WorldWideScience

Sample records for primary cutaneous mucormycosis

  1. Devastating posttraumatic primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are saprophytic fungi causing mucormycosis, which is a life threatening infection manifested as rhinocerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and disseminated forms. The cutaneous form is further divided into primary and secondary forms. The major risk factors include uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with or without ketoacidosis, other forms of metabolic acidosis, and trauma. We report here a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae, in a diabetic after a road traffic accident.

  2. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor irregularis in an elderly person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayaka; Okubo, Yuko; Katano, Azusa; Sano, Ayako; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare but often lethal severe fungal infection, which usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor irregularis in an elderly patient. Seven months after the surgical dissection of the involved skin, cutaneous mucormycosis recurred at the peripheral edge of the skin graft. Shortly subsequent to the administration of liposomal amphotericin B, the remaining skin lesion was excised again. M. irregularis is rarely but increasingly reported as a cause of mucormycosis in immunocompetent individuals, especially in Asian farmers. M. irregularis may be largely disseminated in the soils of Asia and thus the trivial trauma at the time of farm work may be a trigger for the onset. These cases tend to leave severe cosmetic damage even in healthy individuals, although the vital prognosis is not affected. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Cutaneous mucormycosis secondary to penetrative trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Bilal; Kent, Stephen; Wall, Daryl

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare but serious sequelae of penetrating trauma [1-5]. In spite of aggressive management, mortality remains high due to dissemination of infection. We completed a review of literature to determine the most optimal treatment of cutaneous mucormycosis which occurs secondary to penetrating trauma. We completed a review regarding the management of mucormycosis in trauma patients. We selected a total of 36 reports, of which 18 were case-based, for review. Surgical debridement is a primary predictor of improved outcomes in the treatment of mucormycosis [3,6,7]. Anti-fungal therapy, especially lipid soluble formulation of Amphotericin B, is helpful as an adjunct or when surgical debridement has been maximally achieved. Further research is needed to fully evaluate the impact of topical dressings; negative pressure wound therapy is helpful. An aggressive and early surgical approach, even at the expense of disfigurement, is necessary to reduce mortality in the setting of cutaneous mucormycosis that results from penetrating trauma [4,8,9]. Anti-fungal therapy and negative pressure wound therapy are formidable adjuncts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cutaneous mucormycosis in a leukemic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salati, S.A.; Rabah, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a fulminant and uncommon fungal infection of skin which mostly occurs in immunocompromised patients. Early diagnosis followed by aggressive debridement and administration of antifungal agents is the key to management. We report primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a 23 years old patient of acute leucocytic leukemia who developed this lesion over volar surface of right forearm at the site of intravenous cannulation during induction phase of chemotherapy. The condition was treated successfully by wide surgical debridement, amphotericin-B, wound care and definitive reconstruction with skin graft. (author)

  5. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  6. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Taxonomy and epidemiology Mucor irregularis, agent of chronic cutaneous mucormycosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, X.L.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Dolatabadi, S.; Ran, Y.P.; Gerrits van den Ende, A.H.G.; Shen, Y.N.; Li, C.Y.; Xi, L.Y.; Hao, F.; Zhang, Q.Q.; Li, R.Y.; Hu, Z.M.; Lu, G.; Wang, J.J.; Drogari-Apiranthitou, M.; Klaassen, C.; Meis, J.F.; Hagen, F.; Liu, W.D.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis usually presents as a progressive infection with significant angio-invasion. Mucormycosis due to Mucor irregularis (formerly Rhizomucor variabilis var. variabilis), however, is exceptional in causing chronic cutaneous infection in immunocompetent humans, ultimately leading to severe

  8. Cutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Patient following Traditional Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ahmadinejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare manifestation of an aggressive fungal infection. Early diagnosis and treatment are vitally important in improving outcome. We report an unusual case presenting with progressive necrotizing fasciitis due to mucormycosis following trauma and dressing by man-made herbal agents.

  9. Successful treatment of cutaneous mucormycosis in a young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful treatment of cutaneous mucormycosis in a young diabetic with end- stage renal disease ... Ketone reductase, the enzyme present in Rhizopus organisms, allows .... burns, malnutrition and intravenous drug abuse.3 The prevalence.

  10. Mucor irregularis-associated cutaneous mucormycosis: Case report and review

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    Blandine Rammaert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Solid organ transplant recipients are at risk for invasive fungal diseases, and are also exposed to healthcare-associated mucormycosis. Mainly causing localized cutaneous mucormycosis, Mucor irregularis infection is reported for the first time in a kidney-transplant recipient. A healthcare-associated origin was highly suspected in this case. We performed a literature review and highlight the characteristics of this very rare fungus.

  11. Taxonomy and epidemiology of Mucor irregularis, agent of chronic cutaneous mucormycosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, X.-L.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Dolatabadi, S.; Ran, Y.-P.; Shen, Y.-N.; Li, C.-Y.; Xi, L.-Y.; Hao, F.; Zhang, Q.-Q.; Li, R.-Y.; Hu, Z.-M.; Lu, G.-X.; Wang, J.-J.; Drogari-Apiranthitou, M.; Klaassen, C.; Meis, J.F.; Hagen, F.; Liu, W.-D.; Hoog, de G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis usually presents as a progressive infection with significant angio-invasion. Mucormycosis due to Mucor irregularis (formerly Rhizomucor variabilis var. variabilis), however, is exceptional in causing chronic cutaneous infection in immunocompetent humans, ultimately leading to severe

  12. Successful Treatment of Cutaneous Mucormycosis in a Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... poorly controlled type 1 diabetic patient with end-stage renal disease using a combination of systemic antifungal agents and aggressive surgical debridement. Keywords: Cutaneous Mucormycosis, Diabetic, Echinocandin, Fungal, Liposomal Amphotericin-B, Mucorales, Polyene-Caspofungin Combination, Posaconazole ...

  13. An unusual ulcer: A case of cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Gardiner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycoses are high-mortality infections feared by clinicians worldwide. They predominantly affect immunocompromised hosts and are associated with a spectrum of disease. We describe a case of cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae in a patient with multiple risk factors cured with complete surgical excision and a short course of antifungal therapy.

  14. Early Diagnosis of Cutaneous Mucormycosis Due to Lichtheimia corymbifera After a Traffic Accident

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyll, T.; Lysková, P.; Hubka, Vít; Muller, M.; Zelenka, L.; Čurdová, M.; Tučková, I.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Hamal, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 184, 1-2 (2015), s. 119-124 ISSN 0301-486X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cutaneous mucormycosis * Mycological diagnosis * Amphotericin B Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.671, year: 2015

  15. Cutaneous Mucormycosis Following a Bullous Pemphigoid Flare in a Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient on Ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Matthew K; Karri, Saradasri; Reynolds, Jackson; Owsley, Jeff; Wise, Austin; Martin, Mike G; Zare, Fereshteh

    2018-04-01

    While the recent development of novel therapeutics in oncology, such as small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs), has enabled our ability to target disease-specific molecular pathways, the prolonged impact of these agents on the immune system and infectious risk remains to be seen. We present a 68-year-old male with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) on ibrutinib monotherapy for 3 years who developed extensive cutaneous mucormycosis following a severe bullous pemphigoid (BP) flare. He received amphotericin B for 4 weeks and was continued on posaconazole with resolution of his mucormycosis infection. Consistent with a growing evidence of literature identifying opportunistic fungal infections in patients on ibrutinib therapy, providers should be cognizant of medical comorbidities that may predispose to such infections and explore methods of prevention before starting ibrutinib and other SMKIs.

  16. Necrotizing cutaneous mucormycosis after a tornado in Joplin, Missouri, in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett Fanfair, Robyn; Benedict, Kaitlin; Bos, John; Bennett, Sarah D; Lo, Yi-Chun; Adebanjo, Tolu; Etienne, Kizee; Deak, Eszter; Derado, Gordana; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Drew, Clifton; Zaki, Sherif; Sugerman, David; Gade, Lalitha; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Sutton, Deanna A; Engelthaler, David M; Schupp, James M; Brandt, Mary E; Harris, Julie R; Lockhart, Shawn R; Turabelidze, George; Park, Benjamin J

    2012-12-06

    Mucormycosis is a fungal infection caused by environmentally acquired molds. We investigated a cluster of cases of cutaneous mucormycosis among persons injured during the May 22, 2011, tornado in Joplin, Missouri. We defined a case as a soft-tissue infection in a person injured during the tornado, with evidence of a mucormycete on culture or immunohistochemical testing plus DNA sequencing. We conducted a case-control study by reviewing medical records and conducting interviews with case patients and hospitalized controls. DNA sequencing and whole-genome sequencing were performed on clinical specimens to identify species and assess strain-level differences, respectively. A total of 13 case patients were identified, 5 of whom (38%) died. The patients had a median of 5 wounds (range, 1 to 7); 11 patients (85%) had at least one fracture, 9 (69%) had blunt trauma, and 5 (38%) had penetrating trauma. All case patients had been located in the zone that sustained the most severe damage during the tornado. On multivariate analysis, infection was associated with penetrating trauma (adjusted odds ratio for case patients vs. controls, 8.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 69.2) and an increased number of wounds (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0 for each additional wound; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.2). Sequencing of the D1-D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA yielded Apophysomyces trapeziformis in all 13 case patients. Whole-genome sequencing showed that the apophysomyces isolates were four separate strains. We report a cluster of cases of cutaneous mucormycosis among Joplin tornado survivors that were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Increased awareness of fungi as a cause of necrotizing soft-tissue infections after a natural disaster is warranted.

  17. Primary cutaneous lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, M. Connie; Cleary, Sean F.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review analyzed the survival and freedom from relapse of patients with stage IE or IIE primary cutaneous lymphoma (non mycosis fungoides) after treatments with radiation therapy alone (XRT), chemotherapy alone (RX) or combined modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: Fifty two patients with stage IE-IIE cutaneous lymphoma treated at Stanford University Hospital were reviewed. The median age was 57, with a range of 26 to 94 and a male to female ratio of 1.21:1. Patients were staged according to the Ann Arbor System. Pathology was classified according to the Working Formulation. Treatment outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival curves with a Gehan p-value test. Results: The follow up range was 6 months to 22 years (median 7 years.) Twenty one percent of patients had low grade, 63% had intermediate grade and 15% had high grade lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large cell lymphoma Thirty two patients received radiation alone as initial treatment and sixteen patients received combined modality as initial treatment. Four patients received chemotherapy alone. The only significant prognostic factor for survival was the stage at diagnosis. Patients with stage IE disease had a longer actuarial survival (5-yr=79%, 10-yr=71%), as compared to those with stage IIE (5-yr=49%, 10-yr=33%), (p=0.029). The only significant prognostic factor for freedom from relapse was the initial treatment. Initial combined modality treatment lead to a longer freedom from relapse compared to patients treated with radiation alone (p=0.002), (median 5 years vs. 1.2 years). Despite this, the actuarial overall survival in the combined modality group and the radiation alone group are similar (median survival 7.7 and 8 years). The efficacy of either radiation or chemotherapy as salvage treatment after radiation failure was equivalent and both salvage treatments lead to equally long survival and freedom from second relapse. Conclusion

  18. Primary cutaneous lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, M Connie; Cleary, Sean F; Hoppe, Richard T

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review analyzed the survival and freedom from relapse of patients with stage IE or IIE primary cutaneous lymphoma (non mycosis fungoides) after treatments with radiation therapy alone (XRT), chemotherapy alone (RX) or combined modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: Fifty two patients with stage IE-IIE cutaneous lymphoma treated at Stanford University Hospital were reviewed. The median age was 57, with a range of 26 to 94 and a male to female ratio of 1.21:1. Patients were staged according to the Ann Arbor System. Pathology was classified according to the Working Formulation. Treatment outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival curves with a Gehan p-value test. Results: The follow up range was 6 months to 22 years (median 7 years.) Twenty one percent of patients had low grade, 63% had intermediate grade and 15% had high grade lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large cell lymphoma Thirty two patients received radiation alone as initial treatment and sixteen patients received combined modality as initial treatment. Four patients received chemotherapy alone. The only significant prognostic factor for survival was the stage at diagnosis. Patients with stage IE disease had a longer actuarial survival (5-yr=79%, 10-yr=71%), as compared to those with stage IIE (5-yr=49%, 10-yr=33%), (p=0.029). The only significant prognostic factor for freedom from relapse was the initial treatment. Initial combined modality treatment lead to a longer freedom from relapse compared to patients treated with radiation alone (p=0.002), (median 5 years vs. 1.2 years). Despite this, the actuarial overall survival in the combined modality group and the radiation alone group are similar (median survival 7.7 and 8 years). The efficacy of either radiation or chemotherapy as salvage treatment after radiation failure was equivalent and both salvage treatments lead to equally long survival and freedom from second relapse. Conclusion

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of primary immunodeficiency

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    Safa Abdelhakim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs are a group of rare, chronic disorders with deficient or malfunctioning immune system. It commonly affects the hematopoietic system, with skin the second most affected organ. Skin involvement is observed in half of pediatric PID cases and often precedes the final diagnosis. Skin infections and eczemas are the two most common manifestations in PID.[1] Skin manifestations associated with PIDs can be of infectious and noninfectious causes. Common noninfectious causes are eczema, erythroderma, cutaneous granulomas, dysplasia, vasculitis, and telangiectasia. It is important to be aware of skin manifestations in pediatric patients as early detection of PID may aid in the management of serious immunologic conditions and prevent associated morbidity and mortality.

  20. Primary Cutaneous Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are the lungs, central nervous system (CNS), and sinuses, however, the rare cutaneous infection is usually associated with immunodeficiency. Primary cutaneous infection, especially in immunocompetent patients, is extremely rare, but an increase in prevalence has been noted in the last. 20 years. The predisposing factors ...

  1. Rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prando, D.; Clemente Filho, A.S.; Secaf, F.

    1982-01-01

    Rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis is a very serious and frequently fatal disease in wich accurate analysis will often suggest the diagnosis. The Computerized Tomography (CT) scans are very helpful to establish the early diagnosis of mucormycosis and in the clear demonstration of the typical relationship between the sinus, orbital and cerebral disease. The recognition of the characteristic pattern in the involved areas should be helpful to early diagnosis and surgical treatment. The findings in one patient with craniofacial mucormycosis who underwent five times to CT examination are presented. Special attention is given to the serial CT scans and in the rapid spread to the central nervous system. (Author) [pt

  2. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment......, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era....

  3. Mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Que, Tak Lun; Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong; Lam, Wing Yin

    2003-10-01

    To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. A Medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "Mucorales," "Rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 +/- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 +/- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, Rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. Mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin B and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.

  4. Primary squamous cell carcinoma with mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Nirmal Kumar; Mookerjee, Sekhar Kumar; Chaudhuri, Bhaskarnarayan

    2013-02-01

    The diabetic foot ulcer is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus leading to prolonged hospital stay. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetes may be due to peripheral neuropathy and/or vasculopathy. Non-healing occurs following a trivial trauma due to loss of local immunity and increased infection by bacteria and fungus. Candida and mucormycosis are common fungal infection in diabetic foot ulcer. Squamous cell carcinoma in any non-healing ulcer is a common occurrence. But squamous cell carcinoma in non-healing diabetic foot ulcer is rarely reported. Here, mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer which turned into squamous cell carcinoma is reported in a 62-year-old male with poor glycaemic control for last 21 years who presented with a non-healing ulcer of 8 months' duration over dorsum of left forefoot. Microbiological examination revealed presence of mucormycosis infection and histopathology of ulcer showed infiltrating well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinicians and pathologists should be aware of these combinations because only eradication of mucormycosis may not cure the ulcer, rather presence of squamous cell carcinoma may be ignored that may be an immediate threat to the patient's life.

  5. Esophageal Mucormycosis

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    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  6. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Edward; Karajgikar, Jay; Tabbara, Imad A

    2013-10-01

    Since the recognition of the anaplastic large-cell lymphomas in the 1980s, much has been learned about the diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment of these malignant conditions. The systemic and primary cutaneous types of anaplastic large cell lymphomas have been differentiated on clinical and immunophenotypical findings, but further research is required to elucidate their exact etiologies and pathogeneses. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma has a 95% disease-specific 5-year survival, owing partly to the relatively benign course of the disease and partly to the variety of effective treatments that are available. As with many other oncological diseases, new drugs are continually being tested and developed, with immunotherapy and biological response modifiers showing promise.

  7. Primary cutaneous lymphoma with involvement of external genitalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscandi, C.; Campo, L. del

    1998-01-01

    We describe the radiological findings recorded in a case of primary B cells cutaneous lymphoma that presented with involvement of penis and scrotum. The patient was referred to our center to undergo an ultrasonographic study. (Author) 7 refs

  8. Mucormycosis: a rare fungal infection in tornado victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Cindy L; Finley, Phillip J; Mikkelson, Debbie R; Tibbs, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews four immunocompetent patients who developed a rare fungal infection, mucormycosis, secondary to multiple traumatic injuries sustained during an EF-5 tornado in Joplin, MO. Commonly found in soil and decaying organic matter, mucorales are fungi associated with soft tissue and cutaneous infections. Onset of this fungal infection can occur without clinical signs, presenting several days to several weeks after injury, delaying diagnosis. A multidisciplinary treatment approach including aggressive antifungal therapy and aggressive surgical debridement is critical. This diagnosis should be considered in all patients presenting with injuries sustained from high-velocity embedment of debris such as natural disasters or explosions. We present four cases of mucormycosis, species Apophysomyces trapeziformis. Data reported includes predisposing factors, number of days between injury and diagnosis of mucormycosis, surgical treatment, antifungal therapy, outcomes, and potential risk factors that may have contributed to the development of mucormycosis.

  9. The First Year of the AEVD Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñate, Y; Servitje, O; Machan, S; Fernández-de-Misa, R; Estrach, M T; Acebo, E; Mitxelena, J; Ramón, M D; Flórez, A; Blanes, M; Morillo, M; Medina, S; Bassas, J; Zayas, A; Espinosa, P; Pérez, A; Gónzalez-Romero, N; Domínguez, J D; Muniesa, C; López Robles, J; Combalia, A; Yanguas, I; Suh, H; Polo-Rodríguez, I; Bielsa, I; Mateu, A; Ferrer, B; Descalzo, M A; García-Doval, I; Ortiz-Romero, P L

    2018-04-18

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon. This article describes the Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma Registry of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) and reports on the results from the first year. Disease registry for patients with primary cutaneous lymphoma. The participating hospitals prospectively recorded data on diagnosis, treatment, tests, and disease stage for all patients with primary cutaneous lymphoma. A descriptive analysis was performed. In December 2017, the registry contained data on 639 patients (60% male) from 16 university hospitals. The most common diagnoses, in order of frequency, were mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) (348 cases, 55%), primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL) (184 cases, 29%), primary cutaneous CD30 + T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30 + CLPD) (70 cases, 11%), and other types of T-cell lymphoma (37 cases, 5%). In total, 105 (16.5%) of the cases recorded were incident cases. The most common diagnosis in the MF/SS group was classic MF (77.3%). Half of the patients with MF had stage IA disease when diagnosed, and the majority were either in partial remission (32.5%) or had stable disease (33.1%). The most widely used treatments were topical corticosteroids (90.8%) and phototherapy. The most common form of primary CBCL was marginal zone lymphoma (50%). Almost all of the patients had cutaneous involvement only and nearly half had stage T1a disease. Most (76.1%) were in complete remission. The main treatments were surgery (55.4%) and radiotherapy (41.9%). The most common diagnosis in patients with CD30 + CLPD was lymphomatoid papulosis (68.8%). Most of the patients (31.4%) had stage T3b disease and half were in complete remission. The most common treatments were topical corticosteroids (68.8%) and systemic chemotherapy (32.9%). The characteristics of patients with primary cutaneous lymphoma in Spain do not differ from those described in other series in the literature. The registry will facilitate

  10. Disseminated primary cutaneous histoplasmosis successfully treated with itraconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhi M

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old immunocompetent lady with disseminated primary cutaneous histoplasmosis is reported. Histology showed a granulomatous skin infiltrate with numerous intracellular PAS positive rounded yeast cells within macrophages. Culture on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar yielded a typical cottony white colony characteristic of Histoplasma capsulatum. Treatment with itraconazole showed an excellent response.

  11. Characterization of primary cutaneous CD8+/CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn J; Ra, Seong; Abdulla, Farah; Cassarino, David S

    2015-11-01

    CD30 primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative diseases include both lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL). The neoplastic cell of most primary CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders is CD4 positive. The terminology LyP "type D" has been used to describe a growing number of cases of LyP with a predominantly CD8 infiltrate. PCALCL with a CD8 phenotype has also been described, which presents a particularly difficult diagnostic and management challenge, given the difficulty in distinguishing it histologically from other cytotoxic lymphomas such as primary cutaneous aggressive epidermotropic CD8 cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and CD8 gamma/delta and natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. We report 7 additional cases of these rare cutaneous CD8/CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders. We also present a unique case of CD8/CD30 LyP with histologic similarities to LyP type B. In all 7 of our cases of CD8 LyP and CD8 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we found focal to diffuse MUM-1 positivity. We propose that MUM-1 may represent an adjunctive marker for CD8 lymphoproliferative disease. Finally, we review the current literature on cases of CD8 LyP and PCALCL. For the 106 cases examined, we found similar clinical and histologic features to those reported for traditional CD4CD30 LyP and PCALCL.

  12. Notch signalling in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders: a new therapeutic approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Biskup, E; Gniadecki, R

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of deregulated Notch signalling has been described in several haematopoietic malignancies. We have previously reported an increased expression of Notch1 in primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large...

  13. Atypical Primary Cutaneous Rosai Dorfman Disease: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinio, Anna E; Sawchuk, Michael A; Pratt, Melanie

    Rosai Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare disorder that typically presents with bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy and follows a benign course. We present a case of late-onset atypical primary cutaneous RDD that is resistant to treatment modalities described in the literature. Case report. An 84-year-old woman presented with a 7-year history of cutaneous lesions histologically consistent with RDD. She later failed initial treatments of acitretin and thalidomide. Physicians must be aware of unusual presentations of RDD. Also, further treatment options must be explored for patients resistant to classical management of RDD.

  14. Mucormycosis in immunochallenged patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Jane

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales species are deadly opportunistic fungi with a rapidly invasive nature. A rare disease, mucormycosis is most commonly reported in patients with diabetes mellitus, because the favorable carbohydrate-rich environment allows the Mucorales fungi to flourish, especially in the setting of ketoacidosis. However, case reports over the past 20 years show that a growing number of cases of mucormycosis are occurring during treatment following bone marrow transplants (BMT and hematological malignancies (HM such as leukemia and lymphoma. This is due to the prolonged treatment of these patients with steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Liposomal amphotericin B treatment and posaconazole are two pharmacologic agents that seem to be effective against mucormycosis, but the inherently rapid onset and course of the disease, in conjunction with the difficulty in correctly identifying it, hinder prompt institution of appropriate antifungal therapy. This review of the literature discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of mucormycosis among the BMT and HM populations.

  15. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-12-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Primary localised cutaneous amyloidosis - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Britta; Schmidt, Grethe; Lauritzen, Anne Falensteen

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidosis is defined as extracellular deposits of heterogenic, misfolded proteins, amyloid fibrils, in various tissues. The aim of our study was to review the literature and to evaluate the risk of developing systemic amyloidosis (SA) and the risk of local recurrence of primary localised...

  17. Breaking the Mold: A Review of Mucormycosis and Current Pharmacological Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Treavor T; Muzny, Christina A; Swiatlo, Edwin; Legendre, Davey P

    2016-09-01

    To review the current literature for the pathogenesis of mucormycosis, discuss diagnostic strategies, and evaluate the efficacy of polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins as pharmacological treatment options. An electronic literature search was conducted in PubMed using the MESH terms Rhizopus, zygomycetes, zygomycosis, Mucorales and mucormycosis, with search terms amphotericin B, micafungin, anidulafungin, caspofungin, extended infusion amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, combination therapy, triazole, posaconazole, isavuconazole, diagnosis, and clinical manifestations. Studies written in the English language from January 1960 to March 2016 were considered for this review article. All search results were reviewed, and the relevance of each article was determined by the authors independently. Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with an exceedingly high mortality and few therapeutic options. It has a distinct predilection for invasion of endothelial cells in the vascular system, which is likely important in dissemination of disease from a primary focus of infection. Six distinct clinical syndromes can occur in susceptible hosts, including rhino-orbital-cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, widely disseminated, and miscellaneous infection. Diagnosis of mucormycosis is typically difficult to make based on imaging studies, sputum culture, bronchoalveolar lavage culture, or needle aspirate. Surgical debridement prior to dissemination of infection improves clinical outcomes. Surgery combined with early, high-dose systemic antifungal therapy yields greater than a 1.5-fold increase in survival rates. The Mucorales are inherently resistant to most widely used antifungal agents. Amphotericin B is appropriate for empirical therapy, whereas posaconazole and isavuconazole are best reserved for de-escalation, refractory cases, or patients intolerant to amphotericin B. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. [Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas: study of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Carrasco, Pablo; Morillo Andújar, Mercedes; Pérez Ruiz, Carmen; de Zulueta Dorado, Teresa; Cabrera Pérez, Rocío; Conejo-Mir, Julián

    2016-09-02

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL) is a very low prevalence neoplasm and constitutes 25% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. Our objective was to discover the epidemiological, clinic and histologic characteristics of CBCL in our area. Retrospective descriptive study with patients with histologic diagnosis of CBCL followed up in our department between 2004 and 2015. Twenty-two patients with CBCL were included; 65% were men and 35% were women. Follicle centre lymphoma was the most common subtype (41%). Only 3 cases presented with node involvement and one with bone marrow invasion. Five recurrences were detected and one patient died because of the CBCL. This is one of the first CBCL series in theSpanish population. The incidence, sex, age, subtype distribution, clinical features and immunohistochemical patterns are very similar to those of the other series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Primary cutaneous smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittler, Julia; Martires, Kathryn; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramsay, David

    2016-12-15

    HTLV-1 is a virus that is endemic in southwesternJapan and the Caribbean and has been implicatedin the development of ATLL. ATLL, which is anuncommon malignant condition of peripheralT-lymphocytes, is characterized by four clinicalsubtypes, which include acute, lymphomatous,chronic, and smoldering types, that are based onLDH levels, calcium levels, and extent of organinvolvement. We present a 52-year- old woman withpruritic patches with scale on the buttocks and withtender, hyperpigmented macules and papules oftwo-years duration. Histopathologic examinationwas suggestive of mycosis fungoides, laboratoryresults showed HTLV-I and II, and the patient wasdiagnosed with primary cutaneous ATLL. We reviewthe literature on HTLV-1 and ATLL and specifically theprognosis of cutaneous ATLL. The literature suggeststhat a diagnosis of ATLL should be considered amongpatients of Caribbean origin or other endemicareas with skin lesions that suggest a cutaneousT-cell lymphoma, with clinicopathologic features ofmycosis fungoides. Differentiation between ATLLand cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is imperative as theyhave different prognoses and treatment approaches.

  20. [Primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis cellulitis in immunocompetent child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachor-Meyouhas, Yael; Ravid, Sarit; Suhair, Hanna; Kassis, Imad

    2012-08-01

    Primary cutaneous nocardiosis is an infrequent infection among children, generally affecting immunocompromised hosts. It is caused by Gram positive bacteria, partially alcohol and acid resistant which are saprophytes of the soil, water and organic matter. In most cases the causal agent enters through inhalation, and hematogenous dissemination may occur mainly among the immune compromised patients. Direct cutaneous inoculation is less frequent, especially among children. We report an 8-year old female who lives in an urban house with a small garden, who presented with an ulcer on her right shin accompanied by surrounding cellulitis, pain, swelling and fever. The patient's medical history was unremarkable, with no exposure to animals or travelling, except for rafting on the Jordan River the previous week. Culture from the ulcer grew Nocardia brasiliensis, and she recovered after 8 weeks of therapy with trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole.

  1. [Laboratory diagnosis of mucormycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea

    2013-03-01

    Mucormycosis are deep infections caused by ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order of Mucorales. The disease occurs mostly in immunocompromised, diabetic or solid organ transplant recipients. There are currently no specific diagnostic guidelines for mucormycosis. The histological examination and culture of the clinical sample remain the most useful approaches for diagnosis. Furthermore, alternative methods to the fungal culture are yet to be standardized. Here we review the current microbiological approaches used for the diagnosis and identification of Mucorales. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  2. Posttransplantation primary cutaneous CD30 (Ki-1)-positive large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçkin, D; Demirhan, B; Oğuz Güleç, T; Arikan, U; Haberal, M

    2001-12-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year-old female renal transplant recipient with primary cutaneous CD30-positive large-cell lymphoma of T-cell origin. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are rarely reported in organ transplant recipients, and we believe they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous neoplastic and infectious diseases affecting this patient group.

  3. Spontaneous gastric ulcer perforation and acute spleen infarction caused by invasive gastric and splenic mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushira Abdulaziz Enani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare life-threatening fungal infection mostly affecting immunocompromised hosts. The main categories of human disease with the Mucorales are sinusitis/rhinocerebral, pulmonary, cutaneous/subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and disseminated disease. Other disease states occur with a much lower frequency and include cystitis, vaginitis; external otitis and allergic disease. We report a diabetic patient with comorbidities, who developed gastric perforation clinically indistinguishable from perforated peptic ulcer due to invasive gastric mucormycosis complicated by spleen infarction.

  4. [Mucormycosis cutanea- clinical case presentation souvenir etiopatogenia diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey Gutierrez, Miguel Enrique; Martinez, Gabriel W; Alvarez Milan, Lorena; Acuña Vassallo, Juan P; Trinajstic, Eduardo M

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is serious emerging infection, caused by saprophytic fungi of the order Mucorales, which mainly affects immunocompromised patients. Presentation forms can be rinosinusal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, disseminated and localized wounds and burns. The cutaneous presentation is caused by inoculation of spores into the dermis with the subsequent development compatible with gangrenous ecthyma. Our patient was treated with surgical lesion and antifungal cleaning. Presenting hemodynamic complication secondary to the administration of posaconazole.

  5. Rituximab in the treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Guarino, M; Ortiz-Romero, P L; Fernández-Misa, R; Montalbán, C

    2014-06-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric mouse-human antibody that targets the CD20 antigen, which is found in both normal and neoplastic B cells. In recent years, it has been increasingly used to treat cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and is now considered an alternative to classic treatment (radiotherapy and surgery) of 2 types of indolent lymphoma, namely, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma and primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. Rituximab is also administered as an alternative to polychemotherapy in the treatment of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type. Its use as an alternative drug led to it being administered intralesionally, with beneficial effects. In the present article, we review the literature published on the use of rituximab to treat primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary cutaneous malignancies in the Northern Cape Province of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. A total of 4 270 biopsies (13 cutaneous malignancies) were identified. The commonest was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), followed by basal cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and basosquamous carcinoma, in descending order. The odds of a white male developing ...

  7. Computed tomographic appearance of mucormycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Hinrichs, T.; Jacobi, V.; Boehme, A.; Hoelzer, D.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of the morphological characteristics of pulmonary mucormycosis using computed tomography (CT). Material and methods: Prospective analysis of CT studies in 9 patients out of 19 patients with proven pulmonary mucormycosis. Results: Pulmonary mucormycosis was most frequently found in the upper lobe bilaterally (51% of all nodules). In 22% of the manifestations, the morphological criterion of a 'bird's nest' could be verified in CT, in 37% central necrotic areas were detected. In 37% an open bronchus was diagnosed, in 6% we observed bronchiectases. 43% of all nodules presented with a halo sign. In three patients we found pleural effusions, enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes were diagnosed in one patient. Conclusion: Computed tomography allows an improved diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up in patients suffering from pulmonary mucormycosis. (orig.) [de

  8. Cutaneous features seen in primary liver cell (Hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    features associated with the entity as a possible aid to diagnosis cutaneous features being considered a cheap tool that can help ... liver cell cancer (PLCC) and cancer of the breast and ... laboratory based -abdominal ultrasonography, liver.

  9. Primary cutaneous meningioma on the scalp of an infant; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jeong; Lim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sung Mee; Yoo, Eun Ae [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    During childhood, meningioma is an uncommon tumor, and in infants, extracranial meningioma is very rare. We report a case of primary cutaneous menigioma occurring on the scalp of a ten-month-old girl.

  10. Primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma: clinical and histological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, A; Sassi, S; Fazaa, B; Ben Hassouna, J; Ben Romdhane, K; Kamoun, M R

    2009-02-01

    According to the WHO-EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas, primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma are now well characterized. We report here a case of primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma in a 51 year-old man in which the diagnosis was made using both histology and immunopathology. The patient had no remarkable medical history, no history of either acute inflammation or insect bite, and presented with a 5 cm solitary asymptomatic erythematous firm, multinodular and infiltrated plaque on the back for 12 months. Histological examination and immunohistochemical study of a cutaneous biopsy provided a differential diagnosis between B cell lymphoma and lymphocytoma cutis. Full body work up revealed no signs of extracutaneous dissemination. The patient underwent surgical excision of the nodule. Histological examination showed a histological and immunophenotyping profile typical of primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. The lesion was completely excised with clear margins and no recurrence occurred after a 12 month-follow-up period. Primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma are low-grade lymphomas that have an indolent course and a high tendency to recur. They should be differentiated from lymphocytoma cutis and from the other types of cutaneous B cell lymphomas that have a different course and prognosis.

  11. Outcome of mucormycosis after treatment: report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bellazreg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycoses are serious infections caused by filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales. They occur most often in immunocompromised patients. We report five cases of mucormycosis in patients hospitalized in the Infectious Diseases Department in Sousse – Tunisia between 2000 and 2013. They were 4 males and one female, mean age 60 years. Three patients were diabetic and one patient had acute leukemia. The locations of mucormycosis were rhinocerebral, rhino-orbital, auricular, pulmonary and cutaneous. The Mucorales isolated were Rhizopus arrhizus in 3 cases and Lichteimia in 2 cases. All patients were treated with amphotericin B and 2 patients had, in addition, surgical debridement. Two patients died and 2 kept peripheral facial paralysis.

  12. Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma masquerading as large pyogenic granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Bains

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL forms 9% of the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. It usually presents as solitary reddish brown ulcerating nodule or indurated plaque. Sometimes, it mimics other dermatological diseases such as eczema, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyogenic granuloma, morphea, and squamous cell carcinoma. Our case presented with large pyogenic granuloma like lesion with regional lymphadenopathy. Since pcALCL is rare, one can misdiagnose such cases and therefore high index of suspicion is necessary.

  13. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Nallapu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an acute opportunistic infection caused by saprophytic fungus of class Phycomycetes order Mucorales and family Mucoracae, found in soil, bread molds, and decaying fruits and vegetables. Even though this fungus is ubiquitous in the nature, the disease is usually prevented by immune system and is therefore rare. Rhizopus, Rhizomucor, Absidia and Cunninghamella are the most common species associated with Mucormycosis. Diabetes, chronic kidney disease, desferroxamine use in dialysis, leukemia, lymphoma, immunocompromised state, burns and open wounds are the risk factors of mucormycosis. Out of six clinical entities of mucormycosis, rhinocerebral mucormycosis is the most common variety which includes three subtypes rhinomaxillary, rhino-orbital and rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis. Here are two case reports of Rhinocerebral mucormycosis of different subtypes emphasizing the role of early detection of the disease to limit the spread of infection and reducing the morbidity and mortality.

  14. Mucormycosis (zygomycosis) of renal allograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Krishan L.; Joshi, Kusum; Kohli, Harbir S.; Jha, Vivekanand; Sakhuja, Vinay

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infection is relatively common among renal transplant recipients from developing countries. Mucormycosis, also known as zygomycosis, is one of the most serious fungal infections in these patients. The most common of presentation is rhino-cerebral. Isolated involvement of a renal allograft is very rare. A thorough search of literature and our medical records yielded a total of 24 cases with mucormycosis of the transplanted kidney. There was an association with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and anti-rejection treatment in these patients and most of these transplants were performed in the developing countries from unrelated donors. The outcome was very poor with an early mortality in 13 (54.5%) patients. Renal allograft mucormycosis is a relatively rare and potentially fatal complication following renal transplantation. Early diagnosis, graft nephrectomy and appropriate antifungal therapy may result in an improved prognosis for these patients. PMID:26069793

  15. Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma – a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Milena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, the World Health Organization - European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHOEORTC classified cutaneous B-cell lymphomas into 4 categories: primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (PCMZL, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL, primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL-LT, and primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, other (PCDLBCL-O. The absence of evident extra-cutaneous disease is a necessary condition for the diagnosis of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, because they have a completely different clinical behavior and prognosis from their nodal counterparts. PCDLBCL-O basically represents a morphological variation, lacking the typical features of PCDLBCLLT, neither confirming the definition of PCFCCL, but on the clinical ground, its behavior seems at least to partially overlap the indolent course of PCFCCL. In fact, the present WHO lymphoma classification from 2008 overcame the previous WHO-EORTC classification, including at least a part of PCDLBCL-O within the spectrum of PCFCCL. However, owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of the PCDLBCL-O, the precise clinicopathological characteristics have not been well characterized and the optimal treatment for this group of lymphomas is yet to be defined. Nevertheless, dermatologists and pathologists should be aware of this entity in order to avoid unnecessary aggressive treatment. We present a case of a 46-year-old Caucasian male with one large round-shaped tumor and a few scattered nodules localized on the back. The histopathological features of the lesion corresponded to PCDLBCL-O. The patient follow-up showed that he was disease-free three months after surgical excision of the lesions and adjuvant local radiotherapy. No additional therapy was introduced, including chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, oncovin, prednisolone (R-CHOP.

  16. A case of cutaneous scleroderma with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H P Nandeesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing cholangitis comprises of a spectrum of cholestatic conditions that are characterized by patchy fibrosis, inflammation and destruction of intra hepatic and extrahepatic ducts. We report a case of a 42 year old woman who presented with darkening of skin with yellowish discolouration of the eyes. Clinical examination revealed icterus, taut skin with hepatosplenomegaly. Liver function tests showed a cholestatic picture. Skin biopsy showed features of cutaneous scleroderma. MRCP and Liver biopsy was suggestive of sclerosing cholangitis.

  17. Primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection isolated in an immunosuppressed patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kimberly W; Brodell, Lindsey A; Lambert, Emily; Menegus, Marilyn; Scott, Glynis A; Tu, John H

    2012-02-01

    Cutaneous nocardiosis is a rare infection that may manifest as a superficial skin lesion, lymphocutaneous infection, mycetoma, or diffuse cutaneous infection from a disseminated systemic infection. We report a case of a 65-year-old immunocompromised man with persistent primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection following a motor vehicle collision. A high degree of suspicion is needed to diagnose Nocardia infection because of its resemblance to other bacterial infections. Nocardiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of chronic cutaneous infections, especially when the response to antibiotics is inadequate or when the patient is immunocompromised. Because Nocardia may take several weeks to grow in standard bacterial culture media, laboratories should be notified of the suspicion so that culture plates are held for longer time periods. Long-term therapy, usually with sulfonamides, often is necessary.

  18. Mucormicosis ocular Ocular mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmary Aragonés Cruz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La mucormicosis es una infección causada por hongos del orden de mucorales, esta entidad es poco frecuente y su aparición se relaciona con el estado inmune del paciente. Es muy importante sospecharla ante la presencia de una escara negra y realizar un diagnóstico precoz, tiene un pronóstico reservado. Las tasas de supervivencia se han ido incrementando de 6 hasta 73 % y se vinculan con la extensión de la lesión al momento del diagnóstico y la gravedad del inmunocompromiso del paciente.Mucormycosis is an infection caused by mucoral mushrooms; this illness is not very frequent and its occurence relates to the patient's immune state. It is very important to suspect about its existence whenever there is black eschar and to diagnose it early. Prognosis is conservative. Survival rates have increased from 6 to 73 % and they are linked with lesion extension at the time of diagnosis and the immunosuppresive condition of the patient.

  19. Primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of scalp: Case report of a rare variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Khatib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma (Bcl is defined as a lymphoma composed of large cells constituting more than 80% of the infiltrate and absence of extracutaneous involvement after staging investigations. In the new World Health Organization/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer classification, cutaneous Bcls with large cells are of three types - primary cutaneous large Bcl leg type (PCLBCLLT, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma diffuse type (PCFCLDT, and primary cutaneous large Bcls other (PCLBCLO. These three different types are distinct in terms of their clinicopathological features and survival. The PCLBCLO has intermediate features between those of PCLBCLLT and PCFCLDT. We present a case of PCLBCLO in a 57-year-old male who presented with a scalp swelling. Ultrasonography examination was suggestive of a sebaceous cyst. Computed tomography scan revealed the presence of an ill-defined hyperdense region in the soft tissue of the scalp region extending into the deeper layers of the scalp. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC revealed the presence of atypical lymphoid cells. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and immunohistochemistry. Patient received rituximab combined with doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone regimen with complete resolution of the lesion. We present this case for its rarity, the utility of FNAC in early diagnosis, and to discuss the differential diagnosis.

  20. Changing Epidemiology of Mucoralean Fungi: Chronic Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mucor irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Jagdish; Kaur, Mandeep; Bhalla, Mala; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Singla, Nidhi; Bhola, Kalyani; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Stchigel, Alberto M; Guarro, Josep

    2015-10-01

    The fungi pertaining to order Mucorales usually cause an acute form of clinical disease called mucormycosis. A primary chronic presentation in an immunocompetent patient is a rare form of mucormycosis. Mucor irregularis is known for causing chronic cutaneous infections geographically confined to Asia, mainly in China. We describe a case of primary chronic cutaneous mucormycosis caused by M. irregularis from a new geographical niche in India, highlighting changing aspects of its epidemiology. The patient was a farmer with a history of skin lesions over the lower limb for the past 6 years. The biopsy taken from the lesions showed pauci-septate hyphae with right-angle branching on KOH wet mount as well as special fungal stains. On fungal culture, greyish-white cottony mycelial growth of Mucormycetes was obtained. The strain was finally identified as M. irregularis on macro- and microscopic features on 2 % MEA and DNA sequencing. The antifungal susceptibility was done using EUCAST broth microdilution method and was found to be susceptible to commonly used antifungal agents. The patient was started on oral itraconazole and saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI). While undergoing treatment for 2 months, he was lost to follow-up, however, after a year when he recently visited the hospital; the disease got completely healed with no new crops of skin lesions. Mucoralean fungi should also be suspected in cases with chronic presentation, in immunocompetent host, as there is emergence of such fungi in new endemic areas, particularly located in Asia. The role of other antifungal agents apart from amphotericin B for the treatment of chronic mucormycosis needs to be explored.

  1. Primary cilium depletion typifies cutaneous melanoma in situ and malignant melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinah Kim

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is a lethal malignancy that arises spontaneously or via in situ precursor neoplasms. While melanoma in situ and locally invasive malignant melanoma can be cured surgically, these lesions can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from melanocytic nevi. Thus, the identification of histolopathologic or molecular features that distinguish these biologically distinct lesions would represent an important advance. To this end, we determined the abundance of melanocytic primary cilia in a series of 62 cases composed of typical cutaneous melanocytic nevi, melanoma in situ, invasive melanoma, and metastatic melanoma. Primary cilia are sensory organelles that modulate developmental and adaptive signaling and notably, are substantially depleted from the neoplastic epithelium of pancreatic carcinoma at a stage equivalent to melanoma in situ. In this series, we find that while nearly all melanocytes in 22 melanocytic nevi possessed a primary cilium, a near-complete loss of this organelle was observed in 16 cases of melanoma in situ, in 16 unequivocal primary invasive melanomas, and in 8 metastatic tumors, each associated with a cutaneous primary lesion. These findings suggest that the primary cilium may be used to segregate cutaneous invasive melanoma and melanoma in situ from melanocytic nevi. Moreover, they place the loss of an organelle known to regulate oncogenic signaling at an early stage of melanoma development.

  2. Treatment of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma with superficial x-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Malene E; Gniadecki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The optimal radiation schedule for primary cutaneous anaplastic lymphoma (PCALCL) has not been investigated. We report here satisfactory outcomes of low-dose (16-20 Gy, 3-5 fractions), superficial X-ray radiation (40-50 kV) in a series of 10 patients with PCALCL. Only 1 patient developed a local...

  3. Ex vivo confocal microscopy: a new diagnostic technique for mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, A; Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Perrot, J L; Cambazard, F

    2016-05-01

    Skin-dedicated ex vivo confocal microscopy (EVCM) has so far mainly been employed to identify cutaneous tumours on freshly excised samples. We present two cases where EVCM has been used to diagnose cutaneous mucormycosis. The skin biopsies were evaluated by the skin-dedicated ex vivo confocal microscope VivaScope 2500(®) (MAVIG GmbH, Munich Germany) under both reflectance and fluorescence mode. Conventional direct optical examination on skin scraping and histological examination were later performed. Mucormycetes observed by EVCM presented as hyper-reflective elongated 20 μm in diameter structures with perpendicular ramifications. Fungi were found both under reflectance and fluorescence mode and were better visible with acridine orange under fluorescence EVCM. Conventional direct optical examination on skin scraping and histological examination found the same elongated and branching structures confirming the presence of Mucormycetes. Ex vivo confocal microscopy has both the advantages of being fast as the direct optical examination, and to be able to show the localisation of the fungi in the tissue like the histological examination. In our cases, EVCM allowed to rapidly confirm the clinical diagnosis of mucormycosis, which is essential for the treatment of this fungal infection. Further studies are needed to compare the performance of EVCM with the findings of conventional histological and mycological examinations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Radiotherapy of primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma: case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceovic, Romana; Jovanovic, Ivana; Kostovic, Kresimir; Rados, Jaka; Dotlic, Snjezana; Radman, Ivo; Kulisic, Sandra Marinovic; Loncaric, Davorin

    2013-01-01

    Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma is an indolent primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma originating from the follicle center cells, composed of a combination of centrocytes (small and large cleaved cells) and centroblasts (large noncleaved cells) with a follicular, follicular/diffuse, or diffuse growth pattern. Lesions are mostly located on the head, neck and trunk. A case is presented of a 56-year-old male patient with primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma, with lesions involving the skin of the back, shoulders, presternal area and right forearm. As the patient presented a disseminated cutaneous form of the disease that involved several anatomical regions, complete work-up was followed by superficial fractionated radiotherapy of eight fields in VI expositions, with total irradiation dose of 1400 cGy upon the following fields: right and left pectoral region, left and right shoulders, right suprascapular region, and proximal third of the right forearm. Total irradiation dose applied upon each field for the lesions located on the left and right side of the back was 1500 cGy. This therapy resulted in significant reduction of visible tumor. The patient was regularly followed up on outpatient basis for 12 months of radiotherapy, being free from local recurrence and systemic spread of the disease

  5. Double-hit or dual expression of MYC and BCL2 in primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menguy, Sarah; Frison, Eric; Prochazkova-Carlotti, Martina; Dalle, Stephane; Dereure, Olivier; Boulinguez, Serge; Dalac, Sophie; Machet, Laurent; Ram-Wolff, Caroline; Verneuil, Laurence; Gros, Audrey; Vergier, Béatrice; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Pham-Ledard, Anne

    2018-03-26

    In nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the search for double-hit with MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 rearrangements or for dual expression of BCL2 and MYC defines subgroups of patients with altered prognosis that has not been evaluated in primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma. Our objectives were to assess the double-hit and dual expressor status in a cohort of 44 patients with primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma according to the histological subtype and to evaluate their prognosis relevance. The 44 cases defined by the presence of more than 80% of large B-cells in the dermis corresponded to 21 primary cutaneous follicle centre lymphoma with large cell morphology and 23 primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type. Thirty-one cases (70%) expressed BCL2 and 29 (66%) expressed MYC. Dual expressor profile was observed in 25 cases (57%) of either subtypes (n = 6 or n = 19, respectively). Only one primary cutaneous follicle centre lymphoma, large-cell case had a double-hit status (2%). Specific survival was significantly worse in primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type than in primary cutaneous follicle centre lymphoma, large cell (p = 0.021) and for the dual expressor primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma group (p = 0.030). Both overall survival and specific survival were worse for patients belonging to the dual expressor primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type subgroup (p = 0.001 and p = 0.046, respectively). Expression of either MYC and/or BCL2 negatively impacted overall survival (p = 0.017 and p = 0.018 respectively). As the differential diagnosis between primary cutaneous follicle centre lymphoma, large cell and primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type has a major impact on prognosis, dual-expression of BCL2 and MYC may represent a new diagnostic criterion for primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type subtype and further identifies patients with

  6. Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen versus topical salicylic acid application for cutaneous warts in primary care : randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Zaaijer, Krista; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; de Waal, Margot W. M.; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Koes, Bart W.; Eekhof, Just A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is widely used for the treatment of cutaneous warts in primary care. However, evidence favours salicylic acid application. We compared the effectiveness of these treatments as well as a wait-and-see approach. Methods: Consecutive patients with new cutaneous warts were

  7. Cutaneous features seen in primary liver cell (Hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary liver cell carcinoma (PLCC), predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma is a killer. In the southwestern region of Nigeria it occupies the second position, behind prostate cancer in males. Females account for about a third of diagnosed cases. Children are not spared. Over 80 % of PLCC cases present to the hospital at ...

  8. Primary Cutaneous CD 30+ Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma. A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Serra Valdés

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous CD 30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma is part of the spectrum of primary cutaneous CD30 + lymphoproliferative disorders, together with lymphomatoid papulosis. Its frequency is less than 0.5 x 100 000 inhabitants per year. It accounts for a very small proportion of non-Hodgkins lymphomas. The case of an 80-year-old female patient whose diagnosis was established in 2006 because of lesions on the face and neck is presented. The lesions continued to grow in an exaggerated fashion lately leading to deformity of her face. She was admitted due to neurological manifestations unrelated to the lesions. The presentation of this case is necessary because it requires performing differential diagnosis in clinical practice. Given its rarity, it is of interest to the medical community, especially trainees.

  9. Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haber, Daniel Martiniano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by Mucorales fungi, and the Rhizopus is the most common one (70% of the cases. It is an acute invasive fungal disease whose form is disseminated, cutaneous, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and rhino-orbitocerebral. The latter is the most common form and its symptoms comprise of unilateral sinusitis, fever and headache. Once established in the orbit the symptoms can be chemosis, diplopia and reduced vision. The infection can spread to the brain via the orbital apex, orbital arteries or via the cribriform plate. Mucormycosis is a medical emergency and the treatment consists of a surgery to an aggressive debridement and in the use of antifungal therapy. Despite the appropriate management, the mortality rate can reach 40% of the cases. One possible intracranial complication of Mucormycosis is the Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis which is a rare and fatal infective disease. The initial symptoms of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis are headache, retro-orbital pain, periorbital edema, proptosis, diplopia and reduced vision. Case Report: We describe the case of 43-year-old woman with medical history of diabetes mellitus and use of immunosuppressant drugs after kidney transplantation. The patient developed Acute Bacterial Sinusitis and Rhino-orbitocerebral Mucormycosis associated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis.

  10. Primary versus secondary closure of cutaneous abscesses in the emergency department: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam J; Taira, Breena R; Chale, Stuart; Bhat, Rahul; Kennedy, David; Schmitz, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous abscesses have traditionally been treated with incision and drainage (I&D) and left to heal by secondary closure. The objective was to compare the healing rates of cutaneous abscesses following I&D after primary or secondary closure. This was a randomized, controlled, trial, balanced by center, with blocked randomization created by a random-number generator. One urban and one suburban academic emergency department (ED) participated. Subjects were randomized to primary or secondary wound closure following I&D of the abscess. Main outcome measures were the percentage of healed wounds (wound was completely closed by visual inspection; a 40% difference in wound healing was sought) and overall failure rate (need for additional intervention including suture removal, additional drainage, antibiotics, or admission within 7 days after drainage). Fifty-six adult patients with simple localized cutaneous abscesses were included; 29 were randomized to primary closure, and 27 were randomized to secondary closure. Healing rates at 7 days were similar between the primary and secondary closure groups (69.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 49.1% to 84.4% vs. 59.3%, 95% CI = 40.7% to 75.5%; difference 10.3%, 95% CI = -15.8% to 34.1%). Overall failure rates at 7 days were also similar between the primary and secondary closure groups (30.4%, 95% CI = 15.6% to 50.9% vs. 28.6%, 95% CI = 15.2% to 47.1%; difference 1.8%, 95% CI = -24.2% to 28.8%). The rates of wound healing and treatment failure following I&D of simple abscesses in the ED are similar after primary or secondary closure. The authors did not detect a difference of at least 40% in healing rates between primary and secondary closure. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. Analysis of trends and seasonal variation in primary cutaneous melanoma: an Irish study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Downes, M R

    2010-11-10

    A seasonal variation in the presentation of cutaneous melanoma has been documented in several studies. We performed a retrospective review of primary cutaneous melanomas (n = 263) from our institution to examine whether the seasonal patterns of presentation noted in the literature would be similar in Ireland, a climate with low ambient sunshine. A summer : winter ratio was determined for age, gender, subtype, location and Breslow thickness. We found an increase in total numbers of melanomas, particularly in men. The summer : winter ratio was 2.39 for all patients (95% CI 1.60-3.57, P < 0.001), with seasonal variations noted for location, thickness and subtype (excluding lentigo). Melanomas presenting over the summer tended towards a greater Breslow thickness than did those presenting in winter. This subclassification of primary cutaneous melanoma with summer : winter ratios based on patient and tumour characteristics gave remarkably similar results to previously published reports, notwithstanding the low levels of annual ambient sunshine in Ireland.

  12. [Posttraumatic primary cutaneous aspergillosis with Candida guilliermondii infection in a healthy host].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkşen, Zeynep; Yağcı, Server; Karadağ, Ayşe Serap; Tezer, Ayla; Taner, Omer Faruk; Tekin, Fatih; Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap

    2010-10-01

    Opportunistic fungal infections are usually seen in immunocompromised patients. While Candida is the most prevalent agent in such infections, Aspergillus is at the second order. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is most common in immunocompromised patients but can rarely be seen in healthy hosts as well. We report a case of posttraumatic primary cutaneous aspergillosis and Candida guilliermondii coinfection in a 70-years-old healthy man. The patient had an ulcerous lesion which developed in the site of a trauma on the middle finger of the right hand. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens revealed septate hyphae with dichotomous branching small circular blastospores. The cultures of the biopsy specimen yielded yellow-green colored, granular mold colonies and creamy white yeast colonies. Microscopic examination of the lactophenol cotton blue stained mold colonies indicated long conidiophores with vesicles surrounded by uniseriate phialides, compatible with Aspergillus flavus. Yeast colonies were identified as Candida guilliermondii by ID32C (BioMerieux, France) and by their microscopical morphology detected in corn meal-Tween 80 agar incubated at 25°C for 72 hours. The patient was treated properly with surgical debridement and itraconazole therapy. Since the immune system is compressed as a consequence of aging, cutaneous opportunistic fungal infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of posttraumatic necrotic ulcers and black eschar in aged patients.

  13. Primary Cutaneous Carcinosarcoma of the Basal Cell Subtype Should Be Treated as a High-Risk Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeault, Emilie; Alain, Jimmy; Gagné, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous carcinosarcoma is a rare primary tumor of the skin, characterized by biphasic epithelial and mesenchymal differentiation. Due to the limited number of cases reported, there is no consensus regarding treatment and prognosis. Some authors suggest that cutaneous carcinosarcomas should be viewed as aggressive tumors, with ancillary imaging used to evaluate potential metastatic disease. Other reports demonstrate an indolent disease course, especially with epidermal-type cutaneous carcinosarcomas. We report a case of cutaneous carcinosarcoma, which we treated with electrodessication and curettage following a shave biopsy. The tumor had an epithelial component resembling a basal cell carcinoma and a fibrosarcomatous stroma. At 1-year follow-up, our patient did not show evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Our case suggests that a cutaneous carcinosarcoma with an epithelial component composed of basal cell carcinoma can be regarded as a high-risk nonmelanoma skin cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Atypical cause of forearm skin ulceration in a leukaemic child: mucormycosis. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, C; Brutus, J P; De Mey, A

    2005-01-01

    Primary cutaneous mucormycosis is an uncommon, deep and aggressive fungal infection occurring mainly in immunosuppressed or diabetic patients. Rapid diagnosis and therapy are necessary to prevent a fatal outcome. An eight-year-old leukaemic child presented with a dark necrotic ulcer on the volar-ulnar aspect of the left forehand. The lesion had developed over seven days, beginning as a vasculo-haemorrhagic erythematous plaque. There was no known history of trauma to the area, but skin necrosis from external compression caused by an intravenous line could not be completely ruled out. The lesion rapidly progressed to a 5 x 8 cm painful necrotic ulcer with an erythematous border. Treatment with ichthyol dressing and intra-venous antibiotherapy failed to improve the condition. Wide debridement was performed and specimens were sent for microbiology and pathology examinations. Microscopic examination demonstrated broad, irregularly walled, non-septate fungal hyphae that were consistent with Mucor. Amphotericin B was administrated intravenously (1 mg/kg/day) and hydrogel and hydrophile adhesive polyurethane foam dressings were applied. After 12 days, the soft tissue defect was covered with a split-thickness skin graft, harvested from the lateral aspect of the thigh. Diagnosis of this infection is based on complete histopathological and microbiological studies. Awareness, and a high index of suspicion are required because of the potential fulminant and fatal course.

  15. Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD4 Small/Medium T cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder with Intralesional Triamcinolone Acetonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    12. REPORT TYPE 02/15/2018 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treatment of Primary Cutaneous CD4+ Small/Medium T- cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder with...cutaneous CD4+ small/medium T- cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) is a generally indolent cutaneous T- cell proliferation. Most cases follow a benign...lmmunohistochemistry showed diffuse CD3+ CD4+ T- cells without CD30, TIA1 or CD10. A subset of medium to large cells expressed BCL-6. Small subsets of B- cells and CDB

  16. Sarcomas cutâneos primários Primary cutaneous sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Fróes Fleury Jr

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Os sarcomas com apresentação cutânea primária são tumores raros e de grande heterogeneidade histológica. Com a evolução da oncologia cutânea e da cirurgia dermatológica, os dermatologistas têm sido cada vez mais requisitados para o diagnóstico e orientação terapêutica de tumores menos freqüentes. Este artigo de revisão analisa os sarcomas cutâneos primários observando suas características clínicas, etiopatogênicas e histológicas, bem como aspectos do tratamento e evolução. Enfatiza os sarcomas de maior relevância para o dermatologista, como angiossarcoma, dermatofibrossarcoma protuberans, fibroxantoma atípico, leiomiossarcoma, lipossarcoma, tumor maligno de bainha de nervo periférico e sarcoma epitelióide. O sarcoma de Kaposi não é abordado devido a suas características individuais específicas.Soft tissue tumors represent a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal and neural lesions. The cutaneous presentation of these tumours is rare. With the evolution of dermatologic surgery and cutaneous oncology, dermatologists have emerged as specialists for skin cancer management. This article reviews primary cutaneous sarcomas with particular emphasis on the epidemiologic, clinical, and histological features of diagnosis, as well as treatment modalities and prognosis. The most frequent cutaneous sarcomas were reviewed, including angiosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, atypical fibroxanthoma, leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant nerve sheath tumor, and epithelioid sarcoma. Kaposi's sarcoma, due to specific characteristics, was omitted from this review.

  17. Primary cutaneous lymphomas: A clinical and histological study of 99 cases in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Fatemi Naeini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs represent a heterogeneous group of T- and B-cell lymphomas that present in the skin with no evidence of extracutaneous disease at the time of diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess and report the epidemiological characteristics of PCLs in Isfahan, Isfahan Province, Iran - as a main province of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 patients were recruited over a recent 10-year period (2003-2013 with diagnosis of PCLs; the patients were classified according to the The World Health Organization/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC criteria. Mean and standard deviations (SDs were used to describe continuous data, numbers, and percentages for categorical data. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. Results: The patients comprised 45 men and 54 women aged 5-80 years (median 36 at diagnosis. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.2. Histological examination showed features of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (PCBCLs in four cases. The mean ± SD age in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (PCTCLs and PCBCLs was 37.9 ± 16.5 years and 39.7 ± 9.1 years, respectively (P = 0.72. The mean ± SD latent period between the time of diagnosis and initiation of skin lesions in men and women was 2.3 ± 4.1 years and 5.9 ± 10.1 years, respectively (P = 0.02. The most frequent subtypes were mycosis fungoides (MFs (86.9% followed by Sιzary syndrome (SS (4%. Five patients died from PCL-related deaths. Conclusion: The distinguishing epidemiologic characteristics of PCL in Iran are the absence of a male predominance and a lower age of diagnosis. The study highlights the ethnic or regional variations in the clinicoepidemiological characteristics of PCLs.

  18. MicroRNA profiling of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianne Koens

    Full Text Available Aberrant expression of microRNAs is widely accepted to be pathogenetically involved in nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs. However, the microRNAs profiles of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas (PCLBCLs are not yet described. Its two main subtypes, i.e., primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL-LT and primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL are characterized by an activated B-cell (ABC-genotype and a germinal center B-cell (GCB-genotype, respectively. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis on frozen tumor biopsies from 19 cases of PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT to establish microRNA profiles. Cluster analysis of the complete microRNome could not distinguish between the two subtypes, but 16 single microRNAs were found to be differentially expressed. Single microRNA RT-qPCR was conducted on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies of 20 additional cases, confirming higher expression of miR-9-5p, miR-31-5p, miR-129-2-3p and miR-214-3p in PCFCL as compared to PCLBCL-LT. MicroRNAs previously described to be higher expressed in ABC-type as compared to GCB-type nodal DLBCL were not differentially expressed between PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT. In conclusion, PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT differ in their microRNA profiles. In contrast to their gene expression profile, they only show slight resemblance with the microRNA profiles found in GCB- and ABC-type nodal DLBCL.

  19. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis due to Aspergillus niger in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohapatra S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare entity, usually caused by A. fumigatus and A. flavus . Here, we present such a case, manifested by ulceration due to A. niger, which remained undiagnosed for a prolonged period. The immunological status was intact, although the patient had associated severe fungal infection. Recurrence of the lesion occurred despite repeated anti-fungal therapies. Anti fungal testing was done based on the broth dilution (M-38A, NCCLS, USA method. The culture isolate was found to be sensitive to fluconazole and amphotericin B. Continuation of antifungal therapy improved the symptoms, reducing the size of the lesion.

  20. Transcriptome patterns from primary cutaneous Leishmania braziliensis infections associate with eventual development of mucosal disease in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Maretti-Mira

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (LCL and Mucosal Leishmaniasis (ML are two extreme clinical forms of American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis that usually begin as solitary primary cutaneous lesions. Host and parasite factors that influence the progression of LCL to ML are not completely understood. In this manuscript, we compare the gene expression profiles of primary cutaneous lesions from patients who eventually developed ML to those that did not. METHODS: Using RNA-seq, we analyzed both the human and Leishmania transcriptomes in primary cutaneous lesions. RESULTS: Limited number of reads mapping to Leishmania transcripts were obtained. For human transcripts, compared to ML patients, lesions from LCL patients displayed a general multi-polarization of the adaptive immune response and showed up-regulation of genes involved in chemoattraction of innate immune cells and in antigen presentation. We also identified a potential transcriptional signature in the primary lesions that may predict long-term disease outcome. CONCLUSIONS: We were able to simultaneously sequence both human and Leishmania mRNA transcripts in primary cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions. Our results suggest an intrinsic difference in the immune capacity of LCL and ML patients. The findings correlate the complete cure of L. braziliensis infection with a controlled inflammatory response and a balanced activation of innate and adaptive immunity.

  1. Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma in the setting of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Konda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous malignancies arising in association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL are notable for their atypical clinical and histological presentation. We report a 69-year-old man with a 17-year history of CLL who presented for evaluation of a well-defined red to violaceous nodule with a central depressed scar on the left lower extremity. Microscopic examination of a punch biopsy revealed an infiltrate of predominantly small lymphocytes with scattered large, atypical epithelioid cells. Immunohistochemical stains revealed diffuse positive staining of the lesional cells with CD20+ and bcl-6+ and focal positive staining with bcl-2+ (negative CD10 and CD23, findings which, in conjunction with the histology, were most compatible with a diagnosis of primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL. A review of the clinical charts revealed several prior biopsies with varied diagnoses. In light of the most recent biopsy findings, all previous biopsies were re-reviewed and interpreted as PCFCL arising in the setting of CLL. Features contributing to the diagnostic conundrum in this case included an atypical clinical and histological presentation, lack of pertinent clinical history and multiple presentations at different institutions.

  2. Distinct types of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma identified by gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefnagel, Juliette J; Dijkman, Remco; Basso, Katia; Jansen, Patty M; Hallermann, Christian; Willemze, Rein; Tensen, Cornelis P; Vermeer, Maarten H

    2005-05-01

    In the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification 2 types of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma (PCLBCL) are distinguished: primary cutaneous follicle center cell lymphomas (PCFCCL) and PCLBCL of the leg (PCLBCL-leg). Distinction between both groups is considered important because of differences in prognosis (5-year survival > 95% and 52%, respectively) and the first choice of treatment (radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy, respectively), but is not generally accepted. To establish a molecular basis for this subdivision in the EORTC classification, we investigated the gene expression profiles of 21 PCLBCLs by oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering based on a B-cell signature (7450 genes) classified PCLBCL into 2 distinct subgroups consisting of, respectively, 8 PCFCCLs and 13 PCLBCLsleg. PCLBCLs-leg showed increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation; the proto-oncogenes Pim-1, Pim-2, and c-Myc; and the transcription factors Mum1/IRF4 and Oct-2. In the group of PCFCCL high expression of SPINK2 was observed. Further analysis suggested that PCFCCLs and PCLBCLs-leg have expression profiles similar to that of germinal center B-cell-like and activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, respectively. The results of this study suggest that different pathogenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of PCFCCLs and PCLBCLs-leg and provide molecular support for the subdivision used in the EORTC classification.

  3. Potential involvement of Notch1 signalling in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M.R.; Ralfkiaer, E.; Skovgaard, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The central role of Notch signalling in T-cell development and oncogenesis raises the question of the importance of this pathway in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Objectives To investigate the pattern of expression of Notch and its ligands, Jagged and Delta, in skin samples of primary...... obtained from three patients with LyP and two patients with primary cutaneous ALCL. Results We identified single Notch1-positive cells or small clusters of atypical cells in LyP. Similarly, strongly positive Jagged1 cells tended to be localized in clusters. Primary cutaneous ALCL had higher expression...... of Notch1 and Jagged1 compared with LyP. Cells expressing Notch1 and Jagged1 were colocalized and a subset of cells expressed both the receptor and the ligand. The expression of the ligand Delta1 was low to undetectable in both types of lymphoproliferations. A subpopulation of lymphoma cells was found...

  4. Review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common primary psychiatric causes of cutaneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krooks, J A; Weatherall, A G; Holland, P J

    2018-06-01

    Approximately half of all patients presenting to dermatologists exhibit signs and symptoms of psychiatric conditions that are either primary or secondary to cutaneous disease. Because patients typically resist psychiatric consult, dermatologists often are on the front line in evaluating and treating these patients. Accordingly, distinguishing the specific underlying or resulting psychiatric condition is essential for effective treatment. The etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and first-line treatment of specific primary psychiatric causes of dermatologic conditions, including delusional infestation, Morgellons syndrome, olfactory reference syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder, excoriation disorder, trichotillomania, and dermatitis artefacta are discussed here, followed by a discussion of the recommended treatment approach with an overview of the different first-line therapies discussed in this review, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy, atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants. Included is a guide for dermatologists to use while prescribing these medications.

  5. [Emphysematous gastritis secondary to gastric mucormycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Lezama, Julio; Espinosa-González, Omar; García-Cano, Eugenio; Sánchez-Córdova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection of the mucorales order, which affects mostly immunocompromised patients. The association with emphysematous gastritis is rare and often fatal produced by gas -forming bacteria. We report the case of a trauma patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and diabetic ketoacidosis complicated with gastric mucormycosis associated with emphysematous gastritis. A male aged 32 who is involved in a car accident, who suffered head trauma, is admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, presenting diabetic ketoacidosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. An endoscopy was performed and an erosive esophagitis Class C, ischemia and gastric necrosis was found. A computed tomography scan showed emphysematous gastritis and gastric necrosis. He underwent total gastrectomy with a histopathology report of gastric mucormycosis. After the surgical procedure the patient died because of sepsis secondary to pulmonary mucormycosis Mucormycosis is a rare fungical disease which infrequently affects the gastrointestinal tract, being the stomach the most affected site. The mortality is high if the diagnosis is not done promptly and appropriate treatment is given. Suspecting its existence is necessary in patients with immunocompromised status to diagnose and provide timely treatment to increase survival, because of its high mortality. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  6. Mucormycosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infant appeared mentally irritated, but the level of consciousness was ... with infiltration of the brain, usually resulting in death. The other .... male preponderance of IQ: 1. Patients ... Human infection with Fungi, Actinomycefes and Algae.

  7. Patients' Illness Perception as a Tool to Improve Individual Disease Management in Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkert, Stefanie; Lehner-Baumgartner, Eva; Valencak, Julia; Knobler, Robert; Riedl, Elisabeth; Jonak, Constanze

    2018-02-07

    The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) has been shown to assess illness perception reproducibly in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Illness perception reflects patients' individual concepts of understanding and interpretation of the disease, influencing illness behaviour and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study investigated the clinical relevance of the relationships between illness perception, illness behaviour, and HRQOL in CTCL and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCL). A total of 92 patients completed the IPQ-R, the Scale for the Assessment of Illness Behavior (SAIB), and a skin-specific HRQOL tool (Skindex-29). Data on illness behaviour were not evidently related to illness perception, whereas illness perception was significantly associated with HRQOL. Both, IPQ-R and HRQOL results correlated with disease entity, stage, and socio-demographics. Only IPQ-R results provided practical information on patients' needs to train personal coping strategies. IPQ-R assessment in CTCL and CBCL might be a useful instrument to improve individual disease management.

  8. Primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in a young patient with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chun Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease, while primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL is a rare T-cell lymphoma which always has an excellent prognosis, although multifocal PC-ALCL tends to relapse after systemic chemotherapy. Psoriasis associated with PC-ALCL is exceptionally rare. We report a 29-year-old Chinese female with a 5-year history of psoriasis treated with Chinese herbs alone, who was referred to our institution with a tumor on the left clavicular region for 1 year and another one on the left palm for 2 months. Skin biopsies of both lesions showed diffuse infiltration of tumor cells, composed of large atypical cells with marked nuclear pleomorphism, prominent nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Large numbers of neutrophilic infiltrations were also noted in the lesion. Immunostaining revealed the lesion to be positive for CD30, vimentin, CD45, and CD68, and weakly positive for epithelial membrane antigen, but negative for anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase. The patient was diagnosed to have psoriasis associated with PC-ALCL; she died 18 months after the final diagnosis with unknown cause. We consider that immune dysregulation and/or Chinese herbs may play roles in the development of the present PC-ALCL.

  9. Thin and thick primary cutaneous melanomas reveal distinct patterns of somatic copy number alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Valentina; Benelli, Matteo; Apollo, Alessandro; Pescucci, Chiara; Licastro, Danilo; Urso, Carmelo; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Luzzatto, Lucio; Stecca, Barbara

    2016-05-24

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most aggressive type of skin tumor. Early stage melanoma can be often cured by surgery; therefore current management guidelines dictate a different approach for thin (thick (>4mm) melanomas. We have carried out whole-exome sequencing in 5 thin and 5 thick fresh-frozen primary cutaneous melanomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) identified two groups corresponding to thin and thick melanomas. The most striking difference between them was the much greater abundance of SCNAs in thick melanomas, whereas mutation frequency did not significantly change between the two groups. We found novel mutations and focal SCNAs in genes that are embryonic regulators of axon guidance, predominantly in thick melanomas. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets provided further support for a potential role of Ephrin receptors in melanoma progression. In addition, we have identified a set of SCNAs, including amplification of BRAF and ofthe epigenetic modifier EZH2, that are specific for the group of thick melanomas that developed metastasis during the follow-up. Our data suggest that mutations occur early during melanoma development, whereas SCNAs might be involved in melanoma progression.

  10. Spontaneous regression of primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type with significant T-cell immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Graham, DO

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of histologically confirmed primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL-LT that subsequently underwent spontaneous regression in the absence of systemic treatment. The case showed an atypical lymphoid infiltrate that was CD20+ and MUM-1+ and CD10–. A subsequent biopsy of the spontaneously regressed lesion showed fibrosis associated with a lymphocytic infiltrate comprising reactive T cells. PCDLBCL-LT is a cutaneous B-cell lymphoma with a poor prognosis, which is usually treated with chemotherapy. We describe a case of clinical and histologic spontaneous regression in a patient with PCDLBCL-LT who had a negative systemic workup but a recurrence over a year after his initial presentation. Key words: B cell, lymphoma, primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type, regression

  11. Advanced-Stage Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Treated with Bexarotene and Denileukin Diftitox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Cervigón-González

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Advanced-stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has an unfavorable prognosis and low survival rates. Aggressive treatment with chemotherapy is not curative and causes considerable side effects. The combination of bexarotene and denileukin diftitox is associated with an acceptable safety profile and a likely synergistic effect because bexarotene is capable of modulating expression of IL-2 receptor and enhance the susceptibility of T-cell leukemia cells to denileukin diftitox. In the case reported here, the response to this combined treatment was satisfactory and well tolerated. The patient showed a complete regression of pruritus, restlessness, and insomnia. Skin lesions improved partially, and lymphadenopathy was reduced and finally disappeared completely.

  12. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis following a wasp sting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L; Xu, X; Ran, Y

    2017-04-10

    We report a case of an 87-year-old woman who presented with painful erythema of her right forearm 10 days after she had been stung by a wasp on her right hand. The lesion had rapidly deteriorated during the week before presentation, and treatment with antibiotics and glucocorticoids did not improve the condition. After careful evaluation, we performed cultures from the lesion aspiration, and morphological and genetic analysis of bacteria cultures confirmed a bacterial infection with Nocardia brasiliensis. The patient recovered after 3 weeks. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis due to Nocardia spp. is relatively uncommon in clinics, but it was the distance of the lesions from the affected area of the wasp sting that has made this an even rarer case and of interest to report. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Are the cutaneous manifestations in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome a marker for predicting lung manifestations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontic, Milica; Stojanovich, Ljudmila; Mijailović-Ivković, Milena; Velinović, Mladen; Srnka, Jasminka; Zdravkovic, Marija

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate association between pulmonary and skin manifestations in a large group of patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) as well as their connection with antiphospholipid antibodies. Our prospective study comprises of 390 patients with primary APS. Antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) analysis included detection of aCL (IgG/IgM), ß2GPI (IgG/IgM) and LA. Distinct pulmonary and skin associations were determined, as well as their associations with aPL. In PAPS patients the presence of LA was more common in PTE (p=0.005) and in pulmonary microthrombosis (p=0.003). We revealed statistical significance considering the presence of aCL IgM and pulmonary microthrombosis (p=0.05). Skin ulcerations correlated with positive titres aCL IgM and ß2 GPI IgM (p=0.03 and 0.04, respectively), while pseudovasculitis correlated with positive titres ß2 GPI IgM (p=0.02). PAPS patients were more more likely to develop pulmonary thromboembolisam if they had livedo reticularis (p=0.005), skin ulcerations (p=0.007), pseudovasculitic lesions (p=0.01), superficial cutaneous necrosis (p=0.005), and digital gangrene (p=0.02). Patients were also more prone to pulmonary microthrombosis if they already had livedo reticularis (p=0.03), skin ulcerations (p=0.007), pseudovasculitic lesions (p=0.05), superficial cutaneous necrosis (p=0.006), and digital gangrene (p=0.02). There is strong link between some pulmonary and skin manifestations in PAPS patients, suggesting complexity and evolutionary nature of APS. The presence of skin manifestations may be a high risk factor for several types of serious pulmonary manifestations in PAPS. Certain aPL types are associated with distinct pulmonary and skin manifestation, suggesting their predictive role.

  14. Adenoviral gene delivery to primary human cutaneous cells and burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Tobias; von Peter, Sebastian; Dubin, Grzegorz; Mittler, Dominik; Jacobsen, Frank; Lehnhardt, Markus; Eriksson, Elof; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The adenoviral transfer of therapeutic genes into epidermal and dermal cells is an interesting approach to treat skin diseases and to promote wound healing. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro and in vivo transfection efficacy in skin and burn wounds after adenoviral gene delivery. Primary keratinocytes (HKC), fibroblasts (HFB), and HaCaT cells were transfected using different concentrations of an adenoviral construct (eGFP). Transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity was determined up to 30 days. Expression was quantified by FACS analysis and fluorimeter. Cytotoxicity was measured using the trypan blue exclusion method. 45 male Sprague Dawley rats received 2x10(8) pfu of Ad5-CMV-LacZ or carrier control intradermally into either superficial partial thickness scald burn or unburned skin. Animals were euthanized after 48 h, 7 or 14 days posttreatment. Transgene expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry and bioluminescent assays. The highest transfection rate was observed 48 h posttransfection: 79% for HKC, 70% for HFB, and 48% for HaCaT. The eGFP expression was detectable in all groups over 30 days (P>0.05). Cytotoxic effects of the adenoviral vector were observed for HFB after 10 days and HaCaT after 30 days. Reporter gene expression in vivo was significantly higher in burned skin compared with unburned skin (P=0,004). Gene expression decreases from 2 to 7 days with no significant expression after 14 days. This study demonstrates that effective adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of epidermal primary cells and cell-lines is feasible. Ex vivo gene transfer in epithelial cells might have promise for the use in severely burned patients who receive autologous keratinocyte sheets. Transient cutaneous gene delivery in burn wounds using adenoviral vectors causes significant concentrations in the wound tissue for at least 1 week. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that transient cutaneous adenoviral gene delivery of wound healing promoting factors has

  15. Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified with an indolent clinical course: a distinct peripheral T-cell lymphoma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, A J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTL), unspecified, are rare lymphomas, with a poor prognosis. They grow and disseminate rapidly, leading to widespread disease. We report a case of PTL, unspecified occurring on the nose. Despite its aggressive histology, this tumour behaved indolently. It is remarkably similar, clinically and histologically, to four recently described cases that occurred on the ear.

  16. The burden of mucormycosis in HIV-infected patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José; Varon, Andrea; Galhardo, Maria Clara; Santos, Fabio; Lyra, Marcelo; Castro, Rodolfo; Oliveira, Raquel; Lamas, Cristiane C

    2016-09-01

    Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection afflicting immunocompromised patients, causing a significant degree of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of the study was to provide a comprehensive analysis describing the epidemiology and outcome of mucormycosis in the scenario of HIV infection. We systematically searched PubMed for reports about mucormycosis associated with HIV. Eligible studies describe the predisposing factor, clinical form, treatment, and survival outcome. We included 61 articles from 212 reviewed abstracts, corresponding to 67 cases. Patients were mostly men (68.2%) with a median CD4(+) count of 47 [IQR 17-100] cells/mm(3). Intravenous drug use (50%), neutropenia (29.7%) and corticosteroid use (25%) were the predominant associated factors. The main clinical forms were disseminated (20.9%), renal (19.4%), and rhino-cerebral (17.9%). Rhizopus (45.5%) and Lichtheimia spp (30.3%) were the main fungal isolates. Treatment consisted of antifungal therapy and surgery in 38.8%. Overall mortality rate was 52.2%, and varied with the site of infection: 92.9% for disseminated disease, 62.5% for cerebral disease, 60% for pulmonary infection, and 36.4% for cutaneous infection. Survival was worse for those who did not initiate antifungals (p = .04), who were antiretroviral naïve (p = .01), who were admitted to ICU (p = .003) or had disseminated disease (p = .007). Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection in HIV patients and clinician should be aware of this co-infection in the differential diagnosis of HIV opportunistic infections. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Case of early-disseminated Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus mucormycosis in a renal transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dikshya Sharma,1 Kumud Dahal,2 Bandana Pathak,3 Udip Dahal4 1Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY, 2University of Illinois College of Medicine, 3OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, IL, 4University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: Mucormycosis is a rare infection caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales and class Zygomycetes. These species are vasotropic, causing rapid onset of tissue infarctions and necrosis and subsequent thrombosis by invading vascular bed. The disease spectrum ranges from involvement of skin, sinuses, lung, and brain to disseminated and mostly fatal infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we present a case of a fatal disseminated mucormycosis in a 56-year-old female who had deceased donor renal allograft transplantation ~2 weeks prior to presentation. She presented with shortness of breath and dry cough. Despite being on broad-spectrum antibiotics/antifungals and proper management by transplant, infectious disease, and primary team, she died within 3 weeks of admission. Autopsy showed disseminated mucormycosis of lungs and thyroid. Disseminated infection within 2 weeks of solid organ transplantation in this patient was one of the rare features of mucormycosis. Keywords: Zygomycetes, immunocompromised, transplant

  18. Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma associated with an extracutaneous dissemination: a cytogenetic finding of potential prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Magro, Cynthia M; Gogineni, Swarna; Tam, Wayne; Mathew, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cytogenetic studies on cutaneous lymphomas are rare, and very little is known about their prognostic value. We present a rare case of primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) with a complex translocation presenting with cutaneous and extracutaneous dissemination in the lymph node. Morphologic, immunohistochemical, conventional cytogenetic, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies were performed on this patient. A combination of cytogenetic and FISH analysis identified a complex novel four-way t(2;14;9;3) (p11.2;q32;p13;q27) translocation involving rearrangements of BCL6, immunoglobulin light and heavy chain genes, and an unknown gene on 9p. Our report elaborates the morphologic and immunohistochemical features in combination with cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis of PCFCL, which provide additional insight into the clinical and biologic behavior of this lesion. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  19. The relationship between MDM2 expression and tumor thickness and invasion in primary cutaneous malignant melanoma

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    Parvin Rajabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malignant melanoma is the most invasive cutaneous tumor which is associated with an incredibly high mortality rate. The most reliable histological factors associated with melanoma prognosis are tumor thickness- measured by the Breslow index- and invasion depth- measured by Clark level. Murine double minute 2 (MDM2 gene inhibits p53-dependent apoptosis. An increase in MDM2 expression has been found in many tumors. This study aimed to investigate MDM2 expression and its correlation with tumor thickness and invasion level in malignant melanoma. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated paraffin blocks from 43 randomly selected patients with primary cutaneous melanoma who referred to the main university pathology center in Isfahan, Iran. MDM2 expression rate was assessed via immunohistochemical techniques and hematoxylin and eosin staining to determine tumor thickness and invasion level. Correlations between MDM2 expression and tumor thickness and invasion were analyzed using Spearman′s correlation coefficient in SPSS 17 . Results: The mean age of patients was 61.2 ± 15 years. Men and women constituted 55.8% and 44.2% of the participants, respectively. The rate of MDM2 positivity was 28.9%. MDM2 expression was directly associated with tumor thickness (r = 0.425; p = 0.002 and weakly with invasion level (r = 0.343; p = 0.01. Conclusions: Despite the low MDM2 expression rate observed in this study, direct relationships between MDM2 positivity and tumor thickness and invasion level were identified. MDM2 expression can thus be suggested as a potential new predictive prognostic factor.

  20. Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: An International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group Multi-institutional Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Million, Lynn, E-mail: lmillion@stanford.edu [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Yi, Esther J.; Wu, Frank; Von Eyben, Rie [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Campbell, Belinda A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Dabaja, Bouthaina [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Richard W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology/Radiation Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Turin, Turin (Italy); Kirova, Youlia [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To collect response rates of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, to radiation therapy (RT), and to determine potential prognostic factors predictive of outcome. Methods and Materials: The study was a retrospective analysis of patients with primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma who received RT as primary therapy or after surgical excision. Data collected include initial stage of disease, RT modality (electron/photon), total dose, fractionation, response to treatment, and local recurrence. Radiation therapy was delivered at 8 participating International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group institutions worldwide. Results: Fifty-six patients met the eligibility criteria, and 63 tumors were treated: head and neck (27%), trunk (14%), upper extremities (27%), and lower extremities (32%). Median tumor size was 2.25 cm (range, 0.6-12 cm). T classification included T1, 40 patients (71%); T2, 12 patients (21%); and T3, 4 patients (7%). The median radiation dose was 35 Gy (range, 6-45 Gy). Complete clinical response (CCR) was achieved in 60 of 63 tumors (95%) and partial response in 3 tumors (5%). After CCR, 1 tumor recurred locally (1.7%) after 36 Gy and 7 months after RT. This was the only patient to die of disease. Conclusions: Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare, indolent cutaneous lymphoma with a low death rate. This analysis, which was restricted to patients selected for treatment with radiation, indicates that achieving CCR was independent of radiation dose. Because there were too few failures (<2%) for statistical analysis on dose response, 30 Gy seems to be adequate for local control, and even lower doses may suffice.

  1. Primary Cutaneous CD4-Positive Small/Medium Pleomorphic T-cell Lymphoma – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micković Milena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous CD4-positive small- to medium-sized pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma is a provisional entity in the 2005 WHO-EORTC classification for cutaneous lymphomas. It is a rare condition and, in most cases, it has a favorable clinical course and prognosis. Primary cutaneous CD4-positive small/medium pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma (PCSM-TCL is defined as a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with predominantly small- to medium-sized CD4-positive pleomorphic T-cells without a history of patches and plaques typical of mycosis fungoides. PCSM-TCL usually presents as a solitary plaque or tumor on the head, neck, trunk or upper extremities and it is considered to have indolent clinical behavior. Histologically, it is characterized by a dense infiltration of small/medium-sized pleomorphic T-cells that involves the entire dermal thickness, often with nodular extension into the hypodermis. Using immunohistochemical staining, the majority of the reported cases proved to be CD3, CD4 positive and CD8, CD30 negative. However, due to the rarity and heterogeneity of the PCSM-TCL, precise clinicopathologic characteristics of PCSM-TCL have not been well characterized and the optimal treatment for this group of lymphomas is yet to be defined. Dermatologists and pathologists should be aware of this entity in order to avoid unnecessary aggressive treatments.

  2. Expression of MCM-3 and MCM-7 in Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Konsur, Alina; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Reich, Adam; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Maj, Joanna; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas is a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas, originally affecting the skin. Increased proliferation activity is a hallmark of diverse tumors and the proliferation rate, measured by the expression of various markers has a predictive value regarding the malignancy course. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value and the potential correlation between the expression of proliferation markers Ki-67, MCM-3 and MCM-7, and clinicopathological data for different types of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed on paraffin blocks obtained from 90 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and 21 patients with other CTCL (oCTCL), in comparison to 19 patients with benign inflammatory dermatosis (lichen planus, eczema), serving as control. Statistically significant differences in the expression of Ki-67, MCM-3 and MCM-7 were observed between oCTCL vs. the control group (29% vs. 5%; 17% vs. 5%; 13% vs. 1.5%, respectively, ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test: pMCM-3 (r=0.83; pMCM-7 (r=0.84; pMCM-3 and MCM-7 (r=0.81, pMCM-3 expression was significantly higher in advanced compared to early stages (11% vs. 3% and 15.5% vs. 5.0%, respectively, Student's t-test: pMCM-3 and MCM-7 compared to benign inflammatory dermatoses (Student's t-test: pMCM-3 and MCM-7 than T1a (pMCM-3 expression in MF showed a positive relationship with both nodal and distant metastases (ANOVA with Scheffé post hoc test: pMCM-3 expression correlated with shorter survival in MF, although the latter did not reach statistical significance (10-year survival 0.38 vs. 0.82, p=0.02, and 0.46 vs. 0.81, p=0.06, respectively; log rank test). All studied proliferation markers may had predictive values regarding the disease severity and prognosis. Further studies are required to analyze their implementation into patient stratification and treatment process such that will improve prognosis in CTCL. Copyright© 2015 International

  3. Successful Treatment of Cutaneous Mucormycosis in a Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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  4. Lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Sora; Kimura, Satoko; Soma, Yoshinao; Waki, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Nakazawa, Daigo; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro; Kawakami, Tamihiro

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) could be one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of vasculitides. We established a transgenic rat model, env-pX rats, with various vasculitides including cutaneous vasculitis. Human primary cutaneous vasculitis includes cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). We measured serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels in morbid env-pX rats and injected anti-LAMP-2 antibody into premorbid env-pX rats. We further measured serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels in patients with CPN and HSP. Cutaneous vasculitis was observed in ∼30% of 6-month-old morbid env-pX rats. In contrast, these findings were rare in premorbid env-pX rats under 3 months old. We also examined 85 patients with CPN and 36 adult patients with HSP. Serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels were determined using ELISA. Premorbid env-pX rats under 3 months old were given an i.v. injection of anti-LAMP-2 antibody at day 0 and day 7. At day 14, these rats underwent histopathological and direct immunofluorescence examination. Cell surface LAMP-2 expression of rat neutrophils was examined by flow cytometry. Serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels were significantly higher in morbid env-pX rats than in wild-type normal rats. In addition, the levels in the cutaneous vasculitis group of morbid env-pX rats were significantly higher than the no cutaneous vasculitis group. Intravenous anti-LAMP-2 antibody injection into premorbid env-pX rats under 3 months old induced infiltration of neutrophils into cutaneous small vessels. Anti-LAMP-2 antibody-binding neutrophils were detected there. LAMP-2 expression on the cell surface of neutrophils in premorbid env-pX rats under PMA stimulation was higher compared with controls. Serum anti-LAMP-2 antibody levels in CPN and HSP were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. These data support a positive relationship between anti-LAMP-2 antibody and cutaneous vasculitis.

  5. A Novel Missense Mutation in Oncostatin M Receptor Beta Causing Primary Localized Cutaneous Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Saeedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis (PLCA is a chronic skin disorder, caused by amyloid material deposition in the upper dermis. Autosomal dominant PLCA has been mapped earlier to pathogenic missense mutations in the OSMR gene, which encodes the oncostatin M receptor ß subunit (OSMRß. OSMRß is interleukin-6 family cytokine receptors and possesses two ligands, oncostatin M and interleukin-31, which both have biologic roles in inflammation and keratinocyte cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we identified a new OSMR mutation in a Kurdish family for the first time. Blood samples were taken from all the affected individuals in the family. DNA extraction was performed using salting out technique. Primers were designed for intron flanking individual exons of OSMR gene which were subjected to direct sequencing after PCR amplification for each sample. Sequencing showed a C/T substitution at position 613 in the proband. This mutation results in an L613S (leucine 613 to serine amino acid change. The identified mutation was observed in all affected family members but not in 100 ethnically matched healthy controls. Elucidating the molecular basis of familial PLCA provides new insight into mechanisms of itch in human skin and may lead to new therapeutic targets for pruritus.

  6. CASE REPORT: Primary Cutaneous Nocardiosis of Axillary Region: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj V. Peerapur

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nocardiosis is an uncommon but world-wide infection caused by several species of soil-borne aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Nocardia. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis (PCN is an uncommon entity. It usually occurs among immunocompetent but occupationally predisposed individuals. Clinically, it can present as acute infection (abscess or cellulitis, mycetoma, or sporotrichoid infection [1]. Here we are reporting a case of PCN presented as mycetoma in axilla which is a rare site. Case History: The patient had extensive lesions in and around the axilla, which could be attributed to the fact that the patient, being an agriculturist, had been exposed to recurrent trauma while carrying firewood and soiled sacks. Single lesion initiated four years ago, progressed to multiple lesions with few healed scars. Despite the treatment in several hospitals, lesions recurred. The present patient was diagnosed as PCN caused by Nocardia brasiliensis and appropriately treated. Conclusion: Nocardia infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a supportive and granulomatous dermatitis that presents clinically as multiple discharging sinuses with papules and nodules in and around axilla apart from tuberculosis.

  7. Further insights into the natural history and management of primary cutaneous neuroendocrine (merkel cell) carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Frances; Pendlebury, Susan; Bell, David

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Primary cutaneous neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinoma is a rare neoplasm with aggressive behavior but potential for response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Optimal treatment regimens are evolving based on reports of case series and a growing understanding of the natural history. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 34 cases treated at two Australian Institutions over 13 years is presented, focusing on clinical features and response to therapy. Results: The aggressive nature of this neoplasm is confirmed by the local recurrence rate of 22% following surgical excision, the development of regional node metastases in 76%, and of distant metastases in 70%. Overall median survival was 24 months with 65% of patients succumbing to metastatic disease. An association with B cell malignancies and immunosuppressive therapy is noted, with these patients having a poorer outcome, and one spontaneous remission was observed. Radiation therapy produced responses in 21 of 30 measurable sites (11 complete, 10 partial), and in 11 sites irradiated prophylactically there was only one infield relapse (9%). Responses to chemotherapy were observed in 8 of 20 applications (40%), particularly carboplatin and etoposide given in the setting of regional node disease. Conclusion: In this poor prognosis tumor, further investigation of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is warranted, as responsiveness of recurrent disease is confirmed. Immunological factors appear important in the natural history, and their manipulation may offer additional therapeutic options

  8. Experience-induced plasticity of cutaneous maps in the primary somatosensory cortex of adult monkeys and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, C; Coq, J O; Merzenich, M M; Jenkins, W M

    1996-01-01

    In a first study, the representations of skin surfaces of the hand in the primary somatosensory cortex, area 3b, were reconstructed in owl monkeys and squirrel monkeys trained to pick up food pellets from small, shallow wells, a task which required skilled use of the digits. Training sessions included limited manual exercise over a total period of a few hours of practice. From an early clumsy performance in which many retrieval attempts were required for each successful pellet retrieval, the monkeys exhibited a gradual improvement. Typically, the animals used various combinations of digits before developing a successful retrieval strategy. As the behavior came to be stereotyped, monkeys consistently engaged surfaces of the distal phalanges of one or two digits in the palpation and capture of food pellets from the smallest wells. Microelectrode mapping of the hand surfaces revealed that the glabrous skin of the fingertips predominantly involved in the dexterity task was represented over topographically expanded cortical sectors. Furthermore, cutaneous receptive fields which covered the most frequently stimulated digital tip surfaces were less than half as large as were those representing the corresponding surfaces of control digits. In a second series of experiments, Long-Evans rats were assigned to environments promoting differential tactile experience (standard, enriched, and impoverished) for 80 to 115 days from the time of weaning. A fourth group of young adult rat experienced a severe restriction of forepaw exploratory movement for either 7 or 15 days. Cortical maps derived in the primary somatosensory cortex showed that environmental enrichment induced a substantial enlargement of the cutaneous forepaw representation, and improved its spatial resolution (smaller glabrous receptive fields). In contrast, tactile impoverishment resulted in a degradation of the forepaw representation that was characterized by larger cutaneous receptive fields and the emergence of

  9. Total Skin Electron Beam for Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Moustakis, Christos; Scobioala, Sergiu; Reinartz, Gabriele; Haverkamp, Uwe; Willich, Normann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Weishaupt, Carsten [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Stadler, Rudolf [Department of Dermatology, Johannes-Wesling-Klinikum Minden, Minden (Germany); Sunderkötter, Cord [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor, E-mail: Hans.Eich@ukmuenster.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Recent trials with low-dose total skin electron beam (TSEB) therapy demonstrated encouraging results for treating primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (PCTCL). In this study, we assessed the feasibility of different radiation doses and estimated survival rates of different pathologic entities and stages. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 45 patients with PCTCL undergoing TSEB therapy between 2000 and 2015. Clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and toxicity were assessed. Results: A total of 49 courses of TSEB therapy were administered to the 45 patients. There were 26 pathologically confirmed cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) lymphoma, 10 cases of Sézary syndrome (SS), and 9 non-MF/SS PCTCL patients. In the MF patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 92% (50% complete remission [CR]), 70% ORR in SS patients (50% CR), and 89% ORR in non-MF/SS patients (78% CR). The ORR for MF/SS patients treated with conventional dose (30-36 Gy) regimens was 92% (63% CR) and 75% (25% CR) for low-dose (<30-Gy) regimens (P=.09). In MF patients, the overall survival (OS) was 77 months with conventional dose regimens versus 14 months with low-dose regimens (P=.553). In SS patients, the median OS was 48 versus 16 months (P=.219), respectively. Median event-free survival (EFS) for MF in conventional dose patients versus low-dose patients was 15 versus 8 months, respectively (P=.264) and 19 versus 3 months for SS patients (P=.457). Low-dose regimens had shorter treatment time (P=.009) and lower grade 2 adverse events (P=.043). A second TSEB course was administered in 4 MF patients with 100% ORR. There is a possible prognostic impact of supplemental/boost radiation (P<.001); adjuvant treatment (P<.001) and radiation tolerability (P=.021) were detected. Conclusions: TSEB therapy is an efficacious treatment modality in the treatment of several forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. There is a nonsignificant trend to higher and longer clinical benefit

  10. Primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma associated with juxta-articular fibrotic nodules in a teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Porter, Joanne; Wroblewski, Danielle; Carlson, John Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma (PCMZL) has rarely been reported in teenagers and is occasionally associated with Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Juxta-articular fibrotic nodules represent a unique, localized fibrosing response to spirochete infections, namely Borreliosis. Herein, we report a 15-year-old healthy boy who presented with a 4-year history of progressive acquisition of asymptomatic, erythematous nodules, ≤ 3 cm, beginning with his right forearm (3), then right arm (1) and lastly his right inner thigh (1). Biopsy showed PCMZL in three of five samples, and inflamed, fibrotic nodules, near the elbow in two. The bottom heavy lymphomatous nodules consisted of mostly small CD20+ CD43+ lymphocytes, some with plasmacytoid features. Mature plasma cells were lambda light chain restricted by in situ hybridization. The juxta-articular fibrotic nodules were located in the deep dermis and subcutis, had peripheral plasma cell-rich infiltrates, and showed nodular sclerosis (morphea profunda-like) in one, and lamellar and angiocentric sclerosis in the other reminiscent of quiescent lesions of chronic localized fibrosing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Immunohistochemistry for B. burgdorferi revealed rare positive organisms; however, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serology were negative for B. burgdorferi as were serologic and/or PCR assays for Bartonella henselae, Ba. quintana, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Treponema pallidum, Helicobacter pylori and Babesia microti. No evidence of extracutaneous disease was found by the review of systems and imaging studies. A 4-week trial of doxycycline therapy failed, whereas intralesional (IL) corticosteroid therapy induced rapid regression of his nodules. After two local recurrences, also treated with IL corticosteroids, he is well, without cutaneous disease, 20 months later. A literature review of 19 pediatric cases PCMZL reveals a similar natural history as adult PCMZL. Despite negative serology and PCR for B. burgdorferi

  11. The role of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of primary cutaneous lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Tu, Guojian; Li, Jing; Chen, Yue

    2017-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphoma (PCL) is the second most common type of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including both cutaneous T-cell and B-cell lymphomas. PCL comprises numerous subtypes and thus has myriad clinical presentations in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Accurate classification and staging are important for making treatment recommendations for PCL and will further impact patient prognosis significantly. We review the role of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET (F-FDG PET) and F-FDG PET with computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis, staging, tumor biological evaluation, treatment response assessment, and early recurrence surveillance of PCL. Although F-FDG PET and PET/CT do not seem to adequately distinguish the plaque, patch, or erythroderma cutaneous lesions of PCL, the imaging modalities are superior to CT, MRI, and other nuclear medicine methods in detecting both the cutaneous and the extracutaneous lesions of PCL. The available literature addressing the clinical role of F-FDG PET and PET/CT in patients with PCL is promising for the use of the modalities in staging, tumor biological evaluation, biopsy guidance, early treatment response assessment, and recurrence surveillance. However, more data are needed to better specify the role of F-FDG PET and PET/CT in the management of PCL.

  12. Mucormycosis in two community hospitals and the role of infectious disease consultation: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yue Dai,1 James W Walker,1 Ruba A Halloush,2 Faisal A Khasawneh3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 2Amarillo Pathology Group, 3Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX, USA Background: Mucorales are ubiquitous filamentous fungi that can cause a devastating, invasive infection. This order has become an increasingly important pathogen during the last two decades, due to the dramatic increase in patients with predisposing factors. The aim of this retrospective study was to report the clinical characteristics, therapeutic options, and outcomes of patients diagnosed with mucormycosis in community hospitals in Amarillo, Texas, and to reflect on the role of infectious disease (ID physicians in managing this potentially life-threatening problem. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective chart review of patients hospitalized with mucormycosis in two community hospitals in Amarillo between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2011. Results: Ten patients were diagnosed with mucormycosis during the study period, with a mean age of 58.8 years. There were five cases of pulmonary infection, two cases of cutaneous infection, two cases of rhinocerebral infection, and one case of gastrointestinal infection. Poorly controlled diabetes was the most common risk factor, identified in six patients, followed by hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, and trauma. ID physicians were consulted in all cases, albeit late in some cases. Nine patients received antifungal therapy, and five patients received surgical debridement. Lipid formulations of amphotericin B were prescribed for eight patients, used alone in two cases, and combined with caspofungin and posaconazole in one and five cases, respectively. One patient was treated with posaconazole alone. Eight patients were discharged from the hospital alive. The mortality rate at 6-month

  13. CT findings in rhinocerebral mucormycosis and aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Kyu Chang

    1986-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis or mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses involving the cranial cavity is termed rhinocerebral mycosis, which is often difficult to differentiate from malignancy. Prognosis of rhinocerebral mycosis is disastrous and usually fatal. The authors herein report 6 cases of rhinocerebral mycosis; two of them were mucormycosis and four were aspergillosis histopathologically. Main CT features are nodular mucosal thickening in the multiple sites of the paranasal sinuses that extend to orbital apex or cavernous sinus through focal destruction of bony wall. In spite of their invasiveness beyond bony boundary, destruction is not so remarkable and it is always accompanied by bony sclerosis. Awareness of these disease and CT patterns discussed in this report should be helpful in leading to early biopsy and treatment.

  14. Importance of gallium-67 scintigraphy in primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attab, Cyomara Sanches; Moriguchi, Sonia Marta; Rocha, Euclides Timoteo da

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma where correct staging, treatment and follow-up could be achieved through a combination of conventional imaging studies and gallium-67 scintigraphy. (author)

  15. Rhino Cerebral Mucormycosis - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Eswar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino cerebral Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection caused by a saprophytic fungus which is found in soil, decaying fruits and vegetables. Usually predisposing factors for this infection are poorly controlled diabetes, ketoacidosis, leukemia, immunodeficiency states, prolonged steroid therapy etc. The fungus once entering the susceptible host do cause highly invasive and fulminant infection usually with fatal outcome. Early recognition of this condition is highly essential to initiate immediate life saving measures.

  16. Pulmonary gangrene as a complication of mucormycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagoria, R.J.; Choplin, R.H.; Karstaedt, N.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary gangrene, a rare complication of pneumonia occurs when vascular thrombosis leads to necrosis of a large portion of lung. The devitalized lung is then sloughed into a cavity, resulting in a characteristic radiographic appearance. The previously reported cases of pulmonary gangrene have been associated with either bacterial or tuberculous pneumonia; the authors describe a case resulting from mucormycosis. In addition to the plain-film findings, the computed tomographic (CT) appearance is described

  17. Isavuconazole treatment for mucormycosis: a single-arm open-label trial and case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Francisco M; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Cornely, Oliver A; Mullane, Kathleen M; Perfect, John R; Thompson, George R; Alangaden, George J; Brown, Janice M; Fredricks, David N; Heinz, Werner J; Herbrecht, Raoul; Klimko, Nikolai; Klyasova, Galina; Maertens, Johan A; Melinkeri, Sameer R; Oren, Ilana; Pappas, Peter G; Ráčil, Zdeněk; Rahav, Galia; Santos, Rodrigo; Schwartz, Stefan; Vehreschild, J Janne; Young, Jo-Anne H; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Jaruratanasirikul, Sutep; Kanj, Souha S; Engelhardt, Marc; Kaufhold, Achim; Ito, Masanori; Lee, Misun; Sasse, Carolyn; Maher, Rochelle M; Zeiher, Bernhardt; Vehreschild, Maria J G T

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon invasive fungal disease with high mortality and few treatment options. Isavuconazole is a triazole active in vitro and in animal models against moulds of the order Mucorales. We assessed the efficacy and safety of isavuconazole for treatment of mucormycosis and compared its efficacy with amphotericin B in a matched case-control analysis. In a single-arm open-label trial (VITAL study), adult patients (≥18 years) with invasive fungal disease caused by rare fungi, including mucormycosis, were recruited from 34 centres worldwide. Patients were given isavuconazole 200 mg (as its intravenous or oral water-soluble prodrug, isavuconazonium sulfate) three times daily for six doses, followed by 200 mg/day until invasive fungal disease resolution, failure, or for 180 days or more. The primary endpoint was independent data review committee-determined overall response-ie, complete or partial response (treatment success) or stable or progressive disease (treatment failure)-according to prespecified criteria. Mucormycosis cases treated with isavuconazole as primary treatment were matched with controls from the FungiScope Registry, recruited from 17 centres worldwide, who received primary amphotericin B-based treatment, and were analysed for day-42 all-cause mortality. VITAL is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00634049. FungiScope is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01731353. Within the VITAL study, from April 22, 2008, to June 21, 2013, 37 patients with mucormycosis received isavuconazole for a median of 84 days (IQR 19-179, range 2-882). By day 42, four patients (11%) had a partial response, 16 (43%) had stable invasive fungal disease, one (3%) had invasive fungal disease progression, three (8%) had missing assessments, and 13 (35%) had died. 35 patients (95%) had adverse events (28 [76%] serious). Day-42 crude all-cause mortality in seven (33%) of 21 primary-treatment isavuconazole cases was similar to 13 (39%) of 33

  18. [Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma of the penis complicated by Fournier gangrene: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zun-lin; Wang, Chuan-yun; Xu, Zhi-shun; Zheng, Bao-zhong

    2008-06-01

    To explore the clinical presentation, pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma of the penis. A 49-year-old man presented with painful swelling and inflammation of the foreskin, failed to respond to antibiotic treatment and dorsal incision, and was instead complicated by Fournier gangrene. Then he underwent debridement and pathological examination. Pathological results indicated cutaneous T-cell lymphoma of the penis. Immunohistochemistry showed CD3 and CD45 RO to be positive, but CD30, CD79a, CD20 and HMB negative. The patient was treated by interferon alpha and ultraviolet B for 2 weeks, followed by total removal of the external genitalia because of necrosis of the corpus spongiosum, which involved the scrotum and right testis on pathological examination. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma of the penis is a rare condition and easily mis diagnosed in the early phase. Definitive diagnosis depends on pathological study.

  19. Leukocyte infiltration and tumor cell plasticity are parameters of aggressiveness in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillen, F.; Baeten, C.I.M.; Winkel, van de A.; Creytens, D.; Schaft, van der D.W.J.; Winnepenninckx, V.; Griffioen, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    Various clinical and experimental observations detected an immunological host defense in cutaneous melanoma. In order to investigate the prognostic value of leukocyte effector mechanisms, we examined the presence of different subsets of leukocytes in tumor samples of 58 patients diagnosed with

  20. [Role of stem cell transplantation in treatment of primary cutaneous T‑cell lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranzenbach, R; Theurich, S; Schlaak, M

    2017-09-01

    Within the heterogeneous group of cutaneous T‑cell lymphomas (CTCL) the therapeutic options for advanced and progressive forms are particularly limited. The therapeutic value of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in CTCL was analyzed. A literature search using the keywords "hematopoietic stem cell transplantation" and "cutaneous T‑cell lymphoma" was performed in PubMed. Studies between 1990 and 2017 were taken into account. The studies identified were analyzed for relevance and being up to date. After reviewing the currently available literature no prospective randomized studies were found. Wu et al. showed a superiority of allogeneic transplantation in a comparison of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation for cutaneous lymphoma. The graft-versus-lymphoma effect plays a significant role in a prolonged progression-free survival after allogeneic transplantation. By using a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen, stem cell transplantation can also be an option for elderly patients. The most extensive long-term data after allogeneic stem cell transplantation were reported by Duarte et al. in 2014. Autologous stem cell transplantation does not currently represent a therapeutic option, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced cutaneous T‑cell lymphoma, using a non-myeloablative conditioning scheme, does represent a therapeutic option. However, there is no consensus on the appropriate patients and the right timing. Morbidity and mortality of complications should be taken into account. Thus, this procedure is currently subject to an individual case decision.

  1. Mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Invasive fungal infection is among the leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia after induction of chemotherapy. In the past few decades, the incidence of invasive fungal infection has increased dramatically. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. Mucorales. Neutropenic patients are at a high risk of developing an invasive mucormycosis with fulminant course and high mortality rate (35-100%. Case Outline. We are presenting the case of a 72-year-old male with an acute monoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated during five days with hydroxycarbamide 2 × 500 mg/day, followed by cytarabine 2 × 20 mg/sc over the next 10 days. He developed febrile neutropenia, headache, and edema of the right orbital region of the face. Computed tomography of the sinuses revealed shadow in sinuses with thickening of mucosa of the right paranasal sinuses. Lavage and aspirate from the sinuses revealed Rhizopus oryzae. Mucormycosis was successfully treated with amphotericin B (5 mg/kg/day followed by ketoconazole (400 mg/day. Two months later the patient died from primary disease. Conclusion. In patients with acute leukemia who developed aplasia, febrile neutropenia, and pain in paranasal sinuses, fungal infection should be taken into consideration. New and non-invasive methods for taking samples from sinuses should be standardized in order to establish an early and accurate diagnosis of mucormycosis with the source in paranasal sinuses, and to start early treatment by a proper antifungal drug. Clear communication between physician and mycologist is critical to ensure proper and timely sampling of lavage and aspirate from sinuses and correct specimen processing when mucormycosis is suspected clinically. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175034

  2. Mucormycosis: a devastating fungal infection in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M.; Bari, A.; Mehmood, S.; Tariq, K.M.; Haq, I.; Niwaz, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a highly invasive, devastating and usually fatal fungal infection of the sinuses, brain, or lungs that occurs primarily in people with immune disorders. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, a high mortality still exists. We present a middle aged diabetic male with this serious fungal infection involving nose, paranasal area and adjacent periorbital regions with a high risk of progressing further towards the dura mater. He was promptly diagnosed and managed with serial surgical debridements with systemic antifungals and was later fitted with a nasal prosthesis. (author)

  3. Renal mucormycosis in a patient with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, M.; Leiva, M.C.; Acebal, M.; Algarra, J.; Luis, M.C. de.

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of renal mucormycosis in al HIV-positive patient presenting evidence of AIDS, with involvement of no other organs. Intravenous showed left kidney to be enlarged and nonfunctioning: US disclosed and enlarged organ, with no hydronephrosis and showing loss of corticomedullary differentiation: CT revealed the presence of a large mass of the density of water surrounded by peripheral enhancement. After surgical treatment, the necrotic tissue was found to contain hyphae corresponding to a mucor fungus. The patient improved significantly with amphotericin B. the radiological findings are discussed. (Author) 10 refs

  4. Primary and secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders : a report from the Dutch Cutaneous Lymphoma Group on the long-term follow-up data of 219 patients and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkenk, MW; Geelen, FAMJ; Vader, PCV; Heule, F; Geerts, ML; van Vloten, WA; Meijer, CJLM; Willemze, R

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate our diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, clinical and long-term follow-up data of 219 patients with primary or secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lympho proliferative disorders were evaluated. The study group included 118 patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP; group 1), 79 patients with

  5. Primary and secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders: a report from the Dutch Cutaneous Lymphoma Group on the long-term follow-up data of 219 patients and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkenk, M. W.; Geelen, F. A.; van Voorst Vader, P. C.; Heule, F.; Geerts, M. L.; van Vloten, W. A.; Meijer, C. J.; Willemze, R.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate our diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, clinical and long-term follow-up data of 219 patients with primary or secondary cutaneous CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disorders were evaluated. The study group included 118 patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP; group 1), 79 patients with

  6. Mucormycosis resulting in a pseudoaneurysm in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevitt, P.C.; Das Narla, L. [Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (United States); Hingsbergen, E.A. [Children' s Radiologic Institute, Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon and frequently fatal fungal infection. It characteristically affects patients with diabetes mellitus or patients with severe immunosuppression. The hallmark of mucormycosis infection is tissue infarction and vascular invasion. We present clinical data and imaging studies of a 16 year-old child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by disseminated mucormycosis resulting in a pseudoaneurysm of the spleen. This was successfully managed by a combination of systemic antifungal therapy (Amphotericin B) and surgery (splenectomy). This entity has not been described in the literature. (orig.)

  7. Mucormycosis resulting in a pseudoaneurysm in the spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevitt, P.C.; Das Narla, L.; Hingsbergen, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon and frequently fatal fungal infection. It characteristically affects patients with diabetes mellitus or patients with severe immunosuppression. The hallmark of mucormycosis infection is tissue infarction and vascular invasion. We present clinical data and imaging studies of a 16 year-old child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by disseminated mucormycosis resulting in a pseudoaneurysm of the spleen. This was successfully managed by a combination of systemic antifungal therapy (Amphotericin B) and surgery (splenectomy). This entity has not been described in the literature. (orig.)

  8. Rhinocerebrocutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor species: A rare causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Balvant Lunge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is the most common form of mucormycosis occurring commonly in patients of diabetic ketoacidosis. Fungi of the order Mucorales belong to six families, among whom Rhizopus is the most common, while Mucor is a rare cause. We report a 45-year-old female with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus diagnosed to have rhinocerebrocutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor species. The diagnosis was confirmed on histology and culture. A high-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and timely initiation of therapy to optimize the outcome. Our patient succumbed to her infection.

  9. Clinical Features and Outcome of Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodrigo Camara-Lemarroy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis (MCM is a life-threatening infection that carries high mortality rates despite recent advances in its diagnosis and treatment. The objective was to report 14 cases of mucormycosis infection and review the relevant literature. We retrospectively analyzed the demographic and clinical data of 14 consecutive patients that presented with MCM in a tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Mexico. The mean age of the patients was 39.9 (range 5–65. Nine of the patients were male. Ten patients had diabetes mellitus as the underlying disease, and 6 patients had a hematological malignancy (acute leukemia. Of the diabetic patients, 3 had chronic renal failure and 4 presented with diabetic ketoacidosis. All patients had rhinocerebral involvement. In-hospital mortality was 50%. All patients received medical therapy with polyene antifungals and 11 patients underwent surgical therapy. Survivors were significantly younger and less likely to have diabetes than nonsurvivors, and had higher levels of serum albumin on admission. The clinical outcome of patients with MCM is poor. Uncontrolled diabetes and age are negative prognostic factors.

  10. Molecular methods to improve diagnosis and identification of mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Sarah P; Bialek, Ralf; Milner, Danny A; Petschnigg, Eva M; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M

    2011-06-01

    Mucormycosis is difficult to diagnose. Samples from suspected cases often fail to grow Mucorales in microbiologic cultures. We identified all hematologic malignancy and stem cell transplant patients diagnosed with proven mucormycosis between 2001 and 2009 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Seminested PCR targeting Mucorales 18S ribosomal DNA and sequencing were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Of 29 cases of mucormycosis, 27 had tissue samples available for PCR and sequencing. Mucorales PCR was positive in 22. Among 12 culture-positive cases, 10 were PCR positive and sequencing was concordant with culture results to the genus level in 9. Among 15 culture-negative cases, PCR was positive and sequencing allowed genus identification in 12. Mucorales PCR is useful for confirmation of the diagnosis of mucormycosis and for further characterization of the infection in cases where cultures are negative.

  11. Sequence of oral manifestations in rhino-maxillary mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati R Doni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis, caused by saprophytic fungi of the order Mucorales of the class Zygomycetes, is a rare opportunistic fungal infection, which has a rapidly progressive and fulminant course with fatal outcome. These fungi are ubiquitous, found in soil, bread molds, decaying fruits and vegetables. The most common form of mucormycosis is rhinocerebral and is usually seen in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus or in immunocompromised patients. This fungus invades the arteries, leading to thrombosis that subsequently causes necrosis of hard and soft tissues. We report a case of palatal perforation by rhino-maxillary mucormycosis in an immunocompromised patient. The aim of this article is to draw attention to the clinical presentation and pathogenesis of mucormycosis and to emphasize the need for high degree of suspicion in its diagnosis and management.

  12. Pulmonary Mucormycosis in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izza Mir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary mucormycosis is a rare life-threatening fungal infection associated with high mortality. We present the case of a 61-year-old man with history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia who presented with fever and cough, eventually diagnosed with pulmonary mucormycosis after right lung video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B and right lung pneumonectomy; however, he later died from left lung pneumonia.

  13. Mucormycosis and Myiasis in Uncontrolled Diabetes: A Double Whammy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash D Toshniwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare, often fatal opportunistic fungal infection that is caused by an aerobic saprophytic fungus belonging to the order mucorales and class zygomycetes. Myiasis is caused by the members of the Diptera fly family that lay eggs or larvae on food, necrotic tissue, open wounds, and unbroken skin or mucosa. We report a rare case of mucormycosis coexisting with oral myiasis in a 50-year-old woman with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Progression in Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Leg Type during Ibrutinib Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C. Fox

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL-LT is one of the well-recognized extranodal lymphomas commonly addicted to the B-cell receptor-MYD88 superpathway. We aimed to describe the genomic changes in a patient who progressed through treatment with ibrutinib, a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK inhibitor. An 80-year-old woman presented with multiply relapsed PCDLBCL-LT after multiple lines of chemoimmunotherapy and radiotherapy. Pre-treatment testing of the localized cutaneous tumor lesion on a lymphoid amplicon panel demonstrated an MYD88 p.L265P mutation. Ibrutinib therapy was subsequently commenced, resulting in complete resolution of the skin disease. Despite an ongoing skin response, the patient developed progressive nodal disease at two months. Genomic analysis of the cutaneous tumor sample at baseline was compared to that of the inguinal lymph node upon progression, and revealed the acquisition of multiple genomic changes. These included several aberrations expected to bypass BTK inhibition, including two CARD11-activating mutations, and a deleterious mutation in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB negative regulator, NFKBIE. In addition, an IgH-IRF8 translocation was detected (which brings the IRF8 transcription factor under control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, representing a third plausible mechanism contributing to ibrutinib resistance. Several copy-number changes occurred in both samples, including an amplification of 18q, which encodes the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. We describe the first case of novel genomic changes of PCDLBCL-LT that occurred while on ibrutinib, providing important mechanistic insights into both pathogenesis and drug resistance.

  15. Primary cutaneous amyloidosis involving the external ears along with the classical sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaitan Binod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26- year- old woman had multiple itchy persistent gradually progressive papular lesions on the forearms and shins for 10 and 4 years respectively. She also noticed similar lesions on both the ears for 4 years. There were no systemic symptoms. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple 2-3 mm discrete firm hyperpigmented papules on the extensors of forearms, shins and earlobes. Skin biopsy from all sites demonstrated deposits of amyloid in the papillary dermis. The patient was treated with cyclophosphamide 50 mg daily orally. There was more than 50% improvement in her lesions.

  16. Agressive infection following a dental extraction in a diabetic patient :Rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehani, Alia; Smichi, Ines; Marrakchi, Jihene; Besbes, Ghazi; Haouet, Slim; Kchir, Nidhameddine

    2017-05-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare and acute fungal infection which is frequently lethal, usually observed in non-controlled diabetic patients. The infection usually begins in the nose but it can invade the lung, the digestive tract, and the skin. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis accounts for 40 to 49% of mucormycosis cases. We report the case of a 44-year-old diabetic man, presenting with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Our patient was treated by an association of amphotericin B and surgical debridement.

  17. Germline mutations in candidate predisposition genes in individuals with cutaneous melanoma and at least two independent additional primary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Antonia L; Johansson, Peter A; Nathan, Vaishnavi; Howlie, Madeleine; Symmons, Judith; Palmer, Jane M; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2018-01-01

    While a number of autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive cancer syndromes have an associated spectrum of cancers, the prevalence and variety of cancer predisposition mutations in patients with multiple primary cancers have not been extensively investigated. An understanding of the variants predisposing to more than one cancer type could improve patient care, including screening and genetic counselling, as well as advancing the understanding of tumour development. A cohort of 57 patients ascertained due to their cutaneous melanoma (CM) diagnosis and with a history of two or more additional non-cutaneous independent primary cancer types were recruited for this study. Patient blood samples were assessed by whole exome or whole genome sequencing. We focussed on variants in 525 pre-selected genes, including 65 autosomal dominant and 31 autosomal recessive cancer predisposition genes, 116 genes involved in the DNA repair pathway, and 313 commonly somatically mutated in cancer. The same genes were analysed in exome sequence data from 1358 control individuals collected as part of non-cancer studies (UK10K). The identified variants were classified for pathogenicity using online databases, literature and in silico prediction tools. No known pathogenic autosomal dominant or previously described compound heterozygous mutations in autosomal recessive genes were observed in the multiple cancer cohort. Variants typically found somatically in haematological malignancies (in JAK1, JAK2, SF3B1, SRSF2, TET2 and TYK2) were present in lymphocyte DNA of patients with multiple primary cancers, all of whom had a history of haematological malignancy and cutaneous melanoma, as well as colorectal cancer and/or prostate cancer. Other potentially pathogenic variants were discovered in BUB1B, POLE2, ROS1 and DNMT3A. Compared to controls, multiple cancer cases had significantly more likely damaging mutations (nonsense, frameshift ins/del) in tumour suppressor and tyrosine kinase genes and

  18. CT and MR imaging of rhinocerebral mucormycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, G.A.; Weindling, S.M.; Hesselink, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Eight patients with biopsy-proven rhinocerebral mucormycosis had postcontrast CT. MR examination (1.5T) was also performed in two patients. Unilateral maxillary and ethmoid sinus disease with orbital apex extension was seen in five of six patients examined preoperatively. T2-weighted images showed intracranial extension as hyperintensity and mass effect in gray matter and white matter of frontal and temporal lobes, hypothalamus, thalamus, and pons in two patients. In the region of septic thrombosis of the cavernous sinus and internal carotid artery, MR detected inflammatory tissue of mixed signal intensity replacing the expected carotid signal void and petrous apex. Resolution of MR findings correlated with clinical improvement in one surviving patient

  19. Is bone marrow biopsy always indicated in patients with primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniesa, C; Hernández-Machín, B

    2013-10-01

    Bone marrow involvement at the time of diagnosis is uncommon in patients with primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (PCMZL). Moreover, in these patients such involvement is rarely found in isolation on diagnosis. Typically the few patients with PCMZL who have early bone marrow involvement also present secondary nodal or visceral involvement, which is detected by other staging studies (usually computed tomography). In recent years, this has given rise to some debate about whether a bone marrow biopsy should be routinely performed in patients diagnosed with PCMZL in view of the good prognosis and low incidence of bone marrow infiltration and/or extracutaneous involvement in this type of lymphoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Severe sunburn and subsequent risk of primary cutaneous malignant melanoma in scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKie, R. M.; Aitchison, T.

    1982-01-01

    A case-control study of occupational and recreational sun exposure, Mediterranean and other sun-exposed holidays, tanning history and history of isolated episodes of severe sunburn has been carried out on 113 patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma and 113 age- and sex-matched controls. Social class and skin type were also considered in the analysis of the data which involved the use of conditional multiple logistic regression. A highly significant increase in the history of severe sunburn was recorded in melanoma patients of both sexes in the 5-year period preceding presentation with their tumour. Higher social class and negative history of recreational sun exposure were also significantly increased in patients by comparison with controls. In the male group severe sunburn, lack of occupational sun exposure and higher social class were significant factors while in the female group only severe sunburn was significantly increased in the melanoma patients. This study thus provides evidence to suggest that short intense episodes of UV exposure resulting in burning may be one of the aetiological factors involved in subsequent development of melanoma. PMID:7150488

  1. Mucormycosis (Mucor fungus ball) of the maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hang Sun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2014-01-01

    A fungus ball is an extramucosal fungal proliferation that completely fills one or more paranasal sinuses and usually occurs as a unilateral infection. It is mainly caused by Aspergillus spp in an immunocompetent host, but some cases of paranasal fungal balls reportedly have been caused by Mucor spp. A Mucor fungus ball is usually found in the maxillary sinus and/or the sphenoid sinus and may be black in color. Patients with mucormycosis, or a Mucor fungal ball infection, usually present with facial pain or headache. On computed tomography, there are no pathognomonic findings that are conclusive for a diagnosis of mucormycosis. In this article we report a case of mucormycosis in a 56-year-old woman and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on the "Mucor fungus ball." To the best of our knowledge, 5 case reports (8 patients) have been published in which the fungus ball was thought to be caused by Mucor spp.

  2. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Primary Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudillo, Laura; Cerretti, Raffaella; Picardi, Alessandra; Mariotti, Benedetta; De Angelis, Gottardo; Cantonetti, Maria; Postorino, Massimiliano; Ceresoli, Eleonora; De Santis, Giovanna; Nasso, Daniela; Pisani, Francesco; Scala, Enrico; Di Piazza, Fabio; Lanti, Alessandro

    2018-06-01

    In our retrospective study, 16 patients affected by advanced cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Two patients (12.5%) were in complete remission (CR), nine (56.3%) in partial remission (PR), and five (31.2%) with active disease. The patients were transplanted from an HLA-identical (n = 7) from a mismatched (n = 1) or haploidentical (n = 1) sibling, from matched unrelated donor (n = 5), or from a single cord blood unit (n = 2). Conditioning regimen was standard myeloablative in 6 patients and at reduced intensity in 10. Seven patients died from non relapse mortality (NRM) and four patients relapsed or progressed, three of them achieved a second CR after donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or chemotherapy plus DLI. To date, with a median follow-up of 76 months (range 6-130), nine patients are alive, eight in CR, and one with active disease. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 and 10 years are 61% (95% CI 40-91%) and 54% (95% CI 33-86%), 40% (95% CI 22-74%), and 34% (95% CI 16-68%), respectively. The time from diagnosis to transplant seems to influence negatively both OS (log-rank p < 0.04) and DFS (log-rank p < 0.05). Our results confirm on a long follow-up that CTCL appears particularly susceptible to the graft versus lymphoma (GVL) effect, so that allogeneic HSCT represents a possibility of cure for advanced CTCL. The timing of HSCT in the clinical course of disease remains an open issue.

  3. Mucormycosis: New Developments into a Persistently Devastating Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, François; Aguilar, Claire; Catherinot, Emilie; Alanio, Alexandre; DeWolf, Susan; Lortholary, Olivier; Lanternier, Fanny

    2015-10-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare, though increasingly prevalent, life-threatening fungal disease caused by Mucorales. The incidence has increased over the last decade and its mortality remains high at around 50%. Mucormycosis occurs mostly in patients with diabetes mellitus and/or in the context of immunosuppression resulting from chemotherapy for hematological malignancy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or solid-organ transplantation. In this situation, lung and rhino-orbito-cerebral infections are the most frequent localizations of the disease. Prompt initiation of an effective treatment is essential to decrease mortality. However, mucormycosis and aspergillosis share close clinical and radiological features. Invasive procedures such as bronchial endoscopy and/or lung biopsy are necessary to confirm diagnosis, as no indirect tests are yet validated. Therefore, the challenge is to minimize the delay in diagnosis. When present, the reversed halo sign on CT scan is suggestive of mucormycosis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction is a new promising approach to detect Mucorales DNA in serum and new molecular tools are available to detect Mucorales in tissues as well as to specify species. Recommendations from ECIL and ECMM/ESCMID have recently been published on management of mucormycosis. The recommended treatment is an amphotericin B lipid formulation in combination with surgery and modification of risk factors. High-dose (10 mg/kg) of liposomal amphotericin B is recommended in case of neurological involvement and posaconazole for maintenance therapy. Place of isavuconazole as well as posaconazole new formulations (tablets and intravenous) in first line treatment have to be defined. Improved radiologic descriptions of mucormycosis and new molecular tools may be key elements to help with rapid diagnosis in the future. Clinical trials are warranted to improve therapeutic success and hopefully survival. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001

  4. The impact of surgery on survival of patients with cutaneous melanoma: revisiting the role of primary tumor excision margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Pasquali, Sandro; Nitti, Donato

    2011-02-01

    To quantify the impact of excision margins on disease-specific survival of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma. Current guidelines recommend narrow margins for the treatment of primary melanoma, although available evidence on this subject is not unequivocal and not always appropriately analyzed. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCT) addressing the issue of wide versus narrow excision margins was performed. Meta-analysis methods for time-to-event data were used to extract hazard ratios(HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) from eligible studies, and ultimately to estimate the summary effect of excision margins on patients' survival. The 5 eligible RCT enrolled a total of 3295 patients who were allocated to wide (3-5 cm) or narrow (1-2 cm) excision of their primary tumor. The data of locoregional disease-free (LDFS), disease-free (DFS),disease-specific (DSS), and overall (OS) survival were available for 3, 5, 3, and 5 RCT, respectively. The meta-analysis suggested that narrow margins might be associated with an increased risk of both locoregional disease recurrence (HR: 1.30, CI: 1.07-1.57; P = 0.01) and death by disease (HR: 1.28, CI:1.07-1.53, P = 0.01). As regards DFS, the borderline disadvantage (HR:1.13, CI: 0.995-1.28; P = 0.06) becomes significant when considering RCT that enrolled patients with thicker melanoma (HR: 1.19, CI: 1.02-1.39, P =0.03). When death by any cause (OS) was analyzed, no risk difference was found. The lack of DSS data from all the available RCT does not allow to draw definitive conclusions. However, current evidence appears sufficient to question the common belief that narrow excision margins are as safe as wide margins in the management of primary melanoma, that calls for further investigation in this field.

  5. Economic burden of mucormycosis in the United States: can a vaccine be cost-effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Edwards, John E; Bryant, Richard; Spellberg, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection which causes unacceptably high morbidity and mortality despite treatment. Therefore, a vaccine to prevent mucormycosis is desirable. A major barrier to developing an anti-mucormycosis vaccine is the perception that such a vaccine would not be cost-effective to deploy because the disease is rare. We used data from a recent retrospective study to calculate the annual cost to the US healthcare system caused by mucormycosis infections. We created a model to estimate the cost-efficacy of a niche, anti-mucormycosis vaccine deployed in a targeted manner to high-risk patients. We found that each case of mucormycosis results in an average direct cost to the US healthcare system of $97,743, for an overall cost of mucormycosis of $50 million per year. In the base case scenario, targeted deployment of an anti-mucormycosis vaccine would result in a net cost per quality adjusted life year saved (QUALY) of $17,249. Variations in the price of the vaccine, its market penetration, or the cost of infection could dramatically decrease the net cost, and could even result in net savings per QUALY. In conclusion, mucormycosis causes considerable cost to the US health care system. Targeted deployment of a niche vaccine could decrease infection rates and mortality from mucormycosis in a cost-effective manner.

  6. Adenoviral Gene Delivery to Primary Human Cutaneous Cells and Burn Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Tobias; von Peter, Sebastian; Dubin, Grzegorz; Mittler, Dominik; Jacobsen, Frank; Lehnhardt, Markus; Eriksson, Elof; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The adenoviral transfer of therapeutic genes into epidermal and dermal cells is an interesting approach to treat skin diseases and to promote wound healing. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro and in vivo transfection efficacy in skin and burn wounds after adenoviral gene delivery. Primary keratinocytes (HKC), fibroblasts (HFB), and HaCaT cells were transfected using different concentrations of an adenoviral construct (eGFP). Transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity was determine...

  7. Primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an immunocompetent host: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Shugo; Sekiya, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Primary extraintestinal complications caused by Yersinia enterocolitica are extremely rare, especially in the form of skin and soft-tissue manifestations, and little is known about their clinical characteristics and treatments. We presented our case and reviewed past cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica. We report a case of primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Y enterocolitica in an immunocompetent 70-year-old woman with keratodermia tylodes palmaris progressiva. She presented to an outpatient clinic with redness, swelling, and pain of the left ring finger and left upper arm without fever or gastrointestinal symptoms 3 days before admission. One day later, ulceration of the skin with exposed bone of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left ring finger developed, and cefditoren pivoxil was described. However, she was admitted to our hospital due to deterioration of symptoms involving the left finger and upper arm. Cefazolin was initiated on admission, then changed to sulbactam/ampicillin and vancomycin with debridement of the left ring finger and drainage of the left upper arm abscess. Wound culture grew Y enterocolitica serotype O:8 and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Blood cultures were negative and osteomyelitis was ruled out. Vancomycin was switched to ciprofloxacin, then skin and soft-tissue manifestations showed clear improvement within a few days. The patient received 14 days of ciprofloxacin and oral amoxicillin/clavulanate and has since shown no recurrence. We reviewed 12 cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica from the literature. In several past cases, portal entry involved failure of the skin barrier on distal body parts. Thereafter, infection might have spread to the regional lymph nodes from the ruptured skin. Y enterocolitica is typically resistant to aminopenicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins. In most cases, these inefficient

  8. Sterile cutaneous pustules: a manifestation of primary irritancy? Identification of contact pustulogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, J E; Maibach, H I

    1981-05-01

    An animal model (the rabbit) was used to define which of 8 chemicals caused pustule formation on topical application. Large occlusive chambers (diameter 12 mm), petrolatum as the vehicle and wrapping contributed to efficient occlusion and pustulation. Sodium lauryl sulfate and mecuric chloride gave reproducible results and clear dose-responses indicating that this pustulation is an expression of primary irritancy. Ammonium fluoride pustulation was not reproducible; croton oil pustules were more difficult to evaluate due to simultaneous erythema and edema. Sodium arsentate, nickel sulfate and potassium iodide pustules developed at sites where the skin barriers had been damaged by a stab injury. Benzalkonium chloride caused yellow staining and edema but not pustules. Because of lack of epidemiologic data, we do not know how frequently similar findings occur in man.

  9. Fatal haemorrhagic duodenal mucormycosis in a non-immunocompromised host: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simbarashe G. Mungazi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the fungi of the Mucorales order of the class Zygomycetes. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis is an uncommon, fatal condition accounting for only 7% of the cases. We present the case of a gastroduodenal mucormycosis presenting as recurrent massive hematemesis. We report this case to alert clinicians of this rare but fatal condition and to encourage further research into its pathogenesis and management.

  10. Ileocolic Mucormycosis – an Unusual Cause of a Mass in the Right Iliac Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishanchand Chethan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a relatively uncommon, aggressive and lethal mycosis. Fungi from the order Mucorales are the etiological agents of mucormycosis. The condition is more common among the immunocompromised, diabetic patients with ketoacidosis and people with iron overload syndromes. Diagnosis of mucormycosis requires a high index of suspicion regarding the possibility of the condition in high-risk individuals. Timely diagnosis is critical to survival and minimization of morbidity. A favourable outcome is possible only if appropriate treatment is initiated as early as possible. The present article reports a case of ileocolic mucormycosis involving a patient with chronic renal failure and familial hyperuricemia.

  11. A surgical approach in the management of mucormycosis in a trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, B A; Piercey, J E; Wall, D R; Tetsworth, K D

    2016-11-01

    Mucormycosis as a consequence of trauma is a devastating complication; these infections are challenging to control, with a fatality rate approaching 96% in immunocompromised patients. We present a case where a proactive approach was successfully employed to treat mucormycosis following complex polytrauma. Aggressive repeated surgical debridement, in combination with appropriate antifungal therapy, proved successful in this instance. In our opinion, mucormycosis in trauma mandates an aggressive surgical approach. This prevents ascending dissemination of mucormycosis and certainly reduces the risk of patient mortality as a direct result. Anti-fungal therapy should be used secondarily as an adjunct together with surgical debridement, or as an alternative when surgical intervention is not feasible.

  12. Preliminary Clinical and Pharmacologic Investigation of Photodynamic Therapy with the Silicon Phthalocyanine Photosensitizer Pc 4 for Primary or Metastatic Cutaneous Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Timothy James; Baron, Elma D.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Hoppel, Charles L.; Ingalls, Stephen T.; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Li, Xiaolin; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Stevens, Seth R.; Remick, Scot C.

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cutaneous malignancies has been found to be an effective treatment with a range of photosensitizers. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 was developed initially for PDT of primary or metastatic cancers in the skin. A Phase I trial was initiated to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of systemically administered Pc 4 followed by red light (Pc 4-PDT) in cutaneous malignancies. A dose-escalation study of Pc 4 (starting dose 0.135 mg/m 2 ) at a fixed light fluence (135 J/cm 2 of 675-nm light) was initiated in patients with primary or metastatic cutaneous malignancies with the aim of establishing the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Blood samples were taken at intervals over the first 60 h post-PDT for pharmacokinetic analysis, and patients were evaluated for toxicity and tumor response. A total of three patients (two females with breast cancer and one male with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma) were enrolled and treated over the dose range of 0.135 mg/m 2 (first dose level) to 0.54 mg/m 2 (third dose level). Grade 3 erythema within the photoirradiated area was induced in patient 2, and transient tumor regression in patient 3, in spite of the low photosensitizer doses. Pharmacokinetic observations fit a three-compartment exponential elimination model with an initial rapid distribution phase (∼0.2 h) and relatively long terminal elimination phase (∼28 h), Because of restrictive exclusion criteria and resultant poor accrual, the trial was closed before MTD could be reached. While the limited accrual to this initial Phase I study did not establish the MTD nor establish a complete pharmacokinetic and safety profile of intravenous Pc 4-PDT, these preliminary data support further Phase I testing of this new photosensitizer.

  13. Preliminary clinical and pharmacologic investigation of photodynamic therapy with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 for primary or metastatic cutaneous cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James Kinsella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT for cutaneous malignancies has been found to be an effective treatment with a range of photosensitizers. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 was developed initially for PDT of primary or metastatic cancers in the skin. A Phase I trial was initiated to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of systemically administered Pc 4 followed by red light (Pc 4-PDT in cutaneous malignancies. A dose-escalation study of Pc 4 (starting dose 0.135 mg/m2 at a fixed light fluence (135 J/cm2 of 675-nm light was initiated in patients with primary or metastatic cutaneous malignancies with the aim of establishing the maximum tolerated dose (MTD. Blood samples were taken at intervals over the first 60 hours post-PDT for pharmacokinetic analysis, and patients were evaluated for toxicity and tumor response. A total of 3 patients (2 females with breast cancer and 1 male with cutaneous lymphoma were enrolled and treated over the dose range of 0.135 mg/m2 (first dose level to 0.54 mg/m2 (third dose level. Grade 3 erythema within the photoirradiated area was induced in patient 2, and transient tumor regression in patient 3, in spite of the low photosensitizer doses. Pharmacokinetic observations fit a 3-compartment exponential elimination model with an initial rapid distribution phase (~0.2 hrs and relatively long terminal elimination phase (~28 hrs, Because of restrictive exclusion criteria and resultant poor accrual, the trial was closed before MTD could be reached. While the limited accrual to this initial Phase I study did not establish the MTD nor establish a complete pharmacokinetic and safety profile of intravenous Pc 4-PDT, these preliminary data support further Phase I testing of this new photosensitizer.

  14. 2-cm versus 4-cm surgical excision margins for primary cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2 mm: a randomised, multicentre trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillgren, Peter; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Niin, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Optimum surgical resection margins for patients with clinical stage IIA-C cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2 mm are controversial. The aim of the study was to test whether survival was different for a wide local excision margin of 2 cm compared with a 4-cm excision margin.......Optimum surgical resection margins for patients with clinical stage IIA-C cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2 mm are controversial. The aim of the study was to test whether survival was different for a wide local excision margin of 2 cm compared with a 4-cm excision margin....

  15. Cavernous sinus syndrome due to rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Moyses Vilela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the case of a 43-year-old diabetic patient with facial pain, protruding eyes, nasal congestion and decreased right vision (involvement of the ipsilateral cranial nerves III, IV and V. Computed tomography showed diffuse sinusitis at right, cribriform plate erosion and presence of a hypodense collection in the frontal lobe with peripheral enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of a cerebral abscess. Samples were collected from the lesion, confirming hyphae compatible with mucormycosis.

  16. 2-cm versus 4-cm surgical excision margins for primary cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2 mm: a randomised, multicentre trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillgren, Peter; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Niin, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Optimum surgical resection margins for patients with clinical stage IIA-C cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2 mm are controversial. The aim of the study was to test whether survival was different for a wide local excision margin of 2 cm compared with a 4-cm excision margin....

  17. Acute orbital apex syndrome and rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders UM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ursula M Anders,1 Elise J Taylor,1 Joseph R Martel,1–3 James B Martel1–3 1Research Center, Martel Eye Medical Group, Rancho Cordova, 2Graduate Medical Education, California Northstate University College of Medicine, Elk Grove, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Dignity Health, Carmichael, CA, USA Purpose: To demonstrate the successful clinical identification and management of rhino-orbital mucormycosis, a fungal infection with a high mortality rate. Patients and methods: A diabetic male patient with a headache and orbital apex syndrome in the right eye was examined using computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for a possible fungal infection. Endoscopic surgical resection was performed and a pathology sample was taken. Specimens were prepared with Gömöri methenamine silver and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 400 mg daily, followed by posaconazole 400 mg twice daily. Results: CT and MRI revealed a mass of the right sphenoid spreading into the orbit, indicative of a fungal infection. The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of mucormycosis. Complete recovery of eyelid and oculomotor function was achieved after 10 months of treatment, although the patient continues to suffer from irreversible blindness in the right eye due to optic nerve atrophy. He has been without signs or symptoms of recurrence. Conclusion: Patients with rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis need extensive surgical and medical treatment to maximize outcomes. Success requires multidisciplinary management. Keywords: ophthalmoplegia, sixth nerve palsy, diabetes mellitus, nephrotoxicity, amphotericin B, posaconazole

  18. Invasive rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis in a diabetic patient – the need for prompt treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Chow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare life threatening fungal infection predominately seen in immunocompromised or diabetic patients. The following case is of a known type II diabetic patient who presented with sepsis and sudden unilateral loss of vision secondary to infective rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis. Treatment of the condition required extensive surgical intervention and medical management for a life saving outcome.

  19. Clinico-Radiologic Findings in Primary Cutaneous Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type Mimicking Cellulitis of the Left Arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Seon, Hyun Ju; Choi, Yoo Duk; Yun, Sook Jung

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma is a very rare and aggressive disease characterized histopathologically by an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive atypical lymphoid cytotoxic infiltrate, extensive vascular destruction, and prominent tissue necrosis. It commonly shows cutaneous lesions that primarily or secondarily mimic cellulitis at the primary site. We report on a very rare case of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type of skin/soft tissue, in a 64-year-old man, and describe the radiological findings. The condition was misdiagnosed as cellulitis of the left arm based on initial noninvasive clinical and radiologic work-up

  20. Primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with amyloid deposition: report of two cases with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Liu, An-Li; Zhou, Ling-sheng; He, Miao-Xia; Wang, Jian-Xin

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid deposition is rare. If there was a great amount of amyloid depositions in the skin tissue, it would be considered to be amyloid deposition disease at first, and then primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (PCMZL). This study was to analyze the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of two cases of PCMZL with amyloid deposition. Clinicopathologic characteristics and follow-up of two cases of PCMZL were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining was performed by EnVision method using antibodies LCA, CD19, CD20, CD79a, CD3, CD7, MUM1, kappa, lambda, Ki-67. IgH and TCRgamma gene rearrangement was detected by polymerase chain reactive (PCR). Case 1, a 71-year-old Chinese male, had a subcutaneous mass on the right elbow that was initially diagnosed with "amyloidosis" in 2004. Three years after the initial diagnosis, he developed recurrences on the right para-auxillary that was still diagnosed with "probably amyloidosis". Four years after the first diagnosis, the patient presented a lesion on the right para-auxillary with a diameter of 2 cm and a lesion on the temporal-parietal dural with a size of 6.0 cmx3.0 cmx3.0 cm. Case 2, a 68-year-old Chinese male, had a subcutaneous mass next to back of the left ear with a size of 9.0 cmx5.0 cm, and he underwent a operation one year previously because of subcutaneous mass in the same site. Microscopically, the tumors of both cases were located in dermis and subcutaneous, tumor cells were medium size with a nodular or diffuse distribution, and some of tumor cells were plasmacytoid/plasma cells. Morphologically, the temporal-parietal dural lesion was similar to subcutaneous lesion and infiltrated into cranial (case 1). Juxtaposed the tumor cells of two cases, there were the large amyloid deposits of amorphous hyaline material and concentrically laminated hyaline spherules in case 1, while cord-like amyloid deposits in case 2. Reactive lymphoid follicles with germinal centers and foreign body giant cells in the stroma were

  1. Cutaneous Pseudolymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Pérez, D; Blanes Martínez, M; Encabo-Durán, B

    2016-10-01

    The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma refers to benign reactive lymphoid proliferations in the skin that simulate cutaneous lymphomas. It is a purely descriptive term that encompasses various reactive conditions with a varied etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histology, and behavior. We present a review of the different types of cutaneous pseudolymphoma. To reach a correct diagnosis, it is necessary to contrast clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings. Even with these data, in some cases only the clinical course will confirm the diagnosis, making follow-up essential. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The endothelial cell receptor GRP78 is required for mucormycosis pathogenesis in diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingfu; Spellberg, Brad; Phan, Quynh T.; Fu, Yue; Fu, Yong; Lee, Amy S.; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a fungal infection of the sinuses, brain, or lungs that causes a mortality rate of at least 50% despite first-line therapy. Because angioinvasion is a hallmark of mucormycosis infections, we sought to define the endothelial cell receptor(s) for fungi of the order Mucorales (the fungi that cause mucormycosis). Furthermore, since patients with elevated available serum iron, including those with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis, we sought to define the role of iron and glucose in regulating the expression of such a receptor. Here, we have identified glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) as what we believe to be a novel host receptor that mediates invasion and damage of human endothelial cells by Rhizopus oryzae, the most common etiologic species of Mucorales, but not Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. Elevated concentrations of glucose and iron, consistent with those seen during DKA, enhanced GRP78 expression and the resulting R. oryzae invasion and damage of endothelial cells in a receptor-dependent manner. Mice with DKA, which have enhanced susceptibility to mucormycosis, exhibited increased expression of GRP78 in sinus, lungs, and brain compared with normal mice. Finally, GRP78-specific immune serum protected mice with DKA from mucormycosis. These results suggest a unique susceptibility of patients with DKA to mucormycosis and provide a foundation for the development of new therapeutic interventions for these deadly infections. PMID:20484814

  3. Mucormicosis: Una micosis emergente Mucormycosis: An emergent mycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Tiraboschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar la incidencia, frecuencia, características clínicas y evolución de los pacientes con mucormicosis atendidos en el Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires, entre los años 1982 y 2010. Durante ese período se diagnosticaron 10 casos de mucormicosis. Los tres primeros entre 1982 y 2004 y los últimos 7 entre 2005 y 2010. La incidencia y frecuencia de esta enfermedad, para el período 1980-2004 fue 0.13 pacientes/año y 0.1 casos/10 000 egresos (IC 95%: 0.00 a 0.3 respectivamente. En el período 2005-2010 la incidencia fue 0.86 pacientes/año y la frecuencia de 1.1 casos/10 000 egresos (IC 95%: 0.5 a 2.4. Hubo nueve casos de mucormicosis rinosinuso-orbitaria, siete en pacientes con diabetes mellitus, uno en una paciente con una hemopatía maligna y neutropenia, y el restante en un paciente con HIV/sida que además estaba neutropénico y con un síndrome hemofagocítico. En una paciente se realizó el diagnóstico post mortem de mucormicosis pulmonar. El diagnóstico se efectuó por la observación de filamentos cenocíticos en los diez casos. Hubo desarrollo de mucorales en los cultivos de 8/9 pacientes; cinco Rhizopus spp y tres Mucor spp. Todos los pacientes recibieron un tratamiento inicial con anfotericina B deoxicolato, que en tres de ellos fue continuado con anfotericina B liposomal, y cirugía. Tres enfermos recibieron además un tratamiento adyuvante con oxigeno hiperbárico. La mortalidad fue 30%.Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. It is characterized by rapid progression and high morbidity and mortality in the absence of early diagnosis and prompt treatment. It was an infrequent disease, but in recent years, its incidence appears to have increased. The aim of this paper is to report the cases of mucormycosis diagnosed from 1982 to 2010 at the Hospital de Clinicas José de San Martín, University of Buenos Aires. We

  4. Mucormycosis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Comprehensive Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamim Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare but devastating infection. We present a case of fatal disseminated mucormycosis infection in a renal transplant patient. Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and immunosuppression are the major predisposing factors to infection with Mucorales. Mucorales are angioinvasive and can infect any organ system. Lungs are the predominant site of infection in solid organ transplant recipients. Prompt diagnosis is challenging and influences outcome. Treatment involves a combination of surgical and medical therapies. Amphotericin B remains the cornerstone in the medical management of mucormycosis, although other agents have been used. Newer agents are promising.

  5. Mucormycosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Case Series and Review of the Literature

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    Maheen Z. Abidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare and often fatal invasive fungal infection mostly seen in immune-compromised individuals. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary, so that effective preemptive therapy can be started, as timely intervention is crucial. In this series we present three cases of invasive mucormycosis in patients with underlying inflammatory bowel disease that had received therapy with immunomodulators prior to the infection. All three had varied clinical manifestations. We also review the literature of invasive mucormycosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Excellent outcome of immunomodulation or Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibition in highly refractory primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type

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    Eva Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL-LT is a rare diffuse large B-cell lymphoma confined to the skin of the legs. The typical presentation is characterized by solitary or multiple growing plaques, usually confined to one leg. We report a case of PCDLBCL-LT of activated B-cell subtype characterized by multiple local relapses in the legs, initially, and systemic relapses about seven years after the diagnosis. Local relapses were sensitive to radiation therapy. Cutaneous and systemic relapses responded well to immunomodulatory therapy with lenalidomide followed by Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibition with ibrutinib. Ibrutinib is the only treatment that resulted in long-lasting complete remission. Lenalidomide and especially ibrutinib appear to have a significant activity against this lymphoma and should be incorporated in the treatment of this resistant and aggressive lymphoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of PCDLBCL-LT reported in the literature exhibiting a complete response to ibrutinib.

  7. Isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis infections

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    Donnelley MA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monica A Donnelley,1,2 Elizabeth S Zhu,1 George R Thompson 3rd3 1Department of Inpatient Pharmacy, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Touro University College of Pharmacy, Vallejo, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California – Davis, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: We have a limited arsenal with which to treat invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales. The morbidity and mortality for both pathogens remains high. A triazole antifungal, isavuconazole, was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. A randomized double-blind comparison trial for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis found isavuconazole noninferior to voriconazole. A separate, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of isavuconazole in the treatment of mucormycosis found comparable response rates to amphotericin B and posaconazole treated historical controls. The prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate is commercially available in both an oral and intravenous formulation and is generally well tolerated. Isavuconazole’s broad spectrum of activity, limited side effect profile, and favorable pharmacokinetics will likely solidify its place in therapy. Keywords: isavuconazonium, antifungal, zygomycosis, mucor, mould infection, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, therapy, new agent

  8. Primary Cutaneous Cryptococcosis Treated with Debridement and Fluconazole Monotherapy in an Immunosuppressed Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Jennifer Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic yeast present in the environment. Practitioners are familiar with the presentation and management of the most common manifestation of cryptococcal infection, meningoencephalitis, in patients with AIDS or other conditions of immunocompromise. There is less awareness, however, of uncommon presentations where experience rather than evidence guides therapy. We report a case of primary cutaneous cryptococcosis (PCC in a patient who had been immunosuppressed by chronic high-dose corticosteroid for the treatment of severe asthma. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of aggressive cellulitis that fails standard empiric antibiotic treatment in an immunocompromised patient. It also demonstrates successful treatment of PCC with a multispecialty approach including local debridement and fluconazole monotherapy.

  9. Adenocarcinoma metastático cutâneo de origem desconhecida: Relato de um caso Metastatic cutaneous adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site: Case report

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    Caio Sergio Rizkallah Nahas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Metástases podem ser a primeira manifestação de adenocarcinoma. Cerca de 60% destas podem ser cutâneas e correspondem a casos de neoplasia em estágio avançado. A procura pelo sítio primário é onerosa, sendo necessário o emprego de diversos exames de imagem, endoscópicos e imunoistoquímicos. Apesar disto, o sítio primário é descoberto somente em 15% a 20% dos pacientes, sendo os demais casos reconhecidos nas autopsias. OBJETIVO: Relatar um caso de adenocarcinoma, moderadamente diferenciado metastático cutâneo, de sítio primário desconhecido. A região acometida foi a pele da fossa ilíaca esquerda. RESULTADOS: A lesão foi ressecada cirurgicamente. O sítio primário não foi identificado por nenhum exame de imagem ou endoscópico. O estudo imunoistoquímico revelou o seguinte padrão de imunoperoxidase: CEA negativo, CK7 positivo, CK20 negativo e PSA negativo. Com base nestes achados, foram afastados tumores primários do intestino grosso e da próstata (PSA, CK20 e CEA negativos. Os principais sítios primários aventados foram pâncreas e vias biliares. CONCLUSÃO: A procura pelo sítio primário de adenocarcinoma metastático continua sendo tarefa difícil, onerosa e com pouco impacto no tratamento dos pacientes acometidos.BACKGROUND: Metastases may be the first manifestation of adenocarcinoma. Up to 60% are cutaneous and present in advanced stage neoplasms. Research for the primary site is costly and requires endoscopy, imaging and immunohistochemical exams. The primary site becomes obvious in only 15% to 20% of live patients and is detected mainly at autopsy. AIM: To report a case of metastatic cutaneous moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site, located in the lower left abdomen. RESULTS: The lesion was surgically resected. Primary site was not found by any imaging or endoscopy exams. The immunohistochemistry was negative for CEA, CK20, PSA and positive for CK7. Based on these exams

  10. Amphotericin B cement beads: A good adjunctive treatment for musculoskeletal mucormycosis

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    Justin Arockiaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is one among the aggressive, invasive fungal infections usually seen in immunocompromised patients. Mucormycosis osteomyelitis is very rare. We present a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who complained of pain over the right proximal thigh. Plain radiograph revealed ill defined osteolytic lesion of proximal femur. MRI showed altered signal in proximal femur with focal collection and cortical breach. Biopsy and tissue culture diagnosed mucormycosis both histologically and microbiologically. He was treated with aggressive debridement, skeletal stabilization, and amphotericin antifungal cement beads. He recovered with no residual pain, minimal limb shortening, and no clinical or radiological evidence of recurrence at 3 years followup. The high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, and adequate antifungal therapy play a significant role in the treatment of musculoskeletal mucormycosis.

  11. Lymphocutaneous type of nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis: a case report and review of primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis reported in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hidetsugu; Saotome, Atsuko; Usami, Nao; Urushibata, Osamu; Mukai, Hideki

    2008-06-01

    Nocardiosis is a mixed suppurative and granulomatous inflammatory disease caused by infection with Nocardia organisms, a group of aerobic actinomycetes. We recently encountered a 25-year-old woman with posttraumatic nocardiosis of the lower extremities. The clinical symptoms noted during her first visit included erythematous swelling of the right knee accompanied by white maceration of the center of the knee and erosions, shallow ulcers and satellite pustules. In addition, multiple erythematous areas (up to the size of the tip of the thumb) were linearly distributed on the right thigh. These lesions were painful, and right inguinal lymphadenopathy was also noted. No lesion was found in internal organs such as the lungs. Histopathologically, signs of nonspecific granulomatous inflammation were observed, as well as several filamentous branching bacilli positive on Grocott stain. The organisms isolated from culture of pus were acid-fast, Gram-positive long rods. The isolated strain was finally identified as Nocardia brasiliensis. The patient was therefore diagnosed with lymphocutaneous type of primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis. Drip infusion of flomoxef sodium was initially performed to treat her condition. Because of exacerbation of erythematous swelling of the right knee and an increase in number of pustules, treatment was switched to oral minocycline hydrochloride therapy. The disease healed 9 weeks after the start of oral minocycline hydrochloride therapy. Our patient was free of systemic immunosuppression and was neither under 10 nor over 65 years of age. She may therefore be considered a rare case of lymphocutaneous type of nocardiosis. We present this case and discuss reported cases of primary cutaneous nocardiosis due to N. brasiliensis in Japan.

  12. The iron chelator deferasirox protects mice from mucormycosis through iron starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Gebermariam, Teclegiorgis; Fu, Yue; Lin,, Lin; Husseiny, Mohamed I.; French, Samuel W.; Schwartz, Julie; Skory, Christopher D.; Edwards, John E.; Spellberg, Brad J.

    2007-01-01

    Mucormycosis causes mortality in at least 50% of cases despite current first-line therapies. Clinical and animal data indicate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to mucormycosis. Here we demonstrate that deferasirox, an iron chelator recently approved for use in humans by the US FDA, is a highly effective treatment for mucormycosis. Deferasirox effectively chelated iron from Rhizopus oryzae and demonstrated cidal activity in vitro against 28 of 29 clinical isolates of Mucorales at concentrations well below clinically achievable serum levels. When administered to diabetic ketoacidotic or neutropenic mice with mucormycosis, deferasirox significantly improved survival and decreased tissue fungal burden, with an efficacy similar to that of liposomal amphotericin B. Deferasirox treatment also enhanced the host inflammatory response to mucormycosis. Most importantly, deferasirox synergistically improved survival and reduced tissue fungal burden when combined with liposomal amphotericin B. These data support clinical investigation of adjunctive deferasirox therapy to improve the poor outcomes of mucormycosis with current therapy. As iron availability is integral to the pathogenesis of other infections (e.g., tuberculosis, malaria), broader investigation of deferasirox as an antiinfective treatment is warranted. PMID:17786247

  13. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma is associated with somatically hypermutated immunoglobulin variable genes and frequent use of VH1-69 and VH4-59 segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, M; Pacchiarotti, A; Frontani, M; Pescarmona, E; Caprini, E; Lombardo, G A; Russo, G; Faraggiana, T

    2010-03-01

    Accurate assessment of the somatic mutational status of clonal immunoglobulin variable region (IgV) genes is relevant in elucidating tumour cell origin in B-cell lymphoma; virgin B cells bear unmutated IgV genes, while germinal centre and postfollicular B cells carry mutated IgV genes. Furthermore, biases in the IgV repertoire and distribution pattern of somatic mutations indicate a possible antigen role in the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. This work investigates the cellular origin and antigenic selection in primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (PCBCL). We analysed the nucleotide sequence of clonal IgV heavy-chain gene (IgVH) rearrangements in 51 cases of PCBCL (25 follicle centre, 19 marginal zone and seven diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg-type) and compared IgVH sequences with their closest germline segment in the GenBank database. Molecular data were then correlated with histopathological features. We showed that all but one of the 51 IgVH sequences analysed exhibited extensive somatic hypermutations. The detected mutation rate ranged from 1.6% to 21%, with a median rate of 9.8% and was independent of PCBCL histotype. Calculation of antigen-selection pressure showed that 39% of the mutated IgVH genes displayed a number of replacement mutations and silent mutations in a pattern consistent with antigenic selection. Furthermore, two segments, VH1-69 (12%) and VH4-59 (14%), were preferentially used in our case series. Data indicate that neoplastic B cells of PBCBL have experienced germinal centre reaction and also suggest that the involvement of IgVH genes is not entirely random in PCBCL and that common antigen epitopes could be pathologically relevant in cutaneous lymphomagenesis.

  14. Very late onset small intestinal B cell lymphoma associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia and diffuse cutaneous warts

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhnik, Y; Etienney, I; Nemeth, J; Thevenot, T; Lavergne-Slove, A; Matuchansky, C

    2000-01-01

    As only a handful of lymphoma cases have been reported in conjunction with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, it is not yet clear if this association is merely fortuitous or related to primary intestinal lymphangiectasia induced immune deficiency. We report on two female patients, 50 and 58 years old, who developed small intestinal high grade B cell lymphoma a long time (45 and 40 years, respectively) after the initial clinical manifestations of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia. They pre...

  15. Mucormycosis and bone scintillography of three phases. Case description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis S, M.; Larrea R, E.; Carrasco R, C.A.; Garrido A, R.A.; Olmedo T, D.; Perez C, M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of presenting this work, besides the interest that shows the mucormycosis pathology not so frequent, it is to carry out a clinical correlation photographic with the imagenology, particularly with the bone scintillography. In the Nuclear Medicine Service it is carried out bone scintillography of three phases previous endovenous administration of 30 mCi (1110 MBq) of 99m Tc-MDP. The images are obtained with a gamma camera model Elscint APEX SPX, first each 2 seconds during the first minute, then early image to the 5 minutes and finally the late ones to the 3 hs. The bone scintillography in the phases 2 and 3 detects bigger radioactive density in left hemi side, with increment of the osteoblast activity mainly in the medial border and the floor of the orbit, in the malar bone and a little more tenuous in the superior maxillary. (Author)

  16. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    thosis, and intraepidermal abscesses (Figs 4.23 to 4.26). In the dermis, where the inflammatory infiltrate consists of histiocytes, lymphocytes...intraepidermal abscess . See also Figures 4.39, 4.51, 4.53, and 4.54. x24 Figure 4.26 Higher magnification of intraepidermal abscess in patient described in...patient. J Heart Lung Transplant. 1992;11:820-823. 41. Azadeh B, Samad A, Ardehali S. Histological spectrum of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to

  17. QPCR detection of Mucorales DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid to diagnose pulmonary mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Emeline E; Iriart, Xavier; Bellanger, Anne Pauline; Dupont, Damien; Guitard, Juliette; Gabriel, Frederic; Cassaing, Sophie; Charpentier, Eléna; Guenounou, Sarah; Cornet, Murielle; Botterel, Françoise; Rocchi, Steffi; Berceanu, Ana; Millon, Laurence

    2018-06-06

    Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improving the outcome of mucormycosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the contribution of quantitative PCR detection of Mucorales DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids for early diagnosis of pulmonary mucormycosis.Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (n=450) from 374 patients with pneumonia and immunosuppressive conditions were analyzed using a combination of 3 quantitative PCR assays targeting the main genera involved in mucormycosis in France ( Rhizomucor, Mucor/Rhizopus, Lichtheimia ).Among these 374 patients, 24 had at least one bronchoalveolar lavage with a positive PCR; 23/24 patients had radiological criteria for invasive fungal infections according to consensual criteria : 10 patients with probable or proven mucormycosis, and 13 additional patients with other invasive fungal infections (4 probable aspergillosis, 1 proven fusariosis, and 8 possible invasive fungal infections). Only 2/24 patients with a positive PCR on bronchoalveolar lavage had a positive Mucorales culture.PCR was also positive on serum in 17/24 patients. In most cases, PCR was first detected positive on sera (15/17). However, a positive PCR on bronchoalveolar lavage was the earliest and/or the only biological test revealing mucormycosis in 4 patients with a final diagnosis of probable or proven mucormycosis, 3 patients with probable aspergillosis and one patient with a possible invasive fungal infection.Mucorales PCR performed on bronchoalveolar lavage could provide additional arguments for earlier administration of Mucorales-directed antifungal therapy, thus improving the outcome of lung mucormycosis. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Remote Cutaneous Breast Carcinoma Metastasis Mimicking Dermatitis

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    Annakan V Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from primary internal malignancies are an uncommon presentation. Cutaneous metastases are more frequently seen in breast cancer than in any other visceral malignancy in women. Medical practitioners should be vigilant of the possibility of unusual presentations of metastatic disease in breast cancer patients with lobular carcinoma presenting as cutaneous lesions mimicking benign dermatological conditions. Herein, we present a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with cutaneous lobular breast carcinoma metastases on her anterior right leg, which had previously been misdiagnosed as dermatitis for 9 years.

  19. A CROSS-SECTIONAL PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON CUTANEOUS DISEASES IN PAEDIATRIC PATIENTS BELONGING TO LOW INCOME GROUP FAMILIES ATTENDING PRIMARY HEALTH CENTRES AT BANGALORE RURAL, SOUTH

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    Megha Chandrashekar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The incidence and the spectrum of paediatric dermatological diseases vary from one part of the world to another.1 Skin diseases, though very common in many developing countries are not often regarded as a significant health problem.2 Majority of the skin diseases tend to occur in children under the age of 5 years. This high prevalence could be due to the lower immunity or higher frequency of hospital visits by infants due to greater parental care. The aim of the study is to compare the present spectrum of cutaneous disorders between two age groups of children less than 5 years and 5-14 years old and their correlation with socioeconomic status attending primary health centre, Bangalore rural, south. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted from March 22 to November 22, 2017, in children with skin disorders under 14 years old who attended primary health centre at Bangarappanagar and Uttarahalli in Bangalore. RESULTS A total of 522 children with skin diseases, 486 children were included in the study and they were divided into two groups of those less than 5 years with the sex ratio (M:F 1.5:1 and 5-14 years old with the sex ratio (M:F 1.3:1. The most common dermatological disease among less than 5 years age group was infections, eczema, infestations and pigmentary disorders and the most common dermatological diseases between 5-14 years was infections, scabies, eczema and acne. CONCLUSION Skin problems mainly scabies, tinea, impetigo and eczema were common in children who attended the primary health centres at Bangalore rural. There is a high prevalence of communicable diseases among children belonging to parents of low socioeconomic status. Community health education regarding personal hygiene coupled with that of the surrounding environment can help in controlling these diseases in the long run.

  20. Intravesicular taxane-induced dermatotoxicity in a 78-year-old man with urothelial carcinoma and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Pelletier, Daniel; O'Donnell, Michael; Stone, Mary Seabury; Liu, Vincent

    2018-06-01

    Patients treated with intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy for urothelial carcinoma often become refractory and experience recurrent disease, thus necessitating alternative intravesical treatment modalities if the patient is to be spared the morbidities associated with radical cystectomy. Intravesical treatment with taxane-based chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, has gained traction in urologic oncology, proving to be an effective salvage therapy in such patients. Systemic taxane-based chemotherapeutic regimens have long been used in several advanced malignancies, and their systemic side-effects and associated histologic correlates have been extensively documented. In contrast to adverse effects associated with systemic administration, intravesical taxane administration has thus far proven to be well-tolerated, with little to no systemic absorption. To our knowledge, features of taxane-induced systemic effects have not been reported in this setting. Herein, we report a case of a patient with recurrent urothelial carcinoma treated with intravesical docetaxel, along with primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, who developed characteristic dermatotoxic histologic findings associated with intravenous taxane administration. As such histopathologic findings often represent close mimickers of neoplastic and infectious etiologies, knowledge of the potential for systemic manifestations of taxane therapy in patients treated topically may prevent potentially costly diagnostic pitfalls. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mucormycosis in a diabetic patient: A case report with an insight into its pathophysiology

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    Syeda Neelam Afroze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is one of the most rapidly progressing and fulminant forms of fungal infection which usually begins in the nose and paranasal sinuses following inhalation of fungal spores. It is caused by organisms of the subphylum Mucormycotina, including genera as Absidia, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Rhizopus. The incidence of mucormycosis is approximately 1.7 cases per 1,000,000 inhabitants per year. Mucormycosis affecting the maxilla is rare because of rich blood vessel supply of maxillofacial areas although more virulent fungi such as Mucor can overcome this difficulty. The common form of this infection is seen in the rhinomaxillary region and in patients with immunocompromised state such as diabetes. Hence, early diagnosis of this potentially life-threatening disease and prompt treatment is of prime importance in reducing the mortality rate.

  2. Successful treatment of pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. A. Nikitina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis (zygomycosis is a frequently fatal fungal infection in immunocompromized patients. We describe a case of a successfull treatment of pulmonary mucormycosis in 11-year-child with a very severe aplastic anemia. The diagnosis of invasive mycosis has been proved according to EORTC 2008 criteria. Computed tomography showed bilobar right-sided pulmonary infiltration. Lichtheimia corymbifera cultured from BAL. The child achieved complete clinical, laboratory and instrumental response on long-term amphotericin B lipid-formulated therapy combined with posaconazole.

  3. MR imaging findings of orbitofacial infarction secondary to rhinoorbital mucormycosis : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Jong Kwan; Lee, Jae Hee; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Kyong Mee; Kim Ki Jun; Lee, Sung Yong; Choi, Kyu H.

    2000-01-01

    Rhino-orbital mucormycosis is the most frequently fatal fungal infection commonly occurring in patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and those who are immunocompromised, and requires prompt treatment. We describe a case of rhino-orbital mucormycosis with orbital cellulitis and paranasal sinusitis, as seen on initial MR images, which on follow-up images had evolved to orbitofacial infarction. MR imaging was useful for the demonstration of orbitofacial infarction, seen as areas of lack of enhancement and thus suggesting vascular involvement by mucor hyphae. (author)

  4. MR imaging findings of orbitofacial infarction secondary to rhinoorbital mucormycosis : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Jong Kwan; Lee, Jae Hee; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Kyong Mee; Kim Ki Jun; Lee, Sung Yong [Our Lady of Mercy Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu H. [Kangnam' s St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    Rhino-orbital mucormycosis is the most frequently fatal fungal infection commonly occurring in patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and those who are immunocompromised, and requires prompt treatment. We describe a case of rhino-orbital mucormycosis with orbital cellulitis and paranasal sinusitis, as seen on initial MR images, which on follow-up images had evolved to orbitofacial infarction. MR imaging was useful for the demonstration of orbitofacial infarction, seen as areas of lack of enhancement and thus suggesting vascular involvement by mucor hyphae. (author)

  5. Tumor shape pulmonary mucormycosis associated with sinonasal aspergillosis in a diabetic patient

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    Sophie Point

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare and life-threatening fungal infection of the Mucorales order occurring mainly in immunosuppressed patients. The most common forms are rhinocerebral but pulmonary or disseminated forms may occur. We report the case of a 61-year-old patient in whom pulmonary mucormycosis was diagnosed during his first-ever episode of diabetic ketoacidosis. While receiving liposomal amphotericin B, a sinusal aspergillosis due to Aspergillus fumigatus occurred. Evolution was slowly favorable under antifungal tritherapy by liposomal amphotericin B, posaconazole and caspofungin.

  6. Successful treatment of a necrotizing fasciitis patient caused by Mucor indicus with amphotericin B and skin grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yijin; Zeng, Fanqin; Huang, Xiaowen; Li, Qun; Tan, Guozhen; Xi, Liyan; Lu, Changming; Guo, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis, an uncommon disease caused by Mucorales, predominantly occurs in immunocompromised host. The present case is a primary cutaneous mucormycosis due to Mucor indicus in an immunocompetent individual. It is with the features of necrotizing fasciitis over the right pretibial area. We are presenting this case owing to its rarity and the successful treatment with amphotericin B and skin grafting.

  7. Intratumoral and peritumoral lymphovascular invasion detected by D2-40 immunohistochemistry correlates with metastasis in primary cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rohil, Rami N; Milton, Denái R; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Curry, Jonathan L; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Ivan, Doina; Prieto, Victor G; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Aung, Phyu P

    2018-07-01

    Primary cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine malignancy in which lymphovascular invasion (LVI) correlates with more aggressive phenotype. The prognostic significance of LVI detected by D2-40 immunohistochemistry (IHC) in MCC remains controversial. We aimed to determine how LVI detected by D2-40 IHC compares with LVI detected by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining in predicting MCC metastasis. Clinical and histopathologic features of MCCs diagnosed and treated in 2002 to 2015 were assembled and included 58 MCC tumors from 58 patients. H&E-stained tissue sections and D2-40 IHC studies were reviewed. When LVI was present, the location (peritumoral or intratumoral) and the size of the largest invaded vessel were recorded. LVI findings by H&E staining and D2-40 IHC were compared with each other and with histologic features and clinical outcomes. H&E staining showed LVI in 37 of 58 cases; D2-40 IHC confirmed LVI in 30 of these cases but failed to confirm LVI in 7. D2-40 IHC also detected 14 cases of LVI not identified on H&E staining. Histologically, D2-40-detected LVI was associated with infiltrative growth pattern and nonbrisk lymphoid infiltrate (P = .005 and P = .055, respectively). There was a statistically significant difference between the frequency of detection of peritumoral LVI by H&E in comparison to D2-40 IHC (P = .0009). MCCs in which D2-40 IHC-detected both intratumoral and peritumoral LVI were typically larger than MCCs without (mean, 24.5 mm versus 17.3 mm; P = .03) and more frequently metastasized (87% versus 51%; P = .03). D2-40 IHC detection of both intratumoral and peritumoral LVI is associated with metastasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures by primary fascio-septo-cutaneous local flap and primary fixation: The ′fix and shift′ technique

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    P R Ramasamy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Open fractures of tibia have posed great difficulty in managing both the soft tissue and the skeletal components of the injured limb. Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures are more difficult to manage than I, II, and III A fractures. Stable skeletal fixation with immediate soft tissue cover has been the key to the successful outcome in treating open tibial fractures, in particular, Gustilo Anderson III B types. If the length of the open wound is larger and if the exposed surface of tibial fracture and tibial shaft is greater, then the management becomes still more difficult. Materials and Methods: Thirty six Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures managed between June 2002 and December 2013 with "fix and shift" technique were retrospectively reviewed. All the 36 patients managed by this technique had open wounds measuring >5 cm (post debridement. Under fix and shift technique, stable fixation involved primary external fixator application or primary intramedullary nailing of the tibial fracture and immediate soft tissue cover involved septocutaneous shift, i.e., shifting of fasciocutaneous segments based on septocutaneous perforators. Results: Primary fracture union rate was 50% and reoperation rate (bone stimulating procedures was 50%. Overall fracture union rate was 100%. The rate of malunion was 14% and deep infection was 16%. Failure of septocutaneous shift was 2.7%. There was no incidence of amputation. Conclusion: Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures with "fix and shift" technique has resulted in better outcome in terms of skeletal factors (primary fracture union, overall union, and time for union and malunion and soft tissue factors (wound healing, flap failure, access to secondary procedures, and esthetic appearance when compared to standard methods adopted earlier. Hence, "fix and shift" could be recommended as one of the treatment modalities for open III B tibial fractures.

  9. Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures by primary fascio-septo-cutaneous local flap and primary fixation: The 'fix and shift' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, P R

    2017-01-01

    Open fractures of tibia have posed great difficulty in managing both the soft tissue and the skeletal components of the injured limb. Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures are more difficult to manage than I, II, and III A fractures. Stable skeletal fixation with immediate soft tissue cover has been the key to the successful outcome in treating open tibial fractures, in particular, Gustilo Anderson III B types. If the length of the open wound is larger and if the exposed surface of tibial fracture and tibial shaft is greater, then the management becomes still more difficult. Thirty six Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures managed between June 2002 and December 2013 with "fix and shift" technique were retrospectively reviewed. All the 36 patients managed by this technique had open wounds measuring >5 cm (post debridement). Under fix and shift technique, stable fixation involved primary external fixator application or primary intramedullary nailing of the tibial fracture and immediate soft tissue cover involved septocutaneous shift, i.e., shifting of fasciocutaneous segments based on septocutaneous perforators. Primary fracture union rate was 50% and reoperation rate (bone stimulating procedures) was 50%. Overall fracture union rate was 100%. The rate of malunion was 14% and deep infection was 16%. Failure of septocutaneous shift was 2.7%. There was no incidence of amputation. Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures with "fix and shift" technique has resulted in better outcome in terms of skeletal factors (primary fracture union, overall union, and time for union and malunion) and soft tissue factors (wound healing, flap failure, access to secondary procedures, and esthetic appearance) when compared to standard methods adopted earlier. Hence, "fix and shift" could be recommended as one of the treatment modalities for open III B tibial fractures.

  10. CT and MR imaging findings of appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis in a patient with acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo Youn; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Boem Ha; Chin, Su Sie; Park, Seong Kyu; Chung, Jun Chul [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Fungal infections occur in severely immunocompromised patients having profound and prolonged neutropenia. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female who, at the conclusion of induction chemotherapy for acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia, developed angioinvasive mucormycosis involving the appendix and liver, which presented as abdominal pain. This case is the first to provide detailed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of angioinvasive appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis. The implications of these findings as well as the diagnosis and management of mucormycosis, is further discussed.

  11. CT and MR imaging findings of appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis in a patient with acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seo Youn; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Boem Ha; Chin, Su Sie; Park, Seong Kyu; Chung, Jun Chul

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections occur in severely immunocompromised patients having profound and prolonged neutropenia. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female who, at the conclusion of induction chemotherapy for acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia, developed angioinvasive mucormycosis involving the appendix and liver, which presented as abdominal pain. This case is the first to provide detailed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of angioinvasive appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis. The implications of these findings as well as the diagnosis and management of mucormycosis, is further discussed

  12. Molecular analysis of immunoglobulin variable genes supports a germinal center experienced normal counterpart in primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg-type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Ledard, Anne; Prochazkova-Carlotti, Martina; Deveza, Mélanie; Laforet, Marie-Pierre; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Vergier, Béatrice; Parrens, Marie; Feuillard, Jean; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Gachard, Nathalie

    2017-11-01

    Immunophenotype of primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg-type (PCLBCL-LT) suggests a germinal center-experienced B lymphocyte (BCL2+ MUM1+ BCL6+/-). As maturation history of B-cell is "imprinted" during B-cell development on the immunoglobulin gene sequence, we studied the structure and sequence of the variable part of the genes (IGHV, IGLV, IGKV), immunoglobulin surface expression and features of class switching in order to determine the PCLBCL-LT cell of origin. Clonality analysis with BIOMED2 protocol and VH leader primers was done on DNA extracted from frozen skin biopsies on retrospective samples from 14 patients. The clonal DNA IGHV sequence of the tumor was aligned and compared with the closest germline sequence and homology percentage was calculated. Superantigen binding sites were studied. Features of selection pressure were evaluated with the multinomial Lossos model. A functional monoclonal sequence was observed in 14 cases as determined for IGHV (10), IGLV (2) or IGKV (3). IGV mutation rates were high (>5%) in all cases but one (median:15.5%), with superantigen binding sites conservation. Features of selection pressure were identified in 11/12 interpretable cases, more frequently negative (75%) than positive (25%). Intraclonal variation was detected in 3 of 8 tumor specimens with a low rate of mutations. Surface immunoglobulin was an IgM in 12/12 cases. FISH analysis of IGHM locus, deleted during class switching, showed heterozygous IGHM gene deletion in half of cases. The genomic PCR analysis confirmed the deletions within the switch μ region. IGV sequences were highly mutated but functional, with negative features of selection pressure suggesting one or more germinal center passage(s) with somatic hypermutation, but superantigen (SpA) binding sites conservation. Genetic features of class switch were observed, but on the non functional allele and co-existing with primary isotype IgM expression. These data suggest that cell-of origin is

  13. Chronic rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Gutiérrez-Delgado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a life-threatening disease, were rhinocerebral infection is most commonly seen in the clinical setting. Chronic mucormycosis is a rare presentation that exhibits a challenging diagnosis. We describe the case of a 47 year old diabetic man with complains of left zygomatic arch swelling of 3 months evolution. He had received previous antibiotic treatment without improvement. Biopsy of maxillary sinus revealed the presence of non-septated, 90° angle branched hyphae compatible with zygomicetes. The patient was treated with surgical debridement and amphotericin B until there was no evidence of fungi in the tissue by biopsy. We reviewed chronic rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis from 1964–2014 and 22 cases were found, being this the second case of chronic mucormycosis reported in Mexico. A quarter of the cases were seen in immunocompetent hosts. As only 20% of the causal agent can be isolated by culture, the diagnosis is mainly made by biopsy. Besides treatment with amphotericin B, posaconazole as alternative, and control of the underlying comorbidities, surgical debridement represents the corner stone therapy. We recommend at least 36 month follow-up, due to the 13% risk of recurrence. A chronic presentation has a general survival rate of approximately 83%.

  14. Successful Treatment of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Mucormycosis in a Child with Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thorbjørn S.R.; Arendrup, Maiken C.; Von Buchvald, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis (ROCM) is a rare fulminant opportunistic fungal infection that despite relevant treatment has high mortality. We present a case of a 3-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and ROCM, who was treated successfully with excessive surgery, systemic antifu...

  15. Rhino cerebral mucormycosis in a patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome: Disease course as studied by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.T.; Marcos, F.; Villanueva, J.M.; Vicente, L.

    1996-01-01

    A case of richinocerebral mucormycosis is reported a patient with refractory sideroblastic anemia assessed by means of serial CT; the disorder initially mimicked bacterial rhino sinusitis, coursing later with sinonasal necrosis, orbital involvement and, finally, cerebral involvement. The CT findings are compared with those described in the literature. (Author) 8 refs

  16. Co-incidental Plasmodium Knowlesi and Mucormycosis infections presenting with acute kidney injury and lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Arunachalam; Pisharam, Jayakrishnan K; Aung, Hla; Ghazala, Kafeel; Maboud, Khalil; Chong, Vui Heng; Tan, Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is frequently reported in Southeast Asian countries and is now widely regarded as the fifth malarial parasite. Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection that can occur in patients with a weakened immune system. We report a case of acute kidney injury secondary to Plasmodium knowlesi malaria infection and mucormycosis fungal infection. In addition, the patient also had lower gastrointestinal bleeding from invasive gastrointestinal mucormycosis. P. knowlesi infection was diagnosed by blood film and mucormycosis was diagnosed by histopathological examination of biopsy specimen of the colon. The patient recovered with antimalarial treatment (Quinine), antifungal treatment (Lipophilic Amphotericin), and supportive hemodialysis treatment. We hypothesize that P. knowlesi malarial infection can lower the immunologic threshold and predisposes vulnerable individuals to rare disseminated fungal infections. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first P. Knowlesi malaria-associated invasive fungal infection reported in the literature.

  17. Primary cutaneous b-cell lymphoma successfully treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy alone: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Villafañe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL is an unusual skin neoplasm with a great range of clinical presentations. Here, we report a case of CBCL in an AIDS patient presented as a single and nodular/ulcerative lesion in the perianal area. The patient was started on highly active antiretroviral therapy alone with a good clinical and oncological response. Two years later, the patient is asymptomatic with undetectable viral load and immune reconstitution.

  18. An integrated genomic and transcriptomic survey of mucormycosis-causing fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibucos, Marcus C.; Soliman, Sameh; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Lee, Hongkyu; Daugherty, Sean; Orvis, Joshua; Shetty, Amol C.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Hazen, Tracy H.; Etienne, Kizee A.; Kumari, Priti; O'Connor, Timothy D.; Rasko, David A.; Filler, Scott G.; Fraser, Claire M.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Skory, Christopher D.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Bruno, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection caused by Mucorales fungi. Here we sequence 30 fungal genomes, and perform transcriptomics with three representative Rhizopus and Mucor strains and with human airway epithelial cells during fungal invasion, to reveal key host and fungal determinants contributing to pathogenesis. Analysis of the host transcriptional response to Mucorales reveals platelet-derived growth factor receptor B (PDGFRB) signaling as part of a core response to divergent pathogenic fungi; inhibition of PDGFRB reduces Mucorales-induced damage to host cells. The unique presence of CotH invasins in all invasive Mucorales, and the correlation between CotH gene copy number and clinical prevalence, are consistent with an important role for these proteins in mucormycosis pathogenesis. Our work provides insight into the evolution of this medically and economically important group of fungi, and identifies several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27447865

  19. Taxonomy of Fungi Causing Mucormycosis and Entomophthoramycosis (Zygomycosis) and Nomenclature of the Disease: Molecular Mycologic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis confirmed the phylum Zygomycota to be polyphyletic, and the taxa conventionally classified in Zygomycota are now distributed among the new phylum Glomeromycota and 4 subphyla incertae sedis (uncertain placement). Because the nomenclature of the disease zygomycosis was based on the phylum Zygomycota (Zygomycetes) in which the etiologic agents had been classified, the new classification profoundly affects the name of the disease. Zygomycosis was originally described as a convenient and inclusive name for 2 clinicopathologically different diseases, mucormycosis caused by members of Mucorales and entomophthoramycosis caused by species in the order Entomophthorales of Zygomycota. Without revision of original definition, the name “zygomycosis,” however, has more often been used as a synonym only for mucormycosis. This article reviews the progress and changes in taxonomy and nomenclature of Zygomycota and the disease zygomycosis. The article also reiterates the reasons why the classic names “mucormycosis” and “entomophthoramycosis” are more appropriate than “zygomycosis.” PMID:22247451

  20. Efficacy of Liposomal Amphotericin B and Posaconazole in Intratracheal Models of Murine Mucormycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guanpingsheng; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Lee, Hongkyu; French, Samuel W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening fungal infection almost uniformly affecting diabetics in ketoacidosis or other forms of acidosis and/or immunocompromised patients. Inhalation of Mucorales spores provides the most common natural route of entry into the host. In this study, we developed an intratracheal instillation model of pulmonary mucormycosis that hematogenously disseminates into other organs using diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA) or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice. Various degrees of lethality were achieved for the DKA or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice when infected with different clinical isolates of Mucorales. In both DKA and cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate models, liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) or posaconazole (POS) treatments were effective in improving survival, reducing lungs and brain fungal burdens, and histologically resolving the infection compared with placebo. These models can be used to study mechanisms of infection, develop immunotherapeutic strategies, and evaluate drug efficacies against life-threatening Mucorales infections. PMID:23650163

  1. Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma: a rare cutaneous neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous leiomyomas are firm, round to oval, skin-coloured to brownish papules and nodules that may present as a solitary, few discrete or multiple clustered lesions. Different uncommon patterns of multiple leiomyoma distribution have been noted as bilateral, symmetrical, linear, zosteriform, or dermatomal-like arrangement. One such rare presentation was seen in a 23-year-old patient who presented with zosteriform skin coloured, occasionally painful cutaneous lesions over left shoulder region. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. He was symptomatically managed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and topical capcicum cream. Case is reported here due to rare occurrence of this benign cutaneous neoplasm in an atypical pattern and on uncommon site. (author)

  2. Mucormycosis Attributed Mortality: A Seven-year Review of Surgical and Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    01 DEC 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mucormycosis attributed mortality: A seven-year review of surgical...Despite aggressive debridement , survival cannot be expected in most victims. Ten of the 12 (83.3%) patients in this study underwent amputation with...18]. The mortality of the victims was reported to be 38% (5 of 13 cases) with all 13 patients undergoing an average of four surgical debridements . The

  3. Coinfections in Intensive Care Unit with pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis: A clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Pratibha; Saroa, Richa; Palta, Sanjeev

    2016-03-01

    Herein, we present the case report of an adult male diabetic patient who had coinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and mucormycosis, which otherwise is a rare clinical entity. Diabetes mellitus may predispose a patient to tuberculosis (TB) infection which further weakens immune system thus making him susceptible to other fungal or bacterial infections which may pose various treatment difficulties. Therefore, there is a need for mycological and bacteriological investigations in patients with pulmonary TB to rule out secondary coinfections thus contributing to better management.

  4. A Case Report of Rare Tracheal Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Parham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Mucormycosis is a systemic killer fungal disease in diabetes resulting in immune deficiency and malignancies that can lead to death if left untreated. Its treatment includes eliminating background diseases, performing surgery, and using anti- fungal drugs such as Amphotripcin B. The aim of this study was to report a Tracheal Mucormycosis which was treated with surgery and anti- fungal drug.

    Case Report

    The patient was a diabetic woman that had referred to the hospital complaining of dyspnea, nausea and vomiting. She had been suffering from fever, dyspnea, and vomiting for two weeks. She went to a public care center and was treated with Ceftriacxon, Dexamethasone and Diphenhydramin. Despite this treatment, her problem worsened, so she referred to the hospital again. On admission, she was suffering from fever, respiratory distress, tachycardia and tachypenea. Epiglottis was edematous and Erythematous. Diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed based on her laboratory tests. Because of worsening of the respiratory distress, tracheostomy was performed. Diagnostic Bronchoscopy and biopsy were on done on the patient on the second day of her admission and Mucormycosis was reported by the pathologist.

  5. Pulmonary mucormycosis. Serial morphologic changes on computed tomography correlate with clinical and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Bo Da; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Myung Jin; Han, Joungho

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate serial computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary mucormycosis correlated with peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Between February 1997 and June 2016, 20 immunocompromised patients (10 males, 10 females; mean age, 48.9 years) were histopathologically diagnosed as pulmonary mucormycosis. On initial (n=20) and follow-up (n=15) CT scans, the patterns of lung abnormalities and their changing features on follow-up scans were evaluated, and the pattern changes were correlated with ANC changes. All patients were immunocompromised. On initial CT scans, nodule (≤3cm)/mass (>3cm) or consolidation with surrounding ground-glass opacity halo (18/20, 90%) was the most common pattern. On follow-up CT, morphologic changes (13/15, 87%) could be seen and they included reversed halo (RH) sign, central necrosis, and air-crescent sign. Although all cases did not demonstrate the regular morphologic changes at the same timeline, various combinations of pattern change could be seen in all patients. Sequential morphologic changes were related with recovering of ANC in 13 of 15 patients. Pulmonary mucormycosis most frequently presents as consolidation or nodule/mass with halo sign at CT. Morphologic changes into RH sign, central necrotic cavity or air-crescent sign occur with treatment and recovery of ANC. (orig.)

  6. Molecular diagnosis of rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis from fresh tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Kamran; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash Mandya; Das, Ashim; Panda, Naresh; Honnavar, Prasanna; Kaur, Harsimran; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate a PCR-based technique for the diagnosis of mucormycosis and the identification of fungi from fresh tissue specimens in patients with rhino-orbito-cerebral-mucormycosis (ROCM). Fifty cases of ROCM were included in the study. Conventional identification was performed using microscopy and culture. Molecular diagnosis was performed by amplifying the ribosomal DNA using pan-fungal ITS primers and semi-nested Mucorales-specific primers of the 18S region. The amplified products were sequenced to identify the agents. The utility of PCR-RFLP of the 18S region of rDNA was evaluated to identify the Mucorales. The ROCM cases were diagnosed by the demonstration of aseptate ribbon-like hyphae in biopsy specimens collected from the patients. Isolation was possible in 24 (48 %) samples. The ITS2 PCR confirmed mucormycosis in 27 cases (54 %; CI 59.4-68.2). By comparison, Mucorales-specific PCR was able to amplify DNA and the sequence enabled the identification of Mucorales speciesin all the patients. PCR-RFLP of the 18S region of rDNA could only identify the agent to genus level. The molecular technique was able to identify Mucorales species in 26 (42 %) cases that were negative by culture. Mucorales-specific semi-nested PCR targeting the 18S region is a better technique than ITS2 PCR for diagnosis. PCR-RFLP of the 18S region helps in identification to genus level.

  7. pH manipulation as a novel strategy for treating mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaska, Wioleta J; Correia, Joao N; Villegas, Maria T; May, Robin C; Voelz, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is a fatal fungal disease caused by several organisms within the order Mucorales. In recent years, traumatic injury has emerged as a novel risk factor for mucormycosis. Current antifungal therapy is ineffective, expensive, and typically requires extensive surgical debridement. There is thus a pressing need for safe prophylactic treatment that can be rapidly and easily applied to high-risk patients, such as those with major trauma injuries. Acetic acid has been used as a topical treatment for burn wounds for centuries and has proven activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that acetic acid is also highly effective against major pathogenic groups of Mucorales, even at very low concentrations (0.3%). This antifungal effect is not seen with other acids, such as hydrochloric and lactic acid, suggesting that acetic acid activity against Mucorales spores is not solely evoked by low environmental pH. In agreement with this, we demonstrate that the antifungal activity of acetic acid arises from a combination of its ability to potently lower intracellular pH and from pH-independent toxicity. Thus, dilute acetic acid may offer a low-cost, safe, prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of invasive mucormycosis following traumatic injury. Copyright © 2015, Trzaska et al.

  8. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis treated with 32 gram liposomal amphotericin B and incomplete surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özsüt Halit H

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucormycosis (or zygomycosis is the term for infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. Mucoraceae may produce severe disease in susceptible individuals, notably patients with diabetes and leukemia. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis most commonly manifests itself in the setting of poorly controlled diabetes, especially with ketoacidosis. Case Presentation A 31-year-old diabetic man presented to the outpatient clinic with the following signs and symptoms: headache, periorbital pain, swelling and loss of vision in the right eye. On physical examination his right eye was red and swollen. There was periorbital cellulitis and the conjunctiva was edematous. KOH preparation of purulent discharge showed broad, ribbonlike, aseptate hyphae when examined under a fluorescence microscope. Cranial MRI showed involvement of the right orbit, thrombosis in cavernous sinus and infiltrates at ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. Mucormycosis was diagnosed based on these findings. Amphotericin B (AmBisome®; 2 mg/kg.d was initiated after the test doses. Right orbitectomy and right partial maxillectomy were performed; the lesions in ethmoid and maxillary sinuses were removed. The duration of the liposomal amphotericin B therapy was approximately 6 months and the total dose of liposomal amphotericin B used was 32 grams. Liposomal amphotericin B therapy was stopped six months later and oral fluconazole was started. Conclusions Although a total surgical debridement of the lesions could not be performed, it is remarkable that regression of the disease could be achieved with medical therapy alone.

  9. Pulmonary mucormycosis. Serial morphologic changes on computed tomography correlate with clinical and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Bo Da; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Myung Jin [Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Centre for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joungho [Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate serial computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary mucormycosis correlated with peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Between February 1997 and June 2016, 20 immunocompromised patients (10 males, 10 females; mean age, 48.9 years) were histopathologically diagnosed as pulmonary mucormycosis. On initial (n=20) and follow-up (n=15) CT scans, the patterns of lung abnormalities and their changing features on follow-up scans were evaluated, and the pattern changes were correlated with ANC changes. All patients were immunocompromised. On initial CT scans, nodule (≤3cm)/mass (>3cm) or consolidation with surrounding ground-glass opacity halo (18/20, 90%) was the most common pattern. On follow-up CT, morphologic changes (13/15, 87%) could be seen and they included reversed halo (RH) sign, central necrosis, and air-crescent sign. Although all cases did not demonstrate the regular morphologic changes at the same timeline, various combinations of pattern change could be seen in all patients. Sequential morphologic changes were related with recovering of ANC in 13 of 15 patients. Pulmonary mucormycosis most frequently presents as consolidation or nodule/mass with halo sign at CT. Morphologic changes into RH sign, central necrotic cavity or air-crescent sign occur with treatment and recovery of ANC. (orig.)

  10. The imaging appearances of the pulmonary mucormycosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinxin; Tang Xiaoping; Zhang Lieguang; Jiang Songfeng; Chen Bihua; Gan Xinqing; Huang Ruilian; Shi Hongling; Huang Wuzhi; Huang Deyang; Tang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To manifest the imaging appearances of the pulmonary mucormycosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods: The radiographic and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features of the pulmonary, mucormycosis in 13 patients with AIDS were retrospectively analyzed. Results: On radiography, the infiltrative lesions were found in 5 patients, 7 cases had reticular pattern, 4 cases had pleural effusion, 4 cases had enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, 3 cases had diffuse milliary lesions, 3 cases had masses, 2 cases had ground-glass shadows, 2 cases had cystic lesions, cavity, pleural thickening, pericardial effusion and focal pneumothorax was presented in 1 case respectively. On HRCT, 7 cases had enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes, 7 cases had interlobular septal thickening, the infiltrative lesion were found in 6 patients, 5 cases had diffuse milliary lesions, 4 cases had pleural effusion, 3 cases had masses, 2 eases had ground-glass shadows, 2 cases had cystic lesions, cavity, pleural thickening, focal bronchiectasis, pericardial effusion and focal pneumothorax was presented in 1 case respectively. Conclusion: The main imaging appearances of the pulmonary mucormycosis in patients with AIDS include diffuse milliary lesion, enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph node, interlobular septal thickening, infiltrative lesion, pleural effusion and mass. (authors)

  11. Diabetes mellitus as the major risk factor for mucormycosis in Mexico: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and outcomes of reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo-León, Dora E; Chora-Hernández, Luis D; Rodríguez-Zulueta, Ana P; Walsh, Thomas J

    2018-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging infectious disease with high rates of associated mortality and morbidity. Little is known about the characteristics of mucormycosis or entomophthoromycosis occurring in Mexico. A search strategy was performed of literature published in journals found in available databases and theses published online at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) library website reporting clinical cases or clinical case series of mucormycosis and entomophthoromycosis occurring in Mexico between 1982 and 2016. Among the 418 cases identified, 72% were diabetic patients, and sinusitis accounted for 75% of the reported cases. Diabetes mellitus was not a risk factor for entomophthoromycosis. Mortality rate was 51% (125/244). Rhizopus species were the most frequent isolates (59%, 148/250). Amphotericin B deoxycholate was used in 89% of cases (204/227), while surgery and antifungal management as combined treatment was used in 90% (172/191). In diabetic individuals, this combined treatment approach was associated with a higher probability of survival (95% vs 66%, OR = 0.1, 95% CI, 0.02-0.43' P = .002). The most common complications were associated with nephrotoxicity and prolonged hospitalization due to IV antifungal therapy. An algorithm is proposed to establish an early diagnosis of rhino-orbital cerebral (ROC) mucormycosis based on standardized identification of warning signs and symptoms and performing an early direct microbiological exam and histopathological identification through a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team. In summary, diabetes mellitus was the most common risk factor for mucormycosis in Mexico; combined antifungal therapy and surgery in ROC mucormycosis significantly improved survival. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  13. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shurong; Hersh, Andrew M; Naughton, Greg; Mullins, Kevin; Fung, Maxwell A; Sharon, Victoria R

    2013-11-15

    The dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii commonly causes localized cutaneous disease with lymphocutaneous distribution. However, disseminated sporotrichosis occurs predominantly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV with a CD4 count of 208. The patient presented with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules as well as fever and malaise. Tissue culture and skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sporotrichosis. He was started on itraconazole 200mg twice a day with rapid resolution of fever along with cessation of the development of new lesions.

  14. Accidental injuries and cutaneous contaminations during general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that cutaneous, percutaneous, and mucous membrane exposure to patients blood and body fluids are common events during general surgical operations. Most accidental injuries were due to solid suture needle-sticks, mostly injured personnel were the primary operating surgeons, ...

  15. Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia with giant cell arteritis and pulmonary mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Denu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL is characterized by a low CD4+ lymphocyte count in the absence of HIV or other underlying etiologies. We report a case of a 57-year old man with ICL and giant cell arteritis (GCA who developed pulmonary mucormycosis, which, to our knowledge, is the first report of these occurring in a patient with ICL. Abnormally low total lymphocyte or CD4+ cell counts occurring in patients with autoimmune disorders should alert clinicians to the possibility of ICL. Immunosuppressive treatment should be used with caution in this context.

  16. Fatal Neonatal Peritoneal Candidiasis Mimicking Mucormycosis-A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Bineeta; Kusumakar, Kanupriya; Kumar Sarin, Yogesh

    2016-10-01

    Candida species have been implicated as significant contributors to morbidity in the neonatal period and are associated with 25-50% of mortality in invasive neonatal candidiasis. Peritoneal candidiasis, being paucisymptomatic, cannot often be correctly identified in a preterm neonate. The correct approach to diagnosis of neonatal peritoneal candidiasis is taking into account the epidemiology along with a strong clinical suspicion and appropriate timely diagnostic interventions. We report a case of fatal neonatal peritoneal candidiasis which was misdiagnosed as mucormycosis. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Craniofacial mucormycosis following assault: an unusual presentation of an unusual disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melsom, S.M.; Khangure, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    A case of craniofacial mucormycosis following assault is discussed. A female diabetic developed peri-orbital cellulitis adjacent to a scalp wound which progressed to a necrotizing fasciitis. This did not respond to treatment. Subsequently the patient developed a hemiparesis, with CT imaging showing peri-orbital and paranasal sinus inflammatory changes, evidence of cavernous sinus invasion and development of a middle cerebral artery territory infarction. The patient died shortly afterwards. The imaging findings and their relationship to the pathological spread of mucor infection are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Surgery for post-operative entero-cutaneous fistulas: is bowel resection plus primary anastomosis without stoma a safe option to avoid early recurrence? Report on 20 cases by a single center and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, A; Cirocchi, R; Cautero, N; Dazzi, A; Pironi, D; Di Matteo, F M; Santoro, A; Faenza, S; Pironi, L; Pinna, A D

    2017-01-01

    A review was performed on entero-cutaneous fistula (ECF) repair and early recurrence, adding our twenty adult patients (65% had multiple fistulas). The search yielded 4.098 articles but only 15 were relevant: 1.217 patients underwent surgery. The interval time between fistula's diagnosis and operative repair was between 3 months and 1 year. A bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed in 1.048 patients, 192 (18.3%) underwent a covering stoma: 856 patients (81.7%) had a fistula takedown in one procedure. The patients had 14.3% recurrence and 13.1% mortality rate. In our experience 75% were surgically treated after a period equal or above one year from fistula occurrence: surgery was very demolitive (in 40% remnant small bowel was less than 100 cm). We performed a bowel resection with a hand-sewn anastomosis (95%) without temporary stoma. In-hospital mortality was 0% and at discharge all were back to oral intake with 0% early re-fistulisation. Literature supports our experience: ECF takedown could be safely performed after an adequate period of recovery from 3 months to one year from fistula occurrence. In our series primary repair (bowel resection plus reconnection surgery without temporary stoma) avoided an early recurrence without mortality.

  19. Increasing incidence of mucormycosis in a large Spanish hospital from 2007 to 2015: Epidemiology and microbiological characterization of the isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Guinea

    Full Text Available We studied 19 cases of proven/probable mucormycosis diagnosed from 2007 to 2015 in our hospital and assessed the microbiological characteristics of the isolates. We recorded the incidence of mucormycosis and clinical and microbiological data of infected patients. Isolates were identified to molecular level and tested for their antifungal susceptibility to azoles, amphotericin B, and liposomal amphotericin B according to the CLSI M-38 A2 procedure. The incidence of mucormycosis in cases/100,000 hospital admissions during 2007-2015 increased significantly with respect to that reported in 1988-2006 (3.3 vs. 1.2; P<0.05. Patients mainly had hematological malignancies (52.6% and/or trauma/surgical wounds (52.6% and had received antifungal agents before the diagnosis of mucormycosis in 68% of cases. Diagnosis was by isolation (n = 17/19 and/or direct staining (n = 17/18 of Mucorales fungi in clinical samples. Identification was by panfungal PCR in patients with negative results in culture and in direct staining. The microorganisms identified were Lichtheimia spp. (42%, Rhizopus spp. (21%, Cunninghamella bertholletiae (16%, and others (21%. Liposomal amphotericin B was always more active than the other drugs against all the microorganisms except C. bertholletiae. All patients received antifungal treatment with 1 or more antifungal agents, mainly liposomal amphotericin B (17/19. Mortality was 47.4%, although this was significantly lower in the 11 patients in whom debridement was performed (18% vs. 87.5% (P = 0.015. The incidence of mucormycosis has risen in recent years. The proportion of cases with soft tissue involvement was high, and Lichtheimia was the most frequently involved species. The highest antifungal activity was observed with liposomal amphotericin B.

  20. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction detection of circulating DNA in serum for early diagnosis of mucormycosis in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, Laurence; Larosa, Fabrice; Lepiller, Quentin; Legrand, Faezeh; Rocchi, Steffi; Daguindau, Etienne; Scherer, Emeline; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Leroy, Joel; Grenouillet, Frederic

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the detection of circulating DNA from the most common species of Mucorales for early diagnosis of mucormycosis in at-risk patients. We retrospectively evaluated a combination of 3 quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays using hydrolysis probes targeting Mucor/Rhizopus, Lichtheimia (formerly Absidia), and Rhizomucor for circulating Mucorales detection. Serial serum samples from 10 patients diagnosed with proven mucormycosis (2-9 samples per patient) were analyzed. No cross-reactivity was detected in the 3 qPCR assays using 19 reference strains of opportunistic fungi, and the limit of detection ranged from 3.7 to 15 femtograms/10 µL, depending on the species. DNA from Mucorales was detected in the serum of 9 of 10 patients between 68 and 3 days before mucormycosis diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and/or positive culture. All the qPCR results were concordant with culture and/or PCR-based identification of the causing agents in tissue (Lichtheimia species, Rhizomucor species, and Mucor/Rhizopus species in 4, 3, and 2 patients, respectively). Quantitative PCR was negative in only 1 patient with proven disseminated mucormycosis caused by Lichtheimia species. Our study suggests that using specific qPCR targeting several species of Mucorales according to local ecology to screen at-risk patients could be useful in a clinical setting. The cost and efficacy of this strategy should be evaluated. However, given the human and economic cost of mucormycosis and the need for rapid diagnosis to initiate prompt directed antifungal therapy, this strategy could be highly attractive.

  1. Characterization of systemic disease in primary Sjogren's syndrome : EULAR-SS Task Force recommendations for articular, cutaneous, pulmonary and renal involvements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Seror, Raphaele; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Doerner, Thomas; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mariette, Xavier; Theander, Elke; Bombardieri, Stefano; De Vita, Salvatore; Mandl, Thomas; Ng, Wan-Fai; Kruize, Aike; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Vitali, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To reach a European consensus on the definition and characterization of the main organspecific extraglandular manifestations in primary SS. Methods. The EULAR-SS Task Force Group steering committee agreed to approach SS-related systemic involvement according to the EULAR SS Disease

  2. Cutaneous signs of piety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, V; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2014-07-01

    It is important for dermatologists to be aware of cutaneous changes related to religious practices to help in their recognition and management. The anatomic location of cutaneous lesions associated with friction from praying varies based on religious practice. Allergic contact dermatitis from products and substances commonly used in worshipping also vary by religion. Some religious practices may render individuals prone to infections that manifest on the skin. Tattoos of godly figures also may adorn the body. Religious practices also have been implicated in cases of urticaria, köbnerization, and leukoderma. This article reviews the clinical presentation of some of the most common cutaneous changes that occur in individuals who practice the following religions: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Sikhism.

  3. Actinomicose cutânea primária do pé simulando neoplasia de partes moles: relato de caso Primary cutaneous actinomycosis of the foot mimicking a soft tissue neoplasm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata La Rocca Vieira

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos um caso de actinomicose cutânea primária do pé simulando neoplasia de partes moles, com revisão da literatura sobre sua incidência, aspectos clínicos, patológicos e de imagem. Utilizamos radiografias simples, ressonância magnética e estudo anatomopatológico. A importância do estudo se deve à raridade da enfermidade, localização atípica e, particularmente, ao diagnóstico diferencial com neoplasia de partes moles.We report a case of a patient with primary cutaneous actinomycosis of the foot mimicking a soft tissue neoplasm. A literature review on the incidence, clinical features, pathology and imaging findings is also presented. The plain films and magnetic resonance imaging findings and the pathology results are presented. This paper reports a rare disease occurring in an atypical location, simulating a soft tissue neoplasm.

  4. Cutaneous metastatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Arun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5.5-year-old male presented with asymptomatic nodules and plaques on his scalp and pubic region of 2 months′ duration. He was having productive cough, haemoptysis, chest pain, anorexia and weight loss and receiving antitubercular treatment for these symptoms for last 3 months. Clinical diagnosis of cutaneous metastatic disease was made. Chest x-ray revealed multiple coin shaped shadows on both sides with pleural effusion. Routine investigations were normal except for anemia and hyperuricemia. Biopsy of skin nodules showed features of metastatic adenocarcinoma. Features and significance of cutaneous metastases are discussed.

  5. Differential diagnosis in primary and metastatic cutaneous melanoma by FT-Raman spectroscopy Diagnóstico diferencial no melanoma primário e metastático por espectroscopia FT-Raman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fernandes de Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To qualify the FT-Raman spectral data of primary and metastatic cutaneous melanoma in order to obtain a differential diagnosis. METHODS: Ten normal human skin samples without any clinical or histopathological alterations, ten cutaneous melanoma fragments, and nine lymph node metastasis samples were used; 105, 140 and 126 spectra were obtained respectively. Each sample was divided into 2 or 3 fragments of approximately 2 mm³ and positioned in the Raman spectrometer sample holder in order to obtain the spectra; a monochrome laser light Nd:YAG at 1064 nm was used to excite the inelastic effect. RESULTS: To differentiate the three histopathological groups according to their characteristics extracted from the spectra, data discriminative analysis was undertaken. Phenylalanine, DNA, and Amide-I spectral variables stood out in the differentiation of the three groups. The percentages of correctly classified groups based on Phenylalanine, DNA, and Amide-I spectral features was 93.1%. CONCLUSION: FT-Raman spectroscopy is capable of differentiating melanoma from its metastasis, as well as from normal skin.OBJETIVO: Qualificar os dados espectrais FT-Raman do melanoma cutâneo primário e metastático e assim realizar o diagnóstico diferencial. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizadas amostras de 10 fragmentos de pele sem alterações clínicas ou histopatológicas, 10 de melanomas cutâneos e 9 de metástases linfonodais; 105, 140 and 126 espectros foram obtidos respectivamente. Cada amostra foi dividida em 2 ou 3 frações de 2 mm³ e posicionada no porta amostras do espectrômetro Raman para obtenção dos espectros, por meio da excitação do espalhamento inelástico pelo laser de Nd:YAG em 1064 nm incididos na amostra. RESULTADOS: Para diferenciar os três grupos formados de acordo com as características fornecidas pelos espectros, realizamos a análise discriminante dos dados. As variáveis espectrais Fenilalanina, DNA e Amida-I se destacaram na

  6. Invasive Mucormycosis Induced Pneumopericardium: A Rare Cause of Pneumopericardium in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucor and Rhizopus cause life-threatening infections primarily involving the lungs and sinuses, which disseminate very rapidly by necrosis and infarction of the contiguous tissues. We present a case of a 64-year-old African American posttransplant patient who presented with a productive cough and weight loss. He had a past surgical history of renal transplant for renal cell carcinoma and was on dual immunosuppressive therapy, that is, mycophenolate and tacrolimus. During his hospital stay, he developed a pneumopericardium due to the direct extension of a lung lesion. The diagnosis was made by radiological imaging and PCR result which was consistent with Mucor species. He was treated with antifungal therapy. The purpose of this report is to highlight the unusual association of mucormycosis with pneumopericardium.

  7. Post-bronchoscopy fatal endobronchial hemorrhage in a woman with bronchopulmonary mucormycosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Licata Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction During infection, Mucorales fungi invade major blood vessels, leading to extensive necrosis, and in cases of extensive pulmonary disease, bleeding into the lungs may occur. Case presentation We report an unexpected event of post-bronchoscopy fatal endobronchial hemorrhage in a 62-year-old HIV-negative Italian woman with well controlled diabetes mellitus who presented with diffuse cavitated pulmonary lesions. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed bilateral obstruction of the segmental bronchi. Fatal massive bleeding occurred after standard biopsy procedures. Histologic examination showed that the hyphae were more deeply colored by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E than by other stains for fungi. Culture and autopsy confirmed bronchopulmonary mucormycosis. Conclusion Infection by Mucorales fungi should be considered in the diabetes population regardless of the degree of metabolic control. In these patients, particular caution should be taken during bronchoscopic procedures because of the greater friability of the fungal lesions.

  8. Importance of gallium-67 scintigraphy in primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: report of two cases;Importancia da cintilografia com galio-67 no linfoma cutaneo primario de celulas B: relato de dois casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attab, Cyomara Sanches, E-mail: rubinha.attab@terra.com.b [Centro Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear (CEBRAMEN), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Moriguchi, Sonia Marta [Fundacao Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Hospital de Cancer; Paton, Eduardo Jose Alencar [Fundacao Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Cancer Hospital. Div. of Hemotherapy and Bone-Marrow Transplant; Alencar, Mario Henrique Leite de [Clinica de Prevencao em Cancer, Goiania, GO, (Brazil); Rocha, Euclides Timoteo da [Fundacao Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Cancer Hospital. Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2010-05-15

    The authors describe two cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma where correct staging, treatment and follow-up could be achieved through a combination of conventional imaging studies and gallium-67 scintigraphy. (author)

  9. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishya B

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of cutaneous leishmaniasis is being reported from Assam, a North Eastern state of India. Clinical feature and direct smear examination of the case confirmed the diagnosis. Dramatic resolution of the lesions with sodium antimony gluconate during 10 days of therapy was achieved.

  10. Mucormicosis yeyunal en paciente con linfoma de Hodgkin Jejunal mucormycosis in a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Madrigal

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Comunicamos un caso de mucormicosis intestinal en un hombre de 46 años de edad, diagnosticado de enfermedad de Hodgkin clásica, estadio IV-B. Durante la primera fase de la quimioterapia, sufrió una hemorragia digestiva masiva secundaria a una úlcera yeyunal por zigomicosis tipo mucor, diagnosticada por biopsia endoscópica. El paciente fue tratado con antifúngicos y resección quirúrgica del intestino afectado. En la cirugía, se apreció una doble perforación yeyunal cubierta. El estudio anatomopatológico de la pieza confirmó el diagnóstico previo. Tras un año de seguimiento, el paciente está recuperado y su linfoma de Hodgkin en remisión completa. Tras una extensa revisión de la literatura, según nuestro conocimiento, este es el segundo caso publicado en la literatura de mucormicosis intestinal en un paciente con linfoma de Hodgkin.We report a case of intestinal mucormycosis in a 46-year-old male diagnosed with classical Hodgkin's disease, IV-B stage. During the first phase of chemotherapy he had a massive digestive bleeding event secondary to a jejunal ulcer, and zygomicosis mucor-type was diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy. The patient was treated with antifungal drugs and surgical resection of the intestine involved. At surgery a double covered perforation of the jejunum was seen. Pathological examination confirmed the previous diagnosis. After one year of follow-up the patient is doing well, and his lymphoma is on remission. To our best knowledge this is the second case of intestinal mucormycosis in a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma reported in the medical literature.

  11. The "black evil" affecting patients with diabetes: a case of rhino orbito cerebral mucormycosis causing Garcin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Santhosh Narayanan,1 Geetha Panarkandy,1 Gomathy Subramaniam,2 Chandni Radhakrishnan,1 NK Thulaseedharan,1 Neeraj Manikath,1 Sreejith Ramaswamy,1 Suma Radhakrishnan,3 Danish Ekkalayil1 1Department of General Medicine, 2Department of Radiodiagnosis, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India Abstract: Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection affecting patients with diabetes. It is an angioinvasive disease often resistant to treatment with a debilitating course and high mortality. Here, we report a case of a 45 year old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus who presented to us with history of right-sided ptosis and facial palsy, and subsequently developed loss of vision and palatal palsy. She was in diabetic ketoacidosis. Nervous system examination revealed involvement of right second, third, fourth, sixth, seventh, ninth, and tenth cranial nerves, suggestive of Garcin syndrome. The hard palate had been eroded with formation of black eschar. Computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed right maxillary and ethmoid sinusitis, with spread of inflammation to infratemporal fossa and parapharynygeal neck spaces. Debridement of sinus mucosa was done, and culture of the same yielded growth of rhizopus species. Histopathological examination of the tissue showed angioinvasion and fungal hyphae suggestive of mucormycosis. She was treated with amphotericin B, posaconazole, and periodic nasal sinus debridement, but her general condition worsened after 8 weeks due to secondary sepsis and she succumbed to death. Keywords: diabetes, rhinoorbitocerebral, mucormycosis, garcin syndrome

  12. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vishwas; Seykora, John T

    2017-09-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a malignant neoplasm of the skin characterized by an aberrant proliferation of keratinocytes. Cutaneous SCC is the second most common malignancy globally, and usually arises in the chronically sun-damaged skin of elderly white individuals. From a pathologist's perspective, it is important to differentiate cSCC from the benign and reactive squamoproliferative lesions and identify the high-risk features associated with aggressive tumor behavior. In this article, we provide an up-to-date overview of cSCC along with its precursor lesions and important histologic variants, with a particular emphasis on the histopathologic features and molecular pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cutaneous mercury granuloma

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana A Bothale; Sadhana D Mahore; Sushil Pande; Trupti Dongre

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mercury granuloma is rarely encountered. Clinically it may pose difficulty in diagnosis. Here, we report a 23-year-old male presented with erythematous, nodular lesions over the forearm and anterior aspect of chest wall. Metallic mercury in tissue sections appear as dark black, opaque, spherical globules of varying size and number. They are surrounded by granulomatous foreign-body reaction. It is composed of foreign body giant cells and mixed inflammatory infiltrate composed of hist...

  14. Invasive mucormycosis in children: an epidemiologic study in European and non-European countries based on two registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Dorothea Pana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucormycosis has emerged as a rare but frequently fatal invasive fungal disease. Current knowledge on paediatric mucormycosis is based on case reports and small series reported over several decades. Contemporary data on a large cohort of patients is lacking. Methods Two large international registries (Zygomyco.net and FungiScope™ were searched for mucormycosis cases in ≤19 year-old patients. Cases enrolled between 2005 and 2014 were extracted, and dual entries in the two databases merged. Epidemiology, clinical characteristics, diagnostic procedures, therapeutic management and final outcome were recorded and analysed with SPSS v.12. Results Sixty-three unique cases (44 proven and 19 probable were enrolled from 15 countries (54 in European and 9 in non-European countries. Median age was 13 years [Interquartile Range (IQR 7.7] with a slight predominance (54.1 % of females. Underlying conditions were haematological malignancies (46 %, other malignancies (6.3 %, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (15.9 %, solid organ transplantation, trauma/surgery and diabetes mellitus (4.8 % each and a variety of other diseases (7.9 %; in 9.5%, no underlying medical condition was found. Neutropenia was recorded in 46 % of the patients. The main sites of infection were lungs (19 %, skin and soft tissues (19 %, paranasal sinus/sino-orbital region (15.8 % and rhino-cerebral region (7.9 %. Disseminated infection was present in 38.1 %. Mucormycosis diagnosis was based on several combinations of methods; culture combined with histology was performed in 31 cases (49.2 %. Fungal isolates included Rhizopus spp. (39.7 %, Lichtheimia spp. (17.5 %, Mucor spp. (12.7 %, Cunninghamella bertholletiae (6.3 % and unspecified (23.8 %. Treatment comprised amphotericin B (AmB monotherapy in 31.7 % or AmB in combination with other antifungals in 47.7 % of the cases, while 14.3 % received no antifungals. Surgery alone was performed in 6.3 %, and combined

  15. Rhinocerebral Mucormycosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... 1. , Ramandeep Gambhir. 2*. , Samir Anand. 3. , Avani Dixit. 4. OPEN ACCESS ... as diabetic ketoacidosis and neutropenia are present in most cases which can .... differentiate histopathologically from other types of lesions.

  16. Mucormycosis (Zygomycosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal candidiasis Invasive candidiasis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis ...

  17. Dificuldade diagnóstica em dois casos de neoplasia de células linfóides precursoras cutâneas primárias Diagnostic pitfalls in two cases of primary cutaneous neoplasia of precursor lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Gomes Cardim Mendes de Oliveira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O linfoma linfoblástico (LLB é uma neoplasia maligna de linfócitos precursores (B, T ou células NK. O comprometimento primário da pele é raro. Relatamos as características clínicas, anatomopatológicas e imunofenotípicas em dois pacientes com apresentação cutânea primária que, histologicamente, apresentavam infiltrado de células imaturas. A análise imunofenotípica foi realizada com amplo painel de anticorpos. A pesquisa de rearranjo no gene do receptor de células T (TCR-gama pelo método de reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR resultou positiva em um caso, que era CD56 positivo, classificado como linfoma de células NK blásticas-símile. Este caso representa uma entidade distinta derivada de células precursoras num estágio precoce de uma via comum de diferenciação para células T e NK. O outro caso foi classificado como LLB-T com expressão aberrante de CD79a, o que poderia ser erroneamente interpretado. O diagnóstico correto depende da utilização de um amplo painel de anticorpos para caracterização imunofenotípica e avaliação molecular.The lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL is a malignant neoplasm of precursor lymphocytes (B, T or NK-cells. The primary involvement of the skin is rare. We examined the clinical, anatomopathological and immunophenotypic features of two patients with primary cutaneous involvement. Histologically they showed an infiltrate of immature cells. The immunophenotypic analysis was performed with a comprehensive panel of antibodies. T-cell receptor rearrangement (TCR-gamma was analyzed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR and it was positive in one case, which was CD56 positive, classified as blastic NK-cell-like lymphoma. This case represents a distinct entity derived from precursor cells at an early stage of a common developmental pathway for T and NK cells. The other case was classified as T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma with aberrant expression of CD79a, what could be a diagnostic pitfall. The

  18. More experiences with the Tzanck smear test: cytologic findings in cutaneous granulomatous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Murat; Baba, Mete; Seçkin, Deniz

    2009-09-01

    Granulomatous dermatitis is a distinctive histopathologic cutaneous reaction pattern against various infectious and noninfectious agents. Cytologically, granulomatous dermatitis shows granulomas and multinucleated giant cells. Various etiologic agents of granulomatous diseases can also be identified. We aimed to investigate Tzanck smear findings in granulomatous skin diseases. Patients who had granulomas and/or multinucleated giant cells of Langhans, foreign body- and/or Touton type in Tzanck smear tests were included in the study. In these patients, Tzanck preparations were then further evaluated for additional cytologic findings. Samples stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain were evaluated by the same dermatologist throughout the study. In some patients, methylene blue, Gram and/or Erlich-Ziehl-Nielsen stains were also performed. In all of the study cases, the final diagnosis was established after the evaluation of clinical and laboratory findings (including, when appropriate, potassium hydroxide examination; bacterial, leishmanial, and fungal cultures; histopathology; tuberculosis and leishmania polymerase chain reaction). We also calculated the sensitivity and specificity of the Leishman-Donovan body for cutaneous leishmaniasis. Over a 2-year period, 94 of 950 patients (9.9%) in whom Tzanck smear tests were performed had cytologic findings consistent with a granulomatous reaction. In 74 (78.7%) and 20 (21.3%) patients, the granulomatous reaction was due to infectious and noninfectious causes, respectively. Infectious causes included cutaneous leishmaniasis in 65 patients (87.8%), candidal granuloma in two patients, botyromycosis in two patients, and aspergillosis, blastomycosis, mucormycosis, leprosy, and cutaneous tuberculosis in one patient each. In 58 of 74 patients (78.4%) with infectious granulomatous dermatitis, the causes of the granulomas were identified. Noninfectious granulomatous reactions were due to granuloma annulare in 7 patients, sarcoidosis

  19. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchin, Pedro; Trope, Beatriz Moritz; Fernandes, Larissa Araujo; Barreiros, Glória; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis), it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  20. A 27-Year-Old Severely Immunosuppressed Female with Misleading Clinical Features of Disseminated Cutaneous Sporotrichosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Atiyah; Mudenda, Victor; Lakhi, Shabir; Ngalamika, Owen

    2016-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. It is considered to be a rare condition in most parts of the world. It mostly causes cutaneous infection but can also cause multisystemic disease. Unlike most deep cutaneous mycoses which have a primary pulmonary focus, it is usually caused by direct inoculation of the fungus into the skin causing a classical linear, lymphocutaneous nodular eruption. However, atypical presentations of the condition can occur especially in immunosuppressed individuals. We report the case of a severely immunosuppressed female who presented with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis which was initially diagnosed and treated as disseminated cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. PMID:26881148

  1. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Secchin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed along the lymphatic tract, similar to the lymphocutaneous variant of sporotrichosis. We present a 61-year-old man who, after an insect bite in the left leg, developed an ulcerated lesion associated with ascending lymphangitis, nonresponsive to previous antibiotic therapies. The patient was admitted for investigation, based on the main diagnostic hypothesis of lymphatic cutaneous sporotrichosis entailed by the highly suggestive morphology, associated with the epidemiologic information that he is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite the patient being a resident of the State of Rio de Janeiro (endemic region for sporotrichosis, it is highlighted that it is necessary to be aware of the differential diagnoses of an ulcerated lesion with lymphangitis, favoring an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the illness.

  2. Chronic zosteriform cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidian M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmanasis (CL may present with unusual clinical variants such as acute paronychial, annular, palmoplantar, zosteriform, erysipeloid, and sporotrichoid. The zosteriform variant has rarely been reported. Unusual lesions may be morphologically attributed to an altered host response or owing to an atypical strain of parasites in these lesions. We report a patient with CL in a multidermatomal pattern on the back and buttock of a man in Khozestan province in the south of Iran. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multidermatomal zosteriform CL. It was resistant to conventional treatment but responded well to a combination of meglumine antimoniate, allopurinol, and cryotherapy.

  3. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be in...

  4. Evaluation of Mucorales DNA load in cerebrospinal fluid in a patient with possible cerebral mucormycosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Saito, Shoji; Koike, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old male with possible cerebral mucormycosis following chemotherapy. We detected a Lichtheimia DNA load of 2.0×10(4) copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), although a CSF culture showed no growth. After treatment with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, the Lichtheimia DNA load fell below the detection limit, and at the same time the patient's headache and imaging findings improved. The quantification of Mucorales DNA in CSF may be useful for evaluating cerebral mucormycosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Mucorales DNA load in cerebrospinal fluid in a patient with possible cerebral mucormycosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonari Shigemura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 19-year-old male with possible cerebral mucormycosis following chemotherapy. We detected a Lichtheimia DNA load of 2.0 × 104 copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, although a CSF culture showed no growth. After treatment with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, the Lichtheimia DNA load fell below the detection limit, and at the same time the patient's headache and imaging findings improved. The quantification of Mucorales DNA in CSF may be useful for evaluating cerebral mucormycosis.

  6. RNAi-Based Functional Genomics Identifies New Virulence Determinants in Mucormycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Anh Trieu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are an emerging group of human pathogens that are responsible for the lethal disease mucormycosis. Unfortunately, functional studies on the genetic factors behind the virulence of these organisms are hampered by their limited genetic tractability, since they are reluctant to classical genetic tools like transposable elements or gene mapping. Here, we describe an RNAi-based functional genomic platform that allows the identification of new virulence factors through a forward genetic approach firstly described in Mucorales. This platform contains a whole-genome collection of Mucor circinelloides silenced transformants that presented a broad assortment of phenotypes related to the main physiological processes in fungi, including virulence, hyphae morphology, mycelial and yeast growth, carotenogenesis and asexual sporulation. Selection of transformants with reduced virulence allowed the identification of mcplD, which encodes a Phospholipase D, and mcmyo5, encoding a probably essential cargo transporter of the Myosin V family, as required for a fully virulent phenotype of M. circinelloides. Knock-out mutants for those genes showed reduced virulence in both Galleria mellonella and Mus musculus models, probably due to a delayed germination and polarized growth within macrophages. This study provides a robust approach to study virulence in Mucorales and as a proof of concept identified new virulence determinants in M. circinelloides that could represent promising targets for future antifungal therapies.

  7. Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis in a patient with idiopathic crescentic glomerulonephritis

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    Suzan Sanavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis, caused by mucorales, is an acute, rapidly progressive infection associated with high mortality. Rhino-orbitocerebral infection is the most common variant and is generally seen in association with immune deficiency syndromes. Prompt medical treatment of this infection and debridement decreases the mortality rate. We describe a 47-year-old man with crescentic glomerulonephritis on maintenance prednisolone therapy. He had earlier received steroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapies. Renal functions improved following immunosuppressive treatment. In the third month of maintenance therapy, he presented to us with left-sided facial swelling and bloody nasal discharge. He had high blood sugar and acidic blood pH (ketoacidosis, probably due to steroid therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head and sinuses showed inflammation and mass in the ethmoid sinus and nose with partial septal destruction, proptosis, global destruction of the left eye, brain infarction and carotid artery obliteration. Endoscopic biopsy of the sinuses revealed severe tissue necrosis. Samples of nasal discharge and biopsy tissue showed aseptate hyphae on light microscopy and culture, compatible with Rhizopus. The patient was treated with amphotericin B and multiple wound debridements along with ethmoidectomy and enucleation of the left eye. He was discharged in good general condition but with mild right hemiparesis. On follow-up examination at one year, there were no signs of fungal infection or renal dysfunction.

  8. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Robert A; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J

    2012-07-16

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months' review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  9. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

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    Pol Robert A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2–3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case presentation A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months’ review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. Conclusions This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  10. Corynebacterium ulcerans cutaneous diphtheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Luke S P; Leslie, Asuka; Meltzer, Margie; Sandison, Ann; Efstratiou, Androulla; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    We describe the case of a patient with cutaneous diphtheria caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans who developed a right hand flexor sheath infection and symptoms of sepsis such as fever, tachycardia, and elevated C-reactive protein, after contact with domestic cats and dogs, and a fox. We summarise the epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, diagnosis, therapy, and public health aspects of this disease, with emphasis on improving recognition. In many European countries, C ulcerans has become the organism commonly associated with cutaneous diphtheria, usually seen as an imported tropical disease or resulting from contact with domestic and agricultural animals. Diagnosis relies on bacterial culture and confirmation of toxin production, with management requiring appropriate antimicrobial therapy and prompt administration of antitoxin, if necessary. Early diagnosis is essential for implementation of control measures and clear guidelines are needed to assist clinicians in managing clinical diphtheria. This case was a catalyst to the redrafting of the 2014 national UK interim guidelines for the public health management of diphtheria, released as final guidelines in March, 2015. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in local recurrence of cutaneous melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junqueira, G. Jr.; Bodanese, B.; Boff, M.F.; Espindola, M.B.; Haack, R.L.; Frigeri, C.D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Locally recurrent disease in patients with melanoma is usually defined as cutaneous or subcutaneous arising within 5 cm of the primary site after complete excision of the primary lesion. It may represent residual disease not excised with the primary tumor or the outgrowth of the satellite lesions, which are common with melanoma. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is highly accurate in staging nodal basins at risk of regional metastases in primary melanoma patients and identifies those who may benefit from earlier lymphadenectomy. Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of sentinel lymph node mapping and biopsy in local recurrence of cutaneous melanoma when the primary lesion was less than 1.0mm thick. Three patients with local recurrence of cutaneous melanoma underwent sentinel lymph node mapping and biopsy. All patients underwent preoperative lymphoscintigraphy to identify the lymphatic basin and the site of the sentinel node. All patients subsequently underwent intra-operative lymphatic mapping and selective lymph node biopsy with vital blue dye and hand-held gamma probe. Excised SLN were analysed by conventional histological staining (H and E) and immunohistochemical staining. In all patients the lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy was successful. The SLN biopsy was negative in two patients and positive in one who underwent therapeutic lymph node dissection. Our results indicate that the SLN mapping and biopsy is also possible in patients having local recurrence of cutaneous melanoma. Although long-term results are not available, early results are promising. (author)

  12. Increased virulence of Cunninghamella bertholletiae in experimental pulmonary mucormycosis: correlation with circulating molecular biomarkers, sporangiospore germination and hyphal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Hughes, Johanna E; Cotton, Margaret P; Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan; Gamaletsou, Maria N; Bacher, John D; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Members of the order Mucorales are emerging invasive molds that cause infections in immunocompromised patients. However, little is known about the relation between different species of Mucorales and their virulence in invasive pulmonary mucormycosis. Based upon our earlier epidemiological studies, we hypothesized that Cunninghamella bertholletiae would demonstrate increased virulence. Therefore, we studied the relative virulence of C. bertholletiae (CB), Rhizopus oryzae (RO), R. microsporus (RM), and Mucor circinelloides (MC) in experimental invasive pulmonary mucormycosis in persistently neutropenic rabbits in relation to the fungi in vitro sporangiospore germination rate and hyphal metabolic activity. Rabbits infected with CB demonstrated (1) higher lung weights in comparison to RM (P ≤ 0.05), RO and MC (P ≤ 0.001), (2) pulmonary infarcts in comparison to RO and MC (P ≤ 0.001), (3) tissue fungal burden (CFU/g) vs. MC (P ≤ 0.001), and (4) the lowest survival of 0% (0/18), in comparison to 16% (3/18, P ≤ 0.01) of RM, 81% (21/26) of RO, and 83% (15/18) of MC-infected rabbits (P ≤ 0.001). Serum PCR concentration-time-curve showed the greatest amplitude for CB. Virulence correlated directly with sporangiospore germination rate at 4 h among species, i.e., CB (67-85%) > RM (14-56%) > RO (4-30%) > MC (0%), and hyphal metabolic activity, i.e., CB (1.22-1.51) > MC (0.54-0.64) = RM (0.38-0.41) = RO (0.37-0.59). C. bertholletiae was significantly more virulent in experimental invasive pulmonary mucormycosis than R. microsporus, R. oryzae, and M. circinelloides. In vivo virulence correlated with species-dependent differences of in vitro germination rate and hyphal metabolic activity.

  13. American cutaneous leishmaniasis triggered byelectrocoagulation

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    Sofia Sales Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis is usually transmitted by infected phlebotomine sand fly bites that initiate local cutaneous lesions. Few reports in the literature describe other modes of transmission. We report a case of a previously healthy 59-year-old woman who underwent electrocoagulation to remove seborrheic keratosis confirmed by dermatoscopy. Three months later, a skin fragment tested positive for Leishmania culture; the parasite was identified as L. (V. braziliensis. Trauma may generate inflammatory cascades that favor Leishmania growth and lesion formation in previously infected patients. American cutaneous leishmaniasis is a dynamic disease with unclear pathophysiology because of continually changing environments, demographics, and human behaviors.

  14. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: A rare isolated cutaneous vasculitis

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    Praveen Kumar A Subbanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN is a rare form of cutaneous vasculitis that involves small and medium sized arteries of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue without systemic involvement. It presents with tender subcutaneous nodules, digital gangrene, livedo reticularis and subcutaneous ulcerations. The diagnosis is by skin biopsy and characteristic pathologic feature is a leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the small to medium-sized arterioles of the dermis. We report a rare case of benign cutaneous PAN in a 14-year-old girl who presented with history of fever, subcutaneous nodules with cutaneous ulcer and digital gangrene. The skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis in the dermal vessels. She received treatment with steroids and lesions resolved completely over a period of month.

  15. Medication Related Cutaneous Disorders in End Stage Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    BACKGROUND. In End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients, a wide range of cutaneous manifestations are present which may be due to the medications prescribed. Most patients' with ESRD are on numerous medications for their primary ailment, with transplant patients needing long term steroids and cytotoxics for ...

  16. Cutaneous larva migrans

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    Aleksandra Wieczorek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM is a tropical zoonosis, caused by parasites, usually Ancylostoma braziliense. Humans are an accidental host. Polish patients with CLM are usually tourists visiting tropical and subtropical countries. The first symptoms do not always appear as creeping eruptions, which complicates the diagnosis. Objective. To present the case of a man with CLM after returning from Thailand to Poland and associated diagnostic difficulties. Case report. We present a case of a 28-year-old man who returned to Poland from Thailand. The first symptoms appeared as disseminated pruritic papules. No improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines was observed. The diagnosis was established after the appearance of serpentine erythemas and improvement after albendazole therapy. Conclusions. In the case of returnees from exotic countries suffering from raised, pruritic rashes, and no improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines, parasitic etiology should be considered.

  17. Primary "cutaneous" T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma, CD30+, neutrophil-rich variant with subcutaneous panniculitic lesions, in a post-renal transplant patient: report of unusual case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, S

    2005-06-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) presenting clinically in the skin are rare and usually of B-cell phenotype. Only 7 cases of cutaneous T-cell PTLD have been previously reported, mostly mycosis fungoides type, with no known cases of "cutaneous" presentation by CD30 (Ki-1) anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The case reported is a 59-year-old male who developed multiple skin nodules on the right leg, 6 years following renal transplantation. Initial biopsy showed ALCL involving the dermis with a background rich in neutrophils. The neoplastic cells were of T-cell phenotype, strongly CD30 with typical staining, and BCL-2 positive, but P53 negative. No EBV was detected by IHC, ISH, or DNA analysis. One year later, he developed painful subcutaneous nodules with surrounding erythema, resembling deep pustules or panniculitis, which on biopsy showed preferential involvement of the subcutaneous fat and prominent component of neutrophils. Twenty-two months following diagnosis, he died of cardiac failure with terminal myocardial infarct. There was however no clinical evidence of systemic spread of the lymphoma.This report adds to the clinical and morphologic spectrum of these rare "cutaneous" lymphomas of T-cell lineage arising in the posttransplantation setting, and suggests that EBV does not play a role in their pathogenesis.

  18. Miltefosine in cutaneous leishmaniasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.B.; Mumtaz, N.; Bari, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of oral Miltefosine in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and its comparison with the most effective standard treatment, pentavalent antimony compound. Thirty patients, 12 years of age or older clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as cutaneous leishmaniasis were selected. Fifteen patients received orally administered Miltefosine 2.5mg/kg/day for 28 days and remaining 15 received injectable pentavalent antimony 20mg/kg/day for 28 days. Pre-treatment complete physical examination was done along with necessary laboratory investigations in all cases. These were repeated again after 2 weeks and at the end of treatment to note any deviation from the normal limits. Groups were almost matched in terms of age, weight, parasitological score. The efficacy was evaluated by ulcer size, before therapy, at 2 weeks and 4 weeks. Patients were followed-up at 3 and 6 months. Efficacy of two groups was statistically compared by calculating p-value by z-test. All patients completed the study without any serious complication. Lesions improved significantly and only scarring and post-inflammatory pigmentation was left. At 3 months, cure rate was 93% in group A and it was 73.33% in group B while at the end of 6 months, it was 86% and 66.6% respectively. This difference between efficacies of two groups was not found to be statistically significant (p-value >0.5). Miltefosine appears to be a safe and effective alternative to currently used therapies. The striking advantage of Miltefosine is its oral administration and it may also be helpful in regions where parasites are resistant to current agents. (author)

  19. The successful use of amphotericin B followed by oral posaconazole in a rare case of invasive fungal sinusitis caused by co-infection with mucormycosis and aspergillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharana Mahomed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on an unusual case of oro-rhinocerebral disease caused by mucormycosis and aspergillus co-infection in a 54-year-old insulin dependent diabetic patient. Although she was successfully treated with parenteral amphotericin B followed by oral posaconazole, she was left with irreversible blindness of the right eye and multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  20. Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis from renal cell carcinoma: A case report with review of literature

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    Vishal Dhingra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC in the absence of history of primary tumor is difficult as it can be confused with other clear cell tumors. We report here a case of cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of RCC in a patient who had nephrectomy done 9 years back at some other centre, but did not have any records with him. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of primary internal organ malignancy in patients presenting with cutaneous lesions and therefore conduct a careful examination and get necessary investigations. Prompt diagnosis and treatment will have its bearing on the eventual outcome.

  1. Mucormicosis rinocerebral en paciente con cefalea y diabetes mellitus Rhinocerebral mucormycosis in diabetic patient with headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Botero

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta el caso de un paciente masculino de 52 años, con antecedentes personales de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 en tratamiento con metformín quien consultó por cefalea intensa y congestión nasal. Se diagnosticó una pansinusitis que no respondió al manejo médico. Fue evaluado por medicina interna y otorrinolaringología y se encontraron costras secas, negras, en los cornetes y meatos mediante la fibronasolaringoscopia. Se practicó una resonancia magnética en la que se reportó una lesión en la región temporal izquierda asociada a edema vasogénico. Se programó para drenaje del absceso el cual se realizó sin complicaciones; en el estudio de histopatología se informó la presencia de hifas aseptadas que correspondían a Rhizopus sp. Se inició su manejo con anfotericina B para la mucormicosis rinocerebral con respuesta adecuada y se dio de alta por mejoría de su enfermedad.We report the case of a 52 years old male patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus under metformin therapy that presented with acute headache and nasal congestion. Pansinusitis was diagnosed which did not respond to medical treatment. He was evaluated by the internal medicine and otorrinolaringology departments. In the fibronasolaringoscopy exam black necrotic scars were found in turbinates and meatus. A magnetic resonance was ordered which evidenced a lesion in the left temporal region associated to vasogenic edema. The patient was programmed for abscess drainage without any complications; the histopathological report informed the presence of non septated hyphae compatible with Rhizopus sp. The patient began to receive amphotericyn B for a rhinocerebral mucormycosis with optimal response and was discharged with improvement of his clinical picture.

  2. Cutaneous zygomycosis: A possible postoperative complication in immunocompetent individuals

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    Tilak Ragini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi in the class of zygomycetes usually produce serious infections in diabetics and immunocompromised hosts. Cutaneous zygomycosis is a less common form, with an unpredictable extent of anatomical involvement and clinical course. Here, we report two cases of primary cutaneous zygomycosis as postoperative complications in otherwise healthy females. Zygomycosis was suspected and specimens from the surgical debridement were examined by microbiological and histopathological studies for confirming the clinical diagnosis. Rapid diagnosis, liposomal amphotericin B, and proper debridement of affected tissue are necessary to avoid a fatal outcome.

  3. Prurigo Nodularis With Cutaneous Horn

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    Thadeus Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous horns are rare horny excrescences which occur in various dermatoses. We report a girl with prurigo nodularis who developed a horn on one of the nodules. This unique association has not been reported so far.

  4. Complete Remission Obtained with Azacitidine in a Patient with Concomitant Therapy Related Myeloid Neoplasm and Pulmonary Mucormycosis

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    Saveria Capria

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is the third cause of invasive mycosis after candidiasis and aspergillosis in AML patients, representing a poor prognostic factor associated with a high rate of fatal outcome. We report  a case of a patient with AML and a concomitant pulmonary mucormycosis at diagnosis,  who obtained a  complete remission both of her AML and of the fungal infection. The incidence of the infection at the onset of leukemia is extremely unusual, and, to our knowledge, the sporadic cases reported in the literature are included in heterogeneous series retrospectively examined. In our case, Liposomal Amphotericin B as single agent appeared incapable of controlling the infection, so anti-infective therapy was intensified with posaconazole and simultaneously antileukemic treatment with 5-azacitidine was started, with the understanding that the only antifungal treatment would not have been able to keep the infection under control for a long time if not associated with a reversal of neutropenia related to the disease. We observed a progressive improvement of the general conditions, a healing of pneumonia and a complete remission of the leukemic disease, suggesting that a careful utilization of the new compounds available today, in terms of both antifungal and antileukemic treatment, may offer a curative chance a patient who would have otherwise been considered unfit for a potentially curative therapeutic strategy.

  5. Serial monitoring of Mucorales DNA load in serum samples of a patient with disseminated mucormycosis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sano, Kenji; Yaguchi, Takashi; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Saito, Shoji; Noda, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Honda, Takayuki; Koike, Kenichi

    2014-08-01

    Mucormycosis is a fatal complication in immunocompromised patients, and is additionally difficult to diagnose due to the lack of useful serum biomarkers. Using a quantitative PCR approach, we retrospectively analyzed Mucorales DNA load in sera collected serially from a 3-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease, who died of multi-organ failure probably due to dissemination of Rhizomucor pusillus, which was detected from necropsy specimens. Mucorales DNA load was below the detection limit on days 9, 2, and 4 after unrelated bone marrow transplantation. Rhizomucor DNA was first detected on day 14 (1.6 × 10(3) copies/mL), and subsequently fluctuated between 1.3 × 10(3) and 37.2 × 10(3) copies/mL until day 43. Rhizomucor achieved a peak value of 940.0 × 10(3) copies/mL on day 48 the day before death. The detection or fluctuation of Rhizomucor DNA appeared to be associated with corticosteroid dosages or C-reactive protein levels. This specific, noninvasive, and highly quantitative assay may be useful for the early diagnosis of mucormycosis and prediction of disease progression.

  6. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvoyiannis, Miltiadis; Khromachou, Tamim; Byers, Norman; Hargreaves, James; Murray, Henry W

    2014-09-01

    In the United States, autochthonous cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by infection with Leishmania mexicana has been reported from Texas and Oklahoma. Here, we describe a child with 2 new features: cutaneous infection acquired outside of the south-central United States (in North Dakota) and infection caused by Leishmania donovani species complex. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Linfoma cutâneo primário de grandes células B de apresentação atípica: relato de caso Primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of atypical presentation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio René Diógenes de Sousa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Linfomas cutâneos primários são definidos como neoplasias linfocíticas que se apresentam clinicamente na pele sem doença extracutânea no momento do diagnóstico e até por 6 meses após. Os autores relatam o caso de um paciente masculino, idoso, com história de pápulas em axila, há 3 meses, que evoluíram para ulceração. Ao exame, úlcera profunda de bordos irregulares, infiltrados, em axila direita. Exames físico e complementares não evidenciaram doença à distância. O histopatológico mostra infiltrado dérmico denso e difuso de linfócitos atípicos. A imuno-histoquímica evidencia expressão de antígenos CD20 e bcl-2, com CD10 negativo, configurando diagnóstico de linfoma cutâneo difuso de grandes células B. Neste tipo de linfoma, é rara a manifestação cutânea primária, assim como a incidência é menor em homens e a localização, mais comum em membros inferioresPrimary cutaneous lymphomas are defined as lymphocytic neoplasias that present themselves clinically in the skin without extracutaneous disease at diagnosis and up to 6 months after it. The authors report the case of an elderly male patient, with a three- month-history of papules in the axilla which evolved into painful ulceration. Examination found deep ulcer with irregular borders ,infiltrates, in the right axilla. Physical and additional examinations did not evidence disease at distance. Histopathology revealed dense and diffuse dermic sample infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes. Imunohistochemistry shows expression of CD20 and bcl-2 antigens , with negative CD10, configuring diagnosis of cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma. In this type of cutaneous lymphoma, primary cutaneous manifestation is rare ,the incidence in men is lower and it is most commonly located in the lower limbs

  8. Cutaneous xanthomas with concurrent demodicosis and dermatophytosis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelnest, L J

    2001-07-01

    Multiple cutaneous xanthomas, associated with fasting hyperlipidaemia, are described in a 9-month-old domestic long-haired cat. A severely pruritic, papular, and crusting dermatitis affecting the head and neck, initially diagnosed as lesions of the eosinophilic granuloma complex, progressively developed on the head and pinnae. Pruritus was controlled with administration of prednisolone and chlorambucil. Repeat histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous xanthoma and concurrent mild demodicosis. Marked fasting hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and transient hyperglycaemia were subsequently confirmed. Treatment for hyperlipidaemia and xanthomas with a low-fat diet (Hill's Feline r/d) and the previously unreported treatment for feline demodicosis of daily oral milbemycin were commenced. Multiple pink, alopecic plaques and papules gradually regressed, however pruritus recurred if immunosuppressive treatment was reduced, and well-demarcated areas of alopecia developed on the head, limbs and trunk, despite negative skin scrapings for demodex mites. Fungal culture of hair samples yielded Microsporum canis. All cutaneous lesions resolved with the addition of griseofulvin to the treatment regimen. Concurrent corneal ulceration and keratoconjunctivitis sicca ultimately resolved with treatment, including topical cyclosporin. Diabetes mellitus developed 6 months after resolution of skin lesions. No cutaneous or ocular abnormalities were present 6 months later with continued low-fat diet and insulin administration, although transient recurrence of papules and pruritus occurred after inadvertent access to a fatty meal. An underlying primary hyperlipidaemia was suspected, causing pruritic xanthomas. This may represent the first report of concurrent cutaneous xanthomas, demodicosis and dermatophytosis in a cat.

  9. Metastatic breast disease from cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Lucarelli, Nicola Maria; Martino, Gianluigi; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing cancer in the world. Breast metastases from melanoma are uncommon but could reflect a widespread disease. We report a case of malignant widespread melanoma presenting with bilateral breast nodules in a 39 year-old pre-menopausal Caucasian woman with an history of cutaneous melanoma of the trunk. Breast clinical examination revealed the presence of a hard and mobile lump located on the left breast. Ultrasound detected two bilateral nodules corresponding to oval opacities with well-defined edges and without calcifications or architectural distortion on mammography. Fine needle aspiration cytology performed on both breast nodules confirmed that the breast lesions were metastases from primary cutaneous malignant melanoma. A total-body CT examination detected brain, lung and abdominal lymph nodes metastases. The breast represents an uncommon site of metastatic disease from extra-mammary tumors. Imaging features of breast metastases from melanoma usually do not allow a differential diagnosis with breast primary tumors. Breast metastases may be asymptomatic or palpable as dense and well-circumscribed nodules. Breast metastases indicate a widespread disease and should lead to avoid aggressive surgical procedures because of the poor prognosis of patients affected by metastatic melanoma. The detection of bilateral breast metastases from melanoma is highly suggestive of metastatic multi-organ disease and could be useful to address the therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. MUC1 positive cutaneous metastasis with transepidermal elimination from a breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amalia Luna, Maria Emilia Merino, Cecilio G Alberdi, Martin C Abba, Amada Segal-Eiras, Maria Virginia Croce Center of Basic and Applied Immunological Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of La Plata, Argentina Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cutaneous metastases from internal malignancies. Generally, the neoplastic cells are located in the dermis or hypodermis, while a finding of transepidermal elimination on cutaneous metastases is exceptional. In this report we present a patient with perforating cutaneous metastases from breast cancer with mucin 1 expression. Cutaneous, bone, lung, and hepatic lesions were detected two years after the diagnosis of the primary tumor. Keywords: breast cancer, cutaneous metastasis, transepidermal elimination, MUC1

  11. [Retrospective study of 25 cases of pulmonary mucormycosis in acute leukaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillot, D; Legouge, C; Lafon, I; Ferrant, E; Pagès, P B; Plocque, A; Estivalet, L; Valot, S; Dalle, F; Abou Hanna, H; Chretien, M-L

    2018-04-01

    In acute leukaemia (AL), the occurrence of pulmonary mucormycosis (PM), the incidence of which is increasing, as a result of chemotherapy induced marrow aplasia, remains a life threatening complication. Analysis of clinical, biological and thoracic CT characteristics of patients with PM developing during the treatment of AL between 2000 and 2015. Day 0 (D0) was defined as the day with first CT evidence of PM. Among 1193 patients, 25 cases of PM were recorded during 2099 episodes of bone marrow aplasia. At time of diagnosis of PM, 24/25 patients had been neutropenic for a median of 12 days. None of the patients had diabetes mellitus. On initial CT (D0), the lesion was solitary in 20/25 cases and a reversed halo sign (RHS) was observed in 23/25 cases. From D1 to D7, D8 to D15 and after D15, RHS was seen in 100 %, 75 % and 27 % of cases, respectively. A tissue biopsy was positive in 17/18 cases. The detection of circulating Mucorales DNA in serum was positive in 23/24 patients and in 97/188 serum specimens between D-9 and D9. Bronchoalveolar lavage contributed to diagnosis in only 3/21 cases. The antifungal treatment was mainly based on liposomal amphotericin B combined with, or followed by, posaconazole. A pulmonary surgical resection was performed in 9/25 cases. At 3 months, 76 % of patients were alive and median overall survival was 14 months. In AL, early use of CT could improve the prognosis of PM. The presence of a RHS on CT suggests PM and is an indication for prompt antifungal treatment. Copyright © 2018 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  13. Localized cutaneous sporotrichosis lasting for 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi S

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available A case of localized cutaneous sporotrichosis lasting for 10 years is being reported. The fixed cutaneous variety creates diagnostic difficulty by mimicking other conditions, chiefly lupus vulgaris.

  14. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Bagherani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields.

  15. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  16. Mucormycosis and bone scintillography of three phases. Case description; Mucormicosis y centelleografia osea de tres fases. Descripcion de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis S, M; Larrea R, E; Carrasco R, C A; Garrido A, R A; Olmedo T, D; Perez C, M [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias Ismael Cosio Villegas, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of presenting this work, besides the interest that shows the mucormycosis pathology not so frequent, it is to carry out a clinical correlation photographic with the imagenology, particularly with the bone scintillography. In the Nuclear Medicine Service it is carried out bone scintillography of three phases previous endovenous administration of 30 mCi (1110 MBq) of {sup 99m} Tc-MDP. The images are obtained with a gamma camera model Elscint APEX SPX, first each 2 seconds during the first minute, then early image to the 5 minutes and finally the late ones to the 3 hs. The bone scintillography in the phases 2 and 3 detects bigger radioactive density in left hemi side, with increment of the osteoblast activity mainly in the medial border and the floor of the orbit, in the malar bone and a little more tenuous in the superior maxillary. (Author)

  17. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum; Cancer cutane et xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Carcinologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Sallemi, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Turki, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Dermatologie, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2007-11-15

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  18. The skin in primary immunodeficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, J. Henk; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2005-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders comprise serious and rare diseases, predominantly in children. The skin may be involved in a primary immunodeficiency and the cutaneous alterations such as infections, eczematous dermatitis, erythroderma, autoimmune dermatoses and vasculitis may be the basis for

  19. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis presenting as a necrotic facial mass: Case and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Ma, Chelsea; Fung, Maxwell; Fitzmaurice, Sarah

    2017-07-15

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycotic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a group of common saprophytes of soil, plants, and organic debris. Disseminated forms may be seen in the setting of immunosuppression and are typically treated initially with intravenous lipidized amphotericin B. We report an unusual case of a 65-year-old woman who developed disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis with extensive facial involvement in the absence of a known primary inoculation. Her cutaneous lesions completely resolved after treatment with intravenous posaconazole without amphotericin B.

  20. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis presenting as a necrotic facial mass: Case and review

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yong; Ma, Chelsea; Fung, Maxwell; Fitzmaurice, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycotic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a group of common saprophytes of soil, plants, and organic debris. Disseminated forms may be seen in the setting of immunosuppression and are typically treated initially with intravenous lipidized amphotericin B. We report an unusual case of a 65-year-old woman who developed disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis with extensive facial involvement in the absence of a known primary inoculation. Her cutaneous lesio...

  1. [Primitive cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma: a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplace, M; Mélard, P; Perrinaud, A; Goré, C; Vergier, B; Machet, L

    2011-05-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (or peripheral neuroectodermal tumour) is generally found in bone tissue, and a primary dermal site is extremely rare. We report a case of primary cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma in a 21-year-old woman. A 21-year-old woman presented with a scapular lesion that had been slowly developing for one year. The 1-cm lesion was removed and histological examination showed proliferation of small round cells in the dermis. Immunostaining revealed cytoplasmic membrane expression of CD99 and a negative immunoprofile for other small round-cell tumors. Ewing's sarcoma fusion gene transcripts were detected using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A staging examination revealed no other abnormalities. It was decided to treat the lesion as for osseous Ewing's sarcoma with wide resection followed by systemic adjuvant chemotherapy. Cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma raises concerns about diagnosis and treatment. Owing to the non-specificity of its clinical presentation, histology and immunoprofile, diagnosis of superficial Ewing's sarcoma is difficult and numerous differential diagnoses must be considered. When dealing with a surface tumour, the diagnosis of cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma must be considered. CD99 immunostaining and molecular testing for evidence of EWSR1 rearrangement are useful investigations to confirm the diagnosis. Furthermore, modalities of treatment must be carefully discussed. Cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma is currently treated in the same way as osseous Ewing's sarcoma (wide surgical excision, adjuvant radiotherapy when surgical margins are unsatisfactory, systemic adjuvant chemotherapy, and, in some cases, bone marrow transplant). However, some studies show a more favourable prognosis for cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma than for osseous Ewing's sarcoma. We may thus ask whether such aggressive multimodal treatment is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Sporotrichoid pattern of cutaneous nocardiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A young male patient, having linearly arranged nodular lesions on lower extremity was diagnosed to have lymphocutaneous variety of cutaneous nocardiosis. This is a rare entity and has to be differentiated form other causes of nodular lymphangitis. The patient responded dramatically to Cotrimoxazole therapy.

  3. Orbito-Maxillofacial Cutaneous Anthrax

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and development of a black eschar were reviewed. Occupational history, falls and/or contact with animal meat was ... and oral ciprofloxacin (500mg BD for 21 days). The culture results isolated Bacillus anthracis highly ... The clinical evolution of cutaneous anthrax is typical with the initial development of minute red macules.

  4. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  5. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J.; Sallemi, T.; Turki, H.

    2007-01-01

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis with secondary cutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Saadia; Rahman, Atiya; Herekar, Fivzia; Masood, Sadia

    2013-09-16

    Cryptococcosis is a potentially fatal fungal disease caused by variants of Cryptococcus neoformans species.  The respiratory tract is the usual portal of entry, with a peculiar predilection to invade the central nervous system.  The skin can be secondarily involved in disseminated infection or be exceptionally involved as primary cutaneous infection by inoculation.  The disease is mostly seen in immunodeficiency states.  The diagnosis is frequently unsuspected in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated cryptococcal meningitis in an immunocompetent young adult. The cutaneous eruption prompted the accurate diagnosis.  The patient, a 20-year-old female, had fever, cough, headache and intractable vomiting for the past two months and was being managed as a case of tuberculous meningitis. Two weeks after starting antituberculous treatment she developed umbilicated papules on the head and neck region. Necessary laboratory workup identified C. neoformans in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skin specimens.  The titers of cryptococcal antigen were measured in CSF and serum for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.  Anti-fungal treatment resulted in regression of the cutaneous lesions and resolution of systemic complaints. The case highlights the need for high degree of suspicion, especially in healthy young adults, in the diagnosis of cryptococcosis. The cutaneous eruptions can be the first manifestation or a diagnostic clue of enormous significance.

  7. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV...... postoperatively, UV-irradiated cicatrices healing by second intention: (i) were significantly pointed out as the most disfiguring; (ii) obtained significantly higher scores of colour, infiltration and cicatrix area; and (iii) showed significantly higher increase in skin-reflectance measurements of skin......-pigmentation vs. non-irradiated cicatrices. No histological, immunohistochemical or biochemical differences were found. In conclusion, postoperative UV exposure aggravates the clinical appearance of cicatrices in humans....

  8. Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, L W; Datta, P; Heydenreich, J

    2013-01-01

    Background  It has been reported that patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a second primary melanoma by limiting recreational sun exposure. Previous studies based on questionnaires and objective surrogate measurements indicate that before their diagnosis......, patients with CMM are exposed to higher ultraviolet radiation (UVR) doses than controls, followed by a reduction after diagnosis. Objectives  In a prospective, observational case-control study, we aimed to assess sun exposure after diagnosis of CMM by objective measurements to substantiate advice about sun...... months and 6 years before the start of the study. During a summer season participants filled in sun exposure diaries daily and wore personal electronic UVR dosimeters in a wristwatch that continuously measured time-stamped UVR doses in standard erythema dose. Results  The UVR dose of recently diagnosed...

  9. Usefulness of molecular biology performed with formaldehyde-fixed paraffin embedded tissue for the diagnosis of combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in an immunocompromised patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vénissac Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunocompromised patients who develop invasive filamentous mycotic infections can be efficiently treated if rapid identification of the causative fungus is obtained. We report a case of fatal necrotic pneumonia caused by combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in a 66 year-old renal transplant recipient. Aspergillus was first identified during the course of the disease by cytological examination and culture (A. fumigatus of bronchoalveolar fluid. Hyphae of Mucorales (Rhizopus microsporus were subsequently identified by culture of a tissue specimen taken from the left inferior pulmonary lobe, which was surgically resected two days before the patient died. Histological analysis of the lung parenchyma showed the association of two different filamentous mycoses for which the morphological features were evocative of aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the definitive identification of the associative infection was made by polymerase chain reaction (PCR performed on deparaffinized tissue sections using specific primers for aspergillosis and mucormycosis. This case demonstrates that discrepancies between histological, cytological and mycological analyses can occur in cases of combined mycotic infection. In this regard, it shows that PCR on selected paraffin blocks is a very powerful method for making or confirming the association of different filamentous mycoses and that this method should be made available to pathology laboratories.

  10. SOLAR RADIATION AS A RISK FACTOR FOR CUTANEOUS MELANOMA: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Pesce

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a particularly aggressive type of skin cancer, and its incidence has been increasing steadily since the 1970s. In this article we have reviewed the main risk factors for this disease in particular: sun exposure, the use of tanning beds or sunlamps and skin phototype. We also mention the importance of primary prevention in subjects at risk to reduce the onset of cutaneous melanoma.

  11. Cutaneous metastasis: clinicopathological study of 72 patients from a tertiary care center in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, Jinane; Khalifeh, Ibrahim; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Abbas, Ossama

    2014-02-01

    Cutaneous metastasis is the result of malignant cell spread from primary malignancy to the skin. This is not uncommon, and rates reported in the literature are as high as 10.4%. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies assessing the epidemiologic, clinical, and histopathological features of cutaneous metastasis in our region. To assess the clinical and histopathological findings of all patients diagnosed with cutaneous metastasis at the American University of Beirut - Medical Center (AUB-MC) and to compare our findings with those published in the literature. Retrospective clinical and histopathologic evaluation of all cases diagnosed as cutaneous metastasis at AUB-MC between 1992 and 2010. A total of 72 patients (50 females and 22 males) were identified. The mean age at diagnosis was 55.2 years. The most common primary cancer was breast cancer in women and laryngeal cancer in men. The most common clinical presentation was a single nodule in 27% of cases followed by multiple nodules in 23%. Cutaneous metastasis lesions were asymptomatic in the majority. The chest was the most commonly affected site. On microscopy, the majority of metastatic cases were adenocarcinomas (74%). This is, to our knowledge, the first study characterizing the epidemiological, clinical, and histopathological features of cutaneous metastasis in the Lebanese population. The clinical and histopathological features observed were in concordance with the published literature, with minor differences. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. A 27-Year-Old Severely Immunosuppressed Female with Misleading Clinical Features of Disseminated Cutaneous Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyah Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic granulomatous mycosis caused by fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. It is considered to be a rare condition in most parts of the world. It mostly causes cutaneous infection but can also cause multisystemic disease. Unlike most deep cutaneous mycoses which have a primary pulmonary focus, it is usually caused by direct inoculation of the fungus into the skin causing a classical linear, lymphocutaneous nodular eruption. However, atypical presentations of the condition can occur especially in immunosuppressed individuals. We report the case of a severely immunosuppressed female who presented with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis which was initially diagnosed and treated as disseminated cutaneous Kaposi’s sarcoma.

  13. Isolated cutaneous involvement in a child with nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhu Mendiratta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a common childhood T-cell and B-cell neoplasm that originates primarily from lymphoid tissue. Cutaneous involvement can be in the form of a primary extranodal lymphoma, or secondary to metastasis from a non-cutaneous location. The latter is uncommon, and isolated cutaneous involvement is rarely reported. We report a case of isolated secondary cutaneous involvement from nodal anaplastic large cell lymphoma (CD30 + and ALK + in a 7-year-old boy who was on chemotherapy. This case is reported for its unusual clinical presentation as an acute febrile, generalized papulonodular eruption that mimicked deep fungal infection, with the absence of other foci of systemic metastasis.

  14. Testicular choriocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis in a 19-year-old man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toberer, Ferdinand; Enk, Alexander; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Grüllich, Carsten

    2018-07-01

    A 19-year-old man suffering from testicular choriocarcinoma presented to the dermatology department with a cutaneous metastasis on his head. This metastasis was the first sign of disease that led to medical consultation. Histopathology revealed cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts, the later expressing human chorionic gonadotropin antigen. Whole body computed tomography showed multiple metastases of the brain, lung, liver, bone, paraaortic lymph nodes and left uvea; the primary was found in the left testicle. Despite neurosurgical intervention and chemotherapy the patient died 9 days after the biopsy of the cutaneous metastasis. Cutaneous metastases of testicular choriocarcinoma are exceptionally rare, with fewer than a dozen cases reported in the English-language literature. The present case highlights that testicular choriocarcinoma metastatic to the skin should be included in the differential of cutaneous scalp tumors. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Unusual presentation of cutaneous leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapnashree Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a case of leiomyoma cutis because of its rarity and unusual presentation. The case presented with a solitary leiomyoma lesion which was painless. However, the adjacent normal appearing area was tender. A biopsy of the lesion as well as of a portion of the adjacent normal appearing area was taken, which confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. This may suggest the dormant nature of the disease which has not yet become apparent.

  16. Unusual presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahiry Anup Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leis hmaniasis is endemic in some regions of Saudi Arabia. A case with uncommon hyperkeratotic type of lesion was seen. Being an endemic zone, a slit- skin smear was done and stained with Giemsa′s stain. Smears howed Leishman Donovan bodies within and outside the macrophages. Significant improvement, followed by complete resolution of the lesion was seen with ketoconazole treatment.

  17. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  18. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum of a metastatic adenocarcinoma.

  19. Cutaneous Chromatophoromas in Captive Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, J F; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2016-11-01

    Chromatophoromas are neoplasms arising from pigment-bearing cells (chromatophores) of the dermis. While isolated cases have been reported in the literature, the prevalence and biological behavior of chromatophoromas in snakes are unknown. Forty-two chromatophoromas were identified among 4663 submissions (0.9%) to a private diagnostic laboratory in a 16-year period. The most commonly affected snakes were colubrids (23 cases, 55%) and vipers (8 cases, 19%). The San Francisco garter snake was the most commonly affected species (6 cases; 14% of all affected snake species and 3.7% of all garter snake submissions). No sex predilection was found. The age of 28 snakes ranged from 5 to 27 years. Single cutaneous chromatophoromas were most commonly observed and presented as pigmented cutaneous masses or plaques along any body segment. Euthanasia or death due to progressive neoplastic disease or metastasis was reported in 8 (19%) and 4 (10%) cases, respectively. The survival time of 4 animals ranged from 4 to 36 months. Microscopically, xanthophoromas, iridophoromas, melanocytic neoplasms, and mixed chromatophoromas were identified, with melanocytic neoplasms being most common. Microscopic examination alone was generally sufficient for the diagnosis of chromatophoroma, but immunohistochemistry for S-100 and PNL-2 may be helpful for diagnosing poorly pigmented cases. Moderate to marked nuclear atypia appears to be consistently present in cutaneous chromatophoromas with a high risk of metastasis, while mitotic count, lymphatic invasion, the level of infiltration, and the degree of pigmentation or ulceration were not reliable predictors of metastasis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ting Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a rare gastrointestinal tumor. Additionally, cutaneous metastasis from such an internal malignancy is also uncommon. We reported the case of a 55-year-old man afflicted with ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. The patient did not undergo the standard Whipple procedure but received chemotherapy due to apparent left neck lymph node metastasis noted by initial PET/CT imaging. The skin metastasis presented as a left neck infiltrating purpuric lesion, which was confirmed by skin biopsy approximately one year after the patient's disease was first diagnosed. Thereafter, the patient received further chemotherapy pursuant to his course of medical management. Skin metastasis usually represents a poor patient prognosis. In these cases, treatment of cutaneous metastasis typically includes systemic chemotherapy and local management such as radiation therapy or tumor excision. And when choosing a chemotherapy regimen for the ampullary cancer, the histological subtypes (intestinal or pancreatobiliary should be comprehensively considered. In our review of the literature, the intestinal type seems to have less distant lymph node metastasis, advanced local invasion, as well as recurrence than pancreatobiliary type of ampullary cancer.

  1. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in patient with alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Benvegnú

    Full Text Available Abstract Sporotrichosis is the most prevalent subcutaneous mycosis and is characterized by a subacute or chronic development of a cutaneous or subcutaneous nodular lesion. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix spp, which may manifest in different clinical forms. The disseminated cutaneous form is uncommon and is more likely to occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a 47-year-old male patient with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules. The patient was diagnosed with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis based on the isolation and identification of Sporothrix spp. The patient was treated with potassium iodide, which resulted in clinical improvement of the lesions.

  2. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in patient with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvegnú, Ana Maria; Stramari, Juliana; Dallazem, Lia Natália Diehl; Chemello, Raíssa Massaia Londero; Beber, André Avelino Costa

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the most prevalent subcutaneous mycosis and is characterized by a subacute or chronic development of a cutaneous or subcutaneous nodular lesion. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix spp, which may manifest in different clinical forms. The disseminated cutaneous form is uncommon and is more likely to occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a 47-year-old male patient with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules. The patient was diagnosed with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis based on the isolation and identification of Sporothrix spp. The patient was treated with potassium iodide, which resulted in clinical improvement of the lesions.

  3. Localized cutaneous mucinosis associated with multiple myeloma: A rare presentation

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    Parvaiz Anwar Rather

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen myxoedematosus (LM, a form of primary cutaneous mucinosis, may present either as localized less severe form called papular mucinosis or diffuse more severe form called scleromyxoedema. The diffuse form is almost always associated with monoclonal gammopathy, whereas localized form is not. We report an atypical case of localized form of LM associated with multiple myeloma in a 66-year-old male, who presented with asymptomatic waxy papular eruption on extremities, which on histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous mucinosis. After initially being put on steroids and hydroxychloroquine with minimal improvement, patient subsequently presented with encephalopathy and on evaluation revealed hypernatremia, hypercalcemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, reversal of albumin-globulin (A/G ratio, azotemia, and lytic lesions in skull X-ray. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy confirmed multiple myeloma. Patient was successfully treated with standard treatment regimen for multiple myeloma with bortezumib and dexamethasone and his skin lesions subsided completely.

  4. Breast Cancer Mimic: Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as an Isolated Breast Mass

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    Margaret Taghavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma typically localizes to the skin, and dissemination to internal organs is rare. Lymphomatous involvement of the breasts is also rare. We describe the clinical and radiological findings of an unusual case of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma presenting as an isolated breast mass without associated skin changes. Case Presentation: The patient was a 55-year-old Caucasian female who initially presented with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma around her eyes and forehead with recurrence involving the skin between her breasts. Three years after terminating treatment due to a lack of symptoms, she presented for an annual screening mammogram that found a new mass in her upper inner right breast without imaging signs of cutaneous extension. On physical examination, there were no corresponding skin findings. Due to the suspicious imaging features of the mass that caused concern for primary breast malignancy, she underwent a core biopsy which revealed cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion: When evaluating patients with a systemic disease who present with findings atypical for that process, it is important to still consider the systemic disease as a potential etiology, particularly with lymphoma given its reputation as a great mimicker.

  5. Effects of kinesthetic and cutaneous stimulation during the learning of a viscous force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Giulio; Oscari, Fabio; Pacchierotti, Claudio; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Haptic stimulation can help humans learn perceptual motor skills, but the precise way in which it influences the learning process has not yet been clarified. This study investigates the role of the kinesthetic and cutaneous components of haptic feedback during the learning of a viscous curl field, taking also into account the influence of visual feedback. We present the results of an experiment in which 17 subjects were asked to make reaching movements while grasping a joystick and wearing a pair of cutaneous devices. Each device was able to provide cutaneous contact forces through a moving platform. The subjects received visual feedback about joystick's position. During the experiment, the system delivered a perturbation through (1) full haptic stimulation, (2) kinesthetic stimulation alone, (3) cutaneous stimulation alone, (4) altered visual feedback, or (5) altered visual feedback plus cutaneous stimulation. Conditions 1, 2, and 3 were also tested with the cancellation of the visual feedback of position error. Results indicate that kinesthetic stimuli played a primary role during motor adaptation to the viscous field, which is a fundamental premise to motor learning and rehabilitation. On the other hand, cutaneous stimulation alone appeared not to bring significant direct or adaptation effects, although it helped in reducing direct effects when used in addition to kinesthetic stimulation. The experimental conditions with visual cancellation of position error showed slower adaptation rates, indicating that visual feedback actively contributes to the formation of internal models. However, modest learning effects were detected when the visual information was used to render the viscous field.

  6. Many faces of cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Bari Arfan Ul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is known for its clinical diversity and increasing numbers of new and rare variants of the disease are being reported these days. Aim: The aim of this descriptive study was to look for and report the atypical presentations of this common disease occurring in Pakistan. Methods: The study was carried out in three hospitals (MH, Rawalpindi; PAF Hospital, Sargodha; and CMH, Muzaffarabad from 2002 to 2006. Military and civilian patients of all ages, both males and females, belonging to central and north Punjab province and Kashmir were included in the study. Clinical as well as parasitological features of cutaneous leishmaniasis were studied. The unusual lesions were photographed and categorized accordingly using simple descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 718 patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis, 41 (5.7% had unusual presentations. The commonest among unusual morphologies was lupoid leishmaniasis 14 (34.1%, followed by sporotrichoid 5 (12.1%, paronychial 3 (7.3%, lid leishmaniasis 2 (4.9%, psoriasiform 2 (4.9%, mycetoma-like 2 (4.9%, erysipeloid 2 (4.9%, chancriform 2 (4.9%, whitlow 1 (2.4%, scar leishmaniasis 1 (2.4%, DLE-like 1 (2.4%, ′squamous cell carcinoma′-like 1 (2.4%, zosteriform 1 (2.4%, eczematous 1 (2.4%, verrucous 1 (2.4%, palmar/plantar 1 (2.4% and mucocutaneous 1 (2.4%. Conclusion: In Pakistan, an endemic country for CL, the possibility of CL should be kept in mind while diagnosing common dermatological diseases like erysipelas, chronic eczema, herpes zoster, paronychia; and uncommon disorders like lupus vulgaris, squamous cell carcinoma, sporotrichosis, mycetoma and other deep mycoses.

  7. Cutaneous lesions in new born

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    Sachdeva Meenakshi

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Five hundred unselected newborn babies delivered in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit II of SGBT Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar during April 2000 to October 2000 were examined for cutaneous lesions daily for the first five days after birth. Different cutaneous lesions were seen in 474(94. 8% newborns. The physiological skin changes observed in order of frequency were Epstein pearls in 305(61%, Mongolian spot in 301(60. 2%, superficial cutaneous desquamation in 200(40%, icterus in 128(25. 6%, milia in 119(23. 8%, sebaceous gland hyperplasia in 107 (21. 4%, occipital alopecia in 94(18. 8%, lanugo in 72(14. 4%, peripheral cyanosis in 47(9. 4%, breast hypertrophy in 29(5. 8% and miniature puberty in 28(5. 6% newborns. Of the transient non-infective skin diseases, erythema toxicum neonatorum was observed most commonly in 105(21 %, followed by miliaria rubra in 103(20. 6% and acne neonatorum in 27(5. 4% newborns. The naevi and other developmental defects in the descending order were salmon patch in 69(13. 8%, congenital melanocytic noevi in 10(2%, accessory tragi in 3(0.6%, spina bifida in 2(0.4%, hydrocephalus in 1(0.2% and poliosis in 1(0.2% newborns. Cradle cap was the only dermatitis observed in 50(10% newborns. One (0.2% case each of Harlequin ichthyosis and labial cyst was seen.

  8. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with Unusual Presentation

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    N Bagherani

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nThis case report states a 25-year-old woman, residing in the city of Dezfool, Khuzestan Province, south of Iran with the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis in June 2008. Her skin lesion had de­veloped from 8 months earlier as a nodule on her left arm, 1×3 cm in diameter. Because of sever­ity of the lesion, we prescribed meglumine antimoniate intralesionally with giving up her breast feeding. After 6 months follow-up, no recurrence was seen.

  9. BAP1 PLAYS A SURVIVAL ROLE IN CUTANEOUS MELANOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Miao, Benchun; Ji, Zhenyu; Njauw, Jenny Ching-Ni; Jönsson, Göran; Frederick, Dennie Tompers; Tsao, Hensin

    2014-01-01

    Although the pattern of BAP1 inactivation in ocular melanoma specimens and in the BAP1 cutaneous/ocular melanoma (CM/OM) predisposition syndrome suggests a tumor suppressor function, the specific role of this gene in the pathogenesis of cutaneous melanoma is not fully understood. We thus set out to characterize BAP1 in cutaneous melanoma and discovered an unexpected pro-survival effect of this protein. Tissue and cell lines analysis showed that BAP1 expression was maintained, rather than lost, in primary melanomas compared to nevi and normal skin. Genetic depletion of BAP1 in melanoma cells reduced proliferation and colony forming capability, induced apoptosis and inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. On the molecular level, suppression of BAP1 led to a concomitant drop in the protein levels of survivin a member of anti-apoptotic proteins and a known mediator of melanoma survival. Restoration of survivin in melanoma cells partially rescued the growth-retarding effects of BAP1 loss. In contrast to melanoma cells, stable overexpression of BAP1 into immortalized but non-transformed melanocytes did suppress proliferation and reduce survivin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that BAP1 may play a growth-sustaining role in melanoma cells, but that its impact on ubiquitination underpins a complex physiology which is context and cell dependent. PMID:25521456

  10. On a Rare Cutaneous Metastasis from a Sacrococcygeal Chordoma

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    Alessandro D’Amuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordomas are rare malignant tumors of notochordal origin and are rare locally aggressive ones with a metastatic potential. The skin rarely is seen as metastatic site. We describe a case of an adult woman with cutaneous metastasis of a primary sacral chordoma excised ten years before, which appeared as a painless cutaneous mass located in the dorsal region. Once removed, the surgical specimen was formalin fixed and in paraffin embedded. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin, and histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations were performed. Histologically, the neoplasia was characterized by cords or single tumor cells with an abundant myxoid stroma, conspicuous pale vacuolated cytoplasm (the classic “physaliphorous cells”, and mild nuclear atypia. Mitotic activity was scanty. At immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells were diffusely positive for S-100 protein, pan-keratins, EMA, and vimentin. A diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of chordoma was performed. This case illustrates a diagnostic challenge because of the unusual presentation of an already rare tumor.

  11. Cutaneous melanoma – guidelines for diagnostics and therapy in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Rutkowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dermoscopy is currently the standard method for clinical differential diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma and for qualifying a lesion for excisional biopsy. Full thickness excisional biopsy of suspicious melanomatous skin lesions likely to be diagnosed as early melanomas is crucial in establishing the diagnosis and defining prognostic factors. Early diagnosis and surgical removal of cutaneous melanoma not only improves patients’ prognosis but is also associated with approximately 90% likelihood of cure. The next steps in the therapeutic management of cutaneous melanoma following excisional biopsy are radical scar excision with adequate margins and sentinel lymph node biopsy. Radical lymph node dissection is recommended in the case of regional lymph node metastases. High-risk patients (lymph node involvement and/or ulcerated primary lesion should be advised to participate in prospective clinical trials on adjuvant therapy. Melanoma patients with distant metastases are still characterized by poor outcomes. In patients with metastatic disease testing for the presence of BRAF gene mutation is mandatory. Patients with metastatic disease should be considered for participation in clinical trials. Long-term survival is confined to a selected group of patients undergoing resection of isolated metastatic lesions. In systemic – mainly first-line – therapy of patients with BRAF V600 mutation the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib or dabrafenib (preferentially in combination with a MEK inhibitor may be employed and independently of mutational status immunotherapy with anti-PD-1 antibodies (nivolumab or pembrolizumab and eventually ipilimumab (anti-CTLA4 antibody may be used.

  12. Cutaneous sporotrichosis: Unusual clinical presentations

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    Mahajan Vikram

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three unusual clinical forms of sporotrichosis described in this paper will be a primer for the clinicians for an early diagnosis and treatment, especially in its unusual presentations. Case 1, a 52-year-old man, developed sporotrichosis over pre-existing facial nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma of seven-year duration, due to its contamination perhaps from topical herbal pastes and lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis over right hand/forearm from facial lesion/herbal paste. Case 2, a 25-year-old woman, presented with disseminated systemic-cutaneous, osteoarticular and possibly pleural (effusion sporotrichosis. There was no laboratory evidence of tuberculosis and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs (ATT did not benefit. Both these cases were diagnosed by histopathology/culture of S. schenckii from tissue specimens. Case 3, a 20-year-old girl, had multiple intensely pruritic, nodular lesions over/around left knee of two-year duration. She was diagnosed clinically as a case of prurigo nodularis and histologically as cutaneous tuberculosis, albeit, other laboratory investigations and treatment with ATT did not support the diagnosis. All the three patients responded well to saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI therapy. A high clinical suspicion is important in early diagnosis and treatment to prevent chronicity and morbidity in these patients. SSKI is fairly safe and effective when itraconazole is not affordable/ available.

  13. [Cutaneous mastocytosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegpi-Trueba, María Soledad; Hasbún-Acuña, Paula; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis represents a group of diseases characterised by an excesive accumulation of mastocytes in one or multiple tissues. It can affect only the skin, or have a systemic involvement. It has a low prevalence, and the prognosis is benign in children. To report a case of urticaria pigmentosa as a subtype of cutaneous mastocytosis, and present a literature review focused on clinical findings, diagnosis and initial basic management. A child of six months of age presenting with multiple blemishes and light brown papules located on the trunk, arms and legs. The symptoms were compatible with urticaria pigmentosa, and was confirmed by biopsy. Tests to rule out systemic involvement were requested. The patient was treated with general measures, education, and antihistamines, with favourable results. Cutaneous mastocytosis is a rare disease with a good prognosis. In childhood general measures and education are usually enough to obtain favourable results. Histamine H1 antagonists are the first line drug treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Insight into the epidemiology of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with perineural spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Timothy A; Whiteman, David C; Porceddu, Sandro V; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-09-01

    Perineural spread (PNS) of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) can be associated with poor outcomes. Disease understanding and awareness is limited leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify epidemiological features of patients with PNS of cutaneous SCCHN. Tumor characteristics and demographics of patients with PNS of cutaneous SCCHN managed through a single institution were collected between 1998 and 2013. One hundred twenty patients were included in this study. The majority had a history of skin cancer (85.8%). The median time from primary tumor treatment to PNS symptom onset was 16 months (range, 1-86 months). A total of 34.2% had no perineural invasion (PNI) detected in the primary, and 22.5% had no known primary tumor. Only 5.8% of the patients had nodal involvement at presentation. Patients can present with PNS from cutaneous SCCHN with no known primary tumor or with primary tumors without PNI. The majority of patients presented without regional nodal involvement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1416-1420, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  16. Is It Time to Include CT "Reverse Halo Sign" and qPCR Targeting Mucorales in Serum to EORTC-MSG Criteria for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Mucormycosis in Leukemia Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillot, Denis; Valot, Stéphane; Lafon, Ingrid; Basmaciyan, Louise; Chretien, Marie Lorraine; Sautour, Marc; Million, Laurence; Legouge, Caroline; Payssot, Alexandre; Dalle, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    In 23 leukemia patients with proven (n = 17) or possible (n = 6) pulmonary mucormycosis (PM), the presence of reversed halo sign on computed tomography was strongly associated with the positivity of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting Mucorales in the serum, confirming the value of these two tools for the diagnosis of PM in this setting.

  17. Heterothallic mating in Mucor irregularis and first isolate of the species outside of Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports on the discovery of heterothallic mating in Mucor irregularis (formerly Rhizomucor variabilis var. variabilis) and it extends the range of this species from Asia to the United States. We report on a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis, involving the forearms of a cotton farmer ...

  18. American cutaneous leishmaniasis triggered by electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Sofia Sales; Santos, Adriana de Oliveira; Lima, Beatriz Dolabela; Gomes, Ciro Martins; Sampaio, Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro

    2018-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is usually transmitted by infected phlebotomine sand fly bites that initiate local cutaneous lesions. Few reports in the literature describe other modes of transmission. We report a case of a previously healthy 59-year-old woman who underwent electrocoagulation to remove seborrheic keratosis confirmed by dermatoscopy. Three months later, a skin fragment tested positive for Leishmania culture; the parasite was identified as L. (V.) braziliensis. Trauma may generate inflammatory cascades that favor Leishmania growth and lesion formation in previously infected patients. American cutaneous leishmaniasis is a dynamic disease with unclear pathophysiology because of continually changing environments, demographics, and human behaviors.

  19. Cutaneous findings in five cases of malaria

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    Jignesh B Vaishnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. Cutaneous lesions in malaria are rarely reported and include urticaria, angioedema, petechiae, purpura, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Here, five malaria cases associated with cutaneous lesions have been described. Out of the five cases of malaria, two were associated with urticaria and angioedema, one case was associated with urticaria, and other two were associated with reticulated blotchy erythema with petechiae. Most of the cutaneous lesions in malaria were nonspecific and reflected the different immunopathological mechanism in malarial infection.

  20. Malignant T cells express lymphotoxin alpha and drive endothelial activation in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Christensen, Louise; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    Lymphotoxin α (LTα) plays a key role in the formation of lymphatic vasculature and secondary lymphoid structures. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is the most common primary lymphoma of the skin and in advanced stages, malignant T cells spreads through the lymphatic to regional lymph nodes...

  1. Lipid composition of the stratum corneum and cutaneous water loss in birds along an aridity gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champagne, Alex M.; Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Shtayyeh, Tamer; Tieleman, B. Irene; Hegemann, Arne; Clement, Michelle E.; Williams, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular and covalently bound lipids within the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis, are the primary barrier to cutaneous water loss (CWL) in birds. We compared CWL and intercellular SC lipid composition in 20 species of birds from desert and mesic environments.

  2. Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma : classification, prognostic factors and management recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senff, Nancy Johanna

    2009-01-01

    The term primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas refers to a heterogeneous group of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, that present in the skin without evidence of extracutaneous disease at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, there has been considerable debate regarding the classification and terminology

  3. Cutaneous Metastasis of Medullary Carcinoma Thyroid Masquerading as Subcutaneous Nodules Anterior Chest and Mandibular Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis of underlying primary malignancies can present to dermatologist with chief complaints of cutaneous lesions. The underlying malignancy is generally diagnosed much later after a complete assessment of the concerned case. Medullary carcinoma thyroid (MCT is a relatively uncommon primary neoplasia of the thyroid. Very few cases presenting as cutaneous metastases of MCT have been reported in the literature. Most of the cases which have been reported are of the papillary and the follicular types. We here report a case of a patient who presented in the dermatology clinic with the primary complaint of multiple subcutaneous nodules in anterior chest wall and left side of body of mandible. By systematic application of clinical and diagnostic skills these nodules were diagnosed as cutaneous metastasis of MCT bringing to the forefront a history of previously operated thyroid neoplasm. So clinically, the investigation of a flesh coloured subcutaneous nodule, presenting with a short duration, particularly in scalp, jaw, or anterior chest wall should include possibility of metastastic deposits. A dermatologist should keep a possibility of an internal organ malignancy in patients while investigating a case of flesh coloured subcutaneous nodules, presenting with short duration. A systematic application of clinical and diagnostic skills will eventually lead to such a diagnosis even when not suspected clinically at its primary presentation. A prompt and an emphatic diagnosis and treatment will have its bearing on the eventual outcome in all these patients.

  4. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  5. Cutaneous tuberculosis, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilamani Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous tuberculosis because of its variability in presentation, wider differential diagnosis, and difficulty in obtaining microbiological confirmation continues to be the most challenging to diagnose for dermatologists in developing countries. Despite the evolution of sophisticated techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA, the sensitivity of new methods are not better than the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosum in culture. Even in the 21 st century, we rely on methods as old as the intradermal reaction purified protein derivative standard test and therapeutic trials, as diagnostic tools. We describe a case which has been diagnosed and treated as eczema by renowned physicians for 2 years. Incisional biopsy showed the presence of well-defined granulomas and ZN staining of the biopsy specimen showed the presence of acid fast bacilli; a trial of ATT (antitubercular therapy for 6 months lead to permanent cure of the lesion.

  6. A STUDY OF AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN THE OCCURRENCE OF CUTANEOUS VASCULITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN NORTH KERALA

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    Praveen Malayath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cutaneous vasculitis is a condition caused by various aetiologies. They can be primary or secondary. Cutaneous lesions maybe a pointer to systemic diseases. So, it is important to identify the various aetiological factors in the occurrence of the various types of cutaneous vasculitis. The patterns and the various aetiologies of cutaneous vasculitis in Kerala is not well documented in the existing literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive study of patients with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis admitted in Medicine and Dermatology Wards of Calicut, Government Medical College during January 2013 to December 2013. A detailed history and clinical examination of patients along with histopathological examination of skin biopsy was done. RESULTS Out of the 70 cases of cutaneous vasculitis studied, idiopathic cutaneous small vessel vasculitis was the most common type followed by Henoch-Schonlein purpura. The most common aetiology identified was drugs followed by infections. No aetiological factor was identified in 42.8% of the cases. CONCLUSION An aetiological association could be found in 57.8% of cases. The causes identified include drugs, infections, malignancy, connective tissue disorder associated, chronic systemic diseases and Behcet’s disease in decreasing order of frequency.

  7. Current and Emerging Therapeutics for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Annabelle L. Rodd; Katherine Ververis; Tom C. Karagiannis

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is a term that encompasses a spectrum of non-Hodgkin’s T-cell lymphomas with primary manifestations in the skin. It describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that are characterised by an accumulation of malignant T cells of the CD4 phenotype that have the propensity to home and accumulate in the skin, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. The two most common variants of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma include mycosis fungoides and the leukemic variant, the Sézary syndrome....

  8. Cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection in an immunocompetent host after ovarian cystectomy: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manideepa SenGupta

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nocardia brasiliensis is a rare human pathogen that is usually associated with localised cutaneous infections. We report a case of primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection causing delayed wound healing that developed after ovarian cystectomy in an otherwise healthy 32-year-old woman. The patient was initially treated with cotrimoxazole, however due to intolerance intravenous amikacin was given and gradually the wound healed. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstrating the causative organism in exudates, and cultures. Early diagnosis as well as early institution of chemotherapy is effective in most patients, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolate should be performed to identify the best treatment options.

  9. Cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection in an immunocompetent host after ovarian cystectomy: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Sarkar; Saha, Puranjay; Sengupta, Manideepa

    2011-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a rare human pathogen that is usually associated with localised cutaneous infections. We report a case of primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection causing delayed wound healing that developed after ovarian cystectomy in an otherwise healthy 32-year-old woman. The patient was initially treated with cotrimoxazole, however due to intolerance intravenous amikacin was given and gradually the wound healed. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstrating the causative organism in exudates, and cultures. Early diagnosis as well as early institution of chemotherapy is effective in most patients, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolate should be performed to identify the best treatment options.

  10. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...... joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases....

  11. Laser therapy for cutaneous sarcoidosis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Soleymani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic, multi-organ disease of unknown etiology characteristically defined by the development of non-caseating granulomas. The development of sarcoidosis has been associated with a number of environmental and microbacterial factors coupled with genetic susceptibility. Depending on the type, location and distribution of disease, sarcoidosis can cause functional impairment, symptomatic distress, scarring and disfigurement. The advent of lasers as precise, minimally destructive surgical tools has allowed for their development as promising alternatives that minimize the morbidity associated with current therapies.In this paper, we reviewed the role of laser therapy in the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis. A comprehensive search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and PUBMED databases was performed to identify relevant literatures investigating the role of laser therapy in the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis. In our opinion, laser therapy, particularly PDL, appears to be an effective, safe and generally well-tolerated modality for the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis and should be considered in patients with localized cutaneous disease that is refractory to conventional treatments. Less is known about the efficacy and tolerability of ablative laser therapy for the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis, though the limited data appears promising as well. With that said, however, the data is limited and warrants a need for additional larger, randomized controlled studies to further investigate the utility and efficacy of laser therapy in the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis.

  12. Cutaneous Manifestations of Human and Murine Leishmaniasis

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    Breanna M. Scorza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are diseases caused by pathogenic protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Infections are initiated when a sand fly vector inoculates Leishmania parasites into the skin of a mammalian host. Leishmania causes a spectrum of inflammatory cutaneous disease manifestations. The type of cutaneous pathology is determined in part by the infecting Leishmania species, but also by a combination of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host immune response factors resulting in different clinical outcomes. This review discusses the distinct cutaneous syndromes described in humans, and current knowledge of the inflammatory responses associated with divergent cutaneous pathologic responses to different Leishmania species. The contribution of key hematopoietic cells in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in mouse models are also reviewed and compared with those observed during human infection. We hypothesize that local skin events influence the ensuing adaptive immune response to Leishmania spp. infections, and that the balance between inflammatory and regulatory factors induced by infection are critical for determining cutaneous pathology and outcome of infection.

  13. PRIMARY MALIGNANT MELANOMA OF ARYEPIGLOTTIC FOLD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... commonly in larynx, tongue, and tonsil.2 Primary mel- anoma of the larynx and trachea are very rare among the group of non-cutaneous melanomas. In primary melanoma of the larynx, the least common site is the subglottic mucosa.3 Here we present a case of primary malignant melanoma of aryepiglottic ...

  14. Cutaneous expression of systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraz, J; Delgado-Jiménez, Y; Pérez-Gala, S; Nam-Cha, S; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Diez, A

    2009-01-01

    Skin lesions associated with Candida septicaemia occur only in a minority of patients, who are usually immunocompromised, but they can help to establish a diagnosis rapidly. The lesions form a characteristic maculopapular or nodular rash at the onset of the infection. We report three cases of systemic candidiasis (SC) with cutaneous manifestations in immunocompromised patients. In these patients, the lesions started as asymptomatic or slightly pruriginous macules, papules or nodules localized on the trunk and extremities. The patients' general condition was very poor and they presented a high fever at the onset of the illness. Candida spp. were isolated from blood in all cases, and histology showed yeasts in two of them. Most of the lesions resolved with antifungal treatment. The diagnosis of SC is often delayed or missed because of the absence of useful diagnostic tools, the varying clinical manifestations and the frequent negativity (50-75%) of blood cultures for Candida. Fluconazole is the treatment of choice for Candida albicans, but treatment response is unknown for other Candida spp., which may require treatment with amphotericin B.

  15. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemp, P.; Staberg, B.

    1983-01-01

    The disappearance rate of 133 Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for 133 Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002)

  16. Cutaneous and subcutaneous Ewing's sarcoma: an indolent disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, Edward; Merchant, Thomas E.; Pappo, Alberto; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Shah, Amit B.; Kun, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The occurrence of extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma (ES) in deep soft tissues has been well described, but cases in which this tumor occurs in a primary cutaneous or subcutaneous site have rarely been reported. The superficial variant may be less aggressive than are the more common bony and deep soft tissue counterparts with an apparently favorable outcome. A retrospective review of patients with cutaneous or subcutaneous ES was conducted to analyze outcome and patterns of failure. Methods and Materials: Between July 1985 and March 1997, 14 patients with cutaneous or subcutaneous ES were treated at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The median age at presentation was 16 years (range 7-21 years). Anatomic locations included trunk and pelvis (7), upper or lower extremity (4), and head and neck (3). The median size of the lesion was 3 cm (range, 1-12 cm). Thirteen had definitive surgical resections, and one had biopsy of the mass at the time of referral. They were enrolled on institutional (12) or cooperative group (2) protocols. All patients received chemotherapy, composed of vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, etoposide, and dactinomycin. Patients on institutional protocols received radiation (36 Gy) to the operative bed (150-180 cGy/fraction/day). Postoperative radiotherapy was omitted for 2 patients who had complete resection on the cooperative group study. Results: No patients had metastatic disease at presentation. Thirteen patients had wide local excision of the primary tumors prior to enrollment on chemotherapy; surgical margins were negative (10), microscopically positive (2), and indeterminate (1). Eleven patients received radiotherapy to the tumor bed; 2 with clear surgical margins were treated without irradiation. The patient who had biopsy only received induction chemotherapy followed by definitive surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 77 months (range 17-111 months). None of the patients

  17. Evaluation of laboratory diagnosis for cutaneous tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Afsar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB is still difficult to diagnose due to its varied clinical presentation and limitations of diagnostic methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of diagnostic laboratory tests available for CTB. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six skin biopsy specimens belonging to clinically suspected cases of CTB were studied retrospectively. The specimens were divided into two portions, one part processed for histopathological evaluation and the other was used for microscopy and inoculation for the isolation of mycobacteria. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique was applied to 14 of 26 specimens to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC DNA. Results: Of the 26 biopsy specimens, 11 were confirmed as CTB by identification of MTBC in culture and/or histopathologic affirmation. Of these, four were lupus vulgaris, four were TB verrucosa cutis, one was scrofuloderma, one was primary inoculation TB, and one was periorifical CTB. Culture for mycobacteria was positive for five (45.45% specimens, while histopathologic affirmation was obtained in ten (90.90% specimens. Acid-fast Bacilli were not demonstrated in any of the specimens on microscopic examination. The PCR was found to be applied to six of the 11 specimens diagnosed as CTB and was positive in two specimens (33.3%, which were positive for growth in culture and histopathological correlation. Conclusion: The recovery rate of MTBC from biopsy specimens was found to be satisfactory for CTB with histopathological correlation, but the combination of culture with a rapid method, PCR, may improve the diagnostic rate.

  18. IgV(H) and bcl6 somatic mutation analysis reveals the heterogeneity of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma, and indicates the presence of undisclosed local antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Renato; Camacho, Francisca I; Fernández-Vázquez, Amalia; Algara, Patrocinio; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L; De Rosa, Gaetano; Piris, Miguel A

    2004-06-01

    Our understanding of the ontology of B-cell lymphomas (BCL) has been improved by the study of mutational status of IgV(H) and bcl6 genes, but only a few cases of cutaneous BCL have been examined for this status. We analyzed IgV(H) and bcl6 somatic mutations in 10 cutaneous BCL, classified as follicular (three primary and one secondary), primary marginal zone (two cases), and diffuse large BCL (three primary and one secondary). We observed a lower rate (IgV(H) mutation in all marginal zone lymphomas, and a preferential usage of V(H)2-70 (one primary follicular and two primary diffuse large BCL). Fewer than expected replacement mutations in framework regions (FR) were observed in three primary follicular lymphomas (FLs) and in all diffuse large BCL, indicating a negative antigen selection pressure. Ongoing mutations were observed in eight of 10 cases. Only two primary FLs and two diffuse large BCL showed bcl6 somatic mutation. These data support the heterogeneous nature of the different cutaneous BCL, and specifically the distinction between cutaneous follicular and marginal zone lymphomas. The biased usage of V(H)2-70, the low rate of replacement mutation in the FR, and the presence of ongoing mutation imply that local antigens could modulate the growth of primary cutaneous BCL.

  19. Downregulation of miR-125b in metastatic cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glud, Martin; Rossing, Maria; Hother, Christoffer; Holst, Line; Hastrup, Nina; Nielsen, Finn C; Gniadecki, Robert; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to identify microRNA species involved in the earliest metastatic event in cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM). Samples from 28 patients with MM [stage T2 (tumor), M0 (distant metastasis)] were grouped by the presence of micrometastasis in the sentinel lymph nodes (N0/N1). Melanoma cells were harvested from primary, cutaneous MM tumors by laser-capture microdissection, and microRNA expression profiles were obtained by the microarray technique. Results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. We found that miR-125b was downregulated in the primary cutaneous melanomas that produced early metastases (T2, N1, M0) compared with the sentinel lymph node-negative (T2, N0, M0) melanomas. MiR-125b has earlier been found to be downregulated in other tumor types and in atypic naevi compared with the common acquired naevi. In conclusion, miR-125b may be involved in an early progression of cutaneous MM.

  20. Mucorales-specific T cells emerge in the course of invasive mucormycosis and may be used as a surrogate diagnostic marker in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Leonardo; Vallerini, Daniela; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Forghieri, Fabio; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Candoni, Anna; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Del Giovane, Cinzia; D'Amico, Roberto; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Pecorari, Monica; Cavalleri, Francesca; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Luppi, Mario

    2011-11-17

    Mucorales-specific T cells were investigated in 28 hematologic patients during the course of their treatment. Three developed proven invasive mucormycosis (IM), 17 had infections of known origin but other than IM, and 8 never had fever during the period of observation. Mucorales-specific T cells could be detected only in patients with IM, both at diagnosis and throughout the entire course of the IM, but neither before nor for long after resolution of the infection. Such T cells predominantly produced IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-10, and to a lesser extent IL-17 and belonged to either CD4(+) or CD8(+) subsets. The specific T cells that produced IFN-γ were able to directly induce damage to Mucorales hyphae. None of the 25 patients without IM had Mucorales-specific T cells. Specific T cells contribute to human immune responses against fungi of the order Mucorales and could be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker of IM.

  1. Cutaneous manifestations in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, C; Rost, B; Itin, P

    2000-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder among adolescent girls and young women which, though common, often goes undetected and untreated. Anorexia nervosa is a response for young people with psychological conflicts who try to win love by having a body corresponding to the present-day image, symbolising strength, beauty, attraction, power and success. Anorexia nervosa involves inadequate calorie intake leading to marked cachexia with metabolic and endocrinological disturbances. We investigated dermatological changes in 21 young female anorectics aged 19-24 in an attempt to find dermatological markers which mirror the dynamics of the disease and thus obtain helpful signs for early diagnosis with its important bearing on the outcome. Extensive histories were taken and whole-body examinations performed. Seven sex- and age-matched persons served as a control group. The most common dermatological findings were xerosis (71%, controls 29%), cheilitis (76%), bodily hypertrichosis (62%), alopecia (24%), dry scalp hair (48%), acral coldness (38%), acrocyanosis (33%), periungual erythema (48%), gingival changes (37%), nail changes (29%) and calluses on dorsum of hand due to self-induced vomiting (67%). Our study documented for the first time that a body mass index of anorexia nervosa and in HIV infection. Patients with anorexia nervosa develop early stereotype skin changes which are cardinal diagnostic symptoms and pointers to the diagnosis of eating disorders. During training at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Solothurn one of us (C. H.) was once more able to observe most of the above-described cutaneous and mucocutaneous changes in anorexic adolescents. This paper is intended to stimulate further basic research on this topic. We hope our study will facilitate early diagnosis of anorexia nervosa by the family physician and enable him or her to institute immediate treatment for the eating disorder and thereby improve the prognosis.

  2. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  3. Outbreak of Invasive Wound Mucormycosis in a Burn Unit Due to Multiple Strains of Mucor circinelloides f. circinelloides Resolved by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dea Garcia-Hermoso

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are ubiquitous environmental molds responsible for mucormycosis in diabetic, immunocompromised, and severely burned patients. Small outbreaks of invasive wound mucormycosis (IWM have already been reported in burn units without extensive microbiological investigations. We faced an outbreak of IWM in our center and investigated the clinical isolates with whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis. We analyzed M. circinelloides isolates from patients in our burn unit (BU1, Héééôèéééûéôèôèôôèéôééôéôôèôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France together with nonoutbreak isolates from Burn Unit 2 (BU2, Paris area and from France over a 2-year period (2013 to 2015. A total of 21 isolates, including 14 isolates from six BU1 patients, were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS. Phylogenetic classification based on de novo assembly and assembly free approaches showed that the clinical isolates clustered in four highly divergent clades. Clade 1 contained at least one of the strains from the six epidemiologically linked BU1 patients. The clinical isolates were specific to each patient. Two patients were infected with more than two strains from different clades, suggesting that an environmental reservoir of clonally unrelated isolates was the source of contamination. Only two patients from BU1 shared one strain, which could correspond to direct transmission or contamination with the same environmental source. In conclusion, WGS of several isolates per patients coupled with precise epidemiological data revealed a complex situation combining potential cross-transmission between patients and multiple contaminations with a heterogeneous pool of strains from a cryptic environmental reservoir.

  4. Rare Presentation of a Primary Cutaneous well Differentiated Liposarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    Roberts, Capt Jared 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 59th Clinical Research Division 1100 Willford Hall Loop, Bldg 4430 JBSA-Lackland...TX 78236-9908 210-292-7141 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 59th Clinical Research Division 1100 Willford Hall Loop, Bldg...been proposed to aid in identifying lipoblasts. Lipoblasts should have a hyperchromatic indented or sharply scalloped nucleus, a lipid -rich droplets

  5. Primary cutaneous malignancies in the Northern Cape Province of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    size, the Northern Cape (NC) Province has the smallest population of the ... whether skin cancer incidence in SA has followed the global trend.[12] ... high risk of mortality.[16] As ... 2012 was conducted using public and private health sector databases. .... majority of KSs occurred in the younger age group 30 - 39 years.

  6. Cutaneous sarcoidosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Suparna M, Joshi Shivani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a Greek word (Sarco means flesh and Eido means type or like. Cutaneous sarcoidosis occurs in up to one third of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. This disease is characterised by the presence of non – caseating epitheloid cell granulomas in the skin. Cutaneous sarcoidosis presents as a diagnostic challenge to the dermatopathologists due to its varied presentations and almost identical histologic pictures. Hence, exclusion of infectious causes and compatibility with clinical and radiologic picture serve as significant criteria to come up to a diagnosis. Sometimes; skin lesions are the first manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. This is not a contagious or allergic disease. There is a risk of development of systemic manifestations at a later date; for which a close follow up is a must. We are presenting a case of cutaneous sarcoidosis, which later on progress to sarcoidosis with systemic manifestations.

  7. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  8. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  9. Mouse papillomavirus infections spread to cutaneous sites with progression to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cooper, Timothy K; Balogh, Karla K; Christensen, Neil D; Myers, Roland; Majerciak, Vladimir; Gotte, Deanna; Zheng, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Jiafen

    2017-09-25

    We report secondary cutaneous infections in the mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1)/mouse model. Our previous study demonstrated that cutaneous MmuPV1 infection could spread to mucosal sites. Recently, we observed that mucosal infections could also spread to various cutaneous sites including the back, tail, muzzle and mammary tissues. The secondary site lesions were positive for viral DNA, viral capsid protein and viral particles as determined by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy analyses, respectively. We also demonstrated differential viral production and tumour growth at different secondarily infected skin sites. For example, fewer viral particles were detected in the least susceptible back tissues when compared with those in the infected muzzle and tail, although similar amounts of viral DNA were detected. Follow-up studies demonstrated that significantly lower amounts of viral DNA were packaged in the back lesions. Lavages harvested from the oral cavity and lower genital tracts were equally infectious at both cutaneous and mucosal sites, supporting the broad tissue tropism of this papillomavirus. Importantly, two secondary skin lesions on the forearms of two mice displayed a malignant phenotype at about 9.5 months post-primary infection. Therefore, MmuPV1 induces not only dysplasia at mucosal sites such as the vagina, anus and oral cavity but also skin carcinoma at cutaneous sites. These findings demonstrate that MmuPV1 mucosal infection can be spread to cutaneous sites and suggest that the model could serve a useful role in the study of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of papillomavirus.

  10. Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Heiat

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually, more than 14 million people are reported to be infected with Leishmaniasis all over the world. In Iran, this disease is seen in the form of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, of which the cutaneous form is more wide spread. In recent years, cutaneous leishmaniaisis is diagnosed by PCR utilizing specific primers in order to amplify different parasite genes including ribosomal RNA genes, kinetoplast DNA or tandem repeating sequences. The aim of this research was to detect early stage cutaneous leishmaniasis using Multiplex-PCR technique. Methods: In this study, 67 samples were prepared from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. DNA was extracted with phenolchloroform. Each specimen was analyzed using two different pairs of PCR primers. The sensitivity of each PCR was optimized on pure Leishmania DNA prior to use for diagnosis. Two standard parasites L. major and L. tropica were used as positive control. Results: DNA amplification fragments were two 115 bp and 683 bp for AB and UL primers, respectively. The sensitivity of two primers was not equal for detection of L. major and L. tropica. The sensivity of PCR with AB primer was 35 cells, while that for UL primer was 40 cells. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that PCR is a sensitive diagnostic assay for cutaneous leishmaniasis and could be employed as the new standard for routine diagnosis when species identification is not required. However, the ability to identify species is especially important in prognosis of the disease and in deciding appropriate therapy, especially in regions where more than one type of species and disease are seen by clinicians.

  11. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  12. Cutaneous Silicone Granuloma Mimicking Breast Cancer after Ruptured Breast Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations due to migration of silicone from ruptured implants are rare. Migrated silicone with cutaneous involvement has been found in the chest wall, abdominal wall, and lower extremities. We describe a case of cutaneous silicone granuloma in the breast exhibiting unusual growth mimicking breast cancer after a ruptured implant.

  13. Cutaneous manifestations of HIV/AIDS: Part I | Dlova | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can lead to a variety of clinical cutaneous manifestations. These cutaneous disorders occur universally during the course of HIV infection. Cutaneous manifestations of HIV are very diverse. The course and clinical presentation of HIV in individuals who have access to highly ...

  14. Etiology of cutaneous vasculitis: utility of a systemic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanussot-Deprez, Caroline; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Flores-Suárez, Luis; Ríos-Romero, Celia; Cabiedes-Contreras, Javier; Reyes, Edgardo; Rangel-Gamboa, Lucia

    2018-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculities (CV) represents a diagnostic challenge, occurs as primary cutaneous disorder or as a manifestation of other entities. To search the cause of CV. Methods: Patients with CV were prospectively evaluated. In all patients, skin biopsies were drawn, and direct immunofluorescence was done in most of the patients. American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Chapel Hill Consensus Conference Criteria (CHCC) were used for classification. 32 patients were studied. There was female predominance (71.8%). Children presented drug-associated CV or Schönlein-Henoch púrpura (SHP). Adults presented more frequently SHP, systemic lupus erythematosus or paraneoplastic vasculitis, other diagnosis as polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis, thrombotic vasculitis (post-puerperal), antiphospholipid syndrome, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and drug-associated CV were presented. Using the ACR and CHCC criteria, 50% of cases were classified. In our institution, during this work the etiologic diagnostic of CV increased more than twice. However, in the case of HSV or LA and SHP none of the proposed criteria had high specificity; other parameters were used to discern between both. Six patients remained as not classified. In our view, cryoglobulins and hepatitis serology do not seem useful unless patient’s history supports they need to be done. Unclassified patients were followed-up closely for 2 years. Copyright: © 2018 SecretarÍa de Salud

  15. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  16. Cutaneous chancroid in a visitor from Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, William J H; Hannah, Rory C S; Le Cornec, Genevera M; Bletchly, Cheryl

    2008-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman from Vanuatu presented to an Australian hospital with a 3-week history of a non-healing ulcer on the lower leg. A swab was submitted for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction designed to investigate genital ulcerative conditions. Haemophilus ducreyi was detected and the gene product was subsequently sequenced, confirming the diagnosis of cutaneous chancroid. The lesion responded to intramuscular benzathine penicillin. This report adds further evidence that cutaneous chancroid should be considered in the evaluation of skin ulcers in the south Pacific.

  17. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old female spayed Schnauzer was presented with cutaneous ulcerated nodular lesions shortly after the beginning of an immunosuppressive treatment for immune-mediated hemolytic disease. Cytology was performed and a great number of neutrophils and banana-shaped organisms were observed. Biopsy showed a neutrophilic and histiocytic dermatitis and panniculitis with myriads of intralesional bradyzoites cysts and tachyzoites. PCR analysis was positive for Toxoplasma gondii and negative for Neospora caninum. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intralesional T. gondii antigens. This study reports a rare case of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog.

  18. Sporotrichoid cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major of different zymodemes in the Sudan and Saudi Arabia: a comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaafar, A; Fadl, A; el Kadaro, A Y

    1994-01-01

    Sporotrichoid cutaneous leishmaniasis is due to dissemination of amastigotes via the lymphatics to the subcutaneous tissues. A comparison was made between the potential to disseminate by this route of 2 parasites of different zymodemes in Sudan and Saudi Arabia. In Sudan cutaneous leishmaniasis...... is caused by Leishmania major zymodeme LON-1, and in Saudi Arabia by L. major LON-4. Sporotrichoid leishmaniasis was significantly more common in Sudan, occurring in 23% of patients compared with 10% in Saudi Arabia. Lymph node involvement was slightly more prevalent in the Sudan. Clinical and pathological...... differences between subcutaneous nodules, particularly when they ulcerate, and multiple primary cutaneous lesions are described and treatment of localized and sporotrichoid leishmaniasis is discussed. The pathological features of the primary lesions in the Sudan and Saudi Arabia were similar....

  19. Primary Anorectal Melanoma: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Carcoforo, M.T Raiji, G.M Palini, M Pedriali, U Maestroni, G Soliani, A Detroia, M.V Zanzi, A.L Manna, J.G Crompton, R.C Langan, A Stojadinovic, I Avital

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anorectum is a rare anatomic location for primary melanoma. Mucosal melanoma is a distinct biological and clinical entity from the more common cutaneous melanoma. It portrays worse prognosis than cutaneous melanoma, with distant metastases being the overwhelming cause of morbidity and mortality. Surgery is the treatment of choice, but significant controversy exists over the extent of surgical resection. We present an update on the state of the art of anorectal mucosal melanoma. To illustrate the multimodality approach to anorectal melanoma, we present a typical patient.

  20. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  1. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Robert A.; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. Case

  2. Expertise effects in cutaneous wind perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijms, Joost P.; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M.; Mulder, F.A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J.P.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether expertise effects are present in cutaneous wind perception. To this end, we presented wind stimuli consisting of different wind directions and speeds in a wind simulator. The wind simulator generated wind stimuli from 16 directions and with three speeds by means of eight

  3. Epidemiological studies on cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://www.cioms.ch/publications/layout_guide2002.p df. 4. Uzun S, Durdu M, Çulha G, Allahverdiyev AM,. Memişoğlu HR. Clinical features, epidemiology, and efficacy and safety of intralesional antimony treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis: recent experience in Turkey. J. Parasitol 2004; 90: 853-859. 5. Uzun S, Uslular C, ...

  4. Cutaneous reaction associated with weekly docetaxel administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lita; Chuen, Vivianne Shih Lee

    2009-03-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy will remain clinically relevant and many of our patients will continue to receive the drug. In a recent phase 2 study of docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (weekly) in patients with metastatic breast cancer, the incidence of grade 3 cutaneous toxicity is 19%. The skin toxicity observed consists of limb/palmar-plantar erythematous reactions, or fixed-plaque erythrodysesthesia. Case series or reports have reported varied manifestations of skin reactions and include erythema multiforme, nail changes (onycholysis, pigmentation, paronychia), scleroderma, supravenous discoloration, radiation recall dermatitis, and flagellate erythema. We would like to report four patients with cutaneous reactions resulting from weekly administration of docetaxel. All cases are heavily pre-treated patients, receiving docetaxel as second or third line therapy. The cutaneous reactions occur at cycle 5. The time between chemotherapy to development of skin lesions is from 1 to 7 days. Lesions usually resolve with desquamation leaving behind areas with hyper-pigmentation or hypo-pigmentation over a period of 2 to 3 weeks. The management strategies include hand elevation, warm or cold compresses, topical and/or systemic antibiotics, topical and/or systemic corticosteroids, and cessation of drug. There is a need for a systematic approach to manage these cutaneous reactions. Oncology trained pharmacists play vital roles in assessing, managing, documenting and patient education.

  5. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  6. Mefloquine in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correia Dalmo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were treated orally with a mefloquine dose of 4.2mg/kg/day for six days in the Teaching Hospital of the Faculdade de Medicina do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, MG, Brazil. Three weeks later a new series was repeated. No patient was cured.

  7. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis with laryngeal involvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis with laryngeal involvement in a setting of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. ... Grocott-Gomori methenamine silver and Periodic acid–Schiff (PAS) stains revealed a relative paucity of intracellular, narrow-neck budding fungal organisms. Culture findings confirmed the ...

  8. A rapidly enlarging cutaneous hemangioma in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ma'ayeh, Marwan

    2014-06-18

    This is a case of a rapidly enlarging cutaneous pedunculated tumor on a patient\\'s thumb during her pregnancy. This was excised and identified as a hemangioma. A literature search identified a possible hormonal factor in causing an accelerated growth of this tumor.

  9. Bronchopleural cutaneous fistula due to Eikenella corrodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Sun; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the subject and to report on and discuss a case of bronchopleural cutaneous fistula due to Eikenella corrodens. A 16-year-old girl was brought to our hospital with fever and blood-tinged sputum 2 weeks prior to her admission. She suffered from neurologic sequelae of herpetic encephalitis and had been bed-ridden since 5 years of age. A longitudinal paraspinal soft mass had been noted in the previous week by her mother. She had been given oral feeding despite frequent choking for the past few years. On palpation, the mass can be squeezed to follow the least resistance of subcutaneous space longitudinally extending to the lower thoracic region. Chest computed tomography scan revealed right lower lobe necrotizing pneumonitis and a pleuro-cutaneous fistula leading to the subcutaneous air locules. A protracted course of antibiotics was prescribed and subcutaneous air trapping decreased in size over 8 weeks. Eikenella corrodens has increasingly been implicated as a potential causative pathogen in pleuropulmonary infections. Pleuro-cutaneous fistula and abscess formation complicating empyema and necrotizing pneumonitis due to E. corrodens infection have not been reported. A bulging thoracic subcutaneous lesion waxes and wanes with respiration suggest the possibility of a pleruo-cutaneous fistula. Treatment of Eikenella empyema using antibiotics without surgical decortication requires a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy.

  10. Unusual Cutaneous Manifestation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Shah

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations are found in 60 to 70% cases of tuberous sclerosis and consist of adenoma sebaceum, periungual fibromatas, cafe au lait spots, shagreen patches and white macules. Our patient showed unusual skin manifestations like spotty pigmentation on the chest, back and abdomen and hyperkeratosis palmaris et plantaris.

  11. Linear Malignant Melanoma In Situ: Reports and Review of Cutaneous Malignancies Presenting as Linear Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-09-18

    Melanomas usually present as oval lesions in which the borders may be irregular. Other morphological features of melanoma include clinical asymmetry, variable color, diameter greater than 6 mm and evolving lesions. Two males whose melanoma in situ presented as linear skin lesions are described and cutaneous malignancies that may appear linear in morphology are summarized in this report. A medical literature search engine, PubMed, was used to search the following terms: cancer, cutaneous, in situ, linear, malignant, malignant melanoma, melanoma in situ, neoplasm, and skin. The 25 papers that were generated by the search and their references, were reviewed; 10 papers were selected for inclusion. The cancer of the skin typically presents as round lesions. However, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma may arise from primary skin conditions or benign skin neoplasms such as linear epidermal nevus and linear porokeratosis. In addition, linear tumors such as basal cell carcinoma can occur. The development of linear cutaneous neoplasms may occur secondary to skin tension line or embryonal growth patterns (as reflected by the lines of Langer and lines of Blaschko) or exogenous factors such as prior radiation therapy. Cutaneous neoplasms and specifically melanoma in situ can be added to the list of linear skin lesions.

  12. The cutaneous radiation syndrome: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, R.U.; Steinert, M.; Gottlober, P.

    2001-01-01

    Accidental exposure to ionising radiation may occur during such catastrophic events as the Chernobyl accident in 1986 or for days and weeks as in Goiania in 1987 and in the military camp during the training of soldiers in Lilo/Georgia in 1997 as well as in medical institutions. The cutaneous symptoms after radiation exposure are based on a combination of inflammatory processes and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of transcriptionally activated pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. They follow a time course consisting of prodromal erythema, manifestation, chronic stage, late stage and they are referred to as Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome. The time course depends on several factors such as the applied radiation dose, radiation quality, individual radiation sensitivity, the extent of contamination and absorption and volume of the skin. For diagnostics of the cutaneous radiation syndrome the following procedures are used: 7.5 MHz to 20 MHz-B-scan-sonography, thermography, capillary microscopy, profilometry, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy and histology. Based on the results of experimental and clinical research of the last years pharmacotherapy of the cutaneous radiation syndrome includes topic or systemic application of corticosteroids, gamma-interferon, pentoxifylline and vitamin E and superoxide dismutase. The treatment depends on the stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. Due to the complexity of the clinical manifestations of radiation disease in most patients an interdisciplinary treatment in specialized centres is necessary. Dermatologists are asked to perform in most cases life-long therapy and follow-up of the patients. (author)

  13. WITHDRAWN: Systemic treatments for metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Tom; Fish, Reg; Coles, Bernadette; Mason, Malcolm

    2018-02-07

    Systemic therapies for metastatic cutaneous melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancers, remain disappointing. Few lasting remissions are achieved and the therapeutic aim remains one of palliation.Many agents are used alone or in combination with varying degrees of toxicity and cost. It is unclear whether evidence exists to support these complex regimens over best supportive care / placebo. To review the benefits from the use of systemic therapies in metastatic cutaneous melanoma compared to best supportive care/placebo, and to establish whether a 'standard' therapy exists which is superior to other treatments. Randomised controlled trials were identified from the MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR/CENTRAL databases. References, conference proceedings, and Science Citation Index/Scisearch were also used to locate trials. Cancer registries and trialists were also contacted. Randomised controlled trials of adults with histologically proven metastatic cutaneous melanoma in which systemic anti-cancer therapy was compared with placebo or supportive care. Study selection was performed by two independent reviewers. Data extraction forms were used for studies which appeared to meet the selection criteria and, where appropriate, full text articles were retrieved and reviewed independently. No randomised controlled trials were found comparing a systemic therapy with placebo or best supportive care in metastatic cutaneous melanoma. There is no evidence from randomised controlled clinical trials to show superiority of systemic therapy over best supportive care / placebo in the treatment of malignant cutaneous melanoma.Given that patients with metastatic melanoma frequently receive systemic therapy, it is our pragmatic view that a future systematic review could compare any systemic treatment, or combination of treatments, to single agent dacarbazine.

  14. A project by the SIDeMaST Immunopathology Group on cutaneous vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, M; Quaglino, P; La Placa, M; Marzano, A V

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitides are a challenge to the clinician, in terms of both diagnosis and therapy. Multiple classification systems have been implemented and the numerous classification schemes reflect the complexity of establishing a simple classification that could be functional for daily care. Although vasculitis classification has become increasingly elaborated, some areas remain ill defined. Some forms of vasculitis are still difficult to assign to a specific disease entity. Generally accepted operational criteria are available for many vasculitides, but for some entities there are no effective criteria. Moreover, diagnostic criteria for vasculitis with sufficient strength and/or confidence that can be universally accepted are not yet available. The need for diagnostic criteria validated and agreed upon is particularly relevant in the context of cutaneous vasculitis. The project of the SIDeMaST Italian Group of Immunopathology on cutaneous vasculitis is a national prospective observational study designed to develop and validate diagnostic criteria and to improve and validate classification criteria for cutaneous small vessel vasculitis also known as leukocytoclastic vasculitis (CLV). Primary objective of the study will also be that of developing the CUtaneous VAsculitis Severity Index (CUVASI). Secondary objectives of the project will be: 1) definition of the etiological agents that are most frequently associated with CLV; 2) search for possible correlations between causative agent and peculiar clinical and/or histopathological aspects; 3) evaluation of immunofluorescence pattern observed in this specific group of primitive cutaneous vasculitis in order to characterize the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this technique; 4) identification of a set of clinical investigations and laboratory tests to be performed for a correct CLV assessment. Actually 15 Italian dermatological clinics are contributing to the project and anticipated recruiting >100 patients with CLV

  15. American cutaneous leishmaniasis in infancy and childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Talhari, Carolina; García Bustos, María F; Rosales, Tamara; Villamil-Gomez, Wilmer E; Marquez, Marilianna; Pérez Alvarez, Alexandra M; Tálamo Sánchez, Alejandra I; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2017-12-01

    Infant and young child skin diseases are among the most common features of morbidity throughout the tropics. Because the skin is directly exposed to the environment, it is considerably affected by climatic and local conditions such as vectors and microorganisms, as in the case of leishmaniasis. In America the observed magnitude of cutaneous leishmaniasis in children has led to the study of increased risk of exposure of this group due to the possibility of peri- and intradomiciliary transmission. The present review pretends to make a concrete approach all through the broad and main figures of this parasitic disease, including the clinical, physiopathological, epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects, in order to be used as a practical source of reference for pediatricians leading with tropical cutaneous pathology in the region. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Cutaneous angiomatosis in a llama (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppi, M M; Malta, M C C; Ocarino, N M; França, S A; Serakides, R

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous angiomatosis was diagnosed in an adult female llama (Lama glama). Lesions were raised or plaque-like, erythematous, firm to soft in consistency and were observed on the face and skin of the axillary, abdominal, perineal and inguinal regions. The lesions were not painful or pruritic. Microscopical examination revealed an irregular parakeratotic lamellar hyperkeratosis associated with diffuse proliferation of arterioles and venules in the superficial dermis. Immunohistochemical analysis determined that the cells forming these vessels and perivascular cells expressed factor VIII-related antigen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31 and smooth-muscle alpha-actin. These studies confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous angiomatosis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Cutaneous myiasis--a vacation souvenir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieling, U; Nashan, D; Metze, D

    1999-03-01

    Cutaneous myiasis is a temporary infestation of the skin with fly larvae. Travelling to subtropical areas accounts for a higher risk and increasing incidence in Europeans. In Middle- and South American myiasis is mainly caused by the botfly (Dermatobia hominis). Blood-suckling arthropods, usually mosquitoes, transmit the larvae of the botfly via phoresis, a unique mechanism of egg deposition. In Africa cutaneous myiasis is mostly due to the tumbu fly (Cordylobia anthropophaga). Infection with the tumbu fly larvae occurs after direct contact with the eggs that are often deposited in clothes and towels. Clinically an abscess-like lesion develops. Creeping sensations of movement under the skin are occasionally described. Following hatching, spontaneous healing can normally be expected, although extraction of the larvae is recommended to prevent abscess formation and superinfection.

  18. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Deepak Rambhia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV is a distinct, rare, and underdiagnosed condition. We report a case of CCV in a 50-year-old woman presenting as asymptomatic, erythematous to hyperpigmented nonblanchable macules over both the lower extremities. The clinical differential diagnosis of the lesions was pigmented purpuric dermatoses (Schamberg's purpura and cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. Histology of the lesions revealed dilated superficial dermal vessels with abundant pink hyaline material in the vessel wall, which stained with periodic acid Schiff stain. The patient was diagnosed as CCV. This condition remains largely underdiagnosed and is commonly mistaken for pigmented purpuric dermatosis or generalized essential telangiectasia. Emphasis on the differentiation of CCV from its clinical and histological mimicks is made.

  19. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Holm Sandholdt, Linda; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......: To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  20. Multiple cutaneous malignancies in xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty Prasenjeet

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of xeroderma pigmentosum with multiple cutaneous malignancies is being reported. The case presented with freckles, letigens, and keratosis, a non-tender ulcerated nodular lesion on the nose, a nodular ulcerated lesion on the right outer canthus of the conjunctiva, and a nodular growth which developed on the right cheek which on histopathology was found to be squamous cell cercinoma, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma respectively.

  1. Infiltrative Cutaneous Hemangiolipoma in a Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Collier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 4-year-old castrated male, Saanen cross goat presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation and removal of a 22 cm × 22 cm, dark red, thickened, and crusted cutaneous lesion along the left ventrolateral thorax. An initial incisional biopsy performed approximately 8 weeks earlier was suspicious for cutaneous hemangiosarcoma. Surgical excision was deemed to be the most appropriate treatment option for this goat. A complete physical exam, complete blood count, and chemistry profile were performed and results were within normal limits. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound were performed to rule out metastatic disease and comorbid conditions; no metastatic lesions or other abnormalities were observed. En bloc surgical excision of the affected skin was performed and the entire tissue was submitted for histopathology. A final diagnosis of cutaneous hemangiolipoma was reached upon extensive sectioning and histologic examination of the larger tissue specimen. The goat recovered well from surgery and has had no further complications up to 9 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a hemangiolipoma in a goat and surgical excision for such lesions appears to be a viable treatment method.

  2. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Felix Boon-Bin

    2011-10-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic fungal infection caused by the ubiquitous fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis is an uncommon entity and is usually present in the immunosuppressed. Here, a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent patient is reported. This 70-year-old healthy woman presented with multiple painful ulcerated nodules on her face and upper and lower extremities of 6-month duration, associated with low-grade fever, night sweats, loss of appetite, and loss of weight. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy revealed epidermal hyperplasia and granulomatous inflammation in the dermis, with budding yeast. Fungal culture identified S. schenckii. She had total resolution of the lesions after 2 weeks of intravenous amphotericin B and 8 months of oral itraconazole. All investigations for underlying immunosuppression and internal organ involvement were negative. This case reiterates that disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis, although common in the immunosuppressed, can also be seen in immunocompetent patients. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Cutaneous adverse reactions to tattoos and piercings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix, J; Silvestre, J F

    2009-10-01

    Piercings and tattoos have become very popular in western society in recent decades, particularly among younger generations. Reports of medical complications associated with these decorative techniques have increased in parallel with the rise in their popularity. Due to their high frequency, adverse cutaneous reactions are particularly important among these potential complications. Tattoo-related complications include a number of cutaneous and systemic infections secondary to breach of the epidermal barrier, acute and delayed inflammatory reactions with different histopathological patterns, the appearance of benign and malignant tumors on tattooed areas of skin, and certain dermatoses triggered by isomorphic phenomena. Piercing-related complications are similar, though some, such as pyogenic skin infections, are much more common due to the delayed wound healing after piercing in certain sites. We must differentiate between complications that are independent of the site of piercing, and specific complications, which are closely related to the body area pierced. The rate of complications after performing piercings or tattoos depends on the experience of the artist, the hygiene techniques applied, and the postprocedural care by the customer. However, some of these complications are unpredictable and depend on factors intrinsic to the patient. In this article, we review the most common decorative techniques of body art, with particular focus on the potential cutaneous complications and their management.

  4. Measuring Cutaneous Lesions: Trends in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shali; Blalock, Travis W

    2018-03-01

    Knowing the size of a cutaneous lesion can be important for tracking its progression over time, selecting the proper treatment modality, surgical planning, determining prognosis, and accurate billing. However, providers vary in their consistency, accuracy, and methods of measuring cutaneous lesions. To investigate the clinical practices of US dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons regarding how they determine the size of cutaneous lesions. A survey was electronically distributed to members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Four hundred twenty-six dermatologists completed the online survey. When a lesion is suspected to be malignant, 85% of respondents obtained exact measurements most, if not all, of the time; however, only 8% did for benign lesions. Most providers determined lesion sizes themselves rather than delegating to staff. When performing visual estimation, approximately three-quarters believed that they were accurate to within 1 to 2 mm. The top reasons for obtaining exact measurements were for tracking atypical pigmented lesions, determining treatment pathways, and accurate billing. The majority of respondents believed that lesion size affected management decisions; however, the need for exact measurement remains controversial, particularly for benign lesions. Future studies may investigate whether taking exact versus estimated measurements has an effect on outcomes.

  5. CRYOSURGERY FOR TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS WARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Bagus Adhi Paramitha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Minor surgery is a general surgical procedure that applied with minimally invasive procedures and short duration, done in a superficial or just the affected tissue.  This technique is normally only requires a local anaesthetic and only has minimal  risk or complications. There are many cases that could be dealt with minor surgery one is veruka. Veruka or known as cutaneous warts is a disease that is often complained in children and adults. Veruka being estimated to occur until over 10% in children and young adults. Largest incident occurred in range of age 12 to 16 years. Veruka occurs more frequently in women than men. The peak incidence occur of age 13 years on women and 14.5 years in males. Salicylic acid and cryosurgery therapy are two of the most frequently performed in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Salicylic acid is therapy  for cutaneous warts who recently had already started replaced by cryosurgery because it is relatively easy to do and faster recovery.  

  6. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Giles T S; Mills, Stuart J; Cowin, Allison J; Smith, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  7. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles T. S. Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  8. Multiple Cutaneous Metastases as Initial Presentation in Advanced Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Nambiar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin metastases from advanced colorectal cancer are relatively rare and occur most often when the cancer is advanced, following the spread to other organs. Cutaneous metastases occur in about 3% of advanced colorectal cancers. We present an extremely rare case of a 68-year-old woman with advanced ascending colon adenocarcinoma that presented with multiple rapidly progressing painless cutaneous metastatic lesions with no other distant metastases. Of all the tumors, breast cancer most commonly spreads as cutaneous metastasis is followed by lung, colorectal, renal, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cutaneous metastases can present in a variety of clinical manifestations, such as a rapidly growing painless dermal or subcutaneous nodule with intact overlying epidermis or as ulcers. In cases where the cutaneous deposit is isolated, as in visceral metastasis, there is a role for radical management such as wide local excision and reconstruction. In our patient, since she had multiple cutaneous metastases she began treatment with palliative systemic combination chemotherapy.

  9. Surgery of Primary Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Rutkowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains the mainstay of melanoma therapy, regardless of the tumor site. Only the early diagnosis combined with proper surgical therapy currently gives patients affected by this malignancy the chance for a full cure. The main goal of surgical therapy is to provide the local control of the disease and to secure long-term survival of the patient without reasonable functional and esthetic impairment. The recommended method of biopsy—excisional biopsy, as an initial diagnostic and, to some extent, therapeutic procedure—is performed under local anesthesia as an elliptical incision with visual clear margins of 1–3 mm and with some mm of subcutaneous tissue. The extent of radical excision of the primary tumor (or scar after excisional biopsy is based on the histopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor and usually consists of 1–2 cm margins with primary closure. The philosophy behind conducted randomized clinical trials has been to find the most conservative surgical approach that is able to guarantee the same results as more demolitive treatment. This has been the background of the trials designed to define the correct margins of excision around a primary cutaneous melanoma. Much less definition can be dedicated to the surgical management of patients with non-cutaneous melanomas.

  10. Surgery of Primary Melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: rutkowskip@coi.waw.pl; Zdzienicki, Marcin; Nowecki, Zbigniew I. [Soft Tissue/Bone Sarcoma and Melanoma Department, M. Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Akkooi, Alexander C. J. van [Erasmus University Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-11

    Surgery remains the mainstay of melanoma therapy, regardless of the tumor site. Only the early diagnosis combined with proper surgical therapy currently gives patients affected by this malignancy the chance for a full cure. The main goal of surgical therapy is to provide the local control of the disease and to secure long-term survival of the patient without reasonable functional and esthetic impairment. The recommended method of biopsy—excisional biopsy, as an initial diagnostic and, to some extent, therapeutic procedure—is performed under local anesthesia as an elliptical incision with visual clear margins of 1–3 mm and with some mm of subcutaneous tissue. The extent of radical excision of the primary tumor (or scar after excisional biopsy) is based on the histopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor and usually consists of 1–2 cm margins with primary closure. The philosophy behind conducted randomized clinical trials has been to find the most conservative surgical approach that is able to guarantee the same results as more demolitive treatment. This has been the background of the trials designed to define the correct margins of excision around a primary cutaneous melanoma. Much less definition can be dedicated to the surgical management of patients with non-cutaneous melanomas.

  11. Surgery of Primary Melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Zdzienicki, Marcin; Nowecki, Zbigniew I.; Akkooi, Alexander C. J. van

    2010-01-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of melanoma therapy, regardless of the tumor site. Only the early diagnosis combined with proper surgical therapy currently gives patients affected by this malignancy the chance for a full cure. The main goal of surgical therapy is to provide the local control of the disease and to secure long-term survival of the patient without reasonable functional and esthetic impairment. The recommended method of biopsy—excisional biopsy, as an initial diagnostic and, to some extent, therapeutic procedure—is performed under local anesthesia as an elliptical incision with visual clear margins of 1–3 mm and with some mm of subcutaneous tissue. The extent of radical excision of the primary tumor (or scar after excisional biopsy) is based on the histopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor and usually consists of 1–2 cm margins with primary closure. The philosophy behind conducted randomized clinical trials has been to find the most conservative surgical approach that is able to guarantee the same results as more demolitive treatment. This has been the background of the trials designed to define the correct margins of excision around a primary cutaneous melanoma. Much less definition can be dedicated to the surgical management of patients with non-cutaneous melanomas

  12. A Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus-Like Eruption Induced by Hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Daniel A; Mosser-Goldfarb, Joy L

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a medication with many well-described cutaneous side effects, notably the dermatomyositis-like eruption known as hydroxyurea dermopathy. Although systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported with hydroxyurea use, cutaneous lupus has not. We report a novel case of chronic cutaneous lupus induced by hydroxyurea and propose that this is a side effect that is distinct from hydroxyurea dermopathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. New targeted treatments for cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Bagot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs represent a group of rare and heterogeneous diseases that are very difficult to treat at advanced stages. The development of monoclonal antibodies is a new hope for the treatment of these diseases. Alemtuzumab (Campath is a humanized IgG1 kappa monoclonal antibody specific for CD52, an antigen expressed by most T and B lymphocytes. Alemtuzumab may frequently induce long-term remissions in patients with Sezary syndrome but high-dose treatments lead to severe cytopenia, immune depletion, and opportunistic infections. This treatment is less efficient in mycosis fungoides (MF. Brentuximab vedotin is a chimeric anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E, a cytotoxic antitubulin agent. Brentuximab vedotin is a very interesting new treatment for advanced tumor MF, Sezary syndrome, and primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. The main limiting adverse event is neurosensitive peripheral neuropathy. Mogamulizumab is a humanized anti-C-C chemokine receptor Type 4 monoclonal antibody with a defucosylated Fc region leading to increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Mogamulizumab is very efficient on aggressive peripheral T-cell lymphomas, particularly adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and CTCLs, especially on the blood component of tumor cells. The main limiting events are related to the concomitant depletion of regulatory T-cells. IPH4102 is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the immune receptor KIR3DL2/CD158k. Preclinical results with this antibody offer proofs of concept for the clinical development of IPH4102 to treat patients with advanced CTCL.

  14. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  15. [Clinical features of 32 patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Maturana, Donaldo; Amaro, Patricio; Segovia, Laura; Balestrini, Claudia

    2004-02-01

    The skin is a common target of small vessel vasculitis, with a wide assortment of pathological changes. This condition is usually associated to systemic diseases. To report the clinical and pathological features of patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. A retrospective review of 32 patients with a pathological diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis. Seventy two percent of patients were women. Cutaneous lesions were mainly located in the lower limbs (94%). The most common lesion was palpable purpura (62%). Connective tissue diseases and systemic vasculitis were the most commonly associated systemic diseases. Palpable purpura is the most common manifestation of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis, that is usually associated to connective tissue diseases or systemic vasculitis.

  16. Incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine; Zedek, Daniel; Sayed, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both rare congenital conditions that most commonly occur on the scalp and may appear clinically and histologically similar. A subtype of aplasia cutis congenita, membranous aplasia cutis congenita, and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both proposed to result from neural tube closure errors. However, neither non-membranous nor membranous aplasia cutis congenita are known to occur together with cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in the same lesion. We report the incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia within a lesion of aplasia cutis congenita. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Tumor attributes predicting cutaneous metastatic destiny: a report of two interesting cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumurthi, Ravichandran; Thirumalai, Raja; Easow, Jose M; Mohan, Subhashini

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous metastases are the result of complex interaction between the tumor cells ("seed") and the host environment ("soil"). Metastases to the skin can be an early sign of internal malignancy or represent recurrence of the primary tumor and portends a poorer prognosis. Invasion and metastasis are the hallmarks of on cogenesis. Skin is the largest organ in the body, but the incidence of metastases is low. With advances in molecular biology, factors responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of metastatic tumor cells at distant sites are being elucidated. The concept of "pre-metastatic niche" and interaction between various chemokines has given a new outlook in understanding the organ specificity of metastatic tumor cells. We present two cases of cutaneous metastases with interesting clinical findings correlating with its biologic subtypes.

  18. Importância da cintilografia com gálio-67 no linfoma cutâneo primário de células B: relato de dois casos Importance of gallium-67 scintigraphy in primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyomara Sanches Attab

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam dois casos de linfoma cutâneo de células B, nos quais o correto estadiamento, tratamento e seguimento foram possíveis graças à combinação de exames convencionais e a cintilografia com gálio-67.The authors describe two cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma where correct staging, treatment and follow-up could be achieved through a combination of conventional imaging studies and gallium-67 scintigraphy.

  19. Importância da cintilografia com gálio-67 no linfoma cutâneo primário de células B: relato de dois casos Importance of gallium-67 scintigraphy in primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Cyomara Sanches Attab; Sônia Marta Moriguchi; Eduardo José Alencar Paton; Mário Henrique Leite de Alencar; Euclides Timóteo da Rocha

    2010-01-01

    Os autores relatam dois casos de linfoma cutâneo de células B, nos quais o correto estadiamento, tratamento e seguimento foram possíveis graças à combinação de exames convencionais e a cintilografia com gálio-67.The authors describe two cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma where correct staging, treatment and follow-up could be achieved through a combination of conventional imaging studies and gallium-67 scintigraphy.

  20. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Masson, Adèle; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Bouaziz, Jean-David; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Aubin, François; Garciaz, Sylvain; d’Incan, Michel; Dereure, Olivier; Dalle, Stéphane; Dompmartin, Anne; Suarez, Felipe; Battistella, Maxime; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Rivet, Jacqueline; Adamski, Henri; Brice, Pauline; François, Sylvie; Lissandre, Séverine; Turlure, Pascal; Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa; Brissot, Eolia; Dulery, Rémy; Servais, Sophie; Ravinet, Aurélie; Tabrizi, Reza; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Joly, Pascal; Socié, Gérard; Bagot, Martine

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas remains challenging. In particular, large-cell transformation of mycosis fungoides is associated with a median overall survival of two years for all stages taken together. Little is known regarding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this context. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 37 cases of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including 20 (54%) transformed mycosis fungoides. Twenty-four patients (65%) had stage IV disease (for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome) or disseminated nodal or visceral involvement (for non-epidermotropic primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas). After a median follow up of 29 months, 19 patients experienced a relapse, leading to a 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 56% (95%CI: 0.38–0.74). Estimated 2-year overall survival was 57% (95%CI: 0.41–0.77) and progression-free survival 31% (95%CI: 0.19–0.53). Six of 19 patients with a post-transplant relapse achieved a subsequent complete remission after salvage therapy, with a median duration of 41 months. A weak residual tumor burden before transplantation was associated with increased progression-free survival (HR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.1–0.8; P=0.01). The use of antithymocyte globulin significantly reduced progression-free survival (HR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.3–6.2; P=0.01) but also transplant-related mortality (HR=10−7, 95%CI: 4.10−8–2.10−7; P<0.001) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the use of antithymocyte globulin was the only factor significantly associated with decreased progression-free survival (P=0.04). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including transformed mycosis fungoides. PMID:24213148

  1. Early diagnosis and monitoring of mucormycosis by detection of circulating DNA in serum: retrospective analysis of 44 cases collected through the French Surveillance Network of Invasive Fungal Infections (RESSIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, L; Herbrecht, R; Grenouillet, F; Morio, F; Alanio, A; Letscher-Bru, V; Cassaing, S; Chouaki, T; Kauffmann-Lacroix, C; Poirier, P; Toubas, D; Augereau, O; Rocchi, S; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Bretagne, S

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a set of three Mucorales quantitative PCR assays in a retrospective multicentre study. Mucormycosis cases were recorded thanks to the French prospective surveillance programme (RESSIF network). The day of sampling of the first histological or mycological positive specimen was defined as day 0 (D0). Detection of circulating DNA was performed on frozen serum samples collected from D-30 to D30, using quantitative PCR assays targeting Rhizomucor, Lichtheimia, Mucor/Rhizopus. Forty-four patients diagnosed with probable (n = 19) or proven (n = 25) mucormycosis were included. Thirty-six of the 44 patients (81%) had at least one PCR-positive serum. The first PCR-positive sample was observed 9 days (range 0-28 days) before diagnosis was made using mycological criteria and at least 2 days (range 0-24 days) before imaging. The identifications provided with the quantitative PCR assays were all concordant with culture and/or PCR-based identification of the causal species. Survival rate at D84 was significantly higher for patients with an initially positive PCR that became negative after treatment initiation than for patients whose PCR remained positive (48% and 4%, respectively; p Mucorales quantitative PCR could not only confirm the mucormycosis diagnosis when other mycological arguments were present but could also anticipate this diagnosis. Quantification of DNA loads may also be a useful adjunct to treatment monitoring. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder complicating infectious mononucleosis in an immunosuppressed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Cindy England; Callen, Jeffrey P; Bahrami, Soon

    2011-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is the syndrome produced by primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus during adolescence or early adulthood. In immunosuppressed individuals, depressed T-cell function allows the Epstein-Barr virus-driven B-cell proliferation to continue unabated, potentially leading to a lymphoproliferative disorder. A 15-year-old girl with a history of ulcerative colitis treated with 6-mercaptopurine and mesalamine presented with the acute onset of a rapidly enlarging, ulcerative nodule on her left lower eyelid 4 weeks following recovery from infectious mononucleosis. The biopsy revealed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder. Systemic disease was absent. Following discontinuation of 6-mercaptopurine, the patient was treated with two courses of intravenous cyclophosphamide. The lesion resolved completely and she remains disease free at 14 months following diagnosis. We report a solitary cutaneous lesion of an immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative disorder (IR-LPD) occurring as a complication of infectious mononucleosis, and review the pathogenesis and reported cases of Epstein-Barr virus-related immunosuppression-related lymphoproliferative disorder arising in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease. It is important for dermatologists and dermatopathologists to be aware of the occurrence of IR-LPD in patients being treated for inflammatory conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Given the role of primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus in the development of IR-LPD, consideration may be given to assessing Epstein-Barr virus status prior to initiating immunosuppressive therapy in young patients. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Diagnostic performance of the (1-3-β-D-glucan assay in patients with Pneumocystis jirovecii compared with those with candidiasis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, and tuberculosis, and healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Ju Son

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP relies on microscopic visualization of P. jirovecii, or detection of Pneumocystis DNA in respiratory specimens, which involves invasive procedures such as bronchoalveolar lavage. The (1-3-β-D-glucan (BG assay has been proposed as a less invasive and less expensive diagnostic test to rule out PCP. We therefore compared blood levels of BG in patients with PCP with those of patients with candidemia, chronic disseminated candidiasis (CDC, invasive aspergillosis, mucormycosis, and tuberculosis and those of healthy volunteers.Adult patients who were diagnosed with PCP, candidemia, CDC, invasive aspergillosis, mucormycosis, and tuberculosis whose blood samples were available, and healthy volunteers were enrolled in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea, during a 21-month period. The blood samples were assayed with the Goldstream Fungus (1-3-β-D-glucan test (Gold Mountain River Tech Development, Beijing, China.A total of 136 individuals including 50 patients P. jirovecii,15 candidemia, 6 CDC, 15 invasive aspergillosis, 10 mucormycosis, and 40 controls (20 TB and 20 healthy volunteers were included. The mean±SD of the concentration of 1-3-β-D-glucan in the patients with PCP (290.08 pg/mL±199.98 were similar to those of patients with candidemia (314.14 pg/mL±205.60, p = 0.90 at an α = 0.005 and CDC (129.74 pg/mL±182.79, p = 0.03 at an α = 0.005, but higher than those of patients with invasive aspergillosis (131.62 pg/mL±161.67, p = 0.002 at an α = 0.005, mucormycosis (95.08 pg/mL±146.80, p 31.25 pg/mL, which is highly sensitive for PCP versus tuberculosis plus healthy volunteers at the expense of specificity, the BG assay had a sensitivity of 92% (95% CI 81%-98% and a specificity of 55% (95% CI 39%-71%.The BG assay appears to be a useful adjunct test for PCP.

  4. [Cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hali, Fouzia; Khadir, Khadija; Idhammou, Wassima; Bensardi, Fatima-Zahra; Lefriyekh, Mohamed-Rachid; Benider, Abdelatif; Zamiati, Soumia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2011-11-01

    The appearance of skin symptoms in male breast is the main reason for consultation in our context. The aim of this study is to describe the various cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer through a series of cases collected in a dermatology department. A retrospective study was conducted in the dermatology department at the CHU Ibn Rochd January 1988 to December 2009. All cases of male breast cancer initially diagnosed in dermatology were included. The various epidemiological, clinical, histological and therapeutic data were collected from medical records. Twenty cases were collected. The mean age was 61.25 years. Skin invasion by tumor was found in all patients, and it was the reason for consultation. It was a cutaneous involvement at the nipple and areola (17 cases) and at the periareolar skin (three cases). The clinical appearance of skin involvement was vegetative type in 12 cases, infiltrating with nipple retraction in five cases and nodule with skin change in three cases. The average period of consultation was 25 months. The axillary lymph nodes were noted in 11 patients and distant metastases in eight patients. The cutaneous metastases outside breast were noted in six patients. The histological types were: infiltrating ductal carcinoma in 15 cases (75%), papillary carcinoma in two cases (10%) and non-specific carcinoma in three cases (15%). The treatment was surgery in 14 patients and consisted of radical mastectomy with complete axillary nodal dissection according to Patey. Complementary therapies, chemotherapy or radiotherapy, were indicated in 14 patients. Our single-center study with dermatological recruitment illustrates the frequency and variety of skin disease in male breast cancer and demonstrates that they are still the main reason for consultation in our context. Better information for public and practitioners would allow earlier diagnosis and a more favourable prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Mesotherapy and cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difonzo, Elisa Margherita; Campanile, Grazia Lucia; Vanzi, Laura; Lotti, Lorena

    2009-06-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum usually are a complication of trauma or postsurgical wounds. A 41-year-old woman presented with numerous dusky red nodules, abscesses and sinuses on the right buttock and on the lateral surfaces of both thighs. The lesions developed at the injection sites of mesotherapy treatment. M. fortuitum was cultured from a biopsy specimen and purulent fluid drained from lesions. The lesions had cleared completely with ciprofloxacin 500 mg b.d. for 3 weeks, and then 250 mg b.d. for another 3 weeks. This case demonstrates the importance of suspecting mycobacterial etiology in patients with nodules and abscesses in the areas of mesotherapy treatment.

  6. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Karin; Escribano, Luis; Grattan, Clive

    2016-01-01

    with mastocytosis. To address this unmet need, an international task force involving experts from different organizations (including the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology) met several...... times between 2010 and 2014 to discuss the classification and criteria for diagnosis of cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis. This article provides the major outcomes of these meetings and a proposal for a revised definition and criteria. In particular, we recommend that the typical...

  7. Cutaneous drug hypersensitivity : Immunological and genetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisalay Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity is an unpredictable, immunologically mediated adverse reaction, clustered in a genetically predisposed individual. The role of "hapten concept" in immune sensitization has recently been contested by the "pharmacological interaction" hypothesis. After completion of the "human genome project" and with the availability of high-resolution genotyping, genetic susceptibility to hypersensitivity for certain drugs has been proved beyond doubt though the trend is ethnicity and phenotype dependent. Application of this newly acquired knowledge may reduce or abolish the morbidity and mortality associated with cutaneous drug hypersensitivity.

  8. LASER TREATMENT OF BENIGN CUTANEOUS VASCULAR LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital and acquired vascular lesions of the skin and subcutis are a common health problem from aesthetic and also from psycho-social point of view. However, recent advances in laser technology have enabled an efficient and safe treatment. This study presents our experience with treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions using modern laser systems. Most common benign cutaneous vascular lesions are described.Patients and methods. In years 2002 and 2003, 109 patients, 4 to 80 (mean 39 years old, Fitzpatrick skin type 1–4, with 210 benign cutaneous vascular lesions were treated using the Dualis VP® laser system (Fotona, Slovenia which incorporates the KTP and Nd:YAG lasers. Vascular lesions in the upper layers of the skin with diameter up to 1 mm were treated with the KTP laser (wavelength 532 nm. For larger vessels in deeper layer we used the Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm. Patients graded the pain during treatment on a scale of 1–10. Clinical outcomes were evaluated 1–3 months after the last treatment: according to the percentage of clearance of the lesion compared to the adjacent normal skin and for the presence of adverse effects. According to these criteria each lesion was assigned a score: poor (0–25%, fair (26–50%, good (51–75%, excellent (76–100%.Results. Immediate response after application of a laser beam with proper characteristics was whitish-grey discoloration of treated area. Treatment results after 1–3 months were excellent in 48.1%, good 40.9%, fair in 8.6% and poor in 2.4%. Patients without prior anaesthesia graded pain during treatment from 1 to 8 (mean 4.0 and patients with EMLA® anaesthesia from 1 to 6 (mean 2.6. Side effects were frequent but minimal and transient. Erythema disappeared in several days after treatment while crusting persisted for 14 days. 3 permanent hyperpigmentations, 2 permanent hypopigmentations, 2 hypertrophic scars and 1 beam sized atrophic scar were detected at last follow

  9. Familial hypercholesterolemia with multiple cutaneous xanthomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy BSN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An interesting episode of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia affecting four children born to a consanguinous parents belonging to two different families is reported for its rarity. The patients had multiple cutaneous xanthomas including the characteristic xanthoma tendinosum, xanthoma interosseum, xanthoma tuberosum, and xanthelasma palpebrarum. Prominent corneal arcus juvenalis has been noted in three children. Gross elevation of serum levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc with normal values of triglycerides have been found in all patients. They have been prescribed medication with oral tablets of simvastatin and advised fat restricted diet and regular follow up in the clinic at periodic intervals.

  10. Equine cutaneous pythiosis: a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Headley Selwyn Arlington

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous pythiosis is described in four horses in Northern Paraná, Brazil. All animals presented ulcerative, granulomatous, cutaneous lesions that did not invade adjacent muscular tissues. Histopathological evaluations revealed eosinophilic granulomatous reactions associated with intralesional hyphae suggestive of Pythium insidiosum observed at the margins of coagula. P. insidiosum hyphae were visualized by Gomori’s methenamine silver stain.

  11. Case Report: Generalized Cutaneous Candidiasis in a Preterm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Generalised cutaneous candidiasis is rare in the neonatal period. When it does occur there is a risk of disseminated disease, particularly in preterm infants. Method A case report of a preterm baby who developed extensive cutaneous candidiasis. Result A 45 day old product of 30 weeks gestation noticed to ...

  12. Cutaneous Carcinosarcoma with Metastasis to the Parotid Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Tze Ling; Tomlinson, Jeanne; Chin, Ronald; Eslick, Guy D.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous carcinosarcoma is a rare malignancy that exhibits both mesenchymal and epithelial components. It is similar to nonmelanoma skin cancers in terms of risk and prognostic factors. However, these malignancies are known to have a propensity for local recurrence and metastasis, even with adequate resection margins. Here we report a case of metastatic cutaneous carcinosarcoma to the parotid gland and review the relevant literature.

  13. Cutaneous Aspergillosis at the site of ulceration from radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Fumiko; Okabe, Tomohiro.

    1979-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with cutaneous aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus nidulans was observed. The infection developed at the site of ulceration from radiation, which occurred after operation and radiotherapy for breast cancer. In cases of cutaneous aspergillosis, saprophytic lesions can be seen. (Nishio, M.)

  14. dermatology cutaneous manifestations of hiv/aids: part i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2004-11-01

    Nov 1, 2004 ... Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can lead to a variety of clinical cutaneous manifestations. These cutaneous disorders ... 1. Correlation between mean CD4 cell count and incidences of specific skin disorders in patients with HIV infection. Fig. 2. Morbilliform rash of acute seroconversion illness.

  15. Delayed Cutaneous Hypersensitivity Reactions to Antibiotics: Management with Desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Caitlin M G; Park, Miguel A

    2017-11-01

    Successful desensitization to mild to moderate delayed cutaneous adverse reaction to antibiotics has been described in a limited number of antibiotics and found to be safe. However, there are ample opportunities to standardize protocols for delayed cutaneous adverse reactions to antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acitretin for the management of generalized cutaneous lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirnia, Aria; Cohen, Philip R

    2014-09-16

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory disease that affects the skin, the oral mucosa, or both. Generalized cutaneous lichen planus may pose a therapeutic challenge for clinicians if the condition persists or flares after topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. Acitretin, a systemic retinoid, can be considered a potential second-line treatment for patients with generalized cutaneous lichen planus. Herein, we describe a postmenopausal woman with generalized cutaneous lichen planus who was successfully treated with acitretin. A 58-year-old woman presented with generalized cutaneous lichen planus involving her upper and lower extremities as well as her lower back. After failing corticosteroid therapy, she was started on acitretin 20 mg/day, which was later increased to 30 mg/day. To review the literature on the use of acitretin in cutaneous lichen planus, we used the PubMed search engine and searched for the terms "acitretin" and "cutaneous lichen planus." Our patient had complete resolution of pruritus within one week of initiating acitretin 20 mg/day. After an increase in dose to 30 mg/day, the cutaneous lesions completely resolved over a 3-month period. There was no recurrence of disease as acitretin was tapered and discontinued. Generalized cutaneous lichen planus may pose a therapeutic challenge for the symptomatic relief of skin lesions. Topical and systemic corticosteroids are first-line treatments. In patients who fail corticosteroids, relapse after corticosteroid therapy, or have contraindications to corticosteroids, acitretin may be considered a potential second-line therapy.

  17. Isolated cutaneous leishmaniasis over face – A diagnostic dilemma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated cutaneous leishmaniasis over face – A diagnostic dilemma. Santosh K. Swain, Ishwar C. Behera, Mahesh C. Sahu, Maitreyee Panda. Abstract. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a disease caused by an intracellular protozoa belong to the genus Leishmania, transmitted by the bite of a sandfly. It has diverse clinical ...

  18. The First Korean Case of Cutaneous Lung Tissue Heterotopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ga Won; Han, Seong Woo; Jung, Ji Mi; Kang, Mi Seon

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia is a very rare disorder where mature lung tissues develop in the skin. This is only the second known report of cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia, with the first by Singer et al. in 1998. A newborn infant had a hemangioma-like, freely movable mass connected to the anterior aspect of the sternal manubrium. Pathologic findings showed mature lung tissues with bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli through the dermis and subcutis, and it was diagnosed as cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia. Cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia is hypervascular, so grossly it looks like a hemangioma. It can be differentiated from pulmonary sequestration, teratoma, bronchogenic cyst, and branchial cleft cyst by histology and the location of the mass. We describe the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings of a cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia, the first reported in Korea. PMID:20808688

  19. Cutaneous lichen planus: A systematic review of treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Nasim

    2015-06-01

    Various treatment modalities are available for cutaneous lichen planus. Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Health Technology Assessment Database were searched for all the systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials related to cutaneous lichen planus. Two systematic reviews and nine relevant randomized controlled trials were identified. Acitretin, griseofulvin, hydroxychloroquine and narrow band ultraviolet B are demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous lichen planus. Sulfasalazine is effective, but has an unfavorable safety profile. KH1060, a vitamin D analogue, is not beneficial in the management of cutaneous lichen planus. Evidence from large scale randomized trials demonstrating the safety and efficacy for many other treatment modalities used to treat cutaneous lichen planus is simply not available.

  20. Treatment recommendations in patients diagnosed with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veness, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Non-melanoma cutaneous cancers occur at an epidemic rate in Australia. With an ageing population, more Australians will develop these cancers and at an increasing rate. In the majority of cases local treatment is highly curative. However, a subset of the population will be diagnosed with a high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. These can be defined as patients at risk of having subclinical metastases to regional lymph nodes based on unfavourable primary lesion features (including inadequately excised and recurrent lesions), patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to regional lymph nodes, and squamous cell carcinoma in immunosuppressed patients. The mortality and morbidity associated with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is usually as a consequence of uncontrolled metastatic nodal disease and, to a lesser extent, distant metastases. Radiotherapy has an essential role in treating these patients and in many cases the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy may be life saving. It is therefore important that all clinicians treating skin cancers have an understanding and awareness of the optimal approach to these patients. The aim of this article is to present treatment recommendations based on an overview of the current published literature. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Veness

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas occur at an epidemic rate in many countries with the worldwide incidence increasing. The sun-exposed head and neck are the most frequent sites for these cancers to arise and in most patients diagnosed with a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, local treatment is usually curative. However, a subset is diagnosed with a high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. High-risk factors include size (> 2 cm, thickness/depth of invasion (> 4 mm, recurrent lesions, the presence of perineural invasion, location near the parotid gland, and immunosuppression. These patients have a higher risk (> 10–20% of developing metastases to regional lymph nodes (often parotid nodes, and in some cases also of experiencing local morbidity (perineural invasion, based on unfavourable primary lesion and patient factors. Despite treatment, many patients developing metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma experience mortality and morbidity usually as a consequence of uncontrolled metastatic nodal disease. It is therefore important that clinicians treating nonmelanoma skin cancers have an understanding and awareness of these high-risk patients. The aim of this article is to discuss the factors that define a high-risk patient and to present some of the issues pertinent to their management.

  2. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent adult

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    Manoj Harnalikar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis, a systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum var capsulatum and Histoplasma capsulatum var duboisii is endemic to many parts of the world. The clinical manifestations range from acute or chronic pulmonary infection to a progressive disseminated disease. After initial exposure to the fungus, the infection is self-limited and restricted to the lungs in 99% of healthy individuals. The remaining 1%, however, progress to either disseminated or chronic disease involving the lungs, liver, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or rarely, the skin and mucous membranes. Mucocutaneous histoplasmosis is frequently reported in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, but it is rare in immunocompetent hosts. A 60-year-old male presented with asymptomatic swelling of the hard palate and crusted papules and nodules over the extremities, face and trunk. Clinically, the diagnoses of cutaneous cryptococcosis versus histoplasmosis was considered in this patient. A chest X-ray revealed hilar lymphadenopathy. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV was nonreactive. Skin biopsy revealed multiple tiny intracellular round yeast forms with a halo in the mid-dermis. Culture of the skin biopsy in Sabouraud′s dextrose agar showed colonies of Histoplasma capsulatum. Despite an investigation including no evidence of underlying immunosuppression was found, he was started on IV amphotericin-B (0.5 mg/kg/day. However, the patient succumbed to his disease 2 days after presentation. We report a rare case of disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent individual.

  3. Cutaneous ulcers associated with hydroxyurea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrone, Filippo; Dini, Valentina; Barbanera, Sabrina; Zerbinati, Nicola; Romanelli, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antitumoral drug mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative syndromes and sickle-cell disease. Ulcers represent a rare but severe long-term adverse effect of hydroxyurea therapy. Hydroxyurea-induced ulcers are often multiple and bilateral, typically developing in the perimalleolar region, although any cutaneous district is potentially affected. They generally look small, well-defined, shallow with an adherent, yellow, fibrinous necrotic base. A constant finding is also an extremely intense, treatment-resistant pain accompanying these ulcerations. Withdrawal of the drug generally leads to spontaneous healing of these lesions. Care providers tend to show insufficient awareness of this highly debilitating cutaneous side effect, and late or missed diagnoses are frequent. Instead, regular dermatologic screening should be performed on hydroxyurea-treated patients. This article will present a comprehensive review of indexed case reports and clinical studies, followed by a discussion about treatment options aiming at increasing knowledge about this specific topic. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cutaneous Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia in a Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, M; Katori, Y; Sasaki, H; Obara, R D; Furumoto, R; Kato, M; Nakahira, R; Yoshimura, H; Soeta, S; Ishiwata, T; Takahashi, K

    2017-07-01

    A 5-year-old male miniature dachshund was presented with a dermal nodule on the left forelimb that increased to 5 mm in diameter over a 2-month period. Grossly, the nodule was firm, and both the external and cut surfaces were homogeneously pale pink in colour. Microscopically, the nodule was comprised of mainly plump endothelial cells and inflammatory cells; among the latter, lymphocytes were predominant, with few scattered plasma cells, mast cells and macrophages. Lymphoid follicles with germinal centres were often observed. Mitotic figures were not observed amongst the endothelial cells. Immunohistochemically, the endothelial cells were positive for vimentin, factor VIII-related antigen and CD31, and the surrounding cells were positive for smooth muscle actin. Lymphocytes expressed CD3 or BLA36. These findings led to a diagnosis of cutaneous angiolymphoid hyperplasia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a cutaneous proliferative disorder comprising an admixture of proliferating vascular endothelial cells and lymphocytic infiltration with follicle formation in a dog. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Muhammad, Z.; Qayum, I.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycaemia due to absolute or relative insulin deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus of this area. This descriptive study was conducted in medical out patient door of District Headquarter Hospital Battgram from January 2008 to July 2008. A total of 350 diabetic (types 1 and 2) patients over 15 years of age attending the medical OPD of DHQ Hospital were examined in detail for skin manifestations of the disease. Three hundred and fifty diabetic (type-1 and type-2) patients (193 females and 157 males) enrolled in this study. Mean age of the patients was 54+-8.53 years. Duration of diabetes was between 1-12 years; 320 patients had type-2 and 30 patients had type-1 diabetes mellitus. Patients with uncontrolled disease were 327 and 23 patients showed adequate glycaemic control. Seventy-six percent of patients had cutaneous manifestations. The skin manifestations observed were: skin infections 30.9%, foot gangrene and ulcers 12.9%, pruritus 7.1%, vitiligo 5.7%, yellow skin 4.2%, diabetic dermopathy 4.2%, skin tags 3.7%, acanthosis nigricans 2.9%, eruptive xanthomas 2.6%, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum 1.4%, diabetic bullae 0.6%, and pigmented purpuras in 0.3% patients. Cutaneous manifestations were quite Common in the diabetics of this area. (author)

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

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    Kumar, S S; Kuruvilla, M; Pai, G S; Dinesh, M

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two confirmed cases of non -Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were examined for cutaneous manifestations for a period of 2 years from November 1998 in KMC Hospital Attavar, Mangalore. Cutaneous manifestations in the study group were compared to a control group of 32 patients. Specific infiltrates were present in all (5/5) CTCL patients and one out of twenty-seven patients with low grade NHL. Morphologically they presented as papules, plaques, nodules and erythroderma. Infective conditions seen in the study group were superficial fungal (7/32) and viral infections (2/ 32). Non-infective conditions were acquired ichthyosis (10/32), generalised pruritus (5/32), insect bite reaction (1/32) and drug eruption (1/32). When compared to control patients only acquired ichthyosis and generalised pruritus were found to be statistically significant. The study group also showed changes due to chemotherapy like diffuse alopecia (24/29), bluish pigmentation of proximal part of nail (4/29), localised pigmentation of palms and soles (1 /29), diffuse pigmentation at injection site (1 /29), pigmentation at scar site (1 /29) and stomatitis (4/29).

  7. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis – Dermoscopic Findings And Cryotherapy

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    Dobrev Hristo P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a 60-year-old male patient who, three months after a holiday in Southern Greece, found a small ‘pimple’ on his back, which gradually got as big as a small walnut, the central part becoming ulcerated and scabby. Dermatological examination found an erythematous-to-livid nodular lesion on the right shoulder; it was 16 mm in diameter with central ulceration, covered with brownish crust which discharged pus-like secretion upon pressure. Microscope examination of Romanowsky-Giemsa stained lesion material detected amastigote forms of Leishmania tropica. The culture investigation and serological tests for leishmaniasis were negative. Dermoscopy of the lesion found the following features: erythema, hyperkeratosis, central ulceration covered with brownish crust, “yellow tears-like” structures and “white starburst-like” patterns, and various vascular structures (including dotted vessels, comma-shaped vessels, hairpin- and glomerular-like vessels. The patient was diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis and underwent four cryotherapy sessions every other week with excellent therapeutic results - complete resolution of infiltrate with subsequent gentle hypopigmented scarring. In conclusion, dermoscopy is an easily accessible non-invasive method which can be useful for the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for single skin lesions.

  8. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

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    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Da Silva, F.C.A., E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, N.J. [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. (author)

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-10-08

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

  10. Prevalence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Ramshir, Iran; an Epidemiological Study

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    Vazirianzadeh B.* PhD,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a prevalent parasitological disease with diverse clinical manifestations in Iran. Therefore, the present retrospective study carried out to describe the demographic features of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ramshir, Iran. Materials & Methods This descriptive study was performed on 136 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients whose data were recorded in the Ramshir health center during 2006-9. Demographic information of patients including age, sex, habitat and sites of lesions, month and years of incidence were recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software. Findings Totally 79 patients (58.1% resided in urban areas and the born to 9 years (49.3% was recognized as the most infected age group. Hands (41.2% had the highest rates of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions followed by face (36.0% and foot (22.8%. The maximum number of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions was reported in March. Conclusion As cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ramshir seemed to be an endemic rural type, the appropriate preventing measures regarding to the rural cutaneous leishmaniasis should be considered to decrease incidence of the disease in the region.

  11. Adverse Cutaneous Reactions to Psychotropic Drugs: A Review

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    Filipa Novais

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychotropic drugs are often implicated in cutaneous adverse drug reactions. While most of these reactions have a benign character, it is still important, however, to consider its role in the increasing stigma and treatment adherence. A small number of the cutaneous adverse drug reactions can develop into serious and potentially fatal conditions. Objectives: This article aims to review the most common cutaneous adverse drug reactions in patients taking psychotropic drugs. Methods: In this study, a search was carried out in the MEDLINE database for English language articles published , from 1999 to 2014, using as keywords: psychiatric, psychotropic, cutaneous, adverse reaction, antidepressive agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, anticonvulsant, dementia. Information available from the Portuguese regulatory and supervising agency (Infarmed was also included.Results: 121 articles were found with reference to cutaneous adverse drug reactions associated with psychotropic drugs. The drugs most frequently reported as associated with such adverse effects were anticonvulsants used as mood stabilizers, followed by the antipsychotics . The antidementia drugs were rarely associated with serious cutaneous adverse reactions. Discussion and Conclusion: Cutaneous drug adverse reactions are common in psychiatric clinical practice and typically are minor in severity. The most severe reactions are most often associated with the use of mood stabilizing medications. Some of these side effects can be solved with reduction or drug discontinuation. More severe cases should be referred to a specialist in dermatology.

  12. Toxigenic cutaneous diphtheria in a returned traveller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Nur R; Koehler, Ann P; Shaw, Doug D; Graham, Caitlin R

    2014-12-31

    Diphtheria is rarely reported in Australia. A case of cutaneous diphtheria was reported to the South Australian Department for Health and Ageing in April 2013 in an Australian-born 18-year-old female following travel in India. The case presented with a skin ulcer on her toe. Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae was isolated from a swab of the lesion. The case was treated with antibiotics. The public health response included infection control advice, assessing the case and household contacts for organism carriage and providing antimicrobial chemoprophylaxis to contacts. Although cutaneous diphtheria is not included as part of the Australian communicable disease surveillance case definition, this may be an oversight as international evidence demonstrates that it is a source of organism transmission and can potentially result in outbreaks among susceptible populations. This formed the rationale for the public health response to this particular case. The protocol for the public health management of diphtheria in South Australia has since been revised to include cutaneous lesions caused by the toxigenic strain of the organism as part of the surveillance case definition. This work is copyright. You may download, display, print and reproduce the whole or part of this work in unaltered form for your own personal use or, if you are part of an organisation, for internal use within your organisation, but only if you or your organisation do not use the reproduction for any commercial purpose and retain this copyright notice and all disclaimer notices as part of that reproduction. Apart from rights to use as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968 or allowed by this copyright notice, all other rights are reserved and you are not allowed to reproduce the whole or any part of this work in any way (electronic or otherwise) without first being given the specific written permission from the Commonwealth to do so. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights are to be sent

  13. BAP1 has a survival role in cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Taylor, Michael; Miao, Benchun; Ji, Zhenyu; Njauw, Jenny C-N; Jönsson, Göran; Frederick, Dennie T; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-04-01

    Although the pattern of BAP1 inactivation in ocular melanoma specimens and in the BAP1 cutaneous melanoma (CM)/ocular melanoma predisposition syndrome suggests a tumor suppressor function, the specific role of this gene in the pathogenesis of CM is not fully understood. We thus set out to characterize BAP1 in CM and discovered an unexpected pro-survival effect of this protein. Tissue and cell lines analysis showed that BAP1 expression was maintained, rather than lost, in primary melanomas compared with nevi and normal skin. Genetic depletion of BAP1 in melanoma cells reduced proliferation and colony-forming capability, induced apoptosis, and inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. On the molecular level, suppression of BAP1 led to a concomitant drop in the protein levels of survivin, a member of anti-apoptotic proteins and a known mediator of melanoma survival. Restoration of survivin in melanoma cells partially rescued the growth-retarding effects of BAP1 loss. In contrast to melanoma cells, stable overexpression of BAP1 into immortalized but non-transformed melanocytes did suppress proliferation and reduce survivin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that BAP1 may have a growth-sustaining role in melanoma cells, but that its impact on ubiquitination underpins a complex physiology, which is context and cell dependent.

  14. Treatment of cutaneous melanoma: current approaches and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algazi, Alain P; Soon, Christopher W; Daud, Adil I

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive and deadly type of skin cancer. Surgical resection with or without lymph node sampling is the standard of care for primary cutaneous melanoma. Adjuvant therapy decisions may be informed by careful consideration of prognostic factors. High-dose adjuvant interferon alpha-2b increases disease-free survival and may modestly improve overall survival. Less toxic alternatives for adjuvant therapy are currently under study. External beam radiation therapy is an option for nodal beds where the risk of local recurrence is very high. In-transit melanoma metastases may be treated locally with surgery, immunotherapy, radiation, or heated limb perfusion. For metastatic melanoma, the options include chemotherapy or immunotherapy; targeted anti-BRAF and anti-KIT therapy is under active investigation. Standard chemotherapy yields objective tumor responses in approximately 10%–20% of patients, and sustained remissions are uncommon. Immunotherapy with high-dose interleukin-2 yields objective tumor responses in a minority of patients; however, some of these responses may be durable. Identification of activating mutations of BRAF, NRAS, c-KIT, and GNAQ in distinct clinical subtypes of melanoma suggest that these are molecularly distinct. Emerging data from clinical trials suggest that substantial improvements in the standard of care for melanoma may be possible

  15. Breast metastasis from cutaneous malignant melanoma mimicking a breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglio, Marina; Capalbo, Emanuela; Viganò, Sara; Trecate, Giovanna; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco Paride; Panizza, Pietro

    2015-06-25

    Breast metastases are very uncommon, either from solid tumors or malignant melanoma. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with a history of cutaneous melanoma of the shoulder excised 21 years ago. She presented with a palpable lump in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast. Ultrasound demonstrated a solid mass within a cystic lesion. A core biopsy was taken and first histology reported a poorly differentiated primary breast cancer suspected to be triple negative. MRI detected a satellite lesion in the same breast, a focus of suspected enhancement in the other breast, and the extramammary finding of an enhancing pulmonary lesion. Staging computed tomography detected widespread metastases to the lungs, brain, subcutaneous left shoulder, liver, pancreas, and hepatorenal recess. A core biopsy was taken from the left breast lesion and the previous slides were reviewed; histopathology and immunohistochemistry were in keeping with metastasis from melanoma. The possibility of a metastatic lesion to the breast should be taken into account in any patient presenting with a breast lump and a previous history of melanoma. Breast involvement cannot be considered an isolated finding, as it might be the first manifestation of widespread disease.

  16. Skin bleaching: highlighting the misuse of cutaneous depigmenting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadzie, O E; Petit, A

    2009-07-01

    Hydroquinone and other cutaneous depigmenting agents are widely used by dermatologists to treat pigmentary disorders. On 29 August 2006, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a monograph in the US Federal Register proposing to ban all hydroquinone products that have not been approved via a New Drug Application process. Reports in the scientific literature on the occurrence of exogenous ochronosis, in relation to the use of hydroquinone, was one of the concerns expressed by the FDA in relation to this agent. However, a review of the English-language scientific literature reveals that most of the reported cases of hydroquinone-induced exogenous ochronosis occurs in Africa, where the cultural practice of skin bleaching is highly prevalent. Skin bleaching is the practice of applying hydroquinone and/or other depigmenting agents to specific or widespread areas of the body, the primary function being to lighten normally dark skin. This practice typically occurs in men and women with Fitzpatrick skin phototypes IV to VI. It is a dangerous practice associated with a diverse range of side-effects, including mercury poisoning. Thus, this current discussion within the dermatological community on the safety of hydroquinone provides a unique opportunity to raise awareness about skin bleaching.

  17. A novel splice variant of the Fas gene in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Remco; Dijkman, Remco; Vermeer, Maarten H; Starink, Theo M; Willemze, Rein; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2002-10-01

    Defective apoptosis signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs), a group of malignancies derived from skin-homing T cells. An important mediator of apoptosis in T cells is the Fas receptor. We identified a novel splice variant of the Fas gene that displays retention of intron 5 and encodes a dysfunctional Fas protein in 13 of 22 patients (59%) in both early and advanced CTCL. Impairment of Fas-induced apoptosis resulting from aberrant splicing potentially contributes to the development and progression of CTCL by allowing continued clonal expansion of activated T cells and by reducing susceptibility to antitumor immune responses.

  18. Increased risk of depression in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J H; Egeberg, A; Kofoed, K

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reported prevalences of depression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) range widely, while the prevalence of depression in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) remains severely understudied. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether patients with SLE or CLE have increased risk...... of primary and secondary care, analyses of risk for depression and antidepressant use were performed in Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, prior depression, and prior antidepressant use. RESULTS: A total of 3,489 patients with lupus erythematosus were...

  19. Papulonodular Secondary Syphilis Presenting as Multiple Distinct Cutaneous Lesions in an HIV-Positive Transgender Woman

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    Kristina Navrazhina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the first reported case of papulonodular secondary syphilis in an HIV-positive transgender female. Syphilis is classified into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages, with secondary syphilis having notably diverse cutaneous manifestations. Our patient presented with diverse lesions throughout her body, all pathologically consistent with papulonodular secondary syphilis. Proper identification of the multiple presentations of syphilis is crucial to early diagnosis and treatment. This report seeks to broaden the scope of dermatological manifestations that arise secondary to papulonodular syphilis in HIV-positive patients.

  20. Sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis in a Cutaneous leishmaniasis focus in central Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Y; Osorio, L; Alvarez, G; Rojas, J; Jiménez, F; Gómez, C; Ferro, C

    1996-01-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis, 15 other species of the genus Lutzomyia, and one species of Brumptomyia were collected in an endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a river canyon 450 m above sea-level, in Rio Claro, Antioquia, Colombia. The presence of Lu. longipalpis is associated with the destruction of the primary forest and the development of new farmland and rural settlement in this region. The composition of species identified a different habitat for Lu. longipalpis in Colombia. Lu. yuilli and Lu. longipalpis were predominant (68.26%) followed by Lu. trapidoi, Lu. hartmani, Lu. triramula, Lu. panamensis, Lu. gomezi.

  1. Cutaneous angiosarcoma in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum

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    Arora Raman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by photosensitivity, cutaneous pigmentary changes, premature skin ageing and development of various cutaneous and internal malignancies at an early age as a result of a defect in nucleotide excision repair following ultraviolet light exposure. Cutaneous angiosarcomas are aggressive neoplasms that are rarely associated with XP. In this communication, we report the case of a 40-year-old male patient with XP who developed an angiosarcoma of the face and discuss the implications of this association in view of recent developments in this field.

  2. [Comparative description and retrospective analisis of modern methods of surgical wounds closure for intraoperative prophylaxis of development of pathologic cutaneous cicatrices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavyts'kyĭ, S O; Avetikov, D S; Lokes, K P; Rozkolupa, O O; Boĭko, I V

    2014-05-01

    The experience of application of various methods of closure was presented for the head and neck cutaneous wound surfaces after elective operative interventions. The variant of the postoperative results estimation and optimization of the wounds healing by primary closure was proposed.

  3. Malignant T Cells Secrete Galectins and Induce Epidermal Hyperproliferation and Disorganized Stratification in a Skin Model of Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thode, Christenze; Andersen, Anders Woetmann; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL) are the most common primary skin lymphomas; which are characterized by an accumulation of malignant T cells in the skin. The early lesion resembles both clinically and histologically benign inflammatory disorders, which also presents with hyperproliferative epide...... in CTCL.Journal of Investigative Dermatology accepted article preview online, 09 July 2014; doi:10.1038/jid.2014.284....

  4. Human herpesvirus 8-associated lymphoma mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Fang; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Lin; Huang, Wen-Ya; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Lien, Huang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma, a human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-associated lymphoma, is uncommon, and it is usually seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It presents as a body cavity-based lymphomatous effusion, but several cases of the so-called solid primary effusion lymphoma presenting as solid tumors without associated lymphomatous effusion have been reported. They have similar clinical, histopathological and immunophenotypical features. Most of them have a B-cell genotype. This suggests the solid variant may represent a clinicopathological spectrum of primary effusion lymphoma. We report a case of HHV8-associated lymphoma histopathologically and immunophenotypically mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The patient was a 31-year-old HIV-seropositive man presenting with skin nodules over his right thigh. Biopsy of the nodules showed anaplastic large cells infiltrating the dermis. These malignant cells strongly expressed CD3, CD30 and CD43. Cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma was initially diagnosed, but further tests, including immunoreactivity for HHV8 protein and clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes, confirmed the diagnosis of HHV8-associated B-cell lymphoma with aberrant T-cell marker expression. This case provides an example of solid primary effusion lymphoma mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma and highlights the importance of HHV8 immunohistochemistry and molecular tests in the diagnosis of HHV8-associated lymphoma with a cutaneous presentation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Influence of microemulsions on cutaneous drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2002-01-01

    In attempt to increase cutaneous drug delivery, microemulsion vehicles have been more and more frequently employed over recent years. Microemulsion formulations have been shown to be superior for both transdermal and dermal delivery of particularly lipophilic compounds, but also hydrophilic...... compounds appear to benefit from application in microemulsions compared to conventional vehicles, like hydrogels, emulsions and liposomes. The favourable drug delivery properties of microemulsions appear to mainly be attributed to the excellent solubility properties. However, the vehicles may also act...... as penetration enhancers depending on the oil/surfactant constituents, which involves a risk of inducing local irritancy. The correlation between microemulsion structure/composition and drug delivery potential is not yet fully elucidated. However, a few studies have indicated that the internal structure...

  6. Overcoming the Cutaneous Barrier with Microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luciana B.

    2014-01-01

    Microemulsions are fluid and isotropic formulations that have been widely studied as delivery systems for a variety of routes, including the skin. In spite of what the name suggests, microemulsions are nanocarriers, and their use as topical delivery systems derives from their multiple advantages compared to other dermatological formulations, such as ease of preparation, thermodynamic stability and penetration-enhancing properties. Composition, charge and internal structure have been reported as determinant factors for the modulation of drug release and cutaneous and transdermal transport. This manuscript aims at reviewing how these and other characteristics affect delivery and make microemulsions appealing for topical and transdermal administration, as well as how they can be modulated during the formulation design to improve the potential and efficacy of the final system. PMID:24590260

  7. Overcoming the Cutaneous Barrier with Microemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana B. Lopes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microemulsions are fluid and isotropic formulations that have been widely studied as delivery systems for a variety of routes, including the skin. In spite of what the name suggests, microemulsions are nanocarriers, and their use as topical delivery systems derives from their multiple advantages compared to other dermatological formulations, such as ease of preparation, thermodynamic stability and penetration-enhancing properties. Composition, charge and internal structure have been reported as determinant factors for the modulation of drug release and cutaneous and transdermal transport. This manuscript aims at reviewing how these and other characteristics affect delivery and make microemulsions appealing for topical and transdermal administration, as well as how they can be modulated during the formulation design to improve the potential and efficacy of the final system.

  8. Cellular requirements for cutaneous sensitivity elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, I

    1985-01-01

    The role of glass-adherent cells in cutaneous sensitivity (CS) elicitation has been analyzed in this study. CS responses have been revealed to be mediated by at least two distinct subsets of genetically restricted T cells: I-restricted 'DTH-like' T cells and K/D-restricted 'CTL-like' T cells. Both T-cell responses require I-A-positive glass-adherent cell populations, which lack T-cell markers, to manifest their activities. The role of the adherent cells is different in the 'DTH-like' responses and the 'CTL-like' responses. The disparities between the present results and previous contentions are discussed in this paper.

  9. Unusual Presentation of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Ocular Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Doroodgar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are parasitic diseases that are transmitted to humans by infected female sandflies. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is one of 3 main forms of the disease. CL is the most common form of the disease and is endemic in many urban and rural parts of Iran and usually caused by two species of Leishmania: L. major and L. tropica. We report a case of unusual leishmaniasis with 25 lesions on exposed parts of the body and right eyelid involvement (ocular leishmaniasis. The patient was a 75-year-old male farmer referred to health care center in Aran va Bidgol city. The disease was diagnosed by direct smear, culture, and PCR from the lesions. PCR was positive for Leishmania major.

  10. Worldwide Increasing Incidences of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godar, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has been increasing at a steady rate in fair-skinned populations around the world for decades. Scientists are not certain why CMM has been steadily increasing, but strong, intermittent UVB (290-320 nm) exposures, especially sunburn episodes, probably initiate, CMM, while UVA (321-400 nm) passing through glass windows in offices and cars probably promotes it. The CMM incidence may be increasing at an exponential rate around the world, but it definitely decreases with increasing latitude up to∼ 50 degree N where it reverses and increases with the increasing latitude. The inversion in the incidence of CMM may occur because there is more UVA relative to UVB for most of the year at higher latitudes. If windows, allowing UVA to enter our indoor-working environment and cars, are at least partly responsible for the increasing incidence of CMM, then UV filters can be applied to reduce the rate of increase worldwide.

  11. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  12. Blog and Podcast Watch: Cutaneous Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Grock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM based on the ongoing Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of cutaneous emergencies from the AIR series.    The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 most accessed sites per the Social Media Index published within the previous 12 months and scored by eight board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27-29 receive an “honorable mention” label, if the editorial board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. A total of 35 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. None scored ≥30 points necessary for the AIR label, although four honorable mention posts were identified. Key educational pearls from these honorable mention posts are summarized. This Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expertbased, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on cutaneous emergencies. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(2288-292.

  13. Cutaneous horn and thermal keratosis in erythema AB igne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood Apra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46 - year - old Kashmiri lady developed erythema ab igne on both legs. She subsequently developed multiple keratoses and a cutaneous horn in the involved skin. An uncommon association of these three clinical conditions is being presented.

  14. Cutaneous leishmaniasis with lymphadenopathy due to Leishmania donovani

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, W. R.; Wonders, J.; Jensema, A. J.; Chocholova, E.; Kager, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis with lymphadenopathy due to Leishmania donovani, which was successfully treated with oral miltefosine. Given the increased prevalence of travelling, patients presenting with lymph-node enlargement should have leishmaniasis included in the

  15. Diffuse Cutaneous Mastocytosis in a Child - a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popadić Svetlana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mastocytosis refers to a group of diseases characterized by a clonal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in one or more tissues/organs with different clinical presentations. In children, limited cutaneous forms of mastocytosis are rather frequent, while systemic mastocytosis is rare. The diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis is based on clinical findings and histopathology. We present a patient who developed skin lesions at the age of 18 months. Clinical findings, confirmed by histopathology, were consistent with diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis. The follow-up period was 7 years. The treatment included oral antihistamines in combination with mast cell stabilizers, mild topical steroids and avoidance of friction. During the follow-up period, there were no signs of systemic involvement, and the quality of life was preserved, despite the large surface of affected skin. This case report should increase the awareness and knowledge of clinicians about this rare form of cutaneous mastocytosis in the pediatric population.

  16. Tumor-infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes effect on clinical outcome of muco-cutaneous melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Rahbar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent data have changed our views of prognostic factors in cutaneous melanoma, while some newer methods have yielded better prognostic information. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are believed to represent the immune reaction/response to melanoma cells which is often found in melanocytic cancer. Aim and Objective: We carried out an analysis, aiming to establish pooled estimates for clinical outcomes based on the presence of CD8+ T cell in melanocytic cancer. Materials and Methods: We have included 42 patients with primary cutaneous melanocytic cancer without preoperative treatments in our study. We next analyzed the proliferative activity of CD8+ T cells that infiltrated in tumor cell nests. The intratumoral and adjacent to invasive margin of tumor CD+ T-cell infiltration were analyzed which could also reflect antitumor immunity. Results: The total number of CD8+ cells especially adjacent to invasive margin of tumor was positively correlated with anatomical tumor thickness (P < .001 and not correlated with patient′s age and sex. The stage of tumor which is related to vascular-neural invasion, regional lymph nodes involvement and tumor thickness shows positive correlation with CD8+ infiltration in tumor (P < .004, P < .005, P < .001, respectively. Acral melanoma shows more CD8 lymphocytes infiltration and also recurrence rate of tumor (P < .005. Conclusion: We believe that CD8+ T-cell infiltration in primary cutaneous melanocytic cancer represents the immune reaction/response to melanoma which could be an important new therapy for melanoma although more research is needed on this treatment modality.

  17. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2011-02-18

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment.

  18. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Wongkitisophon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment.

  19. Cutaneous sporotrichosis as an occupational disease: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    César Bimbi; Piotr Brzezinski

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous mycoses are not rare in Latin America. In Brazil, sporotrichosis was once almost exclusively found in rural areas, but in recent years it changed its profile and has been more frequent among urban adults. Cutaneous sporotrichosis is acquired from saprophytic dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii usually found in soil, vegetation, and especially decaying organic matter in tropical, subtropical, and humid environments through cutaneous inoculation. The fungus abundantly grows on de...

  20. Cutaneous Mycoses among Rice Farmers in Anambra State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ekwealor, Chito Clare; Oyeka, Christie Amechi

    2013-01-01

    Rice grain is one of the world's most important food crops, and its cultivation is a major occupation in Anambra State, Nigeria. These rice farmers are exposed to various agents that predispose them to cutaneous mycoses. The aim of this work was to screen rice farmers for lesions suggestive of cutaneous mycoses and to isolate and identify fungal agents associated with the infection. This survey was carried out between November 2009 and June 2011 in Anambra State, Nigeria. Clinical samples col...

  1. A case of cutaneous Rhodotorula infection mimicking cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S M C; Quante, M; Cubbon, M D; MacDiarmaid-Gordon, A R; Topham, E J

    2016-12-01

    Rhodotorula is a ubiquitous environmental and commensal yeast, and an emerging opportunistic pathogen, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Clinical infections with Rhodotorula have been increasingly recognized over the past 30 years; however, infections in solid-organ transplant recipients are uncommon, and cutaneous manifestations have rarely been reported. We describe a 59-year-old male renal transplant recipient, who developed cutaneous infection with Rhodotorula upon failure of his graft and commencement of haemodialysis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. Elephantiasis of the external genitalia: A sequel to cutaneous tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem and cutaneous tuberculosis constitutes a minor proportion of extra pulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis. Elephantiasis of the external genitalia, as a sequel to cutaneous tuberculosis, in a 40-year-old diabetic lady is being reported for its rarity. The patient also had lesions of healed scrofuloderma of 27 years′ duration, in both axillae, with residual pedunculated nodules.

  3. Cutaneous Carcinosarcoma with Metastasis to the Parotid Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Ling Loh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous carcinosarcoma is a rare malignancy that exhibits both mesenchymal and epithelial components. It is similar to nonmelanoma skin cancers in terms of risk and prognostic factors. However, these malignancies are known to have a propensity for local recurrence and metastasis, even with adequate resection margins. Here we report a case of metastatic cutaneous carcinosarcoma to the parotid gland and review the relevant literature.

  4. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an American Adolescent Returning From Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjaei, Kimia G; Lawton, Kira; Gaur, Sunanda

    2018-06-06

    We present here the case of a healthy 16-year-old American girl who returned from an organized trip to Israel with cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major; the infection was treated successfully with paromomycin-gentamicin ointment. She was initially misdiagnosed with staphylococcal and pseudomonal cellulitis. Although cutaneous leishmaniasis is seen only rarely in the United States, it should be considered when diagnosing new skin lesions after travel to affected countries.

  5. Tuberculosis. Lung and extrapulmonary compromise (cutaneous and ganglionar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez Mildred; Neira, Myriam Consuelo; Latorre Pablo; Faisal, Michel

    2000-01-01

    We present the case or a male, 28 year old that consulted for fever, weight loss and axillary ulcer. Clinically had two skin lesions where cutaneous tuberculosis was proven (lupus vulgaris-scrofuloderma). The skin lesions led to the diagnosis of lung tuberculosis and tuberculous adenitis. In this case all the diagnostic criteria for cutaneous tuberculosis were completed: active presence of tuberculosis in another place, positive reaction to tuberculin test, physical signs and appropriate answer to the treatment

  6. A novel xenograft model of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Kopp, Katharina; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are characterized by accumulation of malignant T cells in the skin. Early disease resembles benign skin disorders but during disease progression cutaneous tumors develop, and eventually the malignant T cells can spread to lymph nodes and internal organs. However...... and lymphatic tumors, originated from the transplanted malignant T cells. In conclusion, we describe a novel mouse model of tumor stage CTCL for future studies of disease dissemination and preclinical evaluations of new therapeutic strategies....

  7. Thermotherapy. An alternative for the treatment of American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    OpenAIRE

    López, Liliana; Robayo, Martha; Vargas, Margarita; Vélez, Iván D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Pentavalent antimonials (Sb5) and miltefosine are the first-line drugs for treating cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia; however, toxicity and treatment duration negatively impact compliance and cost, justifying an active search for better therapeutic options. We compared the efficacy and safety of thermotherapy and meglumine antimoniate for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Colombia. Method An open randomized Phase III clinical trial was performed in five milita...

  8. CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    OpenAIRE

    R. Suganya Gnanadeepam; S. Kayalvizhi Money

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The kidney and the skin are the two large networks of the body with abundant blood supply associated with various cutaneous manifestations. This study aims to detect the various cutaneous manifestations and its incidence in patients with chronic renal failure and renal transplantation. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was done for a period of 1 year from January 2016 to December 2016 at Nephrology OPD ward and Medicine wards, Government KAPV Medical College Hos...

  9. Cutaneous vasoregulation during short- and long-term aerial acclimation in the amphibious mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C A; Litwiller, S L; Murrant, C L; Wright, P A

    2012-03-01

    The mangrove rivulus (Kryptolebias marmoratus) is an amphibious fish and evidence suggests that the cutaneous surface is the primary site of gas exchange during emersion. The aim of this study was to determine whether cutaneous blood vessels were regulated in the caudal fin during the initial transition from water to aerial exposure, and after 10 days of aerial acclimation. Acute changes (first 3 min following emersion) in the cutaneous vessels diameter were measured in real-time on live fish using light microscopy. The data show that under control conditions, only arterioles in the caudal fin were vasoactive. During the first 20s of aerial acclimation the arterioles significantly constricted (-2.1 ± 0.4 μm), which was followed immediately by a relaxation (from 40 to 180 s). This vasoconstriction was eliminated with the addition of phentolamine (50 μmoll(-1)), which indicates that the vasoconstriction was mediated by α-adrenoreceptors. Longer-term changes in the cutaneous surface vasculature were determined using fluorescent immunohistochemistry and antibodies for the endothelial marker, CD31. Fish aerially acclimated for 10 days exhibited significantly higher levels of endothelial fluorescence in the caudal fin when compared to control fish in water, indicating endothelial cell production (i.e. angiogenesis). These data combined show that for every emersion episode, there is an initial α-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction, which is most likely, a stress response. This is then followed by a long-term acclimation involving an upregulation in endothelial cell production, which would subsequently enhance blood perfusion to the cutaneous surface and potentially increase the capacity for gas exchange with the external environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The antiviral effectiveness of butylated hydroxytoluene on herpes cutaneous infections in hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, A.D.; Arruda, D.; Snipes, W.; Frost, P.

    1982-01-01

    Hairless mice, cutaneously infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), were treated topically with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The effectiveness of BHT in shortening the duration of infections was assayed under three conditions. In the first experiments, mice undergoing primary infections with no prior immunity to HSV-1 were utilized. These animals tended to develop deep lesions that were not typical of recurrent HSV-1 infections in humans. A second set of experiments utilized mice that had recovered from a primary infection and that were immunosuppressed by γ irradiation. Immunosuppression was essential for the full development of lesions upon reinfection. The lesions in these animals remained more localized with less tendency to spread into deep tissues. A third set of experiments utilized animals that were subcutaneously inoculated with human serum γ-globulin 24 hr prior to infection. Lesions on these animals also remained localized and did not penetrate into deep tissues. Under all three conditions, BHT was found to be effective in reducing the clearance time of HSV-1 cutaneous lesions when applied topically to the infected area

  11. Histopathological development of equine cutaneous papillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, M; Oyamada, T; Yoshikawa, H; Yoshikawa, T; Itakura, C

    1990-05-01

    The histopathological development of equine cutaneous papillomas was studied in 78 warts naturally occurring in 50 one to 3-year-old Thoroughbred or Arab horses and in 54 warts experimentally induced in three 2-year-old Thoroughbreds. Lesions in the natural cases were categorized into three phases, growth, development and regression. Main lesions of the growing phase were marked hyperplasia of the basal cells and mild to moderate acanthosis, hyper- and parakeratosis with a few intranuclear inclusion bodies (IIB) which were positive with anti-bovine papillomavirus serum. In the developing phase, there was prominent acanthosis with cellular swelling and fusion, and marked hyper- and parakeratosis. Many IIB were also present in swollen or degenerative prickle cells and granular cells, with a high degree of parakeratosis in keratinocytes. In the regressing phase, epidermal layers were almost normal with only slight hyperplastic change. However, there was rete peg proliferation downward into the dermis with moderate proliferation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. In addition, in 10 spontaneous and one experimental wart, the lesions were fibropapillomas and this has never been described in horses previously. It was concluded that papillomas were initiated by basal cell hyperplasia without viral antigen production, with formation of acanthosis and hyper- and parakeratosis with IIB production. These findings were confirmed by examination of the experimental cases on the basis of the gross diameter of the warts.

  12. Sensitive Molecular Diagnostics for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Orli; Berkowitz, Anat; Codish, Shlomi; Novack, Victor; Rashti, Aviv; Akad, Fouad; Shemer-Avni, Yonat

    2017-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and identification of Leishmania species is highly important for the disease management. In Israel, CL is caused mainly by Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica species. We established an easy to handle point of care lesion-swabbing, combined with a highly sensitive multiplex real time PCR (multiplex qPCR) for accurate and rapid diagnosis of Leishmania species. Using three probes: one general for: Leishmania species, and two specific for L major , and L tropica , we screened 1783 clinical samples collected during two years. Leishmania species was found in 1086 individuals, 1008 L major , and 70 L tropica . Eight samples positive for Leishmania species only, were further tested using a second set of multiplex qPCR developed, and were found positive for Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania infantum/donovani (2 and 6 samples, concomitantly). Taken together, the test enabled diagnostics and better treatment of Leishmania infections from the Old World (1078 samples) and the New World (8 samples), and the subtyping of the dominant strains in the region, as well as in returning travelers'.

  13. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is a protozoal disease usually caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica and transmitted by the bite of a sandfly. It is usually characterized by a single, polymorphous lesion located in an uncovered area. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the clinico-epidemiological characteristics of CL among children. Materials and Methods: It was a retro-prospective study carried out over a period of 18 months in our center, in which the clinico-epidemiological features of children presenting with CL were assessed. Results: A total of 10 children (male:female - 7:3 were included in the study with the age range of 1–15 years, with a mean age of 8.8 years. Face was the most commonly affected site (n = 8, followed by neck and hands (1 each, and nodulo-ulcerative was the most common clinical type seen in nine patients. Skin smears for Leishman–Donovan (LD bodies were positive in five patients while the skin biopsy, which was done in four cases, showed the presence of LD bodies in only one patient. Conclusion: CL is a common presentation among children, especially in the endemic areas, and the clinical features are similar to the adult onset disease.

  14. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meephansan J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jitlada Meephansan,1 Atiya Rungjang,1 Werayut Yingmema,2 Raksawan Deenonpoe,3 Saranyoo Ponnikorn3 1Division of Dermatology, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 2Laboratory Animal Centers, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 3Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand Abstract: Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin after injury. ROS are involved in all phases of wound healing. A balance between oxidative and antioxidative forces is necessary for a favorable healing outcome. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is considered a powerful antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing. Full-thickness dermal wounds were created in 36 healthy female mice, which were divided into a control group and a group receiving 78.9 µM topical astaxanthin treatment twice daily for 15 days. Astaxanthin-treated wounds showed noticeable contraction by day 3 of treatment and complete wound closure by day 9, whereas the wounds of control mice revealed only partial epithelialization and still carried scabs. Wound healing biological markers including Col1A1 and bFGF were significantly increased in the astaxanthin-treated group since day 1. Interestingly, the oxidative stress marker iNOS showed a significantly lower expression in the study. The results indicate that astaxanthin is an effective compound for accelerating wound healing. Keywords: astaxanthin, wound healing, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant 

  15. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meephansan, Jitlada; Rungjang, Atiya; Yingmema, Werayut; Deenonpoe, Raksawan; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin after injury. ROS are involved in all phases of wound healing. A balance between oxidative and antioxidative forces is necessary for a favorable healing outcome. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is considered a powerful antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing. Full-thickness dermal wounds were created in 36 healthy female mice, which were divided into a control group and a group receiving 78.9 µM topical astaxanthin treatment twice daily for 15 days. Astaxanthin-treated wounds showed noticeable contraction by day 3 of treatment and complete wound closure by day 9, whereas the wounds of control mice revealed only partial epithelialization and still carried scabs. Wound healing biological markers including Col1A1 and bFGF were significantly increased in the astaxanthin-treated group since day 1. Interestingly, the oxidative stress marker iNOS showed a significantly lower expression in the study. The results indicate that astaxanthin is an effective compound for accelerating wound healing.

  16. Worldwide Increasing Incidences of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne E. Godar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM has been increasing at a steady rate in fair-skinned populations around the world for decades. Scientists are not certain why CMM has been steadily increasing, but strong, intermittent UVB (290–320 nm exposures, especially sunburn episodes, probably initiate, CMM, while UVA (321–400 nm passing through glass windows in offices and cars probably promotes it. The CMM incidence may be increasing at an exponential rate around the world, but it definitely decreases with increasing latitude up to ~50°N where it reverses and increases with the increasing latitude. The inversion in the incidence of CMM may occur because there is more UVA relative to UVB for most of the year at higher latitudes. If windows, allowing UVA to enter our indoor-working environment and cars, are at least partly responsible for the increasing incidence of CMM, then UV filters can be applied to reduce the rate of increase worldwide.

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogiparthi, S N; Muralidhar, K; Seshadri, K G; Rangarajan, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus. The incidence is rising in modern Indian society because of Industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are usually associated with the duration of Diabetes. Among the various forms, the most common is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic ulcer formation leading to amputations frequently. Hence the aim of this study is to document the early cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling Diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with Type 2 DM. Participant's neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score. Among the Skin changes documented, the common changes seen were: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), Xerosis in 168 (82%), Anhydrosis in 162 (79%), Plantar Fissures in 136 (66.3%), Plantar Ulcer in 80 (39%), common nail changes documented were Onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and Onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients in relation to the occupation and duration of Diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the all stages of Diabetes and institute foot care measures to prevent the complications of neuropathy.

  18. Functional assessment of cutaneous microvasculature after radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, C.; Durand, R.; Grulkey, W.; Sayer, S.; Olivotto, I.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine if laser Doppler flowmetry could be used to non-invasively evaluate microvasculature function after radiation therapy (RT), we assessed blood flow response to heating in women following RT after breast conservation.Materials and methods: Forty women with unilateral stage I/II breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and RT were evaluated at varying intervals post RT. Ten patients were retested after an interval of 55 to 57 months to assess reproducibility of the control data. A laser Doppler probe fitted into a heat source was used to non-invasively measure blood flow in a small area of skin on the treated breast and a matched area on the untreated side. The heating element increased skin surface temperature to 40C, permitting assessment of heat stress induced changes in blood flow.Results36 months post RT, there was no significant difference seen in relative blood flow between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides. Cutaneous blood flow response to the heat stress was very reproducible when women were reassessed 55 to 57 months after initial testing.Conclusions 36 months post RT. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Selenium for the Prevention of Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Grossman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of selenium (Se supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence.

  20. Selenium for the Prevention of Cutaneous Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Pamela B.; Fain, Heidi D.; Cassidy, James P.; Tran, Sally M.; Moos, Philip J.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Gerads, Russell; Florell, Scott R.; Grossman, Douglas; Leachman, Sancy A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of selenium (Se) supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence. PMID:23470450

  1. Treatment of Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Miguel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous pseudolymphoma (CPL is a reactive polyclonal T- or B-cell lymphoproliferative process. CPL may appear as localized or disseminated skin lesions. While most cases of CPL are idiopathic, they may also occur as a response to, for example, contact dermatitis, arthropod reactions, and bacterial infections. CPL can be classified based on its clinical features, but all variants have similar histopathological patterns of either predominantly B-cell infiltrates, T-cell infiltrates, or mixed T/B-cell infiltrates. The prognosis of CPL is good, but the underlying disease process should be taken into account. If an antigenic stimulus is identified, it should be removed. In patients with idiopathic CPL, a close follow-up control strategy should be adopted. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize all reported treatments for CPL. The review was based on articles from the PubMed database, using the query “skin pseudolymphoma treatment”, English and German, about “human” subjects, and published between 1990 and 2015 documenting adequate treatment and/or aetiology. Mainly individual case reports and small case series were found. Treatment options include topical and intralesional agents, systemic agents, and physical modalities. The final part of the review proposes a treatment algorithm for CPL according to each aetiology, based on the literature of the last 25 years. Future research should focus on randomized controlled trials and studies on long-term outcomes, which were not identified in the current review.

  2. [Hypochondria sine materia as a psychosomatic problem: a model of hypochondriac disorders realized in the cutaneous sphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulevich, A B; Dorozhenok, I Iu; Romanov, D V; L'vov, A N

    2012-01-01

    Hypochondria sine materia is a disorder with physical complains corresponding to no any somatic diagnosis. Hypochondria sine materia is a more complicated psychopathological condition compared to hypochondria cum materia. Hypochondria sine materia could be diagnosed not only in psychiatry, but mainly in general medicine. It is especially prevalent in dermatology. As a result of analysis of hypochondriac disorders involving cutaneous sphere in patients without dermatological diseases, a binary model of psychodermatological syndromes presenting with hypochondria sine materia in dermatology was developed. The binary structure of the psychodermatological syndromes includes secondary psychiatric symptoms based on primary coenesthesiopathic phenomena. The heterogeneous psychodermatological syndromes (cutaneous organ neurosis, impulsive excoriations syndrome, circumscripta hypochondria, coenesthesiopathic paranoia) could be arranged in a continuum of consecutively worsening conditions from neurotic to psychotic severity register. The syndromes differ in clinical and social prognosis requiring different approach to diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Interferon alpha for the adjuvant treatment of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Lens, Marko B; Pasquali, Sandro; Pilati, Pierluigi; Chiarion Sileni, Vanna

    2013-06-18

    Interferon alpha is the only agent approved for the postoperative adjuvant treatment of high-risk cutaneous melanoma. However, the survival advantage associated with this treatment is unclear, especially in terms of overall survival. Thus, adjuvant interferon is not universally considered a gold standard treatment by all oncologists. To assess the disease-free survival and overall survival effects of interferon alpha as adjuvant treatment for people with high-risk cutaneous melanoma. We searched the following databases up to August 2012: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2012, issue 8), MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), AMED (from 1985), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched trials databases in 2011, and proceedings of the ASCO annual meeting from 2000 to 2011. We checked the reference lists of selected articles for further references to relevant trials. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing interferon alpha to observation (or any other treatment) for the postoperative (adjuvant) treatment of patients with high-risk skin melanoma, that is, people with regional lymph node metastasis (American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM (tumour, lymph node, metastasis) stage III) undergoing radical lymph node dissection, or people without nodal disease but with primary tumour thickness greater than 1 mm (AJCC TNM stage II). Two authors extracted data, and a third author independently verified the extracted data. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR), which is the ratio of the risk of the event occurring in the treatment arm (adjuvant interferon) compared to the control arm (no adjuvant interferon). The survival data were either entered directly into Review Manager (RevMan) or extrapolated from Kaplan-Meier plots and then entered into RevMan. Based on the presence of between-study heterogeneity, we applied a fixed-effect or random-effects model for calculating the pooled estimates

  4. Cutaneous sarcoidosis: clinicopathologic study of 76 patients from Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Rim; Kurban, Mazen; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Abbas, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The skin is involved in 25% of cases. Studies on cutaneous sarcoidosis from our region are lacking. This study was conducted to describe clinical and histopathologic findings in all patients diagnosed with cutaneous sarcoidosis at the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1992 and 2010 and to compare findings with those published in the literature. Clinical charts of patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis were retrospectively reviewed. Extracutaneous lesions were classified by organ involvement. Treatment was documented. Pathology specimens were reviewed. Cutaneous sarcoidosis was diagnosed in 76 Lebanese patients, 79% of whom were women. Mean age at diagnosis was 48 years. A total of 29% of patients had systemic disease that was commonly associated with lupus pernio lesions and subcutaneous sarcoidosis. The most common cutaneous lesions were sarcoidal plaques. The histopathologic features in our series did not differ from those described in the literature, except for the documented presence of a grenz zone. Interestingly, 23% of biopsy specimens contained perineural granulomas, raising the possibility of tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid leprosy. Foreign bodies were detected in 10% of cases (all had systemic involvement), supporting the opinion that sarcoidosis and granulomatous foreign body reaction are not mutually exclusive. The clinical and histopathologic features of cutaneous sarcoidosis patients in the present series are generally comparable with those published in the literature, with minor differences. Clinically, the most commonly seen lesion was plaque. Microscopically, cutaneous sarcoidosis may exhibit a grenz zone and may show perineural inflammation and foreign bodies. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious

  6. [Mucormycosis: Study of five cases found in San Juan de Dios hospital and Sor Maria Ludovica hospital in La Plata, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherston, P L; Fernández, G; Munguía, H; Marín, M E

    1998-01-01

    Hospital San Juan de Dios and Sor María Ludovica in La Plata, between 1980 and 1997. Mucormicosis is a frequently fatal, opportunistic fungal infection, that affects immunocompromised patients. The risk factors include diabetes mellitus, leukemia, lymphoma, burns, etc. We present three cases of cutaneous mucormicosis in children 3, 10 and 11 years old, who had been sent to the hospital due to compound fractures in a car crash; one case of pulmonary mucormicosis in an adult 28 years old with prolonged corticotherapy and rhinocerebral mucormicosis in a patient 38 years old with a diagnosis of acute lymphoid leukemia.

  7. An Innovative Field-Applicable Molecular Test to Diagnose Cutaneous Leishmania Viannia spp. Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A Saldarriaga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis is widely distributed in Central and South America. Leishmania of the Viannia subgenus are the most frequent species infecting humans. L. (V. braziliensis, L. (V. panamensis are also responsible for metastatic mucosal leishmaniasis. Conventional or real time PCR is a more sensitive diagnostic test than microscopy, but the cost and requirement for infrastructure and trained personnel makes it impractical in most endemic regions. Primary health systems need a sensitive and specific point of care (POC diagnostic tool. We developed a novel POC molecular diagnostic test for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia spp. Parasite DNA was amplified using isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA with primers and probes that targeted the kinetoplast DNA. The amplification product was detected by naked eye with a lateral flow (LF immunochromatographic strip. The RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity equivalent to 0.1 parasites per reaction. The test amplified the principal L. Viannia species from multiple countries: L. (V. braziliensis (n = 33, L. (V. guyanensis (n = 17, L. (V. panamensis (n = 9. The less common L. (V. lainsoni, L. (V. shawi, and L. (V. naiffi were also amplified. No amplification was observed in parasites of the L. (Leishmania subgenus. In a small number of clinical samples (n = 13 we found 100% agreement between PCR and RPA-LF. The high analytical sensitivity and clinical validation indicate the test could improve the efficiency of diagnosis, especially in chronic lesions with submicroscopic parasite burdens. Field implementation of the RPA-LF test could contribute to management and control of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis.

  8. BRAF, KIT, NRAS, GNAQ and GNA11 mutation analysis in cutaneous melanomas in Turkish population

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    Ismail Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: KIT and mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are important for melanomagenesis. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ and GNA11 gene mutations and investigated their association with clinicopathological features of melanomas in Turkish population. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven primary cutaneous melanomas were included in our study. Sanger sequencing method was used for mutation analysis in all cases. Results: Mean age was 62.1 (29-101 years. Female:male ratio was 17:30. Among 47 melanomas, 14 (29.8% BRAF, 10 (21.3% NRAS, 4 (8.5% KIT and 1(2.1% GNAQ gene mutations were detected. Two of the KIT mutations were found in acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM. In the head and neck region, mutation frequency was significantly lower than in other locations (P = 0.035. The only GNAQ gene mutation (p.Q209L was detected in a melanoma arising from blue nevus located on the scalp. None of the melanomas harbored NRAS exon 2, KIT exon 13/17/18, GNAQ exon 4 and GNA11 exon 4/5 mutations. Overall mutation frequency did not show significant difference between metastatic (8/14, 57.1% and nonmetastatic (18/33, 54.5% patients. We did not observe any significant association between mutation status and gender or age of various patients. Conclusions: Our results support that BRAF and NRAS gene mutations are common in cutaneous melanomas. The activating mutations of KIT gene are rare and especially seen in ALM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations are infrequent in cutaneous melanomas and may be associated only with melanomas arising from blue nevus.

  9. Cutaneous squamous and neuroendocrine carcinoma: genetically and immunohistochemically different from Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulitzer, Melissa P; Brannon, A Rose; Berger, Michael F; Louis, Peter; Scott, Sasinya N; Jungbluth, Achim A; Coit, Daniel G; Brownell, Isaac; Busam, Klaus J

    2015-08-01

    Cutaneous neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinoma most often arises de novo in the background of a clonally integrated virus, the Merkel cell polyomavirus, and is notable for positive expression of retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) protein and low expression of p53 compared with the rare Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative Merkel cell carcinomas. Combined squamous and Merkel cell tumors are consistently negative for Merkel cell polyomavirus. Little is known about their immunophenotypic or molecular profile. Herein, we studied 10 combined cutaneous squamous cell and neuroendocrine carcinomas for immunohistochemical expression of p53, retinoblastoma 1 protein, neurofilament, p63, and cytokeratin 20 (CK20). We compared mutation profiles of five combined Merkel cell carcinomas and seven 'pure' Merkel cell carcinomas using targeted next-generation sequencing. Combined tumors were from the head, trunk, and leg of Caucasian males and one female aged 52-89. All cases were highly p53- and p63-positive and neurofilament-negative in the squamous component, whereas RB1-negative in both components. Eight out of 10 were p53-positive, 3/10 p63-positive, and 3/10 focally neurofilament-positive in the neuroendocrine component. Six out of 10 were CK20-positive in any part. By next-generation sequencing, combined tumors were highly mutated, with an average of 48 mutations per megabase compared with pure tumors, which showed 1.25 mutations per megabase. RB1 and p53 mutations were identified in all five combined tumors. Combined tumors represent an immunophenotypically and genetically distinct variant of primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinomas, notable for a highly mutated genetic profile, significant p53 expression and/or mutation, absent RB1 expression in the context of increased RB1 mutation, and minimal neurofilament expression.

  10. Cutaneous tuberculosis after mesotherapy: report of six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela, Dora; Puerto, Gloria; Mejía, Graciela; Castro, Claudia; Garzón, María Consuelo; García, Luz Mary; Hernández, Elkin; Ribón, Wellman; Rodríguez, Gerzaín

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis as a result of a needle injection is a rare event; it generally occurs among medical and laboratory personnel and among patients receiving percutaneous treatment. Six patients are presented who developed cutaneous tuberculosis after mesotherapy cosmetic treatment. One to four months after injection of an unknown product as treatment for obesity and cellulites, five women and a man developed papules, nodules and drainage of wax like material at the inoculated sites; this was interpreted clinically as a non tuberculous mycobacterium infection. Skin biopsies were taken for a histopathologic study; the biopsy and exudates were cultured to make a phenotypic identification. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme pattern analyses (PCR-restriction pattern analysis)) procedures were applied to the skin biopsies. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was confirmed in the culture and by PRA analysis in the paraffin-embedded biopsies. The patients had never had tuberculosis. Their thoracic X rays were normal and the size of the tuberculin reaction was 17 to 20 mm. Five patients recovered with antituberculosis treatment and the sixth spontaneously healed after the removal of the largest cutaneous module. No satellite adenopathy or recurrences were observed. A previously undescribed mode of acquisition cutaneous tuberculosis was described. This was the second incident of a demonstrated cutaneous tuberculosis following mesotherapy in Colombia. Skin lesions induced by injections must be tested to detect mycobacterias to include M. tuberculosis.

  11. Cutaneous Adverse Events of Targeted Therapies for Hematolymphoid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, Julia D; Kwong, Bernice Y

    2017-12-01

    The identification of oncogenic drivers of liquid tumors has led to the rapid development of targeted agents with distinct cutaneous adverse event (AE) profiles. The diagnosis and management of these skin toxicities has motivated a novel partnership between dermatologists and oncologists in developing supportive oncodermatology clinics. In this article we review the current state of knowledge of clinical presentation, mechanisms, and management of the most common and significant cutaneous AEs observed during treatment with targeted therapies for hematologic and lymphoid malignancies. We systematically review according to drug-targeting pathway the cutaneous AE profiles of these drugs, and offer insight when possible into whether pharmacologic target versus immunologic modulation primarily underlie presentation. We include discussion of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, ponatinib), blinatumomab, ibrutinib, idelalisib, anti-B cell antibodies (rituximab, ibritumomab, obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, tositumomab), immune checkpoint inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), alemtuzumab, brentuximab, and proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib, carfilzomib, ixazomib). We highlight skin reactions seen with antiliquid but not solid tumor agents, draw attention to serious cutaneous AEs that might require therapy modification or cessation, and offer management strategies to permit treatment tolerability. We emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to minimize disruptions to care, optimize prognosis and quality of life, and promptly address life-threatening skin or infectious events. This evolving partnership between oncologists and dermatologists in the iterative characterization and management of skin toxicities will contribute to a better understanding of these drugs' cutaneous targets and improved patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Iron in the Skin & Cutaneous Wound Healing

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    Josephine Anne Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA 320-400 nm portion of the ultraviolet spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anaemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anaemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anaemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialisation. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localised iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary haemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anaemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron haemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation.

  13. Cutaneous neoplasia following PUVA therapy for psoriasis

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    McKenna, K.E.; Handley, J.; McGinn, S.; Allen, G. [Belfast City Hospital (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dermatology; Patterson, C.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    To determine the risk of cutaneous neoplasia following photochemotherapy (PUVA), we reviewed patients with psoriasis treated at out unit between 1979 and 1991. Two hundred and forty-five patients were assessed, with a median duration of follow-up of 9.5 years. Fifty-nine per cent were male, and 41% female. The median number of exposures was 59, and the median total dose was 133J/cm{sup 2} for the group as a whole. Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) occurred in six individuals (2.4%), basal cell carcinoma occurred in all six and one individual also developed four squamous cell carcinomas and Bowen`s disease of the penis. No cases of malignant melanoma were recorded. Patients who developed NMSC received a median number of 225 exposures and a median cumulative dose of 654J/cm{sup 2}. Compared with a control study population in West Glamorgan, Wales, there was a 1.4 (95% confidence limits (CL) 0.5 and 3.1) times increased risk of NMSC. A statistically significant increased incidence of NMSC was found for patients who had received 100 or more exposures, and 250 or more J/cm{sup 2}, with risks of 3.7 (95% CL 1.0 and 9.5), and 4.0 (95% CL 1.1 and 10), respectively. A PUVA dose of < 250 J/cm{sup 2} or < 100 exposures conferred a minimal increase in risk of NMSC in our study population. (author).

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations in HIV Infected Libyan Patients

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    Aljehawi Nabil A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease may result from HIV infection itself, or from opportunistic disorders secondary to the declined immunocompetence due to the disease. A total of 220 HIV positive patients, treated in the Benghazi Center of Infectious Diseases and Immunology over a period of 14 years (January 2003 to November 2016, were included in a retrospective study. The patients' age ranged from 7 to 46 years. The study was conducted by reviewing the patients' records using the management information system (MIS. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out by the t-test and Chi square test. Among the studied patients, 119 (54.1% were males and 101 (45.9% were females, and most of them (78.6% were 10 – 19 years of age. The predominant mode of transmission was parenteral transmission, in 95% of patients, and positive family history was observed in 12% of patients. Among the total number of visits to dermatologists, 93% of patients had a single disease. Of the total number of skin diseases diagnosed during the visits, parasitic infestations were seen in 92 patients (21.0%, eczematous and related disorders in 78 patients (17.8%, viral infections in 71 patients (16.2%, bacterial infections in 41 patients (9.3%, and fungal infections in 35 patients (7.9%. Dermatophyte infections were the most common fungal infections recorded in 19 patients (4.3%, followed by Candida infection in 11 patients (2.5%. Warts were found in 5.9% of viral infections, followed by herpes zoster (4.1%. HIV positive patients should be examined for skin disorders, because early diagnosis and management of such problems improves the quality of life in these patients.

  15. Cutaneous blood flow rate in areas with and without arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, M.; Sejrsen, Per

    1998-01-01

    Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow......Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow...

  16. Mucormycosis and chromoblastomycosis occurring in a patient with leprosy type 2 reaction under prolonged corticosteroid and thalidomide therapy Mucormicose e cromoblastomicose em um paciente com reação hansênica tipo II sob terapia prolongada com corticosteróide e talidomida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Machado Alves Basílio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an uncommon fungal infection caused by Mucorales. It frequently occurs in patients with neutropenia, diabetes, malignancy and on corticoid therapy. However, it is rare in patients with AIDS. Clinical disease can be manifested in several forms. The case reported illustrates the rare occurrence of chromoblastomycosis and mucormycosis in an immunosuppressed patient with multibacillary leprosy, under prolonged corticosteroid and thalidomide therapy to control leprosy type 2 reaction. Neutrophil dysfunction, thalidomide therapy and work activities are some of the risk factors in this case. Chromoblastomycosis was treated by surgical excision and mucormycosis with amphotericin B. Although the prognosis of mucormycosis is generally poor, in the reported case the patient recovered successfully. This case should alert dermatologists to possible opportunistic infections in immunosuppressed patients.Mucormicose é uma infecção fúngica incomum causada por Mucorales. Ocorre frequentemente em pacientes com neutropenia, diabetes, corticoterapia e condições malignas. Porém, é rara em pacientes com AIDS. A doença pode apresentar-se em diferentes formas. Este caso ilustra a rara ocorrência de mucormicose e cromoblastomicose em um paciente com hanseníase multibacilar, que estava sendo tratado com prednisona e talidomida devido a eritema nodoso (reação hansênica tipo II. Disfunção de neutrófilos, uso de talidomida e atividades profissionais são alguns fatores de risco neste caso. A cromoblastomicose foi tratada por excisão cirúrgica e a mucormicose com anfotericina B. Embora o prognóstico da mucormicose seja ruim, neste caso o tratamento foi bem sucedido. Este caso alerta dermatologistas para a possibilidade de infecções oportunistas em pacientes imunossuprimidos.

  17. Cutaneous Larga Migrans - presentation of two typical cases

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    Sara Soares

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cutaneous Larva Migrans is a dermatosis caused by nemantode parasites, mainely Ancylostoma brasiliensis and Ancylostoma caninus. It is an endemic disease in tropical countries but a rare diagnosis in the rest of the world. Case Report: We report the case of a ten-year-old child emigrated from Angola. The physical examination showed scarring injuries from previous incisions made as a form of treatment as well as a serpiginous lesion on the dorsum of the left foot, compatible with cutaneous Larva Migrans. The patient was started on albendazole and complete resolution of symptoms was obtained after one week. About that time, the patient’s brother, who had the same symptoms on both feet, was submitted to the same treatment, also with resolution of symptoms. Discussion: The authors wish to enphasize the relevance of this case due to the migration from countries with high prevalence of cutaneous Larva Migrans.

  18. Giant cutaneous horn in an African woman: a case report

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    Nthumba Peter M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A cutaneous horn is a conical projection of hyperkeratotic epidermis. Though grossly resembling an animal horn, it lacks a bony core. These lesions have been well described in Caucasian patients, as well as in a number of Arabic and Asian patients. Case presentation A young female presented with a large 'horn' of five-year duration, arising from a burn scar. Excision and scalp reconstruction were performed. Histology was reported as verrucoid epidermal hyperplasia with cutaneous horn. Conclusion This may be the first documentation of this lesion in a black African. Although likely rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dermatologic lesions. Up to 40% of cutaneous horns occur as part of a premalignant or malignant lesion, and surgical extirpation with histological examination is thus more important than the curiosity surrounding these lesions.

  19. Epidemiological profile of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Morocco, 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboudi, M

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of our study is to provide a comprehensive overview of the situation of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Morocco. We therefore conducted a retrospective descriptive study covering the decade 2004-2013. Data were collected from the Moroccan Ministry of Health's annual reports about the national program against leishmaniasis. These data show a regression in the cases due to Leishmania major and the persistence of L. tropica transmission. Mapping cutaneous leishmaniasis cases reported between 2004 and 2013 showed geographical changes ; the number of cases due to L. tropica were concentrated in the regions of Marrakech-Tensift-Elhaouz, Souss Massa-Draa Tadla-Azila, and Taza-Al Hoceima-Taounate. Cutaneous disease due to L. major was most common in the Souss-Massa-Draa region. Continuous monitoring of the epidemiological situation is important to assess the actions taken to reduce its incidence.

  20. Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basko-Plluska, Juliana L; Thyssen, Jacob P; Schalock, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    ) following the insertion of intravascular stents, dental implants, cardiac pacemakers, or implanted gynecologic devices. Despite repeated attempts by researchers and clinicians to further understand this difficult area of medicine, the association between metal sensitivity and cutaneous allergic reactions......Cutaneous reactions to metal implants, orthopedic or otherwise, are well documented in the literature. The first case of a dermatitis reaction over a stainless steel fracture plate was described in 1966. Most skin reactions are eczematous and allergic in nature, although urticarial, bullous......, and vasculitic eruptions may occur. Also, more complex immune reactions may develop around the implants, resulting in pain, inflammation, and loosening. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium are the three most common metals that elicit both cutaneous and extracutaneous allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure...