nationwide randomised controlled trial to find the best way to treat wound leakage after primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwik, Claudia A M; Wagenaar, Frank-Christiaan; van der Weegen, Walter; Poolman, Rudolf W; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Pronk, Yvette; Vermeulen, Karin M; Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Stevens, Martin; Jutte, Paul C

    2017-12-28

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are highly successful treatment modalities for advanced osteoarthritis. However, prolonged wound leakage after arthroplasty is linked to prosthetic joint infection (PJI), which is a potentially devastating complication. On the one hand, wound leakage is reported as a risk factor for PJI with a leaking wound acting as a porte d'entrée for micro-organisms. On the other hand, prolonged wound leakage can be a symptom of PJI. Literature addressing prolonged wound leakage is scarce, contradictory and of poor methodological quality. Hence, treatment of prolonged wound leakage varies considerably with both non-surgical and surgical treatment modalities. There is a definite need for evidence concerning the best way to treat prolonged wound leakage after joint arthroplasty. A prospective nationwide randomised controlled trial will be conducted in 35 hospitals in the Netherlands. The goal is to include 388 patients with persistent wound leakage 9-10 days after THA or TKA. These patients will be randomly allocated to non-surgical treatment (pressure bandages, (bed) rest and wound care) or surgical treatment (debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR)). DAIR will also be performed on all non-surgically treated patients with persistent wound leakage at day 16-17 after index surgery, regardless of amount of wound leakage, other clinical parameters or C reactive protein. Clinical data are entered into a web-based database. Patients are asked to fill in questionnaires about disease-specific outcomes, quality of life and cost effectiveness at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Primary outcome is the number of revision surgeries due to infection within a year of arthroplasty. The Review Board of each participating hospital has approved the local feasibility. The results will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. NTR5960;Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  15. Scientific goals of SCHOOLS & QUAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückl, Ewald; Köberl, Christian; Lenhardt, Wolfgang; Mertl, Stefan; Rafeiner-Magor, Walter; Stark, Angelika; Stickler, Gerald; Weber, Robert

    2015-04-01

    In many countries around the world seismometers are used in schools to broaden the knowledge in seismology in a vivid way and to take part in the observation of the current worldwide seismic activity. SCHOOLS & QUAKES is a project within the Sparkling Science program (http://www.sparklingscience.at), which not only pursues the given educational goals but also integrates scholars in seismological research permitting their own contributions. Research within SCHOOLS & QUAKES concentrates on the seismic activity of the Mürz Valley - Semmering - Vienna Basin transfer fault system in Austria because of its relatively high earthquake hazard and risk. The detection of low magnitude local earthquakes (magnitude ≤ 2), precise location of hypocenters, determination of the focal mechanisms, and correlation of hypocenters with active geological structures are the main scientific goals in this project. Furthermore, the long term build-up of tectonic stress, slip deficit and aseismic slip, and the maximum credible earthquake in this area are issues to be addressed. The scientific efforts of SCHOOLS & QUAKES build on the work of the Seismological Service of Austria at the Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG), and benefit from the findings on the lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps gained by the CELEBRATION 2000 and ALP 2002 projects. Regional Vp and Vs-models were derived from this data covering the SCHOOLS & QUAKES target area. Within the ALPAACT project (Seismological and geodetic monitoring of ALpine-PAnnonian ACtive Tectonics) the seismic network of the target area was densified by 7 broadband und 2 short period stations. Relocations based on a 3D-velocity model and the densified seismic network yielded substantially higher spatial resolution of seismically active structures. A new method based on waveform stacking (GRA, 16, EGU2014-5722) allowed for focal mechanism solutions of low magnitude (Ml ~2.5) events. Data from 22 GNSS stations have been

  16. Complete PCB design using OrCAD capture and layout

    CERN Document Server

    Mitzner, Kraig

    2011-01-01

    This book provides instruction on how to use the OrCAD design suite to design and manufacture printed circuit boards. The book is written for both students and practicing engineers who need a quick tutorial on how to use the software and who need in-depth knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of the software package. There are two goals the book aims to reach:The primary goal is to show the reader how to design a PCB using OrCAD Capture and OrCAD Layout. Capture is used to build the schematic diagram of the circuit, and Layout is used to design the circuit board so that

  17. Control mechanisms for battery energy storage system performing primary frequency regulation and self-consumption optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pliatskas Stylianidis, A.

    2016-01-01

    This report contains the design of a model for the integration of a battery energy system in a household level and its use for primary frequency regulation and self-consumption optimization. The main goal of this project was to investigate what are the possible applications and the most suitable for

  18. Pro-Social Goals in Achievement Situations: Amity Goal Orientation Enhances the Positive Effects of Mastery Goal Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levontin, Liat; Bardi, Anat

    2018-04-01

    Research has neglected the utility of pro-social goals within achievement situations. In this article, four studies demonstrate that amity goal orientation, promoting mutual success of oneself together with others, enhances the utility of mastery goal orientation. We demonstrate this in longitudinally predicting performance (Studies 1 and 2) and in maintaining motivation after a disappointing performance (Studies 3 and 4). The studies demonstrate the same interaction effect in academic and in work achievement contexts. Specifically, whereas amity goal orientation did not predict achievement on its own, it enhanced the positive effect of mastery goal orientation. Together, these studies establish the importance of amity goal orientation while also advancing our understanding of the effects of other achievement goal orientations. We suggest future directions in examining the utility of amity goals in other contexts.

  19. Get a taste of your goals: promoting motive-goal congruence through affect-focus goal fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Brandstätter, Veronika

    2009-10-01

    Studies show that motive-goal congruence is an important predictor of well-being (Baumann, Kaschel, & Kuhl, 2005; Brunstein, Schultheiss, & Grässmann, 1998). However, little is known about the factors that promote congruence between implicit motives and goals. Relying on McClelland's (1985) concept of implicit motives and the theory of fantasy realization (Oettingen, 1999), we postulated that goal fantasies focusing on motive-specific affective incentives promote motive-congruent goal setting. This hypothesis was tested in 3 experimental studies. In Study 1 (n=46) and Study 2 (n=48), participants were asked to select goals in a hypothetical scenario. In Study 3 (n=179), they rated their commitment to personal goals for their actual life situation. The results of all 3 studies supported our hypothesis that participants who focus on motive-specific affective incentives in their goal fantasies set their goals in line with their corresponding implicit motive dispositions.

  20. Comparative study of goal contents and goal characteristics between medical and business students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soowon; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Jun-Young; Shin, Jongho

    2016-03-01

    Medical and business are one of the most popular majors among students, and both fields require intensive training to reach certain level of expertise. During the development of professionalism, goal can become a crucial role in psychological impetus. The purpose of this study is to compare goal contents, goal characteristics, and effect of goal characteristics on student's major satisfaction between medical and business. A total of 193 undergraduate students (97 medical students, 96 business students) answered survey questions including goal contents, goal characteristics (goal autonomy, goal attainability, social value of goal) and satisfaction on their majors. Qualitative analysis of goal contents and quantitative analysis of goal characteristics, and their effects on student major satisfaction were performed. Goal content analysis showed percentage of social concern goal was higher in medical students (25.8%) than business students (6.3%), whereas percentage of wealth goal was higher business students (24.0%) than medical students (3.1%). Among goal characteristics, goal attainability and social value of goal were higher in medical students than business students. In both groups, social value of goal was significantly predict major satisfaction. Goal contents and goal characteristics are different between medical and business students. Curriculum and educational interventions that concerning students' goal and developing programs to enhance students' social value of goal is necessary.

  1. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 4: Interpretive code translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This specification identifies and describes the principal functions and elements of the Interpretive Code Translator which has been developed for use with the GOAL Compiler. This translator enables the user to convert a compliled GOAL program to a highly general binary format which is designed to enable interpretive execution. The translator program provides user controls which are designed to enable the selection of various output types and formats. These controls provide a means for accommodating many of the implementation options which are discussed in the Interpretive Code Guideline document. The technical design approach is given. The relationship between the translator and the GOAL compiler is explained and the principal functions performed by the Translator are described. Specific constraints regarding the use of the Translator are discussed. The control options are described. These options enable the user to select outputs to be generated by the translator and to control vrious aspects of the translation processing.

  2. Self-regulation through Goal Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Goals are an important motivator. But little is known about why and how people set them. We address this issue in a model based on two stylized facts. i) Goals serve as reference points for performance. ii) Present-biased preferences create self-control problems. We show the power and limits...... of self-regulation through goals. Goals increase an individual's motivation - but only up to a certain point. And they are painful self-disciplining devices. Greater self-control problems may result in tougher goals; but for a severe present bias goals either lack motivating force, or are too painful...

  3. A Randomized Trial of Genetic and Environmental Risk Assessment (GERA) for Colorectal Cancer Risk in Primary Care: Trial Design and Baseline Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ronald E.; Manne, Sharon L.; Wilfond, Benjamin; Sifri, Randa; Ziring, Barry; Wolf, Thomas A.; Cocroft, James; Ueland, Amy; Petrich, Anett; Swan, Heidi; DiCarlo, Melissa; Weinberg, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes an ongoing randomized controlled trial designed to assess the impact of genetic and environmental risk assessment (GERA) on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Methods The trial includes asymptomatic patients who are 50-79 years and are not up-to-date with CRC screening guidelines. Patients who responded to a baseline telephone survey are randomized to a GERA or Control group. GERA Group participants meet with a nurse, decide whether to have a GERA blood test (a combination of genetic polymorphism and folate), and, if tested, receive GERA feedback. Follow-up telephone surveys are conducted at one and six months. A chart audit is performed at six months. Results Of 2,223 eligible patients, 562 (25%) have enrolled. Patients who enrolled in the study were significantly younger than those who did not (p<0.001). Participants tended to be 50-59 years (64%), female (58%), white (52%), married (51%), and have more than a high school education (67%). At baseline, most participants had some knowledge of CRC screening and GERA, viewed CRC screening favorably, and reported that they had decided to do screening. Almost half had worries and concerns about CRC. Conclusions One in four eligible primary care patients enrolled in the study. Age was negatively associated with enrollment. Prospective analyses using data for all participants will provide more definitive information on GERA uptake and the impact of GERA feedback. PMID:20828635

  4. Effects of a Nutrition Education Intervention Designed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM on Reducing the Consumption of Unhealthy Snacks in the Sixth Grade Primary School Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Fathi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMalnutrition can threaten mental and physical development of children while healthy nutrition can improve mental and physical status of children. To select the best foods, children need nutrition education. This study aimed to determine the effect of nutrition education on reducing the consumption of unhealthy snacks in female primary school students in Qom- Iran.Materials and MethodsThis interventional study was conducted on 88 students in intervention and control groups who were selected via multistage random sampling method. The data was collected using a valid and reliable researcher-made questionnaire which was designed based on the health belief model (HBM. First four training sessions were held for the intervention group; two months later, data were collected again from both groups of students (intervention and control group. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS version 16.0 using descriptive statistics and independent and paired t-test.ResultsThe mean score of knowledge and performance of the intervention group, were 96.12 and 18.61 before the intervention which changed to 110.00 and 68.22 after the intervention. The results showed that before the intervention there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of mean scores of knowledge, and the constructs of the health belief model (P>0.05. After the intervention, the scores of all variables and the behavior of unhealthy snacks consumption were significantly increased in the intervention group (P

  5. The Application of Educational Design Research in the Context of Curriculum Materials Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Reeves, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Progress toward the UN Millennium Development Goal to “Achieve Universal Primary Education” by 2015 is severely limited, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper describes the application of educational design research (EDR) to this goal, specifically in the context of improving the capacity of

  6. How best to structure interdisciplinary primary care teams: the study protocol for a systematic review with narrative framework synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wranik, W Dominika; Hayden, Jill A; Price, Sheri; Parker, Robin M N; Haydt, Susan M; Edwards, Jeanette M; Suter, Esther; Katz, Alan; Gambold, Liesl L; Levy, Adrian R

    2016-10-04

    review will contribute directly to the design of interdisciplinary primary care teams. The optimized design will support the goals of primary care, contributing to the improved health of populations. PROSPERO CRD42016041884.

  7. The Relation Between Goals and Autobiographical Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim Berg; Rasmussen, Anne Scharling; Berntsen, Dorthe

    facilitate recall of goal congruent autobiographical memories which supports the idea of autobiographical memory facilitating goal attainment. Further, no differences between involuntary and voluntary memories with regard to frequency or characteristics of goal related content were found. Yet memories...... related to goals were rated as more central to the person's identity, life story and expectations for the future than non-goal related memories, irrespective of mode of recall. Interestingly, depression and PTSD symptoms correlated positively with the proportion of goal related memories, thereby......The present study examines involuntary (spontaneously retrieved) versus voluntary (deliberately retrieved) autobiographical memories in relation to earlier registered goals measured by the Personal Concern Inventory (Cox & Klinger, 2000). We found that the important and not yet planned goals...

  8. Growth goals, maturity, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jack J; McAdams, Dan P

    2004-01-01

    In 2 studies (125 college students and 51 adults), 2 forms of growth goals (exploratory and intrinsic) were compared with 2 forms of personality development (social-cognitive maturity and social-emotional well-being). Participants whose narratives of major life goals emphasized conceptual exploration were especially likely to have high levels of maturity (measured as ego development; J. Loevinger, 1976), whereas those whose goals emphasized intrinsic interests (K. M. Sheldon & T. Kasser, 1995) were especially likely to have high levels of well-being. Participants who had coherent hierarchies of growth goals on the levels of major life goals and everyday goals were especially likely to have high levels of personality development. Finally, growth goals accounted for some relationships between age and personality development. Growth goals are discussed in terms of intentional self-development and specific developmental paths. (c) 2003 APA

  9. Goal setting: Eating, Physical activity & Weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    No matter what your weight loss goal is, the key to reaching your goals is to make changes to your lifestyle behaviors like eating and physical activity. This involves setting realistic expectations and making a plan.

  10. Through economics to Noble goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, Angus Deaton, is the economist most famous for his work related to health, welfare and economic development. In its press release the Nobel Prize Committee highlighted: 'To design economic policy that promotes welfare and reduces poverty, we must first understand individual consumption choices. More than anyone else, Angus Deaton has enhanced this understanding. By linking detailed individual choices and aggregate outcomes, his research has helped transform the fields of microeconomics, macroeconomics, and development economics. Deaton's focus on household surveys has helped transform development economics from a theoretical field based on aggregate data to an empirical field based on detailed individual data.'.

  11. IAEA safeguards approaches and goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2001-01-01

    IAEA safeguards provide a technical means of verifying that political obligations undertaken by States party to international agreements relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy are being honored. The Agency assures the international community that States party to Safeguards Agreements are complying with their undertaking not to use facilities and divert nuclear materials from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear explosive devices. The task of IAEA safeguards can be summed up as to detect diversion of nuclear materials committed to peaceful uses of nuclear energy, or the misuse of equipment or facilities subject to certain safeguards agreements, and to deter such diversion or misuse through the risk of early detection. This lecture concentrates on the factors the Agency takes into account in designing and implementing safeguards approaches at facilities. (author)

  12. Refusals and Rejections: Designing Messages to Serve Multiple Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Mimako; O'Keefe, Barbara J.

    1994-01-01

    Tests a rational model of the elaboration of themes found in rejection messages, using Japanese and American participants. Finds partial support for the initial rational model but notes two key revisions: identifies two new themes in rejection messages and suggests substantial differences in the way Americans and Japanese elaborate themes to serve…

  13. Goals and strategies in the process of architectural design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2005-01-01

    Beskrivelse af projektet: Kvalitetsmål i den arkitektoniske designproces, som fokuserer på det arkitektoniske potentiale, der ligger i anvendelse af moderne industrielle produktionsmetoder og de nyeste muligheder dette giver i forhold til fleksibilitet og individuel tilpasning. Byggeindustrien er...

  14. The Genome of the Netherlands : design, and project goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Dorret I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Slagboom, Eline P.; Swertz, Morris A.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor; Vermaat, Martijn; van Dijk, Freerk; Francioli, Laurent C.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Ruoyan; Du, Yuanping; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; van Setten, Jessica; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L.; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Beekman, Marian; Elbers, Clara C.; Byelas, Heorhiy; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Deelen, Patrick; Dijkstra, Martijn; den Dunnen, Johan T.; de Knijff, Peter; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Koval, Vyacheslav; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Kanterakis, Alexandros; van Enckevort, David; Mai, Hailiang; Kattenberg, Mathijs; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Neerincx, Pieter B. T.; Oostra, Ben; Rivadeneira, Fernanodo; Suchiman, Eka H. D.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Wang, Jun; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    Within the Netherlands a national network of biobanks has been established (Biobanking and Biomolecular Research Infrastructure-Netherlands (BBMRI-NL)) as a national node of the European BBMRI. One of the aims of BBMRI-NL is to enrich biobanks with different types of molecular and phenotype data.

  15. Stability and Change in Social Goals as Related to Goal Structures and Engagement in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjar, Nir

    2017-01-01

    The current studies explored (a) the extended external validity of social-goal-orientation framework; (b) the mediating role of social goals between classroom goal structures and students' engagement; and (c) whether changes in social goals can be explained by classroom goal structures and engagement. Study 1 was cross-sectional (N = 317), and…

  16. The actual goals of geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  17. Understanding performance management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Lisa; Boaden, Ruth

    2017-02-13

    Purpose Principal-agent theory (PAT) has been used to understand relationships among different professional groups and explain performance management between organisations, but is rarely used for research within primary care. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether PAT can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care. Design/methodology/approach Purposive sampling was used to identify a range of general practices in the North-west of England. Interviews were carried out with directors, managers and clinicians in commissioning and regional performance management organisations and within general practices, and the data analysed using matrix analysis techniques to produce a case study of performance management. Findings There are various elements of the principal-agent framework that can be applied in primary care. Goal alignment is relevant, but can only be achieved through clear, strategic direction and consistent interpretation of objectives at all levels. There is confusion between performance measurement and performance management and a tendency to focus on things that are easy to measure whilst omitting aspects of care that are more difficult to capture. Appropriate use of incentives, good communication, clinical engagement, ownership and trust affect the degree to which information asymmetry is overcome and goal alignment achieved. Achieving the right balance between accountability and clinical autonomy is important to ensure governance and financial balance without stifling innovation. Originality/value The principal-agent theoretical framework can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care; although it is likely that only partial goal alignment will be achieved, dependent on the extent and level of alignment of a range of factors.

  18. National Education Goals: Can We Afford Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.

    Financial estimates for achieving the six national education goals proposed at the Charlottesville Education Summit are provided in this paper. Specific objectives under each goal, as outlined by the National Goals Panel, are assessed. A conclusion is that although the cost estimates have involved huge assumptions and sometimes wide variations,…

  19. The selfish goal meets the selfish gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberg, Steven L; Schaller, Mark

    2014-04-01

    The connection between selfish genes and selfish goals is not merely metaphorical. Many goals that shape contemporary cognition and behavior are psychological products of evolutionarily fundamental motivational systems and thus are phenotypic manifestations of genes. An evolutionary perspective can add depth and nuance to our understanding of "selfish goals" and their implications for human cognition and behavior.

  20. From Desires, Obligations and Norms to Goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dignum, F.P.M.; Kinny, D.; Sonenberg, L.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional models of agents based on Beliefs, Desires and Intentions usually only include either desires or goals. Therefore the process whereby goals arise from desires is given scant attention. In this paper we argue that the inclusion of both desires and goals in the same model can be

  1. Goal Expectations as Predictors of Retirement Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brougham, Ruby R.; Walsh, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The current study explored the contribution of personal goals to retirement decisions. A SMARTER methodology (to assess multiattribute utility) and taxonomy of human goals were used to investigate the relationship between older workers' personal goals and their retirement intentions. Two hundred and fifty-one employees of a large university,…

  2. ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS--A SYSTEMS APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHM, ROBERT E.

    CONTEMPORARY SYSTEMS THEORISTS HAVE PROVIDED A HELPFUL VIEW OF THE WAY GOAL-STRUCTURE MAY SHAPE ADMINISTRATIVE BEHAVIOR IN EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. THE "TRADITIONALIST" VIEW ASSIGNED ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS THE FUNCTIONS OF FORECASTING AND PLANNING. THE "EMERGING MODEL" VIEWED GOALS AS UNDEFINED ELEMENTS REQUIRING LITTLE SYSTEMATIC TREATMENT IN A…

  3. Self-regulation through Goal Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    self-control problems. We show how goals permit self-regulation, but also that they are painful self-disciplining devices. Greater self-control problems therefore lead to stronger self-regulation through goals only up to a certain point. For severely present-biased preferences, the required goal...... for self-regulation is too painful and the individual rather gives up....

  4. Cookery demonstrations in GOAL supported clinics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stunting are high, and various micronutrient deficiencies, including those of ... the household are the underlying causes seen in GOAL- assisted areas. ... feeding. Thus, the nutrition cookery demonstration activity has come to play an important role in mother and child health activities in GOAL-supported clinics and GOAL's.

  5. Sustainable Development Goals for Monitoring Action to Improve Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Women and children compose the largest segment of the more than 1 billion people worldwide who are unable to access needed health care services. To address this and other global health issues, the United Nations brought together world leaders to address growing health inequities, first by establishing the Millennium Development Goals in 2000 and more recently establishing Sustainable Development Goals, which are an intergovernmental set of 17 goals consisting of 169 targets with 304 indicators to measure compliance; they were designed to be applicable to all countries. Goal number 3, "Good Health and Well-Being: Ensure Heathy Lives and Promote Well-Being for All at All Ages," includes targets to improve the health of women and newborns. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  6. Specific features of goal setting in road traffic safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesov, V. I.; Danilov, O. F.; Petrov, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    Road traffic safety (RTS) management is inherently a branch of cybernetics and therefore requires clear formalization of the task. The paper aims at identification of the specific features of goal setting in RTS management under the system approach. The paper presents the results of cybernetic modeling of the cause-to-effect mechanism of a road traffic accident (RTA); in here, the mechanism itself is viewed as a complex system. A designed management goal function is focused on minimizing the difficulty in achieving the target goal. Optimization of the target goal has been performed using the Lagrange principle. The created working algorithms have passed the soft testing. The key role of the obtained solution in the tactical and strategic RTS management is considered. The dynamics of the management effectiveness indicator has been analyzed based on the ten-year statistics for Russia.

  7. Goals of measurement systems for international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Montmollin, J.M.; Weinstock, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    The safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency are based on technical performance goals and criteria that have been developed, but not officially adopted by the Agency. The goals derive in part from the external consequences that safeguards are intended to prevent and in some cases on internal considerations of feasibility. To the extent that these goals may not be attainable, as may be the case with large-throughput bulk reprocessing plants, the Agency is placed in a difficult position. In this paper safeguards goals and criteria and their underlying rationales are critically examined. Suggestions for a more rational and workable structure of performance goals are offered

  8. Strengthening the delivery of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care at primary health-care facilities: study design of a cluster randomized controlled trial in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amir Khan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, account for one-fourth of the patients at the primary health-care (PHC facilities in Pakistan. Standard care practices to manage these diseases are necessary to reduce the morbidity and mortality rate associated with non-communicable diseases in developing countries. Objective: To develop and measure the effectiveness of operational guidelines and implementation materials, with sound scientific evidence, for expanding lung health care, especially asthma and COPD through PHC facilities already strengthened for tuberculosis (TB care in Pakistan. Design: A cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms (intervention and control, with qualitative and costing study components, is being conducted in 34 clusters; 17 clusters per arm (428 asthma and 306 COPD patients, in three districts in Pakistan from October 2014 to December 2016. The intervention consists of enhanced case management of asthma and COPD patients through strengthening of PHC facilities. The main outcomes to be measured are asthma and COPD control among the registered cases at 6 months. Cluster- and individual-level analyses will be done according to intention to treat. Residual confounding will be addressed by multivariable logistic and linear regression models for asthma and COPD control, respectively. The trial is registered with ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN 17409338. Conclusions: Currently, only about 20% of the estimated prevalent asthma and COPD cases are being identified and reported through the respective PHC network. Lung health care and prevention has not been effectively integrated into the core PHC package, although a very well-functioning TB program exists at the PHC level. Inclusion of these diseases in the already existent TB program is expected to increase detection rates and care for asthma and COPD.

  9. Safety goals for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    In its official policy statement on safety goals for the operation of nuclear power plants, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) set two qualitative goals, supported by two quantitative objectives. These goals are that (1) individual members of the public should be provided a level of protection from the consequences of nuclear power plant operation such that individuals bear no significant additional risk to life and health; and (2) societal risks to life and health from nuclear power plant operation should be comparable to or less than the risks of generating electricity by viable competing technologies and should not be a significant addition to other societal risks. As an alternative, this study proposes four quantitative safety goals for nuclear power plants. It begins with an analysis of the NRC's safety-goal development process, a key portion of which was devoted to delineating criteria for evaluating goal-development methods. Based on this analysis, recommendations for revision of the NRC's basic benchmarks for goal development are proposed. Using the revised criteria, NRC safety goals are evaluated, and the alternative safety goals are proposed. To further support these recommendations, both the NRC's goals and the proposed goals are compared with the results of three major probabilistic risk assessment studies. Finally, the potential impact of these recommendations on nuclear safety is described

  10. Turkish Primary School Students' Strategies in Solving a Non-Routine Mathematical Problem and Some Implications for the Curriculum Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Turkish primary mathematics curriculum emphasizes the role of problem solving for teaching mathematics and pays particular attention to problem solving strategies. Patterns as a subject and the use of patterns as a non-routine problem solving strategy are also emphasized in the curriculum. The primary purpose of this study was to determine how…

  11. Group Therapy Goals: A Comparison of Group Therapy Providers and Male Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert D.; Garland, J. Travis; Rozycki, Alicia T.; Reich, Darcy A.; Wilson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to identify important process and content goals from the perspective of inmates and compare these goals to the goals identified by group therapists in a previous study conducted by Winterowd, Morgan, and Ferrell (2001). Utilizing survey data from 156 incarcerated adult males, an initial confirmatory factor analysis…

  12. Personal Goal Setting and Quality of Life: A Mixed Methods Study of Adult Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Frank

    2017-01-01

    This mixed methods study was designed to examine the potential impactful relationship between personal goal setting and the quality of life satisfaction (built upon the Goal Setting Theory of motivation and performance). The study aimed to determine how influential the goal achievement process is (or is not) regarding personal fulfillment and…

  13. Design of reactor alarm instrument based on SOPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meng; Lu Yi; Rong Ru

    2008-01-01

    The design of embedded alarm instrument in reactors based on Nios II CPU is introduced in this paper. This design uses the SOPC technology based on the Cyclone series FPGA as a digital bench, and connects the MPU and drivers and interface of times, RS232, sdram,and etc. into a FPGA chip. It is proved that the system achieves the design goals in primary experimentation. (authors)

  14. Self-regulation of unattainable goals in suicide attempters: the relationship between goal disengagement, goal reengagement and suicidal ideation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Rory C

    2009-02-01

    There is growing interest in models of adaptive self-regulation. Recent research suggests that goal disengagement and goal reengagement (i.e., goal adjustment) are implicated in the self-regulation of emotion. This study extends the self-regulation research to investigate the utility of goal adjustment in understanding suicidal risk. To this end, two hundred adults hospitalised following a suicidal episode completed a range of clinical and psychological measures in hospital and were followed up approximately 2.5 months after discharge (Time 2). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that goal reengagement predicted suicidal ideation at Time 2. In addition, the lack of goal reengagement was especially pernicious when reported concomitantly with high disengagement. These predictive effects were independent of baseline mood, attempt status and suicidal intent. The theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle training versus watchful waiting or pessary treatment for pelvic organ prolapse (POPPS) : Design and participant baseline characteristics of two parallel pragmatic randomized controlled trials in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M. C. R.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Schram, Aaltje J.; Messelink, Embert J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and pessaries are commonly used in the conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Because there is a lack of evidence regarding the optimal choice between these two interventions, we designed the "Pelvic Organ prolapse in primary care: effects of

  16. Articulating nurse practitioner practice using King's theory of goal attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon-Demare, Kathleen; MacDonald, Jane; Gregory, David M; Katz, Alan; Halas, Gayle

    2015-11-01

    To further understand the interactions between nurse practitioners (NPs) and patients, King's nursing theory of goal attainment was applied as the conceptual framework to describe the interactions between NPs and patients in the primary care setting. Six dyads of NPs and their patients were video- and audio-taped over three consecutive clinic visits. For the purposes of this arm of the study, the audio-taped interactions were transcribed and then coded using King's concepts in her theory of goal attainment. King's theory was applicable to describe NP practice. King's concepts and processes of nurse-patient interactions, such as disturbances, mutual goal setting, and transactions, were observed in NP-patient interactions. Disturbances during clinical encounters were essential in the progression toward goal attainment. Elements, such as social exchange, symptom reporting, role explanation, and information around clinical processes facilitated relationship building. NPs as practitioners need to be reflective of their own practice, embrace disturbances in the clinical encounter, and attend to these as opportunities for mutual goal setting. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Implementing the Sustainable Development Goals at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareda-Tiana, Silvia; Vidal-Raméntol, Salvador; Fernández-Morilla, Mónica

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to explore the principles and practices of sustainable development (SD) in the university curriculum. Design/methodology/approach: To explore the principles linked with the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and the learning and teaching practices in sustainability at the International University of…

  18. Targeting LDL Cholesterol: Beyond Absolute Goals Toward Personalized Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Morton; Cohen-Stavi, Chandra; Basu, Sanjay; Balicer, Ran D

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to review and assess the evidence for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment goals as presented in current guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Different sets of guidelines and clinical studies for secondary prevention have centered on lower absolute LDL-C targets [achieve greater reductions in cardiovascular risk. Population-based risk models serve as the basis for statin initiation in primary prevention. Reviews of current population risk models for primary prevention show moderate ability to discriminate [with c-statistics ranging from 0.67 to 0.77 (95% CIs from 0.62 to 0.83) for men and women] with poor calibration and overestimation of risk. Individual clinical trial data are not compelling to support specific LDL-C targets and percent reductions in secondary prevention. Increasing utilization of electronic health records and data analytics will enable the development of individualized treatment goals in both primary and secondary prevention.

  19. Science and Technology Capacity in the Framework of Millennium Development Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aduda, B.O.

    2006-01-01

    The millennium Development Goals (MDG's) are eight goals to be achieved by 2015 in response to the world's main challenges. The eight goals are: 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, 2: Achieve universal primary Education, 3: Promote gender equality and empower women, 4: Reduce child mortality, 5: Improve maternal health, 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, 7: Ensure environmental sustainability, and 8: Develop a global Partnership for development

  20. The Efficacy of Goal Setting in Cardiac Rehabilitation-a Gender-Specific Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm-Balderjahn, Sabine; Brünger, Martin; Michel, Anne; Bongarth, Christa; Spyra, Karla

    2016-08-08

    Patients with coronary heart disease undergo cardiac rehabilitation in order to reduce their cardiovascular risk factors. Often, however, the benefit of rehabilitation is lost over time. It is unclear whether this happens in the same way to men and women. We studied whether the setting of gender-specific behavior goals with an agreement between the doctor and the patient at the end of rehabilitation can prolong its positive effects. This study was performed with a mixed-method design. It consisted of qualitative interviews and group discussions with patients, doctors and other treating personnel, and researchers, as well as a quantitative, randomized, controlled intervention trial in which data were acquired at four time points (the beginning and end of rehabilitation and then 6 and 12 months later). 545 patients, 262 of them women (48.1%), were included. The patients were assigned to a goal checking group (n = 132), a goal setting group (n = 143), and a control group (n = 270). The primary endpoints were health-related behavior (exercise, diet, tobacco consumption), subjective state of health, and medication adherence. The secondary endpoints included physiological protection and risk factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol (HDL, LDL, and total), blood sugar, HbA1c, and body-mass index. The intervention had no demonstrable effect on the primary or secondary endpoints. The percentage of smokers declined to a similar extent in all groups from the beginning of rehabilitation to 12 months after its end (overall figures: 12.4% to 8.6%, p exercise behavior, diet, and subjective state of health also improved over the entire course of the study. Women had a healthier diet than men. Subgroup analyses indicated a possible effect of the intervention on exercise behavior in women who were employed and in men who were not (pgoal setting was not demonstrated. Therefore, no indication for its routine provision can be derived from the study results.

  1. Investigation the Relationship between Goal Orientation and Parenting Styles among Sample of Jordanian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Ahmad M.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between goal orientation and parenting styles. Participants of the study completed 650 goal orientation and parenting styles questionnaires. Means, standard deviations, regression and correlation analysis were used for data in establishing the dependence of the two variables. Results…

  2. Social Cognitive Career Theory and the Goal of Becoming a Certified Public Accountant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Jerry; Segal, Gerry; Borgia, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal for professors in academia is to facilitate the career success of their students by providing them with the necessary subject knowledge, skills, experience, and confidence. In this paper, we propose the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) model as a useful tool to explain how accounting students' career interests, goals, and…

  3. A Millennium Learning Goal for Education Post-2015: A Question of Outcomes or Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Angeline M.

    2011-01-01

    As the target year for the current Millennium Development Goal of universal completion of primary education approaches, three World Bank economists have proposed its replacement with a Millennium Learning Goal. This is part of a trend of increased privileging of learning outcomes. The proposal is assessed from the perspective of human rights-based…

  4. [Goal analysis and goal operationalisation: a group intervention for the enhancement of work motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Rana; Fiedler, Rolf G; Dietrich, Hilke; Greitemann, Bernhard; Heuft, Gereon

    2010-08-01

    Work motivation, mental well-being and competencies of self-regulation are linked to successful job-related reintegration after rehabilitation. Based on the Diagnostical Instrument to assess Work motivation (Diagnostikinstrument für Arbeitsmotivation DIAMO) and existing training programs, a new group intervention, the goal analysis and goal operationalization, was developed and evaluated. The objective of this intervention, designed for participants of a rehabilitation program was to enhance work motivation and volitional control processes (self-regulation and self-control), to encourage job-related goal orientation and to thereby increase the probability of goal achievement. In a quasi-experimental longitudinal design 207 patients (111 experimental group/96 control group) were tested. The experimental group took part in the job-related training (ZAZO) in addition to the usual rehabilitation. The evaluation was conducted through various scales at t0 (beginning) and t1 (end of the training). Scales for the measurement of work motivation, mental well-being, status of rehabilitation, competencies of self-regulation and the subjective prognosis of the ability to work were used. As direct effects of the training an enhancement of work motivation and of an improved subjective prognosis of the ability to work were expected. Accordingly, a positive influence on the subjective well-being as indirect effects, were anticipated in the long run, the experimental group should also show an enhanced job-related reintegration. Participants of the experimental group showed significantly higher values on particular scales of the Diagnostical Instrument of Work motivation as opposed to the control group (curiosity motive, attitudes to work and contact motive). Most notably, significant interactional effects could be found on the scale for the subjective prognosis of the ability to work, which is a highly reliable instrument and important predictor for prospective job

  5. Social Science, Equity and the Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals are underpinned by a committment to a world that is just, equitable, inclusive and environmentally sustainable and include goals of ending poverty and hunger; universal access to health, education, water, sanitation, energy and decent work; and reducing the risks and impacts of climate change, biodiversity loss, and marine, forest and land degradation. They seek to reduce inequality between and within countries and achieve gender equality. The SDGs build on the apparent success in meeting many of the Millenium Development Goals, including those of reducing poverty, hunger and debt and providing access to water. The science needed to achieve and monitor most of these goals is social science - an area of scholarship that is traditionally undervalued, underfunded, underepresented misunderstood and lacking in detailed data. This paper will provide an overview of the social science that is needed to support the Sustainable Development Goals, with a particular focus on the challenges of monitoring social data over time and within countries, the importance of research design, and of building capacity and credibility in the social sciences. As an example, the paper will discuss the social science that will be needed to achieve Goal 13: Take urgent actions to combat climate change and its impacts, and measuring targets such as strengthening resilience and adaptive capacity, and raising capacities of women, youth, and marginalized communities to manage and respond climate change.

  6. Modeling Coherent Strategies for the Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, B.; Obersteiner, M.; Herrero, M.; Riahi, K.; Fritz, S.; van Vuuren, D.; Havlik, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for a comprehensive new approach to development rooted in planetary boundaries, equity and inclusivity. Societies have largely responded to this call with siloed strategies capable of making progress on selected subsets of these goals. However, agendas crafted specifically to alleviate poverty, hunger, deforestation, biodiversity loss, or other ills may doom the SDG agenda, as policies and strategies designed to accomplish one or several goals can impede and in some cases reverse progress toward others at national, regional, and global levels. We adopt a comprehensive modeling approach to understand the basis for tradeoffs among environmental conservation initiatives (goals 13-15) and food prices (goal 2). We show that such tradeoffs are manifestations of policy-driven pressure in land (i.e. agricultural and environmental) systems. By reducing total land system pressure, Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP, goal 12) policies minimize tradeoffs and should therefore be regarded as necessary conditions for achieving multiple SDGs. SDG strategies constructed around SCP policies escape problem-shifting, which has long placed global development and conservation agendas at odds. We expect that this and future systems analyses will allow policymakers to negotiate tradeoffs and exploit synergies as they assemble sustainable development strategies equal in scope to the ambition of the SDGs.

  7. The BioImage Study: novel approaches to risk assessment in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease--study design and objectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam, Pieter; McCall, Carol; Sanz, Javier; Falk, Erling; Fuster, Valentin; Badimon, Juan José; Botnar, René M.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Garcia, Mario; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Hazen, Stanley L.; King, Spencer B.; Moreno, Pedro R.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Rudd, James H. F.; Shah, Predimon K.; Sillesen, Henrik; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Yuan, Chun; Bui, James T.; Chen, Christopher J.; Seow, Albert; Plump, Andrew; Raichlen, Joel; Smit, Paul; Stolzenbach, James C.; Urquhart, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk

  8. Five Ways the Sustainable Development Goals Are Better than the Millennium Development Goals and Why Every Educationalist Should Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprani, Lily

    2016-01-01

    For 15 years the millennium development goals (MDGs) were a guiding force for many issues affecting the lives of children and young people around the world. Agreed by UN member states in 2001, the eight MDGs were designed as a framework around which states were expected to develop policy priorities and shape their overseas aid spending plans. The…

  9. Meeting performance goals by the use of experience data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, M.W.; Kennedy, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    DOE Order 5480.28 requires that structures, systems and components (SSCs) be designed and constructed to withstand the effects of natural phenomena hazards. For SSCs to be acceptable, it must be demonstrated that there is a sufficiently low probability of failure of those SSCs consistent with established performance goals. For new design, NPH loads are taken from probabilistic hazard assessments and coupled with response and evaluation methods to control the levels of conservatism required to achieve performance goals. For components qualified by test, performance goals are achieved by specifying a test response spectrum that envelops a required response spectrum coupled with minimal acceptance standards. DOE Standard 1020-92 adapts both of these approaches to ensure that the required performance goals are met for new installations. For existing installations these approaches are generally not applicable. There is a need for a simple approach for use in verifying the performance of existing equipment subject to seismic hazards. The USNRC has adapted such an approach for the resolution of USI A-46 in the Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP). A simple set of screening rules, keyed to a generic bounding spectrum forms the basis of the USNRC approach. A similar approach is being adapted for use in the DOE. The DOE approach, however, must also ensure that appropriate performance goals are met when the general screens are met. This paper summarizes research to date on the topic of meeting performance goals by the use of experience data. The paper presents a review of the background material, a summary of the requirements for existing components, a summary of the approach used in establishing the performance goals associated with experience data approaches, and a summary of results to date. Simplified criteria are proposed

  10. Achievement goals and interpersonal behaviour: How mastery and performance goals shape information exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortvliet, P.M.; Janssen, O.; Van Yperen, N.W.; Van de Vliert, E.

    2007-01-01

    The present research examines the impact of achievement goals on task-related information exchange. Studies 1 and 2 reveal that relative to those with mastery goals or no goal, individuals pursuing performance goals were less open in their information giving to exchange partners. Study 2 further

  11. Performance-approach and performance-avoidance classroom goals and the adoption of personal achievement goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinger, Malte; Stiensmeier-Pelster, Joachim

    2011-12-01

    Students' perceptions of classroom goals influence their adoption of personal goals. To assess different forms of classroom goals, recent studies have favoured an overall measure of performance classroom goals, compared to a two-dimensional assessment of performance-approach and performance-avoidance classroom goals (PAVCG). This paper considered the relationship between students' perceptions of classroom goals and their endorsement of personal achievement goals. We proposed that three (instead of only two) classroom goals need to be distinguished. We aimed to provide evidence for this hypothesis by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and also by divergent associations between the respective classroom goal and students' personal goal endorsement. A total of 871 (474 female) 10th grade students from several German high schools participated in this study. Students responded to items assessing their perception of mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals in the classroom. Additionally, the students reported how much they personally pursue mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. All items referred to German as a specific school subject. RESULTS.A CFA yielded empirical support for the proposed distinction of three (instead of only two) different kinds of classroom goals. Moreover, in hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) analyses all three classroom goals showed unique associations with students' personal goal adoption. The findings emphasized the need to distinguish performance-approach and PAVCG. Furthermore, our results suggest that multiple classroom goals have interactive effects on students' personal achievement strivings. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Implementing Integrated Multicultural Instructional Design in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer L.; Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2011-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to summarize the principles of integrated multicultural instructional design (IMID; Higbee, Goff, & Schultz, in press; Higbee, Schultz, & Goff, 2010) and present specific strategies for incorporating IMID in management education. The primary goal of IMID is to promote the integration of multicultural content…

  13. Effect of a combined education and eHealth programme on the control of oral anticoagulation patients (PORTALS study): a parallel cohort design in Dutch primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom-Kamp, Esther P W A; Verdijk, Noortje A; Kasteleyn, Marise J; Harmans, Lara M; Talboom, Irvin J S H; Numans, Mattijs E; Chavannes, Niels H

    2017-09-27

    To analyse the effect on therapeutic control and self-management skills of the implementation of self-management programmes, including eHealth by e-learning versus group training. Primary Care Thrombosis Service Center. Of the 247 oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) patients, 63 started self-management by e-learning, 74 self-management by group training and 110 received usual care. Parallel cohort design with two randomised self-management groups (e-learning and group training) and a group receiving usual care. The effect of implementation of self-management on time in therapeutic range (TTR) was analysed with multilevel linear regression modelling. Usage of a supporting eHealth platform and the impact on self-efficacy (Generalised Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES)) and education level were analysed with linear regression analysis. After intervention, TTR was measured in three time periods of 6 months. (1) TTR, severe complications,(2) usage of an eHealth platform,(3) GSES, education level. Analysis showed no significant differences in TTR between the three time periods (p=0.520), the three groups (p=0.460) or the groups over time (p=0.263). Comparison of e-learning and group training showed no significant differences in TTR between the time periods (p=0.614), the groups (p=0.460) or the groups over time (p=0.263). No association was found between GSES and TTR (p=0.717) or education level and TTR (p=0.107). No significant difference was found between the self-management groups in usage of the platform (0-6 months p=0.571; 6-12 months p=0.866; 12-18 months p=0.260). The percentage of complications was low in all groups (3.2%; 1.4%; 0%). No differences were found between OAT patients trained by e-learning or by a group course regarding therapeutic control (TTR) and usage of a supporting eHealth platform. The TTR was similar in self-management and regular care patients. With adequate e-learning or group training, self-management seems safe and reliable for a selected

  14. Perception in the service of goal pursuit : Motivation to attain goals enhances the perceived size of goal instrumental objects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltkamp, M.; Aarts, H.; Custers, R.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments tested the functional perception hypothesis (Bruner, 1957) according to which objects that are instrumental in attaining ones' goals are perceived to be bigger if one is motivated to attain these goals. Study 1 demonstrated that participants perceived a glass of water to be bigger

  15. Goals and everyday problem solving: manipulating goal preferences in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Christiane A; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, we examined the link between goal and problem-solving strategy preferences in 130 young and older adults using hypothetical family problem vignettes. At baseline, young adults preferred autonomy goals, whereas older adults preferred generative goals. Imagining an expanded future time perspective led older adults to show preferences for autonomy goals similar to those observed in young adults but did not eliminate age differences in generative goals. Autonomy goals were associated with more self-focused instrumental problem solving, whereas generative goals were related to more other-focused instrumental problem solving in the no-instruction and instruction conditions. Older adults were better at matching their strategies to their goals than young adults were. This suggests that older adults may become better at selecting their strategies in accordance with their goals. Our findings speak to a contextual approach to everyday problem solving by showing that goals are associated with the selection of problem-solving strategies.

  16. The Structure and Application of High Level Safety Goals. A Review by the MDEP Sub-committee on Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    One of the aims of MDEP is to work towards greater harmonisation of regulatory requirements. To achieve this aim, it is necessary that there is a degree of convergence on the safety goals that are required to be met by designers and operators. The term 'safety goals' is defined to cover all health and safety requirements which must be met: these may be deterministic rules and/or probabilistic targets. They should cover the safety of workers, public and the environment in line with the IAEA's Basic Safety Objective; encompassing safety in normal operation through to severe accidents. All regulators have safety goals, but these are expressed in many different ways and exercises in comparing them frequently are done at a very low level eg specific temperatures in the reactor vessel. The differences in the requirements from different regulators are difficult to resolve as the goals are derived using different principles and assumptions and are for a specific technology. Therefore MDEP set up a sub-committee to investigate a different approach. This approach was to start with the top level goals and to derive a structure and means of deriving lower tier goals that can be seen to be clearly related to the higher level ones. This approach has the potential to greatly assist in the process of harmonisation of regulatory requirements. The paper reviews the high level goals used in MDEP countries and the relevant work of international groups. From these it draws broad conclusions that the form of the framework should be an Hierarchical Structure of Safety Goals, incorporating an extended Defense-in-Depth approach. The basis concept is that the higher level safety goals can then developed, in a coherent and consistent manner, into lower level safety goals and targets that can be applied within the design and operation of reactors, with a clear connection between the different levels. This structured approach is technology-neutral and is sufficiently flexible that it can be

  17. Multiple goals, motivation and academic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Antonio; Cabanach, Ramón G; Núnez, José C; González-Pienda, Julio; Rodríguez, Susana; Piñeiro, Isabel

    2003-03-01

    The type of academic goals pursued by students is one of the most important variables in motivational research in educational contexts. Although motivational theory and research have emphasised the somewhat exclusive nature of two types of goal orientation (learning goals versus performance goals), some studies (Meece, 1994; Seifert, 1995, 1996) have shown that the two kinds of goals are relatively complementary and that it is possible for students to have multiple goals simultaneously, which guarantees some flexibility to adapt more efficaciously to various contexts and learning situations. The principal aim of this study is to determine the academic goals pursued by university students and to analyse the differences in several very significant variables related to motivation and academic learning. Participants were 609 university students (74% women and 26% men) who filled in several questionnaires about the variables under study. We used cluster analysis ('quick cluster analysis' method) to establish the different groups or clusters of individuals as a function of the three types of goals (learning goals, performance goals, and social reinforcement goals). By means of MANOVA, we determined whether the groups or clusters identified were significantly different in the variables that are relevant to motivation and academic learning. Lastly, we performed ANOVA on the variables that revealed significant effects in the previous analysis. Using cluster analysis, three groups of students with different motivational orientations were identified: a group with predominance of performance goals (Group PG: n = 230), a group with predominance of multiple goals (Group MG: n = 238), and a group with predominance of learning goals (Group LG: n = 141). Groups MG and LG attributed their success more to ability, they had higher perceived ability, they took task characteristics into account when planning which strategies to use in the learning process, they showed higher persistence

  18. Primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert; Pachman, Jiri [Pardubice Univ. (Czech Republic). Faculty of Chemical Technology

    2013-06-01

    The first chapter provides background such as the basics of initiation and differences between requirements on primary explosives used in detonators and igniters. The authors then clarify the influence of physical characteristics on explosive properties, focusing on those properties required for primary explosives. Furthermore, the issue of sensitivity is discussed. All the chapters on particular groups of primary explosives are structured in the same way, including introduction, physical and chemical properties, explosive properties, preparation and documented use.

  19. Goal-Driven Context-aware Service Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Lian; Glenstrup, Arne John; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    context, user profile and computed results, are gathered by various services, and imported into an ontology based a context repository. A Goal Description Language, Context Condition/Effect are designed to describe the dynamic semantics of goal requirements and service capability. A planner is designed...... and implemented to dynamically compose services based on the current contexts, and a service runner is designed and implemented to invoke proper services based on the contexts and interactions with users.......Two important aspects are associated with service composition. One is to understand the needs and constraints for a new added-value composite service, and otherwise it would lead to an ad-hoc effort for service composition. The second is to reflect the changes of computing environment...

  20. Primary fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Jensen, L T; Foldager, M

    1990-01-01

    Serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide have previously been reported to be low in some patients with primary fibromyalgia and the aim of this study was to determine if such patients differ clinically from primary fibromyalgia patients with normal levels of procollagen...... type III aminoterminal peptide. Subjective symptoms, tender points and dynamic muscle strength in 45 women with primary fibromyalgia were related to serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide. Patients with low serum concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide...... concentrations of procollagen type III aminoterminal peptide of primary fibromyalgia patients are connected to the disease impact....