WorldWideScience

Sample records for primary care patient

  1. Patient evaluations of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, W.L.A.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: So far, studies about people’s appreciation of primary care services has shown that patient satisfaction seems to be lower in health care systems with regulated access to specialist services by gate keeping. Nevertheless, international comparative research about patients’ expectations

  2. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their

  3. Nursing Practice in Primary Care and Patients' Experience of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Brault, Isabelle; Pineault, Raynald; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Prud'homme, Alexandre; D'Amour, Danielle

    2018-01-01

    Nurses are identified as a key provider in the management of patients in primary care. The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' experience of care in primary care as it pertained to the nursing role. The aim was to test the hypothesis that, in primary health care organizations (PHCOs) where patients are systematically followed by a nurse, and where nursing competencies are therefore optimally used, patients' experience of care is better. Based on a cross-sectional analysis combining organizational and experience of care surveys, we built 2 groups of PHCOs. The first group of PHCOs reported having a nurse who systematically followed patients. The second group had a nurse who performed a variety of activities but did not systematically follow patients. Five indicators of care were constructed based on patient questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariate linear mixed models with random intercepts and with patients nested within were used to analyze the experience of care indicators in both groups. Bivariate analyses revealed a better patient experience of care in PHCOs where a nurse systematically followed patients than in those where a nurse performed other activities. In multivariate analyses that included adjustment variables related to PHCOs and patients, the accessibility indicator was found to be higher. Results indicated that systematic follow-up of patients by nurses improved patients' experience of care in terms of accessibility. Using nurses' scope of practice to its full potential is a promising avenue for enhancing both patients' experience of care and health services efficiency.

  4. Primary care providers' experiences caring for complex patients in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Danielle F; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Candrian, Carey; deGruy, Frank V; Binswanger, Ingrid A

    2016-03-22

    Complex patients are increasingly common in primary care and often have poor clinical outcomes. Healthcare system barriers to effective care for complex patients have been previously described, but less is known about the potential impact and meaning of caring for complex patients on a daily basis for primary care providers (PCPs). Our objective was to describe PCPs' experiences providing care for complex patients, including their experiences of health system barriers and facilitators and their strategies to enhance provision of effective care. Using a general inductive approach, our qualitative research study was guided by an interpretive epistemology, or way of knowing. Our method for understanding included semi-structured in-depth interviews with internal medicine PCPs from two university-based and three community health clinics. We developed an interview guide, which included questions on PCPs' experiences, perceived system barriers and facilitators, and strategies to improve their ability to effectively treat complex patients. To focus interviews on real cases, providers were asked to bring de-identified clinical notes from patients they considered complex to the interview. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed to develop categories from the raw data, which were then conceptualized into broad themes after team-based discussion. PCPs (N = 15) described complex patients with multidimensional needs, such as socio-economic, medical, and mental health. A vision of optimal care emerged from the data, which included coordinating care, preventing hospitalizations, and developing patient trust. PCPs relied on professional values and individual care strategies to overcome local and system barriers. Team based approaches were endorsed to improve the management of complex patients. Given the barriers to effective care described by PCPs, individual PCP efforts alone are unlikely to meet the needs of complex patients. To fulfill PCP's expressed concepts of

  5. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede

    BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge...... that is vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care...... approach.RESULTS. The analyses revealed several key areas, e.g.: 1) How to take, give and maintain professional responsibility for palliative home care. 2) A need for transparent communication both among primary care professionals and among professionals across the primary/secondary interface. 3...

  6. Primary care patients with anxiety and depression: need for care from the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Meer, K. van der; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Many anxiety and depression patients receive no care, resulting in unnecessary suffering and high costs. Specific beliefs and the absence of a perceived need for care are major reasons for not receiving care. This study aims to determine the specific perceived need for care in primary care patients

  7. Primary care physician insights into a typology of the complex patient in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Danielle F; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Candrian, Carey; Bayliss, Elizabeth A

    2015-09-01

    Primary care physicians play unique roles caring for complex patients, often acting as the hub for their care and coordinating care among specialists. To inform the clinical application of new models of care for complex patients, we sought to understand how these physicians conceptualize patient complexity and to develop a corresponding typology. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with internal medicine primary care physicians from 5 clinics associated with a university hospital and a community health hospital. We used systematic nonprobabilistic sampling to achieve an even distribution of sex, years in practice, and type of practice. The interviews were analyzed using a team-based participatory general inductive approach. The 15 physicians in this study endorsed a multidimensional concept of patient complexity. The physicians perceived patients to be complex if they had an exacerbating factor-a medical illness, mental illness, socioeconomic challenge, or behavior or trait (or some combination thereof)-that complicated care for chronic medical illnesses. This perspective of primary care physicians caring for complex patients can help refine models of complexity to design interventions or models of care that improve outcomes for these patients. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. Suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiborg, J.F.; Gieseler, D.; Fabisch, A.B.; Voigt, K.; Lautenbach, A.; Lowe, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine rates of suicidality in primary care patients with somatoform disorders and to identify factors that might help to understand and manage active suicidal ideation in these patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study screening 1645 primary care patients. In total, 142

  9. Prediction of dementia in primary care patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Jessen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current approaches for AD prediction are based on biomarkers, which are however of restricted availability in primary care. AD prediction tools for primary care are therefore needed. We present a prediction score based on information that can be obtained in the primary care setting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a longitudinal cohort study in 3.055 non-demented individuals above 75 years recruited via primary care chart registries (Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia, AgeCoDe. After the baseline investigation we performed three follow-up investigations at 18 months intervals with incident dementia as the primary outcome. The best set of predictors was extracted from the baseline variables in one randomly selected half of the sample. This set included age, subjective memory impairment, performance on delayed verbal recall and verbal fluency, on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination, and on an instrumental activities of daily living scale. These variables were aggregated to a prediction score, which achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.84 for AD. The score was applied to the second half of the sample (test cohort. Here, the prediction accuracy was 0.79. With a cut-off of at least 80% sensitivity in the first cohort, 79.6% sensitivity, 66.4% specificity, 14.7% positive predictive value (PPV and 97.8% negative predictive value of (NPV for AD were achieved in the test cohort. At a cut-off for a high risk population (5% of individuals with the highest risk score in the first cohort the PPV for AD was 39.1% (52% for any dementia in the test cohort. CONCLUSIONS: The prediction score has useful prediction accuracy. It can define individuals (1 sensitively for low cost-low risk interventions, or (2 more specific and with increased PPV for measures of prevention with greater costs or risks. As it is independent of technical aids, it may be used within large scale prevention programs.

  10. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...

  11. Characterization of care for patients with wounds in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Ramos Vieira Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the treatment of patients with wounds in the Primary Health Care. A descriptive research with quantitative approach. Ninety-three Family Health Units of the city of Recife-PE, Brazil, were selected, and 112 nurses were interviewed from July to December 2011. The record book of bandages and procedures and the dressing form were used as an additional source of data. Frequencies, measures of central tendency and dispersion, prevalence and, for continuous variables, the analysis of variance were estimated. The prevalence of patients with wounds was 1.9% of the estimated covered population. Vascular ulcers accounted for 74.1% of the treated wounds. The dressing was predominantly performed by Nursing technicians, and the products available for this procedure did not match the current technological development.

  12. Primary care patients with anxiety and depression : Need for care from the patient's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Marijn A.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van der Meer, Klaas; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many anxiety and depression patients receive no care, resulting in unnecessary suffering and high costs. Specific beliefs and the absence of a perceived need for care are major reasons for not receiving care. This study aims to determine the specific perceived need for care in primary

  13. A research agenda on patient safety in primary care. Recommendations by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Bowie, Paul; Parker, Diane; Lainer, Miriam; Valderas, Jose M.; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Healthcare can cause avoidable serious harm to patients. Primary care is not an exception, and the relative lack of research in this area lends urgency to a better understanding of patient safety, the future research agenda and the development of primary care oriented safety programmes. Objective: To outline a research agenda for patient safety improvement in primary care in Europe and beyond. Methods: The LINNEAUS collaboration partners analysed existing research on epidemiology and classification of errors, diagnostic and medication errors, safety culture, and learning for and improving patient safety. We discussed ideas for future research in several meetings, workshops and congresses with LINNEAUS collaboration partners, practising GPs, researchers in this field, and policy makers. Results: This paper summarizes and integrates the outcomes of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care. It proposes a research agenda on improvement strategies for patient safety in primary care. In addition, it provides background information to help to connect research in this field with practicing GPs and other healthcare workers in primary care. Conclusion: Future research studies should target specific primary care domains, using prospective methods and innovative methods such as patient involvement. PMID:26339841

  14. A research agenda on patient safety in primary care. Recommendations by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Bowie, Paul; Parker, Diane; Lainer, Miriam; Valderas, Jose M; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-09-01

    Healthcare can cause avoidable serious harm to patients. Primary care is not an exception, and the relative lack of research in this area lends urgency to a better understanding of patient safety, the future research agenda and the development of primary care oriented safety programmes. To outline a research agenda for patient safety improvement in primary care in Europe and beyond. The LINNEAUS collaboration partners analysed existing research on epidemiology and classification of errors, diagnostic and medication errors, safety culture, and learning for and improving patient safety. We discussed ideas for future research in several meetings, workshops and congresses with LINNEAUS collaboration partners, practising GPs, researchers in this field, and policy makers. This paper summarizes and integrates the outcomes of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care. It proposes a research agenda on improvement strategies for patient safety in primary care. In addition, it provides background information to help to connect research in this field with practicing GPs and other healthcare workers in primary care. Future research studies should target specific primary care domains, using prospective methods and innovative methods such as patient involvement.

  15. Improving Patient Safety Culture in Primary Care: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J. M.; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L. M.

    Background: Patient safety culture, described as shared values, attitudes and behavior of staff in a health-care organization, gained attention as a subject of study as it is believed to be related to the impact of patient safety improvements. However, in primary care, it is yet unknown, which

  16. [Health care for migrant patients: primary care or specialized medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux-Paillard, S; Dao, M Dominicé; Perron, N Junod

    2007-09-26

    When consulting with migrant patients, general practitioners should pay special attention to the quality of their communication, because language barriers and cultural differences may arise. They must also be aware that life events experienced in the home country, during transit and in the host country can impact negatively on their patients' health, and thus a detailed history must be carefully obtained. Finally, they must be conscious that the migratory policies of the host country can influence the delivery of health care to migrant patients as well as their health status.

  17. Patient, Satisfaction, Factor, Importance, Primary Health Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    healthcare workers in outpatient clinics remain a challenge to quality care. The objective of the study is ... confidence on the quality of service provided by the facilities. Thus the objective ..... practitioner relationship. Journal of General Internal.

  18. Multidisciplinary collaboration in primary care: through the eyes of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Lynn H; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z

    2013-01-01

    Managing chronic illness is highly complex and the pathways to access health care for the patient are unpredictable and often unknown. While multidisciplinary care (MDC) arrangements are promoted in the Australian primary health care system, there is a paucity of research on multidisciplinary collaboration from patients' perspectives. This exploratory study is the first to gain an understanding of the experiences, perceptions, attitudes and potential role of people with chronic illness (asthma) on the delivery of MDC in the Australian primary health care setting. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with asthma patients from Sydney, Australia. Qualitative analysis of data indicates that patients are significant players in MDC and their perceptions of their chronic condition, perceived roles of health care professionals, and expectations of health care delivery, influence their participation and attitudes towards multidisciplinary services. Our research shows the challenges presented by patients in the delivery and establishment of multidisciplinary health care teams, and highlights the need to consider patients' perspectives in the development of MDC models in primary care.

  19. Advance directives: survey of primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Rory; Mailo, Kevin; Angeles, Ricardo; Agarwal, Gina

    2015-04-01

    To establish the prevalence of patients with advance directives in a family practice, and to describe patients' perspectives on a family doctor's role in initiating discussions about advance directives. A self-administered patient questionnaire. A busy urban family medicine teaching clinic in Hamilton, Ont. A convenience sample of adult patients attending the clinic over the course of a typical business week. The prevalence of advance directives in the patient population was determined, and the patients' expectations regarding the role of their family doctors were elucidated. The survey population consisted of 800 participants (a response rate of 72.5%) well distributed across age groups; 19.7% had written advance directives and 43.8% had previously discussed the topic of advance directives, but only 4.3% of these discussions had occurred with family doctors. In 5.7% of cases, a family physician had raised the issue; 72.3% of respondents believed patients should initiate the discussion. Patients who considered advance directives extremely important were significantly more likely to want their family doctors to start the conversation (odds ratio 3.98; P < .05). Advance directives were not routinely addressed in the family practice. Most patients preferred to initiate the discussion of advance directives. However, patients who considered the subject extremely important wanted their family doctors to initiate the discussion. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  20. Older Patients' Perspectives on Quality of Serious Illness Care in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Al Hamayel, Nebras; Isenberg, Sarina R; Hannum, Susan M; Sixon, Joshua; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Dy, Sydney M

    2018-01-01

    Despite increased focus on measuring and improving quality of serious illness care, there has been little emphasis on the primary care context or incorporation of the patient perspective. To explore older patients' perspectives on the quality of serious illness care in primary care. Qualitative interview study. Twenty patients aged 60 or older who were at risk for or living with serious illness and who had participated in the clinic's quality improvement initiative. We used a semistructured, open-ended guide focusing on how older patients perceived quality of serious illness care, particularly in primary care. We transcribed interviews verbatim and inductively identified codes. We identified emergent themes using a thematic and constant comparative method. We identified 5 key themes: (1) the importance of patient-centered communication, (2) coordination of care, (3) the shared decision-making process, (4) clinician competence, and (5) access to care. Communication was an overarching theme that facilitated coordination of care between patients and their clinicians, empowered patients for shared decision-making, related to clinicians' perceived competence, and enabled access to primary and specialty care. Although access to care is not traditionally considered an aspect of quality, patients considered this integral to the quality of care they received. Patients perceived serious illness care as a key aspect of quality in primary care. Efforts to improve quality measurement and implementation of quality improvement initiatives in serious illness care should consider these aspects of care that patients deem important, particularly communication as an overarching priority.

  1. Cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of primary care patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... developing countries, it is important for primary care physicians to provide services to patients with ... involves one-on-one session between a trained psy- ... ensure the patient a better quality of life. ... Program (mhGAP) launched by the WHO, is to train ..... depression symptoms as well as quality of life in the.

  2. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2......, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants with usual care. Measurements: All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality of life scores (Short Form 12 Health Questionnaire [SF-12] and the Euroqol instrument [EQ-5D]). Results: Included patients had, on average, four co-occurring chronic...

  3. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, Annemarie A.; Schers, Henk J.; Schene, Aart H.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Lucassen, Peter; van den Bosch, Wil J. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Explorative study comparing patients at risk

  4. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  5. Internet use among primary care patients attending a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Global attention is being drawn to the use of internet resource because of its overwhelming benefits. Individuals, families, social groups, patients as well as research teams spend quality time on a daily basis exploring the internet. Objective: We carried out a study to determine internet use among primary care ...

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of primary care patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental disorders affect a great number of people worldwide. Four out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the world are mental disorders. Because of the scarcity of specialists around the world and especially in developing countries, it is important for primary care physicians to provide services to patients with mental ...

  7. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schene, A.H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lucassen, P.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    Background: Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Objectives: Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Methods: Explorative

  8. Patient satisfaction with primary health-care services in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Muhammad; Alazemi, Talal; Alazemi, Fahad; Bakir, Yusif

    2015-06-01

    The study aims to evaluate patient satisfaction with respect to primary health-care services in Kuwait.A total of 245 patients completed the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire postconsultation version 2.0. Two statistically significant differences of patients' satisfaction with sex and level of education were found. Overall satisfaction was higher among men than women (P = 0.002), and it was also higher among those with university degree of education than the other levels of education (P = 0.049). We also found statistically significant differences of patients' responses over sex for three themes, namely: satisfaction with receptionists, satisfaction with access and satisfaction with communication; and over the age for one theme: satisfaction with access. There was no statistically significant differences of patients' responses over nationality for all themes. Satisfaction is a multifactorial and no one factor alone could provide satisfaction with primary health services in Kuwait. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Verbal communication among Alzheimer's disease patients, their caregivers, and primary care physicians during primary care office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karen L; Lingler, Jennifer H; Schulz, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Primary care visits of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often involve communication among patients, family caregivers, and primary care physicians (PCPs). The objective of this study was to understand the nature of each individual's verbal participation in these triadic interactions. To define the verbal communication dynamics of AD care triads, we compared verbal participation (percent of total visit speech) by each participant in patient/caregiver/PCP triads. Twenty-three triads were audio taped during a routine primary care visit. Rates of verbal participation were described and effects of patient cognitive status (MMSE score, verbal fluency) on verbal participation were assessed. PCP verbal participation was highest at 53% of total visit speech, followed by caregivers (31%) and patients (16%). Patient cognitive measures were related to patient and caregiver verbal participation, but not to PCP participation. Caregiver satisfaction with interpersonal treatment by PCP was positively related to caregiver's own verbal participation. Caregivers of AD patients and PCPs maintain active, coordinated verbal participation in primary care visits while patients participate less. Encouraging verbal participation by AD patients and their caregivers may increase the AD patient's active role and caregiver satisfaction with primary care visits.

  10. Verbal Communication among Alzheimer’s Disease Patients, their Caregivers, and Primary Care Physicians during Primary Care Office Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Schulz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Objective Primary care visits of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often involve communication among patients, family caregivers, and primary care physicians (PCPs). The objective of this study was to understand the nature of each individual’s verbal participation in these triadic interactions. Methods To define the verbal communication dynamics of AD care triads, we compared verbal participation (percent of total visit speech) by each participant in patient/caregiver/PCP triads. Twenty three triads were audio taped during a routine primary care visit. Rates of verbal participation were described and effects of patient cognitive status (MMSE score, verbal fluency) on verbal participation were assessed. Results PCP verbal participation was highest at 53% of total visit speech, followed by caregivers (31%) and patients (16%). Patient cognitive measures were related to patient and caregiver verbal participation, but not to PCP participation. Caregiver satisfaction with interpersonal treatment by PCP was positively related to caregiver’s own verbal participation. Conclusion Caregivers of AD patients and PCPs maintain active, coordinated verbal participation in primary care visits while patients participate less. Practice Implications Encouraging verbal participation by AD patients and their caregivers may increase the AD patient’s active role and caregiver satisfaction with primary care visits. PMID:19395224

  11. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student’s t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student’s t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. PMID:23515133

  12. Contributors to patient engagement in primary health care: perceptions of patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forhan, Mary; Risdon, Cathy; Solomon, Patricia

    2013-10-01

    Patients with obesity are at risk for treatment avoidance and nonadherence. Factors that contribute to engagement in primary health care for patients with obesity are not fully understood. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify issues associated with engagement in primary health care for patients with obesity. Using qualitative methodology, 11 patients with a mean body mass index of 40.8 kg/m(2) registered with a primary health care practice were interviewed. Conventional content analysis was used to identify factors that contribute to engagement in primary health care. Barriers and facilitators to engagement in primary health care were categorized into the following themes: availability of resources, importance of the relationship, meaningful communication, feeling judged, lack of privacy, poor communication and limited provider knowledge about obesity. Obesity was identified as a health condition that requires additional considerations for patient engagement in their health care.

  13. Patient-reported outcomes in primary care patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Antoinette M; Pouwer, Francois; Denollet, Johan

    2014-01-01

    ) and Mokken scale analysis, were performed to explore the latent structure of the CCQ. In study 2 (N=244), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to evaluate the model fit of the structure found in study 1. RESULTS: Both EFA and Mokken scale analysis revealed a structure of two dimensions ('general...... impact' α=0.91 and 'cough' α=0.84). This structure, however, was not confirmed in study 2, nor was the original structure. However, subsequently removing items that violated the assumption of a normal response distribution did result in an excellent model fit with two dimensions measuring 'dyspnoea......' and 'cough' (CFA: comparative fit index (CFI) 0.98; normed fit index (NFI) 0.97; root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA) 0.08 (0.04)). CONCLUSIONS: In primary care, factor analyses on the CCQ revealed a two-component structure measuring 'general impact', and 'cough'. A shortened and more specific...

  14. Registered Nurses’ Patient Education in Everyday Primary Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Nurses’ patient education is important for building patients’ knowledge, understanding, and preparedness for self-management. The aim of this study was to explore the conditions for nurses’ patient education work by focusing on managers’ discourses about patient education provided by nurses. In 2012, data were derived from three focus group interviews with primary care managers. Critical discourse analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews. The discursive practice comprised a discourse order of economic, medical, organizational, and didactic discourses. The economic discourse was the predominant one to which the organization had to adjust. The medical discourse was self-evident and unquestioned. Managers reorganized patient education routines and structures, generally due to economic constraints. Nurses’ pedagogical competence development was unclear, and practice-based experiences of patient education were considered very important, whereas theoretical pedagogical knowledge was considered less important. Managers’ support for nurses’ practical- and theoretical-based pedagogical competence development needs to be strengthened. PMID:28462314

  15. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblad, Solvig; Mollica, Richard F; Fors, Uno; Pantziaras, Ioannis; Lavelle, James

    2013-08-19

    Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system's usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and

  16. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on

  17. Operational integration in primary health care: patient encounters and workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Markaki, Adelais; Kritikos, Kyriakos; Petelos, Elena; Lionis, Christos

    2017-11-29

    Despite several countrywide attempts to strengthen and standardise the primary healthcare (PHC) system, Greece is still lacking a sustainable, policy-based model of integrated services. The aim of our study was to identify operational integration levels through existing patient care pathways and to recommend an alternative PHC model for optimum integration. The study was part of a large state-funded project, which included 22 randomly selected PHC units located across two health regions of Greece. Dimensions of operational integration in PHC were selected based on the work of Kringos and colleagues. A five-point Likert-type scale, coupled with an algorithm, was used to capture and transform theoretical framework features into measurable attributes. PHC services were grouped under the main categories of chronic care, urgent/acute care, preventive care, and home care. A web-based platform was used to assess patient pathways, evaluate integration levels and propose improvement actions. Analysis relied on a comparison of actual pathways versus optimal, the latter ones having been identified through literature review. Overall integration varied among units. The majority (57%) of units corresponded to a basic level. Integration by type of PHC service ranged as follows: basic (86%) or poor (14%) for chronic care units, poor (78%) or basic (22%) for urgent/acute care units, basic (50%) for preventive care units, and partial or basic (50%) for home care units. The actual pathways across all four categories of PHC services differed from those captured in the optimum integration model. Certain similarities were observed in the operational flows between chronic care management and urgent/acute care management. Such similarities were present at the highest level of abstraction, but also in common steps along the operational flows. Existing patient care pathways were mapped and analysed, and recommendations for an optimum integration PHC model were made. The developed web

  18. Culture-bound syndromes in Hispanic primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayles, Bryan P; Katerndahl, David A

    2009-01-01

    We sought to document Hispanic primary care patients' knowledge and experience of five culture-bound syndromes (CBS), as well as the basic socio-cultural correlates of these disorders. A convenience sample of 100 adult Hispanic patients presenting in an urban South Texas primary care clinic was recruited to complete a brief cross-sectional survey, presented in an oral format. Interviews sought information concerning five culture-bound syndromes--susto, empacho, nervios, mal de ojo, and ataques de nervios. Additional demographic, socio-economic, and acculturation data was collected. Descriptive and bivariate statistics (chi square, Fisher's) were used to assess relationships among variables and experience with each CBS. A multivariate logistic analysis was conducted to determine the possible contributions of age, gender, acculturation, and education to the personal experience of a culture-bound syndrome. Results indicate that 77% of respondents had knowledge of all five syndromes, with 42% reporting having personally experienced at least one CBS. Nervios was the most commonly suffered disorder, being reported by 30 respondents. This was followed, in declining order ofprevalence, by susto, mal de ojo, empacho, and ataques de nervios. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that higher education beyond high school was associated with a slightly decreased likelihood of reporting having suffered from any culture-bound syndrome. While co-occurrence among these disorders occurred, the patterns of predictors suggest that the co-occurrence is not a reflection of mislabeling of one common syndrome. Knowledge of and experience with culture-bound syndromes is common among Hispanic primary care patients in South Texas. Healthcare providers ought to consider discussing these illnesses in a non-judgmental manner with patients who present with symptoms that are consistent with these syndromes. Future studies, with larger sample sizes, are warranted to elucidate the nature

  19. Patients' expectations and solutions for improving primary diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Brigitte; Huynh, Ai-Thuy; Breton, Mylaine; Quesnel, Louise; Camirand, Michel; Leblanc, Jeannette; Tardif, Sylvie

    2017-07-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document health care needs expressed by people living with diabetes, describe the solutions they envisaged for improving the quality of primary care (PC) services and empower them to make better use of PC services. Design/methodology/approach A participatory research approach was used. Six workshops were organised to provide diabetes patients with knowledge on available services and to engage them in sharing their experience. Group discussions were recorded. Data were analysed using the thematic analysis method. Findings In total, 79 persons living with diabetes for a mean of 13 years participated. Needs expressed were grouped under seven themes: assurance of satisfactory follow-up by a family physician, continuous access to services adapted to evolving needs, motivation to adopt and maintain healthy behaviours, maintenance of knowledge about diabetes, psychological support, financial constraints, and collaboration with secondary-level services. Patients proposed solutions for improving services that were grouped under five themes: facilitating access to services, disseminating information about available services, centralising diabetes information on the internet, offering personalised services and improving interprofessional collaboration. Practical implications Needs expressed by diabetic patients concern different aspects of care such as accessibility, organisation, coordination, and better dissemination and visibility of services. The solutions proposed by patients focussed on better access to information and interprofessional services. Originality/value The workshop format used in this study offers an original and interesting approach and tool for actively engaging patients in quality improvement of services.

  20. Vitamin D and depression in geriatric primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapid MI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria I Lapid,1 Stephen S Cha,2 Paul Y Takahashi31Division of Outpatient Consultation, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, 3Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USAPurpose: Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly. Vitamin D deficiency may affect the mood of people who are deficient. We investigated vitamin D status in older primary care patients and explored associations with depression.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted and association analyses were performed. Primary care patients at a single academic medical center who were ≥60 years with serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was a diagnosis of depression. Frailty scores and medical comorbidity burden scores were collected as predictors.Results: There were 1618 patients with a mean age of 73.8 years (±8.48. The majority (81% had optimal (≥25 ng/mL 25(OHD range, but 17% met mild-moderate (10–24 ng/mL and 3% met severe (<10 ng/mL deficiencies. Those with severe deficiency were older (P < 0.001, more frail (P < 0.001, had higher medical comorbidity burden (P < 0.001, and more frequent depression (P = 0.013. The 694 (43% with depression had a lower 25(OHD than the nondepressed group (32.7 vs 35.0, P = 0.002. 25(OHD was negatively correlated with age (r = −0.070, P = 0.005, frailty (r = −0.113, P < 0.001, and medical comorbidity burden (r = −0.101, P < 0.001. A 25(OHD level was correlated with depression (odds ratio = 0.990 and 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.983–0.998, P = 0.012. Those with severe vitamin D deficiency were twice as likely to have depression (odds ratio = 2.093 with 95% CI 1.092–4.011, P = 0.026.Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency was present in a fifth of this older primary care population. Lower vitamin D levels

  1. In Connecticut: improving patient medication management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie; Giuliano, Margherita R; Starkowski, Michael P

    2011-04-01

    Medications are a cornerstone of the management of most chronic conditions. However, medication discrepancies and medication-related problems-some of which can cause serious harm-are common. Pharmacists have the expertise to identify, resolve, monitor, and prevent these problems. We present findings from a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services demonstration project in Connecticut, in which nine pharmacists worked closely with eighty-eight Medicaid patients from July 2009 through May 2010. The pharmacists identified 917 drug therapy problems and resolved nearly 80 [corrected] percent of them after four encounters. The result was an estimated annual saving of $1,123 per patient on medication claims and $472 per patient on medical, hospital, and emergency department expenses-more than enough to pay for the contracted pharmacist services. We recommend that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation support the evaluation of pharmacist-provided medication management services in primary care medical homes, accountable care organizations, and community health and care transition teams, as well as research to explore how to enhance team-based care.

  2. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  3. Primary aldosteronism among newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive patients in a Swedish primary care area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Christina; Bergenfelz, Anders; Isaksson, Anders; Nerbrand, Christina; Valdemarsson, Stig

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive patients in primary care using the aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR), and to assess clinical and biochemical characteristics in patients with high and normal ARR. Patient survey study. A total of 200 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed and untreated hypertension from six primary health care centres in Sweden were included. ARR was calculated from serum aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations. The cut-off level for ARR was 65. Patients with an increased ARR were considered for confirmatory testing with the fludrocortisone suppression test (FST), followed by adrenal computed tomographic radiology (CT) and adrenal venous sampling (AVS). Of 200 patients, 36 patients had an ARR > 65. Of these 36 patients, 11 patients had an incomplete aldosterone inhibition during FST. Three patients were diagnosed with an aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) and eight with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BHA). Except for moderately lower level of P-K in patients with an ARR > 65 and in patients with PA, there were no biochemical or clinical differences found among hypertensive patients with PA compared with patients without PA. Eleven of 200 evaluated patients (5.5%) were considered to have PA. The diagnosis of PA should therefore be considered in newly diagnosed hypertensive subjects and screening for the diagnosis is warranted.

  4. Characteristics of Chinese patients with cough in primary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chunxue

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cough is one of the most common respiratory symptoms and is well characterized in specialized cough clinics with high success rates of diagnosis and treatment. However, there is a paucity of data regarding cough in primary care settings. The present study aimed at investigating clinical epidemiology of cough through a national study of two questionnaire surveys sent to primary care physicians in China. Methods Approximately 18,000 subjects recruited were having daytime or night symptoms of cough and diagnoses of respiratory disease from February 2005 to April 2006 as Survey 1 and from June 2007 to December 2007 as Survey 2. Patients suffering from respiratory malignancy, hyperthyroidism, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, severe hypohepatia or renal dysfunction, pregnancy, possible pregnancy or lactation, neutropenia were not eligible. Information regarding demography, history of allergies, symptomatic profile, treatment and curative effects for cough was elicited. Results 8216 questionnaires were collected in Survey 1 and 9711 in Survey 2. The mean values of ages were 25.7 and 22.3 years old, respectively. Symptoms included expectoration (74% and 76%, wheeze (59% and 74%, breathlessness (22% and 26%, chest pain (9% and 13% and fever (15% and 18%. About 15% and 23% patients had hypersusceptibility, of whom 6% to 17% had a family history. More than 50% of the cases had histories of allergic rhinitis, asthma, conjunctivitis or atopic dermatitis. Asthma, COPD, and bronchitis were dominant etiologies of cough. Procaterol or the combination of antibiotics and steroids were used as the treatment. Conclusion Causes and outcomes of cough differed with ages and time in this particular national study, while successful and precise diagnosis and management of cough in primary care settings need to be further improved in China.

  5. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  6. Virtual Patient Technology: Engaging Primary Care in Quality Improvement Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Amanda C; May, Christine N; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Houston, Thomas K

    2017-02-15

    Engaging health care staff in new quality improvement programs is challenging. We developed 2 virtual patient (VP) avatars in the context of a clinic-level quality improvement program. We sought to determine differences in preferences for VPs and the perceived influence of interacting with the VP on clinical staff engagement with the quality improvement program. Using a participatory design approach, we developed an older male smoker VP and a younger female smoker VP. The older male smoker was described as a patient with cardiovascular disease and was ethnically ambiguous. The female patient was younger and was worried about the impact of smoking on her pregnancy. Clinical staff were allowed to choose the VP they preferred, and the more they engaged with the VP, the more likely the VP was to quit smoking and become healthier. We deployed the VP within the context of a quality improvement program designed to encourage clinical staff to refer their patients who smoke to a patient-centered Web-assisted tobacco intervention. To evaluate the VPs, we used quantitative analyses using multivariate models of provider and practice characteristics and VP characteristic preference and analyses of a brief survey of positive deviants (clinical staff in practices with high rates of encouraging patients to use the quit smoking innovation). A total of 146 clinical staff from 76 primary care practices interacted with the VPs. Clinic staff included medical providers (35/146, 24.0%), nurse professionals (19/146, 13.0%), primary care technicians (5/146, 3.4%), managerial staff (67/146, 45.9%), and receptionists (20/146, 13.7%). Medical staff were mostly male, and other roles were mostly female. Medical providers (OR 0.031; CI 0.003-0.281; P=.002) and younger staff (OR 0.411; CI 0.177-0.952; P=.038) were less likely to choose the younger, female VP when controlling for all other characteristics. VP preference did not influence online patient referrals by staff. In high

  7. A guide for identification and continuing care of adult congenital heart disease patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, S; Lamb, J; Haines, A; O'Dell, S; Thomas, G; Sethi, S; Ratcliffe, J; Chisholm, S; Vaughan, J; Mahadevan, V S

    2013-03-10

    Surgical and other advances in the treatment and care of congenital heart disease have resulted in a significant increase in the number of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD), many of whom have no regular cardiology follow-up. Optimised care for ACHD patients requires continuity of specialist and shared care and education of practitioners and patients. The challenges for managing ACHD were identified by a Health Needs Assessment in the North West and are addressed within the UK Department of Health's ACHD Commissioning Guide. An ACHD model of care was recommended in the North West of England and developed by the three North West Cardiac & Stroke Networks. Within this, a Task Group focused on the role of primary care in the identification and continuing care of ACHD patients. A feasibility study demonstrated that existing diagnostic Read Codes can identify ACHD patients on general practice registers. An ACHD Toolkit was developed to provide algorithms to guide the appropriate management of ACHD patients through primary, secondary and/or specialist ACHD care and to improve education/knowledge amongst primary care staff about ACHD and its wider implications. Early findings during the development of this Toolkit illustrate a wide disparity of provision between current and optimal management strategies. Patients lost to follow-up have already been identified and their management modified. By focusing on identifying ACHD patients in primary care and organising/delivering ACHD services, the ACHD Toolkit could help to improve quality, timeliness of care, patient experience and wellbeing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Participation and successful patient recruitment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, N J; Quartero, A O; Zuithoff, A P; Numans, M E

    2001-11-01

    The demand for family physicians (FPs) to participate in research is growing. The delicate balance between research participation and the daily practice routine might explain the often-disappointing number of patients recruited. We analyzed practice and physician characteristics associated with successful patient recruitment. We used a survey to conduct this study. There was a total of 165 FPs who participated in a combined randomized clinical trial/cohort study on drug treatment of dyspepsia in the Netherlands. We surveyed FPs about personal and practice characteristics and their motivation for participation in the project. These data were then related to the number of patients recruited. Univariate associations were calculated; relevant factors were entered into a logistic model that predicted patient recruitment. Data on 128 FPs could be analyzed (80% response rate); these FPs recruited 793 patients in the cohort study (mean = 6.3 per FP) and 527 in the clinical trial (mean = 4.2 per FP). The main reasons for participation were the research topic (59%) and the participation of an academic research group in the study (63%). Many FPs felt that participation was a professional obligation (39%); the financial incentive played a minor role (15%). The number of recruited patients was only independently associated with the participation of an academic research group. Successful patient recruitment in primary care research is determined more by motivation driven by the research group than by financial incentives, the research topic, or research experience.

  9. Stigma Predicts Treatment Preferences and Care Engagement among Veterans Affairs Primary Care Patients with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan G.; Bonner, Laura M.; Bolkan, Cory R.; Lanto, Andrew B.; Zivin, Kara; Waltz, Thomas J.; Klap, Ruth; Rubenstein, Lisa V.; Chaney, Edmund F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Whereas stigma regarding mental health concerns exists, the evidence for stigma as a depression treatment barrier among patients in Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care (PC) is mixed. Purpose To test whether stigma, defined as depression label avoidance, predicted patients' preferences for depression treatment providers, patients' prospective engagement in depression care, and care quality. Methods We conducted cross-sectional and prospective analyses of existing data from 761 VA PC patients with probable major depression. Results Relative to low stigma patients, those with high stigma were less likely to prefer treatment from mental health specialists. In prospective controlled analyses, high stigma predicted lower likelihood of the following: taking medications for mood, treatment by mental health specialists, treatment for emotional concerns in PC, and appropriate depression care. Conclusions High stigma is associated with lower preferences for care from mental health specialists and confers risk for minimal depression treatment engagement. PMID:26935310

  10. Patient safety in primary care: a survey of general practitioners in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general

  11. Urine sampling techniques in symptomatic primary-care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2016-01-01

    in infection rate between mid-stream-clean-catch, mid-stream-urine and random samples. Conclusions: At present, no evidence suggests that sampling technique affects the accuracy of the microbiological diagnosis in non-pregnant women with symptoms of urinary tract infection in primary care. However......Background: Choice of urine sampling technique in urinary tract infection may impact diagnostic accuracy and thus lead to possible over- or undertreatment. Currently no evidencebased consensus exists regarding correct sampling technique of urine from women with symptoms of urinary tract infection...... a randomized or paired design to compare the result of urine culture obtained with two or more collection techniques in adult, female, non-pregnant patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection. We evaluated quality of the studies and compared accuracy based on dichotomized outcomes. Results: We included...

  12. Toward a patient-centered ambulatory after-visit summary: Identifying primary care patients' information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Martina A; Moore, Joi L; Steege, Linsey M; Koopman, Richelle J; Belden, Jeffery L; Canfield, Shannon M; Kim, Min S

    2018-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the information needs of primary care patients as they review clinic visit notes to inform information that should be contained in an after-visit summary (AVS). We collected data from 15 patients with an acute illness and 14 patients with a chronic disease using semi-structured interviews. The acute patients reviewed seven major sections, and chronic patients reviewed eight major sections of a simulated, but realistic visit note to identify relevant information needs for their AVS. Patients in the acute illness group identified the Plan, Assessment and History of Present Illness the most as important note sections, while patients in the chronic care group identified Significant Lab Data, Plan, and Assessment the most as important note sections. This study was able to identify primary care patients' information needs after clinic visit. Primary care patients have information needs pertaining to diagnosis and treatment, which may be the reason why both patient groups identified Plan and Assessment as important note sections. Future research should also develop and assess an AVS based on the information gathered in this study and evaluate its usefulness among primary care patients. The results of this study can be used to inform the development of an after-visit summary that assists patients to fully understand their treatment plan, which may improve treatment adherence.

  13. Clozapine Patients at the Interface between Primary and Secondary Care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, Marita

    2018-02-26

    outcomes for patients included BMI, total cholesterol, and HbA1clevels, which were elevated in 75%, 54% and 17% respectively. Patients prescribed clozapine did not receive a seamless service, between primary and secondary care settings. Community pharmacists were not informed of clozapine, prescribed for their patients, in two thirds of cases. Patients in this study were exposed to clozapine-related drug-drug interactions and hence potential adverse effects. This study supports reports in the literature of substandard management of the physical health of this patient group. This study shows that there is an opportunity for pharmacists to develop active roles in the management of all clozapine-related effects, in addition to their traditional obligatory role in haematological monitoring. This study supports the need for a clinical pharmacist to review inpatients commencing on clozapine, monitor for drug-drug interactions and provide counselling.

  14. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject matter experts and primary healthcare professionals from several EU states rated (a) the applicability to their healthcare system of several existing safety culture assessment tools and (b) the appropriateness and usefulness of a range of potential indicators of a positive patient safety culture to primary care settings. The safety culture tools were field-tested in four countries to ascertain any challenges and issues arising when used in primary care. Results: The two existing tools that received the most favourable ratings were the Manchester patient safety framework (MaPsAF primary care version) and the Agency for healthcare research and quality survey (medical office version). Several potential safety culture process indicators were identified. The one that emerged as offering the best combination of appropriateness and usefulness related to the collection of data on adverse patient events. Conclusion: Two tools, one quantitative and one qualitative, were identified as applicable and useful in assessing patient safety culture in primary care settings in Europe. Safety culture indicators in primary care should focus on the processes rather than the outcomes of care. PMID:26339832

  15. Clozapine Patients at the Interface between Primary and Secondary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Barrett

    2018-02-01

    . Secondary outcomes for patients included BMI, total cholesterol, and HbA1c levels, which were elevated in 75%, 54% and 17% respectively. Patients prescribed clozapine did not receive a seamless service, between primary and secondary care settings. Community pharmacists were not informed of clozapine, prescribed for their patients, in two thirds of cases. Patients in this study were exposed to clozapine-related drug-drug interactions and hence potential adverse effects. This study supports reports in the literature of substandard management of the physical health of this patient group. This study shows that there is an opportunity for pharmacists to develop active roles in the management of all clozapine-related effects, in addition to their traditional obligatory role in haematological monitoring. This study supports the need for a clinical pharmacist to review inpatients commencing on clozapine, monitor for drug-drug interactions and provide counselling.

  16. Diabetic and Obese Patient Clinical Outcomes Improve During a Care Management Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Piatt, Gretchen; Green, Lee A; Chen, Qiaoling; Piette, John

    2017-10-01

    To address the increasing burden of chronic disease, many primary care practices are turning to care management and the hiring of care managers to help patients coordinate their care and self-manage their conditions. Care management is often, but not always, proving effective at improving patient outcomes, but more evidence is needed. In this pair-matched cluster randomized trial, 5 practices implemented care management and were compared with 5 comparison practices within the same practice organization. Targeted patients included diabetic patients with a hemoglobin A1c >9% and nondiabetic obese patients. Clinical values tracked were A1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, microalbumin, and weight. Clinically important improvements were demonstrated in the intervention versus comparison practices, with diabetic patients improving A1c control and obese patients experiencing weight loss. There was a 12% relative increase in the proportion of patients meeting the clinical target of A1c management practices lost 5% or more of their body weight as compared with 10% of comparison patients (adjusted relative improvement, 15%; CI, 2%-28%). These findings add to the growing evidence-base for the effectiveness of care management as an effective clinical practice with regard to improving diabetes- and obesity-related outcomes.

  17. Primary care patients in the emergency department: who are they? A review of the definition of the 'primary care patient' in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzina, Andrew J; Smith, Peter B; Cromwell, David; Eagar, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    To review the definition of 'primary care' and 'inappropriate' patients in ED and develop a generally acceptable working definition of a 'primary care' presentation in ED. A Medline review of articles on primary care in ED and the definitions used. A total of 34 reviewed papers contained a proposed definition or comment on the definition for potential 'primary care', 'general practice', or 'inappropriate' patients in ED. A representative definition was developed premised on the common factors in these papers: low urgency/acuity--triage categories four or five in the Australasian Triage Scale, self-referred--by definition, patients referred by general practitioner/community primary medical services are not primary care cases because a primary care service has referred them on, presenting for a new episode of care (i.e. not a planned return because planned returns are not self-referred), unlikely to be admitted (in the opinion of Emergency Nurse interviewers) or ultimately not admitted. This definition can be applied either prospectively or retrospectively, depending on the purpose. Appropriateness must be considered in light of a legitimate role for ED in primary care and the balance of resources between primary care and emergency medicine in local settings.

  18. Does patient-provider gender concordance affect mental health care received by primary care patients with major depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kitty S; Bird, Chloe E; Weiss, Robert; Duan, Naihua; Meredith, Lisa S; Sherbourne, Cathy D

    2006-01-01

    We sought to determine whether patient-provider gender concordance influences the detection and care of depression and comorbid anxiety and substance use in patients with major depression Cross-sectional analyses of baseline patient survey data linked with provider data were performed. Data based on routine primary care visits in clinics from a variety of health systems serving diverse patient populations across the United States. Participants all had major depression. Depression care was examined in the Quality Improvement for Depression (QID) Collaboration sample (n patients = 1,428, n providers = 389). In a subanalysis of data solely from 714 patients and 157 providers from Partners-In-Care, one of the projects participating in QID, we also examined detection of anxiety disorder and alcohol or drug problems. Rates of detection and care of mental health problems in primary care were low even among patients with major depression. Except for anxiety counseling in female patients, patient-provider gender concordance did not improve care as hypothesized. However, female providers were more likely to counsel on anxiety and less likely to counsel on alcohol or drug use than male providers. Female patients were less likely to be counseled on alcohol or drug use compared with male patients. Detection and care of mental health and substance use problems for patients with major depression is not influenced by patient-provider gender concordance. However, depressed female patients may have greater unmet needs for alcohol and drug use counseling than their male counterparts.

  19. The role and benefits of accessing primary care patient records during unscheduled care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Tom; Coiera, Enrico

    2017-09-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of accessing primary care records on unscheduled care. Unscheduled care is typically delivered in hospital Emergency Departments. Studies published to December 2014 reporting on primary care record access during unscheduled care were retrieved. Twenty-two articles met inclusion criteria from a pool of 192. Many shared electronic health records (SEHRs) were large in scale, servicing many millions of patients. Reported utilization rates by clinicians was variable, with rates >20% amongst health management organizations but much lower in nation-scale systems. No study reported on clinical outcomes or patient safety, and no economic studies of SEHR access during unscheduled care were available. Design factors that may affect utilization included consent and access models, SEHR content, and system usability and reliability. Despite their size and expense, SEHRs designed to support unscheduled care have been poorly evaluated, and it is not possible to draw conclusions about any likely benefits associated with their use. Heterogeneity across the systems and the populations they serve make generalization about system design or performance difficult. None of the reviewed studies used a theoretical model to guide evaluation. Value of Information models may be a useful theoretical approach to design evaluation metrics, facilitating comparison across systems in future studies. Well-designed SEHRs should in principle be capable of improving the efficiency, quality and safety of unscheduled care, but at present the evidence for such benefits is weak, largely because it has not been sought.

  20. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  1. [Patients in treatment for malnutrition in primary care, study of 500 real patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Moreno, A; Venegas Moreno, E; Santos Rubio, M; Sanz, León; García Luna, P P

    2002-01-01

    The worsening of the nutritional status of certain segments of the population has led to frequent situations of chronic undernourishment even in the healthy population. There are very few data available on the prevalence and causes of malnutrition in Primary Health Care. The present study attempts to provide measurable information, obtained at random from the doctors involved in the country's Primary Health Care, on the characteristics of the undernourished patients, the cause of the undernourishment, the diagnostic means used, the treatment applied and the progress of the patients regularly treated in Primary Health Care facilities. A sample of 1,819 doctors in Primary Health Care were surveyed to know their opinions on the nutritional status of their patients. They were asked to complete a "Patient Record" for the first patient to enter their office suffering from undernourishment. A total of 505 Patient Records were received from the different Primary Health Care doctors taking part in the study throughout Spain. Of the patients included, 10% were aged less than 10, while 46.7% were between 16 and 65 years of age and 44.2% were over 65. The main diagnosis in these patients was varied, with cancer patients (22.6%) and anorexics, including anorexia nerviosa and other non-oncological causes, (16.4%) the most common. As for the tests used for diagnosing undernourishment, those most frequently applied were physical examination (61%) and biochemical tests (56.4%). The risk factor most commonly found in these patients was old age/senility (21%). Nutritional support (55.8%) and dietary recommendations (45.3%) were the therapies most often applied. Only 47% of patients correctly implemented their treatment according to the doctors in Primary Health Care and the prognosis was as follows: 31% were expected to improve, 20% to worsen and 44% of cases would remain stable. From this study, it is concluded that most undernourished patients in Primary Health Care are there due

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practice of patients attending primary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Extracellular calcium is vital for the functioning of many metabolic processes and neuromuscular activities. Awareness and practice of patients with vitamin D deficiency are very important. Objective: To explore knowledge, attitude and practice of patients receiving vitamin D supplement and attending primary ...

  3. Interventions for improving older patients' involvement in primary care episodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.V.; Harmsen, M.; Weel, C. van; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing expectation among patients that they should be involved in the delivery of medical care. Accumulating evidence from empirical studies shows that patients of average age who are encouraged to participate more actively in treatment decisions have more favourable health

  4. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, (b) patient satisfaction, and (c) health care-seeking behavior. Methodology: A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by ...

  5. Estimating a reasonable patient panel size for primary care physicians with team-based task delegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Justin; Margolius, David; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Grumbach, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Primary care faces the dilemma of excessive patient panel sizes in an environment of a primary care physician shortage. We aimed to estimate primary care panel sizes under different models of task delegation to nonphysician members of the primary care team. METHODS We used published estimates of the time it takes for a primary care physician to provide preventive, chronic, and acute care for a panel of 2,500 patients, and modeled how panel sizes would change if portions of preventive and chronic care services were delegated to nonphysician team members. RESULTS Using 3 assumptions about the degree of task delegation that could be achieved (77%, 60%, and 50% of preventive care, and 47%, 30%, and 25% of chronic care), we estimated that a primary care team could reasonably care for a panel of 1,947, 1,523, or 1,387 patients. CONCLUSIONS If portions of preventive and chronic care services are delegated to nonphysician team members, primary care practices can provide recommended preventive and chronic care with panel sizes that are achievable with the available primary care workforce.

  6. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care: a focus group study into influential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; Lenzen, Stephanie Anna; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2016-05-28

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding interprofessional collaboration related to care plan development in primary care. A qualitative study, including four semi-structured focus group interviews (n = 4). In total, a heterogeneous group of experts (n = 16) and health care professionals (n = 15) participated. Participants discussed viewpoints, barriers, and facilitators regarding interprofessional collaboration related to care plan development. The data were analysed by means of inductive content analysis. The findings show a variety of factors influencing the interprofessional collaboration in developing a care plan. Factors can be divided into 5 key categories: (1) patient-related factors: active role, self-management, goals and wishes, membership of the team; (2) professional-related factors: individual competences, domain thinking, motivation; (3) interpersonal factors: language differences, knowing each other, trust and respect, and motivation; (4) organisational factors: structure, composition, time, shared vision, leadership and administrative support; and (5) external factors: education, culture, hierarchy, domain thinking, law and regulations, finance, technology and ICT. Improving interprofessional collaboration regarding care plan development calls for an integral approach including patient- and professional related factors, interpersonal, organisational, and external factors. Further, the leader of the team seems to play a key role in watching the patient perspective, organising and coordinating interprofessional collaborations, and guiding the team through developments. The results of this study can be used as input for developing tools and interventions targeted at executing and improving interprofessional

  7. Developing a research agenda for patient safety in primary care. Background, aims and output of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M; Verstappen, Wim; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Wensing, Michel

    2015-09-01

    This paper is an introduction to a supplement to The European Journal of General Practice, bringing together a body of research focusing on the issue of patient safety in relation to primary care. The supplement represents the outputs of the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care, which was a four-year (2009-2013) coordination and support action funded under the Framework 7 programme by the European Union. Being a coordination and support action, its aim was not to undertake new research, but to build capacity through engaging primary care researchers and practitioners in identifying some of the key challenges in this area and developing consensus statements, which will be an essential part in developing a future research agenda. This introductory article describes the aims of the LINNEAUS collaboration, provides a brief summary of the reasons to focus on patient safety in primary care, the epidemiological and policy considerations, and an introduction to the papers included in the supplement.

  8. Examining the Role of Primary Care Physicians and Challenges Faced When Their Patients Transition to Home Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ariel; Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Lampa, Katherine; Reid, M C; Eiss, Brian M; Bhatia, Sonica; Adelman, Ronald D

    2018-04-01

    The transition into home hospice care is often a critical time in a patient's medical care. Studies have shown patients and caregivers desire continuity with their physicians at the end of life (EoL). However, it is unclear what roles primary care physicians (PCPs) play and what challenges they face caring for patients transitioning into home hospice care. To understand PCPs' experiences, challenges, and preferences when their patients transition to home hospice care. Nineteen semi-structured phone interviews with PCPs were conducted. Study data were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. Participants included PCPs from 3 academic group practices in New York City. Measured: Physician recordings were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Most PCPs noted that there was a discrepancy between their actual role and ideal role when their patients transitioned to home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed a desire to maintain continuity, provide psychosocial support, and collaborate actively with the hospice team. Better establishment of roles, more frequent communication with the hospice team, and use of technology to communicate with patients were mentioned as possible ways to help PCPs achieve their ideal role caring for their patients receiving home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed varying degrees of involvement during a patient's transition to home hospice care, but many desired to be more involved in their patient's care. As with patients, physicians desire to maintain continuity with their patients at the EoL and solutions to improve communication between PCPs, hospice providers, and patients need to be explored.

  9. Patient safety in out-of-hours primary care: a review of patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients receive healthcare in primary care settings, but relatively little is known about patient safety. Out-of-hours contacts are of particular importance to patient safety. Our aim was to examine the incidence, types, causes, and consequences of patient safety incidents at general practice cooperatives for out-of-hours primary care and to examine which factors were associated with the occurrence of patient safety incidents. Methods A retrospective study of 1,145 medical records concerning patient contacts with four general practice cooperatives. Reviewers identified records with evidence of a potential patient safety incident; a physician panel determined whether a patient safety incident had indeed occurred. In addition, the panel determined the type, causes, and consequences of the incidents. Factors associated with incidents were examined in a random coefficient logistic regression analysis. Results In 1,145 patient records, 27 patient safety incidents were identified, an incident rate of 2.4% (95% CI: 1.5% to 3.2%. The most frequent incident type was treatment (56%. All incidents had at least partly been caused by failures in clinical reasoning. The majority of incidents did not result in patient harm (70%. Eight incidents had consequences for the patient, such as additional interventions or hospitalisation. The panel assessed that most incidents were unlikely to result in patient harm in the long term (89%. Logistic regression analysis showed that age was significantly related to incident occurrence: the likelihood of an incident increased with 1.03 for each year increase in age (95% CI: 1.01 to 1.04. Conclusion Patient safety incidents occur in out-of-hours primary care, but most do not result in harm to patients. As clinical reasoning played an important part in these incidents, a better understanding of clinical reasoning and guideline adherence at GP cooperatives could contribute to patient safety.

  10. Eating disordered patients: personality, alexithymia, and implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, D L; Dolton, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eating disorders are becoming more apparent in primary care. Descriptions of character traits related to people with eating disorders are rarely reported in the primary care literature and there is little awareness of the implications of alexithymia--a concept that defines the inability to identify or express emotion. We hypothesised that many individuals with active eating disorders have alexithymic traits and a tendency to somatize their distress. AIM: To analyse the character traits and degree of alexithymia of a selected group of women with active eating disorders and in recovery, and to recommend responses by members of the primary care team that might meet the needs of such individuals. METHOD: Letters were sent to 200 female members of the Eating Disorders Association who had agreed to participate in research. Seventy-nine women volunteered to complete four postal questionnaires. This gave a response rate of 38.5%. Responders were categorised into three groups--anorexic, bulimic, and recovered--using the criteria of the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI-2). The results of the 16PF5 Personality Inventory (16PF5) and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and correlated using Pearson's correlation. A biographical questionnaire was also completed. RESULTS: In all three subgroups, high scores were achieved on the 16PF5 on 'apprehension and social sensitivity', while there were significant differences in the scores for 'privateness': a scale that measures the ability to talk about feelings and confide in others. On the TAS-20, 65% of the anorexic and 83% of the bulimic group scored in the alexithymic range compared with 33% of the recovered group. There was a significant negative correlation between alexithymia and social skills such as 'social and emotional expressivity' on the 16PF5. CONCLUSION: The results of this study emphasise the difference between those with active eating disorders who

  11. The role of patient personality in the identification of depression in older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, Laura W; Bogner, Hillary R; Sammel, Mary D; Gallo, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether personality factors significantly contribute to the identification of depression in older primary care patients, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. We examined the association between personality factors and the identification of depression among 318 older adults who participated in the Spectrum study. High neuroticism (unadjusted Odds Ratio (OR) 2.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.42, 3.93]) and low extraversion (adjusted OR 2.24, CI [1.26, 4.00]) were associated with physician identification of depression. Persons with high conscientiousness were less likely to be identified as depressed by the doctor (adjusted OR 0.45, CI [0.22, 0.91]). Personality factors influence the identification of depression among older persons in primary care over and above the relationship of depressive symptoms with physician identification. Knowledge of personality may influence the diagnosis and treatment of depression in primary care. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Individual care plans for chronically ill patients within primary care in the Netherlands: Dissemination and associations with patient characteristics and patient-perceived quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Daphne L; Heijmans, Monique; Rijken, Mieke

    2015-06-01

    To examine the use of individual care plans (ICPs) within primary chronic illness care in the Netherlands, and to explore the relationships between ICP use, patient characteristics, and patient-perceived quality of care. Cross-sectional study using survey data from a panel of chronically ill patients and medical registration data provided by their general practices. A sample of 1377 patients with somatic chronic disease(s) randomly selected in general practices throughout the Netherlands, supplemented with a sample of 225 COPD patients, also recruited from general practices. (i) Percentage of ICP use based on self-report by chronically ill patients, and (ii) patient-perceived quality of care as assessed using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC). ICP use among the total generic sample was low (9%), but slightly higher (13%) among patients diagnosed with diabetes or COPD, diseases for which disease management programmes have been set up in the Netherlands. Patients with a low educational level and patients with poor(er) self-rated health were more likely to have an ICP. Compared with patients without an ICP, patients with an ICP more often reported that the care they received was patient-centred, proactive, planned, and included collaborative goal setting, problem-solving, and follow-up support. Findings reveal a discrepancy between practice and policy aspirations regarding ICP use in primary chronic illness care. More research is needed to gain insight into the effectiveness of ICPs to improve the quality of chronic illness care in various patient populations.

  13. Primary Care Perspectives on Hepatitis C Virus Screening, Diagnosis and Linking Patients to Appropriate Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovics, Edward; Torres, Richard; Porter, Lucinda K

    2017-02-01

    Enormous progress has been made in recent years toward effectively treating and curing patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). However, at least half of the possible 7 million individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the US remain undiagnosed. The formidable task of increasing the number of patients diagnosed, and subsequently linked to appropriate care has fallen to primary care clinicians, who are mandated by some US States to offer screening to individuals born between 1945 and 1965 (the Baby Boomer Generation). This peer-reviewed video roundtable discussion http://hepcresource.amjmed.com/Content/jplayer/video_roundtable.html#video0 addresses the challenges encountered by primary care clinicians faced with the increasing societal need to screen for HCV, make appropriate diagnoses, and subsequently link infected patients to appropriate care. Discussion in this roundtable initially focuses on the offering of HCV screening to patients in primary care settings. Roundtable participants discuss the need for primary care clinicians to ask appropriate risk factor-based questions of their patients, especially if the ongoing HCV epidemic is to be curtailed. The participants note, however, that the majority of patients currently infected with HCV in the US are Baby Boomers, and USPTF guidelines require this population to be tested for HCV regardless of any past risk-taking behaviors. So while asking the right questions is important, the failure of a Baby Boomer to recall risk-taking behavior does not preclude HCV screening. In fact, clinicians should proactively screen all persons in this birth cohort, and be more sensitive and open to screening requests from these individuals. Roundtable participants also discuss how HCV screening results should be communicated to patients, and how physicians can keep patients engaged and not lost to follow-up after an initial positive HCV antibody test. Patients screened and found to be HCV antibody positive require a follow

  14. Subjective well-being among primary health care patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alis Ozcakir

    Full Text Available The psychological importance of subjective well-being for a healthy life has been well recognized. It is also well known that depressive and anxiety disorders have a negative effect on subjective well-being. The aim of this cross-sectional, descriptive study was to assess the subjective well-being status of a group of primary healthcare patients in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, personal health and mood-status.A total of 284 patients participated in the study. The Oxford Happiness Scale, Life Satisfaction Scale, DASS-42 (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-42 and a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics were completed by the participants.In general, the participants were found to be moderately happy and satisfied with their lives. They had mild levels of depression, anxiety and stress. In terms of happiness, an older age (≥40 years, educated to secondary level or higher and not having depression or anxiety were found to be factors increasing happiness. In terms of life satisfaction, female gender, an older age (≥40 years, educated to secondary level or higher, being single and not having depression were found to increase life satisfaction.Primary healthcare providers should give more importance to the mood status of their patients. Screening for depression and anxiety should be applied at the primary healthcare level because negative mood status is more important than some socio-demographic characteristics in respect of unhappiness and dissatisfaction.

  15. Subjective well-being among primary health care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcakir, Alis; Oflu Dogan, Fatma; Cakir, Yakup Tolga; Bayram, Nuran; Bilgel, Nazan

    2014-01-01

    The psychological importance of subjective well-being for a healthy life has been well recognized. It is also well known that depressive and anxiety disorders have a negative effect on subjective well-being. The aim of this cross-sectional, descriptive study was to assess the subjective well-being status of a group of primary healthcare patients in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, personal health and mood-status. A total of 284 patients participated in the study. The Oxford Happiness Scale, Life Satisfaction Scale, DASS-42 (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-42) and a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics were completed by the participants. In general, the participants were found to be moderately happy and satisfied with their lives. They had mild levels of depression, anxiety and stress. In terms of happiness, an older age (≥40 years), educated to secondary level or higher and not having depression or anxiety were found to be factors increasing happiness. In terms of life satisfaction, female gender, an older age (≥40 years), educated to secondary level or higher, being single and not having depression were found to increase life satisfaction. Primary healthcare providers should give more importance to the mood status of their patients. Screening for depression and anxiety should be applied at the primary healthcare level because negative mood status is more important than some socio-demographic characteristics in respect of unhappiness and dissatisfaction.

  16. [Primary care evaluation of the hypertensive patient management in specialized care after derivation (DERIVA-2 Study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell-Claros, Nieves; Galgo Nafría, Alberto; Abad-Cardiel, María; Álvarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; García Donaire, José Antonio; Márquez-Contreras, Emilio; Molino-González, Ángel

    2017-10-13

    To know the opinion/evaluation of the primary care physicians (PCPH) of the received information about patients that were attended in specialized care (SC). Cross-sectional study. Performed nationwide in primary care centers. Researchers from the primary care network. We used the SEH-LELHA derivation criteria guidelines, plus an ad hoc survey that included demographic and anthropometric data, blood pressure levels, and the main reason for derivation to SC at the baseline and final (post-derivation) visit. In addition, time deployed for the study of every patient, changes in diagnosis and treatment, type of follow-up, issues throughout the derivation process and assessment of the medical referred to the PCPH were evaluated. With participation of 578 researchers from primary, the study included 1715 patients aged 60.7±13.3years, 62.7% male. Patients were taking 2.3±1.2 (range 0-10) antihypertensive drugs pre-referral and 2.5±1.2 (0-9) after derivation. Blood pressure levels changed from 166±21.6 /97.7±12.6mmHg to 143±14.4 /85.5±10.5mmHg. The number of controlled patients (BP<140 and <90mmHg) increased from 5.8% to 32.2%. Time between pre- and post-derivation visit was 72±64days (median 57days, IQ26-99). The PCPH received a medical report in 80.3% of cases, 76.9% with an explanation of the results of the complementary tests, 75.8% with additional information or a reasoning of treatment and in 71% of cases information about the patient future management. 63% of PCPH were fully agreed with the management of the specialist, 29% agree and 2% strongly disagree. The derivation was evaluated as effective or very effective in 86% of patients and no effective in 9%. Communication between AE and SC in HTA is valued satisfactorily by MAP. However there is still room for improvement in the process. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  17. Professionals' perception of circuits of care for hypertensive or diabetic patients between primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Moreno, Francisco Javier; Martell-Claros, Nieves; de la Figuera, Mariano; Escalada, Javier; Rodríguez, Marta; Orera, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    To determine the flow of care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension between primary care (PC) and specialized care (SC) in clinical practice, and the criteria used for referral and follow-up within the Spanish National Health System (NHS). A descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study. A probability convenience sampling stratified by number of physicians participating in each Spanish autonomous community was performed. Nine hundred and ninety-nine physicians were surveyed, of whom 78.1% (n=780) were primary care physicians (PCPs), while 11.9% (n=119) and 10.0% (n=100) respectively were specialists in hypertension and diabetes. KEY MEASUREMENTS: was conducted using two self administered online surveys. A majority of PCPs (63.7% and 55.5%) and specialists (79.8% and 45.0%) reported the lack of a protocol to coordinate the primary and specialized settings for both hypertension and T2DM respectively. The most widely used method for communication between specialists was the referral sheet (94.6% in PC and 92.4% in SC). The main reasons for referral to a specialist were refractory hypertension (80.9%) and suspected secondary hypertension (75.6%) in hypertensive patients, and suspicion of a specific diabetes (71.9%) and pregnancy (71.7%) in T2DM patients. Although results showed some common characteristics between PCPs and specialists in disease management procedures, the main finding was a poor coordination between PC and SC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. Patient ethnicity and the identification of anxiety in elderly primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeowon A; Morales, Knashawn H; Bogner, Hillary R

    2008-09-01

    To examine the role of ethnicity and primary care physician (PCP) identification of anxiety in older adults. A cross-sectional survey conducted between 2001 and 2003. Primary care offices in the Baltimore, Maryland, area. A sample of 330 adults aged 65 and older from Maryland primary care practices with complete information on psychological status and physician assessments. PCPs were asked to rate anxiety on a Likert scale. Patient interviews included measures of psychological status and patient use of psychotropic medications. Older black patients were less likely than older white patients to be identified as anxious (unadjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.18-0.64) and less likely to be taking psychotropic medications (unadjusted OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.20-0.81). In multivariate models that controlled for potentially influential characteristics including depression and anxiety symptoms, the association between identification (OR=0.30, 95% CI=0.15-0.61) with patient ethnicity remained significantly unchanged. PCPs were less likely to identify older black Americans as anxious than white patients. An understanding of the role of ethnicity in the identification of anxiety is important for the screening and management of anxiety in elderly people.

  19. Erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia: A hospital-based primary care study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A Al-Turki

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Complete (severe and partial erectile dysfunction was quite common among adult diabetic patients in a hospital-based primary care setting in Saudi Arabia. It is important for primary care physicians to diagnose erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients, and to counsel them early, as most patients are hesitant to discuss their concern during a consultation. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the effect of other risk factors on erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  20. [Primary care for diabetic patients: a quality improvement cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, A; Suárez-Beke, M P; Sánchez-Nicolás, J A; Lázaro-Aragues, P; de Jesús Jiménez-Vázquez, E; Huertas-de Mora, O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve the quality of medical care provided to diabetic patients following the standards proposed by the American Diabetes Association. The study was conducted in three phases by analyzing data from the computerized clinical history of a sample of 340 patients. First phase (2010): cross-sectional, descriptive study which assessed the proportion of patients who met the standards related to the screening of diabetes, and goals of control and treatment. Subsequently, health professionals reviewed the results in order to promote the implementation of corrective action. Finally (2012), a new assessment with the same standards was performed. An increase in the number of patients treated with insulin (12.7% in 2010 and 20.2% in 2012) was observed (P < .01). There were also percentage increases in the number of patients who met the screening standards as regards analytical determinations: glycosylated hemoglobin (from 44.4% to 68.2%), lipid profile (47.6%-73.8%), creatinine (32.5% - 73.5%), and albumin-creatinine ratio (9.2%-24.4%) (P < .001). Only 6.4% (CI: 3.2- 9.8) of diabetic patients attained the composite target of glycosylated hemoglobin < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dl in 2012. This study shows that medical care has improved the goals related to analytical determinations and the number of insulin-treated diabetic type 2 patients. An optimal level was also maintained in metabolic control of diabetes, but there was still poor control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Primary care COPD patients compared with large pharmaceutically-sponsored COPD studies: an UNLOCK validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarije L Kruis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guideline recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are based on the results of large pharmaceutically-sponsored COPD studies (LPCS. There is a paucity of data on disease characteristics at the primary care level, while the majority of COPD patients are treated in primary care. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the external validity of six LPCS (ISOLDE, TRISTAN, TORCH, UPLIFT, ECLIPSE, POET-COPD on which current guidelines are based, in relation to primary care COPD patients, in order to inform future clinical practice guidelines and trials. METHODS: Baseline data of seven primary care databases (n=3508 from Europe were compared to baseline data of the LPCS. In addition, we examined the proportion of primary care patients eligible to participate in the LPCS, based on inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Overall, patients included in the LPCS were younger (mean difference (MD-2.4; p=0.03, predominantly male (MD 12.4; p=0.1 with worse lung function (FEV1% MD -16.4; p<0.01 and worse quality of life scores (SGRQ MD 15.8; p=0.01. There were large differences in GOLD stage distribution compared to primary care patients. Mean exacerbation rates were higher in LPCS, with an overrepresentation of patients with ≥ 1 and ≥ 2 exacerbations, although results were not statistically significant. Our findings add to the literature, as we revealed hitherto unknown GOLD I exacerbation characteristics, showing 34% of mild patients had ≥ 1 exacerbations per year and 12% had ≥ 2 exacerbations per year. The proportion of primary care patients eligible for inclusion in LPCS ranged from 17% (TRISTAN to 42% (ECLIPSE, UPLIFT. CONCLUSION: Primary care COPD patients stand out from patients enrolled in LPCS in terms of gender, lung function, quality of life and exacerbations. More research is needed to determine the effect of pharmacological treatment in mild to moderate patients. We encourage future guideline makers to involve primary care

  2. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to as...

  3. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Reuschenbach, Bernd; Wensing, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. Objective To evaluate whether there is an association between patient satisfaction and job satisfaction of the members of patient care teams. Design The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational d...

  4. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care : a focus group study into influential factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephanie Anna Lenzen; Trudy van der Weijden; Anna Beurskens; Marloes Amantia van Bokhoven; Ramon Daniëls; Jerôme Jean Jacques van Dongen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding

  5. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care: a focus group study into influential factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, J.J. van; Lenzen, S.A.; Bokhoven, M.A. van; Daniels, R.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Beurskens, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding

  6. Beta-blockers and depression in elderly hypertension patients in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringoir, Lianne; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Widdershoven, Jos W M G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Previous findings regarding a possible association between beta-blocker use and depression are mixed. To our knowledge there have been no studies investigating the association of beta-blockers with depression in primary care hypertension patients without previous...... myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between lipophilic beta-blocker use and depression in elderly primary care patients with hypertension. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in primary care practices located in the South of The Netherlands. Primary care...... for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that primary care hypertension patients who use a lipophilic beta-blocker are more likely to have higher depression scores than those who do not use a lipophilic beta-blocker....

  7. [Communication between the primary care physician, hospital staff and the patient during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menahem, Sasson; Roitgarz, Ina; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2011-04-01

    HospitaL admission is a crisis for the patient and his family and can interfere with the continuity of care. It may lead to mistakes due to communication problems between the primary care physician and the hospital medical staff. To explore the communication between the primary care physician, the hospital medical staff, the patient and his family during hospitalization. A total of 269 questionnaires were sent to all Clalit Health Services-South District, primary care physicians; 119 of these questionnaires (44.2%) were completed. Half of the primary care physicians thought that they should, always or almost always, have contact with the admitting ward in cases of internal medicine, oncology, surgery or pediatric admissions. However, the actual contact rate, according to their report, was only in a third of the cases. A telephone contact was more common than an actual visit of the patient in the ward. Computer communication between the hospital physicians and the primary care physicians is still insufficiently developed, although 96.6% of the primary care physicians check, with the aid of computer software, for information on their hospitalized patients. The main reasons to visit the hospitalized patient were severe medical conditions or uncertainty about the diagnosis; 79% of the physicians thought that visiting their patients strengthened the level of trust between them and their patients. There are sometimes communication difficulties and barriers between the primary care physicians and the ward's physicians due to partial information delivery and rejection from the hospital physicians. The main barriers for visiting admitted patients were workload and lack of pre-allocated time on the work schedule. No statistically significant differences were found between communication variables and primary care physician's personal and demographic characteristics. The communication between the primary care physician and the hospital physicians should be improved through

  8. Remission in Depressed Geriatric Primary Care Patients: A Report From the PROSPECT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, George S.; Katz, Ira R.; Bruce, Martha L.; Heo, Moonseong; Have, Thomas Ten; Raue, Patrick; Bogner, Hillary R.; Schulberg, Herbert C.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study compared time to first remission for elderly depressed patients in primary care for practices that implemented a care management model versus those providing usual care. In addition, it sought to identify risk factors for nonremission that could guide treatment planning and referral to care managers or specialists. Method Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial (PROSPECT) data were analyzed. Participants were older patients (≥60 years) selected following screening of 9,072 randomly identified primary care patients. The present analysis examined patients with major depression and a 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score of 18 or greater who were followed for at least 4 months (N=215). Primary care practices were randomly assigned to offer the PROSPECT intervention or usual care. The intervention consisted of services of trained care managers, who offered algorithm-based recommendations to physicians and helped patients with treatment adherence over 18 months. Results First remission occurred earlier and was more common among patients receiving the intervention than among those receiving usual care. For all patients, limitations in physical and emotional functions predicted poor remission rate. Patients experiencing hopelessness were more likely to achieve remission if treated in intervention practices. Similarly, the intervention was more effective in patients with low baseline anxiety. Conclusions Longitudinal assessment of depression, hopelessness, anxiety, and physical and emotional functional limitations in depressed older primary care patients is critical. Patients with prominent symptoms or impairment in these areas may be candidates for care management or mental health care, since they are at risk for remaining depressed and disabled. PMID:15800144

  9. Low uptake of palliative care for COPD patients within primary care in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Chloe I; Slaich, Bhavan; Morales, Daniel R; Smeeth, Liam; Stone, Patrick; Quint, Jennifer K

    2018-02-01

    Mortality and symptom burden from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are similar but there is thought to be an inequality in palliative care support (PCS) between diseases. This nationally representative study assessed PCS for COPD patients within primary care in the UK.This was a cohort study using electronic healthcare records (2004-2015). Factors associated with receiving PCS were assessed using logistic regression for the whole cohort and deceased patients.There were 92 365 eligible COPD patients, of which 26 135 died. Only 7.8% of the whole cohort and 21.4% of deceased patients received PCS. Lung cancer had a strong association with PCS compared with other patient characteristics, including Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage and Medical Research Council Dyspnoea score (whole cohort, lung cancer: OR 14.1, 95% CI 13.1-15; deceased patients, lung cancer: OR 6.5, 95% CI 6-7). Only 16.7% of deceased COPD patients without lung cancer received PCS compared with 56.5% of deceased patients with lung cancer. In patients that received PCS, lung cancer co-diagnosis significantly increased the chances of receiving PCS before the last month of life (1-6 versus ≤1 month pre-death: risk ratio 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.7).Provision of PCS for COPD patients in the UK is inadequate. Lung cancer, not COPD, was the dominant driver for COPD patients to receive PCS. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  10. [Primary care and mental health care collaboration in patients with depression: Evaluation of a pilot experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Carlos; Balagué, Laura; Iruin, Álvaro; Retolaza, Ander; Belaunzaran, Jon; Basterrechea, Javier; Mosquera, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    To implement and assess a collaborative experience between Primary Care (PC) and Mental Health (MH) in order to improve the care of patients with depression. Pilot collaborative project from a participatory action research approach during 2013. Basque Country. Osakidetza (Basque Health Service). Bizkaia and Gipuzkoa. The study included 207 professionals from general practice, nursing, psychiatry, psychiatric nursing, psychology and social work of 9 health centres and 6 mental health centres of Osakidetza. Shared design and development of four axes of intervention: 1) Communication and knowledge between PC and MH professionals, 2) Improvement of diagnostic coding and referral of patients, 3) Training programmes with meetings and common Clinical Practice Guidelines, and 4) Evaluation. Intervention and control questionnaires to professionals of the centres on the knowledge and satisfaction in the PC-MH relationship, joint training activities, and assessment of the experience. Osakidetza registers of prevalences, referrals and treatments. Follow-up meetings. Improvement in the 4 axes of intervention in the participant centres compared with the controls. Identification of factors to be considered in the development and sustainability of PC-MH collaborative care. The pilot experience confirms that collaborative projects promoted by PC and MH can improve depression care and the satisfaction of professionals. They are complex projects that need simultaneous interventions adjusted to the particularities of the health services. Multidisciplinary and continuous participation and management and information system support are necessary for their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient and carer identified factors which contribute to safety incidents in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernan, Andrea L; Giles, Sally J; Fuller, Jeffrey; Johnson, Julie K; Walker, Christine; Dunbar, James A

    2015-09-01

    Patients can have an important role in reducing harm in primary-care settings. Learning from patient experience and feedback could improve patient safety. Evidence that captures patients' views of the various contributory factors to creating safe primary care is largely absent. The aim of this study was to address this evidence gap. Four focus groups and eight semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 patients and carers from south-east Australia. Participants were asked to describe their experiences of primary care. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and specific factors that contribute to safety incidents were identified in the analysis using the Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework (YCFF). Other factors emerging from the data were also ascertained and added to the analytical framework. Thirteen factors that contribute to safety incidents in primary care were ascertained. Five unique factors for the primary-care setting were discovered in conjunction with eight factors present in the YCFF from hospital settings. The five unique primary care contributing factors to safety incidents represented a range of levels within the primary-care system from local working conditions to the upstream organisational level and the external policy context. The 13 factors included communication, access, patient factors, external policy context, dignity and respect, primary-secondary interface, continuity of care, task performance, task characteristics, time in the consultation, safety culture, team factors and the physical environment. Patient and carer feedback of this type could help primary-care professionals better understand and identify potential safety concerns and make appropriate service improvements. The comprehensive range of factors identified provides the groundwork for developing tools that systematically capture the multiple contributory factors to patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  12. Primary care for diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the care model for chronic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Salci

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the health care Primary Health Care professionals provide to diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas. Method: qualitative study, using the theoretical framework of Complex Thinking and the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas and the methodological framework of assessment research. To collect the data, 38 interviews were held with health professionals and managers; observation of the activities by the health teams; and analysis of 25 files of people who received this care. The data analysis was supported by the software ATLAS.ti, using the directed content analysis technique. Results: at the micro level, care was distant from the integrality of the actions needed to assist people with chronic conditions and was centered on the biomedical model. At the meso level, there was disarticulation among the professionals of the Family Health Strategy, between them and the users, family and community. At the macro level, there was a lack of guiding strategies to implement public policies for diabetes in care practice. Conclusion: the implementation of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas represents a great challenge, mainly needing professionals and managers who are prepared to work with chronic conditions are who are open to break with the traditional model.

  13. What components of chronic care organisation relate to better primary care for coronary heart disease patients? An observational study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lieshout, J. van; Frigola Capell, E.; Ludt, S.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) received by patients shows large variation across countries. In this study we explored the aspects of primary care organisation associated with key components of CVRM in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: 273 primary care practices in Austria, Belgium, England, Finland, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Switzerland and Spain. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 4563 CHD patients identified by co...

  14. Trust, temporality and systems: how do patients understand patient safety in primary care? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Penny; Campbell, Stephen; Sanders, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Patient safety research has tended to focus on hospital settings, although most clinical encounters occur in primary care, and to emphasize practitioner errors, rather than patients' own understandings of safety. To explore patients' understandings of safety in primary care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with patients recruited from general practices in northwest England. Participants were asked basic socio-demographic information; thereafter, topics were largely introduced by interviewees themselves. Transcripts were coded and analysed using NVivo10 (qualitative data software), following a process of constant comparison. Thirty-eight people (14 men, 24 women) from 19 general practices in rural, small town and city locations were interviewed. Many of their concerns (about access, length of consultation, relationship continuity) have been discussed in terms of quality, but, in the interviews, were raised as matters of safety. Three broad themes were identified: (i) trust and psycho-social aspects of professional-patient relationships; (ii) choice, continuity, access, and the temporal underpinnings of safety; and (iii) organizational and systems-level tensions constraining safety. Conceptualizations of safety included common reliance on a bureaucratic framework of accreditation, accountability, procedural rules and regulation, but were also individual and context-dependent. For patients, safety is not just a property of systems, but personal and contingent and is realized in the interaction between doctor and patient. However, it is the systems approach that has dominated safety thinking, and patients' individualistic and relational conceptualizations are poorly accommodated within current service organization. © 2015 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdon François

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS. Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6% patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  16. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-09-12

    The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  17. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration. PMID:17850647

  18. Transformational leadership in primary care: Clinicians' patterned approaches to care predict patient satisfaction and health expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho Phi; Sweeny, Kate; Miller, Tricia

    2018-04-01

    Clinicians face the complex challenge of motivating their patients to achieve optimal health while also ensuring their satisfaction. Inspired by transformational leadership theory, we proposed that clinicians' motivational behaviors can be organized into three patient care styles (transformational, transactional, and passive-avoidant) and that these styles differentially predict patient health outcomes. In two studies using patient-reported data and observer ratings, we found that transformational patient care style positively predicted patients' satisfaction and health expectations above and beyond transactional and passive-avoidant patient care style. These findings provide initial support for the patient care style approach and suggest novel directions for the study of clinicians' motivational behaviors.

  19. Determinants of Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes: Implications for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony; Porter, Boaz

    2008-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design of 400 primary care patients with diabetes, the authors evaluated demographics, health status, subjective health and mental health, health behaviors, health beliefs, knowledge of diabetes treatment, satisfaction with medical care, and quality of medical care as potential predictors of QoL and QoL in the hypothetical…

  20. Patient Factors Associated with Guideline-concordant Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Marijn A.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Smolders, Mirrian; Laurant, Miranda G. H.; van der Meer, Klaas; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Seven hundred and twenty-one patients with a current

  1. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szecsenyi, J.; Goetz, K.; Campbell, S.M.; Broge, B.; Reuschenbach, B.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether there is an

  2. Primary care follow-up of radical prostatectomy patients: A regional New Zealand experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Yassaie

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study identified that follow-up by GPs after RP is insufficient. Accordingly, there is a requirement for formal educational programs if primary care is to take a greater role in follow-up of these patients.

  3. The assessment of depressive patients' involvement in decision making in audio-taped primary care consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loh, A.; Simon, D.; Hennig, K.; Hennig, B.; Harter, M.; Elwyn, G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In primary care of depression treatment options such as antidepressants, counseling and psychotherapy are reasonable. Patient involvement could foster adherence and clinical outcome. However, there is a lack of empirical information about the extent to which general practitioners involve

  4. Patients' and clinicians' experiences and perceptions of the primary care management of insomnia: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Zowie; Middlemass, Jo; Siriwardena, Aloysius N

    2015-10-01

    Insomnia is common leading to patients with sleep problems often presenting to primary care services including general practice, community pharmacies and community mental health teams. Little is known about how health professionals in primary care respond to patients with insomnia. We aimed to explore health professionals' and patients' experiences and perceptions of the management of insomnia in primary care. We used a qualitative design and thematic approach. Primary care in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. We undertook focus groups and one-to-one interviews with a purposive sample of health professionals and adults with insomnia. We interviewed 28 patients and 23 health professionals. Practitioners focused on treating the cause of insomnia rather than the insomnia itself. They described providing stepped care for insomnia, but this focused on sleep hygiene which patients often disregarded, rather than cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Practitioners were ambivalent towards hypnotic drugs but often colluded with patients to prescribe to avoid confrontation or express empathy. Patients sometimes took hypnotics in ways that were not intended, for example together with over-the-counter medication. Practitioners and patients were sometimes but not always concerned about addiction. Practitioners sometimes prescribed despite these concerns but at other times withdrew hypnotics abruptly without treating insomnia. Both patients and practitioners wanted more options and better training for the management of insomnia in primary care. A better understanding of the current approaches and difficulties in the management of insomnia will help to inform more therapeutic options and health professional training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Detection and management of depression in adult primary care patients in Hong Kong: a cross-sectional survey conducted by a primary care practice-based research network

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, KTY; Wong, SYS; Chiu, BCF; Chin, WY; Lam, TP; Lam, CLK; Fong, DYT; Lo, YCY

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to examine the prevalence, risk factors, detection rates and management of primary care depression in Hong Kong. Methods A cross-sectional survey containing the PHQ-9 instrument was conducted on waiting room patients of 59 primary care doctors. Doctors blinded to the PHQ-9 scores reported whether they thought their patients had depression and their management. Results 10,179 patients completed the survey (response rate 81%). The prevalence of PHQ-9 positive screeni...

  6. Patient experience of access to primary care: identification of predictors in a national patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Roland, Martin; Reeves, David

    2010-08-28

    The 2007/8 GP Access Survey in England measured experience with five dimensions of access: getting through on the phone to a practice, getting an early appointment, getting an advance appointment, making an appointment with a particular doctor, and surgery opening hours. Our aim was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction and experience with access to English primary care. 8,307 English general practices were included in the survey (of 8,403 identified). 4,922,080 patients were randomly selected and contacted by post and 1,999,523 usable questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 40.6%. We used multi-level logistic regressions to identify patient, practice and regional predictors of patient satisfaction and experience. After controlling for all other factors, younger people, and people of Asian ethnicity, working full time, or with long commuting times to work, reported the lowest levels of satisfaction and experience of access. For people in work, the ability to take time off work to visit the GP effectively eliminated the disadvantage in access. The ethnic mix of the local area had an impact on a patient's reported satisfaction and experience over and above the patient's own ethnic identity. However, area deprivation had only low associations with patient ratings. Responses from patients in small practices were more positive for all aspects of access with the exception of satisfaction with practice opening hours. Positive reports of access to care were associated with higher scores on the Quality and Outcomes Framework and with slightly lower rates of emergency admission. Respondents in London were the least satisfied and had the worst experiences on almost all dimensions of access. This study identifies a number of patient groups with lower satisfaction, and poorer experience, of gaining access to primary care. The finding that access is better in small practices is important given the increasing tendency for small practices to combine into larger

  7. Patient experience of access to primary care: identification of predictors in a national patient survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontopantelis Evangelos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2007/8 GP Access Survey in England measured experience with five dimensions of access: getting through on the phone to a practice, getting an early appointment, getting an advance appointment, making an appointment with a particular doctor, and surgery opening hours. Our aim was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction and experience with access to English primary care. Methods 8,307 English general practices were included in the survey (of 8,403 identified. 4,922,080 patients were randomly selected and contacted by post and 1,999,523 usable questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 40.6%. We used multi-level logistic regressions to identify patient, practice and regional predictors of patient satisfaction and experience. Results After controlling for all other factors, younger people, and people of Asian ethnicity, working full time, or with long commuting times to work, reported the lowest levels of satisfaction and experience of access. For people in work, the ability to take time off work to visit the GP effectively eliminated the disadvantage in access. The ethnic mix of the local area had an impact on a patient's reported satisfaction and experience over and above the patient's own ethnic identity. However, area deprivation had only low associations with patient ratings. Responses from patients in small practices were more positive for all aspects of access with the exception of satisfaction with practice opening hours. Positive reports of access to care were associated with higher scores on the Quality and Outcomes Framework and with slightly lower rates of emergency admission. Respondents in London were the least satisfied and had the worst experiences on almost all dimensions of access. Conclusions This study identifies a number of patient groups with lower satisfaction, and poorer experience, of gaining access to primary care. The finding that access is better in small practices is important given

  8. Quality care provision for older people: an interview study with patients and primary healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Marjolein Helena Johanna; Fluit, Cornelia Rita Maria Gertruda; Lagro, Joep; Niessen, Danielle; Rikkert, Marcellinus Gerardus Maria Olde; Lagro-Janssen, Antoinette Leonarda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, primary health care for the ageing population has become increasingly complex. Aim This study sought to explore the views and needs of healthcare professionals and older patients relating to primary care in order to identify focal areas for improving primary health care for older people. Design and setting This research was structured as a mixed interview study with focus groups and individual interviews. Participants were made up of primary healthcare professionals and older patients. Patients were recruited from five elderly care homes in a small city in the southern part of the Netherlands. Method All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by two individual researchers applying constant comparative analysis. Data collection proceeded until saturation was reached. Results Participants in the study agreed about the need for primary care for older patients, and showed sympathy with one another’s perspectives. They did note, however, a number of obstacles hindering good healthcare provision. The major themes that arose were: ‘autonomy and independence’, ‘organisational barriers’, and ‘professional expertise’. Participants generally noted that it is important to clarify differences in perspectives about good care between patients and healthcare professionals. Conclusion Effective primary care intervention for older patients requires mutual understanding of the expectations and goals of all parties involved. There are a number of important requirements, especially accessible patient information in the form of care plans; specialist training for nurses and GPs on complex care and multimorbidity; and training on discussing autonomy, goal setting, and shared care. Further improvement in health care for older people and its evaluation research should focus on these requirements. PMID:26212845

  9. Perspectives of patients and professionals on the use of patient reported outcome measures in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porter, Ian; Gangannagaripalli, Jaheeda; Davey, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    /or healthcare professional’s perspectives on the clinical utility of using PROMs in clinical practice. Results: 19 studies met the inclusion criteria (4 after 2012), 11 of which were conducted in the UK, reporting on the views of professionals (8), patients (5), and both (7). The majority of studies (12...... communication it was also noted that they undermined the human element of consultations, along with professional intuition and judgement. Burden on GP time was also noted. Conclusions: Patients and professionals highlighted a number of benefits of using PROMs in clinical practice, particularly in terms......A71 Perspectives of patients and professionals on the use of patient-reported outcome measures in primary care: a systematic review of qualitative studies Background: Although the use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in healthcare settings has increased substantially over recent years...

  10. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  11. [Chronic home-care patients and their primary health care environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao Curiel, I; Gastaminza Santacoloma, A M; García García, J A; Quindimil Vázquez, J A; López Rivas, J L; Huidobro Fernández, L

    1994-03-15

    Describing the primary level of attention to chronic home patients (CHP), their quality or life and the one of their home carers. Descriptive transverse study. Teaching Unit of Family of Sestao (Vizcaya) urban environment. 197 CHP patients with subacute, chronic illnesses or in terminal stages or handicapped, that is to say, people who cannot attend the Medical Centre and needing constant home care (longer than 4 weeks) although they do not need to be in hospital at the moment. A questionnaire made up by the researching group. April-June 1992. The clinical histories and home interviews. Mean age (78 +/- 23) years old; 70% were women; average of health problems of patients (4.2 +/- 4); average of drug consumption by patients (3.6 +/- 4); average of one visit to each patient per two months; 75% did not need derivation. The average age of people looking after them was (58 +/- 28) years old and 77.3% of them were women. Their average QL index was (9 +/- 2.4) out of 10, 9.2% had a QL index between 4 and 7 although there was nobody under 3. We have found an old population, mostly women with an average of health problems of (4.24 +/- 4) and who are polymedicated. 9.4 of them are not looked after by anybody. Generally their homes are habitable enough. In 77.3% of the cases the carers are women and 65.6% do not receive any domiciliary help.

  12. Patients living with disabilities: The need for high-quality primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, Aisha; Guilcher, Sara; Maulkhan, Niraj; Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    To compare the potential risk factors for lower-quality primary care, the potential markers of unmet needs in primary care, and the willingness to participate in future research among primary care patients with versus without physical disabilities. A waiting room survey using a convenience sample. A family health team (FHT) in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, with a designated Mobility Clinic. A total of 40 patients seen at the FHT Mobility Clinic and 80 patients from the general patient population of the same FHT. Socioeconomic status and social capital, number of self-reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations in the preceding year, and willingness of the patients in the 2 groups to participate in future research studies. Patients from the Mobility Clinic were more than twice as likely to be receiving benefits or social assistance (75.0% vs 32.1%, P data for research, 82.5% of Mobility Clinic patients agreed versus 55.0% of those in the general patient population (P = .004). In this study, patients with disabilities were at a social disadvantage compared with their peers without disabilities and were more likely to use the emergency department, suggesting that they had unmet health needs. Future research should continue to explore this patient population and to investigate if an interprofessional primary health care team approach focused on patients with disabilities can help to increase quality of care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. Predictors of relational continuity in primary care: patient, provider and practice factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Hogg, William; Dahrouge, Simone; Tuna, Meltem; Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Gebremichael, Goshu

    2013-05-31

    Continuity is a fundamental tenet of primary care, and highly valued by patients; it may also improve patient outcomes and lower cost of health care. It is thus important to investigate factors that predict higher continuity. However, to date, little is known about the factors that contribute to continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyse practice, provider and patient predictors of continuity of care in a large sample of primary care practices in Ontario, Canada. Another goal was to assess whether there was a difference in the continuity of care provided by different models of primary care. This study is part of the larger a cross-sectional study of 137 primary care practices, their providers and patients. Several performance measures were evaluated; this paper focuses on relational continuity. Four items from the Primary Care Assessment Tool were used to assess relational continuity from the patient's perspective. Multilevel modeling revealed several patient factors that predicted continuity. Older patients and those with chronic disease reported higher continuity, while those who lived in rural areas, had higher education, poorer mental health status, no regular provider, and who were employed reported lower continuity. Providers with more years since graduation had higher patient-reported continuity. Several practice factors predicted lower continuity: number of MDs, nurses, opening on weekends, and having 24 hours a week or less on-call. Analyses that compared continuity across models showed that, in general, Health Service Organizations had better continuity than other models, even when adjusting for patient demographics. Some patients with greater health needs experience greater continuity of care. However, the lower continuity reported by those with mental health issues and those who live in rural areas is concerning. Furthermore, our finding that smaller practices have higher continuity suggests that physicians and policy makers need to consider

  14. Identification of major cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes using primary care data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Koen Bernardus; Voorham, Jaco; Hak, Eelko; Denig, Petra

    2016-04-02

    Routine primary care data are increasingly being used for evaluation and research purposes but there are concerns about the completeness and accuracy of diagnoses and events captured in such databases. We evaluated how well patients with major cardiovascular disease (CVD) can be identified using primary care morbidity data and drug prescriptions. The study was conducted using data from 17,230 diabetes patients of the GIANTT database and Dutch Hospital Data register. To estimate the accuracy of the different measures, we analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) relative to hospitalizations and/or records with a diagnosis indicating major CVD, including ischaemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular events. Using primary care morbidity data, 43% of major CVD hospitalizations could be identified. Adding drug prescriptions to the search increased the sensitivity up to 94%. A proxy of at least one prescription of either a platelet aggregation inhibitor, vitamin k antagonist or nitrate could identify 85% of patients with a history of major CVD recorded in primary care, with an NPV of 97%. Using the same proxy, 57% of incident major CVD recorded in primary or hospital care could be identified, with an NPV of 99%. A substantial proportion of major CVD hospitalizations was not recorded in primary care morbidity data. Drug prescriptions can be used in addition to diagnosis codes to identify more patients with major CVD, and also to identify patients without a history of major CVD.

  15. Patient-reported access to primary care in Ontario: effect of organizational characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggah, Elizabeth; Hogg, William; Dahrouge, Simone; Russell, Grant; Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Muldoon, Laura; Devlin, Rose Anne

    2014-01-01

    To describe patient-reported access to primary health care across 4 organizational models of primary care in Ontario, and to explore how access is associated with patient, provider, and practice characteristics. Cross-sectional survey. One hundred thirty-seven randomly selected primary care practices in Ontario using 1 of 4 delivery models (fee for service, established capitation, reformed capitation, and community health centres). Patients included were at least 18 years of age, were not severely ill or cognitively impaired, were not known to the survey administrator, had consenting providers at 1 of the participating primary care practices, and were able to communicate in English or French either directly or through a translator. Patient-reported access was measured by a 4-item scale derived from the previously validated adult version of the Primary Care Assessment Tool. Questions were asked about physician availability during and outside of regular office hours and access to health information via telephone. Responses to the scale were normalized, with higher scores reflecting greater patient-reported access. Linear regressions were used to identify characteristics independently associated with access to care. Established capitation model practices had the highest patient-reported access, although the difference in scores between models was small. Our multilevel regression model identified several patient factors that were significantly (P = .05) associated with higher patient-reported access, including older age, female sex, good-to-excellent self-reported health, less mental health disability, and not working. Provider experience (measured as years since graduation) was the only provider or practice characteristic independently associated with improved patient-reported access. This study adds to what is known about access to primary care. The study found that established capitation models outperformed all the other organizational models, including reformed

  16. Experiences of homosexual patients' access to primary health care services in Umlazi, KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cele, Nokulunga H; Sibiya, Maureen N; Sokhela, Dudu G

    2015-09-28

    Homosexual patients are affected by social factors in their environment, and as a result may not have easy access to existing health care services. Prejudice against homosexuality and homosexual patients remains a barrier to them seeking appropriate healthcare. The concern is that lesbians and gays might delay or avoid seeking health care when they need it because of past discrimination or perceived homophobia within the health care thereby putting their health at risk. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the experiences of homosexual patients utilising primary health care (PHC) services in Umlazi in the province ofKwaZulu-Natal (KZN). A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted which was contextual innature. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 participants. The findings of this study were analysed using content analysis. Two major themes emerged from the data analysis, namely, prejudice against homosexual patients by health care providers and other patients at the primary health care facilities, and, homophobic behaviour from primary health care personnel. Participants experienced prejudice and homophobic behaviour in the course of utilising PHC clinics in Umlazi, which created a barrier to their utilisation of health services located there. Nursing education institutions, in collaboration with the National Department of Health, should introduce homosexuality and anti-homophobia education programmes during the pre-service and in-service education period. Such programmes will help to familiarise health care providers with the health care needs of homosexual patients and may decrease homophobic attitudes.

  17. How do patients with a Turkish background evaluate their medical care in Germany? An observational study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Katja Goetz,1 Jessica Bungartz,2 Joachim Szecsenyi,1 Jost Steinhaeuser3 1Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Praxis Medizin im Zentrum, München, Germany; 3Institute of Family Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany Background: Patients’ evaluation of medical care is an essential dimension of quality of care and an important aspect of the feedback cycle for health care providers. The aim of this study was to document how patients with a Turkish background evaluate primary care in Germany and determine which aspects of care are associated with language abilities.Methods: The study was based on an observational design. Patients with a Turkish background from German primary care practices completed the EUROPEP (European Project on Patient Evaluation of General Practice Care questionnaire consisting of 23 items. Seventeen primary care practices were involved with either German (n=8 or Turkish (n=9 general practitioners (GPs.Results: A convenience sample of 472 patients with a Turkish background from 17 practices participated in the study (response rate 39.9%. Practices with a German GP had a lower response rate (19.6% than those with a Turkish GP (57.5%. Items evaluated the highest were “keeping data confidential” (73.4% and “quick services for urgent health problems” (69.9%. Subgroup analysis showed lower evaluation scores from patients with good or excellent German language abilities. Patients who consulted a Turkish GP had higher evaluation scores.Conclusion: The evaluation from patients with a Turkish background living in Germany with either Turkish or German GPs showed lower scores than patients in other studies in Europe using EUROPEP. However, our results had higher evaluation scores than those of Turkish patients evaluating GPs in Turkey. Therefore, different explanation models for these findings should be explored in future studies

  18. Sensemaking and the co-production of safety: a qualitative study of primary medical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Penny; McDonald, Ruth; Campbell, Stephen; Daker-White, Gavin; Sanders, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    This study explores the ways in which patients make sense of 'safety' in the context of primary medical care. Drawing on qualitative interviews with primary care patients, we reveal patients' conceptualisation of safety as fluid, contingent, multi-dimensional, and negotiated. Participant accounts drew attention to a largely invisible and inaccessible (but taken for granted) architecture of safety, the importance of psycho-social as well as physical dimensions and the interactions between them, informal strategies for negotiating safety, and the moral dimension of safety. Participants reported being proactive in taking action to protect themselves from potential harm. The somewhat routinised and predictable nature of the primary medical care consultation, which is very different from 'one off' inpatient spells, meant that patients were not passive recipients of care. Instead they had a stock of accumulated knowledge and experience to inform their actions. In addition to highlighting the differences and similarities between hospital and primary care settings, the study suggests that a broad conceptualisation of patient safety is required, which encompasses the safety concerns of patients in primary care settings. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  19. Patient safety improvement programmes for primary care. Review of a Delphi procedure and pilot studies by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Esmail, Aneez; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: To improve patient safety it is necessary to identify the causes of patient safety incidents, devise solutions and measure the (cost-) effectiveness of improvement efforts. Objective: This paper provides a broad overview with practical guidance on how to improve patient safety. Methods: We used modified online Delphi procedures to reach consensus on methods to improve patient safety and to identify important features of patient safety management in primary care. Two pilot studies were carried out to assess the value of prospective risk analysis (PRA), as a means of identifying the causes of a patient safety incident. Results: A range of different methods can be used to improve patient safety but they have to be contextually specific. Practice organization, culture, diagnostic errors and medication safety were found to be important domains for further improvement. Improvement strategies for patient safety could benefit from insights gained from research on implementation of evidence-based practice. Patient involvement and prospective risk analysis are two promising and innovative strategies for improving patient safety in primary care. Conclusion: A range of methods is available to improve patient safety, but there is no ‘magic bullet.’ Besides better use of the available methods, it is important to use new and potentially more effective strategies, such as prospective risk analysis. PMID:26339837

  20. Follow-up study on health care use of patients with somatoform, anxiety and depressive disorders in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assendelft Willem JJ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Better management of affective and somatoform disorders may reduce consultation rates in primary care. Somatoform disorders are highly prevalent in primary care and co-morbidity with affective disorders is substantial, but it is as yet unclear which portion of the health care use may be ascribed to each disorder. Our objective was to investigate the use of primary care for undifferentiated somatoform disorders, other somatoform disorders, anxiety and depressive disorders prospectively. Methods In eight family practices 1046 consulting patients (25–79 yrs were screened and a stratified sample of 473 was interviewed. Somatoform disorders, anxiety and depressive disorders were diagnosed (DSM IV using SCAN 2.1. The electronic records of 400 participants regarding somatic diseases, medication and healthcare use were available through their family physicians (FP. Results In the follow-up year patients with psychiatric disorders had more face-to-face contacts with the FP than patients who had no psychiatric disorder: average 7–10 versus 5. The impact on the use of primary care by patients with somatoform disorders was comparable to patients with depressive or anxiety disorders. Undifferentiated somatoform disorders had an independent impact on the use of primary care after adjustment for anxiety and depressive disorders, resulting in 30% more consultations (IRR 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.7. Anxiety disorders had no independent effect. Conclusion Health care planning should focus on the recognition and treatment of somatoform as well as affective disorders.

  1. Patients report better satisfaction with part-time primary care physicians, despite less continuity of care and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panattoni, Laura; Stone, Ashley; Chung, Sukyung; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2015-03-01

    The growing number of primary care physicians (PCPs) reducing their clinical work hours has raised concerns about meeting the future demand for services and fulfilling the continuity and access mandates for patient-centered care. However, the patient's experience of care with part-time physicians is relatively unknown, and may be mediated by continuity and access to care outcomes. We aimed to examine the relationships between a physicians' clinical full-time equivalent (FTE), continuity of care, access to care, and patient satisfaction with the physician. We used a multi-level structural equation estimation, with continuity and access modeled as mediators, for a cross-section in 2010. The study included family medicine (n = 104) and internal medicine (n = 101) physicians in a multi-specialty group practice, along with their patient satisfaction survey responses (n = 12,688). Physician level FTE, continuity of care received by patients, continuity of care provided by physician, and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction with the physician score, on a 0-100 % scale, were measured. Access to care was measured as days to the third next-available appointment. Physician FTE was directly associated with better continuity of care received (0.172% per FTE, p part-time PCPs in practice redesign efforts and initiatives to meet the demand for primary care services.

  2. Management of obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shoaib; Ahmad, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and being overweight is the most powerful risk factor accounting for 80-90% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The epidemic of obesity is driving the diabetes epidemic to alarming levels and primary care is becoming an important setting for obesity management in T2DM in India. Yet many primary care providers feel ill-equipped or inadequately supported to address obesity in patients with diabetes. This article reviews the most recent and strongest evidence-based strategies that may aid physicians in management of obesity in patients with T2DM in primary care. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE using the search terms Obesity, Obesity in T2DM, weight loss and Primary Care was conducted. The American Diabetes Association, National Institute for Health, National Institute of Health and Excellence (NICE), Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) and World Health Organization websites were also searched. Most studies in this area are observational in design with few randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Articles and studies involving meta-analysis or RCTs were preferred over other types. Effective weight management treatment in T2DM patient can be implemented in the primary care setting. Evidence based individualized lifestyle and pharmacologic measures supported by behavioral intervention and counseling with appropriate and informed surgical referrals has the potential to improve the success of weight management within primary care. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient Telephone Appointment System for High Volume Primary Care Sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Worthington, Francine

    2000-01-01

    ... efficient, timely, convenient, and appropriate access to care. This study follows a Continuous Improvement philosophy of customer satisfaction, quality process improvement, and benchmarking, also known as "idealized process redesign...

  4. Assessment of patient safety culture in primary care setting, Al-Mukala, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webair, Hana H; Al-Assani, Salwa S; Al-Haddad, Reema H; Al-Shaeeb, Wafa H; Bin Selm, Manal A; Alyamani, Abdulla S

    2015-10-13

    Patient safety culture in primary care is the first step to achieve high quality health care. This study aims to provide a baseline assessment of patient safety culture in primary care settings in Al-Mukala, Yemen as a first published study from a least developed country. A survey was conducted in primary healthcare centres and units in Al-Mukala District, Yemen. A comprehensive sample from the available 16 centres was included. An Arabic version of the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed to all health workers (110). Participants were physicians, nurses and administrative staff. The response rate from the participating centres was 71 %. (N = 78). The percent positive responses of the items is equal to the percentage of participants who answered positively. Composite scores were calculated by averaging the percent positive response on the items within a dimension. Positive safety culture was defined as 60 % or more positive responses on items or dimensions. Patient safety culture was perceived to be generally positive with the exception of the dimensions of 'Communication openness', 'Work pressure and pace' and 'Patient care tracking/follow-up', as the percent positive response of these dimensions were 58, 57, and 52 % respectively. Overall, positive rating on quality and patient safety were low (49 and 46 % respectively). Although patient safety culture in Al-Mukala primary care setting is generally positive, patient safety and quality rating were fairly low. Implementation of a safety and quality management system in Al-Mukala primary care setting are paramount. Further research is needed to confirm the applicability of the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC) for Al-Mukala primary care.

  5. Why primary care practices should become digital health information hubs for their patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Aaron; Nowak, Samantha

    2014-11-25

    Two interesting health care trends are currently occurring: 1) patient-facing technologies, such as personal health records, patient portals, and mobile health apps, are being adopted at rapid rates, and 2) primary care, which includes family practice, is being promoted as essential to reducing health care costs and improving health care outcomes. While these trends are notable and commendable, both remain subject to significant fragmentation and incentive misalignments, which has resulted in significant data coordination and value generation challenges. In particular, patient-facing technologies designed to increase care coordination, often fall prey to the very digital fragmentation issues they are supposed to overcome. Additionally, primary care providers are treating patients that may have considerable health information histories, but generating a single view of such multi-source data is nearly impossible. We contribute to this debate by proposing that primary care practices become digital health information hubs for their patients. Such hubs would offer health data coordination in a medically professional setting with the benefits of expert, trustworthy advice coupled with active patient engagement. We acknowledge challenges including: costs, information quality and provenance, willingness-to-share information and records, willingness-to-use (by both providers and patients), primary care scope creep, and determinations of technical and process effectiveness. Even with such potential challenges, we strongly believe that more debate is needed on this topic prior to full implementation of various health information technology incentives and reform programs currently being designed and enacted throughout the world. Ultimately, if we do not provide a meaningful way for the full spectrum of health information to be used by both providers and patients, especially early in the health care continuum, effectively improving health outcomes may remain elusive. We view

  6. Can brief behavioral health interventions reduce suicidal and self-harm ideation in primary care patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueweke, Aubrey R; Rojas, Sasha M; Anastasia, Elizabeth A; Bridges, Ana J

    2017-09-01

    We examined whether brief behavioral health visits reduced suicidal and self-harm ideation among primary care patients and compared the effectiveness of interventions that targeted ideation directly (i.e., safety planning) with those that targeted ideation indirectly through management of underlying mental illness (e.g., behavioral activation). We examined first- and last-visit data from 31 primary care patients with suicidal or self-harm ideation seen by behavioral health consultants. Patients reported significantly lower frequencies of suicidal and self-harm ideation at their final visit than at their initial visit. Patients whose ideation was targeted directly showed greater improvements than patients whose ideation was targeted indirectly. Although preliminary, results suggest mild to moderate suicidal ideation could be addressed in primary care through integration of behavioral health consultants into the medical team. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. [Care for immigrant patients: facts and professionals' perception in 6 primary health care zones in Navarre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes Goñi, Maria Carmen; Elizalde, L; De Andrés, M R; García Castellano, P; Urmeneta, S; Uribe, J M; Bustince, P

    2010-01-01

    To describe utilisation of health care services and motives for consultation in Primary Care in the native and the immigrant population, and compare this with the perception of primary care professionals. Data was collected on health care activity during the year 2006 for all people registered (N=86,966) in the 6 basic health care zones with the highest proportion of immigrants (14.4%) and on the following variables: country of origin, age, sex, year of inscription in the public health service. The health card and OMI-AP programme databases were used. A qualitative methodology of focus groups and in-depth interviews was employed. Seventy-two point four percent of immigrants requested care from the primary care professionals in 2006, of whom 50% proceeded from Ecuador and 70% were between 25 and 44 years old. Eighty-two percent of the natives made consultations and required more referrals to specialised care than the immigrants of the same age group. The most frequent consultation with natives and with immigrants was "acute respiratory infections" (7 to 23% according to age group). The second most frequent with immigrants was "administrative problems". The consultations with immigrants were not related to preventive aspects such as smoking and there were more consultations (p>0.001) for gynaeco-obstetric episodes (10.7%) and those related to work (19%) or psychosomatic problems (8.5%). The perception of the primary care professionals was that the immigrants carry out more consultations than the natives and generate a certain "disorder" in the clinic. Immigrants use healthcare services less than the native population. Nonetheless, this fact is not perceived in this way by the primary care professionals. Fewer preventive activities are carried out with immigrants, who suffer from more labour and psychosomatic problems.

  8. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.F.; Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Meer, K. de; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. DESIGN: Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred and

  9. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.; Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; van der Meer, K; Spreeuwenberg, P.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. Design: Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Participants: Seven hundred and

  10. Patient-facing Technology for Identification of COPD in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kevin Ahern

    2016-07-01

    to share and discuss their results with their providers. Results from the semistructured interviews indicated that participants perceived the Lung Age app as intuitive and easy to use. These results demonstrate that tablet computers and mHealth apps can be used to deploy acceptable and useable electronic risk assessments in primary care settings. Future research focused on the impact and outcomes of patient-centered, mHealth apps for risk screening in primary care is warranted.

  11. Counting the cost of social disadvantage in primary care: retrospective analysis of patient data.

    OpenAIRE

    Worrall, A.; Rea, J. N.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To cost the relation between socioeconomic status and various measures of primary care workload and assess the adequacy of current "deprivation" payments in relation to actual costings for patients living in qualifying areas. DESIGN: Retrospective data on primary care were collected over a 4.5 year period from both computerised and manually filed records. Standardised data on socioeconomic status were obtained by postal questionnaire. SETTING: Inner city group practice with a socio...

  12. What components of chronic care organisation relate to better primary care for coronary heart disease patients? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Jan; Frigola Capell, Eva; Ludt, Sabine; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) received by patients shows large variation across countries. In this study we explored the aspects of primary care organisation associated with key components of CVRM in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Observational study. 273 primary care practices in Austria, Belgium, England, Finland, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Switzerland and Spain. A random sample of 4563 CHD patients identified by coded diagnoses in eight countries, based on prescription lists and while visiting the practice in one country each. We performed an audit in primary care practices in 10 European countries. We used six indicators to measure key components of CVRM: risk factor recording, antiplatelet therapy, influenza vaccination, blood pressure levels (systolic organisation based on 39 items. Using multilevel regression analyses we explored the effects of practice organisation on CVRM, controlling for patient characteristics. Better overall organisation of a primary care practice was associated with higher scores on three indicators: risk factor registration (B=0.0307, porganisation was not found to be related with recorded blood pressure or cholesterol levels. Only the organisational domains 'self-management support' and 'use of clinical information systems' were linked to three CVRM indicators. A better organisation of a primary care practice was associated with better scores on process indicators of CVRM in CHD patients, but not on intermediate patient outcome measures. Direct support for patients and clinicians seemed most influential.

  13. Effects of primary care team social networks on quality of care and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Fleming, Michael F; Zakletskaia, Larissa I; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Beasley, John W

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. Primary care teams can be best suited to improve quality of care and lower costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the associations between primary care team communication, interaction, and coordination (ie, social networks); quality of care; and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. Using a sociometric survey, 155 health professionals from 31 teams at 6 primary care clinics identified with whom they interact daily about patient care. Social network analysis calculated variables of density and centralization representing team interaction structures. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between team network density, centralization, and number of patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease for controlled blood pressure and cholesterol, counts of urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital days, and medical care costs in the previous 12 months. Teams with dense interactions among all team members were associated with fewer hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50-0.77) and lower medical care costs (-$556; 95% CI, -$781 to -$331) for patients with cardiovascular disease. Conversely, teams with interactions revolving around a few central individuals were associated with increased hospital days (RR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09-1.94) and greater costs ($506; 95% CI, $202-$810). Team-shared vision about goals and expectations mediated the relationship between social network structures and patient quality of care outcomes. Primary care teams that are more interconnected and less centralized and that have a shared team vision are better positioned to deliver high-quality cardiovascular disease care at a lower cost. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  14. [Screening for bipolar disorder in primary care patients with psychological symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Escobar-Rabadán, Francisco; Téllez-Lapeira, Juan; Mínguez, José; Párraga, Ignacio; Suárez-Hernández, Tatiana; Piñero, María José; Guzón, Marta-Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of positive results in the screening of bipolar disorder (BD) among primary care patients presenting with psychological symptoms, and to analyze their characteristics. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Nineteen Primary Care clinics in different Spanish regions. A total of 360 consecutive primary care patients aged 18 to 70, presenting with psychological symptoms. Screening for BP was performed by means of the Mood Disorders Questionnaire. Data on quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and functional impairment (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained. Data on psychiatric comorbidity and data on the use of psychotropic medication were acquired by review of medical records. Of the patients screened, 11.9% were positive (95%CI: 8.8%-15.7%). Only two patients had a diagnosis of BP in their clinical records and, although more than half received treatment with antidepressants, only two received treatment with mood stabilizers. Positive screening is associated with work, social and family dysfunction, greater perceived stress and poor quality of life. BD screening in primary care patients with psychological problems leads to a striking proportion of positive results, indicating that there may be a significant prevalence of BP patients, most of them undiagnosed and untreated. Further research is needed to determine the role that Primary Care can or should assume in the screening, diagnosis and management of this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. General practitioners' and district nurses' conceptions of the encounter with obese patients in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Finn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care specialists have a key role in the management of obesity. Through understanding how they conceive the encounter with patients with obesity, treatment may be improved. The aim of this study was thus to explore general practitioners' and district nurses' conceptions of encountering patients with obesity in primary health care. Method Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analysed using a phenomenographic approach. The participants were 10 general practitioners (6 women, 4 men and 10 district nurses (7 women, 3 men from 19 primary health care centres within a well-defined area of Sweden. Results Five descriptive categories were identified: Adequate primary health care, Promoting lifestyle change, Need for competency, Adherence to new habits and Understanding patient attitudes. All participants, independent of gender and profession, were represented in the descriptive categories. Some profession and gender differences were, however, found in the underlying conceptions. The general staff view was that obesity had to be prioritised. However, there was also the contradictory view that obesity is not a disease and therefore not the responsibility of primary health care. Despite this, staff conceived it as important that patients were met with respect and that individual solutions were provided which could be adhered to step-by-step by the patient. Patient attitudes, such as motivation to change, evasive behaviour, too much trust in care and lack of self-confidence, were, however, conceived as major barriers to a fruitful encounter. Conclusions Findings from this study indicate that there is a need for development and organisation of weight management in primary health care. Raising awareness of staff's negative views of patient attitudes is important since it is likely that it affects the patient-staff relationship and staff's treatment efforts. More research is also needed on gender and

  16. Getting on with your computer is associated with job satisfaction in primary care: entrants to primary care should be assessed for their competency with electronic patient record systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction in primary care is associated with getting on with your computer. Many primary care professionals spend longer interacting with their computer than anything else in their day. However, the computer often makes demands rather than be an aid or supporter that has learned its user’s preferences. The use of electronic patient record (EPR systems is underrepresented in the assessment of entrants to primary care, and in definitions of the core competencies of a family physician/general practitioner. We call for this to be put right: for the use of the EPR to support direct patient care and clinical governance to be given greater prominence in training and assessment. In parallel, policy makers should ensure that the EPR system use is orientated to ensuring patients receive evidence-based care, and EPR system suppliers should explore how their systems might better support their clinician users, in particular learning their preferences.

  17. Getting on with your computer is associated with job satisfaction in primary care: entrants to primary care should be assessed for their competency with electronic patient record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Pearce, Christopher; Munro, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Job satisfaction in primary care is associated with getting on with your computer. Many primary care professionals spend longer interacting with their computer than anything else in their day. However, the computer often makes demands rather than be an aid or supporter that has learned its user's preferences. The use of electronic patient record (EPR) systems is underrepresented in the assessment of entrants to primary care, and in definitions of the core competencies of a family physician/general practitioner. We call for this to be put right: for the use of the EPR to support direct patient care and clinical governance to be given greater prominence in training and assessment. In parallel, policy makers should ensure that the EPR system use is orientated to ensuring patients receive evidence-based care, and EPR system suppliers should explore how their systems might better support their clinician users, in particular learning their preferences.

  18. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  19. Mixed dyslipidemias in primary care patients in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Laurent; Ambegaonkar, Baishali M; Souchet, Thierry; Sazonov, Vasilisa; Van Ganse, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of single and mixed dyslipidemias among patients treated with statins in clinical practice in France. Methods This is a prospective, observational, cross-sectional, pharmacoepidemiologic study with a total of 2544 consecutive patients treated with a statin for at least 6 months. Main outcome measures Prevalence of isolated and mixed dyslipidemias of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides among all patients and among patients at high cardiovascular risk; clinical variables associated with attainment of lipid targets/normal levels in French national guidelines. Results At least one dyslipidemia was present in 50.8% of all patients and in 71.1% of high-risk patients. Dyslipidemias of LDL-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides were present in 27.7%, 12.4%, and 28.7% of all patients, respectively, and in 51.0%, 18.2%, and 32.5% of high-risk patients, respectively. Among all subjects with any dyslipidemia, 30.9% had mixed dyslipidemias and 69.4% had low HDL-C and/or elevated triglycerides, while 30.6% had isolated elevated LDL-C; corresponding values for high-risk patients were 36.8%, 58.9%, and 41.1%. Age, gender, body mass index and Framingham Risk Score >20% were the factors significantly associated with attainment of normal levels for ≥2 lipid levels. Conclusions At least one dyslipidemia persisted in half of all patients and two-thirds of high cardiovascular risk patients treated with a statin. Dyslipidemias of HDL-C and/or triglycerides were as prevalent as elevated LDL-C among high cardiovascular risk patients. PMID:22566746

  20. Capitated payments to primary care providers and the delivery of patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William S; King, Dana E; Richards, Chesley

    2013-01-01

    Patient education is a critical component of the patient-centered medical home and is a powerful and effective tool in chronic disease management. However, little is known about the effect of practice payment on rates of patient education during office encounters. For this study we took data from the 2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. This was a cross-sectional analysis of patient visits to primary care providers to determine whether practice payment in the form of capitated payments is associated within patient education being included more frequently during office visits compared with other payment methods. In a sample size of 9863 visits in which capitation status was available and the provider was the patient's primary care provider, the weighted percentages of visits including patient education were measured as a percentages of education (95% confidence intervals): 75% capitation, 74.0% (52.2-88.1). In an adjusted logistic model controlling for new patients (yes/no), number of chronic conditions, number of medications managed, number of previous visits within the year, and age and sex of the patients, the odds of receiving education were reported as odds ratios (95% confidence intervals): 75% capitation, 3.38 (1.23-9.30). Patients are more likely to receive education if their primary care providers receive primarily capitated payment. This association is generally important for health policymakers constructing payment strategies for patient populations who would most benefit from interventions that incorporate or depend on patient education, such as populations requiring management of chronic diseases.

  1. The patient-centered medical home neighbor: A primary care physician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsky, Christine A

    2011-01-04

    The American College of Physicians' position paper on the patient-centered medical home neighbor (PCMH-N) extends the work of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a means of improving the delivery of health care. Recognizing that the PCMH does not exist in isolation, the PCMH-N concept outlines expectations for comanagement, communication, and care coordination and broadens responsibility for safe, effective, and efficient care beyond primary care to include physicians of all specialties. As such, it is a fitting follow-up to the PCMH and moves further down the road toward improved care for complex patients. Yet, there is more work to be done. Truly transforming the U.S. health care system around personalized medical homes embedded in highly functional medical neighborhoods will require better staffing models; more robust electronic information tools; aligned incentives for quality and efficiency within payment and regulatory policies; and a culture of greater engagement of patients, their families, and communities.

  2. Foot examinations of diabetes patients by primary health care nurses in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy; Stewart, Alistair; Scragg, Robert

    2014-07-01

    To identify factors associated with patients receiving foot examinations by primary health care nurses. A cross-sectional survey of 287 randomly sampled primary health care nurses, from a total of 1091 in Auckland, completed a postal self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview. Biographical and diabetes management details were collected for 265 diabetes patients consulted by the nurses on a randomly selected day. A response rate of 86% was achieved. Nurses examined patient's feet in 46% of consultations. Controlling for demographic variables, foot examinations were associated with age, odds ratio (1.25, 95% CI 0.57-2.74) for patients aged 51-65 years and >66 years (2.50, 1.08-5.75) compared with those ≤50 years, consultations by district compared with practice nurses (14.23, 95% CI 3.82-53.05), special programme consultations compared with usual follow-up consults (8.81, 95% CI 2.99-25.93) and length of consultation (1.89, 0.72-4.97) for 15-30 min and (4.45, 95% CI 1.48-13.41) >30 min compared with consultations ≤15 min, or for wound care (2.58, 1.01-6.61). Diabetes foot examinations by primary health care nurses varies greatly, and are associated with characteristics of the patient (age, need for wound care) and the consultation (district nurses, diabetes programme and duration). Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Obesity in primary care: a qualitative synthesis of patient and practitioner perspectives on roles and responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a top-priority global health issue; however, a clear way to address obesity in primary care is not yet in view. To conduct a meta-ethnography of patient and primary care practitioner perspectives of roles and responsibilities in how to address obesity in the UK, to inform evidence-based services that are acceptable to, and appropriate for, patients and practitioners. Qualitative synthesis applying meta-ethnographic methods according to the Noblit and Hare monograph. Database searches in MEDLINE(®), Social Sciences Citation Index(®), CINAHL, and Health Management Information Consortium were limited to 1997-2012 to examine recent perspectives. Full articles of practitioner and/or patient perspectives on obesity services in primary care were reviewed, and included semi-structured or unstructured interviews and focus groups, and participant observations. Nine studies were synthesised with perspectives from patients (n = 105) and practitioners (n = 144). Practitioners believe that patients are responsible for obesity, and that primary care should not help, or is poorly equipped to do so. Patients 'take responsibility' by 'blaming' themselves, but feel that practitioners should demonstrate more leadership. The empowerment of patients to access health services is reliant on the empowerment of practitioners to take an unambiguous position. Primary care has the potential either to perpetuate or counter obesity-related stigma. There needs to be a firm decision as to what role primary care will take in the prevention and treatment of obesity. To remain ambiguous runs the risk of losing patients' confidence and adding to a growing sense of futility. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  4. A shared computer-based problem-oriented patient record for the primary care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnarsson, R; Nordgren, K

    1995-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION. A computer-based patient record (CPR) system, Swedestar, has been developed for use in primary health care. The principal aim of the system is to support continuous quality improvement through improved information handling, improved decision-making, and improved procedures for quality assurance. The Swedestar system has evolved during a ten-year period beginning in 1984. 2. SYSTEM DESIGN. The design philosophy is based on the following key factors: a shared, problem-oriented patient record; structured data entry based on an extensive controlled vocabulary; advanced search and query functions, where the query language has the most important role; integrated decision support for drug prescribing and care protocols and guidelines; integrated procedures for quality assurance. 3. A SHARED PROBLEM-ORIENTED PATIENT RECORD. The core of the CPR system is the problem-oriented patient record. All problems of one patient, recorded by different members of the care team, are displayed on the problem list. Starting from this list, a problem follow-up can be made, one problem at a time or for several problems simultaneously. Thus, it is possible to get an integrated view, across provider categories, of those problems of one patient that belong together. This shared problem-oriented patient record provides an important basis for the primary care team work. 4. INTEGRATED DECISION SUPPORT. The decision support of the system includes a drug prescribing module and a care protocol module. The drug prescribing module is integrated with the patient records and includes an on-line check of the patient's medication list for potential interactions and data-driven reminders concerning major drug problems. Care protocols have been developed for the most common chronic diseases, such as asthma, diabetes, and hypertension. The patient records can be automatically checked according to the care protocols. 5. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE. The Swedestar system has been implemented in a

  5. Patient safety in primary care: a survey of general practitioners in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general practitioners (GPs on patient safety were examined. Methods A web-based survey of a sample of GPs was undertaken. The items were derived from aspects of patient safety issues identified in a prior interview study. The questionnaire used 10 clinical cases and 15 potential risk factors to explore GPs' views on patient safety. Results A total of 68 GPs responded (51.5% response rate. None of the clinical cases was uniformly judged as particularly safe or unsafe by the GPs. Cases judged to be unsafe by a majority of the GPs concerned either the maintenance of medical records or prescription and monitoring of medication. Cases which only a few GPs judged as unsafe concerned hygiene, the diagnostic process, prevention and communication. The risk factors most frequently judged to constitute a threat to patient safety were a poor doctor-patient relationship, insufficient continuing education on the part of the GP and a patient age over 75 years. Language barriers and polypharmacy also scored high. Deviation from evidence-based guidelines and patient privacy in the reception/waiting room were not perceived as risk factors by most of the GPs. Conclusion The views of GPs on safety and risk in primary care did not completely match those presented in published papers and policy documents. The GPs in the present study judged a broader range of factors than in previously published research on patient safety in primary care, including a poor doctor-patient relationship, to pose a potential threat to patient safety. Other risk factors such as infection prevention, deviation from guidelines and incident reporting were judged to be less relevant than by policy

  6. Patient safety in primary care: a survey of general practitioners in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaal, Sander; Verstappen, Wim; Wensing, Michel

    2010-01-21

    Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general practitioners (GPs) on patient safety were examined. A web-based survey of a sample of GPs was undertaken. The items were derived from aspects of patient safety issues identified in a prior interview study. The questionnaire used 10 clinical cases and 15 potential risk factors to explore GPs' views on patient safety. A total of 68 GPs responded (51.5% response rate). None of the clinical cases was uniformly judged as particularly safe or unsafe by the GPs. Cases judged to be unsafe by a majority of the GPs concerned either the maintenance of medical records or prescription and monitoring of medication. Cases which only a few GPs judged as unsafe concerned hygiene, the diagnostic process, prevention and communication. The risk factors most frequently judged to constitute a threat to patient safety were a poor doctor-patient relationship, insufficient continuing education on the part of the GP and a patient age over 75 years. Language barriers and polypharmacy also scored high. Deviation from evidence-based guidelines and patient privacy in the reception/waiting room were not perceived as risk factors by most of the GPs. The views of GPs on safety and risk in primary care did not completely match those presented in published papers and policy documents. The GPs in the present study judged a broader range of factors than in previously published research on patient safety in primary care, including a poor doctor-patient relationship, to pose a potential threat to patient safety. Other risk factors such as infection prevention, deviation from guidelines and incident reporting were judged to be less relevant than by policy makers.

  7. Assessing Patients' Preference for Integrating Herbal Medicine Within Primary Care Services in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Safaa; Moharam, Maha; Alarfaj, Gada

    2014-07-01

    Family physician advice and follow-up may be important to reduce the negative aspects of locally marketed herbal remedies and improve the patient outcome. There is a lack of studies assessing the preference of Saudi patients for the integration of herbal medicine into primary care services. To examine the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of Saudi patients toward herbal medicine and its integration into primary care services. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and March 2013 among adult patients attending the family medicine clinics at a primary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire (27 items) was developed and administered to all patients. A total of 240 patients were included in the current analysis. The average age was 33.5 ± 9.9 years, and 61% of the patients were women. Approximately 60% of the patients were aware of herbal medicine use and its possible side effects. More than 85% of the patients believed that herbal containers should be labeled with safety information. Approximately 71% of the patients had a favorable attitude toward integrated services. Approximately 65% of the patients used herbal remedies for themselves, and 42% used them for their children. Preference for integrated services was significantly associated with female sex, better knowledge, positive attitudes toward safety and regulations, and higher level of practice. A good knowledge and a very favorable attitude toward integrating herbal medicine into primary care services were found among a group of patients attending a primary care center in Saudi Arabia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Identifying drivers of overall satisfaction in patients receiving HIV primary care: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to understand the drivers of overall patient satisfaction in a predominantly low-income, ethnic-minority population of HIV primary care patients. The study's primary aims were to determine 1 the component experiences which contribute to patients' evaluations of their overall satisfaction with care received, and 2 the relative contribution of each component experience in explaining patients' evaluation of overall satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 489 adult patients receiving HIV primary care at two clinics in Houston, Texas, from January 13-April 21, 2011. The participation rate among eligible patients was 94%. The survey included 15 questions about various components of the care experience, 4 questions about the provider experience and 3 questions about overall care. To ensure that the survey was appropriately tailored to our clinic population and the list of component experiences reflected all aspects of the care experience salient to patients, we conducted in-depth interviews with key providers and clinic staff and pre-tested the survey instrument with patients. RESULTS: Patients' evaluation of their provider correlated the strongest with their overall satisfaction (standardized β = 0.445, p<0.001 and accounted for almost half of the explained variance. Access and availability, like clinic hours and ease of calling the clinic, also correlated with overall satisfaction, but less strongly. Wait time and parking, despite receiving low patient ratings, did not correlate with overall satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-provider relationship far exceeds other component experiences of care in its association with overall satisfaction. Our study suggests that interventions to improve overall patient satisfaction should focus on improving patients' evaluation of their provider.

  9. Patient-focused quality improvement in primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Secondary analyses of data obtained from a cross-sectional national representative exit survey of patients' experiences of PHC which was conducted with the PES. The PES QUALISTAT is an array of analytic procedures and approaches for presenting data on PHC performance. Colour coding of performance (red ...

  10. Patient and Physician Characteristics Associated with the Provision of Weight Loss Counseling in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Gareth R.; Herman, Katharine G.; Tan, Fei; Goble, Mary; Dancer-Brown, Melissa; Van Vessem, Nancy; Ard, Jamy D.

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of physician and patient characteristics may influence whether weight loss counseling occurs in primary care encounters. Objectives This study utilized a cross-sectional survey of primary care patients, which examined patient characteristics, physician characteristics, and characteristics of the physician-patient relationship associated with weight loss counseling and recommendations provided by physicians. Participants Participants (N=143, mean age=46.8 years, mean BMI=36.9 kg/m2, 65% Caucasian) were overweight and obese primary care patients participating in a managed care weight loss program. Measures Participants completed self-report surveys in the clinic prior to the initial weight loss session. Surveys included items assessing demographic/background characteristics, weight, height, and a health care questionnaire evaluating whether their physician had recommended weight loss, the frequency of their physicians’ weight loss counseling, and whether their physician had referred them for obesity treatment. Results Patient BMI and physician sex were most consistently associated with physicians’ weight loss counseling practices. Patients seen by female physicians were more likely to be told that they should lose weight, received more frequent obesity counseling, and were more likely to have been referred for obesity treatment by their physician. Length and frequency of physician-patient contacts were unrelated to the likelihood of counseling. Conclusions These findings add to previous evidence suggesting possible differences in the weight loss counseling practices of male and female physicians, although further research is needed to understand this potential difference between physicians. PMID:24743007

  11. Perspectives on Providing And Receiving Preventive Health Care From Primary Care Providers and Their Patients With Mental Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbo, Scott P; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Yarborough, Micah T; Green, Carla A

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with mental illnesses have higher morbidity rates and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. Understanding how patients and providers perceive the need for prevention, as well as the barriers and beliefs that may contribute to insufficient care, are important for improving service delivery tailored to this population. Cross-sectional; mixed methods. An integrated health system and a network of federally qualified health centers and safety net clinics. Interviews (n = 30) and surveys (n = 249) with primary care providers. Interviews (n = 158) and surveys (n = 160) with patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety, or major depressive disorders. Semi-structured interviews and surveys. Thematic analysis for qualitative data; frequencies for quantitative data. More than half (n = 131, 53%) of clinicians believed patients with mental illnesses care less about preventive care than the general population, yet 88% (n = 139) of patients reported interest in improving health. Most providers (n = 216, 88%) lacked confidence that patients with mental illnesses would follow preventive recommendations; 82% (n = 129) of patients reported they would try to change lifestyles if their doctor recommended. Clinicians explained that their perception of patients' chaotic lives and lack of interest in preventive care contributed to their fatalistic attitudes on care delivery to this population. Clinicians and patients agreed on substantial need for additional support for behavior changes. Clinicians reported providing informational support by keeping messages simple; patients reported a desire for more detailed information on reasons to complete preventive care. Patients also detailed the need for assistive and tangible support to manage behavioral health changes. Our results suggest a few clinical changes could help patients complete preventive care recommendations and improve health behaviors: improving clinician-patient collaboration on

  12. Proactive penicillin allergy testing in primary care patients labeled as allergic: outcomes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Britta K; Bowen, Brady J; Otabor, Uwa; Celestin, Jocelyn; Sorum, Paul C

    2017-11-01

    To promote penicillin allergy testing in an outpatient setting in patients labeled as penicillin allergic, to determine the number of those who are truly allergic, evaluate patient satisfaction with the testing, and educate both patients and clinicians about testing. Patients with a history of penicillin allergy listed in their EHR were screened and recruited by their primary care office and referred for penicillin allergy testing. The results of allergy testing and patient satisfaction after testing were the main outcomes. We also surveyed the primary care physicians about perceived barriers to recruitment. A total of 82 patients were recruited, although only 37 actually underwent testing. None of these 37 had a positive skin test, and none of 36 had a positive oral challenge (1 refused it). Following testing, 2 patients (5%) had subjective reactions within 24 h. Thirty-one patients (84%) responded to a post-testing follow-up questionnaire; 3 (10%) were subsequently treated with a beta-lactam, and all reported that testing provided important information to their medical history. Providers identified time constraints, either their or their patients lack of time, as the major barrier to recruitment. Penicillin allergy testing safely evaluates patients labeled as penicillin allergic. It is well tolerated, and embraced by the patients who undergo testing. In our study, none of the patients tested had an allergic reaction, but we identified multiple barriers to developing a protocol for testing patients from the primary care setting.

  13. Prospects for rebuilding primary care using the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Bruce E; Gill, James M; Antonelli, Richard C; Rich, Eugene C

    2010-05-01

    Existing research suggests that models of enhanced primary care lead to health care systems with better performance. What the research does not show is whether such an approach is feasible or likely to be effective within the U.S. health care system. Many commentators have adopted the model of the patient-centered medical home as policy shorthand to address the reinvention of primary care in the United States. We analyze potential barriers to implementing the medical home model for policy makers and practitioners. Among others, these include developing new payment models, as well as the need for up-front funding to assemble the personnel and infrastructure required by an enhanced non-visit-based primary care practice and methods to facilitate transformation of existing practices to functioning medical homes.

  14. Internet use by primary care patients: where is the digital divide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robin L; Koopman, Richelle J; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Wakefield, Douglas S; Keplinger, Lynn E; Canfield, Shannon M; Mehr, David R

    2012-05-01

    Internet-based technologies such as personal health records and patient portals are increasingly viewed as essential for enhancing patient-provider communication and patient-centered care. We examined how primary care patients use the Internet, particularly patient characteristics associated with Internet use. We surveyed patients in five primary care clinic waiting rooms. Patients who had used email or the Internet in the past month (Internet users) were asked how often they used a computer for a variety of tasks. Participants who reported not using the Internet were asked about several potential barriers to Internet use. We approached 713 patients, and 638 (89.6%) completed questionnaires; 499 (78%) were Internet users and 139 (22%) were non-users. Lack of computer access and not knowing how to use email or the Internet were the most common barriers to Internet use. Younger age, higher education and income, better health, and absence of a chronic illness were associated with Internet use. After controlling for age and other variables, chronic illness was no longer associated with Internet use. Internet use was high among our primary care patients. The major factor associated with Internet use among patients with chronic conditions was their age. If older adults with chronic illness are to reap the benefits of health information technology, their Internet access will need to be improved. Institutions that are planning to offer consumer health information technology should be aware of groups with lower Internet access.

  15. What patients think about choice in healthcare? A study on primary care services in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Elovainio, Marko; Tynkkynen, Liina-Kaisa; Reissell, Eeva; Vehko, Tuulikki; Chydenius, Miisa; Sinervo, Timo

    2017-09-01

    The ongoing Finnish health and social service reform will expand choice by opening the market for competition between public and private service providers. This study examined the attitudes of primary care patients towards choice and which patient-related factors are associated with these attitudes. A sample of attenders during one week in health centres of 12 big cities and municipal consortiums (including seven outsourced local units) and in primary care units of one private company providing outsourced services for municipalities (aged 18-95, n=8128) was used. The questionnaire included questions on choice-related attitudes, sociodemographic factors, health status, use of health services and patient satisfaction. Of the responders, 77% regarded choice to be important, 49% perceived genuine opportunities to make choices and 35% were satisfied with the choice-relevant information. Higher age, low education, having a chronic illness, frequent use of services, having a personal physician and being satisfied with the physician and with waiting times were related to assigning more importance on choice. Younger patients, those with higher education as well as those with chronic illness regarded their opportunities of choosing the service provider and availability of choice-relevant information poorer. The Finnish primary care patients value choice, but they are critical of the availability of choice-relevant information. Choices of patients with complex health care needs should be supported by developing integrated care alternatives and by increasing the availability of information on existing care alternatives to meet their needs.

  16. What components of chronic care organisation relate to better primary care for coronary heart disease patients? An observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, J. van; Frigola Capell, E.; Ludt, S.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) received by patients shows large variation across countries. In this study we explored the aspects of primary care organisation associated with key components of CVRM in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: 273

  17. Community pharmacist intervention in depressed primary care patients (PRODEFAR study: randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travé Pere

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of depression, the most prevalent and costly mental disorder, needs to be improved. Non-concordance with clinical guidelines and non-adherence can limit the efficacy of pharmacological treatment of depression. Through pharmaceutical care, pharmacists can improve patients' compliance and wellbeing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community pharmacist intervention developed to improve adherence and outcomes of primary care patients with depression. Methods/design A randomized controlled trial, with 6-month follow-up, comparing patients receiving a pharmaceutical care support programme in primary care with patients receiving usual care. The total sample comprises 194 patients (aged between 18 and 75 diagnosed with depressive disorder in a primary care health centre in the province of Barcelona (Spain. Subjects will be asked for written informed consent in order to participate in the study. Diagnosis will be confirmed using the SCID-I. The intervention consists of an educational programme focused on improving knowledge about medication, making patients aware of the importance of compliance, reducing stigma, reassuring patients about side-effects and stressing the importance of carrying out general practitioners' advice. Measurements will take place at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Main outcome measure is compliance with antidepressants. Secondary outcomes include; clinical severity of depression (PHQ-9, anxiety (STAI-S, health-related quality of life (EuroQol-5D, satisfaction with the treatment received, side-effects, chronic physical conditions and socio-demographics. The use of healthcare and social care services will be assessed with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI. Discussion This trial will provide valuable information for health professionals and policy makers on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a pharmaceutical

  18. Barriers to patient portal access among veterans receiving home-based primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishuris, Rebecca G; Stewart, Max; Fix, Gemmae M; Marcello, Thomas; McInnes, D Keith; Hogan, Timothy P; Boardman, Judith B; Simon, Steven R

    2015-12-01

    Electronic, or web-based, patient portals can improve patient satisfaction, engagement and health outcomes and are becoming more prevalent with the advent of meaningful use incentives. However, adoption rates are low, particularly among vulnerable patient populations, such as those patients who are home-bound with multiple comorbidities. Little is known about how these patients view patient portals or their barriers to using them. To identify barriers to and facilitators of using My HealtheVet (MHV), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patient portal, among Veterans using home-based primary care services. Qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews. We conducted a content analysis informed by grounded theory. Fourteen Veterans receiving home-based primary care, surrogates of two of these Veterans, and three home-based primary care (HBPC) staff members. We identified five themes related to the use of MHV: limited knowledge; satisfaction with current HBPC care; limited computer and Internet access; desire to learn more about MHV and its potential use; and value of surrogates acting as intermediaries between Veterans and MHV. Despite their limited knowledge of MHV and computer access, home-bound Veterans are interested in accessing MHV and using it as an additional point of care. Surrogates are also potential users of MHV on behalf of these Veterans and may have different barriers to and benefits from use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Research on Patient Satisfaction with Primary Health Care in the Center of Afyonkarahisar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazli Sensoy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Patient satisfaction is an important indicator to evaluate the quality of primary health care service. It is also significant to improve the quality of medical care, expectation from health staff, priority of patient needs, views and feedbacks about medical services in primary health care. Our objective in this study is to determine the patient satisfaction and the factors effecting this aspect in the evaluation of primary health care quality. Material and Method: This research was carried out in one Mother and Child Health and Family Planning Centre and nine Health Centers in January 2009 at Afyonkarahisar center. The questionnaire was performed to investigate the degree of satisfaction about health services, and socio-demographic characteristics of patients admitted to primary health care by face to face interview method. The data was evaluated by SPSS 15.00.Results: 1227 patients participating in the study, 809 women and 418 were male, married 878, 290 were single.Their education level was 408 graduated from primary school. At the same time, their job distributions were 596 housewives, 133 retired. When the patients had health problems, the most preferable institutione was health center, the choice of the reasons they were satisfied with the services in general, determined as to obtain quick results and confidence in solving problems.75% of the patients waiting time for admission and registration procedures were 0-5minutes. The admission reasons were mostly physical examination and prescription. Patients who are male, aged above 50 years and low educated had much higher satisfaction levels. Discussion: As a result, decreased satisfaction with higher education level, satisfaction increased with increasing age and a short waiting period for the application-registration and examination procedures were being influenced patient satisfaction.

  20. [Health literacy in patients with heart failure treated in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesmases-Masana, Rosalia; González-de Paz, Luis; Real, Jordi; Borràs-Santos, Alicia; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni; Navarro-Rubio, Maria Dolors

    2017-01-01

    The level of health literacy is examined, as well as its conditioning factors in patients with heart failure who are seen routinely in a Primary Health Care Area. A multicentre cross-sectional study. 10 Primary care centres from the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Patients diagnosed with heart failure. to have visited the Primary Health Care centre in the last year, being able to arrive at the primary care setting independently, and voluntarily participation. Health Literacy Survey-European Union - Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q) and Spanish version of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale. An analysis was made of the relationships between health literacy, self-care practices, sociodemographic, and clinical variables using ANOVA test and a multiple linear regression model. The study included 318 patients (51.2% women) with a mean age of 77.9±8.7 years. The index of health literacy of 79.6% (n=253) of the participants indicated problems in understanding healthcare information. Health literacy level was explained by academic level (P<.001), the extent of heart failure (P=.032), self-care, and age (P<.04).The academic level explained 61.6% of the health of literacy (95% bootstrap: 44.58%; 46.75%). In patients with stable heart failure, it is important to consider all factors that help patients to understand the healthcare information. Health literacy explains patient self-care attitude in heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effectiveness of depression disease management for rural and urban primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Scott J; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. To explore whether a depression disease management program has a comparable impact on clinical outcomes over 2 years in patients treated in rural and urban primary care practices and whether the impact is mediated by receiving evidence-based care (antidepressant medication and specialty care counseling). A preplanned secondary analysis was conducted in a consecutively sampled cohort of 479 depressed primary care patients recruited from 12 practices in 10 states across the country participating in the Quality Enhancement for Strategic Teaming study. Depression disease management improved the mental health status of urban patients over 18 months but not rural patients. Effects were not mediated by antidepressant medication or specialty care counseling in urban or rural patients. Depression disease management appears to improve clinical outcomes in urban but not rural patients. Because these programs compete for scarce resources, health care organizations interested in delivering depression disease management to rural populations need to advocate for programs whose clinical effectiveness has been demonstrated for rural residents.

  2. Exhaled and nasal nitric oxide in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with nasal polyps in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frendø, M; Håkansson, K; Schwer, S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a common inflammatory disorder associated with lower airway disease. However, only few studies of CRSwNP from outside secondary/tertiary care centres have been published. We recently reported an asthma frequency of 44% and 65...... patients. Compared with controls, a high level of exhaled NO was significantly more prevalent in CRSwNP irrespective of asthma-status. Nasal NO was significantly lower in patients with CRSwNP compared with controls. CONCLUSION: Subclinical eosinophilic lower airway inflammation is common in CRSwNP......% in primary and secondary care patients respectively. Therefore, we hypothesise that inflammation of the lower airways could be present in all CRSwNP patients, even without asthma. Here, we assessed the degree of lower and upper airway inflammation using exhaled and nasal nitric oxide (NO) in primary care...

  3. [Primary care in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving insomnia in primary care patients: A randomized controlled trial of nurse-led group treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Christina; Hetta, Jerker; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Westman, Jeanette

    2017-07-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem, and most people who seek help for insomnia consult primary care. In primary care, insomnia treatment typically consists of hypnotic drugs, although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment. However, such treatment is currently available to few primary care patients. To evaluate the effects of a group treatment program for insomnia led by nurses in primary care. were the Insomnia Severity Index, a 2-week sleep diary, and a questionnaire on frequency of hypnotic drug use. A randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-treatment assessment and a 1-year post-treatment follow-up of the intervention group. Routine primary health care; 7 primary care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. Patients consulting primary care for insomnia were assessed for eligibility. To be included, patients had to have insomnia disorder and be 18 years or older. Patients were excluded if they if they worked night shifts or had severe untreated somatic and/or mental illness, bipolar disorder, or untreated sleep disorder other than insomnia. One-hundred and sixty-five patients 20 to 90 years were included. Most were women, and many had co-existing somatic and/or mental health problems. The post-treatment dropout rate was 20%. The intervention was a nurse-led group treatment for insomnia based on the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. The nurses had 2days of training in how to deliver the program. Ninety patients were randomized to the intervention and 75 to the control group (treatment as usual). Data from 82 in the intervention and 71 in the control group were analyzed in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Fifty-four of the 72 in the intervention group who participated in the group treatment program were followed up after 1year. Mean Insomnia Severity Index score decreased significantly from 18.4 to 10.7 after group treatment but remained unchanged after treatment as usual (17.0 to 16.6). The effect

  5. Workplace phobia, workplace problems, and work ability among primary care patients with chronic mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Work-related anxieties are frequent and have a negative effect on the occupational performance of patients and absence due to sickness. Most important is workplace phobia, that is, panic when approaching or even thinking of the workplace. This study is the first to estimate the prevalence of workplace phobia among primary care patients suffering from chronic mental disorders and to describe which illness-related or workplace-specific context factors are associated with workplace phobia. A convenience sample of 288 primary care patients with chronic mental disorders (70% women) seen by 40 primary care clinicians in Germany were assessed using a standardized diagnostic interview about mental disorders and workplace problems. Workplace phobia was assessed by the Workplace Phobia Scale and a structured Diagnostic and Statical Manual of Mental Disorders-based diagnostic interview. In addition, capacity and participation restrictions, illness severity, and sick leave were assessed. Workplace phobia was found in 10% of patients with chronic mental disorders, that is, approximately about 3% of all general practice patients. Patients with workplace phobia had longer durations of sick leave than patients without workplace phobia and were impaired to a higher degree in work-relevant capacities. They also had a higher degree of restrictions in participation in other areas of life. Workplace phobia seems to be a frequent problem in primary care. It may behoove primary care clinicians to consider workplace-related anxiety, including phobia, particularly when patients ask for a work excuse for nonspecific somatic complaints. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. in primary care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Claire van Deventer

    Keywords: child HIV, doctor involvement, primary health care, quality improvement ... expertise increased, PHC facilities are now expected to be able to .... organised patient documentation were revisited. .... Review: what can we learn from quality ... South Pacific: Review of evidence and lessons from an innovative.

  7. Quality of life in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Lai, Kelly Y C; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Hall, Brian J; Cai, Mei-Ying; Ng, Chee H; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-08-01

    In China, maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by primary care physicians. This study examined the quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care and explored the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with QOL. Altogether, 612 patients with schizophrenia treated in 22 randomly selected primary care services in China formed the study sample. QOL, psychotic and depressive symptoms, extra-pyramidal symptoms and insight were assessed using standardized instruments. Data analyses were conducted with the one sample t-test and multiple linear regression analyses. Compared with the normative data for the Chinese general population, significantly lower scores in physical and mental QOL domains were found in the patient group. Older age, being unemployed, major medical conditions, no smoking, more severe depressive and negative symptoms, more frequent insomnia, and suicidality were independently associated with poor physical QOL. Male gender, more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, more frequent insomnia, and suicidality were independently associated with poor mental QOL. Patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care had lower level of QOL in comparison with general population. Effective measures need to be implemented to improve their QOL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Is the job satisfaction of primary care team members associated with patient satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Reuschenbach, Bernd; Wensing, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a correlation between physician job satisfaction and patient satisfaction with quality of care, but the connection between job satisfaction of other primary care team members and patient satisfaction is yet unclear. Objective To evaluate whether there is an association between patient satisfaction and job satisfaction of the members of patient care teams. Design The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational design. Setting 676 primary care practices in Germany. Participants 47 168 patients, 676 general practitioners (practice principals), 305 physician colleagues (trainees and permanently employed physicians) and 3011 non-physician practice members (nurses, secretaries). Main outcome measures Patient evaluation was measured using the 23-item EUROPEP questionnaire. Job satisfaction was measured using the 10-item Warr–Cook–Wall job satisfaction scale and further items relating to practice structure. Bivariate correlations were applied in which factors of patient satisfaction and practice structure were compared with physicians and non-physicians satisfaction. Results Patient satisfaction correlates positively with the general job satisfaction of the non-physician (r=0.25, ppatient satisfaction was higher than the correlation between satisfaction of physicians and patients. Patients seem to be sensitive to aspects of practice structure. PMID:21262790

  9. Impact of educational mailing on the blood pressure of primary care patients with mild hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jacquelyn S; Siemienczuk, Joseph; Touchette, Dan; Payne, Nicola

    2004-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of mailed hypertension educational materials. Prospective, randomized, controlled single-blind trial. Primary care practice-based research network in which 9 clinics located in Portland, Oregon participated. Patients with mildly uncontrolled hypertension as defined as a last blood pressure of 140 to 159/90 to 99 mmHg from query of an electronic medical record database. Patients randomized to intervention were mailed 2 educational packets approximately 3 months apart. The first mailer included a letter from each patient's primary care provider. The mailer included a booklet providing an overview of hypertension and lifestyle modification and a refrigerator magnet noting target blood pressure. The second mailing also included a letter from the patient's primary care provider, a second educational booklet focused on medication compliance and home blood pressure monitoring, and a blood pressure logbook. The control group consisted of similar patients receiving usual care for hypertension. Patients from each group were randomly selected for invitation to participate in a study visit to measure blood pressure and complete a survey (intervention n= 162; control n= 150). No significant difference was found in mean blood pressure between intervention and control patients (135/77 mmHg vs 137/77 mmHg; P=.229). Patients in the intervention arm scored higher on a hypertension knowledge quiz (7.48 +/- 1.6 vs 7.06 +/- 1.6; P=.019), and reported higher satisfaction with several aspects of their care. No significant difference was seen in the prevalence of home blood pressure monitoring ownership or use. In patients with mildly uncontrolled hypertension, educational mailers did not yield a significant decrease in blood pressure. However, significant improvement in patient knowledge, frequency of home monitoring, and satisfaction with care were demonstrated.

  10. Detection of mental disorders with the Patient Health Questionnaire in primary care settings in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Olatawura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental disorders lead to difficulties in social, occupational and marital relations. Failure to detect mental disorder denies patients potentially effective treatment. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and nature of mental disorders at the primary care settings and the recognition of these disorders by the attending physicians. Over a period of eight weeks, consecutive and consenting patients who attended three randomly selected primary health care facilities in Sagamu Local Government Area of Ogun state were recruited and administered a questionnaire that included a socio-demographic section and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. A total of 412 subjects took part in the study. Subject age ranged from 18-90 years with a mean age of 52.50±21.08 years. One hundred and seventy- six (42.7% of the subjects were males. A total of 120 (29.1% of the subjects had depressive disorder, 100 (24.3% had anxiety disorder, 196 (47.6% somatoform disorder and 104 (25.2% met the criteria for an alcohol related problem. The PHC physicians were only able to diagnose disorders relating to mental health in 52 (12.6% of the subjects. Health and work situations accounted for more than three-quarters of the causes of stress experienced by the subjects. We conclude that there is a high prevalence of mental disorders among patients seen in primary care settings and that a significant proportion of them are not recognized by the primary care physicians. Stress relating to health, work and financial problems is common among primary health care attendees. Physicians in primary health care should be alert to the possibility and the impact of undetected psychiatric morbidity.

  11. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  12. Comprehensiveness of care from the patient perspective: comparison of primary healthcare evaluation instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Jeannie L; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Santor, Darcy A; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Beaulieu, Christine

    2011-12-01

    Comprehensiveness relates both to scope of services offered and to a whole-person clinical approach. Comprehensive services are defined as "the provision, either directly or indirectly, of a full range of services to meet most patients' healthcare needs"; whole-person care is "the extent to which a provider elicits and considers the physical, emotional and social aspects of a patient's health and considers the community context in their care." Among instruments that evaluate primary healthcare, two had subscales that mapped to comprehensive services and to the community component of whole-person care: the Primary Care Assessment Tool - Short Form (PCAT-S) and the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, a limited measure of whole-person care). To examine how well comprehensiveness is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to six instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation modelling) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance on common constructs. Over one-quarter of respondents had missing responses on services offered or doctor's knowledge of the community. The subscales did not load on a single factor; comprehensive services and community orientation were examined separately. The community orientation subscales did not perform satisfactorily. The three comprehensive services subscales fit very modestly onto two factors: (1) most healthcare needs (from one provider) (CPCI Comprehensive Care, PCAT-S First-Contact Utilization) and (2) range of services (PCAT-S Comprehensive Services Available). Individual item performance revealed several problems. Measurement of comprehensiveness is problematic, making this attribute a priority for measure development

  13. A survey of primary care resident attitudes toward continuity clinic patient handover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfer of clinic patients from graduating residents to interns or junior residents occurs every year, affecting large numbers of patients. Breaches in care continuity may occur, with potential for risk to patient safety. Several guidelines have been developed for implementing standardized inpatient sign-outs, but no specific guidelines exist for outpatient handover. Methods: Residents in primary care programs – internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics – at a US academic medical center were invited to participate in an online survey. The invitation was extended approximately 2 years after electronic medical record (EMR rollout began at the institution. Results: Of 71 eligible residents, 22 (31% responded to the survey. Of these, 18 felt that handover of ambulatory patients was at least moderately important – but only one affirmed the existence of a system for handover. IM residents perceived that they had the highest proportion of high-risk patients (p=0.042; transition-of-care letters were more important to IM residents than other respondents (p=0.041. Conclusion: There is room for improvement in resident acknowledgement of handover processes in continuity clinics. In this study, IM residents attached greater importance to a specific handover tool than other primary care residents. Thus, the different primary care specialties may need to have different handover tools available to them within a shared EMR system.

  14. Embedding online patient record access in UK primary care: a survey of stakeholder experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, Claudia; Shand, Tim; Fisher, Brian

    2012-05-01

    To explore the integration of online patient Record Access within UK Primary Care, its perceived impacts on workload and service quality, and barriers to implementation. Mixed format survey of clinicians, administrators and patients. Telephone interviews with non-users. Primary care centres within NHS England that had offered online record access for the preceding year. Of the 57 practices initially agreeing to pilot the system, 32 had adopted it and 16 of these returned questionnaires. The 42 individual respondents included 14 practice managers, 15 clinicians and 13 patients. Follow-up interviews were conducted with one participant from 15 of the 25 non-adopter practices. Most professionals believed that the system is easy to integrate within primary care; while most patients found it easy to integrate within their daily lives. Professionals perceived no increase in the volume of patient queries or clinical consultations as a result of Record Access; indeed some believed that these had decreased. Most clinicians and patients believed that the service had improved mutual trust, communication, patients' health knowledge and health behaviour. Inhibiting factors included concerns about security, liability and resource requirements. Non-adoption was most frequently attributed to competing priorities, rather than negative beliefs about the service. Record access has an important role to play in supporting patient-focused healthcare policies in the UK and may be easily accommodated within existing services. Additional materials to facilitate patient recruitment, inform system set-up processes, and assure clinicians of their legal position are likely to encourage more widespread adoption.

  15. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Marijn A; Verhaak, Peter F M; Smolders, Mirrian; Laurant, Miranda G H; van der Meer, Klaas; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Bensing, Jozien M

    2010-07-01

    To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Seven hundred and twenty-one patients with a current anxiety or depressive disorder, recruited from 67 general practitioners (GPs), were included. Diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) were made using a structured and widely validated assessment. Socio-demographic and enabling characteristics, severity of symptoms, disability, (under treatment for) chronic somatic conditions, perceived need for care, beliefs and evaluations of care were measured by questionnaires. Actual care data were derived from electronic medical records. Criteria for guideline-concordant care were based on general practice guidelines, issued by the Dutch College of General Practitioners. Two hundred and eighty-one (39%) patients received guideline-concordant care. High education level, accessibility of care, comorbidity of anxiety and depression, and severity and disability scores were positively associated with receiving guideline-concordant care in univariate analyses. In multivariate multi-level logistic regression models, significant associations with the clinical need factors disappeared. Positive evaluations of accessibility of care increased the chance (OR = 1.31; 95%-CI = 1.05-1.65; p = 0.02) of receiving guideline-concordant care, as well as perceiving any need for medication (OR = 2.99; 95%-CI = 1.84-4.85; p depression than clinical need factors. Initiatives to improve GPs' communication skills around mental health issues, and to improve recognition of people suffering from anxiety disorders, could increase the number of patients receiving treatment for depression and anxiety in primary care.

  16. Implementation of computer-based patient records in primary care: the societal health economic effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-Vimárlund, V.; Ljunggren, M.; Timpka, T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exploration of the societal health economic effects occurring during the first year after implementation of Computerised Patient Records (CPRs) at Primary Health Care (PHC) centres. DESIGN: Comparative case studies of practice processes and their consequences one year after CPR implementation, using the constant comparison method. Application of transaction-cost analyses at a societal level on the results. SETTING: Two urban PHC centres under a managed care contract in Ostergötland...

  17. Expectations for the next generation of electronic patient records in primary care: a triangulated study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Christensen

    2008-05-01

    Conclusions Progress toward a problem-oriented EPR system based on episodes of care that includes decision support is necessary to satisfy the needs expressed by GPs. Further research could solve the problem of integration of functionality for consultation with specialists and integration with patient held records. Results from this study could contribute to further development of the next generation of EPRs in primary care, as well as inspire the application of EPRs in other parts of the health sector.

  18. What causes treatment failure - the patient, primary care, secondary care or inadequate interaction in the health services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Ove

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal treatment gives complete relief of symptoms of many disorders. But even if such treatment is available, some patients have persisting complaints. One disorder, from which the patients should achieve complete relief of symptoms with medical or surgical treatment, is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Despite the fact that such treatment is cheap, safe and easily available; some patients have persistent complaints after contact with the health services. This study evaluates the causes of treatment failure. Methods Twelve patients with GERD and persistent complaints had a semi-structured interview which focused on the patients' evaluation of treatment failure. The interviews were taped, transcribed and evaluated by 18 physicians, (six general practitioners, six gastroenterologists and six gastrointestinal surgeons who completed a questionnaire for each patient. The questionnaires were scored, and the relative responsibility for the failure was attributed to the patient, primary care, secondary care and interaction in the health services. Results Failing interaction in the health services was the most important cause of treatment failure, followed by failure in primary care, secondary care and the patient himself; the relative responsibilities were 35%, 28%, 27% and 10% respectively. There was satisfactory agreement about the causes between doctors with different specialities, but significant inter-individual differences between the doctors. The causes of the failures differed between the patients. Conclusions Treatment failure is a complex problem. Inadequate interaction in the health services seems to be important. Improved communication between parts of the health services and with the patients are areas of improvement.

  19. Why do patients with cancer access out-of-hours primary care? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosalind; Wassell, Patrick; Murchie, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Identifying why patients with cancer seek out-of-hours (OOH) primary medical care could highlight potential gaps in anticipatory cancer care. To explore the reasons for contact and the range and prevalence of presenting symptoms in patients with established cancer who presented to a primary care OOH department. A retrospective review of 950 anonymous case records for patients with cancer who contacted the OOH general practice service in Grampian, Scotland between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2011. Subjects were identified by filtering the OOH computer database using the Read Codes 'neoplasm', 'terminal care', and 'terminal illness'. Consultations by patients without cancer and repeated consultations by the same patient were excluded. Data were anonymised. Case records were read independently by two authors who determined the presenting symptom(s). Anonymous case records were reviewed for 950 individuals. Eight hundred and fifty-two patients made contact because of a symptom. The remaining 97 were mostly administrative and data were missing for one patient. The most frequent symptoms were pain (n = 262/852, 30.8%); nausea/vomiting (n = 102/852, 12.0%); agitation (n = 53/852, 6.2%); breathlessness (n = 51/852, 6.0%); and fatigue (n = 48/852, 5.6%). Of the 262 patients who presented with pain, at least 127 (48.5%) had metastatic disease and 141 (53.8%) were already prescribed strong opiate medication. Almost one-third of patients with cancer seeking OOH primary medical care did so because of poorly controlled pain. Pain management should specifically be addressed during routine anticipatory care planning.

  20. Demographic and clinical characteristics of primary and secondary care patients with osteoarthritis of hip and knee are quite similar.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanson, S.; Lucas, C.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As is stated in many guidelines for patients with osteoarthritis, it is advised to treat patients conservatively before patients are referred to secondary care. Therefore, it can be expected that secondary care patietns with osteoarthritis differ from primary care patients. The purpose of

  1. Comparison of patients' experiences in public and private primary care clinics in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullicino, Glorianne; Sciortino, Philip; Calleja, Neville; Schäfer, Willemijn; Boerma, Wienke; Groenewegen, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Demographic changes, technological developments and rising expectations require the analysis of public-private primary care (PC) service provision to inform policy makers. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study using the dataset of the Maltese arm of the QUALICOPC Project to compare the PC patients' experiences provided by public-funded and private (independent) general practitioners in Malta. Seven hundred patients from 70 clinics completed a self-administered questionnaire. Direct logistic regression showed that patients visiting the private sector experienced better continuity of care with more difficulty in accessing out-of-hours care. Such findings help to improve (primary) healthcare service provision and resource allocation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Employment status, employment functioning, and barriers to employment among VA primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivin, Kara; Yosef, Matheos; Levine, Debra S; Abraham, Kristen M; Miller, Erin M; Henry, Jennifer; Nelson, C Beau; Pfeiffer, Paul N; Sripada, Rebecca K; Harrod, Molly; Valenstein, Marcia

    2016-03-15

    Prior research found lower employment rates among working-aged patients who use the VA than among non-Veterans or Veterans who do not use the VA, with the lowest reported employment rates among VA patients with mental disorders. This study assessed employment status, employment functioning, and barriers to employment among VA patients treated in primary care settings, and examined how depression and anxiety were associated with these outcomes. The sample included 287 VA patients treated in primary care in a large Midwestern VA Medical Center. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted examining associations between socio-demographic and clinical predictors of six employment domains, including: employment status, job search self-efficacy, work performance, concerns about job loss among employed Veterans, and employment barriers and likelihood of job seeking among not employed Veterans. 54% of respondents were employed, 36% were not employed, and 10% were economically inactive. In adjusted analyses, participants with depression or anxiety (43%) were less likely to be employed, had lower job search self-efficacy, had lower levels of work performance, and reported more employment barriers. Depression and anxiety were not associated with perceived likelihood of job loss among employed or likelihood of job seeking among not employed. Single VA primary care clinic; cross-sectional study. Employment rates are low among working-aged VA primary care patients, particularly those with mental health conditions. Offering primary care interventions to patients that address mental health issues, job search self-efficacy, and work performance may be important in improving health, work, and economic outcomes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Health-related quality of life in patients by COPD severity within primary care in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, P. W.; Brusselle, G.; Dal Negro, R. W.; Ferrer, M.; Kardos, P.; Levy, M. L.; Perez, T.; Soler-Cataluna, J. J.; van der Molen, T.; Adamek, L.; Banik, N.

    Pan-European data on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are lacking. This cross-sectional epidemiological study evaluated health status in 1817 COPD patients from an 'all-comers' primary care population in seven European countries (87% stable

  4. Results of a multidisciplinary program for patients with fibromyalgia implemented in the primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Bloten, H.; Oeseburg, B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of unknown origin with a high prevalence. Multimodal approaches seem to be the treatment of choice in fibromyalgia. A multidisciplinary program was developed and implemented for patients with fibromyalgia in the primary care setting. The program included education

  5. Beta-blockers and depression in elderly hypertension patients in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringoir, Lianne; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Widdershoven, Jos W. M. G.; Pouwer, Francois; Keyzer, Josephine M. L.; Romeijnders, Arnold C.; Pop, Victor J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Previous findings regarding a possible association between beta-blocker use and depression are mixed. To our knowledge there have been no studies investigating the association of beta-blockers with depression in primary care hypertension patients without previous

  6. Pharmacist medication reviews to improve safety monitoring in primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Casey E; Sokhal, Dimmy; Zeidler Schreiter, Elizabeth; Margolis, Amanda R

    2016-06-01

    Patients prescribed psychotropic medications within primary care are at risk of suboptimal monitoring. It is unknown whether pharmacists can improve medication safety through targeted monitoring of at risk populations. Access Community Health Centers implemented a quality improvement pilot project that included pharmacists on an integrated care team to provide medication reviews for patients. Aims were to determine whether inclusion of a pharmacist performing medication reviews within a primary care behavioral health (PCBH) practice is feasible and facilitates safe medication use. Pharmacists performed medication reviews of the electronic health record for patients referred for psychiatry consultation. Reviews were performed 1-3 months following consultation and focused on medications with known suboptimal monitoring rates. Reviews were documented within the EHR and routed to the primary care provider. Primary outcome measures were change in percentage up-to-date on monitoring and AIMS assessment, and at risk of experiencing drug interaction(s) between baseline and 3 months postreview. Secondary outcome was provider opinion of medication reviews collected via electronic survey. Reviews were performed for 144 patients. Three months postreview, percentage up-to-date on recommended monitoring increased 18% (p = .0001), at risk for drug interaction decreased 20% (p improved safety monitoring of psychotropic medications. Results identify key areas for improvement that other clinics considering integration of similar pharmacy services should consider. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Screening for fecal carriage of MCR-producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthy humans and primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Zurfluh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of the occurrence of the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance genes mcr-1 and mcr-2 among humans is currently sparsely studied in Western Europe. Objectives To determine the occurrence of MCR-producing Enterobacteriaceae in fecal samples of healthy humans with high occupational exposure to food and primary care patients in Switzerland. Methods Stool samples from 1091 healthy individuals and fecal swabs from 53 primary care patients were screened for polymyxin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae using LB agar containing 4 mg/L colistin. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of colistin were determined for non-intrinsic colistin-resistant isolates. Isolates were screened by PCR for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes. Results The fecal carriage rate of colistin resistant (MIC value >2 mg/l Enterobacteriaceae was 1.5% for healthy people and 3.8% for primary care patients. Isolates included Hafnia alvei (n = 9, Escherichia coli (n = 3, Enterobacter cloacae (n = 4, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1 and Raoultella ornithinolytica (n = 1. None of the isolates harbored the mcr-1 or mcr-2 genes. Conclusions There is no evidence for the presence of MCR-producers in the fecal flora of healthy people or primary care patients. Therefore, the risk of transfer of mcr genes from animals, food or the environment to humans is likely to be low in Switzerland.

  8. Identification of major cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes using primary care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen Bernardus; Voorham, Jaco; Hak, Eelko; Denig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Routine primary care data are increasingly being used for evaluation and research purposes but there are concerns about the completeness and accuracy of diagnoses and events captured in such databases. We evaluated how well patients with major cardiovascular disease (CVD) can be

  9. Risk of Lymphoma and Solid Cancer among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Primary Care Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Bertel L; Lindegaard, Hanne Merete; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    lymphoproliferative malignancies or solid cancers. These risk estimates did not change when eosinophilia, CRP, and comorbidities were included in the models. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of patients with RA of short or long duration recruited from a primary care resource, RA was not associated with an increased...

  10. Acute infective conjunctivitis in primary care: who needs antibiotics? An individual patient data meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, Joanna; Perera, Rafael; Everitt, Hazel; van Weert, Henk; Rietveld, Remco; Glasziou, Paul; Rose, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute infective conjunctivitis is a common problem in primary care, traditionally managed with topical antibiotics. A number of clinical trials have questioned the benefit of topical antibiotics for patients with acute infective conjunctivitis Aim To determine the benefit of antibiotics for the treatment of acute infective conjunctivitis in primary care and which subgroups benefit most Design An individual patient data meta-analysis Method Relevant trials were identified and individual patient data gathered for meta-analysis and subgroup analysis Results Three eligible trials were identified. Individual patient data were available from all primary care trials and data were available for analysis in 622 patients. Eighty per cent (246/308) of patients who received antibiotics and 74% (233/314) of controls were cured at day 7. There was a significant benefit of antibiotics versus control for cure at seven days in all cases combined (risk difference 0.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.01 to 0.14). Subgroups that showed a significant benefit from antibiotics were patients with purulent discharge (risk difference 0.09, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.17) and patients with mild severity of red eye (risk difference 0.10, 95% CI = 0.02 to 0.18), while the type of control used (placebo drops versus nothing) showed a statistically significant interaction (P=0.03) Conclusion Acute conjunctivitis seen in primary care can be thought of as a self-limiting condition, with most patients getting better regardless of antibiotic therapy. Patients with purulent discharge or a mild severity of red eye may have a small benefit from antibiotics. Prescribing practices need to be updated, taking into account these results PMID:22152728

  11. Directing Improvements in Primary Care Patient Experience through Analysis of Service Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson Smith, Mel; Smith, David

    2018-06-03

    To examine the influence of dimensions of service quality on patient experience of primary care. Data from the national GP Patient Survey in England 2014/15, with responses from 858,351 patients registered at 7,918 practices. Expert panel and principal component analysis helped identify relevant dimensions of service quality. Regression was then used to examine the relationships between these dimensions and reported patient experience. Aggregated scores for each practice were used, comprising the proportion of positive responses to each element of the study. Of eight service quality dimensions identified, six have statistically significant impacts on patient experience but only two have large effects. Patient experience is highly influenced by practice responsiveness and the interactions with the physician. Other dimensions have small or even slightly negative influence. Service quality provided by nurses has negligible effect on patient experience. To improve patient experience in primary health care, efforts should focus on practice responsiveness and interactions with the physician. Other areas have little influence over patient experience. This suggests a gap in patients' perspectives on health care, which has policy implications for patient education. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Stepped care for depression and anxiety: from primary care to specialized mental health care: a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a stepped care program among primary care patients with mood or anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seekles Wike

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mood and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have a large impact on the lives of the affected individuals. Therefore, optimal treatment of these disorders is highly important. In this study we will examine the effectiveness of a stepped care program for primary care patients with mood and anxiety disorders. A stepped care program is characterized by different treatment steps that are arranged in order of increasing intensity. Methods This study is a randomised controlled trial with two conditions: stepped care and care as usual, whereby the latter forms the control group. The stepped care program consists of four evidence based interventions: (1 Watchful waiting, (2 Guided self-help, (3 Problem Solving Treatment and (4 Medication and/or specialized mental health care. The study population consists of primary care attendees aged 18–65 years. Screeners are sent to all patients of the participating general practitioners. Individuals with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM diagnosis of major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia are included as well as individuals with minor depression and anxiety disorders. Primary focus is the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both conditions are monitored at 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a stepped care program for patients with depressive and anxiety disorder. If effective, a stepped care program can form a worthwhile alternative for care as usual. Strengths and limitations of this study are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610.

  13. Patients' preferences for primary health care - a systematic literature review of discrete choice experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleij, Kim-Sarah; Tangermann, Ulla; Amelung, Volker E; Krauth, Christian

    2017-07-11

    Primary care is a key element of health care systems and addresses the main health problems of the population. Due to the demographic change, primary care even gains in importance. The knowledge of the patients' preferences can help policy makers as well as physicians to set priorities in their effort to make health care delivery more responsive to patients' needs. Our objective was to describe which aspects of primary care were included in preference studies and which of them were the most preferred aspects. In order to elicit the preferences for primary care, a systematic literature search was conducted. Two researchers searched three electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO) and conducted a narrative synthesis. Inclusion criteria were: focus on primary health care delivery, discrete choice experiment as elicitation method, and studies published between 2006 and 2015 in English language. We identified 18 studies that elicited either the patients' or the population's preferences for primary care based on a discrete choice experiment. Altogether the studies used 16 structure attributes, ten process attributes and four outcome attributes. The most commonly applied structure attribute was "Waiting time till appointment", the most frequently used process attribute was "Shared decision making / professional's attention paid to your views". "Receiving the 'best' treatment" was the most commonly applied outcome attribute. Process attributes were most often the ones of highest importance for patients or the population. The attributes and attribute levels used in the discrete choice experiments were identified by literature research, qualitative research, expert interviews, or the analysis of policy documents. The results of the DCE studies show different preferences for primary health care. The diversity of the results may have several reasons, such as the method of analysis, the selection procedure of the attributes and their levels or the specific research

  14. Adherence to a Depression Self-Care Intervention among Primary Care Patients with Chronic Physical Conditions: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G.; Yaffe, Mark; Strumpf, Erin; Sewitch, Maida; Sussman, Tamara; Ciampi, Antonio; Lavoie, Kim; Belzile, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Among primary care patients with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms, to assess (1) the effect of lay telephone coaching on adherence to a psycho-educational intervention for depression, (2) demographic characteristics that predict adherence and (3) the association between adherence and 6-month outcomes. Design:…

  15. Primary care patients' perspectives of barriers and enablers of primary prevention and health promotion-a meta-ethnographic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Conejo-Cerón, Sonia; Fernández, Ana; Berenguera, Anna; Martínez-Andrés, María; Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Motrico, Emma; Rodríguez-Martín, Beatriz; Bellón, Juan A; Rubio-Valera, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Primary care (PC) patients have difficulties in committing to and incorporating primary prevention and health promotion (PP&HP) activities into their long-term care. We aimed to re-interpret, for the first time, qualitative findings regarding factors affecting PC patients' acceptance of PP&HP activities. A meta-ethnographic synthesis was generated following electronic and manual searches that retrieved 29 articles. Papers were reviewed and translated to produce a re-interpretation of the extracted concepts. The factors affecting PC patients' receptiveness to PP&HP activities were framed in a four-level ecological model (intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional and environment and society). Intrapersonal factors (patients' beliefs/attitudes, knowledge, skills, self-concept, motivation and resources) were the most numerous, with almost 25 different factors. Public health education to modify erroneous beliefs and values regarding PP&HP could encourage a transition to healthier lifestyles. Health care professionals' abilities to communicate and involve patients in the decision-making process can act as facilitators. Biopsychosocial training (with emphasis on communication skills) for health professionals must start with undergraduates. Increased consultation time, the use of reminders, follow-up visits and tools for communicating risk and motivating patients could be applied at the intrapersonal level. Collaborative care involving other health professionals (nutritionists or psychotherapists) and family and community stakeholders (teachers or gym trainers) was important in developing healthier habits. Patients also cited barriers related to the built environment and socioeconomic difficulties that highlighted the need for policies promoting social justice and equity. Encouraging PP&HP using social marketing strategies and regulating media to control its impact on health were also cited. Only the perspectives of PC patients in the context of chronic conditions were

  16. Primary care patients' perspectives of barriers and enablers of primary prevention and health promotion-a meta-ethnographic synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Moreno-Peral

    Full Text Available Primary care (PC patients have difficulties in committing to and incorporating primary prevention and health promotion (PP&HP activities into their long-term care. We aimed to re-interpret, for the first time, qualitative findings regarding factors affecting PC patients' acceptance of PP&HP activities.A meta-ethnographic synthesis was generated following electronic and manual searches that retrieved 29 articles. Papers were reviewed and translated to produce a re-interpretation of the extracted concepts. The factors affecting PC patients' receptiveness to PP&HP activities were framed in a four-level ecological model (intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional and environment and society. Intrapersonal factors (patients' beliefs/attitudes, knowledge, skills, self-concept, motivation and resources were the most numerous, with almost 25 different factors. Public health education to modify erroneous beliefs and values regarding PP&HP could encourage a transition to healthier lifestyles. Health care professionals' abilities to communicate and involve patients in the decision-making process can act as facilitators. Biopsychosocial training (with emphasis on communication skills for health professionals must start with undergraduates. Increased consultation time, the use of reminders, follow-up visits and tools for communicating risk and motivating patients could be applied at the intrapersonal level. Collaborative care involving other health professionals (nutritionists or psychotherapists and family and community stakeholders (teachers or gym trainers was important in developing healthier habits. Patients also cited barriers related to the built environment and socioeconomic difficulties that highlighted the need for policies promoting social justice and equity. Encouraging PP&HP using social marketing strategies and regulating media to control its impact on health were also cited. Only the perspectives of PC patients in the context of chronic

  17. The Knowledge Level of Hypertension Patients for Drug Therapy in the Primary Health Care of Malang

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    Hananditia R. Pramestutie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a persistent blood pressure in which systolic pressure ≥140 mmHg and diastolic pressure ≥90 mmHg. The knowledge that should be owned by patients with hypertension is the meaning, causes, symptoms and treatment of hypertension. This knowledge is important to support the success of hypertension therapy. The aim of this research was to determine the knowledge level of hypertension patients about their drug therapy in the primary health care of Malang. This research used observational study methods. The selection of the patients and the primary health care was done using non-random sampling technique (purposive sampling. The subject who meet the inclusion criteria were involved. The result of this study revealed that the patients with hypertension who have a sufficient level of knowledge were 69 respondents (72,63%. Patients who have a good criteria were 26 respondents (27,3763%. There is no patient with low level of knowledge in this research. The conclusion from this study is most patients with hypertension in Primary Health Care Malang have enough knowledge about their treatment.

  18. Primary Care Research in the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Joe V; Slutsky, Jean R

    2016-04-01

    In their article in this issue, Mazur and colleagues analyze the characteristics of early recipients of funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Mazur and colleagues note correctly that PCORI has a unique purpose and mission and suggest that it should therefore have a distinct portfolio of researchers and departments when compared with other funders such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Responding on behalf of PCORI, the authors of this Commentary agree with the characterization of PCORI's mission as distinct from that of NIH and others. They agree too that data found on PCORI's Web site demonstrate that PCORI's portfolio of researchers and departments is more diverse and more heavily populated with clinician researchers, as would be expected. The authors take issue with Mazur and colleagues' suggestion that because half of clinical visits occur within primary care settings, half of PCORI's funded research should be based in primary care departments. PCORI's portfolio reflects what patients and others tell PCORI are the critical questions. Many of these do, in fact, occur with more complex conditions in specialty care. The authors question whether the research of primary care departments is too narrowly focused and whether it sufficiently considers study of these complex conditions. Research on more complex conditions including heart failure, coronary artery disease, and multiple comorbid conditions could be highly valuable when approached from the primary care perspective, where many of the comparative effectiveness questions first arise.

  19. Chronic-disease patients and their use of out-of-hours primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flarup, Lone; Moth, Grete; Christensen, Morten Bondo

    2014-01-01

    that patients with chronic diseases are frequent users of out-of-hours primary care services (OOH), but knowledge is limited on reasons for encounter (RFE), severity of symptoms, and OOH patient handling. We aimed to describe contacts to the OOH services from patients with chronic heart disease, lung disease...... in the Central Denmark Region. A cohort of patients with one or more of the five selected chronic diseases were identified by linking data on the Danish civil registration number (CPR) through specific nationwide Danish health registers. Results Out of 13,930 identified unique patients, 4,912 had at least one...

  20. Brief assessments and screening for geriatric conditions in older primary care patients: a pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seematter-Bagnoud, Laurence; Büla, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the rationale behind performing a brief geriatric assessment as a first step in the management of older patients in primary care practice. While geriatric conditions are considered by older patients and health professionals as particularly relevant for health and well-being, they remain too often overlooked due to many patient- and physician-related factors. These include time constraints and lack of specific training to undertake comprehensive geriatric assessment. This article discusses the epidemiologic rationale for screening functional, cognitive, affective, hearing and visual impairments, and nutritional status as well as fall risk and social status. It proposes using brief screening tests in primary care practice to identify patients who may need further comprehensive geriatric assessment or specific interventions.

  1. Doctor-patient interaction in Finnish primary health care as perceived by first year medical students

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    Mäntyselkä Pekka

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Finland, public health care is the responsibility of primary health care centres, which render a wide range of community level preventive, curative and rehabilitative medical care. Since 1990's, medical studies have involved early familiarization of medical students with general practice from the beginning of the studies, as this pre-clinical familiarisation helps medical students understand patients as human beings, recognise the importance of the doctor-patient relationship and identify practicing general practitioners (GPs as role models for their professional development. Focused on doctor-patient relationship, we analysed the reports of 2002 first year medical students in the University of Kuopio. The students observed GPs' work during their 2-day visit to primary health care centres. Methods We analysed systematically the texts of 127 written reports of 2002, which represents 95.5% of the 133 first year pre-clinical medical students reports. The reports of 2003 (N = 118 and 2004 (N = 130 were used as reference material. Results Majority of the students reported GPs as positive role models. Some students reported GPs' poor attitudes, which they, however, regarded as a learning opportunity. Students generally observed a great variety of responsibilities in general practice, and expressed admiration for the skills and abilities required. They appreciated the GPs' interest in patients concerns. GPs' communication styles were found to vary considerably. Students reported some factors disturbing the consultation session, such as the GP staring at the computer screen and other team members entering the room. Working with marginalized groups, the chronically and terminally ill, and dying patients was seen as an area for development in the busy Finnish primary health care centres. Conclusion During the analysis, we discovered that medical students' perceptions in this study are in line with the previous findings about the

  2. Effects of a Video on Organ Donation Consent Among Primary Care Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J Daryl; Sullivan, Catherine; Albert, Jeffrey M; Cedeño, Maria; Patrick, Bridget; Pencak, Julie; Wong, Kristine A; Allen, Margaret D; Kimble, Linda; Mekesa, Heather; Bowen, Gordon; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2016-08-01

    Low organ donation rates remain a major barrier to organ transplantation. We aimed to determine the effect of a video and patient cueing on organ donation consent among patients meeting with their primary care provider. This was a randomized controlled trial between February 2013 and May 2014. The waiting rooms of 18 primary care clinics of a medical system in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The study included 915 patients over 15.5 years of age who had not previously consented to organ donation. Just prior to their clinical encounter, intervention patients (n = 456) watched a 5-minute organ donation video on iPads and then choose a question regarding organ donation to ask their provider. Control patients (n = 459) visited their provider per usual routine. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who consented for organ donation. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who discussed organ donation with their provider and the proportion who were satisfied with the time spent with their provider during the clinical encounter. Intervention patients were more likely than control patients to consent to donate organs (22 % vs. 15 %, OR 1.50, 95%CI 1.10-2.13). Intervention patients were also more likely to have donation discussions with their provider (77 % vs. 18 %, OR 15.1, 95%CI 11.1-20.6). Intervention and control patients were similarly satisfied with the time they spent with their provider (83 % vs. 86 %, OR 0.87, 95%CI 0.61-1.25). How the observed increases in organ donation consent might translate into a greater organ supply is unclear. Watching a brief video regarding organ donation and being cued to ask a primary care provider a question about donation resulted in more organ donation discussions and an increase in organ donation consent. Satisfaction with the time spent during the clinical encounter was not affected. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01697137.

  3. Association between health literacy and patient experience of primary care attributes: A cross-sectional study in Japan.

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    Takuya Aoki

    Full Text Available Primary care is regarded as a setting that potentially mitigate patient health literacy (HL related inequalities. However, there is a lack of evidence about influence of patient HL on the patients' perception of quality of primary care. We aimed to examine the association between HL and patient experience of primary care attributes. We conducted a cross-sectional survey, and sent questionnaires to adult residents who were randomly selected from a basic resident register in Yugawara Town, Kanagawa, Japan. We assessed HL using a 14-item Health Literacy Scale (HLS-14 and patient experience of primary care attributes using a Japanese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool (JPCAT, which comprises six domains: first contact, longitudinality, coordination, comprehensiveness (services available, comprehensiveness (services provided, and community orientation. We used a multivariable linear regression analyses to adjust individual covariates. Data were analyzed for 381 residents who had a usual source of care. After adjustment for patients' sociodemographic and health characteristics, patient HL was positively associated with the JPCAT total score (B = 4.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.27 to 8.65 for HLS-14 total score highest quartile, compared with the lowest quartile. Among primary care attributes, HL had significant associations with longitudinality and comprehensiveness (service provided. We found that HL was positively associated with patient experience of primary care attributes in Japanese people. Our findings indicated that greater efforts might be needed to improve patient-centered and tailored primary care to those with low HL.

  4. Access to primary care from the perspective of Aboriginal patients at an urban emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Annette J; Smye, Victoria L; Rodney, Patricia; Tang, Sannie Y; Mussell, Bill; O'Neil, John

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we discuss findings from an ethnographic study in which we explored experiences of access to primary care services from the perspective of Aboriginal people seeking care at an emergency department (ED) located in a large Canadian city. Data were collected over 20 months of immersion in the ED, and included participant observation and in-depth interviews with 44 patients triaged as stable and nonurgent, most of whom were living in poverty and residing in the inner city. Three themes in the findings are discussed: (a) anticipating providers' assumptions; (b) seeking help for chronic pain; and (c) use of the ED as a reflection of social suffering. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the role of the ED as well as the broader primary care sector in responding to the needs of patients affected by poverty, racialization, and other forms of disadvantage.

  5. Psychiatric symptomatology and personality in a population of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Biała

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction and objective. Psychiatric disorders (and their high rates of prevalence in primary care have been widely analyzed, but the problem of underdiagnosis remains unresolved. This becomes increasingly more important in rural health centres in the face of lack of epidemiological data from these centres. The aim of this study is focused on the relationship between general health, psychiatric symptomatology and personality characteristics in the context of an adequate diagnosis. materials and methods. 518 primary care patients in 6 Polish urban clinical centres were studied using (in order of administration: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R. results. The investigated sample was representative for urban primary care patients. The findings confirmed a significant association between neuroticism and general health. The strongest relation with current functioning and mental distress of the patients (GHQ general score was observed in case of symptoms of anxiety and insomnia. The symptoms of depression may be the most difficult to identify (psychiatric symptoms assessed using GHQ sub-scales. conclusions. According to the GHQ assumptions and confirmed by the presented study, sub-threshold psychiatric symptomatology affects the functioning of primary care patients and their general health. This correlates with personality factors. Improving adequacy of diagnosis becomes extremely important, as it may often be the only chance for appropriate therapy of mental problems for people living in rural areas due to lower availability of specialistic mental services. Further epidemiological studies concerning rural primary care and prevalence of the spectrum of mental disorders need to be conducted.

  6. Impact of a 12-week wellness coaching on self-care behaviors among primary care adult patients with prediabetes

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    Ramona S. DeJesus

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This single arm prospective study assessed the impact of individualized wellness coaching intervention for primary care patients with prediabetes on self-reported changes in physical activity level and food choices. Five hundred sixty adult patients 18 years and older with prediabetes, seen in primary care clinic, were invited to participate in 12 weeks wellness coaching sessions delivered by certified coaches. Responses from questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks were analyzed. Of 168 consented patients, 99 completed at least one coaching session; majority was elderly, female, overweight or obese. At baseline, 50% had <60 min aerobic exercise/week. At 6 and 12 weeks, average aerobic exercise time significantly increased from 117 min to 166 and 199 min respectively. Effect was sustained at 24 weeks. Success in making healthy eating choices also statistically improved from baseline. Significant effects on both activity level and eating behavior persisted even after adjusting for age, sex and baseline glucose/A1c values. Secondary outcomes of self-efficacy and quality of life likewise showed significant improvement. Results suggest that integration of wellness coaching in primary care practice among individuals at high risk for diabetes is feasible and may be useful as part of diabetes prevention management strategies in target populations. Future randomized clinical trials are needed to further explore this issue. Keywords: Wellness coaching, Primary care, Prediabetes, Preventive health, Health behavior

  7. Patient characteristics do not predict poor glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudswaard, AN; Stolk, RP; Zuithoff, P; Rutten, GEHM

    Many diabetic patients in general practice do not achieve good glycaemic control. The aim of this study was to assess which characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care predict poor glycaemic control (HbA(1c) greater than or equal to7%). Data were collected from the medical

  8. A Strength Training Program for Primary Care Patients, Central Pennsylvania, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vijay A.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Messina, Dino A.; Stuckey, Heather L.; Curry, William J.; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Sherwood, Lisa L.; Hess, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Primary care providers can recommend strength training programs to use “Exercise as Medicine,” yet few studies have examined the interest of primary care patients in these programs. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of primary care patients in central Pennsylvania. Interest in participating in free group-based strength training and weight control programs was assessed, in addition to patient demographics, medical history, and quality of life. Results Among 414 patients, most (61.0%) were aged 54 or older, and 64.0% were female. More patients were interested in a strength training program (55.3%) than in a weight control program (45.4%). Nearly three-quarters (72.8%) of those reporting 10 or more days of poor physical health were interested in a strength training program compared with 49.5% of those reporting no days of poor physical health. After adjusting for potential confounders, those reporting poorer physical health had 2.7 greater odds (95% confidence interval, 1.4–5.1) of being interested in a strength training program compared with those reporting better physical health. Patients with hypertension, diabetes, or high cholesterol were not more interested in a strength training program than those without these conditions. Conclusion Primary care practices may consider offering or referring patients to community-based strength training programs. This study observed high levels of interest in these widely available programs. Practices may also consider screening and referring those with poorer physical health, as they may be the most interested and have the most to gain from participating. PMID:24967829

  9. Privacy concerns of patients and nurse practitioners in primary care--an APRNet study.

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    Olsen, Douglas P; Dixon, Jane Karpe; Grey, Margaret; Deshefy-Longhi, Terry; Demarest, Jo Cecille

    2005-12-01

    This study explores and compares the privacy concerns of primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) and their patients. Privacy concerns were identified in separate focus groups of NPs and patients, and then parallel survey instruments were designed and administered to 27 NPs and 185 of their patients. All subjects were recruited through APRNet, a regional practice-based research network of NPs in southern New England encompassing 58 practices. Both groups demonstrated high levels of concern regarding privacy. While NPs and patients had similar levels of concern about most issues, there were some notable differences regarding breeches because of carelessness, disclosures for research, and which disorders require the most care in maintaining privacy. These results allow NPs to anticipate patient privacy concerns and to enhance trust in the clinical relationship. These results also indicate the need to educate patients regarding privacy rights and expectations.

  10. Readiness for the Patient-Centered Medical Home: structural capabilities of Massachusetts primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Safran, Dana G; Coltin, Kathryn L; Dresser, Marguerite; Schneider, Eric C

    2009-02-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a popular model for primary care reorganization, includes several structural capabilities intended to enhance quality of care. The extent to which different types of primary care practices have adopted these capabilities has not been previously studied. To measure the prevalence of recommended structural capabilities among primary care practices and to determine whether prevalence varies among practices of different size (number of physicians) and administrative affiliation with networks of practices. Cross-sectional analysis. One physician chosen at random from each of 412 primary care practices in Massachusetts was surveyed about practice capabilities during 2007. Practice size and network affiliation were obtained from an existing database. Presence of 13 structural capabilities representing 4 domains relevant to quality: patient assistance and reminders, culture of quality, enhanced access, and electronic health records (EHRs). Three hundred eight (75%) physicians responded, representing practices with a median size of 4 physicians (range 2-74). Among these practices, 64% were affiliated with 1 of 9 networks. The prevalence of surveyed capabilities ranged from 24% to 88%. Larger practice size was associated with higher prevalence for 9 of the 13 capabilities spanning all 4 domains (P < 0.05). Network affiliation was associated with higher prevalence of 5 capabilities (P < 0.05) in 3 domains. Associations were not substantively altered by statistical adjustment for other practice characteristics. Larger and network-affiliated primary care practices are more likely than smaller, non-affiliated practices to have adopted several recommended capabilities. In order to achieve PCMH designation, smaller non-affiliated practices may require the greatest investments.

  11. Insulin initiation and intensification in patients with T2DM for the primary care physician

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    Unger J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jeff UngerCatalina Research Institute, Chino, CA, USAAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is characterized by both insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. All patients with the disease require treatment to achieve and maintain the target glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C level of 6.5%–7%. Pharmacological management of T2DM typically begins with the introduction of oral medications, and the majority of patients require exogenous insulin therapy at some point in time. Primary care physicians play an essential role in the management of T2DM since they often initiate insulin therapy and intensify regimens over time as needed. Although insulin therapy is prescribed on an individualized basis, treatment usually begins with basal insulin added to a background therapy of oral agents. Prandial insulin injections may be added if glycemic targets are not achieved. Treatments may be intensified over time using patient-friendly titration algorithms. The goal of insulin intensification within the primary care setting is to minimize patients' exposure to chronic hyperglycemia and weight gain, and reduce patients' risk of hypoglycemia, while achieving individualized fasting, postprandial, and A1C targets. Simplified treatment protocols and insulin delivery devices allow physicians to become efficient prescribers of insulin intensification within the primary care arena.Keywords: diabetes, basal, bolus, regimens, insulin analogs, structured glucose testing

  12. Primary care for diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the care model for chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salci, Maria Aparecida; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein; Silva, Denise Maria Guerreiro Vieira da

    2017-03-09

    to assess the health care Primary Health Care professionals provide to diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas. qualitative study, using the theoretical framework of Complex Thinking and the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas and the methodological framework of assessment research. To collect the data, 38 interviews were held with health professionals and managers; observation of the activities by the health teams; and analysis of 25 files of people who received this care. The data analysis was supported by the software ATLAS.ti, using the directed content analysis technique. at the micro level, care was distant from the integrality of the actions needed to assist people with chronic conditions and was centered on the biomedical model. At the meso level, there was disarticulation among the professionals of the Family Health Strategy, between them and the users, family and community. At the macro level, there was a lack of guiding strategies to implement public policies for diabetes in care practice. the implementation of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas represents a great challenge, mainly needing professionals and managers who are prepared to work with chronic conditions are who are open to break with the traditional model. evaluar la atención de salud desarrollada por los integrantes de la Atención Primaria de Salud a las personas con diabetes mellitus en la perspectiva del Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas. estudio cualitativo, con referencial teórico del Pensamiento Complejo y del Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas y metodológico de la investigación evaluativa. Para recolectar los datos fueron efectuadas 38 entrevistas con profesionales de salud y gestores; observación de las actividades practicadas por los equipos de salud: y análisis de 25 archivos de personas que recibían esa atención. Los datos fueron analizados con auxilio del software

  13. Price Transparency in Primary Care: Can Patients Learn About Costs When Scheduling an Appointment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloner, Brendan; Cope, Lisa Clemans; Hempstead, Katherine; Rhodes, Karin V; Polsky, Daniel; Kenney, Genevieve M

    2017-07-01

    Cost-sharing in health insurance plans creates incentives for patients to shop for lower prices, but it is unknown what price information patients can obtain when scheduling office visits. To determine whether new patients can obtain price information for a primary care visit and identify variation across insurance types, offices, and geographic areas. Simulated patient methodology in which trained interviewers posed as non-elderly adults seeking new patient primary care appointments. Caller insurance type (employer-sponsored insurance [ESI], Marketplace, or uninsured) and plan were experimentally manipulated. Callers who were offered a visit asked for price information. Unadjusted means and regression-adjusted differences by insurance, office types, and geography were calculated. Calls to a representative sample of primary care offices in ten states in 2014: Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Texas (N = 7865). Callers recorded whether they were able to obtain a price. If not, they recorded whether they were referred to other sources for price information. Overall, 61.8% of callers with ESI were able to obtain a price, versus 89.2% of uninsured and 47.3% of Marketplace callers (P information was also more readily available in small offices and in counties with high uninsured rates. Among callers not receiving a price, 72.1% of callers with ESI were referred to other sources (billing office or insurance company), versus 25.8% of uninsured and 50.9% of Marketplace callers (P information is often unavailable for privately insured patients seeking primary care visits at the time a visit is scheduled.

  14. Patient satisfaction is biased by renovations to the interior of a primary care office: a pretest-posttest assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tièche, Raphaël; da Costa, Bruno R; Streit, Sven

    2016-08-11

    Measuring quality of care is essential to improve primary care. Quality of primary care for patients is usually assessed by patient satisfaction questionnaires. However, patients may not be able to judge quality of care without also reflecting their perception of the environment. We determined the effect that redesigning a primary care office had on patient satisfaction. We hypothesized that renovating the interior would make patients more satisfied with the quality of medical care. We performed a Pretest-Posttest analysis in a recently renovated single-practice primary care office in Grenchen, Switzerland. Before and after renovation, we distributed a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction in four domains. We chose a Likert scale (1 = very poor to 6 = very good), and 12 quality indicators, and included two consecutive samples of patients presenting at the primary care office before (n = 153) and after (n = 153) interior design renovation. Response rate was high (overall 85 %). The sample was similar to the enlisted patient collective, but the sample population was older (60 years) than the collective (52 years). Patient satisfaction was higher for all domains after the office was renovated (p patient satisfaction, including satisfaction in domains otherwise unchanged. Physician skills and patient satisfaction sometimes depend on surrounding factors that may bias the ability of patients to assess the quality of medical care. These biases should be taken into account when quality assessment instruments are designed for patients.

  15. CLINICAL FEATURES OF ACUTE FEBRILE THROMBOCYTOPAENIA AMONG PATIENTS ATTENDING PRIMARY CARE CLINICS

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    Khairani Omar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying clinical features that differentiate acute febrile thrombocytopaenia from acute febrile illness without thrombocytopaenia can help primary care physician to decide whether to order a full blood count (FBC. This is important because thrombocytopaenia in viral fever may signify more serious underlying aetiology like dengue infection.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the clinical features of acute febrile patients with thrombocytopaenia and acute febrile patients without thrombocytopaenia.Methodology: This was a clinic-based cross-sectional study from May to November 2003. Consecutive patients presenting with undifferentiated fever of less than two weeks were selected from the Primary Care Centre of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia and Batu 9 Cheras Health Clinic. Clinical features of these patients were recorded and FBC examination was done for all patients. Thrombocytopaenia was defined as platelet count <150X109/L. The odds ratio of thrombocytopaenia for each presenting symptoms was calculated.Result: Seventy-three patients participated in this study. Among them, 45.2% had thrombocytopaenia. Myalgia and headache were common among all patients. However, nausea and vomiting occurred significantly more often among patients with thrombocytopaenia than in patients with normal platelet count (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.5.Conclusion: Acute non-specific febrile patients presenting with symptoms of nausea and vomiting may have higher risk of thrombocytopaenia and should be seriously considered for FBC.

  16. Risks for depression onset in primary care elderly patients: potential targets for preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Jeffrey M; Yu, Qin; Tang, Wan; Tu, Xin; Conwell, Yeates

    2009-12-01

    Prevention of late-life depression, a common, disabling condition with often poor outcomes in primary care, requires identification of seniors at highest risk of incident episodes. The authors examined a broad range of clinical, functional, and psychosocial predictors of incident depressive episodes in a well-characterized cohort of older primary care patients. In this observational cohort study, patients age >/=65 years without current major depression, recruited from practices in general internal medicine, geriatrics, and family medicine, received annual follow-up assessments over a period of 1 to 4 years. Of 617 enrolled subjects, 405 completed the 1-year follow-up evaluation. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) determined incident major depressive episodes. Each risk indicator's predictive utility was examined by calculating the risk exposure rate, incident risk ratio, and population attributable fraction, leading to determination of the number needed to treat in order to prevent incident depression. A combination of risks, including minor or subsyndromal depression, impaired functional status, and history of major or minor depression, identified a group in which fully effective treatment of five individuals would prevent one new case of incident depression. Indicators routinely assessed in primary care identified a group at very high risk for onset of major depressive episodes. Such markers may inform current clinical care by fostering the early detection and intervention critical to improving patient outcomes and may serve as the basis for future studies refining the recommendations for screening and determining the effectiveness of preventive interventions.

  17. Physicians' professionalism at primary care facilities from patients' perspective: The importance of doctors' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Merry Indah; Prabandari, Yayi Suryo; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is the core duty of a doctor to be responsible to the society. Doctors' professionalism depicts an internalization of values and mastery of professionals' standards as an important part in shaping the trust between doctors and patients. Professionalism consists of various attributes in which current literature focused more on the perspective of the health professionals. Doctors' professionalism may influence patients' satisfaction, and therefore, it is important to know from the patients' perspectives what was expected of medical doctors' professionalism. This study was conducted to determine the attributes of physician professionalism from the patient's perspective. This was a qualitative research using a phenomenology study design. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 patients with hypertension and diabetes who had been treated for at least 1 year in primary care facilities in the city of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The results of the interview were transcribed, encoded, and then classified into categories. Communication skills were considered as the top priority of medical doctors' attributes of professionalism in the perspectives of the patients. This study revealed that communication skill is the most important aspects of professionalism which greatly affected in the process of health care provided by the primary care doctors. Doctor-patient communication skills should be intensively trained during both basic and postgraduate medical education.

  18. Patient satisfaction and side effects in primary care: An observational study comparing homeopathy and conventional medicine

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    Thurneysen André

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is part of a nationwide evaluation of complementary medicine in Switzerland (Programme Evaluation of Complementary Medicine PEK and was funded by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. The main objective of this study is to investigate patient satisfaction and perception of side effects in homeopathy compared with conventional care in a primary care setting. Methods We examined data from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2002–2003. The first study was a physician questionnaire assessing structural characteristics of practices. The second study was conducted on four given days during a 12-month period in 2002/2003 using a physician and patient questionnaire at consultation and a patient questionnaire mailed to the patient one month later (including Europep questionnaire. The participating physicians were all trained and licensed in conventional medicine. An additional qualification was required for medical doctors providing homeopathy (membership in the Swiss association of homeopathic physicians SVHA. Results A total of 6778 adult patients received the questionnaire and 3126 responded (46.1%. Statistically significant differences were found with respect to health status (higher percentage of chronic and severe conditions in the homeopathic group, perception of side effects (higher percentage of reported side effects in the conventional group and patient satisfaction (higher percentage of satisfied patients in the homeopathic group. Conclusion Overall patient satisfaction was significantly higher in homeopathic than in conventional care. Homeopathic treatments were perceived as a low-risk therapy with two to three times fewer side effects than conventional care

  19. Using the Virtual Patient to Improve the Primary Care of Traumatized Refugees

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    Richard Mollica

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Refugees who have experienced traumatic life experiences have entered into the United States’ primary health care system. Primary care providers (PCPs have limited training in their diagnoses and treatment. Assessing and caring for the health and mental health of refugees in a culturally effective way in a time limited health care environment is challenging. We conducted a study on the role of the Virtual Patient (VP as a training instrument for improving the diagnoses and treatment of refugee patients.Methods: This was a descriptive and quantitative study of PCPs at a local neighborhood health care center in Massachusetts. A sample of PCPs initially reviewed an alpha Virtual Patient refugee prototype.An improved β-VP prototype was offered in training. The PCPs performance on pre- and post-diagnosis and treatment planning was assessed after studying the β-VP. 10 PCPs studied the alpha VP prototype; an additional 14 PCPs studied the β-VP prototype (N=24. The Karolinska InstitutetVirtual Patient Learning Experience Questionnaire (KI-VP-LEQ assessed feasibility, and motivation to use the VP. A Trauma-BPPS (Trauma -Bio-Psycho-Social- Spiritual scale scale measured the PCP’s perception of the patient’s trauma history, and medical, psycho-social and spiritual domains. Pre- and post-VP training using refugee paper clinical cases was performed. Concluding telephone interviews were conducted. Analysis included qualitative methods and significance testing.Results: PCPs were receptive and motivated to use the VP in training. Prior to VP training, respondents scored highly on medical diagnosis and treatment planning (Medical domain; followed by the psychologicaldomain. Respondents scored lower on the social domain and lowest on the trauma and spiritual domains. All five domain scores significantly improved for those PCPs who devoted ≥90 minutes studying the VP. Telephone interviews conducted after training revealed PCPs felt they did

  20. Implementation of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in Adult Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Markovitz, Amanda R; Paustian, Michael L; Wise, Christopher G; El Reda, Darline K; Green, Lee A; Fetters, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There has been relatively little empirical evidence about the effects of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation on patient-related outcomes and costs. Using a longitudinal design and a large study group of 2,218 Michigan adult primary care practices, our study examined the following research questions: Is the level of, and change in, implementation of PCMH associated with medical surgical cost, preventive services utilization, and quality of care in the following year? Results indicated that both level and amount of change in practice implementation of PCMH are independently and positively associated with measures of quality of care and use of preventive services, after controlling for a variety of practice, patient cohort, and practice environmental characteristics. Results also indicate that lower overall medical and surgical costs are associated with higher levels of PCMH implementation, although change in PCMH implementation did not achieve statistical significance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Practice context affects efforts to improve diabetes care for primary care patients: a pragmatic cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, L Miriam; Dickinson, W Perry; Nutting, Paul A; Fisher, Lawrence; Harbrecht, Marjie; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Glasgow, Russell E; West, David R

    2015-04-01

    Efforts to improve primary care diabetes management have assessed strategies across heterogeneous groups of patients and practices. However, there is substantial variability in how well practices implement interventions and achieve desired outcomes. To examine practice contextual features that moderate intervention effectiveness. Secondary analysis of data from a cluster randomized trial of three approaches for implementing the Chronic Care Model to improve diabetes care. Forty small to mid-sized primary care practices participated, with 522 clinician and staff member surveys. Outcomes were assessed for 822 established patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes who had at least one visit to the practice in the 18 months following enrollment. The primary outcome was a composite measure of diabetes process of care, ascertained by chart audit, regarding nine quality measures from the American Diabetes Association Physician Recognition Program: HgA1c, foot exam, blood pressure, dilated eye exam, cholesterol, nephropathy screen, flu shot, nutrition counseling, and self-management support. Data from practices included structural and demographic characteristics and Practice Culture Assessment survey subscales (Change Culture, Work Culture, Chaos). Across the three implementation approaches, demographic/structural characteristics (rural vs. urban + .70(p = .006), +2.44(p Culture (high vs. low: -.86(p = .048), +1.71(p = .005), +.34(p = .22)), Work Culture (high vs. low: -.67(p = .18), +2.41(p Culture (high vs. low: -.24(p = .006), -.20(p = .0771), -.44(p = .0019) and Work Culture (high vs. low: +.56(p = .3160), -1.0(p = .008), -.25 (p = .0216) were associated with trajectories of change in diabetes process of care, either directly or differentially by study arm. This study supports the need for broader use of methodological approaches to better examine contextual effects on implementation and effectiveness of quality improvement interventions in primary care settings.

  2. Stakeholders' Recommendations to Improve Patient-centered "LGBTQ" Primary Care in Rural and Multicultural Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Miria; Silva-Bañuelos, Alma Rosa; Sturm, Robert; Willging, Cathleen E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals among gender/sexual minorities share experiences of stigma and discrimination, yet have distinctive health care needs influenced by ethnic/racial minority and rural realities. We collected qualitative data from lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) and queer persons across the largely rural, multicultural state of New Mexico, particularly those from understudied ethnic groups, regarding factors facilitating or impeding patient-centered primary care. The themes identified formed the basis for a statewide summit on LGBT health care guidelines and strategies for decreasing treatment gaps. Three to 15 individuals, ages 18 to 75 years, volunteered for 1 of 4 town hall dialogues (n = 32), and 175 people took part in the summit. Participants acknowledged health care gaps pertinent to LGBT youth, elders, American Indians, and Latinos/Latinas, expressing specific concern for rural residents. This preliminary research emphasizes the need to improve primary care practices that treat rural and ethnic-minority LGBT people and offers patient-driven recommendations to enhance care delivery while clinic-level transformations are implemented. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. Patterns of and reasons for electronic cigarette use in primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhoran, Sara; Alvarado, Nicholas; Vijayaraghavan, Maya; Lum, Paula J; Yuan, Patrick; Satterfield, Jason M

    2017-10-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is rising in both the general and clinical populations. Little is known about e-cigarette use in primary care, where physicians report discussing e-cigarette use with patients. Identify how and why smokers in primary care use e-cigarettes. Cross-sectional secondary data analysis from a randomized controlled trial of a tablet intervention to deliver the 5As for smoking cessation in primary care. Current smokers aged 18 and older in three primary care clinics in San Francisco, CA (N = 788). Patients reported sociodemographics, cigarette smoking habits, quitting readiness, and ever and current use of e-cigarettes. We also asked reasons they have used or would use e-cigarettes. ICD-9 codes from the medical record determined comorbidities. Fifty-two percent (n = 408) of patients reported ever using an e-cigarette, and 20% (n = 154) reported past-30-day use. Ever e-cigarette use was associated with younger age and negatively associated with being seen at practices at a public safety-net hospital compared to a practice at University-affiliated hospital. The most common reason for having used e-cigarettes among ever e-cigarette users, and for interest in future use of e-cigarettes among never e-cigarette users, was to cut down cigarette use. The mean number of days of e-cigarette use in the past 30 increased with duration of e-cigarette use. Most current e-cigarette users did not know the nicotine content of their e-cigarettes. Over half of smokers in primary care have ever used e-cigarettes, and one-fifth are currently using them. Most reported using e-cigarettes to cut down or quit cigarettes. Primary care providers should be prepared to discuss e-cigarettes with patients. Screening for e-cigarette use may help identify and treat patients interested in changing their cigarette smoking habits.

  4. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psoriasis risk in patients with type 2 diabetes in German primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Kostev, Karel

    2017-02-01

    To analyze psoriasis risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients treated in German primary care practices. The study included 87,964 T2DM patients aged 40 years or over who received their initial diabetes diagnosis between 2004 and 2013. Patients were excluded if they had been diagnosed with psoriasis prior to diabetes diagnosis or if the observation period prior to the index date was less than 365 days. After applying these exclusion criteria, 72,148 T2DM patients were included. A total of 72,148 non-diabetic controls were matched (1:1) to T2DM cases based on age, gender, type of health insurance (private or statutory), number of medical visits, and index date. The primary outcome was the diagnosis of psoriasis. Skin infections, dermatitis/eczema, hyperlipidemia, and medications associated with psoriasis (beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, lithium, antimalarials, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and benzodiazepines) were included as potential confounders. The mean age was 68.7 years (SD=12.7 years) and 48.6% of subjects were men. Hyperlipidemia, dermatitis/eczema, and skin infections were more frequent in T2DM patients than in controls. Beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were also more commonly used in people with T2DM than in controls. A total of 3.4% of T2DM patients and 2.8% of matched controls developed psoriasis within ten years of follow-up (p-value risk of developing psoriasis than controls (HR=1.18, 95% CI: 1.08-1.29). T2DM was positively associated with psoriasis in patients treated in German primary care practices. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient satisfaction with out-of-hours primary care in the Netherlands

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    Zwietering PJ

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years out-of-hours primary care in the Netherlands has changed from practice-based to large-scale cooperatives. The purpose of this study is to determine patient satisfaction with current out-of-hours care organised in general practitioner (GP cooperatives, and gain insight in factors associated with this satisfaction. Methods From March to June 2003, 2805 questionnaires were sent to patients within three weeks after they had contacted the GP cooperative in their region. The study was conducted in the province of Limburg in the South of the Netherlands. One-third of these questionnaires was sent to patients who had only received telephone advice, one-third to patients who attended the GP cooperative for consultation, and one-third to patients who received a home visit. Four weeks after the first reminder, a non-respondents telephone interview was performed among a random sample of 100 patients. Analyses were performed with respect to the type of consultation. Results The total response was 42.4% (1160/2733. Sixty-seven percent of patients who received telephone advice only reported to be satisfied with out-of-hours care. About 80% of patients who went to the GP cooperative for consultation or those receiving a home visit, reported to be satisfied. Factors that were strongly associated with overall satisfaction included, the doctor's assistant's attitude on the phone, opinion on GP's treatment, and waiting time. Conclusion Patients seem generally satisfied with out-of-hours primary care as organised in GP cooperatives. However, patients who received telephone advice only are less satisfied compared to those who attended the GP cooperative or those who received a home visit.

  7. Counting the cost of social disadvantage in primary care: retrospective analysis of patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, A; Rea, J N; Ben-Shlomo, Y

    1997-01-04

    To cost the relation between socioeconomic status and various measures of primary care workload and assess the adequacy of current "deprivation" payments in relation to actual costings for patients living in qualifying areas. Retrospective data on primary care were collected over a 4.5 year period from both computerised and manually filed records. Standardised data on socioeconomic status were obtained by postal questionnaire. Inner city group practice with a socioeconomically diverse population. 382 male and female subjects of all ages, with a total of 1296 person years of observation. Primary care costs resulting from consultations with a general practitioner or a practice nurse and both new and repeat prescriptions. Morbidity, workload, and costs of drug treatment increased with decreasing socioeconomic status. The difference in cost for patients in social classes IV and V combined compared with those in I and II combined was about 150 Pounds per person year at risk (47 Pounds for workload and 103 Pounds for drugs). Deprivation payments met only half the extra workload cost for patients from qualifying wards. The greater workload caused by social disadvantage has been previously underestimated by simple consultation rates. The absolute difference in costs for socially disadvantaged patients increase as more detailed measures of workload and drug treatment are included. Current deprivation payments only partially offset the increased expenditure on workload. This shortfall will have to be addressed to attract general practitioners to, or retain them in, deprived areas.

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine use by primary care patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Eric I; Genao, Inginia; Chen, Ian; Mechaber, Alex J; Wood, Jo Ann; Faselis, Charles J; Kurz, James; Menon, Madhu; O'Rorke, Jane; Panda, Mukta; Pasanen, Mark; Staton, Lisa; Calleson, Diane; Cykert, Sam

    2008-11-01

    To describe the characteristics and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among primary care patients with chronic pain disorders and to determine if CAM use is associated with better pain control. Cross-sectional survey. Four hundred sixty-three patients suffering from chronic, nonmalignant pain receiving primary care at 12 U.S. academic medical centers. Self-reported current CAM usage by patients with chronic pain disorders. The survey had an 81% response rate. Fifty-two percent reported current use of CAM for relief of chronic pain. Of the patients that used CAM, 54% agreed that nontraditional remedies helped their pain and 14% indicated that their individual alternative remedy entirely relieved their pain. Vitamin and mineral supplements were the most frequently used CAM modalities. There was no association between reported use of CAM and pain severity, functional status, or perceived self-efficacy. Patients who reported having at least a high school education (odds ratio [OR] 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.19, P = 0.016) and high levels of satisfaction with their health care (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.13-1.91, P = 0.004) were significantly more likely to report using CAM. Complementary and alternative therapies were popular among patients with chronic pain disorders surveyed in academic primary care settings. When asked to choose between traditional therapies or CAM, most patients still preferred traditional therapies for pain relief. We found no association between reported CAM usage and pain severity, functional status, or self-efficacy.

  9. Negotiating complementary and alternative medicine use in primary care visits with older patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Yadegar, Vivien; Tarn, Derjung M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To empirically investigate the ways in which patients and providers discuss Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) treatment in primary care visits. Methods Audio recordings from visits between 256 adult patients aged 50 years and older and 28 primary care physicians were transcribed and analyzed using discourse analysis, an empirical sociolinguistic methodology focusing on how language is used to negotiate meaning. Results Discussion about CAM occurred 128 times in 82 of 256 visits (32.0%). The most frequently discussed CAM modalities were non-vitamin, non-mineral supplements and massage. Three physician–patient interactions were analyzed turn-by-turn to demonstrate negotiations about CAM use. Patients raised CAM discussions to seek physician expertise about treatments, and physicians adopted a range of responses along a continuum that included encouragement, neutrality, and discouragement. Despite differential knowledge about CAM treatments, physicians helped patients assess the risks and benefits of CAM treatments and made recommendations based on patient preferences for treatment. Conclusion Regardless of a physician's stance or knowledge about CAM, she or he can help patients negotiate CAM treatment decisions. Practice implications Providers do not have to possess extensive knowledge about specific CAM treatments to have meaningful discussions with patients and to give patients a framework for evaluating CAM treatment use. PMID:22483672

  10. Evaluation of a patient-centered after visit summary in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, Alex D; Jandorf, Lina; DeLuca, Joseph; Gover, Mary; Sanchez Munoz, Angela; Chen, Li; Wolf, Michael S; Kannry, Joseph

    2018-03-06

    To test the impact of a redesigned, patient-centered after visit summary (AVS) on patients' and clinicians' ratings of and experience with the document. We conducted a difference-in-differences (DiD) evaluation of the impact of the redesigned AVS before and after its introduction in an academic primary care practice compared to a concurrent control practice. Outcomes included ratings of the features of the AVS. The intervention site had 118 and 98 patients in the pre- and post-intervention periods and the control site had 99 and 105, respectively. In adjusted DiD analysis, introduction of the patient-centered AVS in the intervention site increased patient reports that the AVS was an effective reminder for taking medications (p = .004) and of receipt of the AVS from clinicians (p = .002). However, they were more likely to perceive it as too long (p = .04). There were no significant changes in overall rating of the AVS by clinicians or their likelihood of providing it to patients. A patient-centered AVS increased the number of patients receiving it and reporting that it would help them remember to take their medications. Improvements in the patient-centeredness of the AVS may improve its usefulness as a document to support self-management in primary care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Non-verbal communication between primary care physicians and older patients: how does race matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanikova, Irena; Zhang, Qian; Wieland, Darryl; Eleazer, G Paul; Stewart, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Non-verbal communication is an important aspect of the diagnostic and therapeutic process, especially with older patients. It is unknown how non-verbal communication varies with physician and patient race. To examine the joint influence of physician race and patient race on non-verbal communication displayed by primary care physicians during medical interviews with patients 65 years or older. Video-recordings of visits of 209 patients 65 years old or older to 30 primary care physicians at three clinics located in the Midwest and Southwest. Duration of physicians' open body position, eye contact, smile, and non-task touch, coded using an adaption of the Nonverbal Communication in Doctor-Elderly Patient Transactions form. African American physicians with African American patients used more open body position, smile, and touch, compared to the average across other dyads (adjusted mean difference for open body position = 16.55, p non-verbal communication with older patients. Its influence is best understood when physician race and patient race are considered jointly.

  12. Identifying primary care patient safety research priorities in the UK: a James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca Lauren; Stocks, Susan Jill; Alam, Rahul; Taylor, Sian; Rolfe, Carly; Glover, Steven William; Whitcombe, Joanne; Campbell, Stephen M

    2018-02-28

    To identify the top 10 unanswered research questions for primary care patient safety research. A modified nominal group technique. UK. Anyone with experience of primary care including: patients, carers and healthcare professionals. 341 patients and 86 healthcare professionals submitted questions. A top 10, and top 30, future research questions for primary care patient safety. 443 research questions were submitted by 341 patients and 86 healthcare professionals, through a national survey. After checking for relevance and rephrasing, a total of 173 questions were collated into themes. The themes were largely focused on communication, team and system working, interfaces across primary and secondary care, medication, self-management support and technology. The questions were then prioritised through a national survey, the top 30 questions were taken forward to the final prioritisation workshop. The top 10 research questions focused on the most vulnerable in society, holistic whole-person care, safer communication and coordination between care providers, work intensity, continuity of care, suicide risk, complex care at home and confidentiality. This study was the first national prioritisation exercise to identify patient and healthcare professional priorities for primary care patient safety research. The research priorities identified a range of important gaps in the existing evidence to inform everyday practice to address primary care patient safety. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Nutritional screening for improving professional practice for patient outcomes in hospital and primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Vali, Yasaman; Murray, Susan M; Wonderling, David; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-06-06

    Given the prevalence of under-nutrition and reports of inadequate nutritional management of patients in hospitals and the community, nutritional screening may play a role in reducing the risks of malnutrition. Screening programmes can invoke costs to health systems and patients. It is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes. To examine the effectiveness of nutritional screening in improving quality of care (professional practice) and patient outcomes compared with usual care. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June 2012 to find relevant studies. Randomised controlled studies, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies assessing the effectiveness of nutritional screening were eligible for inclusion in the review. We considered process outcomes (for example patient identification, referral to dietitian) and patient outcomes (for example mortality, change in body mass index (BMI)). Participants were adult patients aged 16 years or over. We included studies conducted in different settings, including hospitals, out-patient clinics, primary care or long term care settings. We independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included studies. Meta-analysis was considered but was not conducted due to the discrepancies between the studies. The studies were heterogeneous in their design, setting, intervention and outcomes. We analysed the data using a narrative synthesis approach. After conducting initial searches and screening the titles and abstracts of the identified literature, 77 full text papers were retrieved and read. Ultimately three studies were included. Two controlled before-after studies were conducted in hospital settings (one in the UK and one in the Netherlands) and one cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary care setting (in the USA).The study conducted in

  14. Newly diagnosed incident dizziness of older patients: a follow-up study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness is a common complaint of older patients in primary care, yet not much is known about the course of incident dizziness. The aim of the study was to follow-up symptoms, subjective impairments and needs of older patients (≥65 with incident dizziness and to determine predictors of chronic dizziness. Furthermore, we analysed general practitioners' (GPs' initial diagnoses, referrals and revised diagnoses after six months. Methods An observational study was performed in 21 primary care practices in Germany, including a four-week and six-month follow-up. A questionnaire comprising characteristic matters of dizziness and a series of validated instruments was completed by 66 participants during enrolment and follow-up (after 1 month and 6 months. After six months, chart reviews and face-to-face interviews were also performed with the GPs. Results Mean scores of dizziness handicap, depression and quality of life were not or only slightly affected, and did not deteriorate during follow-up; however, 24 patients (34.8% showed a moderate or severe dizziness handicap, and 43 (62.3% showed a certain disability in terms of quality of life at the time of enrolment. In multivariate analysis, n = 44 patients suffering from chronic dizziness (dependent variable, i.e. relapsing or persistent at six months initially had a greater dizziness handicap (OR 1.42, 95%CI 1.05-1.47 than patients with transient dizziness. GPs referred 47.8% of the patients to specialists who detected two additional cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Conclusions New-onset dizziness relapsed or persisted in a considerable number of patients within six months. This was difficult to predict due to the patients' heterogeneous complaints and characteristics. Symptom persistence does not seem to be associated with deterioration of the psychological status in older primary care patients. Management strategies should routinely consider BPPV as

  15. Relevant patient characteristics for guiding tailored integrated diabetes primary care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertroijs, Dorijn F L; Elissen, Arianne M J; Brouwers, Martijn C G J; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2018-02-06

    Aim To identify which patient-related effect modifiers influence the outcomes of integrated care programs for type 2 diabetes in primary care. Integrated care is a widespread management strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, most integrated care programs are not tailored to patients' needs, preferences and abilities. There is increasing consensus that such a patient-centered approach could improve the management of type 2 diabetes. Thus far, it remains unclear which patient-related effect modifiers should guide such an approach. PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE were searched for empirical studies published after 1998. A systematic literature review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. Findings In total, 23 out of 1015 studies were included. A total of 21 studies measured the effects of integrated diabetes care programs on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and three on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and health-care utilization. In total, 49 patient characteristics were assessed as potential effect modifiers with HbA1c as an outcome, of which 46 were person or health-related and only three were context-related. Younger age, insulin therapy and longer disease duration were associated with higher HbA1c levels in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. Higher baseline HbA1c was associated with higher HbA1c at follow-up in longitudinal studies. Information on context- and person-related characteristics was limited, but is necessary to help identify the care needs of individual patients and implement an effective integrated type 2 diabetes tailored care program.

  16. The Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM: integrating the social dimensions of health into primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Pratt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social dimensions of health are known to contribute to what is often termed “patient complexity”, which is particularly common among patients with multimorbidity. Health-care professionals require tools to help them identify and manage these aspects of patient needs. Objectives: To examine: (i the Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM, a tool for assessing patient complexity in ways that are sensitive to the biopsychosocial dimensions of health, in primary care settings in Scotland; (ii the impact of the PCAM on referral patterns and its perceived value; and (iii the PCAM’s perceived applicability for use in a complex patient population. Design: Two studies are described: (i a mixed-methods prospective cohort study of the implementation of the PCAM in primary care clinics; and (ii a qualitative exploratory study that evaluated the value of the PCAM in a complex patient population. Results: Use of the PCAM did not impact patient satisfaction or perception of practitioners’ empathy, but it did increase both the number of onward referrals per referred patient (9–12% and the proportion of referrals to non-medical services addressing psychological, social, and lifestyle needs. Nurses valued the PCAM, particularly its ability to help them address psychological and social domains of patients’ lives, and found it to be highly relevant for use in populations with known high complexity. Conclusions: The PCAM represents a feasible approach for assessing patient needs with consideration to the social dimensions of health, and allows practitioners to refer patients to a broader range of services to address patient complexity.

  17. [Primary care in Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2017-09-01

    Belgium is an attractive country to work in, not just for doctors but for all Spanish workers, due to it having the headquarters of European Union. The health job allure is double; on the one hand, the opportunity to find a decent job, and on the other, because it is possible to develop their professional abilities with patients of the same nationality in a health system with a different way of working. The Belgium health care system is based on security social models. Health care is financed by the government, social security contributions, and voluntary private health insurance. Primary care in Belgium is very different to that in Spain. Citizens may freely choose their doctor (general practitioner or specialist) increasing the lack of coordination between primary and specialized care. This leads to serious patient safety problems and loss of efficiency within the system. Belgium is a European country with room to improve preventive coverage. General practitioners are self-employed professionals with free choice of setting, and their salary is linked to their professional activity. Ambulatory care is subjected to co-payment, and this fact leads to great inequities on access to care. The statistics say that there is universal coverage but, in 2010, 14% of the population did not seek medical contact due to economic problems. It takes 3 years to become a General Practitioner and continuing medical education is compulsory to be revalidated. In general, Belgian and Spaniards living and working in Belgium are happy with the functioning of the health care system. However, as doctors, we should be aware that it is a health care system in which access is constrained for some people, and preventive coverage could be improved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychological risk factors of micro- and macrovascular outcomes in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, François; Denollet, Johan

    2010-01-01

    tests and physical examinations, and pharmacy medication records. The DiaDDZoB Study uses data that have been collected during the original baseline assessment in 2005 (M0; N = 2,460) and the 2007 (M1; N = 2,225) and 2008 (M2; N = 2,032) follow-up assessments. DISCUSSION: The DiaDDZoB Study is expected......BACKGROUND: Depression is a common psychiatric complication of diabetes, but little is known about the natural course and the consequences of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes. While depression has been related to poor glycemic control and increased risk....... METHODS/DESIGN: This prospective cohort study will examine: (1) the course of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes; (2) whether depressive symptoms and Type D personality are associated with the development of microvascular and/or macrovascular complications and with the risk...

  19. Practical Management of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodia María Rivas Alpizar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a disease of major importance for public health throughout the world. This is mainly caused by its status as one of the most common non-communicable diseases and the severity and diversity of its chronic complications. An updated literary review on the management of patients with diabetes mellitus was conducted. It includes definition, diagnosis and classification, algorithm for disease’s screening, appropriate management of a patient with diabetes mellitus in primary health care, treatment pillars and goals for metabolic control. This review is aimed at exposing practical elements when approaching a patient suffering from diabetes mellitus.

  20. Reciprocal relationship between fear of falling and depression in elderly Chinese primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Chi, Iris

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the current study is to investigate the link between depression and fear of falling in Hong Kong Chinese older adults in primary are settings. Using longitudinal data collected on 321 Chinese primary care patients 65 years of age and older, the authors investigated the reciprocal relationship between fear of falling and depression and examined whether functional disability and social functioning mediated the link between fear of falling and depression. Participants were recruited from three primary care units in Hong Kong. Subjects were assessed in Cantonese by two trained assessors with Minimum Data Set-Home Care twice over a period of one year. Findings revealed that fear of falling at baseline significantly predicted depression at 12 month follow-up assessment after age, gender, marital status, education and depression at baseline were adjusted, but depression at baseline did not predict fear of falling at 12 months after fear of falling at baseline was adjusted. Moreover, social functioning mediated the impact of fear of falling on depression. The findings presented here indicate that fear of falling potentially increases the risk of depression in Chinese older adults in primary care settings.

  1. Positive Affect and Suicide Ideation in Older Adult Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Chapman, Benjamin; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    Suicide is a significant public health problem for older adults. Identification of protective factors associated with reduced risk is important. The authors examined the association of positive affect and suicide ideation in 462 primary care patients ages 65 and older. Positive affect distinguished suicide ideators from nonideators, after controlling for age, gender, depression, negative affect, illness burden, activity, sociability, cognitive functioning, and physical functioning. There was ...

  2. Integrating Social Services and Home-Based Primary Care for High-Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinglass, Joe; Norman, Greg; Golden, Robyn L; Muramatsu, Naoko; Gelder, Michael; Cornwell, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    There is a consensus that our current hospital-intensive approach to care is deeply flawed. This review article describes the research evidence for developing a better system of care for high-cost, high-risk patients. It reviews the evidence that home-centered care and integration of health care with social services are the cornerstones of a more humane and efficient system. The article describes the strengths and weaknesses of research evaluating the effects of social services in addressing social determinants of health, and how social support is critical to successful acute care transition programs. It reviews the history of incorporating social services into care management, and the prospects that recent payment reforms and regulatory initiatives can succeed in stimulating the financial integration of social services into new care coordination initiatives. The article reviews the literature on home-based primary care for the chronically ill and disabled, and suggests that it is the emergence of this care modality that holds the greatest promise for delivery system reform. In the hope of stimulating further discussion and debate, the authors summarize existing viewpoints on how a home-centered system, which integrates social and medical services, might emerge in the next few years.

  3. Convenience, quality and choice: Patient and service-provider perspectives for treating primary care complaints in urgent care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, David

    2017-11-01

    To investigate why patients chose to attend two, nurse-led, minor injury units (MIUs) to access primary healthcare services rather than attend their GP practice. Since the 1980's, healthcare organisations in the UK and elsewhere have implemented an increasingly consumer-orientated model of healthcare provision. As a result, patients with non-urgent presentations are attending Emergency Departments (EDs) and other urgent care facilities in growing numbers. A comparative case study approach was adopted and between October 2014 and May 2015 the researcher was embedded as a participant observer as part of the emergency nurse practitioner team at two, nurse-led, MIUs (site A and B). During this time, 40 patients, 17 service-providers and 1 senior manager were interviewed. Patients and service-providers at both sites identified convenience and quality of care as the principle reasons patients presented for primary healthcare services at MIUs rather than their GP practice. Service-providers were aware that by providing treatment, they established a precedent and a sense of expectation for future care. Patients are acting rationally and predictably in response to healthcare policy promises regarding choice, expectation created by service-providers, and local demographic factors. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristics of Patients Who Report Confusion After Reading Their Primary Care Clinic Notes Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Joseph; Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Mejilla, Roanne; Walker, Jan; Elmore, Joann G

    2016-01-01

    Patient access to online electronic medical records (EMRs) is increasing and may offer benefits to patients. However, the inherent complexity of medicine may cause confusion. We elucidate characteristics and health behaviors of patients who report confusion after reading their doctors' notes online. We analyzed data from 4,528 patients in Boston, MA, central Pennsylvania, and Seattle, WA, who were granted online access to their primary care doctors' clinic notes and who viewed at least one note during the 1-year intervention. Three percent of patients reported confusion after reading their visit notes. These patients were more likely to be at least 70 years of age (p education (p reading visit notes (relative risk [RR] 4.83; confidence interval [CI] 3.17, 7.36) compared to patients who were not confused. In adjusted analyses, they were less likely to report feeling more in control of their health (RR 0.42; CI 0.25, 0.71), remembering their care plan (RR 0.26; CI 0.17, 0.42), and understanding their medical conditions (RR 0.32; CI 0.19, 0.54) as a result of reading their doctors' notes compared to patients who were not confused. Patients who were confused by reading their doctors' notes were less likely to report benefits in health behaviors. Understanding this small subset of patients is a critical step in reducing gaps in provider-patient communication and in efforts to tailor educational approaches for patients.

  5. System requirements for a computerised patient record information system at a busy primary health care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PJ Blignaut

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A prototyping approach was used to determine the essential system requirements of a computerised patient record information system for a typical township primary health care clinic. A pilot clinic was identified and the existing manual system and business processes in this clinic was studied intensively before the first prototype was implemented. Interviews with users, incidental observations and analysis of actual data entered were used as primary techniques to refine the prototype system iteratively until a system with an acceptable data set and adequate functionalities were in place. Several non-functional and user-related requirements were also discovered during the prototyping period.

  6. Consumer satisfaction among patients and their general practitioners about involving nurse specialists in primary care for patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers-Heitner, Pytha; Winkens, Ron; Berghmans, Bary; Joore, Manuela; Nieman, Fred; Severens, Johan; Lagro-Janssen, Toine

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a very common problem, but existing guidelines on UI are not followed. To bring care in line with guidelines, we planned an intervention to involve nurse specialists on UI in primary care and assessed this in a randomised controlled trial. Alongside this intervention, we assessed consumer satisfaction among patients and general practitioners (GPs). Patients' satisfaction with the care provided by either nurse specialists (intervention group) or GPs (control group), respectively, was measured with a self-completed questionnaire. GPs' views on the involvement of nurse specialists were measured in a structured telephone interview. The patient satisfaction score on the care offered by nurse specialists was 8.4 (scale 1-10), vs. 6.7 for care-as-usual by GPs. Over 85% of patients would recommend nurse specialist care to their best friends and 77% of the GPs considered the role of the nurse specialist to be beneficial, giving it a mean score of 7.2. Although the sample was relatively small and the stability of the results only provisionally established, substituting UI care from GP to nurse specialist appears to be welcomed by both patients and GPs. Small changes like giving additional UI-specific information and devoting more attention to UI (which had been given little attention before) would provide a simple instrument to stimulate patients to change their behaviour in the right direction. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of respondents was 276 participants (response rate = 74.79%.Results: Five safety dimensions with lowest positivity (less than 50% were identified and these are; the non – punitive response to errors, frequency of event reporting, staffing, communication openness, center handoffs and transitions with the following percentages of positivity 24%, 32%, 41%, 45% and 47% respectively. The dimensions of highest positivity were teamwork within the center’s units (82% and organizational learning (75%.Conclusion: Patient safety culture in primary healthcare settings in Kuwait is not as strong as improvements for the provision of safe health care. Well-designed patient safety initiatives are needed to be integrated with organizational policies, particularly the pressing need to address the bioethical component of medical errors and their disclosure, communication openness and emotional issues related to them and investing the bright areas of skillful organizational learning and strong team working attitudes.    

  8. Psychological and social problems in primary care patients - general practitioners' assessment and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendal, Marianne; Vedsted, Peter; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Moth, Grete

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the frequency of psychological and social classification codes employed by general practitioners (GPs) and to explore the extent to which GPs ascribed health problems to biomedical, psychological, or social factors. A cross-sectional survey based on questionnaire data from GPs. Setting. Danish primary care. 387 GPs and their face-to-face contacts with 5543 patients. GPs registered consecutive patients on registration forms including reason for encounter, diagnostic classification of main problem, and a GP assessment of biomedical, psychological, and social factors' influence on the contact. The GP-stated reasons for encounter largely overlapped with their classification of the managed problem. Using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2-R), GPs classified 600 (11%) patients with psychological problems and 30 (0.5%) with social problems. Both codes for problems/complaints and specific disorders were used as the GP's diagnostic classification of the main problem. Two problems (depression and acute stress reaction/adjustment disorder) accounted for 51% of all psychological classifications made. GPs generally emphasized biomedical aspects of the contacts. Psychological aspects were given greater importance in follow-up consultations than in first-episode consultations, whereas social factors were rarely seen as essential to the consultation. Psychological problems are frequently seen and managed in primary care and most are classified within a few diagnostic categories. Social matters are rarely considered or classified.

  9. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Suavinho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID. Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2% the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8% showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG levels, 1/7 (14.3% had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3% presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4% of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients.

  10. Patient, Provider, and Combined Interventions for Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Chatterjee, Ranee; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Yancy, William S; Datta, Santanu K; Corsino, Leonor; Dolor, Rowena J

    2017-03-21

    A single-site study showed that a combined patient and provider intervention improved outcomes for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but it did not assess separate effects of the interventions. To examine whether patient-based, provider-based, and patient-provider interventions improve osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized trial with assignment to patient, provider, and patient-provider interventions or usual care. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01435109). 10 Duke University Health System community-based primary care clinics. 537 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved electronic delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to providers. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total score at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire). Linear mixed models assessed the difference in improvement among groups. No difference was observed in WOMAC score changes from baseline to 12 months in the patient (-1.5 [95% CI, -5.1 to 2.0]; P = 0.40), provider (2.5 [CI, -0.9 to 5.9]; P = 0.152), or patient-provider (-0.7 [CI, -4.2 to 2.8]; P = 0.69) intervention groups compared with usual care. All groups had improvements in WOMAC scores at 12 months (range, -3.7 to -7.7). In addition, no differences were seen in objective physical function or depressive symptoms at 12 months in any of the intervention groups compared with usual care. The study involved 1 health care network. Data on provider referrals were not collected. Contrary to a previous study of a combined patient and provider intervention for osteoarthritis in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, this study found no statistically

  11. Email Between Patient and Provider: Assessing the Attitudes and Perspectives of 624 Primary Health Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Puneet; Abu-Abed, Mohamed Ismail; Kapoor, Vikram; Nicholson, Kathryn; Agarwal, Gina

    2016-12-22

    Email between patients and their health care providers can serve as a continuous and collaborative forum to improve access to care, enhance convenience of communication, reduce administrative costs and missed appointments, and improve satisfaction with the patient-provider relationship. The main objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of patients aged 16 years and older toward receiving email communication for health-related purposes from an academic inner-city family health team in Southern Ontario. In addition to exploring the proportion of patients with a functioning email address and interest in email communication with their health care provider, we also examined patient-level predictors of interest in email communication. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered, 1-page survey of attitudes toward electronic communication for health purposes. Participants were recruited from attending patients at the McMaster Family Practice in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. These patients were aged 16 years and older and were approached consecutively to complete the self-administered survey (N=624). Descriptive analyses were conducted using the Pearson chi-square test to examine correlations between variables. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine statistically significant predictors of interest in email communication (yes or no). The majority of respondents (73.2%, 457/624) reported that they would be willing to have their health care provider (from the McMaster Family Practice) contact them via email to communicate health-related information. Those respondents who checked their personal email more frequently were less likely to want to engage in this electronic communication. Among respondents who check their email less frequently (fewer than every 3 days), 46% (37/81) preferred to communicate with the McMaster Family Practice via email. Online applications, including email, are emerging as a viable avenue for patient

  12. Do primary health care nurses address cardiovascular risk in diabetes patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Barbara; Kenealy, Timothy; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Scragg, Robert

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors associated with assessment and nursing management of blood pressure, smoking and other major cardiovascular risk factors by primary health care nurses in Auckland, New Zealand. Primary health care nurses (n = 287) were randomly sampled from the total (n=1091) identified throughout the Auckland region and completed a self-administered questionnaire (n = 284) and telephone interview. Nurses provided details for 86% (n =265) of all diabetes patients they consulted on a randomly selected day. The response rate for nurses was 86%. Of the patients sampled, 183 (69%) patients had their blood pressure measured, particularly if consulted by specialist (83%) and practice (77%) nurses compared with district (23%, p = 0.0003). After controlling for demographic variables, multivariate analyses showed patients consulted by nurses who had identified stroke as a major diabetes-related complication were more likely to have their blood pressure measured, and those consulted by district nurses less likely. Sixteen percent of patients were current smokers. Patients consulted by district nurses were more likely to smoke while, those >66 years less likely. Of those who wished to stop, only 50% were offered nicotine replacement therapy. Patients were significantly more likely to be advised on diet and physical activity if they had their blood pressure measured (p workforce is essential to ensure cardiovascular risk management becomes integrated into diabetes management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Facilitating primary care provider use in a patient-centered medical home intervention study for chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwudozie, Ifeanyi Beverly; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael; Gilmartin, Cheryl; David, Pyone; Ekpo, Eson; Fischer, Michael J; Porter, Anna C; Aziz-Bradley, Alana; Hynes, Denise M

    2018-05-23

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high disease burand may benefit from primary care services and care coord A medical home model with direct access to primary care services is one approach that may address this need, yet has not been examined. As a substudy of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) patient-centered medical home for kidney disease (PCMH-KD) health system intervention study, we examined the uptake of free primary care physician (PCP) services. The PCORI PCMH-KD study was an initial step toward integrating PCPs, a nurse coordinator, a pharmacist, and community health workers (CHWs) within the health care delivery team. Adult chronic hemodialysis (CHD) at two urban dialysis centers were enrolled in the intervention. We examined trends and factors associated with the use of the PCMH-KD PCP among two groups of patients based on their report of having a regular physician for at least six months (established-PCP) or not (no-PCP). Of the 173 enrolled patients, 91 (53%) patients had at least one visit with the PCMH-KD PCP. The rate of visits was higher in those in the no-PCP group compared with those in the established-PCP group (62% vs. 41%, respectively). Having more visits with the CHW was positively associated with having a visit with the PCMH-KD PCPs for both groups. Embedded CHWs within the care team played a role in facilithe uptake of PCMH-KD PCP. Lessons from this health system intervention can inform future approaches on the integration of PCPs and care coordination for CHD patients.

  14. Identifying primary care patients at risk for future diabetes and cardiovascular disease using electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrader Peter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD is possible but identification of at-risk patients for targeting interventions is a challenge in primary care. Methods We analyzed electronic health record (EHR data for 122,715 patients from 12 primary care practices. We defined patients with risk factor clustering using metabolic syndrome (MetS characteristics defined by NCEP-ATPIII criteria; if missing, we used surrogate characteristics, and validated this approach by directly measuring risk factors in a subset of 154 patients. For subjects with at least 3 of 5 MetS criteria measured at baseline (2003-2004, we defined 3 categories: No MetS (0 criteria; At-risk-for MetS (1-2 criteria; and MetS (≥ 3 criteria. We examined new diabetes and CHD incidence, and resource utilization over the subsequent 3-year period (2005-2007 using age-sex-adjusted regression models to compare outcomes by MetS category. Results After excluding patients with diabetes/CHD at baseline, 78,293 patients were eligible for analysis. EHR-defined MetS had 73% sensitivity and 91% specificity for directly measured MetS. Diabetes incidence was 1.4% in No MetS; 4.0% in At-risk-for MetS; and 11.0% in MetS (p MetS vs No MetS = 6.86 [6.06-7.76]; CHD incidence was 3.2%, 5.3%, and 6.4% respectively (p Conclusion Risk factor clustering in EHR data identifies primary care patients at increased risk for new diabetes, CHD and higher resource utilization.

  15. Psychiatric morbidity among adult patients in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia

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    Omar Khairani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for psychiatric disorders in primary care can improve the detection rate and helps in preventing grave consequences of unrecognised and untreated psychiatric morbidity. This is relevant to the Malaysian setting where mental health care is now also being provided at primary care level. The aim of this paper is to report the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia using the screening tool Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. Methods This is a cross-sectional study carried out in a semi-urban primary healthcare centre located south of Kuala Lumpur. Systematic random sampling was carried out and a total of 267 subjects completed the PHQ during the study period. Results The proportion of respondents who had at least one PHQ positive diagnosis was 24.7% and some respondents had more than one diagnosis. Diagnoses included depressive illness (n = 38, 14.4%, somatoform disorder (n = 32, 12.2%, panic and anxiety disorders (n = 17, 6.5%, binge eating disorder (n = 9, 3.4% and alcohol abuse (n = 6, 2.3%. Younger age (18 to 29 years and having a history of stressors in the previous four weeks were found to be significantly associated (p = 0.036 and p = 0.044 respectively with PHQ positive scores. Conclusion These findings are broadly similar to the findings of studies done in other countries and are a useful guide to the probable prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in primary care in other similar settings in Malaysia.

  16. Primary health care teams and the patient perspective: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Lynn H M; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z

    2013-01-01

    Multidisciplinary care (MDC) has been proposed as a potential strategy to address the rising challenges of modern health issues. However, it remains unclear as to how patients' health connections may impact on multidisciplinary processes and outcomes. This research aims to gain a deeper understanding of patients' potential role in MDC: i) describe patients' health networks, ii) compare different care groups, iii) gain an understanding of the nature and extent of their interactions, and iv) identify the role of pharmacists within patient networks. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with asthma patients from Sydney, Australia. Participants were recruited from a range of standard asthma health care access points (community group) and a specialized multidisciplinary asthma clinic (clinic group). Quantitative social network analysis provided structural insight into asthma networks while qualitative social network analysis assisted in interpretation of network data. A total of 47 interviews were conducted (26 community group participants and 21 clinic group participants). Although participants' asthma networks consisted of a range of health care professionals (HCPs), these did not reflect or encourage MDC. Not only did participants favor minimal interaction with any HCP, they preferred sole-charge care and were found to strongly rely on lay individuals such as family and friends. While general practitioners and respiratory specialists were participants' principal choice of HCP, community pharmacists were less regarded. Limited opportunities were presented for HCPs to collaborate, particularly pharmacists. As patients' choices of HCPs may strongly influence collaborative processes and outcomes, this research highlights the need to consider patient perspectives in the development of MDC models in primary care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in cardiovascular disease risk factor management in primary care by sex of physician and patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenkin, Hava; Eaton, Charles B; Roberts, Mary B; Parker, Donna R; McMurray, Jerome H; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors based upon the sex of the patient and physician and their interaction in primary care practice. We evaluated CVD risk factor management in 4,195 patients cared for by 39 male and 16 female primary care physicians in 30 practices in southeastern New England. Many of the sex-based differences in CVD risk factor management on crude analysis are lost once adjusted for confounding factors found at the level of the patient, physician, and practice. In multilevel adjusted analyses, styles of CVD risk factor management differed by the sex of the physician, with more female physicians documenting diet and weight loss counseling for hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-4.40) and obesity (OR = 2.14; 95% CI, 1.30-3.51) and more physical activity counseling for obesity (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.30-3.18) and diabetes (OR = 6.55; 95% CI, 2.01-21.33). Diabetes management differed by the sex of the patient, with fewer women receiving glucose-lowering medications (OR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.94), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy (OR = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22-0.72), and aspirin prophylaxis (OR = 0.30; 95% CI, 0.15-0.58). Quality of care as measured by patients meeting CVD risk factors treatment goals was similar regardless of the sex of the patient or physician. Selected differences were found in the style of CVD risk factor management by sex of physician and patient.

  18. A chart review of morbidity patterns among adult patients attending primary care setting in urban Odisha, India: An International Classification of Primary Care experience

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    Subhashisa Swain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disease burden estimations based on sound epidemiological research provide the foundation for designing health services. Patients visiting a primary care often present with symptoms and signs. Understanding the burden is crucial for developing countries including India. The project aimed to record the reasons for encounter (RFE at primary care settings for estimating the burden at the health-care facility. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was undertaken at four urban health dispensaries of Bhubaneswar, Odisha, with the aim to explore the prevailing patterns of diseases among patients attending these facilities. Data collection spanned from May to October 2012. At each center, patients' information on age, sex, religion, and presenting illness was extracted from the outpatient records over these time period. Data were entered and analyzed in SPSS version 20, and the International Classification of Primary Care-2 was used for coding the illnesses. Results: In total, 2249 patient's records were extracted over 12 weeks. Out of them, 1241 (55.2% were male with mean age of 41.8 (±15.8 years vis-à -vis 38.2 (±14.1 years for females. Around 151 (6.7% had 2 or more symptoms or conditions. Overall, the most common categories were general and unspecified followed by digestive-related symptoms in both sexes. The most common symptoms among males were fever (11.4%, heart burn (8.1%, and vertigo or dizziness (3.6%. Similar pattern was seen among females. Respiratory (17.0% and cardiovascular (10.2% problems were the most common RFEs among males and females. The most common RFEs for acute care among males and females were fever, allergic rhinitis, upper respiratory tract infection, and acute bronchitis. Leading RFEs for chronic care among males were hypertension uncomplicated, heart burn, low back pain, whereas among females, hypertension and heartburn were mostly seen. Conclusion: Primary care settings are experiencing both communicable

  19. Relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Tharek, Zahirah; Ramli, Anis Safura; Whitford, David L; Ismail, Zaliha; Mohd Zulkifli, Maryam; Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Shafie, Asrul A; Jayaraman, Thevaraajan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be positively correlated with self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, such evidence is lacking in the Malaysian primary care setting. The objectives of this study were to i) determine the levels of self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting ii) determine the relationship between self-efficacy, self...

  20. A primary care audit of familial risk in patients with a personal history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul; Ahluwalia, Aneeta; Chorley, Wendy

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women, both in the UK and worldwide. A small proportion of women are at very high risk of breast cancer, having a particularly strong family history. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has advised that practitioners should not, in most instances, actively seek to identify women with a family history of breast cancer. An audit was undertaken at an urban primary care practice of 15,000 patients, using a paper-based, self-administered questionnaire sent to patients identified with a personal history of breast cancer. The aim of this audit was to determine whether using targeted screening of relatives of patients with breast cancer to identify familial cancer risk is worthwhile in primary care. Since these patients might already expected to have been risk assessed following their initial diagnosis, this audit acts as a quality improvement exercise. The audit used a validated family history questionnaire and risk assessment tool as a screening approach for identifying and grading familial risk in line with the NICE guidelines, to guide referral to the familial cancer screening service. The response rate to family history questionnaires was 54 % and the majority of patients responded positively to their practitioner seeking to identify familial cancer risks in their family. Of the 57 returned questionnaires, over a half (54 %) contained pedigrees with individuals eligible for referral. Patients and their relatives who are often registered with the practice welcome the discussion. An appropriate referral can therefore be made. The findings suggest a role for primary care practitioners in the identification of those at higher familial risk. However integrated systems and processes need designing to facilitate this work.

  1. Primary Patient-Derived Cancer Cells and Their Potential for Personalized Cancer Patient Care

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    David P. Kodack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized cancer therapy is based on a patient’s tumor lineage, histopathology, expression analyses, and/or tumor DNA or RNA analysis. Here, we aim to develop an in vitro functional assay of a patient’s living cancer cells that could complement these approaches. We present methods for developing cell cultures from tumor biopsies and identify the types of samples and culture conditions associated with higher efficiency of model establishment. Toward the application of patient-derived cell cultures for personalized care, we established an immunofluorescence-based functional assay that quantifies cancer cell responses to targeted therapy in mixed cell cultures. Assaying patient-derived lung cancer cultures with this method showed promise in modeling patient response for diagnostic use. This platform should allow for the development of co-clinical trial studies to prospectively test the value of drug profiling on tumor-biopsy-derived cultures to direct patient care.

  2. Patient's experience with comorbidity management in primary care: a qualitative study of comorbid pain and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, E Amy; Ramirez, Michelle L; Haltzman, Brittany; Fritz, Megan; Kozak, Andrea T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine perceptions of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity regarding their experience of comorbidity management in primary care settings. Chronic pain and obesity are common comorbidities frequently managed in primary care settings. Evidence suggests individuals with this comorbidity may be at risk for suboptimal clinical interactions; however, treatment experiences and preferences of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity have received little attention. Semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 primary care patients with mean body mass index=36.8 and comorbid persistent pain. The constant comparative method was used to analyze data. Participants discussed frustration with a perceived lack of information tailored to their needs and a desire for a personalized treatment experience. Participants found available medical approaches unsatisfying and sought a more holistic approach to management. Discussions also focused around the need for providers to initiate efforts at education and motivation enhancement and to show concern for and understanding of the unique difficulties associated with comorbidity. Findings suggest providers should engage in integrated communication regarding weight and pain, targeting this multimorbidity using methods aligned with priorities discussed by patients.

  3. Symptoms, unbearability and the nature of suffering in terminal cancer patients dying at home: a prospective primary care study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, C.D.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; van der Wal, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Primary care physicians provide palliative home care. In cancer patients dying at home in the Netherlands (45% of all cancer patients) euthanasia in about one out of every seven patients indicates unbearable suffering. Symptom prevalence, relationship between intensity of symptoms and

  4. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

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    Darko Gvozdanovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1 to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2 to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  5. Systematic review of measurement properties of questionnaires measuring somatization in primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Kate; Dijkstra-Kersten, Sandra M A; Mokkink, Lidwine B; Terluin, Berend; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Leone, Stephanie S; van der Horst, Henriëtte E; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this review is to critically appraise the evidence on measurement properties of self-report questionnaires measuring somatization in adult primary care patients and to provide recommendations about which questionnaires are most useful for this purpose. We assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. To draw overall conclusions about the quality of the questionnaires, we conducted an evidence synthesis using predefined criteria for judging the measurement properties. We found 24 articles on 9 questionnaires. Studies on the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15) and the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) somatization subscale prevailed and covered the broadest range of measurement properties. These questionnaires had the best internal consistency, test-retest reliability, structural validity, and construct validity. The PHQ-15 also had good criterion validity, whereas the 4DSQ somatization subscale was validated in several languages. The Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS) checklist had good internal consistency and structural validity. Some evidence was found for good construct validity and criterion validity of the Physical Symptom Checklist (PSC-51) and good construct validity of the Symptom Check-List (SCL-90-R) somatization subscale. However, these three questionnaires were only studied in a small number of primary care studies. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of either the PHQ-15 or 4DSQ somatization subscale for somatization in primary care. Other questionnaires, such as the BDS checklist, PSC-51 and the SCL-90-R somatization subscale show promising results but have not been studied extensively in primary care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Involving patients in patient safety programmes: A scoping review and consensus procedure by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Hans; Valderas, Jose M; Wensing, Michel; Martin, Helle Max; Egebart, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Patient involvement has only recently received attention as a potentially useful approach to patient safety in primary care. To summarize work conducted on a scoping review of interventions focussing on patient involvement for patient safety; to develop consensus-based recommendations in this area. Scoping review of the literature 2006-2011 about methods and effects of involving patients in patient safety in primary care identified evidence for previous experiences of patient involvement in patient safety. This information was fed back to an expert panel for the development of recommendations for healthcare professionals and policy makers. The scoping review identified only weak evidence in support of the effectiveness of patient involvement. Identified barriers included a number of patient factors but also the healthcare workers' attitudes, abilities and lack of training. The expert panel recommended the integration of patient safety in the educational curricula for healthcare professionals, and expected a commitment from professionals to act as first movers by inviting and encouraging the patients to take an active role. The panel proposed a checklist to be used by primary care clinicians at the point of care for promoting patient involvement. There is only weak evidence on the effectiveness of patient involvement in patient safety. The recommendations of the panel can inform future policy and practice on patient involvement in safety in primary care.

  7. Frequency and characteristics of individuals with seasonal pattern among depressive patients attending primary care in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin, Jean-Michel; Adida, Marc; Belzeaux, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    High rates of bipolar disorder (BD) have been found among major depressives with seasonal pattern (SP) consulting in psychiatric departments, as well as among patients seeking primary care. As SP was reported to be common in the latter, the current study was designed to assess (a) the frequency and characteristics of SP among major depressives attending primary care and (b) the prevalence and aspects of BD in this population. Among 400 patients who consulted French general practitioners (GPs) for major depression between February and December 2010, 390 could be included in the study: 167 (42.8%) met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria for seasonal pattern [SP(+)], whereas 223 (57.2%) did not meet these criteria [SP(-)]. The two groups were compared on demographic, clinical, family history and temperamental characteristics. Compared to SP(-), SP(+) patients were more frequently female, married and with a later age at first depressive episode, and showed more atypical vegetative symptoms, comorbid bulimia and stimulant abuse. They also exhibited more lifetime depressive episodes, were more often diagnosed as having BD II and met more often bipolarity specifier criteria, with higher rates of bipolar temperaments and a higher BD family loading. Among SP(+) patients, 68.9% met the bipolarity specifier criteria, whereas 31.1% did not. Seasonality was not influenced by climatic conditions. The following independent variables were associated with SP: BD according to bipolarity specifier, female gender, comorbid bulimia nervosa, hypersomnia, number of depressive episodes and family history of substance abuse. Seasonal pattern is frequent among depressive patients attending primary care in France and may be indicative of hidden bipolarity. Given the risks associated with both SP and bipolarity, GPs are likely to have a major role in regard to prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of an education programme for patients with osteoarthritis in primary care - a randomized controlled trial

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    Bjärnung Åsa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease, considered to be one of the major public health problems. Research suggests that patient education is feasible and valuable for achieving improvements in quality of life, in function, well-being and improved coping. Since 1994, Primary Health Care in Malmö has used a patient education programme directed towards OA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of this education programme for patients with OA in primary health care in terms of self-efficacy, function and self-perceived health. Method The study was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT in which the EuroQol-5D and Arthritis self-efficacy scale were used to measure self-perceived health and self-efficacy and function was measured with Grip Ability Test for the upper extremity and five different functional tests for the lower extremity. Results We found differences between the intervention group and the control group, comparing the results at baseline and after 6 months in EuroQol-5D (p Conclusion This study has shown that patient education for patients with osteoarthritis is feasible in a primary health care setting and can improve self-perceived health as well as function in some degree, but not self-efficacy. Further research to investigate the effect of exercise performance on function, as well as self-efficacy is warranted. Trial registration The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. Registration number: NCT00979914

  9. Association between obesity, quality of life, physical activity and health service utilization in primary care patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Herman, K.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of obesity with quality of life, health service utilization and physical activity in a large sample of primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Data were retrieved from the PraxArt project, representing a cohort of 1021 primary care

  10. Assistance provided by physical therapists from primary health care to patients after stroke

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    Christina Danielli Coelho de Morais Faria

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Motor impairments, which are prevalent in stroke subjects, require physical therapy (PT rehabilitation. In primary care in the Brazilian Public Health System, PT are part of the Núcleo de Apoio à Saúde da Família (NASF. Objective: To describe the PT assistance provided to stroke patients in a primary healthcare center. Methods: The records of all stroke patients (n = 44; 69.23 ± 13.12 years identified by the health professionals were analyzed. Using keyword recognition, frequency analysis of the services offered by the PT was performed. Subjects were classified according to the Modified Rankin Scale. Results: In the 44 records, 45.5% had a description of the assistance provided by any professional of the NASF and 36.4% of the PT care. PT care was provided at the subject’s home (94.2% and at the healthcare center (5.8%. The PT practices were identified as: orientation (93.8%, evaluation (87.5%, exercises (50%, follow-up (37.5%, referral to another service or to undergrad PT students (18.8%, and referral to other NASF professionals (12.5%. Most of the subjects were classified as having mild/moderate disability. Conclusion: The minority of records had registration of attendance by the NASF PT. The majority of the sessions occurred at the subject’s home, which reveals a practice focused on individual care. The orientation was common, which illustrates that in primary care there is a focus on empowerment for health self-improvement. Follow-up was not common, despite clinical guidelines state that stroke subjects should be monitored at least once a year by the rehabilitation team.

  11. Improvement of the Patient Safety Culture in the Primary Health Care Corporation - Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zoghbi, Mohamad; Farooq, Saad; Abulaban, Ali; Taha, Heba; Ajanaz, Sajna; Aljasmi, Jawaher; Ahmad, Shakil; Said, Hana

    2018-04-17

    Primary Health Care Corporation (PHCC) is the public primary health care provider in Qatar. Having a patient safety culture (PSC) is the keystone to enabling a continuous process to improve the quality of services and to reduce errors. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of accreditation, quality improvement trainings, and patient safety (PS) trainings on the improvement of the PSC at the PHCC in Qatar. The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was used in 2012 and 2015 to assess the culture of PS and health care quality in the 21 health centers. The results of the two surveys were compared using the χ test. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Out of 2689 staff working in the 21 health centers, 1810 (67.3%) completed the survey in 2012, and 2616 (70.0%) of 3735 completed the survey in 2015. The comparison between 2012 and 2015 survey's results showed a statistically significant improvement for all the 10 dimensions (P < 0.05). Although a statistically significant difference was observed between 2012 and 2015 results for work pressure and pace, three of the four questions of the work pressure and pace dimension presented nonsignificant differences. The survey was a good tool to raise awareness on PS and quality issues at PHCC. There is evidence that the implementation of accreditation program, the quality improvement trainings, and PS trainings helped the organization improve its PS culture.

  12. Variations in GP-patient communication by ethnicity, age, and gender: evidence from a national primary care patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jenni; Lloyd, Cathy; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication is a key driver of overall satisfaction with primary care. Patients from minority ethnic backgrounds consistently report more negative experiences of doctor-patient communication. However, it is currently unknown whether these ethnic differences are concentrated in one gender or in particular age groups. To determine how reported GP-patient communication varies between patients from different ethnic groups, stratified by age and gender. Analysis of data from the English GP Patient Survey from 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, including 1,599,801 responders. A composite score was created for doctor-patient communication from five survey items concerned with interpersonal aspects of care. Mixed-effect linear regression models were used to estimate age- and gender-specific differences between white British patients and patients of the same age and gender from each other ethnic group. There was strong evidence (Pcommunication varied by both age and gender. The difference in scores between white British and other responders on doctor-patient communication items was largest for older, female Pakistani and Bangladeshi responders, and for younger responders who described their ethnicity as 'Any other white'. The identification of groups with particularly marked differences in experience of GP-patient communication--older, female, Asian patients and younger 'Any other white' patients--underlines the need for a renewed focus on quality of care for these groups. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  13. Patient and practitioner characteristics predict brief alcohol intervention in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, E F; Heather, N; Brodie, J; Lock, C A; McAvoy, B R

    2001-10-01

    The effectiveness of an evidence-based health care intervention depends on it being delivered consistently to appropriate patients. Brief alcohol intervention is known to be effective at reducing excessive drinking and its concomitant health and social problems. However, a recent implementation trial reported partial delivery of brief alcohol intervention by general practitioners (GPs) which is likely to have reduced its impact. To investigate patient-practitioner characteristics influencing brief alcohol intervention in primary care. Cross-sectional analysis of 12,814 completed Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) screening questionnaires. Eighty-four GPs who had implemented a brief alcohol intervention programme in a previous trial based in the Northeast of England. GPs were requested to screen all adults (aged over 16 years) presenting to their surgery and follow a structured protocol to give a brief intervention (five minutes of advice plus an information booklet) to all 'risk' drinkers. Anonymized carbon copies of the screening questionnaire were collected from all practices after a three-month implementation period. Although AUDIT identified 4080 'risk' drinkers, only 2043 (50%) received brief intervention. Risk drinkers that were most likely to receive brief intervention were males (58%), unemployed (61%), and technically-trained patients (55%). Risk drinkers that were least likely to receive brief intervention were females (44%), students (38%), and university educated patients (46%). Logistic regression modelling showed that patients' risk status was the most influential predictor of brief intervention. Also, GPs' experience of relevant training and longer average practice consultations predicted brief intervention. However, personal characteristics relating to patients and GPs also predicted brief intervention in routine practice. Interpersonal factors relating to patients and practitioners contributed to the selective provision of brief

  14. Nursing involvement in risk and patient safety management in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Vázquez, Valle; García-López, Ana; López-Sauras, Susana; Turón Alcaine, José María

    Patient safety and quality of care in a highly complex healthcare system depends not only on the actions of professionals at an individual level, but also on interaction with the environment. Proactive risk management in the system to prevent incidents and activities targeting healthcare teams is crucial in establishing a culture of safety in centres. Nurses commonly lead these safety strategies. Even though safety incidents are relatively infrequent in primary care, since the majority are preventable, actions at this level of care are highly effective. Certification of services according to ISO standard 9001:2008 focuses on risk management in the system and its use in certifying healthcare centres is helping to build a safety culture amongst professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Global absenteeism and presenteeism in mental health patients referred through primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S Kathleen; Haggarty, John; Kelly, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Disability from mental health (MH) symptoms impairs workers' functioning. Most of what is known about the MH of workers relates to their experiences after intervention or work absence. To profile the clinical symptoms, self-reported absenteeism and presenteeism and treatment response of workers with MH symptoms at the point of accessing MH care and compare the characteristics of patients referred with or without problems related to work. Analysis of 11 years of patient data collected in a Shared Mental Health Care (SMHC) clinic referred within a primary care setting in Ontario, Canada. Multiple regression with MH disorders was used to predict absenteeism and presenteeism. Absenteeism and presenteeism were assessed using the 12-item self-administered version of the WHO-DAS 2. Symptom profiles were assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Some psychiatric disorders (depression, somatization, anxiety) contributed more to predicting absenteeism and presenteeism than others. Patients referred with work-related problems differed from the general SMHC population in terms of sex and type and number of symptoms. Treatment response was good in both groups after a mean of three treatment visits. Patients with work-related mental health complaints formed a distinct clinical group that benefitted equally from the intervention(s) provided by SMHC.

  16. Glycaemic Control among Patients with Diabetes in Primary Care Clinics in Jamaica, 1995 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Harris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the quality of care received by patients with diabetes in public primary care clinics in 2012 with that reported in 1995. Methods: Patient records were audited at six randomly selected Type III health centres in the South East Health Region of Jamaica. The 2012 audit data were compared with published data from a similar audit conducted in 1995. Quality of care measures included timely screening tests and counselling of the patients. Fasting and postprandial glucose tests were used to assess glycaemic control. Results: Two hundred and forty-two patient records were analysed in 2012, and 185 in 1995. In 2012, 88% of patients were weighed within the last year compared with 43% in 1995. Advice on physical activity increased from 1% to 60% and on dietary practices from 6% to 79%. No patient had done the HBA1C in 1995 compared to 38% in 2012. In 1995, 66% had blood glucose measured at a laboratory during the last year while in 2012, 60% had a laboratory test and 90% were tested at the clinic by glucometer. Blood pressure control increased from 19% in 1995 to 41% in 2012 (p < 0.001. Poor glucose control was recorded among 61% of patients in 1995 compared with 68% in 2012. Conclusions: There was no improvement in glycaemic control. Health providers and patients must work together to improve patient outcomes. This will involve closer patient monitoring, treatment intensification where indicated, and the adoption of lifestyle practices that can lead to better control.

  17. Identification of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Patients in the Primary Health Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audra de Witt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have poorer cancer outcomes and experience 30% higher mortality rates compared to non-Indigenous Australians. Primary health care (PHC services are increasingly being recognized as pivotal in improving Indigenous cancer patient outcomes. It is currently unknown whether patient information systems and practices in PHC settings accurately record Indigenous and cancer status. Being able to identify Indigenous cancer patients accessing services in PHC settings is the first step in improving outcomes.MethodsAboriginal Medical Centres, mainstream (non-Indigenous specific, and government-operated centers in Queensland were contacted and data were collected by telephone during the period from 2014 to 2016. Participants were asked to (i identify the number of patients diagnosed with cancer attending the service in the previous year; (ii identify the Indigenous status of these patients and if this information was available; and (iii advise how this information was obtained.ResultsTen primary health care centers (PHCCs across Queensland participated in this study. Four centers were located in regional areas, three in remote areas and three in major cities. All participating centers reported ability to identify Indigenous cancer patients attending their service and utilizing electronic Patient Care Information Systems (PCIS to manage their records; however, not all centers were able to identify Indigenous cancer patients in this way. Indigenous cancer patients were identified by PHCCs using PCIS (n = 8, searching paper records (n = 1, and combination of PCIS and staff recall (n = 1. Six different types of PCIS were being utilized by participating centers. There was no standardized way to identify Indigenous cancer patients across centers. Health service information systems, search functions and capacities of systems, and staff skill in extracting data using PCIS varied between centers

  18. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care, autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866. However, overall support for diabetes care received from friends, family members, other patients with diabetes, and health care professionals may even play a greater role.

  19. Patients' Perceptions and Experiences of Shared Decision-Making in Primary HIV Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Shannon M; Koester, Kimberly A; Guinness, Ryan R; Steward, Wayne T

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is considered best practice in health care. Prior studies have explored attitudes and barriers/facilitators to SDM, with few specific to HIV care. We interviewed 53 patients in HIV primary care clinics in California to understand the factors and situations that may promote or hinder engagement in SDM. Studies in other populations have found that patients' knowledge about their diseases and their trust in providers facilitated SDM. We found these features to be more nuanced for HIV. Perceptions of personal agency, knowledge about one's disease, and trust in provider were factors that could work for or against SDM. Overall, we found that participants described few experiences of SDM, especially among those with no comorbidities. Opportunities for SDM in routine HIV care (e.g., determining antiretroviral therapy) may arise infrequently because of treatment advances. These findings yield considerations for adapting SDM to fit the context of HIV care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integration of mental health resources in a primary care setting leads to increased provider satisfaction and patient access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Kristin S; Ridgeway, Jennifer L; Hathaway, Julie C; Egginton, Jason S; Kaderlik, Angela B; Katzelnick, David J

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation assessed the opinions and experiences of primary care providers and their support staff before and after implementation of expanded on-site mental health services and related system changes in a primary care clinic. Individual semistructured interviews, which contained a combination of open-ended questions and rating scales, were used to elicit opinions about mental health services before on-site system and resource changes occurred and repeated following changes that were intended to improve access to on-site mental health care. In the first set of interviews, prior to expanding mental health services, primary care providers and support staff were generally dissatisfied with the availability and scheduling of on-site mental health care. Patients were often referred outside the primary care clinic for mental health treatment, to the detriment of communication and coordinated care. Follow-up interviews conducted after expansion of mental health services, scheduling refinements and other system changes revealed improved provider satisfaction in treatment access and coordination of care. Providers appreciated immediate and on-site social worker availability to triage mental health needs and help access care, and on-site treatment was viewed as important for remaining informed about patient care the primary care providers are not delivering directly. Expanding integrated mental health services resulted in increased staff and provider satisfaction. Our evaluation identified key components of satisfaction, including on-site collaboration and assistance triaging patient needs. The sustainability of integrated models of care requires additional study. © 2013.

  1. Factors associated with patients' satisfaction in Brazilian dental primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldosari, Muath Abdullah; Tavares, Mary Angela; Matta-Machado, Antônio Thomaz Gonzaga; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2017-01-01

    To assess factors associated with patients' satisfaction with the treatment by dentists in primary health care (PHC) in Brazil. The dataset was part of a nationwide cross-sectional survey for evaluating PHC teams conducted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Patients from each of 16,202 oral health teams were interviewed. In addition to sociodemographic information, the questionnaire included information about patient experience domains: access and booking of dental appointments, bonding and accountability, welcoming of the patient, and their perception of dental facilities. The dependent variable was the answer to the question 'From 0 to 10, how would you grade your satisfaction with treatment received from the dentist?' Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted rate ratios and corresponding 95% confidence interval. The mean patient satisfaction was 9.4 (±2.3). Higher patient satisfaction with PHC was associated with lower education and the patient's perception of the clinic conditions. Moreover, higher satisfaction was associated with positive reception and hospitality, enough time for treatment, and instructions that met patients' needs. Lower satisfaction with PHC was associated with patients who have jobs compared to those who do not work. Patient satisfaction is increased with friendly and understanding PHC staff. Moreover, meeting patient expectations by taking time to understand the needs and giving the right instructions is associated with higher satisfaction.

  2. Exercise-induced bronchospasm: implications for patients with or without asthma in primary care practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden ML

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Stuart W Stoloff1, Gene L Colice2, Mary Lou Hayden3, Timothy J Craig4, Nancy K Ostrom5, Nemr S Eid6, Jonathan P Parsons71University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, 2Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, 3University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 4Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, 5Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center, San Diego, CA, 6University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 7Ohio State University Asthma Center, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB can represent a substantial barrier to physical activity. We present the cases of two patients with EIB, one with asthma, and one without asthma, who were evaluated at our primary care practice. The first case was a 44-year-old man with a history of seasonal allergic rhinitis but no asthma, who reported difficulty breathing when playing tennis. The second case was a 45-year-old woman who presented with persistent, generally well-controlled asthma, who was now experiencing bouts of coughing and wheezing during exercise. In both cases, an exercise challenge was used to diagnose EIB, and patients were prescribed a short-acting beta agonist to be used immediately before initiating exercise. EIB is a frequently encountered problem among patients presenting to primary care specialists. Affected patients should be made aware of the importance of proactive treatment with a short-acting beta agonist before initiating any exercise.Keywords: asthma, compliance, exercise-induced bronchospasm

  3. [Optimization of information on the medication of polypharmacy patients in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicieza-García, María Luisa; Salgueiro-Vázquez, María Esther; Jimeno-Demuth, Francisco José; Manso, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    As part of the protocol of the Health Service of the Principality of Asturias (Spain), primary care physicians periodically receive listings of the treatments of patients of any age taking 10 or more drugs/day for 6 months. Currently, the Health Service of the Principality of Asturias is developing a project that aims to assess the medications of polypharmacy patients. The aim is to identify: 1) the consumption of medicines of low therapeutic usefulness, 2) the consumption of potentially nephrotoxic drugs in patients with a low glomerular filtration rate, and 3) potentially inappropriate prescribing in patients aged 65 years or older. The project was started in Health Area II and the aim is to extend it to the remaining health areas. In our opinion, its automation and general implementation could be useful to optimize drug prescription. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Involving patients in patient safety programmes: A scoping review and consensus procedure by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trier, H.; Valderas, J.M.; Wensing, M.; Martin, H.M.; Egebart, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient involvement has only recently received attention as a potentially useful approach to patient safety in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To summarize work conducted on a scoping review of interventions focussing on patient involvement for patient safety; to develop consensus-based

  5. Health Sector Reform in the Kurdistan Region - Iraq: Financing Reform, Primary Care, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, C Ross; Moore, Melinda; Hilborne, Lee H; Mulcahy, Andrew W

    2014-12-30

    In 2010, the Kurdistan Regional Government asked the RAND Corporation to help guide reform of the health care system in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The overarching goal of reform was to help establish a health system that would provide high-quality services efficiently to everyone to prevent, treat, and manage physical and mental illnesses and injuries. This article summarizes the second phase of RAND's work, when researchers analyzed three distinct but intertwined health policy issue areas: development of financing policy, implementation of early primary care recommendations, and evaluation of quality and patient safety. For health financing, the researchers reviewed the relevant literature, explored the issue in discussions with key stakeholders, developed and assessed various policy options, and developed plans or approaches to overcome barriers and achieve stated policy objectives. In the area of primary care, they developed and helped to implement a new management information system. In the area of quality and patient safety, they reviewed relevant literature, discussed issues and options with health leaders, and recommended an approach toward incremental implementation.

  6. Patient autonomy preferences among hypertensive outpatients in a primary care setting in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Ohno, Maiko; Fujinuma, Yasuki; Ishikawa, Hirono

    2007-01-01

    To investigate autonomy preferences and the factors to promote active patient participation in a primary care setting in Japan. Ninety-two hypertensive outpatients who consecutively visited a Japanese hospital between January and May of 2005 in Tokyo, Japan. This cross-sectional study was conducted by using a self-administered questionnaire. The main outcome measures were patient preferences for autonomy (i.e., decision-making and information-seeking preferences), measured by the Autonomy Preference Index (API). The variables studied were patient sociodemographic characteristics, physician characteristics based on patient preference (i.e., ability to communicate, extent of clinical experience, qualifications, educational background, gender, and age), and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control. On the API scale from 0 to 100, the patients had an intermediate desire for decision-making (median: 51) and a greater desire for information (median: 95). A multivariate regression model indicated that decision-making preference increased when patients were woman and decreased as physician age increased, and information-seeking preference was positively associated with good communication skills, more extensive clinical experience, physicians of middle age, and patient beliefs that they were responsible for their own health, and was negatively associated with a preference for man physicians. Physicians may need to understand that patient autonomy preferences pertain to physician age and gender, physician communication ability and extent of clinical experience, and patient beliefs about self-responsibility toward health, and could use the information to promote reliable patient-physician relationships.

  7. A conceptual data model for a primary health care patient-centric electronic medical record system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available regarding continuity of care, typical healthcare protocols, a study of public healthcare district hospital information systems and both public and private primary healthcare information systems....

  8. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundt Marlon P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%, headaches (9.9%, and knee pain (6.5%; the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248, chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162, acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69, yoga (6.1%, n = 55, herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62, and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54. CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8% and prolotherapy (87.7%, whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  9. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-05-16

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  10. Primary care workforce development in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Heinemann, S.; Gress, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a large variation in the organization of primary care in Europe. In some health care systems, primary care is the gatekeeper to more specialized care, whilst in others patients have the choice between a wide range of providers. Primary care has increasingly become teamwork.

  11. Prevalence of problem alcohol use among patients attending primary care for methadone treatment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryder, Niamh

    2009-06-11

    Abstract Background Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health outcomes among current or former heroin users and primary care is providing methadone treatment for increasing numbers of this population. This study aimed todetermine the prevalence of problem alcohol use among current or former heroin users attending primary care for methadone treatment and to describe the socio-demographic characteristics and health service utilisation characteristics associated with problem alcohol uses. Methods We conducted a cross sectional survey of patients sampled from a national database of patients attending general practice for methadone treatment. Participants were recruited by their general practitioner and data was collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, which included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (\\'AUDIT\\'), with a score of >7 considered abnormal (ie \\'AUDIT positive cases\\') and socio-demographic, medical and substance use characteristics. Results We interviewed 196 patients (71% of those invited, 31% of those sampled, 11% of the national database). The median age was 32 years, 55% were hepatitis C positive, 79% had used illicit drugs in the previous month and 68% were male. Sixty-eight \\'AUDIT positive\\' cases were identified (prevalence of 35%, 95% CI = 28–41%) and these were more likely to have attended a local Emergency Department in the previous year (p < 0.05) and less likely to have attended a hospital clinic in the previous year (p < 0.05). Twenty-seven (14%) scored 20 or higher indicating possible alcohol dependence. Conclusion Problem alcohol use has a high prevalence among current or former heroin users attending primary care for methadone treatment and interventions that address this issue should be explored as a priority. Interventions that address problem alcohol use in this population should be considered as a priority, although the complex medical and psychological needs of this population may make

  12. The Impact of Antidepressant Therapy on Glycemic Control in Canadian Primary Care Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Gagnon

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Depression is common in people with diabetes and is associated with poor glycemic control. Evidence suggests that certain antidepressants (AD increase the risk of poor control. Few population-based studies have examined the impact of individual ADs on glycemic control. This study's objective is to measure the impact of Citalopram, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Trazodone and Escitalopram on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c in Canadian primary care patients with diabetes.Methods: A retrospective study of electronic medical records (EMR from 115 primary care practices across Canada was undertaken. Data were obtained from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN. The sample population comprised 1,084 diabetic patients with 1,127 prescriptions of one of the five selected ADs and with baseline and post-exposure HbA1c measurements. Generalized linear mixed models were computed to estimate the effect of the ADs on HbA1c.Results: Mean HbA1c ratios for Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Trazodone and Escitalopram were all numerically lower than Citalopram. The confidence intervals included the minimum detectable effect, however the differences were not statistically significant. The lowest clinically relevant HbA1c ratios, relative to Citalopram, were found in patients prescribed Trazodone and Escitalopram. Accounting for the prescription of Trazodone for indications other than depression, this research suggests that Escitalopram may be safer than Citalopram for people with diabetes and depression, in terms of its effect on blood glucose.Conclusion: This study can inform future research examining the relationship between ADs and blood glucose and provides insight into the limitations pertaining to the use of health data in health research. Future research should seek to control for, across multiple time points: depression symptoms, depression severity, depression duration, weight, diabetes medication, tobacco and alcohol consumption and

  13. Prevalence of problem alcohol use among patients attending primary care for methadone treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryder, Niamh

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health outcomes among current or former heroin users and primary care is providing methadone treatment for increasing numbers of this population. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of problem alcohol use among current or former heroin users attending primary care for methadone treatment and to describe the socio-demographic characteristics and health service utilisation characteristics associated with problem alcohol uses. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional survey of patients sampled from a national database of patients attending general practice for methadone treatment. Participants were recruited by their general practitioner and data was collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, which included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (\\'AUDIT\\'), with a score of >7 considered abnormal (ie \\'AUDIT positive cases\\') and socio-demographic, medical and substance use characteristics. RESULTS: We interviewed 196 patients (71% of those invited, 31% of those sampled, 11% of the national database). The median age was 32 years, 55% were hepatitis C positive, 79% had used illicit drugs in the previous month and 68% were male. Sixty-eight \\'AUDIT positive\\' cases were identified (prevalence of 35%, 95% CI = 28-41%) and these were more likely to have attended a local Emergency Department in the previous year (p < 0.05) and less likely to have attended a hospital clinic in the previous year (p < 0.05). Twenty-seven (14%) scored 20 or higher indicating possible alcohol dependence. CONCLUSION: Problem alcohol use has a high prevalence among current or former heroin users attending primary care for methadone treatment and interventions that address this issue should be explored as a priority. Interventions that address problem alcohol use in this population should be considered as a priority, although the complex medical and psychological needs of this population may make this

  14. Patient-reported quality indicators for osteoarthritis: a patient and public generated self-report measure for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; Higginbottom, Adele; Taylor, Robert; Bird, Jo; Østerås, Nina; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Edwards, John J; Jordan, Kelvin P; Jinks, Clare; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2016-01-01

    People with osteoarthritis desire high quality care, support and information. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators can be used to benefit patients by measuring whether minimum standards of quality care are being met from a patient perspective. The aim of this study was to describe how a Research User Group (RUG) worked alongside researchers to co-produce a set of self-reported quality indicators for people with osteoarthritis when visiting their general practitioner or practice nurse (primary care). These were required in the MOSAICS study, which developed and evaluated a new model of supported self-management of OA to implement the NICE quality standards for OA. This article describes the public involvement in the MOSAICS study. This was 1) the co-development by RUG members and researchers of an Osteoarthritis Quality Indicators United Kingdom (OA QI (UK)) questionnaire for use in primary care, and 2) the comparison of the OA QI (UK) with a similar questionnaire developed in Norway. This study shows how important and effective a research user group can be in working with researchers in developing quality care indicators for osteoarthritis for use in a research study and, potentially, routine use in primary care. The questionnaire is intended to benefit patients by enabling the assessment of the quality of primary care for osteoarthritis from a patient's perspective. The OA QI (UK) has been used to examine differences in the quality of osteoarthritis care in four European countries. Background People with osteoarthritis (OA) desire high quality care, support and information about OA. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators (QI) can be used to benefit patients by measuring whether minimum standards of quality care (e.g. NICE quality standards) are being met from a patient perspective. A Research User Group (RUG

  15. Impact of the ABCDE triage in primary care emergency department on the number of patient visits to different parts of the health care system in Espoo City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantonen Jarmo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Finnish emergency departments (ED serve both primary and secondary health care patients and are therefore referred to as combined emergency departments. Primary care doctors are responsible for the initial assessment and treatment. They, thereby, also regulate referral and access to secondary care. Primary health care EDs are easy for the public to access, leading to non-acute patient visits to the emergency department. This has caused increased queues and unnecessary difficulties in providing immediate treatment for urgent patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the flow of patients was changed by implementing the ABCDE-triage system in the EDs of Espoo City, Finland. Methods The numbers of monthly visits to doctors were recorded before and after intervention in Espoo primary care EDs. To study if the implementation of the triage system redirects patients to other health services, the numbers of monthly visits to doctors were also scored in the private health care, the public sector health services of Espoo primary care during office hours and local secondary health care ED (Jorvi hospital. A face-to-face triage system was applied in the primary care EDs as an attempt to provide immediate treatment for the most acute patients. It is based on the letters A (patient sent directly to secondary care, B (to be examined within 10 min, C (to be examined within 1 h, D (to be examined within 2 h and E (no need for immediate treatment for assessing the urgency of patients' treatment needs. The first step was an initial patient assessment by a health care professional (triage nurse. The introduction of this triage system was combined with information to the public on the "correct" use of emergency services. Results After implementation of the ABCDE-triage system the number of patient visits to a primary care doctor decreased by up to 24% (962 visits/month as compared to the three previous years in the EDs

  16. Pharmaceutical care issues identified by pharmacists in patients with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Siew Siang; Kok, Li Ching; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Tang, Guang Hui; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Efendie, Benny; Paraidathathu, Thomas

    2012-11-12

    The roles of pharmacists have evolved from product oriented, dispensing of medications to more patient-focused services such as the provision of pharmaceutical care. Such pharmacy service is also becoming more widely practised in Malaysia but is not well documented. Therefore, this study is warranted to fill this information gap by identifying the types of pharmaceutical care issues (PCIs) encountered by primary care patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in Malaysia. This study was part of a large controlled trial that evaluated the outcomes of multiprofessional collaboration which involved medical general practitioners, pharmacists, dietitians and nurses in managing diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings. A total of 477 patients were recruited by 44 general practitioners in the Klang Valley. These patients were counselled by the various healthcare professionals and followed-up for 6 months. Of the 477 participants, 53.7% had at least one PCI, with a total of 706 PCIs. These included drug-use problems (33.3%), insufficient awareness and knowledge about disease condition and medication (20.4%), adverse drug reactions (15.6%), therapeutic failure (13.9%), drug-choice problems (9.5%) and dosing problems (3.4%). Non-adherence to medications topped the list of drug-use problems, followed by incorrect administration of medications. More than half of the PCIs (52%) were classified as probably clinically insignificant, 38.9% with minimal clinical significance, 8.9% as definitely clinically significant and could cause patient harm while one issue (0.2%) was classified as life threatening. The main causes of PCIs were deterioration of disease state which led to failure of therapy, and also presentation of new symptoms or indications. Of the 338 PCIs where changes were recommended by the pharmacist, 87.3% were carried out as recommended. This study demonstrates the importance of pharmacists working in

  17. Pharmaceutical care issues identified by pharmacists in patients with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Siew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of pharmacists have evolved from product oriented, dispensing of medications to more patient-focused services such as the provision of pharmaceutical care. Such pharmacy service is also becoming more widely practised in Malaysia but is not well documented. Therefore, this study is warranted to fill this information gap by identifying the types of pharmaceutical care issues (PCIs encountered by primary care patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in Malaysia. Methods This study was part of a large controlled trial that evaluated the outcomes of multiprofessional collaboration which involved medical general practitioners, pharmacists, dietitians and nurses in managing diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings. A total of 477 patients were recruited by 44 general practitioners in the Klang Valley. These patients were counselled by the various healthcare professionals and followed-up for 6 months. Results Of the 477 participants, 53.7% had at least one PCI, with a total of 706 PCIs. These included drug-use problems (33.3%, insufficient awareness and knowledge about disease condition and medication (20.4%, adverse drug reactions (15.6%, therapeutic failure (13.9%, drug-choice problems (9.5% and dosing problems (3.4%. Non-adherence to medications topped the list of drug-use problems, followed by incorrect administration of medications. More than half of the PCIs (52% were classified as probably clinically insignificant, 38.9% with minimal clinical significance, 8.9% as definitely clinically significant and could cause patient harm while one issue (0.2% was classified as life threatening. The main causes of PCIs were deterioration of disease state which led to failure of therapy, and also presentation of new symptoms or indications. Of the 338 PCIs where changes were recommended by the pharmacist, 87.3% were carried out as recommended. Conclusions This study

  18. Main characteristics of patients of primary health care services in Brazil

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    Ione Aquemi Guibu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To characterize patients of primary health care services according to demographic and socioeconomic aspects, habits and lifestyle, health condition, and demand for health services and medicines. METHODS This study is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos – Serviços (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines – Services, a cross-sectional study carried out between 2014 and 2015. Interviews were conducted with patients over the age of 17 years, with a standardized questionnaire, in primary health care services of a representative sample of cities, stratified by regions of Brazil. The analysis was performed for complex samples and weighted according to the population size of each region. RESULTS A total of 8,676 patients were interviewed, being 75.8% women, most of them aged from 18 to 39 years; 24.2% men, most of them aged from 40 to 59 years; 53.7% with elementary school; 50.5% reported to be of mixed race ethnicity, 39.7%, white, and 7.8%, black. Half of patients were classified as class C and 24.8% received the Bolsa Familia benefit. Only 9.8% had health insurance, with higher proportion in the South and lower in the North and Midwest. The proportion of men who consumed alcohol was higher than among women, as well as smokers. The self-assessment of health showed that 57% believed it to be very good or good, with lower proportion in the Northeast. The prevalence of chronic diseases/conditions, such as hypertension (38.6%, dyslipidemia (22.7%, arthritis/rheumatism (19.4%, depression (18.5%, diabetes (13.6%, and others are higher in these patients them among the general population. Medicines were predominantly sought in the health care service or in pharmacies of the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS It was possible to characterize the profile of patients of Primary Health Care, but the originality of the

  19. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients' primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 10% sample selected at random from the Ontario adult population. Primary care and total health care costs were calculated at the individual level and included costs from physician services, hospital visits and admissions, long term care, drugs, home care, lab tests, and visits to non-medical health care providers. Generalized linear model regressions were conducted to assess the differences in costs between primary care models. Patients not enrolled with a primary care physicians were younger, more likely to be males and of lower socio-economic status. Patients in blended capitation models were healthier and wealthier than FFS and enhanced-FFS patients. Primary care and total health care costs were significantly different across Ontario primary care models. Using the traditional FFS as the reference, we found that patients in the enhanced-FFS models had the lowest total health care costs, and also the lowest primary care costs. Patients in the blended capitation models had higher primary care costs but lower total health care costs. Patients that were in multidisciplinary teams (FHT), where physicians are also paid on a blended capitation basis, had higher total health care costs than non-FHT patients but still lower than the FFS reference group. Primary care and total health care costs increased with patients' age, morbidity, and lower income quintile across all primary care payment types. The new primary care models were associated with lower total health care costs for patients compared to the

  20. Symptoms associated with an abnormal echocardiogram in elderly primary care hypertension patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringoir, L.; Widdershoven, J. W.; Pedersen, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence and diagnostic value of heart failure symptoms in elderly primary care patients with hypertension is unknown. Aim To assess the prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of symptoms in association with an abnormal echocardiogram. Design...... %, and oedema by 13 %. Oedema was the only symptom significantly associated with an abnormal echocardiogram (positive predictive value was 45 %, sensitivity 20 %, and specificity 90 %, OR 2.12; 95 % CI=1.23-3.64), apart from higher age (OR 1.06; 95 % CI=1.03-1.09), previous myocardial infarction (OR 3.00; 95...

  1. Prevalence of suicidal behaviour & associated factors among tuberculosis patients in public primary care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Louw, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the high prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide, there are only a few studies on its psychiatric complications such as suicidal behaviour. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of suicidal behaviour and its associated factors among tuberculosis patients in public primary care in South Africa. In a cross-sectional survey conducted in three provinces of South Africa new TB and new re-treatment patients were assessed within one month of anti-tuberculosis treatment. The sample included 4900 (54.5% men and women 45.5%) consecutively selected tuberculosis patients from 42 public primary care clinics in three districts in South Africa. A total of 322 patients (9.0%) reported suicidal ideation and 131 (3.1%) had a history of a suicide attempt. In multivariate analysis female gender [Odds Ratio (OR)= 0.56, Confidence Interval (CI)= 0.43-0.74], psychological distress (OR=2.36, CI=1.04-2.29), post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) (OR=4.98, CI=3.76-6.59), harmful alcohol use (OR=1.97, CI=1.25-3.09) and being a TB re-treatment patient (OR=1.76, CI=1.32-2.34) were associated with suicidal ideation, and psychological distress (OR=3.27, CI=1.51-7.10), PTSD symptoms (OR=4.48, CI=3.04-6.61) and harmful alcohol use (OR=3.01, CI=1.83-4.95) were associated with a suicide attempt. Our findings suggest that co-morbid illnesses of psychological distress, PTSD and harmful alcohol use and HIV infection should be assessed in TB patients under TB control programmes to prevent suicidal behaviour. Clinicians should be aware about suicidality in tuberculosis patients to reduce mortality.

  2. Prevalence of suicidal behaviour & associated factors among tuberculosis patients in public primary care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Peltzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In spite of the high prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide, there are only a few studies on its psychiatric complications such as suicidal behaviour. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of suicidal behaviour and its associated factors among tuberculosis patients in public primary care in South Africa. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey conducted in three provinces of South Africa new TB and new re-treatment patients were assessed within one month of anti-tuberculosis treatment. The sample included 4900 (54.5% men and women 45.5% consecutively selected tuberculosis patients from 42 public primary care clinics in three districts in South Africa. Results: A total of 322 patients (9.0% reported suicidal ideation and 131 (3.1% had a history of a suicide attempt. In multivariate analysis female gender [Odds Ratio (OR= 0.56, Confidence Interval (CI= 0.43-0.74], psychological distress (OR=2.36, CI=1.04-2.29, post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD (OR=4.98, CI=3.76-6.59, harmful alcohol use (OR=1.97, CI=1.25-3.09 and being a TB re-treatment patient (OR=1.76, CI=1.32-2.34 were associated with suicidal ideation, and psychological distress (OR=3.27, CI=1.51-7.10, PTSD symptoms (OR=4.48, CI=3.04-6.61 and harmful alcohol use (OR=3.01, CI=1.83-4.95 were associated with a suicide attempt. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings suggest that co-morbid illnesses of psychological distress, PTSD and harmful alcohol use and HIV infection should be assessed in TB patients under TB control programmes to prevent suicidal behaviour. Clinicians should be aware about suicidality in tuberculosis patients to reduce mortality.

  3. Primary care patients' expectations regarding medical appointments and their experiences during a visit: does age matter?

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    Jaworski M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mariusz Jaworski,1 Marta Rzadkiewicz,1 Miroslawa Adamus,1 Joanna Chylinska,1 Magdalena Lazarewicz,1 Gørill Haugan,2 Monica Lillefjell,3 Geir Arild Espnes,2 Dorota Wlodarczyk1 1Department of Medical Psychology, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Public Health and Nursing, 3Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Introduction: There is evidence that meeting patients’ expectations toward health care correlates with involvement in the treatment they receive. The most important patient expectations concern certain types of information: explanation of disease and treatment, health promotion, and improvement in quality of life. Other demands include proper rapport and emotional support. The aim of this paper was to examine different patient groups over the age of 50 years and their expectations toward medical visits, evaluated before a visit and after the visit.Patients and methods: The study group consisted of 4,921 primary health-care patients. The patients received self-administered questionnaires that they filled in before and after the appointment with the doctor. Interviews with patients were conducted individually by specially trained interviewers. The PRACTA Patient Expectations Scale was used to measure the appointment-related expectations of the patients.Results: We observed differences related to age in patients’ expectations before medical visits regarding the following factors: disease explanation, treatment explanation, quality of life, rapport, and emotional support. The same differences were not observed on health promotion. Evaluation of patients’ appointment-related experiences after the visit showed that there were significant differences between the age-groups regarding all types of expectations included in the study. Differences between previsit and

  4. Comorbidity and glycemia control among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care

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    Catherine Hudon

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Hudon1,3, Martin Fortin1,3, Marie-France Dubois2, José Almirall31Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Community Health Sciences, Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada; 3Centre de Santé et de Services Sociaux de Chicoutimi, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: Reports on the relationship between comorbidity and glycemia control in diabetic patients are conflicting and the method of measuring comorbidity varies widely among studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between diabetes control and comorbidity, taking into account all comorbidities and their severity, in a primary care setting. We performed a retrospective descriptive study based on chart review of 96 randomly selected type 2 diabetic patients. Comorbidity was measured with the cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS, an exhaustive comorbidity index. Diabetes was considered as controlled if the mean value of two measurements of glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c was less than 7%. Taking diabetes control as the dependent variable, its relationship with the CIRS score, age, sex, diabetes duration, and diabetes-related complications was explored. Diabetes control was not significantly related with the CIRS score, age, sex or diabetes severity. Diabetes duration was the only variable significantly related to diabetes control. Our study suggests that comorbidity measured with the CIRS in patients with type 2 diabetes is not a factor that prevents the achievement of a good glycemia control.Keywords: glycemia control, type 2 diabetes mellitus, comorbidity, primary care

  5. Glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes at a primary health care center in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Khalid A; Al-Haddabi, Mahmod; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al Za'abi, Mohammed

    2014-10-01

    To determine the status of blood sugar control by using fasting blood sugar (FBS) of ≤6.1 mmol/l and glycosyted hemoglobin A1c (HbAc1) of Oman. The overall mean age of the cohort was 53±12 years (range: 24-91) with females representing 60% (n=106) of the study sample. The study found that only 9.6% (n=17) and 35% (n=62) of the patients attained optimal FBS and HbAc1 levels, respectively. Higher HbA1c was significantly associated with higher diastolic BP (84 versus 80 mm Hg; p=0.006), higher total cholesterol (5.2 versus 4.7 mmol/l; p=0.002) and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.8 versus 3.0 mmol/l; p=0.034). The results demonstrated poor glycemic control in Oman type 2 diabetic patients comparable to local and global studies especially in those hypertensive and dyslipidemic patients. Implementation of early and aggressive management of diabetes mellitus at the primary care setting is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diet and Physical Activity Behaviors in Primary Care Patients with Recent Intentional Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Tudorascu, Dana; Bryce, Cindy L; Comer, Diane; Fischer, Gary S; Hess, Rachel; Huber, Kimberly A; McTigue, Kathleen M; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey R; Conroy, Molly B

    2017-01-01

    Lifestyle habits of primary care patients with recent, intentional weight loss are unclear and need to be better understood to aid in translational health promotion efforts. We aimed to characterize diet and exercise habits in primary care patients with recent, intentional weight loss, comparing those with greater (≥10%) vs. lesser (5 to recipes (p=0.019). Average self-reported moderate-vigorous physical activity was 319 (281) minutes/week, with significant differences between greater (374 (328) minutes/week) vs. lesser (276 (230) minutes/week) weight loss groups (p=0.017). By pedometer, 30% had ≥7,500 steps/day; the proportion was higher in greater (43%) vs. lesser (19%) weight loss groups (p=0.005). For weight loss, clinical patients typically employ simple strategies such as 5+ fruits and vegetables per day, fried foods and desserts ≤1 per week, elimination of sugary drinks, choosing low fat foods/recipes, and physical activity 45-60 min/day.

  7. Primary care nursing activities with patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Ariane; Hudon, Catherine; Poitras, Marie-Eve; Roberge, Pasquale; Chouinard, Maud-Christine

    2017-05-01

    To describe nursing activities in primary care with patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders. Patients in primary care who are affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders such as anxiety and depression require care and follow-up based on their physical and mental health condition. Primary care nurses are increasingly expected to contribute to the care and follow-up of this growing clientele. However, little is known about the actual activities carried out by primary care nurses in providing this service in the Province of Quebec (Canada). A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were obtained through semistructured individual interviews with 13 nurses practising among patients with physical chronic disease in seven Family Medicine Groups in Quebec (Canada). Participants described five activity domains: assessment of physical and mental health condition, care planning, interprofessional collaboration, therapeutic relationship and health promotion. The full potential of primary care nurses is not always exploited, and some activities could be improved. Evidence for including nurses in collaborative care for patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders has been shown but is not fully implemented in Family Medicine Groups. Future research should emphasise collaboration among mental health professionals, primary care nurses and family physicians in the care of patients with physical chronic disease and common mental disorders. Primary care nurses would benefit from gaining more knowledge about common mental disorders and from identifying the resources they need to contribute to managing them in an interdisciplinary team. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Use of humour in primary care: different perceptions among patients and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek-Catarivas, M; Goldstein-Ferber, S; Azuri, Y; Vinker, S; Kahan, E

    2005-02-01

    (1) To explore the frequency with which humorous behaviour and statements occur in family medicine practice in Israel, and (2) to quantitatively assess the correlation between the subjective perceptions of humour in medical encounters between patients and physicians. In a cross sectional study, two populations (doctors and patients) were surveyed with paired structured questionnaires completed immediately after primary care practice visits. Two hundred and fifty consecutive encounters from 15 practices were sampled. The physician questionnaire was self administered, and patient questionnaire was administered by a trained research assistant. A mean of 16.7 questionnaires was completed per physician (range 6-20). The physicians reported having used some humour in only 95 encounters (38%), whereas almost 60% of patients agreed with the statement, "The doctor used some humour during the visit". At the same time, for specific encounters, the agreement between patients' perception and physicians' perceptions on the use of humour, although not completely by chance (p = 0.04), is low (kappa = 0.115). Patient characteristics (age, education, gender, family status, mother tongue, self perceived heath status, stress, mood, and expectations) were not related to the degree of agreement between the patients' and physicians' perceptions. Humour was used in a large proportion of encounters, independently of patient characteristics. Patients seem to be more sensitised to humour than physicians, probably because of their high stress level during medical encounters. Cultural differences may also play a part. Physicians should be made aware of this magnifying effect, and the issue should be discussed in medical schools.

  9. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya

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    Asharaf Abdul Salam

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Libyan National Health System (LNHS is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a customer profile, (b patient satisfaction, and (c health care-seeking behavior. Methodology: A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. Results: The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. Conclusions: A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered.

  10. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Asharaf Abdul; Alshekteria, Amina Abdulla; Abd Alhadi, Hana; Ahmed, Mariam; Mohammed, Anees

    2010-10-21

    The Libyan National Health System (LNHS) is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC) system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, (b) patient satisfaction, and (c) health care-seeking behavior. A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered.

  11. Type D (distressed) personality in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, Francois; Pop, Victor J M

    2012-01-01

    D Scale-14 (DS14) in type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS: 1553 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed for demographic, clinical, lifestyle and psychological characteristics in 2007. A subgroup (n=1012) completed the DS14 again 1 year later. RESULTS: The two-factor model of the Type D...... or physiological risk factors, but Type D women had a more sedentary lifestyle (p=.003). Type D patients experienced less social support and more stressful life events, loneliness, and more depressed mood, anhedonia and anxiety (p0......OBJECTIVE: In cardiovascular research, Type D personality (high negative affectivity and social inhibition) has been associated with a more than 3-fold increased risk of adverse health outcomes. This study examined the validity and clinical correlates of the Type D construct as assessed by the Type...

  12. Process evaluation of a stepped-care program to prevent depression in primary care: patients' and practice nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, Alide D; Schipper, Karen; Overkamp, Debbie; van Dijk, Susan E; Bosmans, Judith E; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Adriaanse, Marcel C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-02-23

    Depression is common in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2) and/or coronary heart disease (CHD), with high personal and societal burden and may even be preventable. Recently, a cluster randomized trial of stepped care to prevent depression among patients with DM2 and/or CHD and subthreshold depression in Dutch primary care (Step-Dep) versus usual care showed no effectiveness. This paper presents its process evaluation, exploring in-depth experiences from a patient and practice nurse perspective to further understand the results. A qualitative study was conducted. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 participants (15 patients and nine practice nurses). All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Atlas.ti 5.7.1 software was used for coding and structuring of themes. A thematic analysis of the data was performed. The process evaluation showed, even through a negative trial, that Step-Dep was perceived as valuable by both patients and practice nurses; perceived effectiveness on improving depressive symptoms varied greatly, but most felt that it had been beneficial for patients' well-being. Facilitators were: increased awareness of mental health problems in chronic disease management and improved accessibility and decreased experienced stigma of receiving mental health care. The Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), used to determine depression severity, functioned as a useful starting point for the conversation on mental health and patients gained more insight into their mental health by regularly filling out the PHQ-9. However, patients and practice nurses did not widely support its use for monitoring depressive symptoms or making treatment decisions. Monitoring mental health was deemed important in chronically ill patients by both patients and practice nurses and was suggested to start at the time of diagnosis of a chronic disease. Appointed barriers were that patients were primarily

  13. Primary Care Physician Involvement in Shared Decision Making for Critically Ill Patients and Family Satisfaction with Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kevin B; Weber, Urs; Johnson, Jennifer; Anderson, Nathanial; Knies, Andrea K; Nhundu, Belinda; Bautista, Cynthia; Poskus, Kelly; Sheth, Kevin N; Hwang, David Y

    2018-01-01

    An intensive care unit (ICU) patient's primary care physician (PCP) may be able to assist family with certain ICU shared medical decisions. We explored whether families of patients in nonopen ICUs who nevertheless report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making are more satisfied with ICU shared decision making than families who do not. Between March 2013 and December 2015, we administered the Family Satisfaction in the ICU 24 survey to family members of adult neuroscience ICU patients. We compared the mean score for the survey subsection regarding shared decision making (graded on a 100-point scale), as well as individual survey items, between those who reported the patient's PCP involvement in any medical decision making versus those who did not. Among 263 respondents, there was no difference in mean overall decision-making satisfaction scores for those who reported involvement (81.1; SD = 15.2) versus those who did not (80.1; SD = 12.8; P = .16). However, a higher proportion reporting involvement felt completely satisfied with their 1) inclusion in the ICU decision making process (75.9% vs 61.4%; P = .055), and 2) control over the care of the patient (73.6% vs 55.6%; P = .02), with no difference regarding consistency of clinical information provided by the medical team (64.8% vs 63.5%; P = 1.00). Families who report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making for critically ill patients may be more satisfied than those who do not with regard to specific aspects of ICU decision making. Further research would help understand how best to engage PCPs in shared decisions. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  14. Multimorbidity and Patient Safety Incidents in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Stokes, Jonathan; Esmail, Aneez; Coventry, Peter; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Alam, Rahul; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity is increasingly prevalent and represents a major challenge in primary care. Patients with multimorbidity are potentially more likely to experience safety incidents due to the complexity of their needs and frequency of their interactions with health services. However, rigorous syntheses of the link between patient safety incidents and multimorbidity are not available. This review examined the relationship between multimorbidity and patient safety incidents in primary care. Methods We followed our published protocol (PROSPERO registration number: CRD42014007434). Medline, Embase and CINAHL were searched up to May 2015. Study design and quality were assessed. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for the associations between multimorbidity and two categories of patient safety outcomes: ‘active patient safety incidents’ (such as adverse drug events and medical complications) and ‘precursors of safety incidents’ (such as prescription errors, medication non-adherence, poor quality of care and diagnostic errors). Meta-analyses using random effects models were undertaken. Results Eighty six relevant comparisons from 75 studies were included in the analysis. Meta-analysis demonstrated that physical-mental multimorbidity was associated with an increased risk for ‘active patient safety incidents’ (OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.40 to 3.38) and ‘precursors of safety incidents’ (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.36 to 2.03). Physical multimorbidity was associated with an increased risk for active safety incidents (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.45 to 1.80) but was not associated with precursors of safety incidents (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.13). Statistical heterogeneity was high and the methodological quality of the studies was generally low. Conclusions The association between multimorbidity and patient safety is complex, and varies by type of multimorbidity and type of safety incident. Our analyses suggest that multimorbidity

  15. Primary care physicians' willingness to disclose oncology errors involving multiple providers to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen; Roblin, Douglas W; Greene, Sarah M; Fouayzi, Hassan; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Full disclosure of harmful errors to patients, including a statement of regret, an explanation, acceptance of responsibility and commitment to prevent recurrences is the current standard for physicians in the USA. To examine the extent to which primary care physicians' perceptions of event-level, physician-level and organisation-level factors influence intent to disclose a medical error in challenging situations. Cross-sectional survey containing two hypothetical vignettes: (1) delayed diagnosis of breast cancer, and (2) care coordination breakdown causing a delayed response to patient symptoms. In both cases, multiple physicians shared responsibility for the error, and both involved oncology diagnoses. The study was conducted in the context of the HMO Cancer Research Network Cancer Communication Research Center. Primary care physicians from three integrated healthcare delivery systems located in Washington, Massachusetts and Georgia; responses from 297 participants were included in these analyses. The dependent variable intent to disclose included intent to provide an apology, an explanation, information about the cause and plans for preventing recurrences. Independent variables included event-level factors (responsibility for the event, perceived seriousness of the event, predictions about a lawsuit); physician-level factors (value of patient-centred communication, communication self-efficacy and feelings about practice); organisation-level factors included perceived support for communication and time constraints. A majority of respondents would not fully disclose in either situation. The strongest predictors of disclosure were perceived personal responsibility, perceived seriousness of the event and perceived value of patient-centred communication. These variables were consistently associated with intent to disclose. To make meaningful progress towards improving disclosure; physicians, risk managers, organisational leaders, professional organisations and

  16. Primary care ... where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, G B

    1999-07-01

    Corporate-based nurse managed centers are not the national norm. More prevalent is the use of an occupational health or physician-directed medical model of care. The author describes how a 14-year-old primary care center at a North Carolina computer software company is just "business as usual" when viewed in the context of the company's philosophy, goals, and culture. Included are considerations for nurse practitioners interested in the successful transplantation of this primary care model to other settings.

  17. Carbon footprint of patient journeys through primary care: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elizabeth; Pearson, David; Kelly, Charlotte; Stroud, Laura; Rivas Perez, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The NHS has a target of cutting its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. Travel comprises 17% of the NHS carbon footprint. This carbon footprint represents the total CO2 emissions caused directly or indirectly by the NHS. Patient journeys have previously been planned largely without regard to the environmental impact. The potential contribution of 'avoidable' journeys in primary care is significant. To investigate the carbon footprint of patients travelling to and from a general practice surgery, the issues involved, and potential solutions for reducing patient travel. A mixed methods study in a medium-sized practice in Yorkshire. During March 2012, 306 patients completed a travel survey. GIS maps of patients' travel (modes and distances) were produced. Two focus groups (12 clinical and 13 non-clinical staff) were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using a thematic framework approach. The majority (61%) of patient journeys to and from the surgery were made by car or taxi; main reasons cited were 'convenience', 'time saving', and 'no alternative' for accessing the surgery. Using distances calculated via ArcGIS, the annual estimated CO2 equivalent carbon emissions for the practice totalled approximately 63 tonnes. Predominant themes from interviews related to issues with systems for booking appointments and repeat prescriptions; alternative travel modes; delivering health care; and solutions to reducing travel. The modes and distances of patient travel can be accurately determined and allow appropriate carbon emission calculations for GP practices. Although challenging, there is scope for identifying potential solutions (for example, modifying administration systems and promoting walking) to reduce 'avoidable' journeys and cut carbon emissions while maintaining access to health care.

  18. Working with Bangladeshi patients in Britain: perspectives from Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Kamila; Rahman, Jasmin; Pill, Roisin

    2003-04-01

    The difficulties of ethnic minority communities in accessing appropriate primary care are well documented, but little is known about the experiences of Primary Health Care Teams (PHCTs) serving these communities, or their strategies to help patients overcome these difficulties. The purpose of the study was to explore the PHCT perspective of working with Bangladeshi patients. Qualitative group discussions with PHCTs were set up by four health centres in the Grangetown area of Cardiff, where a large proportion of the Bangladeshi community lives. Experiences of and attitudes to working with Bangladeshi patients were explored. Discussions were taped and transcribed for independent analysis by two researchers. Comparisons within and between PHCTs were made. PHCTs largely entered into full and frank discussions. Health visitors had made significantly more effort than others to get to know their Bangladeshi patients. This had costs in terms of time and effort, with no reduction in caseload. Cutting across this difference were common themes such as communication and cultural differences, and patients' difficulties in using NHS services appropriately, which caused disruption and frustration. While there was an awareness of the reasons for these difficulties, PHCTs generally were not able to allow for them because of the inflexibility of their workload and systems of working. Group discussions are a useful way to encourage PHCTs to reflect on their practice and share experiences. PHCTs are aware of their patients' needs and keen to explore racial awareness training and new ways of looking at how they work. However, the grind of heavy workloads makes this process unlikely without outside facilitation.

  19. Repeated serum creatinine measurement in primary care: Not all patients have chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentille Lorente, Delicia; Gentille Lorente, Jorge; Salvadó Usach, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of kidney failure in patients from a primary care centre in a basic healthcare district with laboratory availability allowing serum creatinine measurements. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study. A basic healthcare district serving 23,807 people aged ≥ 18 years. Prevalence of kidney failure among 17,240 patients having at least one laboratory measurement available was 8.5% (mean age 77.6 ± 12.05 years). In 33.2% of such patients an occult kidney failure was found (98.8% were women). Prevalence of chronic kidney failure among 10,011 patients having at least 2 laboratory measurements available (≥ 3 months apart) was 5.5% with mean age being 80.1 ± 10.0 years (most severely affected patients were those aged 75 to 84); 59.7% were men and 76.3% of cases were in stage 3. An occult kidney failure was found in 5.3% of patients with women being 86.2% of them (a glomerular filtration rate<60 ml/min was estimated for plasma creatinine levels of 0.9 mg/dl or higher). Comparison of present findings to those previously reported demonstrates the need for further studies on the prevalence of overall (chronic and acute) kidney failure in Spain in order to estimate the real scope of the disease. Primary care physicians play a critical role in disease detection, therapy, control and recording (in medical records). MDRD equation is useful and practical to estimate glomerular filtration rate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. What matters in the patients' decision to revisit the same primary care physician?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoun, Jumana M; Hamadeh, Ghassan N; Adib, Salim M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the priority of various aspects of the patient-primary care physician relationship in the decision to visit again that same physician. STUDY SETTINGS: A total of 400 community residents in Ras Beirut, Lebanon. A cross-sectional community based study sampled by a nonrandom sex-education quota-based procedure. Participants were asked to fill a survey where they indicated the ranking of nine items by importance in their decision to revisit the same physician. The nine items were chosen from three categories of factors: professional expertise of the physician; characteristics of the patient-physician relationship, office organization. Having a physician that gives the patient adequate time for discussion prevailed as rank 1 and luxurious clinic ranked as 9th. Affordability was one of the main concerns among men, those with poor health and those of lower socioeconomic status. Accessibility of the physician's phone was considered highly important among women and those of lesser education status. This study emphasizes the importance of adequate time with the patient, accessibility and affordability of the physician in maintaining continuity of care and patient satisfaction, beyond mere medical expertise.

  1. Cardiac auscultation poorly predicts the presence of valvular heart disease in asymptomatic primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardezi, Syed K M; Myerson, Saul G; Chambers, John; Coffey, Sean; d'Arcy, Joanna; Hobbs, F D Richard; Holt, Jonathan; Kennedy, Andrew; Loudon, Margaret; Prendergast, Anne; Prothero, Anthony; Wilson, Joanna; Prendergast, Bernard D

    2018-05-24

    Cardiac auscultation is a key clinical skill, particularly for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease (VHD). However, its utility has declined due to the widespread availability of echocardiography and diminishing emphasis on the importance of clinical examination. We aim to determine the contemporary accuracy of auscultation for diagnosing VHD in primary care. Cardiac auscultation was undertaken by one of two experienced general practitioners (primary care/family doctors) in a subset of 251 asymptomatic participants aged >65 years undergoing echocardiography within a large community-based screening study of subjects with no known VHD. Investigators were blinded to the echocardiographic findings. Newly detected VHD was classified as mild (mild regurgitation of any valve or aortic sclerosis) or significant (at least moderate regurgitation or mild stenosis of any valve). Newly identified VHD was common, with mild disease in 170/251 participants (68%) and significant disease in 36/251 (14%). The sensitivity of auscultation was low for the diagnosis of mild VHD (32%) but slightly higher for significant VHD (44%), with specificities of 67% and 69%, respectively. Likelihood ratios were not statistically significant for the diagnosis of either mild or significant VHD in the overall cohort, but showed possible value for auscultation in non-overweight subjects (body mass index auscultation has limited accuracy for the detection of VHD in asymptomatic patients and is a poor diagnostic screening tool in primary care, particularly for overweight subjects. Ensuring easy access to echocardiography in patients with symptoms suggesting VHD is likely to represent a better diagnostic strategy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. The Coming Primary Care Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Andrew L; Phillips, Russell S

    2017-04-01

    The United States has the most expensive, technologically advanced, and sub-specialized healthcare system in the world, yet it has worse population health status than any other high-income country. Rising healthcare costs, high rates of waste, the continued trend towards chronic non-communicable disease, and the growth of new market entrants that compete with primary care services have set the stage for fundamental change in all of healthcare, driven by a revolution in primary care. We believe that the coming primary care revolution ought to be guided by the following design principles: 1) Payment must adequately support primary care and reward value, including non-visit-based care. 2) Relationships will serve as the bedrock of value in primary care, and will increasingly be fostered by teams, improved clinical operations, and technology, with patients and non-physicians assuming an ever-increasing role in most aspects of healthcare. 3) Generalist physicians will increasingly focus on high-acuity and high-complexity presentations, and primary care teams will increasingly manage conditions that specialists managed in the past. 4) Primary care will refocus on whole-person care, and address health behaviors as well as vision, hearing, dental, and social services. Design based on these principles should lead to higher-value healthcare, but will require new approaches to workforce training.

  3. International Classification of Primary Care-2 coding of primary care data at the general out-patients' clinic of General Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olagundoye, Olawunmi Abimbola; van Boven, Kees; van Weel, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Primary care serves as an integral part of the health systems of nations especially the African continent. It is the portal of entry for nearly all patients into the health care system. Paucity of accurate data for health statistics remains a challenge in the most parts of Africa because of inadequate technical manpower and infrastructure. Inadequate quality of data systems contributes to inaccurate data. A simple-to-use classification system such as the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) may be a solution to this problem at the primary care level. To apply ICPC-2 for secondary coding of reasons for encounter (RfE), problems managed and processes of care in a Nigerian primary care setting. Furthermore, to analyze the value of selected presented symptoms as predictors of the most common diagnoses encountered in the study setting. Content analysis of randomly selected patients' paper records for data collection at the end of clinic sessions conducted by family physicians at the general out-patients' clinics. Contents of clinical consultations were secondarily coded with the ICPC-2 and recorded into excel spreadsheets with fields for sociodemographic data such as age, sex, occupation, religion, and ICPC elements of an encounter: RfE/complaints, diagnoses/problems, and interventions/processes of care. Four hundred and one encounters considered in this study yielded 915 RfEs, 546 diagnoses, and 1221 processes. This implies an average of 2.3 RfE, 1.4 diagnoses, and 3.0 processes per encounter. The top 10 RfE, diagnoses/common illnesses, and processes were determined. Through the determination of the probability of the occurrence of certain diseases beginning with a RfE/complaint, the top five diagnoses that resulted from each of the top five RfE were also obtained. The top five RfE were: headache, fever, pain general/multiple sites, visual disturbance other and abdominal pain/cramps general. The top five diagnoses were: Malaria, hypertension

  4. Patient-centered medical home implementation and primary care provider turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylling, Philip W; Wong, Edwin S; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Hernandez, Susan E; Batten, Adam J; Helfrich, Christian D; Nelson, Karin; Fihn, Stephan D; Hebert, Paul L

    2014-12-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementing a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of care delivery in April 2010 through its Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) initiative. PACT represents a substantial system reengineering of VHA primary care and its potential effect on primary care provider (PCP) turnover is an important but unexplored relationship. This study examined the association between a system-wide PCMH implementation and PCP turnover. This was a retrospective, longitudinal study of VHA-employed PCPs spanning 29 calendar quarters before PACT and eight quarters of PACT implementation. PCP employment periods were identified from administrative data and turnover was defined by an indicator on the last quarter of each uncensored period. An interrupted time series model was used to estimate the association between PACT and turnover, adjusting for secular trend and seasonality, provider and job characteristics, and local unemployment. We calculated average marginal effects (AME), which reflected the change in turnover probability associated with PACT implementation. The quarterly rate of PCP turnover was 3.06% before PACT and 3.38% after initiation of PACT. In adjusted analysis, PACT was associated with a modest increase in turnover (AME=4.0 additional PCPs per 1000 PCPs per quarter, P=0.004). Models with interaction terms suggested that the PACT-related change in turnover was increasing in provider age and experience. PACT was associated with a modest increase in PCP turnover, concentrated among older and more experienced providers, during initial implementation. Our findings suggest that policymakers should evaluate potential workforce effects when implementing PCMH.

  5. [Primary care in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2018-04-01

    The economic crisis and deterioration of the Portuguese National Health service has forced professionals to leave the country. The Portuguese National Health System was introduced in 1976, but it has been unable to provide citizens with the social and health advantages of an equality of access and free national health system. The Portuguese National Health System is financed by taxes. However, a 35% of its incomes are from private sources. The health minister decides the budget, and it is based on an historical financing plus a per capita system. Portuguese citizens and immigrants are entitled to free health care, but there is a co-payment for care, diagnostic, pharmacy, and emergency care. Health care provision is a mixture of public and private health care at a regional level. It leads to fragmentation of services and greater inequalities. Doctors are civil servants. Salary is regulated and it depends on seniority and on-call shifts. Primary care activities are similar to those of their Spanish counterparts. General practitioners have gatekeeper function, but the system is imperfect, and patients with private insurance get direct access to the specialist. Specialist training is similar to the training system in Spain. Continuing education is not regulated. The Portuguese Health System has been trying to become a national health system since 1979. Political instability, fragmentation of services, lack of clarity between public and private and co-payments are important constraints. Inequalities are an important problem to reconsider while discussing a national health system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing performance of 30-day readmission risk classifiers among hospitalized primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Gregory M; Robelia, Paul M; Pecina, Jennifer L; Dawson, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge occurs in almost 20% of US Medicare patients and may be a marker of poor quality inpatient care, ineffective hospital to home transitions, or disease severity. Within a patient centered medical home, care transition interventions may only be practical from cost and staffing perspectives if targeted at patients with the greatest risk of readmission. Various scoring algorithms attempt to predict patients at risk for 30-day readmission, but head-to-head comparison of performance is lacking. Compare published scoring algorithms which use generally available electronic medical record data on the same set of hospitalized primary care patients. The LACE index, the LACE+ index, the HOSPITAL score, and the readmission risk score were computed on a consecutive cohort of 26,278 hospital admissions. Classifier performance was assessed by plotting receiver operating characteristic curves comparing the computed score with the actual outcome of death or readmission within 30 days. Statistical significance of differences in performance was assessed using bootstrapping techniques. Correct readmission classification on this cohort was moderate with the following c-statistics: Readmission risk score 0.666; LACE 0.680; LACE+ 0.662; and HOSPITAL 0.675. There was no statistically significant difference in performance between classifiers. Logistic regression based classifiers yield only moderate performance when utilized to predict 30-day readmissions. The task is difficult due to the variety of underlying causes for readmission, nonlinearity, and the arbitrary time period of concern. More sophisticated classification techniques may be necessary to increase performance and allow patient centered medical homes to effectively focus efforts to reduce readmissions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Impact of an intensive multifactorial intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes at Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Carmen Serrano Cepas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the diseases with a higher social and sanitary impact and therefore, it is one of the priorities in the service we provide. The success of the interventions with people suffering from diabetes lies in the efficacy of the pharmacological treatments as well as in the change of lifestyles and the different confrontations how these patients face their process. Health workers feel quite frustrated as a result of the slight success of our actions to achieve them to follow an adequate diet, make physical exercise or improve their self-sufficiency and self control when dealing with the different situations that should be faced because of diabetes. For such reason, the primary care professionals from Guadalhorce valley Sanitary District applied several different interventions from those generally used for many years. These intensive interventions will consist on eight group sessions of diabetological education, planning and accompaniment at the physical exercises and patients will also receive personalized diet advice; the intervention will be developed during three months, and afterward the level of glycosylated haemoglobin will be measured in order to see if it has improved. Therefore, we are going to evaluate in an objective way the effectiveness of this intensive intervention comparing it to the habitual intervention followed in Primary Health Care.

  8. Health anxiety and medical utilization: The moderating effect of age among patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Thomas A; Griggs, Jackson O; Cunningham, Scott C; Kelley, Lance P

    2017-10-01

    Health anxiety is commonly seen in medical clinics and is related to the overutilization of primary care services, but existing studies have not yet considered the possible moderating effect of age. We examined if age moderated the association between health anxiety and medical utilization. A secondary aim was to examine potential racial/ethnic differences in health anxiety. An ethnoracially diverse group of patients (N=533) seeking treatment from a primary care clinic completed a self-report measure of health anxiety. Three indices of medical utilization were assessed using medical records, including the number of: (a) clinic visits over the past two years, (b) current medications, and (c) lab tests over the past two years. Age moderated the effect of health anxiety on multiple indices of medical utilization. Supplemental analyses found that the moderating effect of age was specific to a somatic/body preoccupation, rather than health worry, dimension of health anxiety. Mean-level differences in health anxiety were either not supported (health anxiety composite, somatic/body preoccupation) or were small in magnitude (health worry) among self-identifying Black, Latino, and White participants. Results indicate that assessing for health anxiety could be particularly important for older adult patients who frequently seek out medical services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Support for learning in the perspective of patient safety in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatianny Tanferri de Brito Paranaguá

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the support for learning, in the perspective of patient safety, offered in the work environment, according to health professionals working in primary care. Method: a transversal study, held with 86 health professionals working in primary care. A validated instrument was used, applied via the Internet. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken with a presentation of median, mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation. Results: points which are favorable to supporting learning were evidenced, such as mutual respect, autonomy for organizing the work and valorization of new ideas, which obtained means above 7.0. The variables which hinder the process of learning in the work environment, perceived by the professionals, were: resistance to changes, and excess of work impeding reflection on how to improve the work, with means above 6.0. Conclusion: the study found evidence of indicators related to the process of staff development in the area of health and indicates the influence of support for learning for the improvement of the work processes and of patient safety. It is necessary that a culture involving the systematic assessment of educational interventions in health should be established, the aim being to diagnose actions which are more incisive for changing health professionals' attitude and, therefore, clinical practice.

  10. Mental health of Chinese primary care patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edmond P H; Lam, Cindy L K; Chin, Weng Yee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mental health of Chinese primary care patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This was a cross-sectional observational study. Five hundred and nineteen subjects with LUTS completed a structured questionnaire containing the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-Short Form, the International Prostate Symptom Score, the adapted International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form and questions about socio-demographics. Overall, 17.7% of subjects reported depressive symptoms, 24.3% anxiety symptoms and 9.6% stress symptoms. In males, demographic factors associated with poorer mental health included being not married; clinical factors included higher LUTS severity, weak stream, straining and mixed urinary incontinence. In females, demographic factors associated with poorer mental health included being younger, not married and lower household income; clinical factors included higher LUTS severity, incomplete bladder emptying, urgency and weak stream. Chinese primary care patients with LUTS appear to be an at-risk group for poorer mental health with increased prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and may require routine screening to identify those who may require more tailored interventions to address both their urinary symptoms and psychological distress.

  11. Limited knowledge of chronic kidney disease among primary care patients – a cross-sectional survey

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    Chow Wai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in Singapore. While preventive effects have focused on early detection and education, little is known about the knowledge level of chronic kidney disease (CKD locally. We seek to evaluate the knowledge of CKD among primary care patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 1520 patients from 3 primary care centers. Those with existing CKD or on dialysis were excluded. Knowledge was assessed based on 7 questions on CKD in the self-administered questionnaire. One point was given for each correct answer with a maximum of 7 points. Results 1435 completed all 7 questions on CKD. Mean age was 48.9 ±15.0 (SD years. 50.9% were male. 62.3% had a secondary and below education and 52.4% had a monthly household income of ≤ $2000. 43.7% had chronic diseases. Mean score was 3.44 ± 1.53 (out of a maximum of 7. Median score was 4. In multivariate logistic regression, being older {>60 years [Odds Ratio (OR 0.50, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 0.32-0.79]; 40–60 years (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.43,0.89}, less educated [up to primary education (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.22-0.49], having a lower monthly household income [ Conclusion This suggests that CKD education should be targeted at older patients with lower education and lower socioeconomic status.

  12. Tuberculosis non-communicable disease comorbidity and multimorbidity in public primary care patients in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl

    2018-04-11

     Little is known about the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) multimorbidity among tuberculosis (TB) patients in Africa.Aim and setting: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of NCD multimorbidity, its pattern and impact on adverse health outcomes among patients with TB in public primary care in three selected districts of South Africa.  In a cross-sectional survey, new TB and TB retreatment patients were interviewed, and medical records assessed in consecutive sampling within 1 month of anti-TB treatment. The sample included 4207 (54.5% men and 45.5% women) TB patients from 42 primary care clinics in three districts. Multimorbidity was measured as the simultaneous presence of two or more of 10 chronic conditions, including myocardial infarction or angina pectoris, arthritis, asthma, chronic lung disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, malignant neoplasms, tobacco and alcohol-use disorder.  The prevalence of comorbidity (with one NCD) was 26.9% and multimorbidity (with two or more NCDs) was 25.3%. We identified three patterns of multimorbidity: (1) cardio-metabolic disorders; (2) respiratory disorders, arthritis and cancer; and (3) substance-use disorders. The likelihood of multimorbidity was higher in older age, among men, and was lower in those with higher education and socio-economic status. The prevalence of physical health decreased, and common mental disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder increased with an increase in the number of chronic conditions.  High NCD comorbidity and multimorbidity were found among TB patients predicted by socio-economic disparity.

  13. Normal limits of the electrocardiogram derived from a large database of Brazilian primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palhares, Daniel M F; Marcolino, Milena S; Santos, Thales M M; da Silva, José L P; Gomes, Paulo R; Ribeiro, Leonardo B; Macfarlane, Peter W; Ribeiro, Antonio L P

    2017-06-13

    Knowledge of the normal limits of the electrocardiogram (ECG) is mandatory for establishing which patients have abnormal ECGs. No studies have assessed the reference standards for a Latin American population. Our aim was to establish the normal ranges of the ECG for pediatric and adult Brazilian primary care patients. This retrospective observational study assessed all the consecutive 12-lead digital electrocardiograms of primary care patients at least 1 year old in Minas Gerais state, Brazil, recorded between 2010 and 2015. ECGs were excluded if there were technical problems, selected abnormalities were present or patients with selected self-declared comorbidities or on drug therapy. Only the first ECG from patients with multiple ECGs was accepted. The University of Glasgow ECG analysis program was used to automatically interpret the ECGs. For each variable, the 1st, 2nd, 50th, 98th and 99th percentiles were determined and results were compared to selected studies. A total of 1,493,905 ECGs were recorded. 1,007,891 were excluded and 486.014 were analyzed. This large study provided normal values for heart rate, P, QRS and T frontal axis, P and QRS overall duration, PR and QT overall intervals and QTc corrected by Hodges, Bazett, Fridericia and Framingham formulae. Overall, the results were similar to those from other studies performed in different populations but there were differences in extreme ages and specific measurements. This study has provided reference values for Latinos of both sexes older than 1 year. Our results are comparable to studies performed in different populations.

  14. [Primary care in Ireland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementation of healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: patients as coproducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kristin; Bendtsen, Preben; Krevers, Barbro

    2014-11-01

    To explore and theorize how patients perceive, interpret, and reactin healthy lifestyle promotion situations in primary care and to investigate patients' role in implementation of lifestyle promotion illustrated by typologies. Grounded theory was used to assess qualitative interview data from 22 patients with varied experience of healthy lifestyle promotion. Data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis. A substantive theory of being healthy emerged from the data. The theory highlights the processes that are important for implementation before, during, and after lifestyle promotion. Three interconnected categories emerged from the data: conditions for being healthy, managing being healthy, and interactions about being healthy; these formed the core category: being healthy. A typology proposed four patient trajectories on being healthy: resigned, receivers, coworkers, and leaders. Patients coproduced the implementation of lifestyle promotion through the degree of transparency, which was a result of patients' expectations and situation appraisals. Different approaches are needed during lifestyle promotion depending on a variety of patient-related factors. The typology could guide practitioners in their lifestyle promotion practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of insomnia and its impact on daily function amongst Malaysian primary care patients

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    Zailinawati Abu-Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insomnia is a common public health problem and the prevalence and impact of insomnia in primary care attendees is not well documented in the Asian population. Objectives To determine the prevalence of self-reported insomnia symptoms amongst adult primary care attendees and the association with socio-demographic factors; to ascertain the impact of insomnia on daily functioning and to describe the psychological profile of patients with insomnia. Methods In this cross-sectional survey, 2049 adult patients (≥18 year old attending seven primary care clinics in Peninsular Malaysia, completed the questionnaire asking about symptoms of insomnia (defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders and DSM IV criteria daytime impairment and psychological symptoms (assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results The response rate was 86.2%. A total of 60% reported insomnia symptoms, 38.9% had frequent insomnia symptoms (>3 times per week, 30.7% had chronic insomnia without daytime consequences and 28.6% had chronic insomnia with daytime dysfunction. Indian ethnicity (OR 1.79; 95%CI, 1.28-2.49, age ≥ 50 or older (OR 1.82; 95%CI, 1.10-3.01, anxiety symptoms (OR 1.65; 95%CI, 1.21-2.22 and depression symptoms (OR 1.65; 95%CI, 1.21-2.26 were risk factors for chronic insomnia with daytime dysfunction. Amongst those with chronic insomnia with daytime dysfunction, 47.8% had anxiety symptoms (OR, 2.01; 95%CI, 1.57-2.59 and 36.5% had depression symptoms (OR, 2.74; 95%CI, 2.04-3.68 based on HADs score. They also had tendency to doze off while driving and to be involved in road traffic accidents. Conclusions A third of primary care attendees have insomnia symptoms and chronic insomnia, associated with significant daytime dysfunction and psychological morbidity. By identifying those at risk of having chronic insomnia, appropriate interventions can be commenced.

  17. Validation of the German version of the patient activation measure 13 (PAM13-D) in an international multicentre study of primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenk-Franz, K.; Hibbard, J.H.; Herrmann, W.J.; Freund, T.; Szecsenyi, J.; Djalali, S.; Steurer-Stey, C.; Sonnichsen, A.; Tiesler, F.; Storch, M.; Schneider, N.; Gensichen, J.

    2013-01-01

    The patients' active participation in their medical care is important for patients with chronic diseases. Measurements of patient activation are needed for studies and in clinical practice. This study aims to validate the Patient Activation Measure 13 (PAM13-D) in German-speaking primary care

  18. Sex, race, and consideration of bariatric surgery among primary care patients with moderate to severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Christina C; Huskey, Karen W; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Colten, Mary Ellen; Davis, Roger B; Hamel, Marybeth

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of few obesity treatments to produce substantial weight loss but only a small proportion of medically-eligible patients, especially men and racial minorities, undergo bariatric surgery. To describe primary care patients' consideration of bariatric surgery, potential variation by sex and race, and factors that underlie any variation. Telephone interview of 337 patients with a body mass index or BMI > 35 kg/m(2) seen at four diverse primary care practices in Greater-Boston. Patients' consideration of bariatric surgery. Of 325 patients who had heard of bariatric surgery, 34 % had seriously considered surgery. Men were less likely than women and African Americans were less likely than Caucasian patients to have considered surgery after adjustment for sociodemographics and BMI. Comorbid conditions did not explain sex and racial differences but racial differences dissipated after adjustment for quality of life (QOL), which tended to be higher among African American than Caucasian patients. Physician recommendation of bariatric surgery was independently associated with serious consideration for surgery [OR 4.95 (95 % CI 2.81-8.70)], but did not explain variation in consideration of surgery across sex and race. However, if recommended by their doctor, men were as willing and African American and Hispanic patients were more willing to consider bariatric surgery than their respective counterparts after adjustment. Nevertheless, only 20 % of patients reported being recommended bariatric surgery by their doctor and African Americans and men were less likely to receive this recommendation; racial differences in being recommended surgery were also largely explained by differences in QOL. High perceived risk to bariatric surgery was the most commonly cited barrier; financial concerns were uncommonly cited. Single geographic region; examined consideration and not who eventually proceeded with bariatric surgery. African Americans and men were less likely to

  19. Internalized stigma as an independent risk factor for substance use problems among primary care patients: Rationale and preliminary support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Magdalena; Watkins, Katherine E; Ober, Allison J; Osilla, Karen C; Ewing, Brett

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about internalized stigma among primary care patients, and whether the presence of internalized stigma is related to the severity of substance use problems independent of substance use-related variables. We sought to examine the relationship between internalized stigma and substance use problems among primary care patients with opioid or alcohol use disorders (OAUDs). We present baseline data from 393 primary care patients who were enrolled in a study of collaborative care for OAUDs. Regression analyses examined the relationship between internalized stigma and substance use problems, controlling for demographics, psychiatric comorbidity, and quantity/frequency of use. The majority of participants reported thinking, at least sometimes, that they "have permanently screwed up" their lives (60%), and felt "ashamed" (60%), and "out of place in the world" (51%) as a result of their opioid or alcohol use. Higher internalized stigma was significantly related to more substance use problems (β=2.68, p<0.01), even after the effects of covariates were accounted for. Stigma added 22%, out of 51% total variance explained, leading to a significant improvement in prediction of substance use problems. Among this group of primary care patients with OAUDs, rates of internalized stigma were comparable to those reported in specialty substance use treatment settings. Consistent with extant specialty care literature, our results suggest that internalized stigma may be a unique contributor that is associated with treatment outcomes, such as substance use problems, among primary care patients with OAUDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcomes among buprenorphine-naloxone primary care patients after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Babak; Grossman, Ellie; Williams, Arthur R; Biary, Rana; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D

    2014-01-27

    The extent of damage in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was unprecedented. Bellevue Hospital Center (BHC), a tertiary public hospital, was evacuated and temporarily closed as a result of hurricane-related damages. BHC's large primary care office-based buprenorphine clinic was relocated to an affiliate public hospital for three weeks. The extent of environmental damage and ensuing service disruption effects on rates of illicit drug, tobacco, and alcohol misuse, buprenorphine medication supply disruptions, or direct resource losses among office-based buprenorphine patients is to date unknown. A quantitative and qualitative semi-structured survey was administered to patients in BHC's primary care buprenorphine program starting one month after the hurricane. Survey domains included: housing and employment disruptions; social and economic support; treatment outcomes (buprenorphine adherence and ability to get care), and tobacco, alcohol, and drug use. Open-ended questions probed general patient experiences related to the storm, coping strategies, and associated disruptions. There were 132 patients enrolled in the clinic at the time of the storm; of those, 91 patients were recruited to the survey, and 89 completed (98% of those invited). Illicit opioid misuse was rare, with 7 respondents reporting increased heroin or illicit prescription opioid use following Sandy. Roughly half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine-naloxone medication supply post-event, and self-lowering of daily doses to prolong supply was common. Additional buprenorphine was obtained through unscheduled telephone or written refills from relocated Bellevue providers, informally from friends and family, and, more rarely, from drug dealers. The findings highlight the relative adaptability of public sector office-based buprenorphine treatment during and after a significant natural disaster. Only minimal increases in self-reported substance use were reported

  1. Resource Utilisation and Costs of Depressive Patients in Germany: Results from the Primary Care Monitoring for Depressive Patients Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Krauth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is the most common type of mental disorder in Germany. It is associated with a high level of suffering for individuals and imposes a significant burden on society. The aim of this study was to estimate the depression related costs in Germany taking a societal perspective. Materials and Methods. Data were collected from the primary care monitoring for depressive patients trial (PRoMPT of patients with major depressive disorder who were treated in a primary care setting. Resource utilisation and days of sick leave were observed and analysed over a 1-year period. Results. Average depression related costs of €3813 were calculated. Significant differences in total costs due to sex were demonstrated. Male patients had considerable higher total costs than female patients, whereas single cost categories did not differ significantly. Further, differences in costs according to severity of disease and age were observed. The economic burden to society was estimated at €15.6 billion per year. Conclusion. The study results show that depression poses a significant economic burden to society. There is a high potential for prevention, treatment, and patient management innovations to identify and treat patients at an early stage.

  2. Barriers and enablers of physical activity engagement for patients with COPD in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosteli MC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria-Christina Kosteli,1 Nicola R Heneghan,1 Carolyn Roskell,1 Sarah E Williams,1 Peymane Adab,2 Andrew P Dickens,2 Alexandra Enocson,2 David A Fitzmaurice,2 Kate Jolly,2 Rachel Jordan,2 Sheila Greenfield,2 Jennifer Cumming1 1School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK Background: Given that physical activity (PA has a positive impact on COPD symptoms and prognosis, this study examined the factors that both encourage and limit participation in PA for individuals with COPD in a primary care setting from the perspective of social cognitive theory.Methods: A purposive sample of 26 individuals with a range of COPD severity (age range: 50–89 years; males =15 were recruited from primary care to participate in one of four focus groups. Thematic analysis was undertaken to identify key concepts related to their self-efficacy beliefs.Results: Several barriers and enablers closely related to self-efficacy beliefs and symptom severity were identified. The main barriers were health related (fatigue, mobility problems, breathing issues caused by the weather, psychological (embarrassment, fear, frustration/disappointment, attitudinal (feeling in control of their condition, PA perception, older age perception, and motivational. The main enabling factors were related to motivation (autonomous or controlled, attitudes, self-regulation, and performance accomplishments.Clinical implications: When designing interventions for individuals with COPD, it is important to understand the patient-specific social cognitive influences on PA participation. This information can then inform individually tailored management planning. Keywords: COPD, social cognitive theory, self-efficacy, barriers, enablers, primary care

  3. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Gilchrist, Valerie J

    2016-06-01

    Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (rate ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more team members, and had a single RN communicating patient care

  4. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Kamnetz, Sandra A.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. Objective To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. Participants 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Results Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (Rate Ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds Ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Conclusions Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more

  5. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-04-19

    There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with higher rates of chronic diseases such as obesity

  6. Advance care planning in patients with primary malignant brain tumours: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Song

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Advance care planning (ACP is a process of reflection and communication of a person’s future health care preferences, and has been shown to improve end-of-life care for patients. The aim of this systematic review is to present an evidence-based overview of ACP in patients with primary malignant brain tumours (pmBT. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using medical and health science electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, MEDLINE, ProQuest, Social Care Online, Scopus and Web of Science up to July 2016. Manual search of bibliographies of articles and grey literature search were also conducted. Two independent reviewers selected studies, extracted data and assessed the methodologic quality of the studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program’s appraisal tools. All studies were included irrespective of the study design. A meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity amongst included studies; therefore, a narrative analysis was performed for best evidence synthesis. Overall, 19 studies were included (1 RCT, 17 cohort studies, 1 qualitative study with 4686 participants. All studies scored low to moderate on the methodological quality assessment, implying high risk of bias. A single RCT evaluating a video decision support tool in facilitating ACP in pmBT patients showed a beneficial effect in promoting comfort care and gaining confidence in decision–making. However, the effect of the intervention on quality of life and care at the end-of-life were unclear. There was a low rate of use of ACP discussions at the end-of-life. Advance Directive completion rates and place of death varied between different studies. Positive effects of ACP included lower hospital readmission rates, and intensive care unit utilization. None of the studies assessed mortality outcomes associated with ACP. In conclusion, this review found some beneficial effects of ACP in pmBT. The literature still remains limited in this area, with lack of

  7. The role of the primary care physician in helping adolescent and adult patients improve asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P

    2011-09-01

    Many adolescents and adults with asthma continue to have poorly controlled disease, often attributable to poor adherence to asthma therapy. Failure to adhere to recommended treatment may result from a desire to avoid regular reliance on medications, inappropriate high tolerance of asthma symptoms, failure to perceive the chronic nature of asthma, and poor inhaler technique. Primary care physicians need to find opportunities and methods to address these and other issues related to poor asthma control. Few adolescents or adults with asthma currently have asthma "checkup" visits, usually seeking medical care only with an exacerbation. Therefore, nonrespiratory-related office visits represent an important opportunity to assess baseline asthma control and the factors that most commonly lead to poor control. Tools such as the Asthma Control Test, the Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire, the Asthma Control Questionnaire, and the Asthma APGAR provide standardized, patient-friendly ways to capture necessary asthma information. For uncontrolled asthma, physicians can refer to the stepwise approach in the 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines to adjust medication use, but they must consider step-up decisions in the context of quality of the patient's inhaler technique, adherence, and ability to recognize and avoid or eliminate triggers. For this review, a literature search of PubMed from 2000 through August 31, 2010, was performed using the following terms (or a combination of these terms): asthma, asthma control, primary care, NAEPP guidelines, assessment, uncontrolled asthma, burden, impact, assessment tools, triggers, pharmacotherapy, safety. Studies were limited to human studies published in English. Articles were also identified by a manual search of bibliographies from retrieved articles and from article archives of the author.

  8. Patient satisfaction between primary care providers and hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in Jilin province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Wang, Pingping; Kong, Xuan; Liang, Hailun; Zhang, Xiumin; Shi, Leiyu

    2016-06-01

    To assess patient satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care between primary care providers and secondary/tertiary hospitals, and to examine its association with socio-demographic characteristics and type of institution, based on self-reported survey data. Cross-sectional survey. Healthcare facilities within Jilin province, China. In total, 993 outpatients and 925 inpatients aged ≥15 years old were recruited. Patient satisfaction with the care experience. Patient satisfaction with outpatient and inpatient care was significantly associated with type of healthcare delivery setting in Jilin, China. Seeking outpatient care from community health centers (CHCs) was significantly associated with a higher ratio of patient satisfaction. Patients of county and tertiary hospitals complained about long-waiting times, bad attitudes of health workers, high expense of treatment, and their overall satisfaction towards outpatient care was lower. In the terms of inpatient care, patients were more satisfied with treatment expense in CHCs compared with county hospitals. CHCs and hospitals face different challenges regarding patient satisfaction. Further healthcare reform in China need to adopt more measures (e.g. increasing quality of primary care, setting up a referral medical system etc.) to improve patient satisfaction. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  9. Association of medical home team-based care functions and perceived improvements in patient-centered care at VHA primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Dolan, Emily D; Fihn, Stephan D; Rodriguez, Hector P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Lempa, Michele; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Joos, Sandra; Lawler, Lauren H; Harvey, Henry B; Stark, Richard; Schectman, Gordon; Nelson, Karin M

    2014-12-01

    Team-based care is central to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), but most PCMH evaluations measure team structure exclusively. We assessed team-based care in terms of team structure, process and effectiveness, and the association with improvements in teams׳ abilities to deliver patient-centered care. We fielded a cross-sectional survey among 913 VA primary care clinics implementing a PCMH model in 2012. The dependent variable was clinic-level respondent-reported improvements in delivery of patient-centered care. Independent variables included three sets of measures: (1) team structure, (2) team process, and (3) team effectiveness. We adjusted for clinic workload and patient comorbidity. 4819 surveys were returned (25% estimated response rate). The highest ratings were for team structure (median of 89% of respondents being assigned to a teamlet, i.e., a PCP working with the same clinical associate, nurse care manager and clerk) and lowest for team process (median of 10% of respondents reporting the lowest level of stress/chaos). In multivariable regression, perceived improvements in patient-centered care were most strongly associated with participatory decision making (β=32, Pteam processes). A stressful/chaotic clinic environment was associated with higher barriers to patient centered care (β=0.16-0.34, P=Team process and effectiveness measures, often omitted from PCMH evaluations, had stronger associations with perceived improvements in patient-centered care than team structure measures. Team process and effectiveness measures may facilitate synthesis of evaluation findings and help identify positive outlier clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Patients' perspectives on the medical primary-secondary care interface: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Rod; Cooper, Jamie; Barbour, Rosaline; Polson, Rob; Wilson, Philip

    2015-10-15

    To synthesise the published literature on the patient experience of the medical primary-secondary care interface and to determine priorities for future work in this field aimed at improving clinical outcomes. Systematic review and metaethnographic synthesis of primary studies that used qualitative methods to explore patients' perspectives of the medical primary-secondary care interface. International primary-secondary care interface. EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus with Full text, PsycINFO, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, Health Business Elite, Biomedica Reference Collection: Comprehensive Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, eBook Collection, Web of Science Core Collection: Citation Indexes and Social Sciences Citation Index, and grey literature. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were full research papers employing qualitative methodology to explore patients' perspectives of the medical primary-secondary care interface. The 7-step metaethnographic approach described by Noblit and Hare, which involves cross-interpretation between studies while preserving the context of the primary data. The search identified 690 articles, of which 39 were selected for full-text review. 20 articles were included in the systematic review that encompassed a total of 689 patients from 10 countries. 4 important areas specific to the primary-secondary care interface from the patients' perspective emerged: barriers to care, communication, coordination, and 'relationships and personal value'. Patients should be the focus of any transfer of care between primary and secondary systems. From their perspective, areas for improvement may be classified into four domains that should usefully guide future work aimed at improving quality at this important interface. PROSPERO CRD42014009486. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. [Analysis of patient complaints in Primary Care: An opportunity to improve clinical safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Añel-Rodríguez, R M; Cambero-Serrano, M I; Irurzun-Zuazabal, E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and type of the clinical safety problems contained in the complaints made by patients and users in Primary Care. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted by analysing both the complaint forms and the responses given to them in the period of one year. At least 4.6% of all claims analysed in this study contained clinical safety problems. The family physician is the professional who received the majority of the complaints (53.6%), and the main reason was the problems related to diagnosis (43%), mainly the delay in diagnosis. Other variables analysed were the severity of adverse events experienced by patients (in 68% of cases the patient suffered some harm), the subsequent impact on patient care, which was affected in 39% of cases (7% of cases even requiring hospital admission), and the level of preventability of adverse events (96% avoidable) described in the claims. Finally the type of response issued to each complaint was analysed, being purely bureaucratic in 64% of all cases. Complaints are a valuable source of information about the deficiencies identified by patients and healthcare users. There is considerable scope for improvement in the analysis and management of claims in general, and those containing clinical safety issues in particular. To date, in our area, there is a lack of appropriate procedures for processing these claims. Likewise, we believe that other pathways or channels should be opened to enable communication by patients and healthcare users. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Health-related quality of life of patients of Brazilian primary health care

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    Bruna de Oliveira Ascef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL of patients of the primary health care of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS and its associated factors. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study with data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos – Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines – Services, 2015. Data were collected with a questionnaire that included the EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D instrument. Patients from the five regions of Brazil were interviewed. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze their Health-Related Quality of Life and its associated factors. RESULTS Of the total of 8,590 patients, the most frequent dimensions were pain/discomfort (50.7% and anxiety/depression (38.8%. About 10% of the patients reported extreme problems in these dimensions. The following factors were significantly associated with a worse quality of life: being female; having arthritis, osteoarthritis, or rheumatism; cerebrovascular accident; heart disease; depression; health self-assessment as poor or very poor; drinking alcoholic beverages once or more per month; dieting to lose weight, avoiding salt consumption, and reducing fat intake. Significant association was observed between a better quality of life and: living in the North and Southeast regions of Brazil; practicing physical activities; and having a higher educational level. No association was observed with factors related to the health services. CONCLUSIONS The Health-Related Quality of Life of patients was influenced by demographic and socioeconomic factors that were related to health conditions and lifestyle, being useful to guide specific actions for promoting health and the integral care to patients of the Brazilian Unified Health System.

  13. The challenge of involving elderly patients in primary care using an electronic communication tool with their professionals : A mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Catharina C.; Ros, Wynand J.G.; Van Leeuwen, Mia; Schrijvers, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients in primary care often have multiple health problems, with different healthcare professionals involved. For consistency in care, it is required that communication amongst professionals and patient-systems (patient and informal-carers) be well tuned.

  14. Inconsistent condom use among public primary care patients with tuberculosis in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matseke, Gladys; Peltzer, Karl; Louw, Julia; Naidoo, Pamela; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2012-01-01

    The high rate of HIV infections among tuberculosis (TB) patients in South Africa calls for urgent HIV reduction interventions in this subpopulation. While correct and consistent condom use is one of the effective means of HIV prevention among sexually active people, there is insufficient research on condom use among TB patients in South Africa. The aim of this paper was to determine the prevalence of inconsistent condom use among public primary care TB patients and its associated factors using a sample of 4900 TB patients from a cross-sectional survey in three health districts in South Africa. Results indicated that when asked about their consistency of condom use in the past 3 months, 63.5% of the participants reported that they did not always use condoms. In the multivariable analysis, being married (OR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.25-2.20) or cohabitating or separated, divorced, or widowed (OR = 3.67; 1.85-7.29), lower educational level (OR = 0.66; 0.46-0.94), greater poverty (OR = 1.60; 1.25-2.20), not having HIV status disclosed (OR = 0.34; 0.25-0.48), sexual partner on antiretroviral treatment (OR = 0.38; 0.23-0.60), and partner alcohol use before sex (OR = 1.56; 1.30-1.90) were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use in the past 3 months. The low proportion of consistent condom use among TB patients needs to be improved.

  15. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits.

  16. Relationship between Teach-back and patient-centered communication in primary care pediatric encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaczewski, Adam; Bauman, Laurie J; Blank, Arthur E; Dreyer, Benard; Abrams, Mary Ann; Stein, Ruth E K; Roter, Debra L; Hossain, Jobayer; Byck, Hal; Sharif, Iman

    2017-07-01

    We proposed and tested a theoretical framework for how use of Teach-back could influence communication during the pediatric clinical encounter. Audio-taped pediatric primary care encounters with 44 children with asthma were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System to measure patient-centered communication and affective engagement of the parent. A newly created Teach-back Loop Score measured the extent to which Teach-back occurred during the clinical encounter; parental health literacy was measured by Newest Vital Sign. Logistic regression was used to test the relationship between Teach-back and features of communication. Focus groups held separately with clinicians and parents elicited perceptions of Teach-back usefulness. Teach-back was used in 39% of encounters. Visits with Teach-back had more patient centered communication (p=0.01). Adjusting for parent health literacy, parent age, and child age, Teach-back increased the odds of both patient centered communication [proportional AOR (95% CI)=4.97 (4.47-5.53)]and negative affect [AOR (95% CI)=5.39 (1.68-17.31)]. Focus group themes common to clinicians and parents included: Teach-back is effective, could cause discomfort, should be used with children, and nurses should use it. Teach-back was associated with more patient-centered communication and increased affective engagement of parents. Standardizing Teach-back use may strengthen patient-centered communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Rasch analysis of patients' opinions of primary health care professionals' ethical behaviour with respect to communication issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, Luis; Kostov, Belchin; López-Pina, Jose A; Solans-Julián, Pilar; Navarro-Rubio, M Dolors; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2015-04-01

    Patients' opinions are crucial in assessing the effectiveness of the ethical theories which underlie the care relationship between patients and primary health care professionals. To study the ethical behaviour of primary health care professionals with respect to communication issues according to patients' opinions. Cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire in patients from a network of 15 urban primary health centres. Participants were patients attended at the centres when the study was conducted. We used a Rasch analysis to verify the structure of the 17 questionnaire items, and to calculate interval level measures for patients and items. We analysed differences according to patient subgroups using analysis of variance tests and differences between the endorsement of each item. We analysed 1013 (70.34%) of questionnaires. Data fit to the Rasch model was achieved after collapsing two categories and eliminating five items. Items with the lowest degree of endorsement were related to the management of differences in conflictive situations between patients and health care professionals. We found significant differences (P communication skills were respected by family physicians and nurses. However, opinions on endorsement were lower when patients disagreed with health care professionals. The differences found between patient subgroups demonstrated the importance of trust and confidence between patients and professionals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Utility of electronic patient records in primary care for stroke secondary prevention trials

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    Ashworth Mark

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to inform the design of a pragmatic trial of stroke prevention in primary care by evaluating data recorded in electronic patient records (EPRs as potential outcome measures. The study also evaluated achievement of recommended standards of care; variation between family practices; and changes in risk factor values from before to after stroke. Methods Data from the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD were analysed for 22,730 participants with an index first stroke between 2003 and 2006 from 414 family practices. For each subject, the EPR was evaluated for the 12 months before and after stroke. Measures relevant to stroke secondary prevention were analysed including blood pressure (BP, cholesterol, smoking, alcohol use, body mass index (BMI, atrial fibrillation, utilisation of antihypertensive, antiplatelet and cholesterol lowering drugs. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were estimated by family practice. Random effects models were fitted to evaluate changes in risk factor values over time. Results In the 12 months following stroke, BP was recorded for 90%, cholesterol for 70% and body mass index (BMI for 47%. ICCs by family practice ranged from 0.02 for BP and BMI to 0.05 for LDL and HDL cholesterol. For subjects with records available both before and after stroke, the mean reductions from before to after stroke were: mean systolic BP, 6.02 mm Hg; diastolic BP, 2.78 mm Hg; total cholesterol, 0.60 mmol/l; BMI, 0.34 Kg/m2. There was an absolute reduction in smokers of 5% and heavy drinkers of 4%. The proportion of stroke patients within the recommended guidelines varied from less than a third (29% for systolic BP, just over half for BMI (54%, and over 90% (92% on alcohol consumption. Conclusions Electronic patient records have potential for evaluation of outcomes in pragmatic trials of stroke secondary prevention. Stroke prevention interventions in primary care remain suboptimal but important

  19. Depressive Disorders in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorilehto, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study (PC-VDS) is a naturalistic and prospective cohort study concerning primary care patients with depressive disorders. It forms a collaborative research project between the Department of Mental and Alcohol Research of the National Public Health Institute, and the Primary Health Care Organization of the City of Vantaa. The aim is to obtain a comprehensive view on clinically significant depression in primary care, and to compare depressive patients in prima...

  20. Characteristics Associated with Uncontrolled Blood Pressure Among Portuguese Primary Care Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Rosendo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The sub-group of people with diabetes identified to have worse tensional control should have a different and more intensive approach in primary care. We recommend further longitudinal and population based confirmatory research.

  1. Factors influencing referral of patients with voice disorders from primary care to otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth M; Kim, Jaewhan; Roy, Nelson; Courey, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, timing, and factors that influence referral of patients with laryngeal/voice disorders to otolaryngology following initial evaluation by a primary care physician (PCP). Retrospective analysis of a large, national administrative US claims database. Patients with a laryngeal disorder based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008, seen by a PCP as an outpatient (with or without otolaryngology involvement), and continuously enrolled for 12 months were included. Patient age, gender, geographic region, last PCP laryngeal diagnosis, comorbid conditions, time from first PCP visit to first otolaryngology visit, number of PCP outpatient visits, and number of PCP laryngeal diagnoses were collected. Cox and generalized linear regressions were performed. A total of 149,653 unique patients saw a PCP as an outpatient for a laryngeal/voice disorder, with 136,152 (90.9%) only seeing a PCP, 6,013 (4.0%) referred by a PCP to an otolaryngologist, and 3,820 (2.6%) self-referred to an otolaryngologist. Acute laryngitis had a lower hazard ratio (HR) for otolaryngology referral than chronic laryngitis, nonspecific dysphonia, and laryngeal cancer. Having multiple comorbid conditions was associated with a greater HR for otolaryngology referral than having no comorbidities. Patient age, gender, and geographic region also affected otolaryngology referral. The time to otolaryngology evaluation ranged from 3 months. PCP-referred patients had less time to the otolaryngology evaluation than self-referred patients. Multiple factors affected otolaryngology referral for patients with laryngeal/voice disorders. Further education of PCPs regarding appropriate otolaryngology referral for laryngeal/voice disorders is needed. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. External Validation of Prediction Models for Pneumonia in Primary Care Patients with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierenberg, Alwin; Minnaard, Margaretha C; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumonia remains difficult to diagnose in primary care. Prediction models based on signs and symptoms (S&S) serve to minimize the diagnostic uncertainty. External validation of these models is essential before implementation into routine practice. In this study all published S&S mode...... discriminative accuracy coupled with reasonable to good calibration across the IPD of different study populations. This model is therefore the main candidate for primary care use....

  3. [What do patients think of primary health care? A questionnaire study among patients in Northern Norway in 1987].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, B; Aaraas, I; Forsdahl, A; Fønnebø, V; Fønnebø Knutsen, S; Lundevall, S; Melbye, H; Anvik, T

    1990-11-10

    Doctors and professional health administrators have been the principal decision-makers and the patients have hardly had any direct influence on the planning and organization of primary health care in Norway. In 1987, in order to draw attention to patient opinions, the Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, conducted a questionnaire survey among patients attending general practices in North Norway. The question were selected to cover issues in the contemporary debate on the ideology, organization and standards of services of general practitioners. 36 teaching practices in the region were included in the survey. Altogether 3,739 questionnaires were returned, a response rate of over 60%. The respondents reported more than 16,000 consultations during the last year. This paper presents the methods used and the main findings concerning the representativeness of the results and the potential for generalization. Subsequent publications will present detailed results from the study within the framework of patient experiences, preferences and expectations.

  4. Characteristics of physicians and patients who join team-based primary care practices: evidence from Quebec's Family Medicine Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Natalie; Strumpf, Erin; Fiset-Laniel, Julie; Tousignant, Pierre; Roy, Yves

    2014-06-01

    New models of delivering primary care are being implemented in various countries. In Quebec, Family Medicine Groups (FMGs) are a team-based approach to enhance access to, and coordination of, care. We examined whether physicians' and patients' characteristics predicted their participation in this new model of primary care. Using provincial administrative data, we created a population cohort of Quebec's vulnerable patients. We collected data before the advent of FMGs on patients' demographic characteristics, chronic illnesses and health service use, and their physicians' demographics, and practice characteristics. Multivariate regression was used to identify key predictors of joining a FMG among both patients and physicians. Patients who eventually enrolled in a FMG were more likely to be female, reside outside of an urban region, have a lower SES status, have diabetes and congestive heart failure, visit the emergency department for ambulatory sensitive conditions and be hospitalized for any cause. They were also less likely to have hypertension, visit an ambulatory clinic and have a usual provider of care. Physicians who joined a FMG were less likely to be located in urban locations, had fewer years in medical practice, saw more patients in hospital, and had patients with lower morbidity. Physicians' practice characteristics and patients' health status and health care service use were important predictors of joining a FMG. To avoid basing policy decisions on tenuous evidence, policymakers and researchers should account for differential selection into team-based primary health care models. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. How Views of the Organization of Primary Care Among Patients with Hypertension Vary by Race or Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George L; Stechuchak, Karen M; Weinberger, Morris; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Kirshner, Miriam A; Edelman, David

    2018-04-17

    We assessed potential racial or ethnic differences in the degree to which veterans with pharmaceutically treated hypertension report experiences with their primary care system that are consistent with optimal chronic illness care as suggested by Wagner's Chronic Care Model (CCM). A cross-sectional analysis of the results of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC), which measured components of the care system suggested by the CCM and was completed at baseline by participants in a hypertension disease management clinical trial. Participants had a recent history of uncontrolled systolic blood pressure. Among 377 patients, non-Hispanic African American veterans had almost twice the odds of indicating that their primary care experience is consistent with CCM features when compared with non-Hispanic White patients (odds ratio (OR) = 1.86; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16-2.98). Similar statistically significant associations were observed for follow-up care (OR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.49-4.50), patient activation (OR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.13-2.87), goal setting (OR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.03-2.64), and help with problem solving (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.00-2.60). Non-Hispanic African Americans with pharmaceutically treated hypertension report that the primary care system more closely approximates the Wagner CCM than non-Hispanic White patients.

  6. Scenarios cancer in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, L.F.J. van der; Schellevis, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies predicted an increase in both the incidence and prevalence of cancer in the Netherlands. Other studies showed that cancer patients use primary care more frequently than non-cancer patients. Finally, during the “chronic phase” of the disease, task substitution from

  7. Self-reported interoceptive awareness in primary care patients with past or current low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehling WE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wolf E Mehling,1,2 Jennifer Daubenmier,1,3 Cynthia J Price,5 Mike Acree,1 Elizabeth Bartmess,1 Anita L Stewart41Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Nursing, Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco, CA, 5School of Nursing, Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USABackground: Mind–body interactions play a major role in the prognosis of chronic pain, and mind–body therapies such as meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais presumably provide benefits for pain patients. The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness (MAIA scales, designed to measure key aspects of mind–body interaction, were developed and validated with individuals practicing mind–body therapies, but have never been used in pain patients.Methods: We administered the MAIA to primary care patients with past or current low back pain and explored differences in the performance of the MAIA scales between this and the original validation sample. We compared scale means, exploratory item cluster and confirmatory factor analyses, scale–scale correlations, and internal-consistency reliability between the two samples and explored correlations with validity measures.Results: Responses were analyzed from 435 patients, of whom 40% reported current pain. Cross-sectional comparison between the two groups showed marked differences in eight aspects of interoceptive awareness. Factor and cluster analyses generally confirmed the conceptual model with its eight dimensions in a pain population. Correlations with validity measures were in the expected direction. Internal-consistency reliability was good for six of eight MAIA scales. We provided specific suggestions for their further development.Conclusion: Self-reported aspects of interoceptive awareness differ between primary care patients with past or current

  8. [Primary care in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    Italy is not a country where Spanish doctors emigrate, as there is an over-supply of health care professionals. The Italian Servizio Sanitario Nazionale has some differences compared to the Spanish National Health System. The Servizio Sanitario Nazionale is financed by national and regional taxes and co-payments. There are taxes earmarked for health, and Primary Care receives 50% of the total funds. Italian citizens and residents in Italy have the right to free health cover. However, there are co-payments for laboratory and imaging tests, pharmaceuticals, specialist ambulatory services, and emergencies. Co-payments vary in the different regions. The provision of services is regional, and thus fragmentation and major inequities are the norm. Doctors in Primary Care are self-employed and from 2000 onwards, there are incentives to work in multidisciplinary teams. Salary is regulated by a national contract and it is the sum of per-capita payments and extra resources for specific activities. Responsibilities are similar to those of Spanish professionals. However, medical care is more personal. Relationships between Primary Care and specialised care depend on the doctors' relationships. Primary Care doctors are gatekeepers for specialised care, except for gynaecology, obstetrics and paediatrics. Specialised training is compulsory in order to work as general practitioner. The Italian Health Care System is a national health system like the Spanish one. However, health care professionals are self-employed, and there are co-payments. In spite of co-payments, Italians have one of the highest average life expectancy, and they support a universal and publicly funded health-care system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Managing obesity in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Christine; Brown, Jenny

    Obesity is a complex problem and often difficult to tackle in primary care. A year-long pilot of a practice nurse-led scheme that used a holistic approach towards self-care in obesity management was set up to reduce the cardiovascular risk of patients who were obese and improve their quality of life. This person-centred approach may offer an important tool in the management of these patients in the GP surgery.

  10. Patient preferences and treatment safety for uncomplicated vulvovaginal candidiasis in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Susana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginitis is a common complaint in primary care. In uncomplicated candidal vaginitis, there are no differences in effectiveness between oral or vaginal treatment. Some studies describe that the preferred treatment is the oral one, but a Cochrane's review points out inconsistencies associated with the report of the preferred way that limit the use of such data. Risk factors associated with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis still remain controversial. Methods/Design This work describes a protocol of a multicentric prospective observational study with one year follow up, to describe the women's reasons and preferences to choose the way of administration (oral vs topical in the treatment of not complicated candidal vaginitis. The number of women required is 765, they are chosen by consecutive sampling. All of whom are aged 16 and over with vaginal discharge and/or vaginal pruritus, diagnosed with not complicated vulvovaginitis in Primary Care in Madrid. The main outcome variable is the preferences of the patients in treatment choice; secondary outcome variables are time to symptoms relief and adverse reactions and the frequency of recurrent vulvovaginitis and the risk factors. In the statistical analysis, for the main objective will be descriptive for each of the variables, bivariant analysis and multivariate analysis (logistic regression.. The dependent variable being the type of treatment chosen (oral or topical and the independent, the variables that after bivariant analysis, have been associated to the treatment preference. Discussion Clinical decisions, recommendations, and practice guidelines must not only attend to the best available evidence, but also to the values and preferences of the informed patient.

  11. Correlates of late-life major depression: a comparison of urban and rural primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bruce; Conwell, Yeates; Delavan, Rachel L

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether factors associated with depression differ between elderly residents of rural and urban areas. The research design was cross-sectional and observational. The study subjects consisted of 926 Medicare primary care patients (650 urban and 276 rural) who were age 65+ and cognitively intact and had enrolled in a randomized, controlled Medicare demonstration. Major depression was identified by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. A logistic regression model was estimated that included a rural-urban indicator variable, additional independent variables, and interaction terms between the rural-urban indicator and independent variables that were significant at p Reporting 0-1 close friends (odds ratio [OR]: 6.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.18-21.58), 2+ emergency room visits during the past 6 months (OR: 4.00; 95% CI: 1.19-13.43), and more financial strain (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.01-2.23) were associated with significantly higher likelihood of major depression among rural as compared with urban patients. The SF-36 Physical Component Summary score had a curvilinear relationship with major depression and was higher for urban patients. The predicted probability for major depression is lower for the rural patients when financial strain is low, about the same for rural and urban patients when strain is intermediate, and higher for rural patients when strain is high. Clinicians in rural areas should be vigilant for major depression among patients with very few close friends, several recent emergency department visits, and financial strain.

  12. Cardiovascular risk rate in hypertensive patients attended in primary health care units: the influence of pharmaceutical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Yuri Milen Firmino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular complications are relevant due to their frequency and severity on the hypertension scenario. Studies refer Pharmaceutical Care (PC as capable of decreasing cardiovascular risk rate (%CVR on hypertensive patients. This study aimed to investigate, through a randomized clinical assay, the influence of PC service on the %CVR of hypertensive patients assisted in a health primary care unit from Fortaleza-Ceará. Two study groups were formed: i. Intervention Group (IG, which received orientation about taking medicines, actions aiming to prevent/solve medicine interactions and adverse effects and non-pharmacological interventions for 9 months and, ii. Control Group (CG, which received traditional assistance of the unit and was monitored during the same period. It was observed a statistically significant reduction on %CVR (10.76 to 7.86; p=0.04 and systolic blood pressure levels (SBP (137.69 to 131.54; p<0.01 in the IG, while, in the CG, there was no significant alteration. 151 Drug Related Problem (DRP were identified and it was realized 124 pharmaceutical interventions, with 89.2% of them resulting on solution/prevention of the problem. Our findings indicated that the inclusion of the PC service in the hypertensive health assistance was more effective at the %CVR and the SBP reduction in comparison to the traditional assistance offered.

  13. Patients' assessments of the continuity of primary care in Finland: a 15-year follow-up questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivio, Risto; Holmberg-Marttila, Doris; Mattila, Kari J

    2014-10-01

    Continuity of care is an essential aspect of quality in general practice. This study is the first systematic follow-up of Finnish primary care patients' assessments with regard to personal continuity of care. To ascertain whether patient-reported longitudinal personal continuity of care is related to patient characteristics and their consultation experiences, and how this had changed over the study period. A 15-year follow-up questionnaire survey that took place at Tampere University Hospital catchment area, Finland. The survey was conducted among patients attending health centres in the Tampere University Hospital catchment area from 1998 until 2013. From a sample of 363 464 patients, a total of 157 549 responded. The responses of patients who had visited a doctor during the survey weeks (n = 97 468) were analysed. Continuity of care was assessed by asking the question: 'When visiting the health centre, do you usually see the same doctor?'; patients could answer 'yes' or 'no'. Approximately half of the responders had met the same doctor when visiting the healthcare centre. Personal continuity of care decreased by 15 percentage points (from 66% to 51%) during the study years. The sense of continuity was linked to several patients' experiences of the consultation. The most prominent factor contributing to the sense of continuity of care was having a doctor who was specifically appointed (odds ratio 7.28, 95% confidence interval = 6.65 to 7.96). Continuity of care was proven to enhance the experienced quality of primary care. Patients felt that continuity of care was best realised when they could consult a doctor who had been specifically appointed to them. Despite efforts of the authorities, over the past 15 years patient-reported continuity of care has declined in Finland. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  14. Potentially inappropriate prescribing to older patients in primary care in the Netherlands: a retrospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin-Huisman, Linette; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Beers, Erna

    2017-01-01

    potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is associated with adverse health effects in older patients. PIP comprises prescription of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs). to estimate the prevalence of PIMs and PPOs among older patients in primary

  15. A study of a culturally focused psychiatric consultation service for Asian American and Latino American primary care patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fava Maurizio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnic minorities with depression are more likely to seek mental health care through primary care providers (PCPs than mental health specialists. However, both provider and patient-specific challenges exist. PCP-specific challenges include unfamiliarity with depressive symptom profiles in diverse patient populations, limited time to address mental health, and limited referral options for mental health care. Patient-specific challenges include stigma around mental health issues and reluctance to seek mental health treatment. To address these issues, we implemented a multi-component intervention for Asian American and Latino American primary care patients with depression at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH. Methods/Design We propose a randomized controlled trial to evaluate a culturally appropriate intervention to improve the diagnosis and treatment of depression in our target population. Our goals are to facilitate a primary care providers' ability to provide appropriate, culturally informed care of depression, and b patients' knowledge of and resources for receiving treatment for depression. Our two-year long intervention targets Asian American and Latino American adult (18 years of age or older primary care patients at MGH screening positive for symptoms of depression. All eligible patients in the intervention arm of the study who screen positive will be offered a culturally focused psychiatric (CFP consultation. Patients will meet with a study clinician and receive toolkits that include psychoeducational booklets, worksheets and community resources. Within two weeks of the initial consultation, patients will attend a follow-up visit with the CFP clinicians. Primary outcomes will determine the feasibility and cost associated with implementation of the service, and evaluate patient and provider satisfaction with the CFP service. Exploratory aims will describe the study population at screening, recruitment, and enrollment

  16. Who needs a gatekeeper? Patients' views of the role of the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, R; Tabenkin, H; Brammli-Greenberg, S

    2000-06-01

    The primary care physician serving as a 'gatekeeper' can make judicious decisions about the appropriate use of medical services, and thereby contribute to containing costs while improving the quality of care. However, in Israel, sick funds competing for members have not adopted this model for fear of endangering their competitive stance. The purpose of this study was to examine, for the first time, the stated preferences and actual behaviour of a national sample of members of the four Israeli sick funds regarding self-referral to specialists, and to identify the characteristics of patients who prefer the gatekeeper model. Data were derived from a national telephone survey carried out in 1997. A random representative sample of 1084 of all adult sick fund members were interviewed, with a response rate of 81%. Bivariate analysis was conducted using over all chi-square tests, and multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression models. A third of all respondents prefer self-referral to a specialist, 40% prefer their family physician to act as gatekeeper and 19% prefer the physician to co-ordinate care but to refer themselves to a specialist. Independent variables predicting preference for the gatekeeper model are: living in the periphery, sick fund membership, low level of education, being male, fair or poor health status, having a permanent family physician and being satisfied with the professional level of the family physician. A significant correlation was found between practising self-referral and preference for self-referral. CONCLUSIONS.: The findings indicate the importance of surveying patients' attitudes as an input in policy formulation. The study identified specific population groups which prefer the gatekeeper model, and explored the advantages of a flexible model of gatekeeping.

  17. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Mola, Ernesto; Rollo, Rodolfo; Caldarola, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco; Pomo, Vincenzo; Bux, Francesco

    2010-05-06

    Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM) model and of the introduction of "care manager" nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative "team" consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk) to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization. Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services as well as treatment paths helped promote confidence and enhance safety of chronic patient management at home. Physicians, care managers, and patients showed unanimous agreement regarding the positive impact on patient health and self-management, and attributed the outcomes to the strong "partnership" between the care manager and the patient and the collaboration between the physician and the care manager. Future studies should consider the possibility of incorporating a patient empowerment model which considers the patient as the most important member of the health team and care managers as key health care collaborators able to enhance and support services to patients provided by physicians in

  18. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Aznida Firzah Abdul; Aziz, Noor Azah Abd; Nordin, Nor Azlin Mohd; Ali, Mohd Fairuz; Sulong, Saperi; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s) control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI). Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD) 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5). The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0) months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007), while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06). Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100) to 90.5 (range: 27−100) (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01). Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22) to 3.0 (range: 0−19) though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457). Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level. PMID:24347948

  19. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  20. Will Mobile Diabetes Education Teams (MDETs in primary care improve patient care processes and health outcomes? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gucciardi Enza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence to suggest that delivery of diabetes self-management support by diabetes educators in primary care may improve patient care processes and patient clinical outcomes; however, the evaluation of such a model in primary care is nonexistent in Canada. This article describes the design for the evaluation of the implementation of Mobile Diabetes Education Teams (MDETs in primary care settings in Canada. Methods/design This study will use a non-blinded, cluster-randomized controlled trial stepped wedge design to evaluate the Mobile Diabetes Education Teams' intervention in improving patient clinical and care process outcomes. A total of 1,200 patient charts at participating primary care sites will be reviewed for data extraction. Eligible patients will be those aged ≥18, who have type 2 diabetes and a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c of ≥8%. Clusters (that is, primary care sites will be randomized to the intervention and control group using a block randomization procedure within practice size as the blocking factor. A stepped wedge design will be used to sequentially roll out the intervention so that all clusters eventually receive the intervention. The time at which each cluster begins the intervention is randomized to one of the four roll out periods (0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Clusters that are randomized into the intervention later will act as the control for those receiving the intervention earlier. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in the proportion of patients who achieve the recommended HbA1c target of ≤7% between intervention and control groups. Qualitative work (in-depth interviews with primary care physicians, MDET educators and patients; and MDET educators’ field notes and debriefing sessions will be undertaken to assess the implementation process and effectiveness of the MDET intervention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01553266

  1. Patients Suspected of Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Cross-Sectional Study Exploring the Sensitivity of Rome III Criteria in Primary Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsbro, Anne Line; Begtrup, Luise Mølenberg; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The Rome III criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are recommended by guidelines to help identify the syndrome. The majority of IBS patients are managed in primary care, where a pragmatic approach to diagnosis is usually adopted, using clinical judgment and knowledge about the patient. Many...

  2. Risk factors for development of impaired renal function in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naushahi, M.J.; Grauw, W.J.C. de; Avery, A.J.; Gerwen, W.H.E.M. van; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Weel, C. van

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate risk factors for the development of an impaired renal function, defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by Cockcroft-Gault formula < 50.5 ml/min, in primary care patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A case-control study of Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with

  3. Feasibility and validity of the self-administered computerized assessment of mild cognitive impairment with older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Mary C; Naglie, Gary; Upshur, Ross; Moineddin, Rahim; Charles, Jocelyn; Jaakkimainen, R Liisa

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether a validated computerized cognitive test, the Computerized Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI), could be independently completed by older primary care patients. We also determined the optimal cut-off for the CAMCI global risk score for mild cognitive impairment against an independent neuropsychological reference standard. All eligible patients aged 65 years and older, seen consecutively over 2 months by 1 family practice of 13 primary care physicians, were invited to participate. Patients with a diagnosis or previous work-up for dementia were excluded. Primary care physicians indicated whether they, the patient, or family had concerns about each patient's cognition. A total of 130 patients with cognitive concerns and a matched sample of 133 without cognitive concerns were enrolled. The CAMCI was individually administered after instructions to work independently. Comments were recorded verbatim. A total of 259 (98.5%) completed the entire CAMCI. Two hundred and forty-one (91.6%) completed it without any questions or after simple acknowledgment of their question. Lack of computer experience was the only patient characteristic that decreased the odds of independent CAMCI completion. These results support the feasibility of using self-administered computerized cognitive tests with older primary care patients, given the increasing reliance on computers by people of all ages. The optimal cut-off score had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 74%.

  4. Five year prognosis in patients with angina identified in primary care: incident cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Brian S

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the risk of acute myocardial infarction, invasive cardiac procedures, and mortality among patients with newly diagnosed angina over five years. DESIGN: Incident cohort study of patients with primary care data linked to secondary care and mortality data. SETTING: 40 primary care practices in Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: 1785 patients with a diagnosis of angina as their first manifestation of ischaemic heart disease, 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2001. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adjusted hazard ratios for acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, death from ischaemic heart disease, and all cause mortality, adjusted for demographics, lifestyle risk factors, and comorbidity at cohort entry. RESULTS: Mean age was 62.3 (SD 11.3). Male sex was associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (hazard ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.35 to 2.97), death from ischaemic heart disease (2.80, 1.73 to 4.53), and all cause mortality (1.82, 1.33 to 2.49). Increasing age was associated with acute myocardial infarction (1.04, 1.02 to 1.06, per year of age increase), death from ischaemic heart disease (1.09, 1.06 to 1.11, per year of age increase), and all cause mortality (1.09, 1.07 to 1.11, per year of age increase). Smoking was associated with subsequent acute myocardial infarction (1.94, 1.31 to 2.89), death from ischaemic heart disease (2.12, 1.32 to 3.39), and all cause mortality (2.11, 1.52 to 2.95). Obesity was associated with death from ischaemic heart disease (2.01, 1.17 to 3.45) and all cause mortality (2.20, 1.52 to 3.19). Previous stroke was associated with all cause mortality (1.78, 1.13 to 2.80) and chronic kidney disease with death from ischaemic heart disease (5.72, 1.74 to 18.79). Men were more likely than women to have coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty after a diagnosis of angina; older people were less likely to

  5. Why do patients seek primary medical care in emergency departments? An ethnographic exploration of access to general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKichan, Fiona; Brangan, Emer; Wye, Lesley; Checkland, Kath; Lasserson, Daniel; Huntley, Alyson; Morris, Richard; Tammes, Peter; Salisbury, Chris; Purdy, Sarah

    2017-05-04

    To describe how processes of primary care access influence decisions to seek help at the emergency department (ED). Ethnographic case study combining non-participant observation, informal and formal interviewing. Six general practitioner (GP) practices located in three commissioning organisations in England. Reception areas at each practice were observed over the course of a working week (73 hours in total). Practice documents were collected and clinical and non-clinical staff were interviewed (n=19). Patients with recent ED use, or a carer if aged 16 and under, were interviewed (n=29). Past experience of accessing GP care recursively informed patient decisions about where to seek urgent care, and difficulties with access were implicit in patient accounts of ED use. GP practices had complicated, changeable systems for appointments. This made navigating appointment booking difficult for patients and reception staff, and engendered a mistrust of the system. Increasingly, the telephone was the instrument of demand management, but there were unintended consequences for access. Some patient groups, such as those with English as an additional language, were particularly disadvantaged, and the varying patient and staff semantic of words like 'urgent' and 'emergency' was exacerbated during telephone interactions. Poor integration between in-hours and out-of-hours care and patient perceptions of the quality of care accessible at their GP practice also informed ED use. This study provides important insight into the implicit role of primary care access on the use of ED. Discourses around 'inappropriate' patient demand neglect to recognise that decisions about where to seek urgent care are based on experiential knowledge. Simply speeding up access to primary care or increasing its volume is unlikely to alleviate rising ED use. Systems for accessing care need to be transparent, perceptibly fair and appropriate to the needs of diverse patient groups. © Article author(s) (or

  6. Tailored internet-administered treatment of anxiety disorders for primary care patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Nordgren Lise

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet-administered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT has been found to be effective for a range of anxiety disorders. However, most studies have focused on one specific primary diagnosis and co-morbidity has not been considered. In primary care settings, patients with anxiety often suffer from more than one psychiatric condition, making it difficult to disseminate ICBT for specific conditions. The aim of this study will be to investigate if ICBT tailored according to symptom profile can be a feasible treatment for primary care patients with anxiety disorders. It is a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the treatment against an active control group. Methods Participants with anxiety disorders and co-morbid conditions (N = 128, will be recruited from a primary care population. The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression, anxiety, quality of life and loss of production and the use of health care. All assessments will be collected via the Internet and measure points will be baseline, post treatment and 12 months post treatment. Discussion This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of ICBT for anxiety disorders in primary care. The trial will also add knowledge on the long term effects of ICBT when delivered for regular clinic patients Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390168

  7. Effectiveness of the PRECEDE model in obese patients undergoing primary care nurses follow-up

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    Inés Maria Barrio Cantalejo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a serious problem in western modern countries. Primary care nurses has to follow up these patients but often with poor results. The PRECEDE model (Green L.W try to help patients to identify factors that predispose, make easier or reinforce their relationship with food and physical exercise. Objectives: To evaluate if PRECEDE makes easier the adherence of obese patients to a new style of feeding and exercise that reduces their BMI. Metodology: Experimental design, community randomised study. We analysed two samples of two different interventions: in one we applied the PRECEDE, in the other one the conventional advice about diet and exercise. Measures at 12 and 18 months. Both samples were homogeneous. The relationship between qualitative data has been studied through the Pearson x2 test and the comparison of quantitative data between two groups through the Student T test for independent samples. Results: a The PRECEDE intervention group lost more weigh than control at 12ª month, but this difference is almost null at 18º month. b The BMI difference has low clinical value because in both cases the final BMI is >30. Conclusions: a PRECEDE model shows a major capacity to reduce the BMI than the conventional model at short time. b To conclude that the PRECEDE weigh reduction is clinically effective we should have to extend our educational intervention longer time.

  8. Primary Care Physician and Patient Perceptions of Reimbursement for Total Knee and Hip Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel H; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Wang, Yuexin; Swami, Nishwant; Pelker, Richard R

    2016-07-01

    The opinions of nonspecialists and patients will be important to determining reimbursements for specialists such as orthopedic surgeons. In addition, primary care physician (PCP) perceptions of reimbursements may affect utilization of orthopedic services. We distributed a web-based survey to PCPs, asking how much they believed orthopedic surgeons were reimbursed for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We also proctored a paper-based survey to postoperative patients, asking how much orthopedic surgeons should be reimbursed. There was a significant difference between perceived and actual reimbursement values for THA and TKA. Hospital-affiliated PCPs estimated higher reimbursements for both THA ($1657 vs $838, P < .0001 for Medicaid and $2246 vs $1515, P = .018 for Medicare) and TKA ($1260 vs $903, P = .052 for Medicaid and $2022 vs $1514, P = .049 for Medicare). Similarly, larger practices estimated higher reimbursements for both THA ($1861 vs $838, P < .0001 for Medicaid and $2635 vs $1515, P = .004 for Medicare) and TKA ($1583 vs $903, P = .005 for Medicaid and $2380 vs $1514, P = .011 for Medicare). Compared to PCPs, patients estimated that orthopedic surgeons should be paid 4 times higher for both THA ($9787 vs $2235, P < .0001) and TKA ($9088 vs $2134, P < .0001). PCPs believe that reimbursements for orthopedic procedures are higher than actual values. The effect that these perceptions will have on efforts at cost reform and utilization of orthopedic services requires further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effectiveness of short educational intervention in patients with insomnia in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancedo-García, Ana; Gutiérrez-Antezana, Angélica Faviola; González-García, Pablo; Salinas-Herrero, Sally; Prieto-Merino, David; Suárez-Gil, Patricio

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of providing an educational intervention in primary care (PC) alongside a pharmacological treatment for insomnia. Single blinded non randomised clinical trial. Two urban primary health centers in Gijón (Asturias, Spain). Patients who consulted for insomnia between July 2012-January 2013 and met the inclusion criteria (n=50) were assigned systematically to the control group (CG) or intervention group (IG). All patients initiated treatment with lorazepam 1mg in the evenings and had four weekly 15 min visits plus a follow-up visit after another month. The IG received training for control of stimuli, sleep hygiene and respiration and relaxation techniques in the four visits. The CG had only non invasive measures taken. Considering as cured those who reached a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index PSQI <6 or a 50% reduction from baseline level. It was also analyzed the change in the PSQI from baseline to final visit and to follow-up visit, and voluntary interruption of lorazepam. Analysis by Bayesian inference. Twelve out of recoveries after intervention against one out of 24 among control group. Mean change in PSQI to final visit and follow-up visit was: -4.7 (95%CrI:-5.9 to -3.5) and -6,3 (95%ICred: -7.5 to -5.1) in IG; -1.8 (95%ICred: -3 to -0.5) and -1.7 (95%ICred: -2.9 to -0.4) in CG. Interruption of lorazepan: in 4 controls (16,7%) and 9 (34,6%) in IG. Twenty nine patients in GI and 17 in GC completed the trial. Per protocol analysis showed similar results. The educational intervention in PC improves sleep quality and reduces the need of treatment with benzodiacepines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a Psychological Intervention for Patients with Chronic Pain in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-García, Francisco J; González-Ortega, María Del Carmen; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Moreno-Borrego, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    According to evidence from recent decades, multicomponent programs of psychological intervention in people with chronic pain have reached the highest levels of efficacy. However, there are still many questions left to answer since efficacy has mainly been shown among upper-middle class patients in English-speaking countries and in controlled studies, with expert professionals guiding the intervention and with a limited number of domains of painful experience evaluated. For this study, a program of multicomponent psychological intervention was implemented: (a) based on techniques with empirical evidence, but developed in Spain; (b) at a public primary care center; (c) among patients with limited financial resources and lower education; (d) by a novice psychologist; and (e) evaluating all domains of painful experience using the instruments recommended by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT). The aim of this study was to evaluate this program. We selected a consecutive sample of 40 patients treated for chronic non-cancer pain at a primary care center in Utrera (Seville, Spain), adults who were not in any employment dispute, not suffering from psychopathology, and not receiving psychological treatment. The patients participated in 10 psychological intervention sessions, one per week, in groups of 13-14 people, which addressed psychoeducation for pain; breathing and relaxation; attention management; cognitive restructuring; problem-solving; emotional management; social skills; life values and goal setting; time organization and behavioral activation; physical exercise promotion; postural and sleep hygiene; and relapse prevention. In addition to the initial assessment, measures were taken after the intervention and at a 6-month follow-up. We assessed the program throughout the process: before, during and after the implementation. Results were analyzed statistically (significance and effect size) and from a clinical

  11. REDUCING SUICIDAL IDEATION AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS: 24-MONTH OUTCOMES OF THE PROSPECT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, George S.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Bruce, Martha L.; Katz, Ira R.; Raue, Patrick J.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Oslin, David; Have, Thomas Ten

    2010-01-01

    Objective The PROSPECT Study evaluated the impact of a care management intervention on suicidal ideation and depression in older primary care patients. This is the first report of outcomes over a 2-year period. Method The subjects (N=599) were older (>=60 years) patients with major or minor depression selected after screening 9,072 randomly identified patients of 20 primary care practices randomly assigned to the PROSPECT intervention or usual care. The intervention consisted of services of 15 trained care managers, who offered algorithm-based recommendations to physicians and helped patients with treatment adherence over 24 months. Results Intervention patients had a higher likelihood to receive antidepressants and or psychotherapy (84.9–89% vs. 49–59%) and a 2.2 times greater decline in suicidal ideation than usual care patients over 24 months. Treatment response occurred earlier in intervention patients and continued to increase from the 18th to the 24th month, while there was no appreciable increase in usual care patients during the same period. Among patients with major depression, a greater number achieved remission in the intervention than the usual care group at 4 (26.6 vs. 15.2%), 8 (36% vs. 22.5%), and 24 (45.4% vs. 31.5%) months. Patients with minor depression had favorable outcomes regardless of treatment assignment. Conclusions Sustained collaborative care maintains high utilization of antidepressant treatment, reduces suicidal ideation, and improves the outcomes of major depression over two years. These observations suggest that sustained collaborative care increases depression-free days. PMID:19528195

  12. Depression in primary care patients with coronary heart disease: baseline findings from the UPBEAT UK study.

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    Paul Walters

    Full Text Available An association between depression and coronary heart disease is now accepted but there has been little primary care research on this topic. The UPBEAT-UK studies are centred on a cohort of primary patients with coronary heart disease assessed every six months for up to four years. The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and associations of depression in this cohort at baseline.Participants with coronary heart disease were recruited from general practice registers and assessed for cardiac symptoms, depression, quality of life and social problems.803 people participated. 42% had a documented history of myocardial infarction, 54% a diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease or angina. 44% still experienced chest pain. 7% had an ICD-10 defined depressive disorder. Factors independently associated with this diagnosis were problems living alone (OR 5.49, 95% CI 2.11-13.30, problems carrying out usual activities (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.93-7.14, experiencing chest pain (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.58-6.76, other pains or discomfort (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.42-8.10, younger age (OR 0.95 per year 95% CI 0.92-0.98.Problems living alone, chest pain and disability are important predictors of depression in this population.

  13. Consultations between nurse prescribers and patients with diabetes in primary care: A qualitative study of patient views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Karen L; Courtenay, Molly; Carey, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    There is a drive to improve the quality of service provision for patients with diabetes and to enable better self-management of this condition. The adoption of prescribing by nurses is increasing worldwide and can potentially enhance service provision. Evidence suggests that patients prefer services where their lifestyle factors and opinions are considered by healthcare professionals within a partnership approach. Few studies have explored patients' views about their consultations with a nurse prescriber. To explore the views patients with diabetes have about their consultations with nurse prescribers and any impact this may have on their medications management. A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Six primary care sites in which nurses prescribed medications for patients with diabetes in England. Data was collected in 2009. Interviews took place with 41 patients with diabetes from the case loads of 7 nurse prescribers. Findings are reported under three themes; the nurse consultation style, benefits of the nurse prescriber consultation and views on involvement and decision-making. Key aspects of the nurse consultation style were a non-hurried approach, care and rapport, approachability, continuity, and providing clear information based on specialist knowledge. Many benefits were described, including improved access to appropriate advice and medication, greater understanding and ability to self-manage, ability to address problems and improved confidence, trust and wellbeing. While patients were happy with the amount of information received and involvement they had decisions about their treatment, there was some controversy over the consistency of information provided on side-effects of treatment. The study provides new knowledge about what patients with diabetes value and benefit from in respect to care provided by nurse prescribers. Continuity of relationship, flexibility over consultation length, nurses' interpersonal

  14. Thoughts on primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    The uptake of family health teams in Ontario has been tremendous. And the creation of group practices in primary care has taken root in other provinces as well. For many people, being involved with something new is exciting. At the same time, once they are committed, they discover the challenges that can be simultaneously exhilarating and frustrating. This issue of Healthcare Quarterly offers two articles that provide interesting reflections on what has been learned so far from the perspectives of both team leadership and the team members themselves within a transforming primary care system.

  15. Impact of Medical Scribes on Physician and Patient Satisfaction in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakova, Anastasia; Laiteerapong, Neda; Volerman, Anna; Feld, Lauren D; Wan, Wen; Burnet, Deborah L; Lee, Wei Wei

    2018-04-26

    Use of electronic health records (EHRs) is associated with physician stress and burnout. While emergency departments and subspecialists have used scribes to address this issue, little is known about the impact of scribes in academic primary care. Assess the impact of a scribe on physician and patient satisfaction at an academic general internal medicine (GIM) clinic. Prospective, pre-post-pilot study. During the 3-month pilot, physicians had clinic sessions with and without a scribe. We assessed changes in (1) physician workplace satisfaction and burnout, (2) time spent on EHR documentation, and (3) patient satisfaction. Six GIM faculty and a convenience sample of their patients (N = 325) at an academic GIM clinic. A 21-item pre- and 44-item post-pilot survey assessed physician workplace satisfaction and burnout. Physicians used logs to record time spent on EHR documentation outside of clinic hours. A 27-item post-visit survey assessed patient satisfaction during visits with and without the scribe. Of six physicians, 100% were satisfied with clinic workflow post-pilot (vs. 33% pre-pilot), and 83% were satisfied with EHR use post-pilot (vs. 17% pre-pilot). Physician burnout was low at baseline and did not change post-pilot. Mean time spent on post-clinic EHR documentation decreased from 1.65 to 0.76 h per clinic session (p = 0.02). Patient satisfaction was not different between patients who had clinic visits with vs. without scribe overall or by age, gender, and race. Compared to patients 65 years or older, younger patients were more likely to report that the physician was more attentive and provided more education during visits with the scribe present (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Male patients were more likely to report that they disliked having a scribe (p = 0.03). In an academic GIM setting, employment of a scribe was associated with improved physician satisfaction without compromising patient satisfaction.

  16. Inconsistent Condom Use among Public Primary Care Patients with Tuberculosis in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Matseke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high rate of HIV infections among tuberculosis (TB patients in South Africa calls for urgent HIV reduction interventions in this subpopulation. While correct and consistent condom use is one of the effective means of HIV prevention among sexually active people, there is insufficient research on condom use among TB patients in South Africa. The aim of this paper was to determine the prevalence of inconsistent condom use among public primary care TB patients and its associated factors using a sample of 4900 TB patients from a cross-sectional survey in three health districts in South Africa. Results indicated that when asked about their consistency of condom use in the past 3 months, 63.5% of the participants reported that they did not always use condoms. In the multivariable analysis, being married (OR=1.66; 95% CI 1.25–2.20 or cohabitating or separated, divorced, or widowed (OR=3.67; 1.85–7.29, lower educational level (OR=0.66; 0.46–0.94, greater poverty (OR=1.60; 1.25–2.20, not having HIV status disclosed (OR=0.34; 0.25–0.48, sexual partner on antiretroviral treatment (OR=0.38; 0.23–0.60, and partner alcohol use before sex (OR=1.56; 1.30–1.90 were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use in the past 3 months. The low proportion of consistent condom use among TB patients needs to be improved.

  17. Implementation and evaluation of early gastroscopy for patients with dyspepsia and warning signs in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alonso, Francisco Javier; Hernández Tejero, María; Rubio Benito, Elvira; Valer, Paz; Guerra, Iván; García Ceballos, Victoria Gema; Noguerol, Mar; Llinares, Victoria; Bermejo, Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Dyspepsia is a common disorder in both Primary (PC) and Specialised Care (SC). Gastroscopy is recommended at the start of the study if there are warning signs, although it is not always available in PC. We developed a pilot project establishing an early gastroscopy programme for patients with dyspepsia and warning signs in PC, subsequently extending it to the entire healthcare area. The aim was to evaluate the requirements, impact and opinion of this service at the PC level. Demographic, symptomatic and endoscopic variables on the patients referred to SC from the pilot centre were recorded. A satisfaction survey was conducted among the PC physicians. The one-year pilot study and the first year of implementation of the programme were evaluated. A total of 355 patients were included (median age 56.4 years; IQR 45.5-64.3); 61.2% (56.1-66.3%) were women. The waiting time for examination was 1.5 weeks (IQR 1.5-2.5). Gastroscopy was correctly indicated in 82.7% (78.4-86.3%) of patients. The median number of requests per month was 1.1 per 10,000 adults (range 0.8-1.6). Monthly referrals to SC clinics from the pilot centre fell by 11 subjects (95% CI 5.9-16) with respect to the previous median of 58 (IQR 48-64.5). Almost all those polled (98.4%) considered the programme useful in routine practice. The availability of an early gastroscopy programme in PC for patients with dyspepsia and warning signs reduced the number of referrals to SC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases. Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level. Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility. Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes. Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  19. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Ozayr H; Naidoo, Salsohni; Asmall, Shaidah; Taylor, Myra

    2015-09-25

    Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR) as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level. A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group) was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs) located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility. There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes). A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training) has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  20. The well-being and treatment satisfaction of diabetic patients in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Sevgi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of life in patients with diabetes is reduced and emotional coping with the disease has great impact on patient well-being. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the psychological well-being and treatment satisfaction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care. Study Design and Setting Patients (n = 112 with type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis for at least six months were enrolled. The Well-Being Questionnaire-22 and the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire were used. Physical examination and laboratory investigations were performed. Results The rates of the achieved targets were 32.1% for hemoglobin A1c, 62.5% for cholesterol and 20.5% for blood pressure. The mean scores for the general well-being, depression, anxiety, positive well-being and energy were 44.40 ± 13.23 (range = 16-62, 12.65 ± 3.80 (range = 5-18, 10.57 ± 4.47 (range = 1-18, 12.00 ± 4.01 (range = 2-18, and 9.16 ± 2.47 (range = 2-12, respectively. The mean scores for the treatment satisfaction, perception for hyperglycemia and perception for hypoglycemia were 22.37 ± 9.53 (range = 0.00-36.00, 1.71 ± 1.59 (range = 0-6, and 0.51 ± 0.98 (range = 0-6, respectively. There were significant associations between the depression score and the educational status, compliance to diet and physical exercise, and diabetic complications; between the anxiety score and the educational status, glycemic control, compliance to diet and physical exercise; between the energy score and the educational status, compliance to physical exercise, and diabetic complications; between the positive well-being score and the educational status, compliance to diet and physical exercise, complications and type of treatment; between the general well-being score and the educational status, compliance for diet and physical exercise, and complications. Treatment satisfaction was significantly associated to the educational status, glycemic control and

  1. Perceptions and abilities related to patient engagement in diabetes care among primary health care providers in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Kragelund Nielsen, Karoline; Calopietro, Michael

    Background: Malaysia seeks to transform its public health sector to manage the growing number of people with diabetes. Patient engagement is a critical clinical competency for HCPs treating people with diabetes. We investigated perceptions of and ability to practice patient engagement among doctors....... The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Summary of Results: Three main themes emerged: 1) limitations in understanding barriers to self-care and treatment especially from a psychosocial perspective, 2) substantial variation in health care providers’ skills within patient engagement...... health care providers’ ability to place the patient at the center of all therapeutic decisions. Take-home Message: Future efforts to improve self-care should seek to develop competencies within patient engagement especially strengthening understanding of psychosocial barriers to self-care. Organisation...

  2. Clinical inertia in the treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, Manel; Benito-Badorrey, Belén; Roura-Olmeda, Pilar; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Pepió-Vilaubí, Josep Maria; Saez, Marc; Coll-de-Tuero, Gabriel

    2013-11-01

    To assess clinical inertia, defined as failure to intensify antidiabetic treatment of patients who have not achieved the HbA1c therapeutic goal (≤7%). Multicenter cross-sectional study. Clinical inertia was assessed in a random sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients seen in primary care centers. A total of 2783 patients (51.3% males; mean age: 68 [±11.5] years; diabetes duration: 7.1 [±5.6] years; mean HbA1c: 6.8 [±1.5]) were analyzed. Of those, 997 (35.8%) had HbA1c >7%. Treatment was intensified in 66.8% and consisted of: dose increase (40.5%); addition of oral antidiabetic (45.8%); or insulin treatment initiation (3.7%). Mean HbA1c values in patients for whom treatment was intensified vs. non-intensified were 8.4% (±1.2) vs. 8.2% (±1.2), p inertia was detected in 33.2% of patients and diminished along with treatment complexity: lifestyle changes only (38.8%), oral monotherapy (40.3%), combined oral antidiabetics (34.5%), insulin monotherapy (26.1%) and combination of insulin and oral antidiabetics (21.4%). Clinical inertia decreased as HbA1c increased: 37.3% for HbA1c values ranging between 7.1%-8%; 29.4% for the 8.1%-9% HbA1c range and 27.1% for HbA1c ≥9%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that diabetes duration, step of treatment and HbA1c were related to inertia. For each unit of HbA1c increase clinical inertia decreased 47% (OR: 0.53). The retrospective design of the study precluded an accurate investigation about reasons for lack of intensification that could actually be justified by some patient conditions, especially patients' lack of adherence. Clinical inertia affected one third of T2DM patients with poor glycemic control and was greater in patients treated with only lifestyle changes or oral monotherapy. Treatment changes were performed when mean HbA1c values were 1.4 points above therapeutic goals.

  3. [Mental disorders in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Lilli; Mühlemann, Nicole; Bischoff, Thomas

    2010-05-19

    Mental disorders (depression, anxiety and somatization) are frequent in Primary care and are often associated to physical complaints and to psychosocial stressors. Mental disorders have in this way a specific presentation and in addition patients may present different associations of them. Sometimes it is difficult to recognize them, but it is important to do so and to take rapidly care of these patients. Specific screening questions exist and have been used in a research of the Institute of General Medicine and the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (PMU), University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

  4. Cardiovascular disease treatment among patients with severe mental illness: a data linkage study between primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Charlotte; Ashworth, Mark; Broadbent, Matthew; Callard, Felicity; Hotopf, Matthew; Schofield, Peter; Soncul, Murat; Stewart, Robert J; Henderson, Max J

    2016-06-01

    Suboptimal treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among patients with severe mental illness (SMI) may contribute to physical health disparities. To identify SMI characteristics associated with meeting CVD treatment and prevention guidelines. Population-based electronic health record database linkage between primary care and the sole provider of secondary mental health care services in south east London, UK. Cardiovascular disease prevalence, risk factor recording, and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) clinical target achievement were compared among 4056 primary care patients with SMI whose records were linked to secondary healthcare records and 270 669 patients without SMI who were not known to secondary care psychiatric services, using multivariate logistic regression modelling. Data available from secondary care records were then used to identify SMI characteristics associated with QOF clinical target achievement. Patients with SMI and with coronary heart disease and heart failure experienced reduced prescribing of beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB). A diagnosis of schizophrenia, being identified with any indicator of risk or illness severity, and being prescribed with depot injectable antipsychotic medication was associated with the lowest likelihood of prescribing. Linking primary and secondary care data allows the identification of patients with SMI most at risk of undertreatment for physical health problems. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  5. 'The onus is on me': primary care patient views of Medicare-funded team care in chronic disease management in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michele M; Mitchell, Geoffrey K

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the views of primary care patients in receipt of Medicare-funded team care for chronic disease management (CDM) in Australia. A qualitative study using a repeat in-depth interview design. Twenty-three patients (17 female), aged 32-89, were recruited over a six-month period from two purposively selected general practices: one urban and one regional practice in Queensland, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants 6 months apart. An interview guide was used to ensure consistency of topics explored. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and a thematic analysis was conducted. Patients in this study viewed the combined contributions of a GP and other health professionals in team care as thorough and reassuring. In this case of Medicare-funded team care, patients also saw obligations within the structured care routine which cultivated a personal ethics of CDM. This was further influenced by how patients viewed their role in the health-care relationship. Aside from personal obligations, Medicare funding got patients engaged in team care by providing financial incentives. Indeed, this was a defining factor in seeing allied health professionals. However, team care was also preferential due to patients' valuations of costs and benefits. Patients are likely to engage with a structured team care approach to CDM if there is a sense of personal obligation and sufficient financial incentive. The level of engagement in team care is likely to be optimized if patient expectations and preferences are considered in decisions. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The benefits of co-location in primary care practices: the perspectives of general practitioners and patients in 34 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonciani, M; Schäfer, W; Barsanti, S; Heinemann, S; Groenewegen, P P

    2018-02-21

    There is no clear evidence as to whether the co-location of primary care professionals in the same facility positively influences their way of working and the quality of healthcare as perceived by patients. The aim of this study was to identify the relationships between general practitioner (GP) co-location with other GPs and/or other professionals and the GP outcomes and patients' experiences. We wanted to test whether GP co-location is related to a broader range of services provided, the use of clinical governance tools and inter-professional collaboration, and whether the patients of co-located GPs perceive a better quality of care in terms of accessibility, comprehensiveness and continuity of care with their GPs. The source of data was the QUALICOPC study (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe), which involved surveys of GPs and their patients in 34 countries, mostly in Europe. In order to study the relationships between GP co-location and both GPs' outcomes and patients' experience, multilevel linear regression analysis was carried out. The GP questionnaire was filled in by 7183 GPs and the patient experience questionnaire by 61,931 patients. Being co-located with at least one other professional is the most common situation of the GPs involved in the study. Compared with single-handed GP practices, GP co-location are positively associated with the GP outcomes. Considering the patients' perspective, comprehensiveness of care has the strongest negative relationship of GP co-location of all the dimensions of patient experiences analysed. The paper highlights that GP mono- and multi-disciplinary co-location is related to positive outcomes at a GP level, such as a broader provision of technical procedures, increased collaboration among different providers and wider coordination with secondary care. However, GP co-location, particularly in a multidisciplinary setting, is related to less positive patient experiences, especially in countries with health systems

  7. Patient and public involvement in primary care research - an example of ensuring its sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Clare; Carter, Pam; Rhodes, Carol; Taylor, Robert; Beech, Roger; Dziedzic, Krysia; Blackburn, Steven; Hughes, Rhian; Ong, Bie Nio

    2016-01-01

    The international literature on patient and public involvement (PPI) in research covers a wide range of issues, including active lay involvement throughout the research cycle; roles that patients/public can play; assessing impact of PPI and recommendations for good PPI practice. One area of investigation that is less developed is the sustainability and impact of PPI beyond involvement in time-limited research projects. This paper focuses on the issues of sustainability, the importance of institutional leadership and the creation of a robust infrastructure in order to achieve long-term and wide-ranging PPI in research strategy and programmes. We use the case of a Primary Care Research Centre to provide a historical account of the evolution of PPI in the Centre and identified a number of key conceptual issues regarding infrastructure, resource allocation, working methods, roles and relationships. The paper concludes about the more general applicability of the Centre's model for the long-term sustainability of PPI in research.

  8. Prevalence and typology of potential drug interactions occurring in primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Picazo, Julio J; Ruiz, Juan C; Sanchez, Jose F; Ariza, Angeles; Aguilera, Belen; Lazaro, Dolores; Sanz, Gonzalo R

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence and types of potential drug interactions in primary care patients to detect risky prescriptions as an essential condition to design intervention policies leading to an improvement in patient safety. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Two areas in Spain comprising 715,661 inhabitants. 430,525 subjects with electronic medical records and assigned to a family doctor regularly updating them. On a random day, 29.4% of the population was taking medication. Of these, 73.9% were at risk of suffering interactions, and these were found in 20.6% of them. The amount of interactions was higher among people with chronic conditions, the elderly, females and polymedicated patients. From the total of interactions, 55.1% belonged to the highest clinical relevance 'A' level, and 28.3% should have been avoided. The active ingredients primarily involved were hydrochlorothiazide and ibuprofen and, when focusing on those that should be avoided, omeprazole and acenocoumarol. The most frequent 'A' interaction that should be avoided was between non-conjugated excreted benzodiazepines and proton-pump inhibitors, followed by some NSAIDs and diuretics. 1 in 20 Spanish citizens is currently undergoing a potential drug interaction, including a high rate of clinically relevant ones that should be avoided. These results confirm the existence of a serious safety issue that should be approached and where all parties involved (physicians, health services, medical