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Sample records for primary brain tumours

  1. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  2. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy

    Verheecke, Magali; Halaska, Michael J; Lok, Christianne A

    2014-01-01

    to obtain better insight into outcome and possibilities of treatment in pregnancy. METHODS: We collected all intracranial tumours (primary brain tumour, cerebral metastasis, or meningioma) diagnosed during pregnancy, registered prospectively and retrospectively by international collaboration since 1973......, respectively. Eight patients (30%) underwent brain surgery, seven patients (26%) had radiotherapy and in three patients (11%) chemotherapy was administered during gestation. Two patients died during pregnancy and four pregnancies were terminated. In 16 (59%) patients elective caesarean section was performed...... were reassuring. CONCLUSION: Adherence to standard protocol for the treatment of brain tumours during pregnancy appears to allow a term delivery and a higher probability of a vaginal delivery....

  3. of brain tumours

    outline of the important clinical issues related to brain tumours and psychiatry. ... Left-sided, frontal tumours also seem to be associated with higher rates of depression, while those in the frontal lobe of the right .... Oxford: Blackwell Science,.

  4. Pentavalent 99Tcm - DMSA SPECT in primary brain tumours of glial cell origin

    Chung, D.K.; Evans, S.G.; Larcos, G.; Gruenewald, S.; Kumar, V.; Barton, M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA [DMSA(V)] has shown promise in brain tumour imaging. This study aimed to assess the role of DMSA(V) brain SPET in glioma for: (1) predicting the histopathological grade of malignancy, (2) monitoring response to therapy and (3) discriminating recurrent tumour from post-radiotherapy necrosis. Twenty-three patients (pts) (14 men, 9 women) of mean age 57 years (range 20-79) were referred with a lesion on CT/MRI (14 new presentations, 5 known and 4 suspected tumour recurrence). Up to 555 MBq of 99 Tc m (V)DMSA were administered and SPET was acquired at 3 h. Tumour uptake ratio (UR) was calculated by the ratio of activity in the tumour to a region in the contralateral brain. All 19 pts with known tumour showed DMSA(V) uptake. The 14 pts with new tumours (10 grade IV, I grade III, 2 grade II and 1 necrotic tumour) had a pre-therapy mean UR of 7.7 (range 2.8-13.6). The 3 lower-grade tumours were scattered widely within this range. Four pts completed radiotherapy and returned for a post-therapy scan, where the UR was less than the pre-therapy UR in 2, unchanged in 1 and greater in 1. The 5 known recurrent tumours had a mean UR of 13.5 (range 7.3-24.9). In the 4 pts with suspected recurrence, the DMSA(V) scan result agreed with clinical course or PET in 3 but was falsely positive in 1. In summary, 99 Tc m (V)-DMSA: (1) showed uptake in all known glial cell tumours in this series, however the UR did not correlate with the histopathological grade; (2) may be useful for discriminating tumour recurrence from post-radiotherapy necrosis; and (3) may have a role in predicting post-therapy prognosis

  5. Frequency, clinical correlates and rating of behavioural changes in primary brain tumour patients: A preliminary investigation.

    Grahame K Simpson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available PurposeFew studies have addressed the specific behavioural changes associated with primary brain tumour (PBT. This paper will report on the frequency and demographic/clinical correlates of such behaviours, and the reliability of rating such behaviours amongst people with PBT, family informants and clinicians. The association of behavioural changes and patient functional status will also be discussed.MethodsA total of 57 patients with 37 family informants were recruited from two large Australian metropolitan hospitals. Each completed three neuro-behavioural self-report measures. Patients also completed a depression symptom measure. Functional status was defined by clinician-rated Karnofsky Performance Status.ResultsPatients were on average 52 years old, a median of four months (range 1-82 post-diagnosis, with high grade (39%, low grade (22% or benign tumours (39%. Patients reported frequency rates of 7-40% across various behavioural domains including anger, inappropriate behaviour, apathy, inertia and executive impairment. The presence of epileptic seizures was associated with significantly higher levels of behavioural changes. Notably, behaviour did not correlate with tumour grade or treatment modality. There was moderate agreement between patients and relatives on the presence or absence of behavioural changes, and substantial agreement between relative and clinician ratings. Depressed patients did not generally report more changes than non-depressed patients. Increases in the relative and clinician-rated behaviour scores were significantly correlated with decreasing functional status in the patient.ConclusionsBehavioural changes were a common sequela of both benign and malignant PBT. Larger scale studies are required to confirm these results. The results suggest the importance of including behaviour in brain cancer psychosocial assessments and the need to develop interventions to treat these patients and reduce the burden of care on families.

  6. Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a “cocktail” of non-tumourous elements is a reliable, quick and easy technique for inferring methylation status in glioblastomas and other primary brain tumours

    Burke, Elinor; Grobler, Mariana; Elderfield, Kay; Bond, Frances; Crocker, Matthew; Taylor, Rohan; Bridges, Leslie R

    2013-01-01

    Background Our aim was to develop a new protocol for MGMT immunohistochemistry with good agreement between observers and good correlation with molecular genetic tests of tumour methylation. We examined 40 primary brain tumours (30 glioblastomas and 10 oligodendroglial tumours) with our new technique, namely double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a "cocktail" of non-tumour antigens (CD34, CD45 and CD68). We compared the results with single-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT an...

  7. [Awake craniotomy for brain tumours].

    Milos, Peter; Metcalf, Kerstin; Vigren, Patrick; Lindehammar, Hans; Nilsson, Malin; Boström, Sverre

    2016-10-11

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumours  Awake neurosurgery is a useful method in lesions near eloquent brain areas, particularly low-grade gliomas.The aim is to maximise tumour resection and preserve neurological function. We performed 40 primary awake surgeries and 8 residual surgeries. Patients were operated awake throughout the procedure or with a laryngeal mask and general anaesthesia during the opening stage and then awake during intracerebral surgery. Language and motor function were mapped with direct cortical stimulation, motor evoked potential and standardised neurological testing. Radiologically, complete resection was achieved in 18 out of 40 patients in the primary surgeries. Full neurological recovery at three months was observed in 29 patients. Of the 11 patients with persisting neurological deficits at three months, symptoms were present preoperatively in 9 patients. We conclude that awake surgery, combined with intraoperative neurophysiological methods, is a safe method to improve treatment for low-grade gliomas.

  8. Advance care planning in patients with primary malignant brain tumours: a systematic review

    Krystal Song

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Advance care planning (ACP is a process of reflection and communication of a person’s future health care preferences, and has been shown to improve end-of-life care for patients. The aim of this systematic review is to present an evidence-based overview of ACP in patients with primary malignant brain tumours (pmBT. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using medical and health science electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, MEDLINE, ProQuest, Social Care Online, Scopus and Web of Science up to July 2016. Manual search of bibliographies of articles and grey literature search were also conducted. Two independent reviewers selected studies, extracted data and assessed the methodologic quality of the studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program’s appraisal tools. All studies were included irrespective of the study design. A meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity amongst included studies; therefore, a narrative analysis was performed for best evidence synthesis. Overall, 19 studies were included (1 RCT, 17 cohort studies, 1 qualitative study with 4686 participants. All studies scored low to moderate on the methodological quality assessment, implying high risk of bias. A single RCT evaluating a video decision support tool in facilitating ACP in pmBT patients showed a beneficial effect in promoting comfort care and gaining confidence in decision–making. However, the effect of the intervention on quality of life and care at the end-of-life were unclear. There was a low rate of use of ACP discussions at the end-of-life. Advance Directive completion rates and place of death varied between different studies. Positive effects of ACP included lower hospital readmission rates, and intensive care unit utilization. None of the studies assessed mortality outcomes associated with ACP. In conclusion, this review found some beneficial effects of ACP in pmBT. The literature still remains limited in this area, with lack of

  9. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  11. Primary vertebral tumours in children

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Masel, J.; Diard, F.; Ferrari-Ciboldi, F.; Le Dosseur, P.; Labatut, J.

    1984-03-01

    20 cases of primary benign and malignant bone tumours in children were reported. The most common tumours were Ewing's sarcoma, aneurismal bone cyst, benign osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma. Some rare primary bone tumours in children (osteochondroma, chondroblastoma 6F, primary lymphoma of bone and neurofibromatosis with unusual cervical spinal changes) were also reported. The authors believe that radiographic findings together with clinical history and clinical examination may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. Although microscopy is essential in the final diagnosis, the microscopic report should be also accepted with caution.

  12. Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a “cocktail” of non-tumourous elements is a reliable, quick and easy technique for inferring methylation status in glioblastomas and other primary brain tumours

    2013-01-01

    Background Our aim was to develop a new protocol for MGMT immunohistochemistry with good agreement between observers and good correlation with molecular genetic tests of tumour methylation. We examined 40 primary brain tumours (30 glioblastomas and 10 oligodendroglial tumours) with our new technique, namely double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a "cocktail" of non-tumour antigens (CD34, CD45 and CD68). We compared the results with single-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA, a recognised molecular genetic technique which we applied as the gold-standard for the methylation status). Results Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT produced a visual separation of tumourous and non-tumourous elements on the same histological slide, making it quick and easy to determine whether tumour cell nuclei were MGMT-positive or MGMT-negative (and thereby infer the methylation status of the tumour). We found good agreement between observers (kappa 0.76) and within observer (kappa 0.84). Furthermore, double-labelling showed good specificity (80%), sensitivity (73.33%), positive predictive value (PPV, 83.33%) and negative predictive value (NPV, 68.75%) compared to MS-MLPA. Double-labelling was quicker and easier to assess than single-labelling and it outperformed quantitative computerised image analysis of MGMT single-labelling in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV. Conclusions Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a cocktail of non-tumourous elements provides a "one look" method for determining whether tumour cell nuclei are MGMT-positive or MGMT-negative. This can be used to infer the methylation status of the tumour. There is good observer agreement and good specificity, sensitivity, PPV and NPV compared to a molecular gold-standard. PMID:24252243

  13. Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a "cocktail" of non-tumourous elements is a reliable, quick and easy technique for inferring methylation status in glioblastomas and other primary brain tumours.

    Burke, Elinor; Grobler, Mariana; Elderfield, Kay; Bond, Frances; Crocker, Matthew; Taylor, Rohan; Bridges, Leslie R

    2013-06-10

    Our aim was to develop a new protocol for MGMT immunohistochemistry with good agreement between observers and good correlation with molecular genetic tests of tumour methylation. We examined 40 primary brain tumours (30 glioblastomas and 10 oligodendroglial tumours) with our new technique, namely double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a "cocktail" of non-tumour antigens (CD34, CD45 and CD68). We compared the results with single-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA, a recognised molecular genetic technique which we applied as the gold-standard for the methylation status). Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT produced a visual separation of tumourous and non-tumourous elements on the same histological slide, making it quick and easy to determine whether tumour cell nuclei were MGMT-positive or MGMT-negative (and thereby infer the methylation status of the tumour). We found good agreement between observers (kappa 0.76) and within observer (kappa 0.84). Furthermore, double-labelling showed good specificity (80%), sensitivity (73.33%), positive predictive value (PPV, 83.33%) and negative predictive value (NPV, 68.75%) compared to MS-MLPA. Double-labelling was quicker and easier to assess than single-labelling and it outperformed quantitative computerised image analysis of MGMT single-labelling in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV. Double-labelling immunohistochemistry for MGMT and a cocktail of non-tumourous elements provides a "one look" method for determining whether tumour cell nuclei are MGMT-positive or MGMT-negative. This can be used to infer the methylation status of the tumour. There is good observer agreement and good specificity, sensitivity, PPV and NPV compared to a molecular gold-standard.

  14. Use of the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) score in patients with brain metastases from primary tumours not represented in the diagnosis-specific GPA studies

    Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Andratschke, N.H. [University Hospital Rostock (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Geinitz, H. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Grosu, A.L. [University Hospital Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: Assessment of prognostic factors might influence treatment decisions in patients with brain metastases. Based on large studies, the diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (GPA) score is a useful tool. However, patients with unknown or rare primary tumours are not represented in this model. A pragmatic approach might be use of the first GPA version which is not limited to specific primary tumours. Patients and methods: This retrospective analysis examines for the first time whether the GPA is a valid score in patients not eligible for the diagnosis-specific GPA. It includes 71 patients with unknown primary tumour, bladder cancer, ovarian cancer, thyroid cancer or other uncommon primaries. Survival was evaluated in uni- and multivariate tests. Results: The GPA significantly predicted survival. Moreover, improved survival was seen in patients treated with surgical resection or radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. The older recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score was significant in univariate analysis. However, the multivariate model with RPA, GPA and surgery or SRS versus none showed that only GPA and type of treatment were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion: Ideally, cooperative research efforts would lead to development of diagnosis-specific scores also for patients with rare or unknown primary tumours. In the meantime, a pragmatic approach of using the general GPA score appears reasonable. (orig.)

  15. Use of the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) score in patients with brain metastases from primary tumours not represented in the diagnosis-specific GPA studies

    Nieder, C.; Tromsoe Univ.; Andratschke, N.H.; Geinitz, H.; Grosu, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Assessment of prognostic factors might influence treatment decisions in patients with brain metastases. Based on large studies, the diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (GPA) score is a useful tool. However, patients with unknown or rare primary tumours are not represented in this model. A pragmatic approach might be use of the first GPA version which is not limited to specific primary tumours. Patients and methods: This retrospective analysis examines for the first time whether the GPA is a valid score in patients not eligible for the diagnosis-specific GPA. It includes 71 patients with unknown primary tumour, bladder cancer, ovarian cancer, thyroid cancer or other uncommon primaries. Survival was evaluated in uni- and multivariate tests. Results: The GPA significantly predicted survival. Moreover, improved survival was seen in patients treated with surgical resection or radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. The older recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score was significant in univariate analysis. However, the multivariate model with RPA, GPA and surgery or SRS versus none showed that only GPA and type of treatment were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion: Ideally, cooperative research efforts would lead to development of diagnosis-specific scores also for patients with rare or unknown primary tumours. In the meantime, a pragmatic approach of using the general GPA score appears reasonable. (orig.)

  16. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy: report on 27 cases and review of literature

    Verheecke, M.; Halaska, M.J.; Lok, C.A.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Fruscio, R.; Dahl-Steffensen, K.; Kolawa, W.; Gziri, M.M.; Han, S.N.; Calsteren, K. van; Heuvel, F. van den; Vleeschouwer, S. De; Clement, P.M.; Menten, J.; Amant, F.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concurrence of intracranial tumours with pregnancy is rare. The purpose of this study was to describe all reported patients registered in the international Cancer in Pregnancy registration study (CIP study; http://www.cancerinpregnancy.org), and to review the literature in order to

  17. Tumours of the brain

    Bleehen, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume is the last in a series of publications containing the edited texts of the clinical oncology symposia patronaged by the Royal College of Radiologists. The topics included essentially cover the pathology, imaging, diagnosis, and treatment of common and uncommon tumors of the brain. Only malignant tumors are discussed in any detail. A short introductory chapter summarized the pathology of brain tumors and the still-prevailing confusion of classification of gliomas. Two interesting chapters deal with immunologic techniques: one for characterizing tumors with immunocytochemical methods; the other, for localization and imaging by means of radiolabeled antibodies. Conventional radiologic methods of imaging, with emphasis on computed tomography, are covered in a comprehensive chapter summarizing what is known today of the accuracy of these methods in the detection, characterization, and grading of tumors of the brain. Two chapters are devoted to more recent developments in imaging, namely, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and positron emission tomography

  18. The negative brain scintiscan in brain tumours

    Dalke, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of 53 histologically verified and two histologically unidentified brain tumours, the author examined the reasons for these wrongly negative scintiscans. EEGs and angiographies carried out at about the same time were taken into account and compared with the scintigraphic findings. (orig.) [de

  19. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of intra-axial brain tumours: differentiation of high-grade gliomas from primary CNS lymphomas

    Schramm, Peter; Xyda, Argyro; Knauth, Michael; Klotz, Ernst; Tronnier, Volker; Hartmann, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) allows to quantitatively assess haemodynamic characteristics of brain tissue. We investigated if different brain tumor types can be distinguished from each other using Patlak analysis of PCT data. PCT data from 43 patients with brain tumours were analysed with a commercial implementation of the Patlak method. Four patients had low-grade glioma (WHO II), 31 patients had glioblastoma (WHO IV) and eight patients had intracerebral lymphoma. Tumour regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in a morphological image and automatically transferred to maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and permeability (K Trans ). Mean values were calculated, group differences were tested using Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney U-tests. In comparison with normal parenchyma, low-grade gliomas showed no significant difference of perfusion parameters (p > 0.05), whereas high-grade gliomas demonstrated significantly higher values (p Trans , p Trans values compared with unaffected cerebral parenchyma (p = 0.0078) but no elevation of CBV. High-grade gliomas show significant higher CBV values than lymphomas (p = 0.0078). PCT allows to reliably classify gliomas and lymphomas based on quantitative measurements of CBV and K Trans . (orig.)

  20. Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in patients with brain tumour

    Forsyth, P.A.; Weaver, S.; Fulton, D.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants in brain tumour patients (without prior seizures) reduced seizure frequency. We stopped accrual at 100 patients on the basis of the interim analysis. One hundred newly diagnosed brain tumour patients received anticonvulsants (AC Group) or not (No AC Group) in this prospective randomized unblinded study. Sixty patients had metastatic, and 40 had primary brain tumours. Forty-six (46%) patients were randomized to the AC Group and 54 (54%) to the No AC Group. Median follow-up was 5.44 months (range 0.13 -30.1 months). Seizures occurred in 26 (26%) patients, eleven in the AC Group and 15 in the No AC Group. Seizure-free survivals were not different; at three months 87% of the AC Group and 90% of the No AC Group were seizure-free (log rank test, p=0.98). Seventy patients died (unrelated to seizures) and survival rates were equivalent in both groups (median survival = 6.8 months versus 5.6 months, respectively; log rank test, p=0.50). We then terminated accrual at 100 patients because seizure and survival rates were much lower than expected; we would need ≥900 patients to have a suitably powered study. These data should be used by individuals contemplating a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants are effective in subsets of brain tumour patients (e.g. only anaplastic astrocytomas). When taken together with the results of a similar randomized trial, prophylactic anticonvulsants are unlikely to be effective or useful in brain tumour patients who have not had a seizure. (author)

  1. Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in patients with brain tumour

    Forsyth, P.A. [Depts. of Oncology and Clinical Neurosciences, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Weaver, S. [Depts. of Neurology and Medicine, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York (United States); Fulton, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and Dept. of Medicine/Neurology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    We conducted a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants in brain tumour patients (without prior seizures) reduced seizure frequency. We stopped accrual at 100 patients on the basis of the interim analysis. One hundred newly diagnosed brain tumour patients received anticonvulsants (AC Group) or not (No AC Group) in this prospective randomized unblinded study. Sixty patients had metastatic, and 40 had primary brain tumours. Forty-six (46%) patients were randomized to the AC Group and 54 (54%) to the No AC Group. Median follow-up was 5.44 months (range 0.13 -30.1 months). Seizures occurred in 26 (26%) patients, eleven in the AC Group and 15 in the No AC Group. Seizure-free survivals were not different; at three months 87% of the AC Group and 90% of the No AC Group were seizure-free (log rank test, p=0.98). Seventy patients died (unrelated to seizures) and survival rates were equivalent in both groups (median survival = 6.8 months versus 5.6 months, respectively; log rank test, p=0.50). We then terminated accrual at 100 patients because seizure and survival rates were much lower than expected; we would need {>=}900 patients to have a suitably powered study. These data should be used by individuals contemplating a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants are effective in subsets of brain tumour patients (e.g. only anaplastic astrocytomas). When taken together with the results of a similar randomized trial, prophylactic anticonvulsants are unlikely to be effective or useful in brain tumour patients who have not had a seizure. (author)

  2. Intra-individual, randomised comparison of the MRI contrast agents gadobutrol versus gadoteridol in patients with primary and secondary brain tumours, evaluated in a blinded read

    Koenig, M. [Klinikum Luenen St. Marien-Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Luenen (Germany); Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen Harlaching, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Piontek, M.; Heuser, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Knappschaftskrankenhaus GmbH, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bochum (Germany); Hentsch, A. [Radiologisches Institut Hohenzollernstrasse, Koblenz (Germany); Spangenberg, P. [Universitaetsklinikum Knappschaftskrankenhaus GmbH, Department of Neurosurgery, Bochum (Germany); Schwenke, C. [SCO:SSiS, Berlin (Germany); Harders, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Knappschaftskrankenhaus GmbH, Department of Neurosurgery Knappschaftskrankenhaus, Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    To prove that 1.0 M gadobutrol provides superior contrast enhancement and MRI image characteristics of primary and secondary brain tumours compared with 0.5 M gadoteridol, thereby providing superior diagnostic information. Brain MRI was performed in two separate examinations in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. Independent injections of 1.0 M gadobutrol and 0.5 M gadoteridol at doses of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight were administered per patient in randomised order. Evaluation was performed in an off-site blinded read. Fifty-one patients in the full analysis set (FAS) were eligible for efficacy analysis and 44 for the per-protocol analysis. For the primary efficacy variable ''preference in contrast enhancement for one contrast agent or the other'', the rate of ''gadobutrol preferred'' was estimated at 0.73 (95 % confidence interval 0.61; 0.83), showing significant superiority of gadobutrol over gadoteridol. Calculated lesion-to-brain contrast and the results of all qualitative secondary efficacy variables were also in favour of gadobutrol. Keeping a sufficient time delay after contrast application proved to be essential to get optimal image quality. Compared with 0.5 M gadoteridol, 1.0 M gadobutrol was proven to have significantly superior contrast enhancement characteristics in a routine MRI protocol of primary and secondary brain tumours. (orig.)

  3. Intra-individual, randomised comparison of the MRI contrast agents gadobutrol versus gadoteridol in patients with primary and secondary brain tumours, evaluated in a blinded read

    Koenig, M.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Piontek, M.; Heuser, L.; Hentsch, A.; Spangenberg, P.; Schwenke, C.; Harders, A.

    2013-01-01

    To prove that 1.0 M gadobutrol provides superior contrast enhancement and MRI image characteristics of primary and secondary brain tumours compared with 0.5 M gadoteridol, thereby providing superior diagnostic information. Brain MRI was performed in two separate examinations in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. Independent injections of 1.0 M gadobutrol and 0.5 M gadoteridol at doses of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight were administered per patient in randomised order. Evaluation was performed in an off-site blinded read. Fifty-one patients in the full analysis set (FAS) were eligible for efficacy analysis and 44 for the per-protocol analysis. For the primary efficacy variable ''preference in contrast enhancement for one contrast agent or the other'', the rate of ''gadobutrol preferred'' was estimated at 0.73 (95 % confidence interval 0.61; 0.83), showing significant superiority of gadobutrol over gadoteridol. Calculated lesion-to-brain contrast and the results of all qualitative secondary efficacy variables were also in favour of gadobutrol. Keeping a sufficient time delay after contrast application proved to be essential to get optimal image quality. Compared with 0.5 M gadoteridol, 1.0 M gadobutrol was proven to have significantly superior contrast enhancement characteristics in a routine MRI protocol of primary and secondary brain tumours. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic benefits of presurgical fMRI in patients with brain tumours in the primary sensorimotor cortex

    Wengenroth, Martina; Blatow, M.; Guenther, J. [University of Heidelberg Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Akbar, M. [University of Heidelberg Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, Heidelberg (Germany); Tronnier, V.M. [University of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Neurosurgery, Luebeck (Germany); Stippich, C. [University Hospital Basle, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basle (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    Reliable imaging of eloquent tumour-adjacent brain areas is necessary for planning function-preserving neurosurgery. This study evaluates the potential diagnostic benefits of presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in comparison to a detailed analysis of morphological MRI data. Standardised preoperative functional and structural neuroimaging was performed on 77 patients with rolandic mass lesions at 1.5 Tesla. The central region of both hemispheres was allocated using six morphological and three functional landmarks. fMRI enabled localisation of the motor hand area in 76/77 patients, which was significantly superior to analysis of structural MRI (confident localisation of motor hand area in 66/77 patients; p < 0.002). FMRI provided additional diagnostic information in 96% (tongue representation) and 97% (foot representation) of patients. FMRI-based presurgical risk assessment correlated in 88% with a positive postoperative clinical outcome. Routine presurgical FMRI allows for superior assessment of the spatial relationship between brain tumour and motor cortex compared with a very detailed analysis of structural 3D MRI, thus significantly facilitating the preoperative risk-benefit assessment and function-preserving surgery. The additional imaging time seems justified. FMRI has the potential to reduce postoperative morbidity and therefore hospitalisation time. (orig.)

  5. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect of expo...... significant associations and exposure-response patterns between long-term residential radon exposure radon in a general population and risk of primary brain tumours, adding new knowledge to this field. This finding could be chance and needs to be challenged in future studies.......Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect...... of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods: During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced...

  6. Radiopharmaceutical therapy of brain tumours

    Riva, P.; Franceschi, G.; Frattarelli, M.; Casi, M.; Santimaria, M.; Cremonini, A.M.; Guiducci, G.; Riva, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The loco-regional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of high-grade malignant glioma may represent a further favourable therapeutic approach, able to ameliorate the ominous prognosis of these diseases. The anti-tenascin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are directly injected in the tumoral bed after the operation. In the first pilot study, 81 glioblastoma patients received the MAbs (BC2 and BC4) labelled with 131 I (mean dose 2035 MBq). The toxicity was absent. The median survival was prolonged up to 25 months and the response rate (PR + CR + NED: no evidence of disease in cases with minimal lesions after customary treatments) was 44%. More recently, 90 Y instead of 131 I was employed. The benzyl-DTPA chelator was utilized for 90 Y conjugation. A phase I study was performed in 20 glioblastoma patients, who previously received all conventional regimens, but with progressive tumour. They were intralesionally given escalating 90 Y doses (185, 370, 555, 740, 925 MBq), 4 cases were included in each incremental level. No change in haematology, liver and renal parameters were encountered. The brain MTD was 925 MBq. The radiopharmaceutical remained in high amount only in the neoplastic area and did not diffuse in normal brain region nor in normal organs. The radiation dose to the tumour was, on average, 0.54 Gy per MBq of 90 Y administered (about 4 times higher in comparison to 131 I). Now a phase II study has been initiated. 30 evaluable patients (23 glioblastoma and 7 anaplastic astrocytoma; 8 newly diagnosed and 22 recurrent tumours) who have been already treated with surgery and radiotherapy, underwent loco-regional RIT, by administering a mean 90 Y dose of 740 MBq; in many cases multiple cycles were given. The median survival of patients who had the antibody infusion when their tumour burden was reduced was 28 months. The objective response consisted of 8 PD, 5 SD, 11 PR, 1 CR and 4 NED. The global response rate (PR + CR + NED) was 53.3% (47.8% in glioblastoma and 75.7% in

  7. MRI of primary meningeal tumours in children

    Yoon, H.K.; Na, D.G.; Byun, H.S.; Han, B.K.; Kim, S.S.; Kim, I.O.; Shin, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Childhood meningeal tumours are uncommon and mostly meningiomas. We reviewed the histological and radiological findings in meningeal tumours in six children aged 12 years or less (four benign meningiomas, one malignant meningioma and one haemangiopericytoma). Compared to the adult counterpart, childhood meningiomas showed atypical features: cysts, haemorrhage, aggressiveness and unusual location. MRI features varied according to the site of the tumour, histology, haemorrhage, and presence of intra- or peritumoral cysts. Diagnosis of the extra-axial tumour was relatively easy in two patients with meningiomas, one malignant meningioma and one haemangiopericytoma. MRI findings strongly suggested an intra-axial tumour in two patients with benign meningiomas, because of severe adjacent edema. Awareness of the variable findings of childhood meningiomas and similar tumours may help in differentiation from brain tumours. (orig.)

  8. A rare metastasis from a rare brain tumour

    Aabenhus, Kristine; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents the story of a patient with an oligodendroglioma metastasizing to the bone marrow and to lymph nodes of the neck. The patient had undergone primary brain surgery 13 years prior to the discovery of metastases and radiotherapy directed at the brain tumour two months prior........ Oligodendroglioma are rare primary brain tumours of which extraneural metastasis is even more rare. The incidence of cases like this may be increasing because of better treatment and thus longer survival of patients with oligodendroglioma....

  9. Second primary tumours in oral cancer

    van der Waal, I.; de Bree, R.

    2010-01-01

    Second primary tumours in patients treated for oral cancer occur at a rate of 3% to 7% per year. The majority of these tumours show up at least six months after the detection of the primary and are often located in the upper aerodigestive tract. Cessation of smoking habits may reduce the risk of the

  10. Over-all accuracy of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate brain scanning for brain tumours

    Bjoernsson, O.G.; Petursson, E.; Sigurbjoernsson, B.; Davidsson, D.

    1978-01-01

    A 3-year follow-up and re-evaluation of all scans on all patients referred for brain scanning in Iceland during 1 year was performed in order to assess the diagnostic reliability of radioisotope scanning for brain tumours. The study included 471 patients. Of these 25 had primary brain tumours and 7 brain metastases. Scans were positive and correctly interpreted in 68% of the patients with primary brain tumours and in 3 of the 7 patients with metastases. The over-all accuracy of brain scanning for brain tumours defined as the total number of correct positive scans and correct negative scans versus total number of scans examined was 96%, this figure being mainly influenced by the high number of true negative scans. (orig.) [de

  11. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Wang, Jian; Chekenya, Martha; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Enger, Per Ø; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Ø; Huszthy, Peter C; Jacobsen, Hege; Brekkå, Narve; Li, Xingang; Zhao, Peng; Mørk, Sverre

    2009-01-01

    Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression

  12. Neurofibromatosis type 1: brain stem tumours

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Molloy, P.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Phillips, P.C.; Vaughan, S.N.; Liu, G.T.; Sutton, L.N.; Needle, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging findings of brain stem tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The NF1 patients imaged between January 1984 and January 1996 were reviewed and 25 patients were identified with a brain stem tumour. Clinical, radiographical and pathological results were obtained by review of records and images. Brain stem tumour identification occurred much later than the clinical diagnosis of NF1. Medullary enlargement was most frequent (68 %), followed by pontine (52 %) and midbrain enlargement (44 %). Patients were further subdivided into those with diffuse (12 patients) and those with focal (13 patients) tumours. Treatment for hydrocephalus was required in 67 % of the first group and only 15 % of the second group. Surgery was performed in four patients and revealed fibrillary astrocytomas, one of which progressed to an anaplastic astrocytoma. In 40 % of patients both brain stem and optic pathway tumours were present. The biological behaviour of brain stem tumours in NF1 is unknown. Diffuse tumours in the patients with NF1 appear to have a much more favourable prognosis than patients with similar tumours without neurofibromatosis type 1. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Primary bone tumours of the hand

    Kozlowski, K.; Azouz, E.M.; Campbell, J.; Marton, D.; Morris, L.; Padovani, J.; Sprague, P.; Beluffi, G.; Berzero, G.F.; Cherubino, P.; Adelaide Children's Hospital; Hospital for Children, Perth; Montreal Children's Hospital, Quebec; Saint Justine Hospital, Montreal, Quebec; Children's Hospital, Denver, CO; Hopital des Enfants, 13 - Marseille; Pavia Univ.; Pavia Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-one primary bone tumours of the hand in children from 8 paediatric hospitals are reported. Osteochondromas and enchondromas were not included. Our material consisted of 16 patients with common tumours (3 Ewing's sarcoma, 5 aneurysmal bone cyst, 6 osteoid osteoma and 2 epithelioma) and 5 patients with uncommon tumours (osteoma, simple bone cyst, haemangiopericytoma, capillary angiomatous tumour and benign ossifying fibroma or osteoblastoma). The X-ray diagnosis of the common tumours should have high concordance with histology, whereas that of uncommon tumours in much more difficult and uncertain. The characteristic features of Ewing's sarcoma are stressed as all our children with this tumour had a delayed diagnosis and a fatal outcome. Differential diagnosis with other short tubular bone lesions of the hand - specifically osteomyelitis - is discussed and the posibilities of microscopic diagnosis are stressed. (orig.)

  14. Treatment Of Brain Tumours In Childhood

    Stancokova, T.

    2007-01-01

    Children tumours are the second most common oncologic diseases in childhood (20 %) with highest incidence of mortality in children oncology. Brain tumours form a heterogenous group of tumours with their classification,diagnostic criteria and therapeutic modalities. General principles of treatment involve neurosurgery, which is a prognostic factor, its radicality depends on localization. Radiotherapy has limitations in children until 3 years for possible late effects. Chemotherapy is effective in tumours with high growing rate. These days challenge is to improve therapeutic outcomes and minimalize toxicity of therapy. (author)

  15. Computed tomography in malignant primary bone tumours

    Kersjes, W.; Harder, T.; Haeffner, P.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of computed tomography is examined in malignant primary bone tumours using a strongly defined examination group of 13 Patients (six Ewing's-sarcomas, five osteosarcomas, one chondrosarcoma and one spindle-shaped cell sarcoma). Computed tomography is judged superior compared to plain radiographs in recognition of bone marrow infiltration and presentation of parosteal tumour parts as well as in analysis of tissue components of tumours, CT is especially suitable for therapy planning and evaluating response to therapy. CT does not provide sufficient diagnostic information to determine dignity and exact diagnosis of bone tumours. (orig.) [de

  16. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  17. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  18. EVALUATION OF BRAIN TUMOURS USING COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    B. Vinod Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The brain is basically formed by the neurons and the supporting cells. Tumours arising of neurons are almost impossible because the neurons never divide. Tumours arising from the supporting cells are almost frequently seen. The tumour characteristics depend upon the cell of origin. The brain is covered by meninges and the vascular tissue supplies the essential nutrients to all these components of the brain. Unfortunately, the brain is placed in a rigid box called as neurocranium. According to Monro–Kellie principle, if any of the one component increases in a rigid box, the other components will be compensated. So in a limited space if any of the catastrophes occur i.e. space occupying lesions, then the other components will be compensated and as a result the effects will be seen in a very small amount of time. A sincere effort has been put in this study to understand and evaluate the Brain Tumours using a CT scan. This study is intended to be useful to the diagnosing radiologists, internal medicine practitioners and general practitioners and surgeons. METHODS The aim of the study is to evaluate the brain tumours using CT and to confirm the diagnosis by sending to the Histopathology Department. The study is a cross-sectional study and is done in the Department of Radiology, Fathima Medical College, Kadapa, Andhra Pradesh. The study was done from December 2014 to May 2016. The study was done using thirty cases who were believed to have brain tumour and were studied in the Department of Radiology after initial clinical evaluation. First, the plain CT was done and was checked for the location, size, characteristics of the lesion and the surrounding characteristics were observed. RESULT In the present study, the most common of all tumours were those of the neuroepithelial groups. Next in frequency were the tumours of meninges of all intracranial tumours. This was followed by tumours of cranial nerves, metastatic tumour, one lymphoma case

  19. Aqp 9 and Brain Tumour Stem Cells

    Guri Fossdal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated the aquaporins (aqp 1, 4, and 9 in the pathogenesis of malignant brain tumours, suggesting that they contribute to motility, invasiveness, and oedema formation and facilitate metabolism in tumour cells under hypoxic conditions. We have studied the expression of aqp1, 4, and 9 in biopsies from glioblastomas, isolated tumour stem cells grown in a tumoursphere assay and analyzed the progenitor and differentiated cells from these cultures. We have compared these to the situation in normal rat brain, its stem cells, and differentiated cells derived thereof. In short, qPCR in tumour tissue showed presence of aqp1, 4, and 9. In the tumour progenitor population, aqp9 was markedly more highly expressed, whilst in tumour-derived differentiated cells, aqp4 was downregulated. However, immunostaining did not reveal increased protein expression of aqp9 in the tumourspheres containing progenitor cells; in contrast, its expression (both mRNA and protein was high in differentiated cultures. We, therefore, propose that aquaporin 9 may have a central role in the tumorigenesis of glioblastoma.

  20. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  1. 2-d spectroscopic imaging of brain tumours

    Ferris, N.J.; Brotchie, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This poster illustrates the use of two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging (2-D SI) in the characterisation of brain tumours, and the monitoring of subsequent treatment. After conventional contrast-enhanced MR imaging of patients with known or suspected brain tumours, 2-D SI is performed at a single axial level. The level is chosen to include the maximum volume of abnormal enhancement, or, in non-enhancing lesions. The most extensive T2 signal abnormality. Two different MR systems have been used (Marconi Edge and GE Signa LX); at each site, a PRESS localisation sequence is employed with TE 128-144 ms. Automated software is used to generate spectral arrays, metabolite maps, and metabolite ratio maps from the spectroscopic data. Colour overlays of the maps onto anatomical images are produced using manufacturer software or the Medex imaging data analysis package. High grade gliomas showed choline levels higher than those in apparently normal brain, with decreases in NAA and creatine. Some lesions showed spectral abnormality extending into otherwise normal appearing brain. This was also seen in a case of CNS lymphoma. Lowgrade lesions showed choline levels similar to normal brain, but with decreased NAA. Only a small number of metastases have been studied, but to date no metastasis has shown spectral abnormality beyond the margins suggested by conventional imaging. Follow-up studies generally show spectral heterogeneity. Regions with choline levels higher than those in normal-appearing brain are considered to represent recurrent high-grade tumour. Some regions show choline to be the dominant metabolite, but its level is not greater than that seen in normal brain. These regions are considered suspicious for residual / recurrent tumour when the choline / creatine ratio exceeds 2 (lower ratios may represent treatment effect). 2-D SI improves the initial assessment of brain tumours, and has potential for influencing the radiotherapy treatment strategy. 2-D SI also

  2. Ten years summary: FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour

    Wang Shuxia; Boethius, J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate FDG-PET in differentiation of post-radiotherapy status: recurrence, radiation necrosis, malignant regression of low grade primary brain tumour, and to evaluate PET in terms of survival prediction. Material and methods: 117 irradiated patients (156 PET) were consecutively included. PET results were judged by a set of rigid follow-up standards. Brain metastases from lung carcinoma were further studied. Survival time was analysed with Kaplan-Meier method. Results: There were 61 true-positive, 2 false-positive, 15 false-negative, 51 true-negative PET; leaving 5 positive and 22 negative PET results indeterminate. PET positive predictive value was 96% in all and 100% in brain metastasis from lung carcinoma. PET negative predictive value was 55.6% among surgically selected cases. Survival time was significantly longer in patient's with negative PET, both brain metastasis and primary brain tumour. Conclusions: FDG-PET was a good method to pick up tumour recurrence from radiation necrosis, especially metastasis from lung carcinoma. FDG uptake could be used as a non-invasive parameter to predict patient's prognosis. (authors)

  3. Primary malignant bone tumour in a tropical African University ...

    Bone tumours are relatively rare tumours as compared with all other tumours. The relative frequency has not been well documented in this environment. The aim of the study was to define the frequency of primary malignant bone tumours in an African University teaching hospital in Ibadan. The medical records of 114 ...

  4. Primary Malignant Bone Tumours at the University Teaching ...

    Introduction: Primary malignant bone tumours include malignancies arising primarily from bone tissue. This is opposed to secondary bone tumours in which case the neoplastic elements arise primarily from other sites within the body and secondarily spread to bone. Primary malignant bone tumours are generally ...

  5. Radiation-induced brain tumours: potential late complications of radiation therapy for brain tumours

    Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Inamura, T.; Takeshita, I.; Fukui, M.; Sasaki, M.; Nakamura, K.; Wakisaka, S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of neoplasms subsequent to therapeutic cranial irradiation is a rare but serious and potentially fatal complication. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical and pathological aspects of 11 patients who underwent cranial irradiation (range, 24-110 cGy) to treat their primary disease and thereafter developed secondary tumours within a span of 13 years. All tumours arose within the previous radiation fields, and satisfied the widely used criteria for the definition of radiation-induced neoplasms. There was no sex predominance (M: 5, F: 6) and the patients tended to be young at irradiation (1.3 - 42 years; median age: 22 years). The median latency period before the detection of the secondary tumour was 14.5 years (range: 6.5 - 24 years). Meningiomas developed in 5 patients, sarcomas in 4, and malignant gliomas in 2. A pre-operative diagnosis of a secondary tumour was correctly obtained in 10 patients based on the neuro-imaging as well as nuclear medicine findings. All patients underwent a surgical removal of the secondary tumour, 3 underwent additional chemotherapy, and one received stereotactic secondary irradiation therapy. During a median of 2 years of follow-up review after the diagnosis of a secondary tumour, 3 patients died related to the secondary tumours (2 sarcomas, 1 glioblastoma), one died of a recurrent primary glioma, while the remaining 7 have been alive for from 10 months to 12 years after being treated for the secondary tumours (median: 3 years). Based on these data, the clinicopathological characteristics and possible role of treatment for secondary tumours are briefly discussed. (author)

  6. The feasibility of a brain tumour website

    Piil, K; Jakobsen, J; Juhler, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a high-grade glioma (HGG) and their caregivers have imminent and changing informational and supportive care needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a Danish brain tumour website (BTW) in patients with HGG and their caregivers. We...... one overarching theme 'challenges and barriers'. Being newly diagnosed, patients described a chaotic and overwhelming life situation and had difficulties in identifying with their new and changed role. When using the BTW, some patients and caregivers experienced technological challenges, while...

  7. Translation and pilot validation of Hindi translation of assessing quality of life in patients with primary brain tumours using EORTC brain module (BN-20

    Budrukkar Ashwini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To translate and validate the European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer (EORTC brain cancer module (BN-20 into Hindi to make it available for patients and scientific community. Methods and Results: The EORTC BN-20 was translated into Hindi using standard guidelines by EORTC. The process included forward translation by two translators, discussion with the translators in case of discrepancies and formation of first intermediate questionnaire. This questionnaire was then given to two more translators who translated this questionnaire back into English. These 2 questionnaires were then compared with the original EORTC questionnaire and the second intermediate questionnaire was formed. The second intermediate questionnaire was subsequently administered in 10 patients with brain tumors who had never seen the questionnaire before, for pilot-testing. Each of these 10 patients after filling up the questionnaire themselves was then interviewed for any difficulty encountered during the filling up of the questionnaire. These were in the form of specific modules including difficulty in answering, confusion while answering and difficulty to understand, whether the questions were upsetting and if patients would have asked the question in any different way. There were major suggestions in three questions, which were incorporated into the second intermediate questionnaire to form the final Hindi BN-20 questionnaire. Conclusion: The final Hindi BN-20 has been approved by EORTC and can be used in clinical practice and studies for patients with brain tumors.

  8. Primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour of breast

    Ikhwan, S M; Kenneth, V K T; Seoparjoo, A; Zin, A A M

    2013-01-01

    Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma belongs to the Ewing's family of tumours. Primary tumours arising from breast are very rare. There are only a few case reports published on primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma and PNET arising from breast. We present an extremely rare case of an inoperable primary Ewing's sarcoma arising from left breast with contralateral breast, lymphatic and lung metastasis.

  9. Primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour of breast.

    Ikhwan, S M; Kenneth, V K T; Seoparjoo, A; Zin, A A M

    2013-06-21

    Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma belongs to the Ewing's family of tumours. Primary tumours arising from breast are very rare. There are only a few case reports published on primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma and PNET arising from breast. We present an extremely rare case of an inoperable primary Ewing's sarcoma arising from left breast with contralateral breast, lymphatic and lung metastasis.

  10. Osteopenia in children surviving brain tumours

    Whitton, A.C.; Eves, M. [Children' s Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Room 3N27B, Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Hay, J. [Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada); Gill, G.J.; Webber, C.E. [Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University (Canada); Simpson, T. [Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Barr, R.D. [Children' s Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Room 3N27B, Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    Osteopenia has been reported in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, apparently as a consequence of therapy. It has been suggested that cranial irradiation may play a crucial role in this disorder. To explore that possibility, survivors of brain tumours in childhood, all of whom had received radiotherapy, were examined for evidence of bone mineral loss. 19 children were assessed, on average at 7 years after treatment. Measurements of growth velocities, plain radiography of the skeleton, bone densitometry, health-related quality of life and physical activity were undertaken. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency had been detected in 6 children and 5 had received GH replacement, for a minimum of more than 3 years. 9 children were radiographically osteopenic (including the 5 who had received GH). Z scores for bone mineral density (BMD) were negative in the majority of children. Health-related quality of life was less and pain more frequent in those with low BMD scores. Pain was correlated negatively with both free-time activity and seasonal activity (P<0.01). Osteopenia is a common sequel of therapy in children with brain tumours. Those with osteopenia have more pain and more compromised, health-related quality of life than those who are not osteopenic, and pain significantly limits physical activity. The pathogenesis of osteopenia in these children is still uncertain, but is likely to be multifactorial. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Primary Central Nervous System Tumours in Children and ...

    Primary CNS tumours are the commonest childhood solid tumours in most developed countries, accounting for 25-30% of cases. In our environment they occur less frequently. These tumours are nonetheless the cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the paediatric age group worldwide. However paediatric CNS ...

  12. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  13. Discrimination of paediatric brain tumours using apparent diffusion coefficient histograms

    Bull, Jonathan G.; Clark, Christopher A.; Saunders, Dawn E.

    2012-01-01

    To determine if histograms of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) can be used to differentiate paediatric brain tumours. Imaging of histologically confirmed tumours with pre-operative ADC maps were reviewed (54 cases, 32 male, mean age 6.1 years; range 0.1-15.8 years) comprising 6 groups. Whole tumour ADC histograms were calculated; normalised for volume. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to differentiate tumour types using histogram metrics, initially for all groups and then for specific subsets. All 6 groups (5 dysembryoplastic neuroectodermal tumours, 22 primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET), 5 ependymomas, 7 choroid plexus papillomas, 4 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRT) and 9 juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas (JPA)) were compared. 74% (40/54) were correctly classified using logistic regression of ADC histogram parameters. In the analysis of posterior fossa tumours, 80% of ependymomas, 100% of astrocytomas and 94% of PNET-medulloblastoma were classified correctly. All PNETs were discriminated from ATRTs (22 PNET and 4 supratentorial ATRTs) (100%). ADC histograms are useful in differentiating paediatric brain tumours, in particular, the common posterior fossa tumours of childhood. PNETs were differentiated from supratentorial ATRTs, in all cases, which has important implications in terms of clinical management. (orig.)

  14. Incidence of Brain Tumours at an Academic Centre in Western ...

    Objective: To determine the incidence of brain tumours at King AbdulAziz University Hospital (KAUH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over eight year period. Design: Retrospective study. Sitting: King Abdul Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah Saudi Arabia. Subjects: Patients with intracranial tumours. Results: The overall average ...

  15. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...

  16. New technologies to combat malignant tumours of the brain.

    Heppner, F

    1982-01-01

    1. The primary problem in an effective treatment of a glioblastoma is the prevention of a recurrence. 2. For that purpose were the following therapeutical procedures undertaken: (a) Temporary implantation of radio cobalt in the brain itself (1957): (b) Clostridium butyricum M 55 was used to render the centre of the tumour fluid (1967): (c) Podophyllin was used to destroy the border of the tumour (1980); (d) The CO2 Laser beam (1975); (e) The electromagnetic heat induction deep in the brain (1973-1978). 3. In order to make the operation and postoperative phase safer for the patient, the following precautions were drawn upon or employed: (a) Hyperbaric oxygenisation in the pressure chamber (1971); (b) The anti-G-suit (1974); (c) the computer controlled automatic infusion pump (1980), and (d) the telemetric measurement of intra-cranial pressure (1975). 4. Apart from the pressure chamber, the mentioned devices were all supervised and developed in the department of the author. 5. The first successful means in the prevention of the recurrence of a glioblastoma multiform seems to be the telethermic method mentioned in 2 (e) above.

  17. Results of irradiating brain tumours (1959-1969)

    Zu Eulenburg, G

    1973-01-01

    The results of the radiation treatment of brain tumours were evaluated for 78 patients. The calculated average survival times, as well as the shape of survival curves show, as compared to numerous other authors, that there is no great deviation for any tumour group. The interpretation of the ratio of an amnesis to survival time shows that with fast growing brain tumours as with glioblastoma, the success of radiotherapy is very small. Radiotherapy was well successful in almost all cases of patients with a longer than average anamnesis.

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolite profiles predict survival in paediatric brain tumours.

    Wilson, Martin; Cummins, Carole L; Macpherson, Lesley; Sun, Yu; Natarajan, Kal; Grundy, Richard G; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Kauppinen, Risto A; Peet, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumours cause the highest mortality and morbidity rate of all childhood tumour groups and new methods are required to improve clinical management. (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows non-invasive concentration measurements of small molecules present in tumour tissue, providing clinically useful imaging biomarkers. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether MRS detectable molecules can predict the survival of paediatric brain tumour patients. Short echo time (30ms) single voxel (1)H MRS was performed on children attending Birmingham Children's Hospital with a suspected brain tumour and 115 patients were included in the survival analysis. Patients were followed-up for a median period of 35 months and Cox-Regression was used to establish the prognostic value of individual MRS detectable molecules. A multivariate model of survival was also investigated to improve prognostic power. Lipids and scyllo-inositol predicted poor survival whilst glutamine and N-acetyl aspartate predicted improved survival (pmodel of survival based on three MRS biomarkers predicted survival with a similar accuracy to histologic grading (p5e-5). A negative correlation between lipids and glutamine was found, suggesting a functional link between these molecules. MRS detectable biomolecules have been identified that predict survival of paediatric brain tumour patients across a range of tumour types. The evaluation of these biomarkers in large prospective studies of specific tumour types should be undertaken. The correlation between lipids and glutamine provides new insight into paediatric brain tumour metabolism that may present novel targets for therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of clonogenic human brain tumour cells: preliminary results of tumour sensitivity testing with BCNU

    Rosenblum, M L; Dougherty, D A; Deen, D F; Hoshino, T; Wilson, C B [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology

    1980-04-01

    Biopsies from 6 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were disaggregated and single cells were treated in vitro with various concentrations of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitroso urea (BCNU) and plated for cell survival. One patient's cells were sensitive to BCNU in vitro; after a single dose of BCNU her brain scan reverted to normal and she was clinically well. Five tumours demonstrated resistance in vitro. Three of these tumours progressed during the first course of chemotherapy with a nitrosourea and the patients died at 21/2, 4 and 81/2 months after operation. Two patients who showed dramatic responses to radiation therapy were considered unchanged after the first course of nitrosourea therapy (although one demonstrated tumour enlargement on brain scan). The correlation of in vitro testing of tumour cell sensitivity with actual patient response is encouraging enough to warrant further work to determine whether such tests should weigh in decisions on patient therapy.

  20. 4. Primary Malignant Bone Tumours at the University Teaching ...

    46987.2

    1Orthopaedic Unit Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. 2Department of ... primary malignant bone tumours at UTH and the hospital ..... unavailable resources. ... bone tumors in Mexico City: retrospective.

  1. Emotional and personality changes following brain tumour resection.

    Jenkins, Lisanne M; Drummond, Katharine J; Andrewes, David G

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress has a high prevalence in brain tumour patients, and understanding the emotional and personality changes that may follow neurosurgery is important for clinical management of these patients. We aimed to characterise these emotional and personality changes using subjective, observer-rated and clinical measures. We examined subjective changes in emotional experience and observer-rated changes to personality disturbances following neurosurgery for brain tumours (n=44), compared to a control group that had undergone spinal surgery (n=26). Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a Subjective Emotional Change Questionnaire. Observers who knew the patients well also completed the Iowa Rating Scale of Personality Change. Compared to controls, patients with tumours reported significantly more changes to their subjective experience of emotions following neurosurgery, particularly anger, disgust and sadness. For the observer-ratings, tumour patients were described as having significant changes in the personality disturbances of irritability, impulsivity, moodiness, inflexibility, and being easily overwhelmed. Anxiety and depression were not significantly different between groups. Neurosurgical resection of a brain tumour is a major life event that changes patients' subjective experiences of different emotions, and leads to observer-rated changes in personality. In this study, these changes were not accompanied by increases in anxiety or depression. We conclude with a discussion of biological and psychosocial mechanisms that can impact emotional functioning and personality in patients with brain tumours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tumour microembolism presenting as "primary pulmonary hypertension"

    Hibbert, M.; Braude, S.

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary tumour microembolism is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension. A case of rapidly progressive pulmonary hypertension in a patient with a past history of breast carcinoma is presented. Despite active consideration and investigation for malignancy as a cause, correct diagnosis was only made at necropsy. 




  3. New MR sequences (diffusion, perfusion, spectroscopy) in brain tumours

    Rossi, Andrea; Gandolfo, Carlo; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Garre, Maria Luisa; Cama, Armando

    2010-01-01

    While MRI has been instrumental in significantly improving care in children harbouring brain tumours, conventional sequences lack information regarding functional parameters including cellularity, haemodynamics and metabolism. Advanced MR imaging modalities, such as diffusion (including diffusion tensor imaging and fibre tractography), perfusion and spectroscopy have significantly improved our understanding of the physiopathology of brain tumours and have provided invaluable additional information for treatment planning and monitoring of treatment results. The contribution of these methods to the characterization of brain neoplasms in children is the focus of the present manuscript. (orig.)

  4. Cognitive deficits in adult patients with brain tumours.

    Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Klein, M.

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive function, with survival and response on brain imaging, is increasingly regarded as an important outcome measure in patients with brain tumours. This measure provides us with information on a patient's clinical situation and adverse treatment effects. Radiotherapy has been regarded as the

  5. Primary hyperparathyroidism with rare presentation as multiple brown tumours

    Smit Doshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of primary hyperparathyroidism with an uncommon presentation as multiple brown tumours, which may easily be mistaken for a primary bone neoplasm. A brief literature review and its clinical and surgical management are also discussed here.

  6. Human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp65 is detected in all intra- and extra-axial brain tumours independent of the tumour type or grade.

    Sylwia Libard

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated.

  7. Value of skeletal scintiscanning in cases of primary bone tumours and tumourous alterations

    Sokolowski, U.

    1982-01-01

    In the course of an investigation on the storage behaviour of primary bone tumours and tumourous bone alterations the skeletal scintigrams of a total of 26 patients were evaluated. Bone scintiscanning was done according to current practice after injection of an average amount of 10mCi sup(99m)Tc-MDP, followed by a semiquantitative evaluation. In all cases of malignant bone tumours there was fond to be increased storage of radionuclide; with benign bone alterations this was so in 70 per cent of cases. To differentiate between benign and malignant tumours respectively inflammatory bone diseases was not as a rule possible; however, the investigation yielded additional information completing the X-ray findings essentially. Thus very high storage of radioactivity was established for all osteosarcomas, whereas benign bone growths exhibited more circumscribed accumulations of activity. Skeletal scintiscanning for diagnostical purposes is particularly informative as to the early detection of bone foci evading X-ray diagnosis, more accurate delimitation of tumourous processes, and course control of tumours tending to degenerate. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Monte Carlo dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy of brain tumours

    Boudou, Caroline; Balosso, Jacques; Esteve, Francois; Elleaume, Helene

    2005-01-01

    A radiation dose enhancement can be obtained in brain tumours after infusion of an iodinated contrast agent and irradiation with kilovoltage x-rays in tomography mode. The aim of this study was to assess dosimetric properties of the synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to humans (SSR) for preparing clinical trials. We designed an interface for dose computation based on a Monte Carlo code (MCNPX). A patient head was constructed from computed tomography (CT) data and a tumour volume was modelled. Dose distributions were calculated in SSR configuration for various energy beam and iodine content in the target volume. From the calculations, it appears that the iodine-filled target (10 mg ml -1 ) can be efficiently irradiated by a monochromatic beam of energy ranging from 50 to 85 keV. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of stereotactic radiotherapy for treating deep-seated brain tumours with monoenergetic x-rays from a synchrotron

  9. Study of bantam miRNA expression in brain tumour resulted due to ...

    ANIMESH BANERJEE

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... these genes lead to an inappropriate segregation of cell fate determinants ... ground could possibly be a consequence of brain tumour resulting ... Expression of bantam miRNA in Drosophila brain tumour. Figure 1. Bantam is ...

  10. Changes in Cognition and Decision Making Capacity Following Brain Tumour Resection: Illustrated with Two Cases.

    Veretennikoff, Katie; Walker, David; Biggs, Vivien; Robinson, Gail

    2017-09-24

    Changes in cognition, behaviour and emotion frequently occur in patients with primary and secondary brain tumours. This impacts the ability to make considered decisions, especially following surgical resection, which is often overlooked in the management of patients. Moreover, the impact of cognitive deficits on decision making ability affects activities of daily living and functional independence. The assessment process to ascertain decision making capacity remains a matter of debate. One avenue for evaluating a patient's ability to make informed decisions in the context of brain tumour resection is neuropsychological assessment. This involves the assessment of a wide range of cognitive abilities on standard measurement tools, providing a robust approach to ascertaining capacity. Evidence has shown that a comprehensive and tailored neuropsychological assessment has greater sensitivity than brief cognitive screening tools to detect subtle and/or specific cognitive deficits in brain tumours. It is the precise nature and severity of any cognitive deficits that determines any implications for decision making capacity. This paper focuses on cognitive deficits and decision making capacity following surgical resection of both benign and malignant, and primary and secondary brain tumours in adult patients, and the implications for patients' ability to consent to future medical treatment and make decisions related to everyday activities.

  11. Predicting parenting stress in caregivers of children with brain tumours.

    Bennett, Emily; English, Martin William; Rennoldson, Michael; Starza-Smith, Arleta

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify factors that contribute to parenting stress in caregivers of children diagnosed with brain tumours. The study was cross-sectional and recruited 37 participants from a clinical database at a specialist children's hospital. Parents were sent questionnaires, which were used to measure factors related to stress in caregivers of children diagnosed with a brain tumour. Stress levels were measured using the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI/SF). Correlation analysis and multiple linear regression were used to examine the associations between parenting stress and coping styles, locus of control, parent-perceived child disability and time since diagnosis. Results revealed that 51% of parents were experiencing clinically significant levels of stress. The mean stress level of parents in the study was significantly higher than the PSI/SF norms (t = 4.7, p parenting stress. Other styles of coping, child behaviour problems and the amount of time since diagnosis were not found to be predictive of levels of parenting stress. There was a high prevalence of parenting stress in caregivers of children with a brain tumour. An external locus of control and coping by accepting responsibility increased the likelihood of elevated levels of stress. Results emphasised the importance of ongoing support for parents of children with brain tumours. Intervention might helpfully be centred on strategies to increase parents' internal locus of control. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Psychiatric manifestations of brain tumours: a review | Magoha | East ...

    Clinicians must have high index of suspicion when managing psychiatric symptoms that are atypical, new-onset, anxiety, or with poor response and resistance to known and efficacious psychopharmaco-therapy treatment regimes, as there may be an underlying brain tumour responsible for the symptomatology. This must ...

  13. Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and brain tumour risks in the INTEROCC study

    Turner, Michelle C; Benke, Geza; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Kincl, Laurel; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumours, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumours. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumours in the large-scale INTEROCC study. Methods Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1–4, 5–9, and 10+ years prior to the diagnosis/reference date. Results There were 3,761 included brain tumour cases (1,939 glioma, 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1–4 years prior to the diagnosis/reference date and glioma (odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumourigenesis. PMID:24935666

  14. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for high-grade brain tumours

    Barazzuol, Lara

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and among the most aggressive of all tumours. For several decades, the standard care of GBM was surgical resection followed by radiotherapy alone. In 2005, a landmark phase III clinical trial coordinated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) demonstrated the benefit of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. With TMZ, the median life expectancy in optimally managed patients is still only 12-14 months, with only 25% surviving 24 months. There is an urgent need for new therapies in particular in those patients whose tumour has an unmethylated methylguanine methyltransferase gene (MGMT) promoter, which is a predictive factor of benefit from TMZ. In this dissertation, the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation is investigated using both a mathematical model, based on in vivo population statistics of survival, and in vitro experimentation on a panel of human GBM cell lines. The results show that TMZ has an additive effect in vitro and that the population-based model may be insufficient in predicting TMZ response. The combination of TMZ with particle therapy is also investigated. Very little preclinical data exists on the effects of charged particles on GBM cell lines as well as on the concomitant application of chemotherapy. In this study, human GBM cells are exposed to 3 MeV protons and 6 MeV alpha particles in concomitance with TMZ. The results suggest that the radiation quality does not affect the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation, showing reproducible additive cytotoxicity. Since TMZ and radiation cause DNA damage in cancer cells, there has been increased attention to the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PARP is a family of enzymes that play a key role in the repair of DNA breaks. In this study, a novel PARP inhibitor, ABT-888

  15. Validation of brain tumour imaging with p-[123I]iodo-l-phenylalanine and SPECT

    Hellwig, Dirk; Sell, Nadja; Schaefer, Andrea; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Samnick, Samuel; Ketter, Ralf; Moringlane, Jean R.; Romeike, Bernd F.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to validate single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with p-[ 123 I]iodo-l-phenylalanine (IPA) in brain tumours and to evaluate its potential for the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. In 45 patients with indeterminate brain lesions or suspected progression of glioma, amino acid uptake was studied using IPA-SPECT and compared with the final diagnosis established by biopsy or serial imaging. After image fusion of IPA-SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging, the presence of tumour was visually determined by two independent observers. IPA uptake was quantified as the ratio between maximum uptake in the suspicious lesion and mean uptake in unaffected brain. Primary brain tumours were present in 35 cases (12 low-grade and 23 high-grade gliomas). Non-neoplastic brain lesions were confirmed in seven cases (three dysplasias, three inflammatory lesions, one lesion after effective therapy). Visual analysis showed a high concordance between the two observers (kappa=0.90, p<0.001), with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 100% for the discrimination of primary brain tumours and non-neoplastic lesions. At 30 min p.i., IPA uptake in primary brain tumours was higher than that in non-neoplastic lesions (1.70±0.36 vs 1.14±0.18, p<0.05). Brain metastases showed no increased uptake (1.13±0.22, n=3). The persistent retention of IPA in low-grade gliomas without disruption of the blood-brain barrier was visualised up to 24 h p.i. Low-grade and high-grade gliomas showed equivalent IPA uptake (1.72±0.37 vs 1.67±0.36 at 30 min, p=0.745). IPA shows long and specific retention in gliomas. IPA is a promising and safe radiopharmaceutical for the visualisation of gliomas and the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. (orig.)

  16. Mobile phone use and risk of brain tumours

    Lahkola, A.

    2010-05-01

    Mobile phone use has increased rapidly worldwide since the 1990's. As mobile telephones are used close to the head, the exposure to the radiofrequency radiation emitted by mobile phones has been suggested as a possible risk factor for brain tumours. The effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, particularly gliomas and meningiomas as well as acoustic neuromas, was evaluated using both a case-control approach and a meta-analysis. In addition, one of the most important sources of error in a case-control study, selection bias due to differential participation, was assessed in a subset of the case-control data. The risk of glioma and meningioma in relation to mobile phone use was investigated in population-based case-control studies conducted in five North European countries. All these countries used a common protocol and were included in a multinational study on mobile phone use and brain tumours, the INTERPHONE study, coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Cases (1,521 gliomas and 1,209 meningiomas) were identified mostly from hospitals and controls (3,299) from national population registers or general practitioners' patient lists. Detailed history of mobile phone use was obtained in personal interviews. Mobile phone use was assessed using several exposure indicators, such as regular use (phone use at least once a week for at least six months), duration of use as well as cumulative number of hours and calls. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, the existing evidence from the epidemiological studies published on the issue was combined using meta-analysis. In the analysis, a pooled estimate was calculated for all brain tumours combined, and also separately for the three most common tumour types, glioma, meningioma and acoustic neuroma using inverse variance-weighted method. Pooled estimate was also obtained for different telephone types (NMT and GSM) and by the location of the

  17. CT-stereotactic interstitial Curie-therapy using iodine-125 seeds in inoperable brain tumours

    Mundinger, F.

    1985-01-01

    Iodine-125 seeds are a new radio-drug featuring favourable physical, biological and radiation protection characteristics and available for interstitial (local) irradiation (Curie-therapy) of non-resectable brain tumours as such (cerebral tumours) or of tumours of the interior of the neuro-cranium (extracerebral tumours). Emitters are inserted right into the tumour or tumour recurrence by means of computerized-tomography stereotaxy either permanently or temporarily with dose release being largely restricted to the tumour and the surrounding brain tissue being spared. (orig.) [de

  18. Primary tonsillar mast cell tumour in a dog.

    Shekell, C C; Thomson, M J; Miller, R I; Mackie, J T

    2018-05-01

    A 6-year-old speyed female Bull Arab-cross dog was found to have a small tonsillar nodule. Histological examination revealed a well-differentiated mast cell tumour (MCT). At initial staging, no evidence of concurrent cutaneous or visceral MCTs was found on a complete blood count, a single lateral thoracic radiograph, abdominal ultrasound or cytology of the spleen and regional lymph nodes. A diagnosis of primary tonsillar MCT was made. At 40 months postoperatively, the dog is alive with no evidence of gross tumour progression, in contrast to some previous reports of rapid disease progression and metastasis in dogs with primary oral MCTs. To the authors' knowledge, no previous reports of a primary MCT of the tonsil in dogs exist in the veterinary literature. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  19. Evaluation of brain tumours by positron emission tomography

    Schober, O.; Meyer, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) for the evaluation of brain tumours has proved clinically valuable. Amino acid and FDG-glucose PET provide information on the degree of malignancy and the prognosis during the initial evaluation. After therapy, the residual tumour can be visualized and recurrence can be differentiated from necrosis. Amino acids have advantages over FDG for these clinical applications. Blood flow, oxygen extraction and metabolism and blood-brain barrier permeability are of minor relevance in clinical situations. Comparison of PET with MRI and MRS will provide new data. The quantitative information of the unique information yielded by PET will lead to a more important clinical role, as will the extrapolation of this experience to the SPECT technique. (orig.) [de

  20. Brain tumour stem cells: implications for cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

    Sanchez-Martin, Manuel

    2008-09-01

    The cancer relapse and mortality rate suggest that current therapies do not eradicate all malignant cells. Currently, it is accepted that tumorigenesis and organogenesis are similar in many respects, as for example, homeostasis is governed by a distinct sub-population of stem cells in both situations. There is increasing evidence that many types of cancer contain their own stem cells: cancer stem cells (CSC), which are characterized by their self-renewing capacity and differentiation ability. The investigation of solid tumour stem cells has gained momentum particularly in the area of brain tumours. Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumours. Nearly two-thirds of gliomas are highly malignant lesions with fast progression and unfortunate prognosis. Despite recent advances, two-year survival for glioblastoma (GBM) with optimal therapy is less than 30%. Even among patients with low-grade gliomas that confer a relatively good prognosis, treatment is almost never curative. Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a small fraction of glioma cells endowed with features of primitive neural progenitor cells and a tumour-initiating function. In general, this fraction is characterized for forming neurospheres, being endowed with drug resistance properties and often, we can isolate some of them using sorting methods with specific antibodies. The molecular characterization of these stem populations will be critical to developing an effective therapy for these tumours with very dismal prognosis. To achieve this aim, the development of a mouse model which recapitulates the nature of these tumours is essential. This review will focus on glioma stem cell knowledge and discuss future implications in brain cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

  1. Scintigraphic assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier of human brain tumours

    Front, D.

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier was performed by sequential scintigraphy in 43 patients with brain tumours. The blood-tumour barrier was evaluated by use of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, and vascularity using sup(99m)Tc-labelled red blood cells. Three groups of tumours were found: tumours with low vascularity and permeable barrier, tumours with high vascularity and permeable barrier, and tumours with low vascularity and relatively impermeable barrier. The first group indicates that when vessels are permeable, there may be a rapid penetration of large amounts of pertechnetate into the tumour even when vascularity is not increased. In the other two groups penetration of pertechnetate into the tumour is affected by vascularity, as it determines the total area where passage of the radiopharmaceutical takes place. It is suggested that the permeability of the blood-tumour barrier and the amount of vascularity may have an effect on the success of chemotherapy in brain tumours. (author)

  2. Role of 99mTc labelled GHA in post treatment evaluation of brain tumours

    Choudhury, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Biochemical investigations have a major role to play in the management of primary brain tumours. It is well known that major biochemical changes occur during cancerous transformation including changes in the energy metabolism of the cell. Changes take place in terms of utilization of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis and expression of antigens and receptors. Changes also take place in disruption of transport mechanisms across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries like blood brain barrier. In the management of primary brain tumours positron emitting tracers have an undisputed role and the role of cationic tracers like Thallium-201, 99m-Tc MIBI and 99m-Tc tetrofosmin has been cited as an alternative to positron tracers in neuro oncology. It must be borne in mind that the cationic tracers are expensive to procure and facilities for positron emission tomography are not available in most of the developing countries. Tc-99m GHA Brain Imaging: Keeping in view the above, a cheaper alternative for PET radio tracers was evaluated. We have so far conducted more than 100 brain SPECT studies, using Tc-99m Glucoheptonic acid (GHA), in 60 patients of brain tumour, both at the time of their diagnosis, as well as after treatment during the follow-up period. Tc-99m Glucoheptonic acid (GHA) is a chemical glucose analogue. Avid concentration of the radiopharmaceutical was noted in viable tumor tissue in the SPECT images done one hour after injection of 740 MBq of 99m-Tc GHA. This was subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination in patients undergoing re-surgery for residual disease or follow up and clinical correlation in patients under remission. Avid tracer concentration was also well demonstrated in recurrent disease (proven by clinical examination, histopathology and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). No significant tracer uptake was seen in areas of radiation induced necrosis. Non-specific uptake in the tumor bed was

  3. Narrative skills of children treated for brain tumours: The impact of tumour and treatment related variables on microstructure and macrostructure.

    Docking, Kimberley; Munro, Natalie; Marshall, Tara; Togher, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    The narrative skills of children with brain tumours were examined. Influence of tumour location, radiotherapy, time post-treatment and presence of hydrocephalus was also investigated, as well as associations between narrative and language abilities. Seventeen children (aged 5;6-14;11) treated for brain tumour and their matched controls completed a narrative assessment and comprehensive language testing. Audio recorded narratives were analysed for microstructure and macrostructure elements. Between-group comparisons were conducted. Narrative elements were explored in association with tumour and treatment-related variables. Correlation analysis examined relationships between narrative scores and language test performance. While significant differences were not found between two groups of children across narrative elements, sub-group comparisons revealed marginal differences in macrostructure related to tumour location and hydrocephalus. Children treated with methods other than radiotherapy showed a significant increase in number of mazes in their narratives compared to children who received radiotherapy. Strong positive correlations also existed between narrative elements and language performance. Preliminary findings highlight the importance of investigating narrative abilities as part of a comprehensive language assessment. Macrostructure should be routinely examined where children are diagnosed with either posterior fossa tumour or hydrocephalus or have undergone surgery and/or chemotherapy for brain tumour.

  4. Preclinical studies for increasing radiation response of malignant brain tumours

    Kalia, Vijay K.; Kumari, Kalyani; Sai Shyam; George, Jennifer; Shobha, A.G.; Chandrasekhar Sagar, B.K.; Lal, Jagath

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common among the CNS cancers. Standard treatment for these tumours - comprises of surgery, followed by Radiotherapy (RT). Combination of Temozolomide (TMZ) increases survival, but hematological toxicities are also increased as compared to RT alone. The median survival depends on grade and location of tumour, as well as the age of the patient. Grade IV gliomas (GSMs) are third leading cause of cancer induced death in the age group of 15 to 34 years. Therefore, it is important to carry out further preclinical studies to develop more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. The present studies were carried out on different established malignant glioma cell lines. (U373MG) as well as primary monolayer cultures derived from biopsies obtained from patients with malignant gliomas. Exponentially growing cells were exposed to TMZ, Lonidamine (LND) (in 0.1% DMSO), or 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG, aqueous solution) - with or without 60 Co-Gamma-rays (1- 2 Gy). The drugs were removed 4 hours after irradiation and the cultures were processed further for different assays of damage. Short term (4 h) treatments with TMZ 20 μM, LND 100 μM or their combination; did not induce micronuclei formation in the unirradiated cultures of U373MG cells. However, radiation (2 Gy) induced micronuclei was significantly increased by drug treatments. In primary cultures from different tumours, TMZ (≤ 10 μM) or 2-DG (1 mM), or gamma-irradiation (1-2 Gy) induced micronuclei and/ or apoptosis. The effects, however, varied in different tumours. These data show that clinically achievable, very low concentrations of these drugs could induce cellular damage and death; and increase radiosensitivity of malignant gliomas. Therefore, adjuvants like Lonidamine and 2-DG, with non-overlapping toxicities, could optimize treatment of malignant gliomas, by reducing the side effects of radio-chemotherapy. (author)

  5. Incidence of brain tumours in rats exposed to an aerosol of 239PuO2

    Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Incidence of brain tumours was investigated in 3390 female and male Wistar rats exposed to an aerosol of 239 PuO 2 , or as sham-exposed controls. Lung doses ranged from 0.05 to 22 Gy. In females, six brain tumours were found in 1058 control rats (incidence, 0.6%) and 24 brain tumours in 2134 rats exposed to Pu (incidence, 1.1%); the survival-adjusted level of significance was p = 0.29 for comparing control with exposed females. In males, two brain tumours were found in 60 control rats (incidence, 3.3%) and seven brain tumours in 138 rats exposed to Pu (incidence, 5.1%); the survival-adjusted level of significance was p = 0.33. Brain tumour incidence was about five times greater in male than in female rats (p = 0.0001), a highly significant sex difference in brain tumour incidence. Tumour types were distributed similarly among control and Pu-exposed groups of both sexes; most were astrocytomas. Mean lifespans for rats with brain tumours were not significantly different between control and Pu-exposed rats. (author)

  6. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Brain Tumours

    Berg, Gertrud; Blomquist, Erik; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for brain tumours is based on data from 9 randomized trials and 1 meta-analysis. Moreover, data from 2 prospective studies, 3 retrospective studies and 4 other articles were used. In total, 19 scientific articles are included, involving 4,266 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 11,252 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized as follows: The conclusion from SBU 129/2 that curative treatment is not available for patients with high-grade malignant glioma (grade III and IV) is still valid. The survival benefit from postoperative radiotherapy compared to supportive care only or chemotherapy is about 3-4 months, as demonstrated in earlier randomized studies. Quality of life is now currently estimated and considered to be of major importance when reporting the outcome of treatment for patients with brain tumours. There is no scientific evidence that radiotherapy using hyper- and hypofractionation leads to longer survival for patients with high-grade malignant glioma than conventional radiotherapy. There is large documentation, but only one randomized study. There is some documentation to support the view that patients with grade IV glioma and poor prognosis can be treated with hypofractionation and with an outcome similar to that after conventional fractionation. A shorter treatment time should be convenient for the patient. Documentation of the benefit of a radiotherapy boost with brachytherapy is limited and no conclusion can be drawn. There is no scientific evidence that radiotherapy prolongs life for patients with low-grade glioma. There are some data supporting that radiotherapy can be used to treat symptoms in

  7. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd; Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Arnold, Dirk; Katzer, Michaela; Schmidt, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  8. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Halle (Germany); Katzer, Michaela [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Urology, Halle (Germany); Schmidt, Joerg [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Medical Statistics and Controlling, Halle (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  9. Primary pleuro-pulmonary malignant germ cell tumours.

    Vaideeswar P

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lungs and pleura are rare sites for malignant germ-cell tumours. Two cases, pure yolk-sac tumour and yolk sac-sac tumour/embryonal carcinoma are described in young males who presented with rapid progression of respiratory symptoms. The malignant mixed germ cell tumour occurred in the right lung, while the yolk-sac tumour had a pseudomesotheliomatous growth pattern suggesting a pleural origin. Alpha-foetoprotein was immunohistochemically demonstrated in both.

  10. 18F-FDG whole body positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT)

    Lassen, U; Daugaard, G; Eigtved, A

    1999-01-01

    adenocarcinomas and 1 poorly differentiated carcinoma). The remaining patients had metastases located in bone (3), bone marrow (1), brain (1), pericardium (1), skin (1), pleura (1) and chest wall (1). All metastatic lesions were visible with PET. In 13 patients PET suggested the site for the primary tumour...... by the PET result. The rest received either radical radiotherapy to the head and neck region (7), palliative radiotherapy to the metastatic lesion (8), chemotherapy based on signet ring cell carcinoma in bone marrow (1) or no therapy (1). These results indicates that PET is useful in UPT preceding expensive......The management of patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT) often includes a large number of radiographical studies and invasive procedures, but the occult primary tumour is detected in less than 25%. In this prospective study we explored whether non-invasive whole body PET scans using FDG (18-F...

  11. Traumatic primary brain stem haemorrhage

    Andrioli, G.C.; Zuccarello, M.; Trincia, G.; Fiore, D.L.; De Caro, R.

    1983-01-01

    We report 36 cases of post-traumatic 'primary brain stem haemorrhage' visualized by the CT scan and confirmed at autopsy. Clinical experience shows that many technical factors influence the inability to visualize brain stem haemorrhages. Experimental injection of fresh blood into the pons and midbrain of cadavers shows that lesions as small as 0.25 ml in volume may be visualized. The volume and the anatomical configuration of traumatic lesions of the brain stem extended over a rostro-caudal direction, and their proximity to bony structures at the base of the skull are obstacles to the visualization of brain stem haemorrhages. (Author)

  12. Radiation-induced brain disorders in patients with pituitary tumours

    Bhansali, A.; Chanda, A.; Dash, R.J.; Banerjee, A.K.; Singh, P.; Sharma, S.C.; Mathuriya, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced brain disorders (RIBD) are uncommon and they are grave sequelae of conventional radiotherapy. In the present report, we describe the clinical spectrum of RIBD in 11 patients who received post-surgery conventional megavoltage irradiation for residual pituitary tumours. Of these 11 patients (nine men, two women), seven had been treated for non-functioning pituitary tumours and four for somatotropinomas. At the time of irradiation the age of these patients ranged from 30 to 59 years (mean, 39.4 ± 8.3; median, 36) with a follow-up period of 696 months (mean, 18.3 ± 26.4; median, 11). The dose of radiation ranged from 45 to 90 Gy (mean, 51.3 ± 13.4; median, 45), which was given in 1530 fractions (mean, 18.6 ± 5.0; median, 15) with 2.8 ± 0.3 Gy (median, 3) per fraction. The biological effective dose calculated for late complications in these patients ranged from 78.7 to 180 Gy (mean, 99.1 ± 27.5; median, 90). The lag time between tumour irradiation and the onset of symptoms ranged from 6 to 168 months (mean, 46.3 ± 57.0; median, 57). The clinical spectrum of RIBD included new-onset visual abnormalities in five, cerebral radionecrosis in the form of altered sensorium in four, generalized seizures in four, cognitive dysfunction in five, dementia in three and motor deficits in two patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/CT of the brain was suggestive of radionecrosis in eight, cerebral oedema in three, cerebral atrophy in two and second neoplasia in one patient. Associated hormone deficiencies at presentation were hypogonadism in eight, hypoadrenalism in six, hypothyroidism in four and diabetes insipidus in one patient. Autopsy in two patients showed primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and brainstem radionecrosis in one, and a cystic lesion in the left frontal lobe following radionecrosis in the other. We conclude that RIBD have distinctive but varying clinical and radiological presentations. Diabetes insipidus and PNET as a second neoplastic

  13. Neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumours in a ...

    Background: Anecdotally, increasing number of patients are seen at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) with brain tumour. Neuro-ophthalmic symptoms and signs may help in timely diagnosis and intervention. Objective: To evaluate the neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumour in patients presenting at a ...

  14. Information needs and requirements in patients with brain tumours and their relatives.

    Reinert, Christiane; Rathberger, Katharina; Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Kölbl, Oliver; Proescholdt, Martin; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Schuierer, Gerhard; Hutterer, Markus; Gerken, Michael; Hau, Peter

    2018-06-01

    Patients with brain tumours face a number of medical and social challenges. Previous studies have shown that these patients and their relatives need a high level of patient-oriented information and counselling. However, these needs are often underestimated. In this single-centre cross-sectional study, we evaluated, for the first time, the information needs of patients with brain tumours and their relatives depending on diagnosis, age and level of education. The participants were interviewed using pre-specified questionnaires. Answers were evaluated descriptively using standard statistical methods. A total of 888 questionnaires were sent out. The return rate was 50.7%. The majority of patients (nP = 103; 59.9%) and a higher proportion of relatives (nR = 103; 72.5%; p = 0.019) wished to receive a maximum of information. The majority (79.7% of patients; 83.1% of relatives) also stated that they preferred a personal, face-to-face meeting as primary source of information. The need for information increased with education (p = 0.015), and decreased with tumour grade (p = 0.025) and age (p = 0.118). Our data indicate that patients with brain tumours and their relatives have high information needs throughout their disease and continuously require information and counselling. Optimal provision of information is based on personal preferences, which needs to be evaluated appropriately. Patient-oriented information and counselling are parts of a successful communication strategy that can improve cancer care significantly.

  15. A PROSPECTIVE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL-BASED STUDY OF BRAIN TUMOURS IN A REFERRAL CENTRE

    Prathima Gujjaru

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brain neoplasms occur at all ages and account for around 2-3 percent of all deaths in adults. In children, the frequency increases to more than twenty percent. In children, it forms the second most common type of malignancy. Most of the tumours encountered are not related to any identifiable risk factors except for irradiation and some hereditary syndromes like subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, cerebellar haemangioblastoma, meningioma, Schwannoma of 7 th cranial nerve. Gliomas constitute fifty percent of the brain tumours and sixty percent of all gliomas are glioblastoma multiforme. Meningiomas constitute twenty percent and cerebral metastasis is seen in fifteen percent of the cases. Seventy percent of supratentorial tumours are found in adults and seventy percent of brain tumours in children are infratentorial. The three common tumours of cerebellum are medulloblastoma, haemangioblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma. Brain tumours are space occupying lesions and cause compression and destruction of adjacent structures, brain oedema (Peritumoural tissue, infarction and ischaemia of brain by compressing/infiltrating cerebral blood vessels, obstruction of CSF flow causing hydrocephalus, and rise in intracranial pressure with herniations. Tumours can undergo ischaemic necrosis and necrotic tumours tend to bleed. Brain tumours generally do not metastasise. Schwannoma and meningioma are benign tumours. Medulloblastoma of childhood may have drop metastasis via CSF. A sincere effort has been put in this study to identify the incidence of each variety of brain tumour among the fifty confirmed and identified cases of brain tumours. METHODS The age range of the cases in present study was 5-72 years with a mean age of occurrence of 44.11 years and the peak age group affected were in the 3 rd and 4 th decades. Cerebral hemisphere was the commonest site for intracranial tumours. RESULT In the present study, fifty

  16. Thallium uptake and biological behaviour in childhood brain tumours

    Bernard, E.J.; Howman-Giles, R.; Kellie, S.; Uren, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The histopathological grade and radiological appearance of the diverse cerebral neoplasms in childhood frequently poorly reflect their biological behaviour. We examined thallium accumulation prior to treatment (and in several cases, at intervals there after) in 13 children to determine its usefulness as a tumour marker. 23 SPECT studies were acquired 20 minutes after the injection of 1-3 mCi of 201 TI. Thallium index (TI), the ratio of counts in tumour/normal brain, was calculated. No uptake was seen in two patients (pts) with a Grade 1 cerebellar astrocytomas (disease free at 4/12 f/u). Three pts with medulloblastomas were studied. One pt showed intense uptake (Tl =12). His tumour (proliferative antigen stain Ki67 = 50%) recurred early after debulking surgery (Tl +ve prior to CT or MRI changes). The second pt was imaged at relapse Ki67 = 60%) and showed intense uptake, Tl = 17. The third pt showed lower level uptake (Tl = 2), Ki67 = 5%, and is disease-free at 5/12 (as per 201 TI and MRI). One pt with a Grade 1 brainstem glioma showed Tl = 5 and has progressed rapidly despite low grade histology. Four pts with chiasmatic-hypothalamic gliomas have been studied. Although these neoplasms are usually low grade histologically, their growth properties vary greatly. Two pts with Tl 3.5 and have required aggressive treatment for rapid disease progression. One pt with a large pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm showed Tl = 9.5. Active treatment was not undertaken. One pt with a pineal germ cell tumour showed avid 201 TI uptake (Tl not performed) and has had two normal studies, and is clinically well, since BMT. Avid 201 TI uptake also seen in one pt with cerebral neuroblastoma. (Died at 8/12 after Dx.) Thus, 201 TI accumulates in histologically diverse paediatric neoplasms. The Tl appears to reflect biological behaviour in the limited number of medulloblastoma and optic gliomas pts studied. Whilst promising, further patient studies and longer follow-up is

  17. Metastatic behaviour of primary human tumours in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model

    Marques, Ines J; Bagowski, Christoph P; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Vlecken, Danielle H; Nitsche, Claudia; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lagendijk, Anne K; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of cell migration drives progression of many diseases, including cancer cell invasion and metastasis formation. Analysis of tumour invasion and metastasis in living organisms to date is cumbersome and involves difficult and time consuming investigative techniques. For primary human tumours we establish here a simple, fast, sensitive and cost-effective in vivo model to analyse tumour invasion and metastatic behaviour. We fluorescently labelled small explants from gastrointestinal human tumours and investigated their metastatic behaviour after transplantation into zebrafish embryos and larvae. The transparency of the zebrafish embryos allows to follow invasion, migration and micrometastasis formation in real-time. High resolution imaging was achieved through laser scanning confocal microscopy of live zebrafish. In the transparent zebrafish embryos invasion, circulation of tumour cells in blood vessels, migration and micrometastasis formation can be followed in real-time. Xenografts of primary human tumours showed invasiveness and micrometastasis formation within 24 hours after transplantation, which was absent when non-tumour tissue was implanted. Furthermore, primary human tumour cells, when organotopically implanted in the zebrafish liver, demonstrated invasiveness and metastatic behaviour, whereas primary control cells remained in the liver. Pancreatic tumour cells showed no metastatic behaviour when injected into cloche mutant embryos, which lack a functional vasculature. Our results show that the zebrafish is a useful in vivo animal model for rapid analysis of invasion and metastatic behaviour of primary human tumour specimen

  18. Results obtained by quantifying skeleton scintiscanning for the evaluation of primary bone tumours

    Buell, U.; Keyl, W.; Meister, P.

    1985-01-01

    Since the region-of-interest technique can now more frequently be applied with nuclear-medical small computer systems available, this conference paper reports about the use of quantifying scintigraphy for evaluating the extent of uptake of Tc-99m-M.D.P. by the primary bone tumours. The quotients thus determined have been correlated with the histological findings for the most frequent bone tumours, for the purpose of assessing the dignity of a bone tumour by means of the quotients. Radiography, however, still is the most important imaging technique for the diagnosis of primary bone tumours. (orig./MG) [de

  19. The significance of brain scintiscanning with Te-99m in the diagnosis of brain tumours

    Spengel, F.

    1973-01-01

    The author gives a short introduction to the technology and methods of brain scintiscanning and states his reasons for using the γ source 99 m Tc as test substance. The pathophysiological causes of the accumulation of this nuclide in tumour tissue are discussed, and the normal brain scan is illustrated by models. After this, the scintiscans with tu1our diagnosis obtained in the 2nd university clinic for internal diseases in the period between 1968 and 1970 are listed. 11 of these cases are treated in detail in a casuistics, and the findings are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. In Vivo Tumour Mapping Using Electrocorticography Alterations During Awake Brain Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    Boussen, Salah; Velly, Lionel; Benar, Christian; Metellus, Philippe; Bruder, Nicolas; Trébuchon, Agnès

    2016-09-01

    During awake brain surgery for tumour resection, in situ EEG recording (ECoG) is used to identify eloquent areas surrounding the tumour. We used the ECoG setup to record the electrical activity of cortical and subcortical tumours and then performed frequency and connectivity analyses in order to identify ECoG impairments and map tumours. We selected 16 patients with cortical (8) and subcortical (8) tumours undergoing awake brain surgery. For each patient, we computed the spectral content of tumoural and healthy areas in each frequency band. We computed connectivity of each electrode using connectivity markers (linear and non-linear correlations, phase-locking and coherence). We performed comparisons between healthy and tumour electrodes. The ECoG alterations were used to implement automated classification of the electrodes using clustering or neural network algorithms. ECoG alterations were used to image cortical tumours.Cortical tumours were found to profoundly alter all frequency contents (normalized and absolute power), with an increase in the δ activity and a decreases for the other bands (P < 0.05). Cortical tumour electrodes showed high level of connectivity compared to surrounding electrodes (all markers, P < 0.05). For subcortical tumours, a relative decrease in the γ1 band and in the alpha band in absolute amplitude (P < 0.05) were the only abnormalities. The neural network algorithm classification had a good performance: 93.6 % of the electrodes were classified adequately on a test subject. We found significant spectral and connectivity ECoG changes for cortical tumours, which allowed tumour recognition. Artificial neural algorithm pattern recognition seems promising for electrode classification in awake tumour surgery.

  1. Time sequential single photon emission computed tomography studies in brain tumour using thallium-201

    Ueda, Takashi; Kaji, Yasuhiro; Wakisaka, Shinichiro; Watanabe, Katsushi; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Futami, Shigemi

    1993-01-01

    Time sequential single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies using thallium-201 were performed in 25 patients with brain tumours to evaluate the kinetics of thallium in the tumour and the biological malignancy grade preoperatively. After acquisition and reconstruction of SPECT data from 1 min post injection to 48 h (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 15-20 min, followed by 4-6, 24 and 48 h), the thallium uptake ratio in the tumour versus the homologous contralateral area of the brain was calculated and compared with findings of X-ray CT, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebral angiography and histological investigations. Early uptake of thallium in tumours was related to tumour vascularity and the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. High and rapid uptake and slow reduction of thallium indicated a hypervascular malignant tumour; however, high and rapid uptake but rapid reduction of thallium indicated a hypervascular benign tumour, such as meningioma. Hypovascular and benign tumours tended to show low uptake and slow reduction of thallium. Long-lasting retention or uptake of thallium indicates tumour malignancy. (orig.)

  2. The retinoblastoma gene is frequently altered leading to loss of expression in primary breast tumours.

    Varley, J M; Armour, J; Swallow, J E; Jeffreys, A J; Ponder, B A; T'Ang, A; Fung, Y K; Brammar, W J; Walker, R A

    1989-06-01

    We have analysed the organisation of the retinoblastoma (RB1) gene in 77 primary breast carcinomas, in metastatic tissue derived from 16 of those primary tumours, and in a variety of benign breast lesions. Expression of RB1 was also assessed in most samples by immunohistochemical detection of the RB1 protein in tissue sections. Structural abnormalities to RB1 were detected in DNA from 15/77 (19%) of primary breast carcinomas examined. Where DNA was available from metastatic tissue derived from such primary tumours, the same aberration could be detected. No alterations were seen in benign breast lesions. 16/56 (29%) of tumours examined for expression by immunohistochemical methods showed a proportion of tumour cells to be completely negative for the RB1 protein. All tumours in which a structural alteration to RB1 was detected had a proportion of negative cells, except for one case where all cells were positive. Several primary tumour samples were identified where there was no detectable structural change to the gene, but there was loss of expression in some tumour cells. The data presented here demonstrate that changes to the RB1 gene leading to loss of expression of both alleles are frequent in primary human breast tumours.

  3. Brain tumour imaging with PET: a comparison between [{sup 18}F]fluorodopa and [{sup 11}C]methionine

    Becherer, Alexander; Karanikas, Georgios; Szabo, Monica; Zettinig, Georg; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Kletter, Kurt [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Asenbaum, Susanne [Department of Neurology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Marosi, Christine [Department of Oncology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Henk, Christine; Wunderbaldinger, Patrick [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czech, Thomas [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2003-11-01

    Imaging of amino acid transport in brain tumours is more sensitive than fluorine-18 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET). The most frequently used tracer in this field is carbon-11 methionine (MET), which is unavailable for PET centres without a cyclotron because of its short half-life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-phenylalanine (FDOPA) in this setting, in comparison with MET. Twenty patients with known supratentorial brain lesions were referred for PET scans with FDOPA and MET. The diagnoses were 18 primary brain tumours, one metastasis and one non-neoplastic cerebral lesion. All 20 patients underwent PET with FDOPA (100 MBq, 20 min p.i.), and 19 of them also had PET scans with MET (800 MBq, 20 min p.i.). In all but one patient a histological diagnosis was available. In 15 subjects, histology was known from previous surgical interventions; in five of these patients, as well as in four previously untreated patients, histology was obtained after PET. In one untreated patient, confirmation of PET was possible solely by correlation with MRI; a histological diagnosis became available 10 months later. MET and FDOPA images matched in all patients and showed all lesions as hot spots with higher uptake than in the contralateral brain. Standardised uptake value ratios, tumour/contralateral side (mean{+-}SD), were 2.05{+-}0.91 for MET and 2.04{+-}0.53 for FDOPA (NS). The benign lesion, which biopsy revealed to be a focal demyelination, was false positive, showing increased uptake of MET and FDOPA. We conclude that FDOPA is accurate as a surrogate for MET in imaging amino acid transport in malignant cerebral lesions for the purpose of visualisation of vital tumour tissue. It combines the good physical properties of {sup 18}F with the pharmacological properties of MET and might therefore be a valuable PET radiopharmaceutical in brain tumour imaging. (orig.)

  4. Medical exposure to ionising radiation and the risk of brain tumours

    Blettner, Maria; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Samkange-Zeeb, Florence

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in the aetiology of brain tumours has yet to be clarified. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between medically or occupationally related exposure to ionising radiation and brain tumours. METHODS: We...... used self-reported medical and occupational data collected during the German part of a multinational case-control study on mobile phone use and the risk of brain tumours (Interphone study) for the analyses. RESULTS: For any exposure to medical ionising radiation we found odds ratios (ORs) of 0.63 (95...... regions. CONCLUSION: We did not find any significant increased risk of brain tumours for exposure to medical ionising radiation....

  5. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    Maroldi, Roberto; Ambrosi, Claudia; Farina, Davide [University of Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia, BS (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  6. Bevacizumab plus irinotecan in the treatment patients with progressive recurrent malignant brain tumours

    Poulsen, H.S.; Grunnet, K.; Sorensen, M.

    2009-01-01

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively determined the efficacy and safety of a combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan in a consecutive series of 52 heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent high-grade brain tumours. Patients received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan [340 mg/m(2...... acceptable safety and is a clinically relevant choice of therapy in heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent high-grade brain tumours Udgivelsesdato: 2009...

  7. Assessment of quantitative FDG PET data in primary colorectal tumours: which parameters are important with respect to tumour detection?

    Strauss, Ludwig G.; Pan, Leyun; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Klippel, Sven; Schoenleben, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    The impact of quantitative parameters on the differentiation of primary colorectal tumours from normal colon tissue was assessed. Dynamic PET data (DPET) were acquired, and compartment and non-compartment modelling applied. The discriminant power of single parameters and the combination of PET parameters was assessed. All lesions were confirmed by histology. FDG DPET studies were acquired in 22 patients with colorectal tumours prior to surgery. Five of these patients also had liver metastases at the time of the PET study. The SUV 56-60 min p.i. was included in the evaluation. A two-tissue compartment model was applied and the parameters k 1 -k 4 as well as the fractional blood volume (V B ) were obtained. The FDG influx was calculated from the compartment data. Non-compartment modelling was used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) of the time-activity data. FD, SUV, influx and k 3 were the most important single parameters for lesion differentiation. The highest accuracy was achieved for FD (88.78%). The overall tracer uptake was mainly dependent on k 3 and not on k 1 or V B . The support vector machines (SVM) algorithm was used to predict the classification based on the combination of individual PET parameters. The overall accuracy was 97.3%, with only one false positive case and no false negative results. The analysis of the subgroup of five patients with primary tumours and synchronous metastases revealed no significant differences for the individual PET parameters. However, V B tended to be lower while k 1 and k 2 were higher in patients with synchronous metastases. The SVM classification analysis predicted the presence of metastases based on the PET data of the primary tumour in three of five patients. Quantitative FDG PET studies provide very accurate data for the differentiation of primary colorectal tumours from normal tissue. The use of quantitative data has the advantage that the detection of a colorectal tumour is not primarily dependent on the

  8. The role of choline (Cho) in the diagnostics and differentiation of brain tumours with HMRS technique

    Sobiecka, B.; Urbanik, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of the research was a comprehensive analysis of Cho concentration and Cho/Cr, NAA/Cho, NAA/Cho+Cr ratios for the purposes of the diagnostics and differentiation of brain tumours (the type of the pathological lesion in patients with brain tumours) with the use of HMRS technique. Material/Methods: The HMRS examinations were performed with the use of the MRI Signa Excite 1.5 T system, in PRESS technique (TR = 1500 ms, TE = 35 ms) and involved 100 patients with brain tumours (age range: 18 to 81 yrs, mean age 50.61). Spectra were taken from three different locations: tumour centre, the tumour edge and contralateral unchanged cerebral tissue. All patients underwent surgery followed by histopathological analysis, on the basis of which two groups were separated (benign tumours, malignant tumours - 50 cases each). Additionally, 30 healthy volunteers in the age of 20 to 79 years (mean age 40.8) were examined. Results: The comparison of the examined patients with the control group revealed significantly higher Cho concentrations in patients with brain tumours. The analysis of Cho concentration was also performed with consideration of the age factor (under and over 60 years of age). Significantly lower mean Cho concentrations were discovered in a group of patients under 60 years of age. The analysis of Cho concentrations and Cho/Cr ratios reveled statistical significance for two factors: voxel location factor and the type of the pathological lesion. The average of Cho concentration and Cho/Cr ratios were higher in the group of patients with malignant tumours. The highest Cho concentrations and Cho/Cr ratios were observed in the tumour centre. The relative NAA/Cho and NAA/Cho+Cr ratios were statistically significant when taking into consideration the voxel location factor only. The results received from contralateral normal cerebral tissue (the internal model) were compared with control group (the external model). Mean values of Cho concentration were

  9. Comparison of contrast in brightness mode and strain ultrasonography of glial brain tumours

    Selbekk, Tormod; Brekken, Reidar; Indergaard, Marit; Solheim, Ole; Unsgård, Geirmund

    2012-01-01

    Image contrast between normal tissue and brain tumours may sometimes appear to be low in intraoperative ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging of strain is an image modality that has been recently explored for intraoperative imaging of the brain. This study aims to investigate differences in image contrast between ultrasound brightness mode (B-mode) images and ultrasound strain magnitude images of brain tumours. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data was acquired during surgery in 15 patients with glial tumours. The data were subsequently processed to provide strain magnitude images. The contrast in the B-mode images and the strain images was determined in assumed normal brain tissue and tumour tissue at selected regions of interest (ROI). Three measurements of contrast were done in the ultrasound data for each patient. The B-mode and strain contrasts measurements were compared using the paired samples t- test. The statistical analysis of a total of 45 measurements shows that the contrasts in the strain magnitude images are significantly higher than in the conventional ultrasound B-mode images (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that ultrasound strain imaging provides better discrimination between normal brain tissue and glial tumour tissue than conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging. Ultrasound imaging of tissue strain therefore holds the potential of becoming a valuable adjunct to conventional intraoperative ultrasound imaging in brain tumour surgery

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) for the evaluation of treatment of brain tumours

    Houkin, K.; Kamada, K.; Sawamura, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Abe, H.; Kashiwaba, T.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated metabolic changes in brain tumours following treatment, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In meningiomas, effective therapeutic embolisation led to an acute increase in lactate. In radiosensitive tumours such as malignant lymphoma, a decrease in lactate and in increase in N-acetyl-aspartate occurred after radiotherapy, which preceded changes observed on magnetic resonance imaging. On the other hand, no significant changes in spectral patterns were observed in malignant gliomas resistant to therapy. Tissue characterisation of brain tumours by spectral patterns on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy remains controversial. However, we have shown it to be sensitive to metabolic changes following treatment, which may reflect the efficacy of the therapy. (orig.)

  11. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  12. Targeted radiotherapy with Sm-153-EDTMP in nine cases of canine primary bone tumours

    R.J. Milner

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Nine dogs with primary bone tumours were treated with Samarium-153-EDTMP (Sm-153- EDTMP. Conventional treatment protocols were precluded by the size of the dogs and the owners' refusal of limb amputation. All the tumours were of the appendicular skeleton; 4 were confirmed osteosarcomas. The other 5 tumours were radiologically suspect for osteosarcoma. Bone scans were performed on all dogs using Technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m-MDP before administration of Sm-153-EDTMP. Regions of interest were identified over the contralateral limb at the same site as the tumour and counts per pixel were recorded for the tumour and contralateral limb and expressed as a ratio. The dogs were given 1 injection of 37 MBq/kg (1 mCi/kg of Sm-153-EDTMP intravenously. Thoracic and primary tumour site radiographs were taken at monthly or 2-monthly intervals to monitor progression of the primary tumour and search for evidence of metastasis. Two dogs showed no response to treatment, with an increase in bone pain, and were euthanased within 1 month. In 1 dog, a tumour of the scapula underwent complete involution and the dog is considered free of disease at 20 months post Sm-153-EDTMP treatment. The overall tumourcidal effect of a single dose of Sm-153-EDTMP on primary bone tumours was difficult to evaluate in this group of dogs, as, with one exception, all the primary tumours progressed over time and the dogs were euthanased. Pain control, for which Sm-155-EDTMP is used in man, was not evident, except in the dog that responded completely to treatment.

  13. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    McRoy

    12] epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (for nasopharyngeal cancer),[13] and others which include immune suppression, sunlight ... incidence of primary head and neck malignant tumours to contribute to the knowledge and understanding on this.

  14. Aggressive solitary intracranial metastatic malignant melanoma from a primary mediastinal tumour.

    Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Vinay S; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2016-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the third most common tumour to cause cerebral metastases, following breast and lung cancer. Central nervous system metastases occur in 10-40% of patients with melanoma. Intracranial metastasis from a primary malignant melanoma of the anterior mediastinum is uncommon. We report a case of solitary intracranial metastatic melanoma arising from a primary mediastinal tumour. We then discuss the clinico-radiological features and treatment options. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Quantitative MR imaging and spectroscopy of brain tumours: a step forward?

    Wagnerova, Dita; Herynek, Vit; Dezortova, Monika; Jiru, Filip; Skoch, Antonin; Hajek, Milan [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Malucelli, Alberto; Bartos, Robert; Sames, Martin [JE Purkyne University and Masaryk Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Vymazal, Josef [Na Homolce Hospital, Department of Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Urgosik, Dusan [Na Homolce Hospital, Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Prague (Czech Republic); Syrucek, Martin [Na Homolce Hospital, Department of Pathology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    A prospective quantitative MR study of brain tumours was performed to show the potential of combining different MR techniques to distinguish various disease processes in routine clinical practice. Twenty-three patients with various intracranial tumours before treatment (diagnosis confirmed by a biopsy) and 59 healthy subjects were examined on a 3-T system by conventional MR imaging, 1H spectroscopic imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and T2 relaxometry. Metabolic concentrations and their ratios, T2 relaxation times and mean diffusivities were calculated and correlated on a pixel-by-pixel basis and compared to control data. Different tumour types and different localisations revealed specific patterns of correlations between metabolic concentrations and mean diffusivity or T2 relaxation times. The patterns distinguish given tissue states in the examined area: healthy tissue, tissue infiltrated by tumour, active tumour, oedema infiltrated by tumour, oedema, etc. This method is able to describe the complexity of a highly heterogeneous tissue in the tumour and its vicinity, and determines crucial parameters for tissue differentiation. A combination of different MR parameters on a pixel-by-pixel basis in individual patients enables better identification of the tumour type, direction of proliferation and assessment of the tumour extension. (orig.)

  16. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk...... family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies...... and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain...

  17. Accuracy and feasibility of estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours: validation using semiautomated technique in 127 patients.

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shinagare, Atul B; O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Nishino, Mizuki; Rosenthal, Michael H; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-01-01

    To validate estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) using semiautomated volumetry. In this IRB-approved retrospective study, we measured the three longest diameters in x, y, z axes on CTs of primary gastric GISTs in 127 consecutive patients (52 women, 75 men, mean age 61 years) at our institute between 2000 and 2013. Segmented volumes (Vsegmented) were obtained using commercial software by two radiologists. Estimate volumes (V1-V6) were obtained using formulae for spheres and ellipsoids. Intra- and interobserver agreement of Vsegmented and agreement of V1-6 with Vsegmented were analysed with concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and Bland-Altman plots. Median Vsegmented and V1-V6 were 75.9, 124.9, 111.6, 94.0, 94.4, 61.7 and 80.3 cm(3), respectively. There was strong intra- and interobserver agreement for Vsegmented. Agreement with Vsegmented was highest for V6 (scalene ellipsoid, x ≠ y ≠ z), with CCC of 0.96 [95 % CI 0.95-0.97]. Mean relative difference was smallest for V6 (0.6 %), while it was -19.1 % for V5, +14.5 % for V4, +17.9 % for V3, +32.6 % for V2 and +47 % for V1. Ellipsoidal approximations of volume using three measured axes may be used to closely estimate Vsegmented when semiautomated techniques are unavailable. Estimation of tumour volume in primary GIST using mathematical formulae is feasible. Gastric GISTs are rarely spherical. Segmented volumes are highly concordant with three axis-based scalene ellipsoid volumes. Ellipsoid volume can be used as an alternative for automated tumour volumetry.

  18. Predictive features of CT for risk stratifications in patients with primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    Zhou, Cuiping; Zhang, Xiang; Duan, Xiaohui; Hu, Huijun; Wang, Dongye; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To determine the predictive CT imaging features for risk stratifications in patients with primary gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). One hundred and twenty-nine patients with histologically confirmed primary GISTs (diameter >2 cm) were enrolled. CT imaging features were reviewed. Tumour risk stratifications were determined according to the 2008 NIH criteria where GISTs were classified into four categories according to the tumour size, location, mitosis count, and tumour rupture. The association between risk stratifications and CT features was analyzed using univariate analysis, followed by multinomial logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. CT imaging features including tumour margin, size, shape, tumour growth pattern, direct organ invasion, necrosis, enlarged vessels feeding or draining the mass (EVFDM), lymphadenopathy, and contrast enhancement pattern were associated with the risk stratifications, as determined by univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Only lesion size, growth pattern and EVFDM remained independent risk factors in multinomial logistic regression analysis (OR = 3.480-100.384). ROC curve analysis showed that the area under curve of the obtained multinomial logistic regression model was 0.806 (95 % CI: 0.727-0.885). CT features including lesion size, tumour growth pattern, and EVFDM were predictors of the risk stratifications for GIST. (orig.)

  19. Short term outcomes following surgery in brain tumours sans neuronavigation.

    Rashid, Mamoon Ur; Junaid, Muhammad; Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Afsheen, Afeera

    2018-02-01

    To determine the presentation and frequency of various intracranial neoplasms and assess outcomes for patients who underwent surgery without neuronavigation. This retrospective study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan, and comprised medical records related to the period from August 2011 to July 2014. Patient histories, examination reports and preoperative and post-operative radiological scans were reviewed and extent of excision was determined based on these coupled with recurrence rates. Intraoperatively, tumour excision was determined largely by the experience of the surgeon and preoperative planning using bony landmarks and radiological scans as an objective guide to resection. SPSS 21 was used for data analysis. Of the 143 patients, 83(57.9%) were males and 60(42.1%)were females. Gliomas were the most common tumours, occurring in 20(33.3%) females and 35(42.2%) males. One-year survival rate for grade 4 astrocytomas was poor (39.4%) and was excellent for meningiomas (100%) and pituitary tumours (100%). Time-tested methods of careful neurological examination and knowledge of neuroanatomy can allow a surgeon with limited resources to plan and accommodate for accurate tumour resection with adequate margins.

  20. Generating prior probabilities for classifiers of brain tumours using belief networks

    Arvanitis Theodoros N

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous methods for classifying brain tumours based on magnetic resonance spectra and imaging have been presented in the last 15 years. Generally, these methods use supervised machine learning to develop a classifier from a database of cases for which the diagnosis is already known. However, little has been published on developing classifiers based on mixed modalities, e.g. combining imaging information with spectroscopy. In this work a method of generating probabilities of tumour class from anatomical location is presented. Methods The method of "belief networks" is introduced as a means of generating probabilities that a tumour is any given type. The belief networks are constructed using a database of paediatric tumour cases consisting of data collected over five decades; the problems associated with using this data are discussed. To verify the usefulness of the networks, an application of the method is presented in which prior probabilities were generated and combined with a classification of tumours based solely on MRS data. Results Belief networks were constructed from a database of over 1300 cases. These can be used to generate a probability that a tumour is any given type. Networks are presented for astrocytoma grades I and II, astrocytoma grades III and IV, ependymoma, pineoblastoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET, germinoma, medulloblastoma, craniopharyngioma and a group representing rare tumours, "other". Using the network to generate prior probabilities for classification improves the accuracy when compared with generating prior probabilities based on class prevalence. Conclusion Bayesian belief networks are a simple way of using discrete clinical information to generate probabilities usable in classification. The belief network method can be robust to incomplete datasets. Inclusion of a priori knowledge is an effective way of improving classification of brain tumours by non-invasive methods.

  1. High precision conformal radiotherapy employing conservative margins in childhood benign and low-grade brain tumours

    Jalali, Rakesh; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Sarin, Rajiv; Sharma, Dayananda S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report local control and follow up outcome data of high precision conformal radiotherapy in childhood brain tumours. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and December 2002, 26 children (17 boys and 9 girls, median age 11.5 years) with incompletely excised or recurrent benign and low-grade brain tumours [13 craniopharyngiomas, 11 low-grade gliomas (LGG) and 2 others] were treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) (12 patients) and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) (14 patients). Gross tumour volume (GTV) included neuro-imaging based visible tumour and/or resected tumour bed. Clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of GTV + 5 mm margin and planning target volume (PTV) consisted of additional 5 mm margin for CRT and 2 mm for SCRT. Treatment was delivered with 3-9 conformal fixed fields to a median dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions. Results: The actuarial 2 and 3 year disease free and overall survival was 96 and 100%, respectively (median follow up: 25 months, range 12-47 months). Radiological follow up available in 25 patients revealed complete response in 1, partial regression in 10, stable disease in 13 and progression in 1 patient (within the CTV). One patient with craniopharyngioma on a routine imaging revealed a mild asymptomatic cyst enlargement, which resolved with conservative management. A patient with chiasmatic glioma developed cystic degeneration and hydrocephalus 9 months after SCRT requiring cyst drainage and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Conclusion: High-precision conformal techniques delivering irradiation to a computer generated target volume employing 7-10 mm 3D margins beyond the visible tumour and/or resected tumour bed appear to be safe in children with incompletely resected or recurrent benign and low-grade brain tumours, based on these data

  2. Active video gaming improves body coordination in survivors of childhood brain tumours

    Sabel, M.; Sjölund, A.; Broeren, J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether active video gaming (AVG) could bring about regular, enjoyable, physical exercise in children treated for brain tumours, what level of physical activity could be reached and if the children’s physical functioning improved. Methods: Thirteen children, aged 7–17 years...... compared to their healthy peers. Active video gaming (AVG), supported by Internet coaching, is a feasible home-based intervention in children treated for brain tumours, promoting enjoyable, regular physical exercise of moderate intensity. In this pilot study, AVG with Nintendo Wii improved Body...

  3. Measurement of tumour size with mammography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging as compared to histological tumour size in primary breast cancer

    Gruber, Ines V; Rueckert, Miriam; Kagan, Karl O; Staebler, Annette; Siegmann, Katja C; Hartkopf, Andreas; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Hahn, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Tumour size in breast cancer influences therapeutic decisions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sizing of primary breast cancer using mammography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and thereby establish which imaging method most accurately corresponds with the size of the histological result. Data from 121 patients with primary breast cancer were analysed in a retrospective study. The results were divided into the groups “ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)”, invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) + ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)”, “invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC)”, “invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC)” and “other tumours” (tubular, medullary, mucinous and papillary breast cancer). The largest tumour diameter was chosen as the sizing reference in each case. Bland-Altman analysis was used to determine to what extent the imaging tumour size correlated with the histopathological tumour sizes. Tumour size was found to be significantly underestimated with sonography, especially for the tumour groups IDC + DCIS, IDC and ILC. The greatest difference between sonographic sizing and actual histological tumour size was found with invasive lobular breast cancer. There was no significant difference between mammographic and histological sizing. MRI overestimated non-significantly the tumour size and is superior to the other imaging techniques in sizing of IDC + DCIS and ILC. The histological subtype should be included in imaging interpretation for planning surgery in order to estimate the histological tumour size as accurately as possible

  4. Fractionated afterloading therapy in inoperable malignant tumours of the brain

    Sparenberg, A.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of the method of afterloading the range of uses for fractionated interstitial brady-therapy could be broadened to include malignant cerebral tumours. The mean survival time of 33 female patients was calculated to be 8.3 months for the entire group and 11.3 months for cases not otherwise pretreated. Even though the age, tumour volume, target dose and Karnofsky index obviously tended to influence the survival time, such relationships could not be confirmed statistically. Using the method by Kaplan-Meier it was determined that 65% of the total study group were likely to survive beyond six months and 32% to survive for one year. A separate analysis of patients receiving no previous treatment showed these chances to be 75% and 44%, respectively. The advantages of this therapy are discussed on a comparative basis. (VHE) [de

  5. Multiscale biomechanics of brain tumours favours cancer invasion by cell softening and tissue stiffening

    Kas, Josef; Fritsch, Anatol; Grosser, Steffen; Friebe, Sabrina; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Müller, Wolf; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Sack, Ingolf

    Cancer progression needs two contradictory mechanical prerequisites. For metastasis individual cancer cells or small clusters have to flow through the microenvironment by overcoming the yield stress exerted by the surrounding. On the other hand a tumour has to behave as a solid to permit cell proliferation and spreading of the tumour mass against its surrounding. We determine that the high mechanical adaptability of cancer cells and the scale controlled viscoelastic properties of tissues reconcile both conflicting properties, fluid and solid, simultaneously in brain tumours. We resolve why different techniques that assess cell and tissue mechanics have produced apparently conflicting results by our finding that tumours generate different viscoelastic behaviours on different length scales, which are in concert optimal for tumour spreading and metastasis. Single cancer cells become very soft in their elastic behavior which promotes cell unjamming. On the level of direct cell-to-cell interactions cells feel their micro-environment as rigid elastic substrate that stimulates cancer on the molecular level. All over a tumour has predominately a stiff elastic character in terms of viscoelastic behaviour caused by a solid backbone. Simultaneously, the tumour mass is characterized by a large local variability in the storage and loss modulus that is caused by areas of a more fluid nature.

  6. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  7. Functional MR imaging of the motor cortex in healthy volunteers and patients with brain tumours: qualitative and quantitative results

    Fellner, C.; Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg; Schlaier, J.; Schwerdtner, J.; Brawanski, A.; Fellner, F.; Oberoesterreichische Landesnervenklinik, Linz; Held, P.; Blank, M.; Kalender, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the motor cortex in healthy volunteers and patients with brain tumours. Functional MR imaging was performed in 14 healthy volunteers and 14 patients with tumours in or near the primary motor cortex with groups being matched for age, sex, and handedness. Functional images were acquired during motion of the right and left hand. Time courses of signal intensity within the contralateral, ipsilateral, and supplementary motor cortex as well as z-maps were calculated, their quality being assessed visually. Mean signal increase between activation and rest were evaluated within the contralateral, ipsilateral, and supplementary motor cortex, the activated area in those regions of interest was measured using z-maps. The quality of functional MR experiments was generally lower in patients than in volunteers. The quantitative results showed a trend towards increased ipsilateral activation in volunteers during left hand compared to right hand motion and in patients during motion of the affected compared to the non-affected hand. Considering quantitative and qualitative results, significantly increased ipsilateral activation was found in patients compared to healthy volunteers. In conclusion, functional MR imaging quality was significantly reduced in patient studies compared to healthy volunteers, even if influences of age, sex, and handedness were excluded. Increased ipsilateral activation was found in patients with brain tumours which can be interpreted by an improved connectivity between both hemispheres. (orig.) [de

  8. Primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve: clinical and MRI findings

    Majoie, C.B.L.M.; Hulsmans, F.J.H.; Sie, L.H.; Castelijns, J.A.; Valk, J.; Walter, A.; Albrecht, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical and MRI findings in primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records, imaging and histological specimens of 10 patients with 11 primary tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We assessed whether tumour site, size, morphology or signal characteristics were related to symptoms and signs or histological findings. Histological proof was available for 8 of 11 tumours: six schwannomas and two plexiform neurofibromas. The other three tumours were thought to be schwannomas, because they were present in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 and followed the course of the trigeminal nerve. Uncommon MRI appearances were observed in three schwannomas and included a large intratumoral haemorrhage, a mainly low-signal appearance on T2-weighted images and a rim-enhancing, multicystic appearance. Only four of nine schwannomas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms, including two with large cystic components, one haemorrhagic and one solid tumor. Of the five schwannomas which did not cause any trigeminal nerve symptoms, two were large. Only one of the plexiform neurofibromas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms. Additional neurological symptoms and signs, not related to the trigeminal nerve, could be attributed to the location of the tumour in three patients. (orig.)

  9. Brain tumour imaging with PET: a comparison between [18F]fluorodopa and [11C]methionine

    Becherer, Alexander; Karanikas, Georgios; Szabo, Monica; Zettinig, Georg; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Kletter, Kurt; Asenbaum, Susanne; Marosi, Christine; Henk, Christine; Wunderbaldinger, Patrick; Czech, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Imaging of amino acid transport in brain tumours is more sensitive than fluorine-18 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET). The most frequently used tracer in this field is carbon-11 methionine (MET), which is unavailable for PET centres without a cyclotron because of its short half-life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[ 18 F]fluoro-phenylalanine (FDOPA) in this setting, in comparison with MET. Twenty patients with known supratentorial brain lesions were referred for PET scans with FDOPA and MET. The diagnoses were 18 primary brain tumours, one metastasis and one non-neoplastic cerebral lesion. All 20 patients underwent PET with FDOPA (100 MBq, 20 min p.i.), and 19 of them also had PET scans with MET (800 MBq, 20 min p.i.). In all but one patient a histological diagnosis was available. In 15 subjects, histology was known from previous surgical interventions; in five of these patients, as well as in four previously untreated patients, histology was obtained after PET. In one untreated patient, confirmation of PET was possible solely by correlation with MRI; a histological diagnosis became available 10 months later. MET and FDOPA images matched in all patients and showed all lesions as hot spots with higher uptake than in the contralateral brain. Standardised uptake value ratios, tumour/contralateral side (mean±SD), were 2.05±0.91 for MET and 2.04±0.53 for FDOPA (NS). The benign lesion, which biopsy revealed to be a focal demyelination, was false positive, showing increased uptake of MET and FDOPA. We conclude that FDOPA is accurate as a surrogate for MET in imaging amino acid transport in malignant cerebral lesions for the purpose of visualisation of vital tumour tissue. It combines the good physical properties of 18 F with the pharmacological properties of MET and might therefore be a valuable PET radiopharmaceutical in brain tumour imaging. (orig.)

  10. Adapting MR-BrainPET scans for comparison with conventional PET: experiences with dynamic FET-PET in brain tumours

    Lohmann, Philipp; Herzog, Hans; Kops, Elena Rota; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinrich H; Shah, N Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Imaging results from subsequent measurements (preclinical 3T MR-BrainPET, HR+) are compared. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) may exhibit non-uniform tracer uptake in gliomas. The aim was to analyse and adapt the physical properties of the scanners and study variations of biological tumour volume (BTV) in early and late FET-PET.

  11. neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumours in a ...

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery and Endocrine units of. KBTH, Ghana. All patients had clinical diagnosis of brain tumour with confirmation by computerized to- mography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen patients had histological confirmation of di- agnosis. Outcome measures: Presenting ...

  12. Patterns of exposure to infectious diseases and social contacts in early life and risk of brain tumours in children and adolescents

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, L S; Poulsen, A H

    2013-01-01

    of childhours at daycare, attending baby groups, birth order or living with other children. Cases of glioma and embryonal tumours had more frequent sick days with infections in the first 6 years of life compared with controls. In 7-19 year olds with 4+ monthly sick day, the respective odds ratios were 2.93 (95......BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases and social contacts in early life have been proposed to modulate brain tumour risk during late childhood and adolescence. METHODS: CEFALO is an interview-based case-control study in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland, including children and adolescents aged 7......-19 years with primary intracranial brain tumours diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 and matched population controls. RESULTS: The study included 352 cases (participation rate: 83%) and 646 controls (71%). There was no association with various measures of social contacts: daycare attendance, number...

  13. Modelling glioblastoma tumour-host cell interactions using adult brain organotypic slice co-culture

    Maria Angeles Marques-Torrejon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an aggressive incurable brain cancer. The cells that fuel the growth of tumours resemble neural stem cells found in the developing and adult mammalian forebrain. These are referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs. Similar to neural stem cells, GSCs exhibit a variety of phenotypic states: dormant, quiescent, proliferative and differentiating. How environmental cues within the brain influence these distinct states is not well understood. Laboratory models of GBM can be generated using either genetically engineered mouse models, or via intracranial transplantation of cultured tumour initiating cells (mouse or human. Unfortunately, these approaches are expensive, time-consuming, low-throughput and ill-suited for monitoring live cell behaviours. Here, we explored whole adult brain coronal organotypic slices as an alternative model. Mouse adult brain slices remain viable in a serum-free basal medium for several weeks. GSCs can be easily microinjected into specific anatomical sites ex vivo, and we demonstrate distinct responses of engrafted GSCs to diverse microenvironments in the brain tissue. Within the subependymal zone – one of the adult neural stem cell niches – injected tumour cells could effectively engraft and respond to endothelial niche signals. Tumour-transplanted slices were treated with the antimitotic drug temozolomide as proof of principle of the utility in modelling responses to existing treatments. Engraftment of mouse or human GSCs onto whole brain coronal organotypic brain slices therefore provides a simplified, yet flexible, experimental model. This will help to increase the precision and throughput of modelling GSC-host brain interactions and complements ongoing in vivo studies. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  14. IDH1-associated primary glioblastoma in young adults displays differential patterns of tumour and vascular morphology.

    Sergey Popov

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive tumour with marked heterogeneity at the morphological level in both the tumour cells and the associated highly prominent vasculature. As we begin to develop an increased biological insight into the underlying processes driving the disease, fewer attempts have thus far been made to understand these phenotypic differences. We sought to address this by carefully assessing the morphological characteristics of both the tumour cells and the associated vasculature, relating these observations to the IDH1/MGMT status, with a particular focus on the early onset population of young adults who develop primary glioblastoma. 276 primary glioblastoma specimens were classified into their predominant cell morphological type (fibrillary, gemistocytic, giant cell, small cell, oligodendroglial, sarcomatous, and assessed for specific tumour (cellularity, necrosis, palisades and vascular features (glomeruloid structures, arcades, pericyte proliferation. IDH1 positive glioblastomas were associated with a younger age at diagnosis, better clinical outcome, prominent oligodendroglial and small cell tumour cell morphology, pallisading necrosis and glomeruloid vascular proliferation in the absence of arcade-like structures. These features widen the phenotype of IDH1 mutation-positive primary glioblastoma in young adults and provide correlative evidence for a functional role of mutant IDH1 in the differential nature of neo-angiogenesis in different subtypes of glioblastoma.

  15. Thymidilate synthase and p53 primary tumour expression as predictive factors for advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    Paradiso, A; Simone, G; Petroni, S; Leone, B; Vallejo, C; Lacava, J; Romero, A; Machiavelli, M; De Lena, M; Allegra, C J; Johnston, P G

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyse the ability of p53 and thymidilate synthase (TS) primary tumour expression to retrospectively predict clinical response to chemotherapy and long-term prognosis in patients with advanced colorectal cancers homogeneously treated by methotrexate (MTX)-modulated-5-fluorouracil (5-FU-FA). A total of 108 advanced colorectal cancer patients entered the present retrospective study. Immunohistochemical p53 (pAb 1801 mAb) and TS (TS106 mAb) expression on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tumour specimens was related to probability of clinical response to chemotherapy, time to progression and overall survival. p53 was expressed in 53/108 (49%) tumours, while 54/108 (50%) showed TS immunostaining. No relationship was demonstrated between p53 positivity and clinical response to chemotherapy (objective response (OR): 20% vs 23%, in p53+ and p53- cases respectively) or overall survival. Percent of OR was significantly higher in TS-negative with respect to TS-positive tumours (30% vs 15% respectively; P < 0.04); simultaneous analysis of TS and p53 indicated 7% OR for p53-positive/TS-positive tumours vs 46% for p53-positive/TS-negative tumours (P < 0.03). Logistic regression analysis confirmed a significant association between TS tumour status and clinical response to chemotherapy (hazard ratio (HR): 2.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.34-1.01; two-sided P < 0.05). A multivariate analysis of overall survival showed that only a small number of metastatic sites was statistically relevant (HR 1.89; 95% CI 2.85-1.26; two-sided P < 0.03). Our study suggests that immunohistochemical expression of p53 and TS could assist the clinician in predicting response of colorectal cancer patients to modulated MTX-5-FU therapy.

  16. 1H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    Callot, Virginie; Galanaud, Damien; Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity

  17. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    Callot, Virginie [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: virginie.callot@univmed.fr; Galanaud, Damien [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France); Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital La Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity.

  18. Neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumours in a tertiary hospital in Ghana

    Tagoe, N. N.; Essuman, V. A.; Fordjuor, G.; Akpalu, J.; Bankah, P.; Ndanu, T.

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, increasing number of patients are seen at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) with brain tumour. Neuro-ophthalmic symptoms and signs may help in timely diagnosis and intervention. The objective of this study is to evaluate the neuro-ophthalmic and clinical characteristics of brain tumour in patients presenting at a tertiary hospital in Ghana. The study design involved a prospective case series involving 36 consecutive patients newly diagnosed with brain tumour from November 2010 to October 2011, at the Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery and Endocrine units of KBTH, Ghana. All patients had clinical diagnosis of brain tumour with confirmation by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen patients had histological confirmation of diagnosis. The outcome measures of the study include presenting visual acuity, colour vision, visual fields and cranial nerve deficits. Data of 36 patients were analysed. The results of the study showed that ages ranged from 3 to 69 years, mean (SD) 42.56(±16.6 years). Twenty-six (72%) were females. Tumours included pituitary adenoma (20, 55.5%), meningioma (10, 27.8%), choroid plexus tumour (1, 2.8%), medulloblastom (1, 2.8%), craniopharyngioma (1, 2.8%), haemangioblastoma (1, 2.8%), thalamic tumour (1, 2.8%) and haemangioma (1, 2.8%). Histologically confirmed tumours included pituitary adenoma (9, 69.2%), meningioma (3, 23.1%), craniopharyngioma (1, 7.7%). One patient had both a pituitary adenoma and meningioma. Blurred vision (30, 83.3%), headache (28, 77.8%) and photophobia (13, 36.1%) were predominant symptoms. Commonest neuro-ophthalmic signs were impaired colour vision (62 eyes, 88.6%), optic atrophy (26, 74.3%), unilateral or bitemporal hemianopia (15, 41.5%) and relative afferent pupillary defect (12, 34.3%). Seven (19.4%) patients were visually impaired and nine (25%) blind. Thirty-three of 72(45.8%) eyes had monocular blindness. Common neuro-ophthalmic characteristics were blurred vision

  19. Intra-operative 3-T MRI for paediatric brain tumours: challenges and perspectives

    Abernethy, L.J.; Avula, S.; Hughes, G.M.; Wright, E.J.; Mallucci, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    MRI is the ideal modality for imaging intracranial tumours. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) makes it possible to obtain scans during a neurosurgical operation that can aid complete macroscopic tumour resection - a major prognostic factor in the majority of brain tumours in children. Intra-operative MRI can also help limit damage to normal brain tissue. It therefore has the potential to improve the survival of children with brain tumours and to minimise morbidity, including neurological deficits. The use of ioMRI is also likely to reduce the need for second look surgery, and may reduce the need for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High-field MRI systems provide better anatomical information and also enable effective utilisation of advanced MRI techniques such as perfusion imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, high-field ioMRI facilities require substantial capital investment, and careful planning is required for optimal benefit. Safe ioMRI requires meticulous attention to detail and rigorous application of magnetic field safety precautions. Interpretation of ioMRI can be challenging and requires experience and understanding of artefacts that are common in the intra-operative setting. (orig.)

  20. MR imaging-guided cryoablation of metastatic brain tumours: initial experience in six patients

    Li, Chengli; Wu, Lebin; Song, Jiqing; Liu, Ming; Lv, Yubo; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the initial experience and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transcranial cryoablation in cystic metastatic brain tumours. Seven cystic metastatic brain tumours in six patients were treated with cryoablation. The approval from the local ethics committee and individual patient consent were acquired before the study. Before the procedure the tumours were detected with conventional CT or MRI. The procedure was performed under local anaesthesia and conscious sedation. A 0.23-T open MRI system with optical tracking was used for procedural planning, instrument guidance and procedural monitoring of the ice ball formation. An MR-compatible, argon-based cryoablation system was used. The schedule of follow-up imaging ranged from 12 days to 12 months. Seven treatment sessions were performed. All the cryoprobes were successfully inserted into the target with one pass. All the patients tolerated the procedure well without experiencing any neurological deficits during the treatment phase or during the immediate post-treatment period. One patient died 12 days after cryoablation. MR-guided and monitored metastasis brain tumour cryoablation is technically feasible and may represent an alternative treatment in selected patients. (orig.)

  1. Neuroendocrine liver metastases: Vascular patterns on triple-phase MDCT are indicative of primary tumour location

    Ronot, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.ronot@aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomédicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Cuccioli, Francesco; Dioguardi Burgio, Marco; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Hentic, Olivia [Department of Pancreatology, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Ruszniewski, Philippe [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); Department of Pancreatology, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); D’Assignies, Gaspard [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Vilgrain, Valérie [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomédicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: To re-evaluate and compare CT features of neuroendocrine liver metastases (NLM) from pancreatic (p) and enteric (e) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumours. Material and methods: From 2006–2013, all patients with proven GEP-neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) with at least one NLM, no previous treatment were included. On unenhanced, arterial and portal phases, NLMs were characterized as hypo-, iso- or hyperattenuating in consensus by 2 radiologists blinded to clinical data. Enhancement patterns (EP) corresponded to the combination of arterial/portal CT attenuation. Results: 78 patients (43 men, 55%, mean 56 ± 13 yo) and 559 NLMs were analyzed. pNLMs were more frequently hypoattenuating on unenhanced CT than eNLMs (72% vs. 57%, p < 0.001). 70% of the lesions were hypervascular with no significant difference between pNLMs and eNLMs (p = 0.32). eNLMs were more frequently hypoattenuating on portal phase than pNLMs (88% vs. 56%, p < 0.001). eNLMs were more frequently hyper/hypo than pNLMs (56% vs. 28%, p < 0.001). pNLMs were more frequently hyper/iso than eNLMs (33% vs. 8%, p < 0.001). Other NLMs showed various patterns, including hypo/hypo in 12%. Conclusion: Most NLMs of GEP tumours are hypervascular but the enhancement pattern on multiphasic CT depends on the primary tumour. These differences are helpful when the primary tumour has not been diagnosed.

  2. The relationship between vascular and metabolic characteristics of primary breast tumours

    Semple, Scott I.K.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Redpath, Thomas W.; Staff, Roger T.; Ahearn, Trevor S.; Welch, Andrew E.; Heys, Steven D.; Hutcheon, Andrew W.; Smyth, Elizabeth H.; Chaturvedi, Shailesh

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between vascular and metabolic characteristics of breast tumours in vivo, using contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI and 2-[ 18 F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) PET imaging. Twenty patients with large or locally advanced primary breast cancers were imaged prior to therapy. MRI data were acquired using a dynamic gradient echo sequence and analysed using two pharmacokinetic models. Static PET data were acquired in 2D mode. A significant association (P<0.05) was observed between the calculated exchange rate constants of both pharmacokinetic models and calculated PET FDG dose uptake ratios (DUR). Statistical analysis showed that the exchange rate constants can explain between 27 and 44% of the variance observed in the PET FDG uptake ratios. A relationship was demonstrated between the vascular and metabolic characteristics of primary breast tumours showing that any assessment of tumour metabolic activity using PET may be controlled at least in part by delivery of uptake agent due to the vascular characteristics of the tumour. MRI and PET provide methods of assessing breast tumour vascularity and metabolism in vivo using the exchange rate constants of dynamic MRI, and DUR of PET, respectively, these measures being related but not equivalent. (orig.)

  3. Failure of the PTEN/aPKC/Lgl Axis Primes Formation of Adult Brain Tumours in Drosophila

    Simona Paglia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different regions in the mammalian adult brain contain immature precursors, reinforcing the concept that brain cancers, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, may originate from cells endowed with stem-like properties. Alterations of the tumour suppressor gene PTEN are very common in primary GBMs. Very recently, PTEN loss was shown to undermine a specific molecular axis, whose failure is associated with the maintenance of the GBM stem cells in mammals. This axis is composed of PTEN, aPKC, and the polarity determinant Lethal giant larvae (Lgl: PTEN loss promotes aPKC activation through the PI3K pathway, which in turn leads to Lgl inhibition, ultimately preventing stem cell differentiation. To find the neural precursors responding to perturbations of this molecular axis, we targeted different neurogenic regions of the Drosophila brain. Here we show that PTEN mutation impacts aPKC and Lgl protein levels also in Drosophila. Moreover, we demonstrate that PI3K activation is not sufficient to trigger tumourigenesis, while aPKC promotes hyperplastic growth of the neuroepithelium and a noticeable expansion of the type II neuroblasts. Finally, we show that these neuroblasts form invasive tumours that persist and keep growing in the adult, leading the affected animals to untimely death, thus displaying frankly malignant behaviours.

  4. A novel technique of serial biopsy in mouse brain tumour models.

    Sasha Rogers

    Full Text Available Biopsy is often used to investigate brain tumour-specific abnormalities so that treatments can be appropriately tailored. Dacomitinib (PF-00299804 is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, which is predicted to only be effective in cancers where the targets of this drug (EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB4 are abnormally active. Here we describe a method by which serial biopsy can be used to validate response to dacomitinib treatment in vivo using a mouse glioblastoma model. In order to determine the feasibility of conducting serial brain biopsies in mouse models with minimal morbidity, and if successful, investigate whether this can facilitate evaluation of chemotherapeutic response, an orthotopic model of glioblastoma was used. Immunodeficient mice received cortical implants of the human glioblastoma cell line, U87MG, modified to express the constitutively-active EGFR mutant, EGFRvIII, GFP and luciferase. Tumour growth was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Upon attainment of a moderate tumour size, free-hand biopsy was performed on a subgroup of animals. Animal monitoring using a neurological severity score (NSS showed that all mice survived the procedure with minimal perioperative morbidity and recovered to similar levels as controls over a period of five days. The technique was used to evaluate dacomitinib-mediated inhibition of EGFRvIII two hours after drug administration. We show that serial tissue samples can be obtained, that the samples retain histological features of the tumour, and are of sufficient quality to determine response to treatment. This approach represents a significant advance in murine brain surgery that may be applicable to other brain tumour models. Importantly, the methodology has the potential to accelerate the preclinical in vivo drug screening process.

  5. First experience of brain tumour scintigraphy with 99mTc-MIBI before and after surgery

    Jurkiene, N.; Kulakiene, I.; Aleksandrovas, D.; Tamasauskas, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Morphological imaging techniques like computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are routinely used to localize tumours. However, their use for prediction of histopathological diagnosis and tumour changes after treatment is difficult. Functional imaging using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were introduced as non-invasive methods for the differentiation and evaluation of brain tumours, especially for their follow-up. The purpose of present study was to investigate the uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in case of malignant brain tumours before and after surgery. 25 patients (13 males and 12 females; age range 21-75 years; average age 48.76±17.25 years) with brain tumours were investigated. The histological diagnoses of the tumours were confirmed from surgical specimens. None of the patients had received any treatment before enrolment for the study. 99mTc-MIBI brain SPECT was performed 3.88±2.85 days before surgery and 9.88±2.24 days after surgery in all cases. SPECT scans were acquired in 64 projections over 360 deg. using a dual-head gamma camera (Siemens E.Cam) coupled with low energy collimator, 15 minutes after intravenous injection of 550 MBq 99mTc-MIBI. Data were recorded in a 64x64 matrix at a zoom factor of 1.78. SPECT images were reconstructed and analysed in the transversal, axial and coronal planes. The study results are presented in the table. Of the 25 tumors, only 19, majority glioblastoma (11) showed avid uptake in the pre- surgery scan. Tumors, II0 astrocytoma (1), oligoasrtrocytoma (1), III0 astrocytoma (3) were missed in the pre surgery scan. Comparison of pre- and postoperative images showed the reduction of 99mTc-MIBI uptake post-operatively except in one case of gliosarcoma where the uptake increased after surgery. In one case of III deg. astrocytoma the 99mTc-MIBI uptakes was observed only after the surgery. All post-operative images showed more intensive uptake in the scalp (zone of

  6. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M.; Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V.; Kronnerwetter, C.; Widhalm, G.; Nemec, S.; Prayer, D.; Ladd, M.E.; Trattnig, S.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  7. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kronnerwetter, C. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Nemec, S.; Prayer, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ladd, M.E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  8. Using R2* values to evaluate brain tumours on magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary results

    Liu, Zhenghua; Liao, Haibo; Yin, Jianhua; Li, Yanfang

    2014-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of the R2* value in assessing the histopathological grade of glioma at magnetic resonance imaging and differentiating various brain tumours. Sixty-four patients with brain tumours underwent R2* mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging examinations. ANOVA was performed to analyse R2* values among four groups of glioma and among high-grade gliomas (grades III and IV), low-grade gliomas (grades I and II), meningiomas, and brain metastasis. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationships between the R2* values or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the histopathological grade of gliomas. R2* values of low- and high-grade gliomas were analysed with the receiver-operator characteristic curve. R2* values were significantly different among high-grade gliomas, low-grade gliomas, meningiomas, and brain metastasis, but not between grade I and grade II or between grade III and grade IV. The R2* value (18.73) of high-grade gliomas provided a very high sensitivity and specificity for differentiating low-grade gliomas. A strong correlation existed between the R2* value and the pathological grade of gliomas. R2* mapping is a useful sequence for determining grade of gliomas and in distinguishing benign from malignant tumours. R2* values are better than ADC for characterising gliomas. (orig.)

  9. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intraventricular tumours of the brain

    Majos, Carles; Aguilera, Carles; Cos, Monica; Camins, Angels; Samitier, Alex; Castaner, Sara; Sanchez, Juan J.; Candiota, Ana P.; Delgado-Goni, Teresa; Mato, David; Acebes, Juan J.; Arus, Carles

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of proton MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis of intraventricular tumours. Fifty-two intraventricular tumours pertaining to 16 different tumour types were derived from our database. All cases had single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy performed at TE at both 30 and 136 ms at 1.5 T. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to search for the most discriminative datapoints each tumour type. Characteristic trends were found for some groups: high Glx and Ala in meningiomas (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively), high mobile lipids in metastasis (p<0.001), high Cho in PNET (p<0.001), high mI+Gly in ependymoma (p<0.001), high NAC (p<0.01) in the absence of the normal brain parenchyma pattern in colloid cysts, and high mI/Gly and Ala in central neurocytoma. Proton MR spectroscopy provides additional metabolic information that could be useful in the diagnosis of intraventricular brain tumors. (orig.)

  10. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intraventricular tumours of the brain

    Majos, Carles; Aguilera, Carles [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge (IDI). Centre Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Cos, Monica; Camins, Angels; Samitier, Alex; Castaner, Sara; Sanchez, Juan J. [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge (IDI). Centre Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Candiota, Ana P.; Delgado-Goni, Teresa [Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Unitat de Bioquimica de Biociencies, Department de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Mato, David [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Department of Neurosurgery, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Acebes, Juan J. [Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Department of Neurosurgery, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Arus, Carles [Unitat de Bioquimica de Biociencies, Department de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of proton MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis of intraventricular tumours. Fifty-two intraventricular tumours pertaining to 16 different tumour types were derived from our database. All cases had single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy performed at TE at both 30 and 136 ms at 1.5 T. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to search for the most discriminative datapoints each tumour type. Characteristic trends were found for some groups: high Glx and Ala in meningiomas (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively), high mobile lipids in metastasis (p<0.001), high Cho in PNET (p<0.001), high mI+Gly in ependymoma (p<0.001), high NAC (p<0.01) in the absence of the normal brain parenchyma pattern in colloid cysts, and high mI/Gly and Ala in central neurocytoma. Proton MR spectroscopy provides additional metabolic information that could be useful in the diagnosis of intraventricular brain tumors. (orig.)

  11. Association of primary tumour FDG uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Koolen, B.B.; Aukema, T.S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrancken Peeters, M.J.T.F.D.; Rutgers, E.J.T. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wesseling, J.; Lips, E.H. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, W.V.; Valdes Olmos, R.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werkhoven, E. van [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, K.G.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rodenhuis, S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of primary tumour {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics of breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Second, we wished to establish for which patients pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET)/CT could safely be omitted because of low FDG uptake. PET/CT was performed in 214 primary stage II or III breast cancer patients in the prone position with hanging breasts. Tumour FDG uptake was qualitatively evaluated to determine the possibility of response monitoring with PET/CT and was quantitatively assessed using maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}). FDG uptake was compared with age, TNM stage, histology, hormone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, grade, Ki-67 and molecular subtype in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 203 tumours (95 %) FDG uptake was considered sufficient for response monitoring. No subgroup of patients with consistently low tumour FDG uptake could be identified. In a univariable analysis, SUV{sub max} was significantly higher in patients with distant metastases at staging examination, non-lobular carcinomas, tumours with negative hormone receptors, triple negative tumours, grade 3 tumours, and in tumours with a high proliferation index (Ki-67 expression). After multiple linear regression analysis, triple negative and grade 3 tumours were significantly associated with a higher SUV{sub max}. Primary tumour FDG uptake in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy is significantly higher in tumours with prognostically unfavourable characteristics. Based on tumour characteristics associated with low tumour FDG uptake, this study was unable to identify a subgroup of patients unlikely to benefit from pretreatment PET/CT. (orig.)

  12. Target volumes in radiation therapy of childhood brain tumours

    Habrand, J.L.; Abdulkarim, B.; Beaudre, A.; El Khouri, M.; Kalifa, C.

    2001-01-01

    Pediatric tumors have enjoyed considerable improvements for the past 30 years. This is mainly due to the extensive use of combined therapeutical modalities in which chemotherapy plays a prominent role. In many children, local treatment including radiotherapy, can nowadays be adapted in terms of target volume and dose to the 'response' to an initial course of chemotherapy almost on a case by case basis. This makes precise recommendation on local therapy highly difficult in this age group. We will concentrate in this paper on brain tumors in which chemotherapy is of limited value and radiotherapy still plays a key-role. (authors)

  13. MRI findings in primary brain lymphoma in immunocompetent patients

    Saeed Nadhim Younis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Primary brain lymphoma is an extranodal aggressive intracranial neoplasm of lymphocytic origin originating and confined to the brain parenchyma and meninges. It is rare in immune competent patients, but its incidence is increasing. This retrospective study was conducted to record the MRI features of primary brain lymphoma at the time of diagnosis in immunocompetent patients. Methods: Of the 450 patients diagnosed with the brain tumor during a period of five years from 2008 to 2013, the clinical features and MRI findings of 16 cases of pathologically proven to be non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma were studied. All the patients were tested negative for HIV and there was no history of immune suppression drugs or any other chronic illness. All the patients were examined with MRI observing the tumor location, multifocality, signal intensity in different sequences, enhancement patterns, peritumoral edema, the presence of hemorrhage and calcification. Results: Of the 16 patients, including the monofocal and multifocal cases, 30 lesions exhibited. The mean age at diagnosis was 53 years. Nine patients (56.25% found to have a multifocal disease. In more than 75% of lesions, MRI was hypo to iso signal on T1 and T2. Mild to moderate perilesional edema, strong contrast enhancement and restricted diffusion were seen in all cases. The hemorrhagic tumor was noticed in four lesions (13.3%. No calcification and no leptomeningeal lesions were noted. The MRI images in post steroid therapy were studied within one month of treatment. Tumour regression was noticed in 21/30 (70%, stable in 3/30 (10% and progressing in 6/30 (20%. Conclusion: MRI is a reliable imaging technique in the management of patients with primary brain lymphoma. Early accurate diagnosis is crucial to avoid the unnecessary operation and shift patients from extensive surgery to chemoradiotherapy.

  14. [Triple synchronous primary gynaecological tumours. A case report].

    Gutiérrez-Palomino, Laura; Romo-de Los Reyes, José María; Pareja-Megía, María Jesús; García-Mejido, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous multiple primary malignancies in the female genital tract are infrequent. From 50 to 70% of them corresponds to synchronous cancers of the endometrium and ovary. To our knowledge, this is only the third case report in the international literature of three concurrent gynaecological cancers of epithelial origin. A case is presented, as well as a literature review due to the infrequency of its diagnosis and the lack of information on the subject. A 49-year-old woman, with previous gynaecological history of ovarian endometriosis. She underwent a hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy, as she had been diagnosed with endometrial hyperplasia with atypia. The final histopathology reported synchronous ovarian, Fallopian tube, and endometrial cancer. An extension study and complete surgical staging was performed, both being negative. She received adjuvant treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is currently free of disease. The aetiology is uncertain. There is controversy relating to increased susceptibility of synchronous neoplasms to pelvic endometriosis and inherited genetic syndromes. Its diagnosis needs to differentiate them from metastatic disease. Additionally, they are problematical from a clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic point of view. The presentation of more cases of triple synchronous cancers is necessary for a complete adjuvant and surgical treatment. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive grading of brain tumours using dynamic amino acid PET imaging: does it work for 11C-Methionine?

    Moulin-Romsee, Gerard; D'Hondt, Eduard; Mortelmans, Luc; Laere, Koen van; Groot, Tjibbe de; Goffin, Jan; Sciot, Raf; Menten, Johan; Bormans, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Static imaging of amino acids does not allow differentiation of low versus high grade brain tumours. It has been shown that dynamic imaging of the amino acid analogue 18 F-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) can achieve this goal. In many centres, 11 C-methionine (MET) is used for tumour imaging, but no clinical studies on the use of dynamic scanning for grading have been performed. Thirty-four patients with primary brain glioma and histopathological confirmation were retrospectively studied using 40 min dynamic MET-PET with 220 MBq 11C-methionine. In relation to histopathological grading, various metabolic indices and temporal parameters as documented by Poepperl et al. (JNM 2006;47:393-403) were analyzed. None of the evaluated static or temporal parameters allowed discrimination between high and low grade tumours. On average, low grade tumours showed washout after the initial uptake maximum, while both increases and decreases were seen for high grade tumours. Only the relative early versus late uptake ratio showed a trend towards significance (-0.16 ± 0.17 for low grade versus 0.01 ± 0.25 for high grade; p = 0.07). Unlike FET-PET, the uptake characteristics of MET-PET do not allow classification of low and high grade tumours on an individual patient basis. Since literature data indicate that both tracers have a similar performance regarding biopsy location, tumour delineation, and detection of recurrence, FET-PET should be advocated over MET-PET as its uptake mechanism also allows noninvasive grading in glioma. (orig.)

  16. Malignancy assessment of brain tumours with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Fayed, Nicolas; Davila, Jorge; Medrano, Jaime [Diagnostic Radiology Department, Clinica Quiron, Zaragoza (Spain); Olmos, Salvador [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: olmos@unizar.es

    2008-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most common and well-established imaging modality for evaluation of intracerebral neoplasms, but there are still some incompletely solved challenges, such as reliable distinction between high- and low-grade tumours, exact delineation of tumour extension, and discrimination between recurrent tumour and radiation necrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of two MRI techniques to non-invasively estimate brain tumour grade. Twenty-four patients referred to MRI examination were analyzed and diagnosed with single intra-axial brain tumour. Lastly, histopathological analysis was performed to verify tumour type. Ten patients presented low-grade gliomas, while the remaining patients showed high-grade tumours, including glioblastomas in eight cases, isolated metastases in four patients and two cases with anaplastic gliomas. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Signa, General Electric). The acquisition protocol included the following sequences: saggital T1-weighted localizer, axial T1- and T2-weighted MRI, single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MRS data was analyzed with standard software provided by the scanner manufacturer. The metabolite ratio with the largest significant difference between tumour grades was the choline/creatine (Ch/Cr) ratio with elevated values in high-grade gliomas and metastases. A Ch/Cr ratio equal or larger than 1.55 predicted malignancy grade with 92% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The area under the ROC curve was 0.92 (CI: 95%; 0.81-1). Regarding to perfusion parameters, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were estimated from the MR signal intensity time series during bolus passage with two commercial software packages. Two different regions of interest (ROI) were used to evaluate rCBV: lesion centre and perilesional region. All rCBV values were normalized to CBV in a

  17. Malignancy assessment of brain tumours with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Fayed, Nicolas; Davila, Jorge; Medrano, Jaime; Olmos, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most common and well-established imaging modality for evaluation of intracerebral neoplasms, but there are still some incompletely solved challenges, such as reliable distinction between high- and low-grade tumours, exact delineation of tumour extension, and discrimination between recurrent tumour and radiation necrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of two MRI techniques to non-invasively estimate brain tumour grade. Twenty-four patients referred to MRI examination were analyzed and diagnosed with single intra-axial brain tumour. Lastly, histopathological analysis was performed to verify tumour type. Ten patients presented low-grade gliomas, while the remaining patients showed high-grade tumours, including glioblastomas in eight cases, isolated metastases in four patients and two cases with anaplastic gliomas. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Signa, General Electric). The acquisition protocol included the following sequences: saggital T1-weighted localizer, axial T1- and T2-weighted MRI, single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MRS data was analyzed with standard software provided by the scanner manufacturer. The metabolite ratio with the largest significant difference between tumour grades was the choline/creatine (Ch/Cr) ratio with elevated values in high-grade gliomas and metastases. A Ch/Cr ratio equal or larger than 1.55 predicted malignancy grade with 92% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The area under the ROC curve was 0.92 (CI: 95%; 0.81-1). Regarding to perfusion parameters, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were estimated from the MR signal intensity time series during bolus passage with two commercial software packages. Two different regions of interest (ROI) were used to evaluate rCBV: lesion centre and perilesional region. All rCBV values were normalized to CBV in a

  18. Treatment planning figures of merit in thermal and epithermal boron capture therapy of brain tumours

    Wallace, S.A.; Mathur, J.N. (Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia)); Allen, B.J. (Ansto PMB 1 Menai, NSW (Australia). Biomedicine and Health)

    1994-05-01

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) figures of merit of advantage depth, therapeutic depth, modified advantage depth and maximum therapeutic depth have been studied as functions of [sup 10]B tumour to blood ratios and absolute levels. These relationships were examined using the Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code, MCNP, with an ideal 18.4 cm diameter neutron beam incident laterally upon an ellipsoidal neutron photon brain-equivalent model. Mono-energetic beams of 0.025 eV (thermal) and 35 eV (epithermal) were simulated. Increasing the tumour to blood [sup 10]B ratio predictably increases all figures of merit. [sup 10]B concentration was also shown to have a strong bearing on the figures of merit when low levels were present in the system. This is the result of a non-[sup 10]B dependent background dose. At higher levels however, the concentration of [sup 10]B has a diminishing influence. For boron sulphydryl (BSH), little advantage is gained by extending the blood [sup 10]B level beyond 30 ppm, whilst for D, L,-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) this limit is 10 ppm. Applying the epithermal beam under identical conditions, the therapeutic depth reaches the brain mid-line with a tumour to blood [sup 10]B ratio of only 5.7 for BPA. For BSH, the maximum therapeutic depth reaches the brain mid-line with a tumour to blood ratio of only 1.9 with 30 ppm in the blood. Human data for these compounds are very close to these requirements. (author).

  19. Three-dimensional textural features of conventional MRI improve diagnostic classification of childhood brain tumours.

    Fetit, Ahmed E; Novak, Jan; Peet, Andrew C; Arvanitits, Theodoros N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of three-dimensional texture analysis (3D TA) of conventional MR images for the classification of childhood brain tumours in a quantitative manner. The dataset comprised pre-contrast T1 - and T2-weighted MRI series obtained from 48 children diagnosed with brain tumours (medulloblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma). 3D and 2D TA were carried out on the images using first-, second- and higher order statistical methods. Six supervised classification algorithms were trained with the most influential 3D and 2D textural features, and their performances in the classification of tumour types, using the two feature sets, were compared. Model validation was carried out using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) approach, as well as stratified 10-fold cross-validation, in order to provide additional reassurance. McNemar's test was used to test the statistical significance of any improvements demonstrated by 3D-trained classifiers. Supervised learning models trained with 3D textural features showed improved classification performances to those trained with conventional 2D features. For instance, a neural network classifier showed 12% improvement in area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) and 19% in overall classification accuracy. These improvements were statistically significant for four of the tested classifiers, as per McNemar's tests. This study shows that 3D textural features extracted from conventional T1 - and T2-weighted images can improve the diagnostic classification of childhood brain tumours. Long-term benefits of accurate, yet non-invasive, diagnostic aids include a reduction in surgical procedures, improvement in surgical and therapy planning, and support of discussions with patients' families. It remains necessary, however, to extend the analysis to a multicentre cohort in order to assess the scalability of the techniques used. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Brown Tumour in the Mandible and Skull Osteosclerosis Associated with Primary Hyperparathyroidism – A Case Report

    Danica Popovik-Monevska

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hyperparathyroidism (HPT is a condition in which the parathyroid hormone (PTH levels in the blood are increased. HPT is categorised into primary, secondary and tertiary. A rare entity that occurs in the lower jaw in association with HPT is the so-called brown tumour, which an osteolytic lesion is predominantly occurring in the lower jaw. It is usually a manifestation of the late stage of the disease. Osteosclerotic changes in other bones are almost always associated with renal osteodystrophy in secondary HPT and are extremely rare in primary HPT. This article reports a rare case of a brown tumour in the mandible as the first sign of a severe primary HPT, associated with osteosclerotic changes on the skull. CASE REPORT: A brown tumour in the mandible was diagnosed in 60 - year old female patient with no previous history of systemic disease. The x - rays showed radiolucent osteolytic lesion in the frontal area of the mandible affecting the lamina dura of the frontal teeth, and skull osteosclerosis in the form of salt and pepper sign. The blood analyses revealed increased values of PTH, calcitonin and β – cross-laps, indicating a primary HPT. The scintigraphy of the parathyroid glands showed a presence of adenoma in the left lower lobe. The tumour lesion was surgically removed together with the lower frontal teeth, and this was followed by total parathyroidectomy. The follow - up of one year did not reveal any signs of recurrence. CONCLUSION: It is critical to ensure that every osteolytic lesion in the maxillofacial region is examined thoroughly. Moreover, a proper and detailed systemic investigation should be performed. Patients should undergo regular check-ups to prevent late complications of HPT.

  1. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy of primary intracranial tumours and histopathological findings: preliminarily findings

    Mandel, C.; Birchall, D.; Ellison, D.; Crawford, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Proton MR spectroscopy is becoming more widely available in the clinical setting, and is increasingly used for the analysis of focal intracranial mass lesions. Several papers have indicated that MR spectroscopy can be applied not only to the differentiation of tumour from non-neoplastic pathologies, but that it may also have a role in the grading of differing histological grades of tumour. MR spectroscopy has therefore been proposed as a means of non-invasive biopsy, but its validation in this context is a necessary prerequisite for its use in this manner. Currently at our centre, all patients undergoing surgical biopsy for intracranial tumour are being imaged preoperatively with proton MR spectroscopy, and comparison made with the histopathological findings. To date, 20 patients (12 male, 8 female, age range 24-72) with primary intracranial tumour have been included in the study. Patients were imaged with conventional MR scanning and proton MR spectroscopy on a Philips Intera 1.5T scanner. Chemical shift spectroscopy was performed in each case (TR 2000 msec, TE 272 msec, slice thickness 20mm, acquisition time 15:53) in an axial plane at the level of tumour. Voxels were chosen within the lesion and within remote normal appearing white matter, and the corresponding spectra were interrogated. The heights of the peaks corresponding to choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate / lipid (Lip) were measured using a semi-quantitative scale. Cho:NAA, Cho:Cr, Cho: Chonormal, Cho:Crnormal, Lip:Crnormal, Chonormal:NAAnormal and Chonormal:Crnormal ratios were calculated. Biopsy was performed by the neurosurgical team, and histopathological analysis performed by a single consultant neuropathologist. Histological analysis demonstrated 10 glioblastomas, 4 anaplastic astrocytomas and 6 low grade gliomas. Spectral analysis demonstrated a mean Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr of 0.3 and 0.8 respectively for normal white matter. Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr were

  2. Primary breast cancer tumours contain high amounts of IgA1 immunoglobulin

    Welinder, Charlotte; Baldetorp, Bo; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2013-01-01

    seen in the percentage of stained cells and in the staining pattern in the different breast cancers analysed. Anti-Tn antibody and HPA were also shown to specifically bind to a number of possible constellations of the Tn antigen in the hinge region of IgA1. Both reagents could also detect the presence....... The short O-glycan that forms the antigen is carried by a number of different proteins. One potential carrier of the Tn antigen is immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which we surprisingly found in tumour cells of the invasive parts of primary breast carcinoma. Conventional immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin......-embedded sections from primary breast cancers showed IgA1 to be present in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of 35 out of 36 individual primary tumours. The immunohistochemical staining of HPA and anti-Tn antibody (GOD3-2C4) did to some extent overlap with the presence of IgA1 in the tumours, but differences were...

  3. Intraoperative probe detecting β{sup −} decays in brain tumour radio-guided surgery

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E., E-mail: elena.solfaroli@roma1.infn.it [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Bocci, V.; Chiodi, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Collamati, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dip. Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); Donnarumma, R.; Faccini, R.; Mancini Terracciano, C. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ‘E. Fermi’, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I.; Muraro, S. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); Recchia, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Rucinski, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dip. Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); Russomando, A. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); Toppi, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Traini, G. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is a technique to intraoperatively detect tumour remnants, favouring a radical resection. Exploiting β{sup −} emitting tracers provides a higher signal to background ratio compared to the established technique with γ radiation, allowing the extension of the RGS applicability range. We developed and tested a detector based on para-terphenyl scintillator with high sensitivity to low energy electrons and almost transparent to γs to be used as intraoperative probe for RGS with β{sup −} emitting tracer. Portable read out electronics was customised to match the surgeon needs. This probe was used for preclinical test on specific phantoms and a test on “ex vivo” specimens from patients affected by meningioma showing very promising results for the application of this new technique on brain tumours. In this paper, the prototype of the intraoperative probe and the tests are discussed; then, the results on meningioma are used to make predictions on the performance of the probe detecting residuals of a more challenging and more interesting brain tumour: the glioma.

  4. Early medical rehabilitation after neurosurgical treatment of malignant brain tumours in Slovenia.

    Kos, Natasa; Kos, Boris; Benedicic, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    The number of patients with malignant brain tumours is on the rise, but due to the novel treatment methods the survival rates are higher. Despite increased survival the consequences of tumour properties and treatment can have a significant negative effect on the patients' quality of life. Providing timely and appropriate rehabilitation interventions is an important aspect of patient treatment and should be started immediately after surgery. The most important goal of rehabilitation is to prevent complications that could have a negative effect on the patients' ability to function. By using individually tailored early rehabilitation it is often possible to achieve the patients' independence in mobility as well as in performing daily tasks before leaving the hospital. A more precise evaluation of the patients' functional state after completing additional oncologic therapy should be performed to stratify the patients who should be directed to complex rehabilitation treatment. The chances of a good functional outcome in patients with malignant brain tumours could be increased with good early medical rehabilitation treatment.

  5. Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of brain tumours: The Danish Nurse Cohort

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Johansen, Martin Søes; Ravnskjær, Line

    2016-01-01

    -reported information on lifestyle was collected. We obtained data on the incidence of brain tumours until 2013 from the Danish Cancer Register, and estimated annual mean concentrations of particulate matter with diameterPM2.5), particulate matter with diameter... positive association between total brain tumours and PM2.5 (1.06; 0.80-1.40 per 3.37μg/m(3)), NO2 (1.09; 0.91-1.29) per 7.5μg/m(3), and NOx (1.02; 0.93-1.12 per 10.22μg/m(3)), and none with PM10 (0.93; 0.70-1.23 per 3.31μg/m(3)). Associations with PM2.5 and NO2 were stronger for tumours located in meninges...... than in brain, and for benign than for malignant tumours. Finally, association of total brain tumours with PM2.5 was modified by BMI, and was statistically significantly enhanced in obese women (2.03; 1.35-3.05). CONCLUSION: We found weak evidence for association between risk of brain tumours and long...

  6. Role of diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI in distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour: a preliminary report

    Noguchi, K.; Watanabe, N.; Nagayoshi, T.; Kanazawa, T.; Toyoshima, S.; Shimizu, M.; Seto, H.

    1999-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar MRI in differentiating between brain abscess and tumour. We examined two patients with surgically confirmed pyogenic brain abscess and 18 with metastatic brain tumours or high-grade glioma, using a 1.5 T system. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of each necrotic or solid contrast-enhancing lesion was measured with two different b values (20 and 1200 s/mm 2 ). All capsule-stage brain abscesses (4 lesions) and zones of cerebritis (2 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as markedly high-signal areas of decreased ADC (range, 0.58-0.70 [(10-3 mm 2 /s; mean, 0.63)]). All cystic or necrotic portions of brain tumours (14 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as low-signal areas of increased ADC (range, 2.20-3.20 [(10-3 mm 2 /s; mean, 2.70)]). Solid, contrast-enhancing portions of brain tumours (19 lesions) were identified on high-b-value DWI as high-signal areas of sightly decreased or increased ADC (range, 0.77-1.29 [(10-3 mm 2 /s; mean, 0.94)]). Our preliminary results indicate that DW echo-planar MRI be used for distinguishing between brain abscess and tumour. (orig.) (orig.)

  7. Computerized tomographic evaluation of primary brain tumors

    Choi, Jin Ok; Lee, Jong Soon; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Mediacal center, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Deok [Inje Medical College, Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    In a study of primary brain tumors 104 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to April 1985. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of primary brain tumor was 54 : 46. 2. The 2nd decade group (26%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 5th decade (16.3%), 1st decade (14.4%) , 3rd decade (12.5%), 4th decade (11.5%), 6th decade (10.6%), 7th decade (8.7%) in that order. 3. The incidence of primary brain tumors was found to be: glioma 64 cases (61.6%) among the GM, the most frequent 17 cases (16.3%), followed by meningioma 12 cases (11.5%), pituitary adenoma 10 cases (9.6%), craniopharyngioma 6 cases (5.8%), pinealoma and germinoma 3 cases (2.9%) respectively, and dermoid cyst 2 cases (1.9%) in that order. 4. The location of the primary brain tumors were as follows: cb. hemisphere (49%) of these 24.5% in parietal region, 11.9% in temporal region, 9.7% in frontal region, 3.0% in occipital region: juxtasella area (16.3%), cerebellar hemisphere (8.7%), parapineal and intraventricle (7.7%) respectively, cerebello-pontine angle area (5.8%), vermis and 4th ventricular region (4.8%). 5. There were no remarkable differences in the findings of pre- and post-contrast CT scanning of primary brain tumors computed with others.

  8. Increased levels of deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) in active bacteria-related appendicitis

    Kaemmerer, Elke; Schneider, Ursula; Klaus, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Kaemmerer E, Schneider U, Klaus C, Plum P, Reinartz A, Adolf M, Renner M, Wolfs T G A M, Kramer B W, Wagner N, Mollenhauer J & Gassler N (2012) Histopathology Increased levels of deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) in active bacteria-related appendicitis Aims:  Deleted in malignant brain...

  9. Pre- and post-operative values of serum CRP in patients undergoing surgery for brain tumour

    Syeda, T.; Rizvi, H.A.; Hashim, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concentration of C-reactive protein in pre- and post-operative serum samples of brain tumour patients in order to detect the potential risks of post-operative infections. Methods: Serum C-reactive protein was measured on pre- and post-operative Day 1, Day 2 and Day 7 in 18 patients who underwent surgery for brain tumours. The study was performed at the Neurosurgical Ward, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from May 2007 to April 2008. Mean pre-operative patients and control values were compared using Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon tests for comparing between pre- and post-operative values. P-value was considered significant at 5.0mg/L but no statistically significant difference was found when compared with healthy controls, with mean 4.4+-6.6 and 0.9+-0.7, respectively. Significantly raised serum concentrations were observed in all post-operative samples when compared with pre-operative samples. Serum CRP concentrations significantly increased post-operatively on Day 1, with mean value of 102.9+-82.0mg/L (p<0.0005), and further increased on Day 2 with mean value of 166.9+-128.1mg/L (p<0.0005), but declined on Day 7, with mean value of 42.7+-63.6mg/L (p<0.005). Conclusion: Pre-operative serum C-reactive protein concentrations of 28% of the patients were elevated, suggesting an association with brain tumours. Post-operative serum concentrations were significantly higher than those noted before the surgery. Absence of a fall of concentration from peak value on post-operative Day 2 or a secondary rise from post-operative Day 7 could be alarming for inter-current infection. (author)

  10. Respiratory Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 (DMBT1) levels increase during lung maturation and infection

    Müller, H; End, C; Weiss, C

    2007-01-01

    .0179). An increase of respiratory DMBT1 levels was detected in neonatal infections (P ...Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 (DMBT1) is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds and aggregates various bacteria and viruses in vitro. Studies in adults have shown that DMBT1 is expressed mainly by mucosal epithelia and glands, in particular within the respiratory...... tract, and plays a role in innate immune defence. We hypothesized that respiratory DMBT1 levels may be influenced by various developmental and clinical factors such as maturity, age and bacterial infection. DMBT1 levels were studied in 205 tracheal aspirate samples of 82 ventilated preterm and full...

  11. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case–control study with incidence data

    Aydin Denis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first case–control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Söderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case–control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case–control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted.

  12. The importance of radiotherapy in paediatric atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour of the brain

    Korab - Chrzanowska, E.; Bartoszewska, J.; Drogosiewicz, M.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Skowronska-Gardas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRT) are very rare children cancers. Approximately 200 cases of ATRT located in the central nervous system have been described in the literature up till now. Aim: The aim of this report was to analyze the results of treatment of 8 children with these very rare neoplasms of the central nervous system, who were treated according to the Polish Paediatric Brain Tumour Group protocol. Material And Methods: Eight children aged from 4 months to 22 years, 5 girls, 3 boys with ATRT of the central nervous system are presented. All children have been operated on and received multidrug chemotherapy; 5 children received radiotherapy as well. In all craniospinal irradiation was applied, in doses of 35 Gy to the whole axis and 55 Gy to tumour boost. Results: Five patients died and 3 children are still alive. The progression-free survival of all 8 patients was 3 to 73 months. The overall survival was 5 to 73 months. All living children received radiotherapy. Two of them had total surgical resection and one partial. Conclusions: We conclude that radiotherapy prolonged survival in ATRT and should be incorporated in all treatment protocols for patients with this diagnosis. (authors)

  13. The role of 18F-FDG PET in the differentiation between lung metastases and synchronous second primary lung tumours

    Dijkman, Bernadette G.; Schuurbiers, Olga C.J.; Heijden, Henricus F.M. van der; Vriens, Dennis; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de; Looijen-Salamon, Monika; Bussink, Johan; Timmer-Bonte, Johanna N.H.; Snoeren, Miranda M.

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer patients with multiple lesions, the differentiation between metastases and second primary tumours has significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the potential of 18 F-FDG PET to discriminate metastatic disease from second primary lung tumours. Of 1,396 patients evaluated by the thoracic oncology group between January 2004 and April 2009 at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, patients with a synchronous second primary lung cancer were selected. Patients with metastatic disease involving the lungs served as the control group. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) measured with 18 F-FDG PET were determined for two tumours in each patient. The relative difference between the SUVs of these tumours (∇SUV) was determined and compared between the second primary group and metastatic disease group. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the ∇SUV for an optimal cut-off value. A total of 37 patients (21 metastatic disease, 16 second primary cancer) were included for analysis. The ∇SUV was significantly higher in patients with second primary cancer than in those with metastatic disease (58 vs 28%, respectively, p 18 F-FDG PET images can be helpful in differentiating metastatic disease from second primary tumours in patients with synchronous pulmonary lesions. Further studies are warranted to confirm the consistency of these results. (orig.)

  14. Primary brain lymphoma presenting as Parkinson's disease

    Sanchez-Guerra, M.; Leno, C.; Berciano, J.; Cerezal, L.; Diez, C.; Figols, J.

    2001-01-01

    Neoplasm is an uncommon cause of a parkinsonian syndrome. We report a woman with primary brain B-cell lymphoma presenting as Parkinson's disease. After 1 year of the illness, CT and MRI showed lesions without mass effect in the basal ganglia and corpus callosum. The patient did not respond to levodopa and right cerebellar and brain-stem signs appeared, which prompted further neuroimaging, showing an increase in size of the lesions and a right cerebellar and pontine mass. Stereotactic biopsy of the basal ganglia showed high-grade B-cell lymphoma. Despite the basal ganglia frequently being involved in lymphoma of the brain, presentation with typical or atypical parkinsonism is exceptional. (orig.)

  15. Supratentorial tumours. Part II: tumors of neurolglial cells

    Sage, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Tumors arising from neuroglial cells are the most common primary brain tumours, representing approximately 45% of all tumours. A simplified classification of these tumours is given, based on the degree of anaplasia. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging appearance of such lesions is presented and the relevance of these techniques in the detection and differential diagnosis of neuroglial cells tumours is discussed. 39 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs

  16. Effect of ephedrine and phenylephrine on brain oxygenation and microcirculation in anaesthetised patients with cerebral tumours

    Koch, Klaus Ulrik; Tietze, Anna; Aanerud, Joel

    2017-01-01

    extraction fraction. Surgery is initiated after MRI/PET measurements and subdural intracranial pressure is measured. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved by the Central Denmark Region Committee on Health Research Ethics (12 June 2015; 1-10-72-116-15). Results will be disseminated via peer......INTRODUCTION: During brain tumour surgery, vasopressor drugs are commonly administered to increase mean arterial blood pressure with the aim of maintaining sufficient cerebral perfusion pressure. Studies of the commonly used vasopressors show that brain oxygen saturation is reduced after......, anaesthetised patients will be randomised to receive either phenylephrine or ephedrine infusion until mean arterial blood pressure increases to above 60 mm Hg or 20% above baseline. Twenty-four patients were allocated to MRI and another 24 patients to PET examination. MRI measurements include cerebral blood...

  17. Alterations of monocarboxylate transporter densities during hypoxia in brain and breast tumour cells

    Cheng, Chang; Edin, Nina F Jeppesen; Lauritzen, Knut H

    2012-01-01

    Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours...

  18. Staging primary breast cancer. Are there tumour pathological features that correlate with a false-negative axillary ultrasound?

    Johnson, S.; Brown, S.; Porter, G.; Steel, J.; Paisley, K.; Watkins, R.; Holgate, C.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the histopathological characteristics of primary breast cancer tumours could predict the likelihood of false-negative axillary ultrasound. Materials and methods: Screening and symptomatic patients were identified from pathology records and imaging and pathology records reviewed. True and false-negative axillary staging ultrasound groups were compared statistically in terms of tumour size, pathological type and grade, lymphovascular invasion, and oestrogen receptor (ER) status. Results: Of 155 women with normal ultrasounds, 45 (29%) were node positive at axillary surgery. Breast tumour size was significantly different with the average size smaller in the true-negative group: 21 versus 30 mm (p < 0.02). The histological type varied significantly between the groups, with more lobular carcinomas in the false-negative group [6/110 (5%) versus 6/45 (13%), p < 0.001]. The false-negative group was also more likely to show lymphovascular invasion in the breast [6/110 (5%) versus 14/45 (31%), p < 0.001]. There was no significant difference in tumour grade or ER status. Conclusion: The present study has found significant differences in tumour characteristics between women with true-negative and false-negative axillary staging ultrasound in terms of size, primary tumour histological type and presence of lymphovascular invasion. In particular, axillary ultrasound in primary lobular carcinoma may be less accurate and a negative result is more likely to be spurious than with primary ductal carcinomas.

  19. Intra-operative neurophysiological mapping and monitoring during brain tumour surgery in children: an update.

    Coppola, Angela; Tramontano, Vincenzo; Basaldella, Federica; Arcaro, Chiara; Squintani, Giovanna; Sala, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the reluctance to operate in eloquent brain areas has been reconsidered in the light of the advent of new peri-operative functional neuroimaging techniques and new evidence from neuro-oncology. To maximise tumour resection while minimising morbidity should be the goal of brain surgery in children as much as it is in adults, and preservation of brain functions is critical in the light of the increased survival and the expectations in terms of quality of life. Intra-operative neurophysiology is the gold standard to localise and preserve brain functions during surgery and is increasingly used in paediatric neurosurgery. Yet, the developing nervous system has peculiar characteristics in terms of anatomical and physiological maturation, and some technical aspects need to be tailored for its use in children, especially in infants. This paper will review the most recent advances in the field of intra-operative neurophysiology (ION) techniques during brain surgery, focussing on those aspects that are relevant to the paediatric neurosurgery practice.

  20. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Preoperative Planning in Brain Tumour Surgery.

    Lau, Jonathan C; Kosteniuk, Suzanne E; Bihari, Frank; Megyesi, Joseph F

    2017-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is being increasingly used for the preoperative evaluation of patients with brain tumours. The study is a retrospective chart review investigating the use of clinical fMRI from 2002 through 2013 in the preoperative evaluation of brain tumour patients. Baseline demographic and clinical data were collected. The specific fMRI protocols used for each patient were recorded. Sixty patients were identified over the 12-year period. The tumour types most commonly investigated were high-grade glioma (World Health Organization grade III or IV), low-grade glioma (World Health Organization grade II), and meningioma. Most common presenting symptoms were seizures (69.6%), language deficits (23.2%), and headache (19.6%). There was a predominance of left hemispheric lesions investigated with fMRI (76.8% vs 23.2% for right). The most commonly involved lobes were frontal (64.3%), temporal (33.9%), parietal (21.4%), and insular (7.1%). The most common fMRI paradigms were language (83.9%), motor (75.0%), sensory (16.1%), and memory (10.7%). The majority of patients ultimately underwent a craniotomy (75.0%), whereas smaller groups underwent stereotactic biopsy (8.9%) and nonsurgical management (16.1%). Time from request for fMRI to actual fMRI acquisition was 3.1±2.3 weeks. Time from fMRI acquisition to intervention was 4.9±5.5 weeks. We have characterized patient demographics in a retrospective single-surgeon cohort undergoing preoperative clinical fMRI at a Canadian centre. Our experience suggests an acceptable wait time from scan request to scan completion/analysis and from scan to intervention.

  1. Results of primary and postoperative radiotherapy of malignant tumours of the larynx and posterior pharynx

    Poppele, G.

    1980-01-01

    In a study on the epidemiology of laryngeal and pharyngeal tumours, a coincidence was found between established alcohol abuse and tumours of the two organs. The results of surgery followed by gammatron radiotherapy (laryngeal tumours) or betatron therapy (pharyngeal tumours) are prescuted and discussed. (APR) [de

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain tumours at 3 T: A potential tool for assessing White matter tract invasion?

    Price, S.J.; Burnet, N.G.; Donovan, T.; Green, H.A.L.; Pena, A.; Antoun, N.M.; Pickard, J.D.; Carpenter, T.A.; Gillard, J.H. E-mail: jhg21@cam.ac.uk

    2003-06-01

    AIM: To determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of brain tumours can demonstrate abnormalities distal to hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, and possibly relate these to tumour grade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial tumours, both gliomas (high and low grade) and metastases, were imaged at 3 T using T2-weighted and DTI sequences. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn within the tumour, in white matter at various distances from the tumour and in areas of abnormality on DTI that appeared normal on T2-weighted images. The relative anisotropy index (RAI)--a measure of white matter organization, was calculated for these ROI. RESULTS: The abnormality on DTI was larger than that seen on T2-weighted images in 10/13 patients (77%) with high-grade gliomas. New abnormalities were seen in the contralateral white matter in 4/13 (30%) of these cases. In these high-grade tumours the RAI in areas of white matter disruption with normal appearance on T2-weighted images was reduced (0.19{+-}0.04). Even excluding patients with previous radiotherapy this difference remains significant. In all non high-grade tumours (WHO grade II gliomas and metastases) the tumour extent on DTI was identical to the abnormalities shown on T2-weighted imaging and RAI measurements were not reduced (0.3{+-}0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Subtle white matter disruption can be identified using DTI in patients with high-grade gliomas. Such disruption is not identified in association with metastases or low-grade gliomas despite these tumours producing significant mass effect and oedema. We suggest the changes in DTI may be due to tumour infiltration and that the DTI may provide a useful method of detecting occult white matter invasion by gliomas.

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain tumours at 3 T: A potential tool for assessing White matter tract invasion?

    Price, S.J.; Burnet, N.G.; Donovan, T.; Green, H.A.L.; Pena, A.; Antoun, N.M.; Pickard, J.D.; Carpenter, T.A.; Gillard, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of brain tumours can demonstrate abnormalities distal to hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, and possibly relate these to tumour grade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial tumours, both gliomas (high and low grade) and metastases, were imaged at 3 T using T2-weighted and DTI sequences. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn within the tumour, in white matter at various distances from the tumour and in areas of abnormality on DTI that appeared normal on T2-weighted images. The relative anisotropy index (RAI)--a measure of white matter organization, was calculated for these ROI. RESULTS: The abnormality on DTI was larger than that seen on T2-weighted images in 10/13 patients (77%) with high-grade gliomas. New abnormalities were seen in the contralateral white matter in 4/13 (30%) of these cases. In these high-grade tumours the RAI in areas of white matter disruption with normal appearance on T2-weighted images was reduced (0.19±0.04). Even excluding patients with previous radiotherapy this difference remains significant. In all non high-grade tumours (WHO grade II gliomas and metastases) the tumour extent on DTI was identical to the abnormalities shown on T2-weighted imaging and RAI measurements were not reduced (0.3±0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Subtle white matter disruption can be identified using DTI in patients with high-grade gliomas. Such disruption is not identified in association with metastases or low-grade gliomas despite these tumours producing significant mass effect and oedema. We suggest the changes in DTI may be due to tumour infiltration and that the DTI may provide a useful method of detecting occult white matter invasion by gliomas

  4. Intra-tumoural vessel area estimated by expression of epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 and microRNA-126 in primary tumours and metastases of patients with colorectal cancer

    Hansen, T. F.; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) and microRNA-126 (miRNA-126) in primary tumours from patients with stage II-IV colorectal cancer (CRC) and in paired samples of primary tumours, regional lymph node metastases and distant metastases. Methods: A total of 126 patients were included. Analyses were performed...

  5. Malignant spinal cord compression in cancer patients may be mimicked by a primary spinal cord tumour.

    Mohammadianpanah, M; Vasei, M; Mosalaei, A; Omidvari, S; Ahmadloo, N

    2006-12-01

    Although it is quite rare, second primary neoplasms in cancer patients may present with the signs and symptoms of malignant spinal cord compression. Primary spinal cord tumours in the cancer patients may be deceptive and considered as the recurrent first cancer. Therefore, it should be precisely differentiated and appropriately managed. We report such a case of intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord mimicking metatstatic recurrent lymphoma and causing cord compression. A 50-year-old man developed intramedullary ependymoma of the cervical spinal cord 1.5 years following chemoradiation for Waldeyer's ring lymphoma. He presented with a 2-month history of neck pain, progressive upper- and lower-extremity numbness and weakness, and bowel and bladder dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary expansive lesion extending from C4 to C6 levels of the cervical spinal cord. The clinical and radiological findings were suggestive of malignant process. A comprehensive investigation failed to detect another site of disease. He underwent operation, and the tumour was subtotally resected. The patient's neurological deficits improved subsequently. The development of the intramedullary ependymoma following treating lymphoma has not been reported. We describe the clinical, radiological and pathological findings of this case and review the literature.

  6. Risk prediction scores for recurrence and progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer : An international validation in primary tumours

    M.M. Vedder (Moniek); M. Márquez (Mirari); E.W. de Bekker-Grob (Esther); M.L. Calle (Malu); L. Dyrskjot (Lars); M. Kogevinas (Manolis); U. Segersten (Ulrika); P.-U. Malmström (Per-Uno); F. Algaba (Ferran); W. Beukers (Willemien); T.F. Orntoft (Torben); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); F.X. Real (Francisco); N. Malats (Núria); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We aimed to determine the validity of two risk scores for patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in different European settings, in patients with primary tumours. Methods: We included 1,892 patients with primary stage Ta or T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer who

  7. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma with brain metastases in a paediatric patient: an unusual presentation.

    Chirmade, Pushpak Chandrakant; Parikh, Sonia; Anand, Asha; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva; Shah, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Primary lung neoplasms are rare in children. The most common primary lung malignancies in children are pleuropulmonary blastoma and carcinoid tumour. Synovial sarcoma (SS) accounts for approximately 1% of all childhood malignancies. In absolute terms, the SS of the lungs and pleura are extremely rare and pose a diagnostic difficulty. Soft tissue sarcomas usually have a high potential for metastases, however, metastasis to the brain is rare, even in widely disseminated disease, and it has been described only in 3 case reports previously. Primary pleuropulmonary SS with brain metastases is even rarer. Here we present a case of an 11-year-old boy who presented with respiratory complaints, viz. fever and cough for 20 days. Initial impression was lung abscess, however, on histopathological, immunohistochemical and molecular study, the disorder was diagnosed as synovial sarcoma. After a week from the first consult, the child developed neurological symptoms, viz., an episode of convulsion and gradually worsening power of the lower limb. Computed tomography scan and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy was suggestive of brain metastases. Given the rarity of primary lung neoplasms in children, clinical detection remains a challenge. Delayed diagnoses are common as respiratory symptoms may be attributed to inflammatory or infective processes. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma is a rare tumour and it is not known to commonly metastasise to the brain. Though rare, primary pleuropulmonary SS should be considered an important differential among peadiatric primary lung neoplasms due to its potential for curability if detected early, and more aggressive metastatic pattern, e.g. brain metastases making early detection imperative.

  8. The role of CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)12-CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 signalling in the migration of neural stem cells towards a brain tumour

    van der Meulen, A. A. E.; Biber, K.; Lukovac, S.; Balasubramaniyan, V.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Mooij, J. J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: It has been shown that neural stem cells (NSCs) migrate towards areas of brain injury or brain tumours and that NSCs have the capacity to track infiltrating tumour cells. The possible mechanism behind the migratory behaviour of NSCs is not yet completely understood. As chemokines are involved

  9. Automated Measurement Of The Density Of Vessels On Whole Slide Images Of Paediatric Brain Tumours

    Christophe Deroulers

    2016-06-01

    Only a few parameters have to be chosen, once and for all samples (e.g., the minimal acceptable size of a blood vessel fragment, which makes the method more robust than assessment by a (panel of human expert(s. The automatic calibration steps enable one to deal with a heterogeneous set of slides (e.g., slight differences in background colour and staining. The method uses only open-source software. It is easy to extend or improve and not tight to a single immunomarker. We applied the method to 129 paediatric brain tumours of 8 different types and 3 locations (posterior fossa, thalamus, hemispheres — 185 samples in total. For each patient, the density of microvessels in the sample is compared to the cerebral blood flow as assessed by preoperative perfusion-weighted-imaging using arterial-spin-labeling. We find a good correlation between microvascular density, MRI data and tumour grading. The microvascular density is broadly distributed among the samples. Visualisation in a web browser is slightly more fluid when images are uploaded in the DeepZoom format rather than as pyramidal TIFF images, but the former consumes roughly 20 times more disk space and needs the transfer of a very large number of files after each modification, which is less tractable.

  10. Initial psycho-oncological counselling in neuro-oncology: analysis of topics and needs of brain tumour patients.

    Schipmann, Stephanie; Suero Molina, Eric; Frasch, Anna; Stummer, Walter; Wiewrodt, Dorothee

    2018-02-01

    Diagnosis of a brain tumour is associated with a tremendous disruption of emotional, physical and social well-being. Due to the complexity of the disease and the affection of the central organ, the brain, brain tumour patients differ from other cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concerns and burdens presented by brain tumour patients during their initial psycho-oncological consultation. We performed a retrospective analysis of 53 patients with the diagnosis of either benign or malignant brain tumour, seeking counsel by a neurosurgeon specialised in psycho-oncology. We performed a thematic analysis of the interviews at first consultation identifying themes and patterns and created thematic categories. The main concerns of the patients presented during the first consultations were psychological problems, reported by 40 patients (75.5%). Death and dying was mentioned by more than half of the patients (n = 30, 56.6%). In addition, 62.3% of the patients (n = 33) asked for information regarding the medical treatment and diagnosis. With our study, we created greater awareness of the psychological needs of brain tumour patients in order to define treatment strategies for this important aspect of disease. We showed that there is a need for patients to talk about death even during the initial consultation. Psycho-oncologist in a neuro-oncological setting should be prepared for topics like that and should have a neurosurgical background or collaborate with members of the surgical team in order to provide the patients with medical details and to better understand the impact of the disease.

  11. Perfusion MRI of brain tumours: a comparative study of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging

    Jaernum, Hanna; Steffensen, Elena G.; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg; Jensen, Finn Taagehoej [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Knutsson, Linda [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Fruend, Ernst-Torben [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); GE Healthcare - Applied Science Lab Europe, Aalborg (Denmark); Lundbye-Christensen, Soeren [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg (Denmark); Shankaranarayanan, Ajit [Global Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Alsop, David C. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Larsson, Elna-Marie [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the non-invasive 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (PC ASL) technique with the clinically established dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) for evaluation of brain tumours. A prospective study of 28 patients with contrast-enhancing brain tumours was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI and PC ASL with whole-brain coverage. The visual qualitative evaluation of signal enhancement in tumour was scored from 0 to 3 (0 = no signal enhancement compared with white matter, 3 = pronounced signal enhancement with equal or higher signal intensity than in grey matter/basal ganglia). The extent of susceptibility artefacts in the tumour was scored from 0 to 2 (0 = no susceptibility artefacts and 2 = extensive susceptibility artefacts (maximum diameter > 2 cm)). A quantitative analysis was performed with normalised tumour blood flow values (ASL nTBF, DSC nTBF): mean value for region of interest (ROI) in an area with maximum signal enhancement/the mean value for ROIs in cerebellum. There was no difference in total visual score for signal enhancement between PC ASL and DSC relative cerebral blood flow (p = 0.12). ASL had a lower susceptibility-artefact score than DSC-MRI (p = 0.03). There was good correlation between DSC nTBF and ASL nTBF values with a correlation coefficient of 0.82. PC ASL is an alternative to DSC-MRI for the evaluation of perfusion in brain tumours. The method has fewer susceptibility artefacts than DSC-MRI and can be used in patients with renal failure because no contrast injection is needed. (orig.)

  12. Evolution of growth hormone neurosecretory disturbance after cranial irradiation for childhood brain tumours: a prospective study

    Spoudeas, H.A.; Hindmarsh, P.C.; Brook, C.G.D.; Matthews, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    To determine the aetiopathology of post-irradiation growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we performed a mixed longitudinal analysis of 56 24 h serum GH concentration profiles and 45 paired insulin-induced hypoglycaemia tests (ITT) in 35 prepubertal children, aged 1.5-11.8 years, with brain tumours in the posterior foss (n = 25) or cerebral hemispheres (n 10). Assessments were made before (n = 16), 1 year (n = 25) and 2 to 5 years (n = 15) after a cranial irradiation (DXR) dose of at least 30 Gy. Fourier transforms, occupancy percentage, first-order derivatives (FOD) and mean concentrations were determined from the GH profiles taken after neurosurgery but before radiotherapy (n = 16) and in three treatment groups: Group 1: neurosurgery only without DXR 9n 9); Group 2: ≥ 30 Gy DXR only (n = 22); Group 3: ≥ 30 Gy DXR with additional chemotherapy (n = 9). Results were compared with those from 26 short normally growing (SN) children. (author)

  13. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  14. Intra-arterial and intra-venous chemotherapy combined with radiation in the treatment of brain tumours

    Watne, K.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigations were undertaken to study the effect of combining different modalities of chemotherapy with radiation in post-operative treatment of brain tumours. The conclusions and clinical implication of the investigations are as follows: The combination of combined intra-arterial chemotherapy followed by radiation leads to an increased median survival with more long term survivors in patients with anaplastic astrocytomas and in patients older than 40 years with astrocytomas. In patients with glioblastoma multiforme, this modality of treatment do not improve median survival, but an increased number of long-term survivors may be seen. Patients younger than 40 years with astrocytomas do not benefit from this modality of treatment. A parallelism exists between sensitivity to chemotherapy and response to radiotherapy. Patients who will benefit from the treatment may be selected early, normally two months after treatment start. Combining intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation does not lead to an increased incidence of adverse CNS reactions. Specific transient abnormalities in the brain may occur during the first year after treatment and may be misinterpreted as tumour recurrence. EEG may be valuable in predicting adverse CNS reactions following treatment. Nuclear brain scan may be of valuable in selecting the patients who are in danger of developing adverse CNS reactions. Intra-arterial chemotherapy does have an effect in patients with brain tumours who have recurrent tumour after radiation. The most important prognostic factors are age, corticosteroid dependency at treatment start, performance status, histology and frontal lobe location. 103 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Vascular targeting of LIGHT normalizes blood vessels in primary brain cancer and induces intratumoural high endothelial venules.

    He, Bo; Jabouille, Arnaud; Steri, Veronica; Johansson-Percival, Anna; Michael, Iacovos P; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Junckerstorff, Reimar; Nowak, Anna K; Hamzah, Juliana; Lee, Gabriel; Bergers, Gabriele; Ganss, Ruth

    2018-06-01

    High-grade brain cancer such as glioblastoma (GBM) remains an incurable disease. A common feature of GBM is the angiogenic vasculature, which can be targeted with selected peptides for payload delivery. We assessed the ability of micelle-tagged, vascular homing peptides RGR, CGKRK and NGR to specifically bind to blood vessels in syngeneic orthotopic GBM models. By using the peptide CGKRK to deliver the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member LIGHT (also known as TNF superfamily member 14; TNFSF14) to angiogenic tumour vessels, we have generated a reagent that normalizes the brain cancer vasculature by inducing pericyte contractility and re-establishing endothelial barrier integrity. LIGHT-mediated vascular remodelling also activates endothelia and induces intratumoural high endothelial venules (HEVs), which are specialized blood vessels for lymphocyte infiltration. Combining CGKRK-LIGHT with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and checkpoint blockade amplified HEV frequency and T-cell accumulation in GBM, which is often sparsely infiltrated by immune effector cells, and reduced tumour burden. Furthermore, CGKRK and RGR peptides strongly bound to blood vessels in freshly resected human GBM, demonstrating shared peptide-binding activities in mouse and human primary brain tumour vessels. Thus, peptide-mediated LIGHT targeting is a highly translatable approach in primary brain cancer to reduce vascular leakiness and enhance immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Thallium brain SPECT and MRI correlation in the evaluation of tumour recurrence versus radiation necrosis

    Robins, P.D.; Mahoney, D.S.; Mullan, B.P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This study compares different methods of determining thallium tumour uptake indices. Correlation with MR was performed to evaluate features that may affect the thallium index (TI) and to improve specificity for differentiation of recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis. 23 patients who had received radiotherapy for a brain neoplasm were included. The TI was determined using three different methods including large and small regions-of-interest (ROI). The concordance between the thallium SPECT and MRI was assessed. The effect of central necrosis on the different thallium indices derived was evaluated. 18 patients were determined to have recurrent tumor and five had inactive disease. The optimal TI cut-off values was statistically delivered and sensitivity and specificity was 78-94% and 80% respectively for cut-off values between 2.0 and 2.6 depending on the method used to calculate the TI. When compared with MRI, the majority of SPECT abnormalities correlated well with location and degree of uptake and enhancement. Seven cases showed central necrosis and the degree of necrosis had less effect on the TI when a small ROI was used in these cases. In conclusion thallium brain SPECT is a sensitive technique for detecting recurrent tumour. When performing semi-quantitative assessment of thallium uptake, a smaller ROI over the most intense area of uptake will reduce the underestimation of the TI in the presence of necrosis and a Tl cut-off value of 2.6 gave optimal accuracy using this method. Correlation with MRI aids in localization, particularly where there is anatomic distortion and enables more accurate analysis of these lesions by avoiding areas of necrosis. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Evaluation of several FDG PET parameters for prediction of soft tissue tumour grade at primary diagnosis and recurrence

    Fendler, Wolfgang P. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Chalkidis, Rebecca P.; Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Knoesel, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Issels, Rolf D.; Lindner, Lars H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Cyran, Clemens C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Vienna General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of SUV-based parameters derived from [{sup 18} F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in order to optimize non-invasive prediction of soft tissue tumour (STT) grade. One hundred and twenty-nine lesions from 123 patients who underwent FDG-PET for primary staging (n = 79) or assessment of recurrence (n = 44) of STT were analyzed retrospectively. Histopathology was the reference standard for tumour grading. Absolute values and tumour-to-liver ratios of several standardized uptake value (SUV) parameters were correlated with tumour grading. At primary diagnosis SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, SUV{sub max}/SUV{sub liver} and SUV{sub peak}/SUV{sub liver} showed good correlation with tumour grade. SUV{sub peak} (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic, AUC-ROC: 0.82) and SUV{sub peak}/SUV{sub liver} (AUC-ROC: 0.82) separated best between low grade (WHO intermediate, grade 1 sarcoma, and low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumours, GISTs) and high grade (grade 2/3 sarcoma and intermediate/high risk GISTs) lesions: optimal threshold for SUV{sub peak}/SUV{sub liver} was 2.4, which resulted in a sensitivity of 79 % and a specificity of 81 %. At disease recurrence, the AUC-ROC was <0.75 for each parameter. A tumour SUV{sub peak} of at least 2.4 fold mean liver uptake predicts high grade histopathology with good diagnostic accuracy at primary staging. At disease recurrence, FDG-PET does not reliably separate high and low grade lesions. (orig.)

  18. Radiosensitivity of primary tumour cultures as a determinant of curability of human head and neck cancers

    Peters, L.J.; Tofilon, P.J.; Goepfert, H.; Brock, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1987, 31 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck who were treated on protocol by surgery and post-operative radiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center had radiosensitivity measurements made on primary cultures of the surgical specimens using the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System. The parameter of cell survival at 2 Gy (S 2 ) was correlated with the clinical outcome independently of pathological risk factors. All five recurrences have been in patients with S 2 values >0.3 (p = 0.08). Evidence of significant intratumoral heterogeneity of cellular radiosensitivity in vitro was demonstrated in one of four cultures tested. Mathematical modelling suggests that in the absence of marked heterogeneity, the S 2 parameter is likely to be more robust than other radiobiologically based assays in predicting clinical treatment outcome. (author)

  19. High field strength magnetic resonance imaging in paediatric brain tumour surgery--its role in prevention of early repeat resections.

    Avula, Shivaram; Pettorini, Benedetta; Abernethy, Laurence; Pizer, Barry; Williams, Dawn; Mallucci, Conor

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the surgical and imaging outcome in children who underwent brain tumour surgery with intention of complete tumour resection, prior to and following the start of intra-operative MRI (ioMRI) service. ioMRI service for brain tumour resection commenced in October 2009. A cohort of patients operated between June 2007 and September 2009 with a pre-surgical intention of complete tumour resection were selected (Group A). A similar number of consecutive cases were selected from a prospective database of patients undergoing ioMRI (Group B). The demographics, imaging, pathology and surgical outcome of both groups were compared. Thirty-six of 47 cases from Group A met the inclusion criterion and 36 cases were selected from Group B; 7 of the 36 cases in Group A had unequivocal evidence of residual tumour on the post-operative scan; 5 (14%) of them underwent repeat resection within 6 months post-surgery. In Group B, ioMRI revealed unequivocal evidence of residual tumour in 11 of the 36 cases following initial resection. In 10 of these 11 cases, repeat resections were performed during the same surgical episode and none of these 11 cases required repeat surgery in the following 6 months. Early repeat resection rate was significantly different between both groups (p = 0.003). Following the advent of ioMRI at our institution, the need for repeat resection within 6 months has been prevented in cases where ioMRI revealed unequivocal evidence of residual tumour.

  20. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation and morphological changes in response to the tumour promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in primary human tumour cells, established and transformed cell lines

    Rance, A J; Thönnes, M; Issinger, O G

    1985-01-01

    lifespan (fibroblasts, primary human tumour cells) can be mimicked by unknown steps also associated with immortalization (establishment function) and the transformed state of the tumour cells. Another interesting observation were morphological changes of the established and SV40-transformed cells which...

  1. Texture analysis in quantitative MR imaging. Tissue characterisation of normal brain and intracranial tumours at 1.5 T

    Kjaer, L; Ring, P; Thomsen, C

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of texture analysis in quantitative tissue characterisation by MR imaging at 1.5 T was evaluated in the brain of 6 healthy volunteers and in 88 patients with intracranial tumours. Texture images were computed from calculated T1 and T2 parameter images by applying groups o...... to be successful in some cases of clinical importance. However, no discrimination between benign and malignant tumour growth was possible. Much texture information seems to be contained in MR images, which may prove useful for classification and image segmentation....

  2. A multinational case-control study on childhood brain tumours, anthropogenic factors, birth characteristics and prenatal exposures

    Vienneau, Danielle; Infanger, Denis; Feychting, Maria

    2016-01-01

    supplement intake) in relation to risk of brain tumour diagnosis among 7-19 year olds. The multinational case-control study in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Switzerland (CEFALO) included interviews with 352 (participation rate=83.2%) eligible cases and 646 (71.1%) population-based controls. Interview data were...... complemented with data from birth registries and validated by assessing agreement (Cohen's Kappa). We used conditional logistic regression models matched on age, sex and geographical region (adjusted for maternal age and parental education) to explore associations between birth factors and childhood brain...... during pregnancy was indicative of a protective effect (OR 0.75, 95%-CI: 0.56-1.01). No association was seen for maternal smoking during pregnancy or working during pregnancy. We found little evidence that the considered birth factors were related to brain tumour risk among children and adolescents....

  3. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities.

  4. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    Lennart Hardell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR and Causes of Death Register (CDR to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  5. Hybrid MR-PET of brain tumours using amino acid PET and chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    da Silva, N A; Lohmann, P; Fairney, J; Magill, A W; Oros Peusquens, A-M; Choi, C-H; Stirnberg, R; Stoffels, G; Galldiks, N; Golay, X; Langen, K-J; Jon Shah, N

    2018-06-01

    PET using radiolabelled amino acids has become a promising tool in the diagnostics of gliomas and brain metastasis. Current research is focused on the evaluation of amide proton transfer (APT) chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR imaging for brain tumour imaging. In this hybrid MR-PET study, brain tumours were compared using 3D data derived from APT-CEST MRI and amino acid PET using O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET). Eight patients with gliomas were investigated simultaneously with 18 F-FET PET and APT-CEST MRI using a 3-T MR-BrainPET scanner. CEST imaging was based on a steady-state approach using a B 1 average power of 1μT. B 0 field inhomogeneities were corrected a Prametric images of magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR asym ) and differences to the extrapolated semi-solid magnetisation transfer reference method, APT# and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE#), were calculated. Statistical analysis of the tumour-to-brain ratio of the CEST data was performed against PET data using the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. A tumour-to-brain ratio derived from APT# and 18 F-FET presented no significant differences, and no correlation was found between APT# and 18 F-FET PET data. The distance between local hot spot APT# and 18 F-FET were different (average 20 ± 13 mm, range 4-45 mm). For the first time, CEST images were compared with 18 F-FET in a simultaneous MR-PET measurement. Imaging findings derived from 18 F-FET PET and APT CEST MRI seem to provide different biological information. The validation of these imaging findings by histological confirmation is necessary, ideally using stereotactic biopsy.

  6. 2005 PRETEXT: a revised staging system for primary malignant liver tumours of childhood developed by the SIOPEL group

    Roebuck, Derek J.; McHugh, Kieran; Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Aronson, Daniel [Academisch Medisch Centrum/Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Clapuyt, Philippe; Ville de Goyet, Jean de; Otte, Jean-Bernard [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Departments of Surgery and Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Czauderna, Piotr [Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Gdansk (Poland); Gauthier, Frederic; Pariente, Daniele [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Bicetre APHP, Le Kremlin-Bicetre cedex (France); MacKinlay, Gordon [Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Surgery, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Maibach, Rudolf [SIAK Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Plaschkes, Jack [Inselspital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Childs, Margaret [United Kingdom Children' s Cancer Study Group, Leicester (United Kingdom); Perilongo, Giorgio [Padua University Hospital, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Padua (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    Over the last 15 years, various oncology groups throughout the world have used the PRETEXT system for staging malignant primary liver tumours of childhood. This paper, written by members of the radiology and surgery committees of the International Childhood Liver Tumor Strategy Group (SIOPEL), presents various clarifications and revisions to the original PRETEXT system. (orig.)

  7. 2005 PRETEXT: a revised staging system for primary malignant liver tumours of childhood developed by the SIOPEL group

    Roebuck, Derek J.; McHugh, Kieran; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Aronson, Daniel; Clapuyt, Philippe; Ville de Goyet, Jean de; Otte, Jean-Bernard; Czauderna, Piotr; Gauthier, Frederic; Pariente, Daniele; MacKinlay, Gordon; Maibach, Rudolf; Plaschkes, Jack; Childs, Margaret; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, various oncology groups throughout the world have used the PRETEXT system for staging malignant primary liver tumours of childhood. This paper, written by members of the radiology and surgery committees of the International Childhood Liver Tumor Strategy Group (SIOPEL), presents various clarifications and revisions to the original PRETEXT system. (orig.)

  8. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  9. Detection of unknown primary tumours in patients with cerebral metastases using whole-body 18F-flouorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    Klee, B; Law, I; Højgaard, L

    2002-01-01

    Identification of the unknown primary tumours in patients presenting with cerebral metastasis is a continued diagnostic challenge. Despite extensive and lengthy diagnostic work-up, the primary tumours will remain obscure in a significant proportion of the patients. The aim of this study was to ev...

  10. Cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary tumours. Results from a national survey by the Danish Society for Head and Neck Oncology

    Grau, Cai; Johansen, L V; Jakobsen, J

    2000-01-01

    The management of patients with cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary tumours is a major challenge in oncology. This study presents data collected from all five oncology centres in Denmark.......The management of patients with cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary tumours is a major challenge in oncology. This study presents data collected from all five oncology centres in Denmark....

  11. Cancer in adolescents and young adults in north Netherlands (1989-2003) : increased incidence, stable survival and high incidence of second primary tumours

    van Gaal, J. C.; Bastiaannet, E.; Schaapveld, M.; Otter, R.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.

    Background: Lack of survival improvement in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer has led to increased awareness of this young population. Design: We carried out a population-based study of incidence and survival of primary tumours and second primary tumours in patients aged 12-24 in north

  12. Outcome of secondary high-grade glioma in children previously treated for a malignant condition: A study of the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium

    Carret, Anne-Sophie; Tabori, Uri; Crooks, Bruce; Hukin, Juliette; Odame, Isaac; Johnston, Donna L.; Keene, Daniel L.; Freeman, Carolyn; Bouffet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports of secondary high-grade glioma (HGG) in survivors of childhood cancer are scarce. The aim of this study was to review the pattern of diagnosis, the treatment, and outcome of secondary pediatric HGG. Patients and methods: We performed a multi-center retrospective study among the 17 paediatric institutions participating in the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium (CPBTC). Results: We report on 18 patients (14 males, 4 females) treated in childhood for a primary cancer, who subsequently developed a HGG as a second malignancy. All patients had previously received radiation therapy +/- chemotherapy for either acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 9) or solid tumour (n = 9). All HGG occurred within the previous radiation fields. At the last follow-up, 17 patients have died and the median survival time is 9.75 months. Conclusion: Although aggressive treatment seems to provide sustained remissions in some patients, the optimal management is still to be defined. Further documentation of such cases is necessary in order to better understand the pathogenesis, the natural history and the prevention of these tumours

  13. Analysis of T cell receptor alpha beta variability in lymphocytes infiltrating melanoma primary tumours and metastatic lesions

    Schøller, J; thor Straten, P; Jakobsen, Annette Birck

    1994-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) alpha beta variable (V) gene family usage of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in four different primary human malignant melanomas and their corresponding metastatic lesions was characterized using a recently developed method based on the reverse-transcription-couple......The T cell receptor (TCR) alpha beta variable (V) gene family usage of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in four different primary human malignant melanomas and their corresponding metastatic lesions was characterized using a recently developed method based on the reverse...... usage of the TCR V gene families V alpha 4, V alpha 5, V alpha 22 and V beta 8, whereas the V beta 3 gene family appeared to be expressed together with HLA-A1. Other highly expressed V gene families, apparently not restricted to either HLA-A1 or -A2, were V alpha 1 (expressed in three of four primary...... tumours) and V alpha 21 (expressed in two of four tumours). We found no evidence suggesting any correlations between the haplotypes HLA-A1 and -A2 and preferential V gene family expression in the metastatic lesions, and the only common feature was V alpha 8, which was found to be highly expressed in two...

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Brain Tumors

    Zhong-min Wang

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used to treat primary brain tumors as standard primary and/or adjunctive therapies for decades. It is difficult for conventional radiotherapy to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumors while sparing surrounding normal brain due to complicated structures and multifunction in human brain. With the understanding of radiation physics and computer technology, a number of novel and more precise radiotherapies have been developed in recent years. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of these strategies. The use of IMRT in the treatment of primary brain tumors is being increasing nowadays. It shows great promise for some of primary brain tumors and also presents some problems, This review highlights current IMRT in the treatment of mainly primary brain tumors.

  15. International Case-Control Study of Adult Brain, Head and Neck Tumours: Results of the Feasibility Study (invited paper)

    Cardis, E.; Kilkenny, M.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the feasibility study were to collect and analyse the information necessary to assess the feasibility of a multi-centric study of adult head and neck tumours (including brain tumours) and mobile telephones. Information was obtained on the availability and accessibility of records from companies, the prevalence of mobile telephone use over time and the expected number of tumour cases in the proposed study regions. The conclusion is that it is feasible to develop a study of the relation between mobile telephone use and brain cancer risk. The feasibility of a study of the relation between radiofrequency exposure and cancer risk is, however, unclear at present. It is unknown whether a sufficiently accurate and precise RF exposure gradient can be derived to classify adequately each subject in the proposed study. A study of the relation between mobile telephone use and risk of salivary gland tumours and acoustic neurinomas is probably feasible, but more information is required about the logistic difficulties of ascertaining these cases in the study regions. Two subcommittees have been formed to develop the exposure measurement and epidemiological aspect of the study. (author)

  16. Newly-derived neuroblastoma cell lines propagated in serum-free media recapitulate the genotype and phenotype of primary neuroblastoma tumours.

    Bate-Eya, Laurel T; Ebus, Marli E; Koster, Jan; den Hartog, Ilona J M; Zwijnenburg, Danny A; Schild, Linda; van der Ploeg, Ida; Dolman, M Emmy M; Caron, Huib N; Versteeg, Rogier; Molenaar, Jan J

    2014-02-01

    Recently protocols have been devised for the culturing of cell lines from fresh tumours under serum-free conditions in defined neural stem cell medium. These cells, frequently called tumour initiating cells (TICs) closely retained characteristics of the tumours of origin. We report the isolation of eight newly-derived neuroblastoma TICs from six primary neuroblastoma tumours and two bone marrow metastases. The primary tumours from which these TICs were generated have previously been fully typed by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) analysis showed that TIC lines retained essential characteristics of the primary tumours and exhibited typical neuroblastoma chromosomal aberrations such as MYCN amplification, gain of chromosome 17q and deletion of 1p36. Protein analysis showed expression for neuroblastoma markers MYCN, NCAM, CHGA, DBH and TH while haematopoietic markers CD19 and CD11b were absent. We analysed the growth characteristics and confirmed tumour-forming potential using sphere-forming assays, subcutaneous and orthotopic injection of these cells into immune-compromised mice. Affymetrix mRNA expression profiling of TIC line xenografts showed an expression pattern more closely mimicking primary tumours compared to xenografts from classical cell lines. This establishes that these neuroblastoma TICs cultured under serum-free conditions are relevant and useful neuroblastoma tumour models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multispectral imaging for highly accurate analysis of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes in primary melanoma

    Vasaturo, A.; Di Blasio, S.; Verweij, D.; Blokx, W.A.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Vries, I.J.M. de; Figdor, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The quality and quantity of the infiltration of immune cells into tumour tissues have substantial impacts on patients' clinical outcomes, and are associated with response to immunotherapy. Therefore, the precise analysis of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is becoming an important

  18. 18F-FDG whole body positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT)

    Lassen, U; Daugaard, G; Eigtved, A

    1999-01-01

    -fluorodeoxyglucose) are of clinical value in detection of UPT. Whole-body FDG-PET scans were performed in 20 patients following standard staging procedures according to histology. PET results were verified either histologically or by the clinical course of the disease. 11 patients had neck metastases (5 squamous cell, 5......The management of patients with unknown primary tumours (UPT) often includes a large number of radiographical studies and invasive procedures, but the occult primary tumour is detected in less than 25%. In this prospective study we explored whether non-invasive whole body PET scans using FDG (18-F...... and this was verified in 9 (45%), either histologically or by the clinical course of disease. 8 of these had primary lung cancer and 1 had carcinoma at the basis of the tongue. In most patients PET had no treatment related implications. 3 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) received chemotherapy prompted...

  19. Pre-surgical planning and MR-tractography utility in brain tumour resection

    Romano, A.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Bozzao, A. [University Sapienza, Department of Neuroradiology, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); D' Andrea, G.; Mastronardi, L.; Ferrante, L. [University Sapienza, Department of Neurosurgery, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Minniti, G. [University Sapienza, Department of Radiotherapy, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the possible identification of trajectories of fibre tracts, (2) to examine the useful of a neuronavigation system for pre-surgical planning, (3) to assess pre- and post-surgery patients' clinical condition and (4) to evaluate the impact of this information on surgical planning and procedure. Twenty-eight right-handed patients were prospectively and consecutively studied. All the patients were clinically assessed by a neurologist in both pre- and post-surgical phases. Separately the pyramidal tract, optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus were reconstructed. The trajectories were considered suitable for surgical planning if there were no interruptions of any of the layers at the level of the lesion. Dedicated software 'merged' the acquired images with the tractographic processing, and the whole dataset was sent to the neuronavigation system. The assessment of the 37 visualised trajectories close to the tumour resulted in a modification of the surgical approach to corticotomy in six patients (21%); the impact on the definition of the resection margins during surgery was 64% (18 cases). The overall impact percentage on the surgical procedure was 82%. In 27 cases, the symptoms had not changed. MR-tractography provides the neurosurgeon with a new anatomical view that has an impact on the surgical resection planning for brain neoplasms. (orig.)

  20. Endocrine morbidity in adults treated with cerebral irradiation for brain tumours during childhood

    Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; MacFarlane, I.A.; Morris Jones, P.H.; Pearson, D.

    1977-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was assessed in 20 adult subjects who were treated with cerebral irradiation for brain tumours during childhood between 8 and 32 years earlier. Nine patients showed impaired growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycaemia, of whom, 7 are below the third centile for standing height. All GH deficient subjects recieved more than 2950 rads to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis with a maximum dose of approximately 5000 rads being used in one case. Three subjects have an elevated basal serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and 2 of these show an exaggerated TSH response to thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH) but no patient was clinically or biochemically hypothyroid. The rest of hypothalamic-pituitary function was essentially normal. This study shows that multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies do not develop with time when the radiation dose is below a critical level. Thus it appears that there is a gradation of radiation damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis which is dependent primarily on the dose received rather than the time interval after radiotherapy. (auth.)

  1. Growth and growth hormone secretion in children following treatment of brain tumours with radiotherapy

    Darendeliler, F.; Livesey, E.A.; Hindmarsh, P.C.; Brook, C.G.D. (Endocrine Unit, The Middlesex Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the growth of 144 children after treatment of brain tumours distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. All had cranial irradiation and 87 spinal irradiation. In 56 patients observed without intervention for 3 years, height SDS in the cranial (CR) group (n=20) declined from 0.02 to -0.44 and in the craniospinal (CS) group (n=36) from -0.28 to -1.11. Failure of spinal growth had a marked effect in the CS group. The onset of puberty was slightly but not significantly advanced; median ages at onset of puberty were 10.3 years in girls and 12.1 years in boys. Of the total group 86.4% had clinical and biochemical evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Fifty-two children, 33 (28 CS; 5 CR) of whome were prepubertal, received biosynthetic human growth hormone, in a dose of 15 mU/m{sup 2}/week by daily injection for a period of one year. Height velocity SDS increased significantly in both groups from -2.74 to +1.90 (CS) and from -1.0 to +4.26 (CR). Spinal response to GH treatment was restricted in the craniospinal group. (authors).

  2. Growth and growth hormone secretion in children following treatment of brain tumours with radiotherapy

    Darendeliler, F.; Livesey, E.A.; Hindmarsh, P.C.; Brook, C.G.D.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the growth of 144 children after treatment of brain tumours distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. All had cranial irradiation and 87 spinal irradiation. In 56 patients observed without intervention for 3 years, height SDS in the cranial (CR) group (n=20) declined from 0.02 to -0.44 and in the craniospinal (CS) group (n=36) from -0.28 to -1.11. Failure of spinal growth had a marked effect in the CS group. The onset of puberty was slightly but not significantly advanced; median ages at onset of puberty were 10.3 years in girls and 12.1 years in boys. Of the total group 86.4% had clinical and biochemical evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Fifty-two children, 33 (28 CS; 5 CR) of whome were prepubertal, received biosynthetic human growth hormone, in a dose of 15 mU/m 2 /week by daily injection for a period of one year. Height velocity SDS increased significantly in both groups from -2.74 to +1.90 (CS) and from -1.0 to +4.26 (CR). Spinal response to GH treatment was restricted in the craniospinal group. (authors)

  3. Pre-surgical planning and MR-tractography utility in brain tumour resection

    Romano, A.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Bozzao, A.; D'Andrea, G.; Mastronardi, L.; Ferrante, L.; Minniti, G.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the possible identification of trajectories of fibre tracts, (2) to examine the useful of a neuronavigation system for pre-surgical planning, (3) to assess pre- and post-surgery patients' clinical condition and (4) to evaluate the impact of this information on surgical planning and procedure. Twenty-eight right-handed patients were prospectively and consecutively studied. All the patients were clinically assessed by a neurologist in both pre- and post-surgical phases. Separately the pyramidal tract, optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus were reconstructed. The trajectories were considered suitable for surgical planning if there were no interruptions of any of the layers at the level of the lesion. Dedicated software 'merged' the acquired images with the tractographic processing, and the whole dataset was sent to the neuronavigation system. The assessment of the 37 visualised trajectories close to the tumour resulted in a modification of the surgical approach to corticotomy in six patients (21%); the impact on the definition of the resection margins during surgery was 64% (18 cases). The overall impact percentage on the surgical procedure was 82%. In 27 cases, the symptoms had not changed. MR-tractography provides the neurosurgeon with a new anatomical view that has an impact on the surgical resection planning for brain neoplasms. (orig.)

  4. A case series discussing the anaesthetic management of pregnant patients with brain tumours [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2hn

    Alaa A Abd-Elsayed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy may aggravate the natural history of an intracranial tumour, and may even unmask a previously unknown diagnosis. Here we present a series of seven patients who had brain tumours during pregnancy. The aim of this case series is to characterize the current perioperative management and to suggest evidence based guidelines for the anaesthetic management of pregnant females with brain tumours. This is a retrospective study. Information on pregnant patients diagnosed with brain tumours that underwent caesarean section (CS and/or brain tumour resection from May 2003 through June 2008 was obtained from the Department of General Anaesthesia and the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumour & Neuro-Oncology Centre (BBTC at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA. The mean age was 34.5 years (range 29-40 years old. Six patients had glioma, two of whom had concomitant craniotomy and CS. Six cases had the tumour in the frontal lobe. Four cases were operated on under general anaesthesia and three underwent awake craniotomy. The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores. Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient. In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

  5. Functional MR imaging of the motor cortex in healthy volunteers and patients with brain tumours: qualitative and quantitative results

    Fellner, C. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics]|[Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Schlaier, J.; Schwerdtner, J.; Brawanski, A. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Fellner, F. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery]|[Oberoesterreichische Landesnervenklinik, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Held, P. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Blank, M.; Kalender, W.A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the motor cortex in healthy volunteers and patients with brain tumours. Functional MR imaging was performed in 14 healthy volunteers and 14 patients with tumours in or near the primary motor cortex with groups being matched for age, sex, and handedness. Functional images were acquired during motion of the right and left hand. Time courses of signal intensity within the contralateral, ipsilateral, and supplementary motor cortex as well as z-maps were calculated, their quality being assessed visually. Mean signal increase between activation and rest were evaluated within the contralateral, ipsilateral, and supplementary motor cortex, the activated area in those regions of interest was measured using z-maps. The quality of functional MR experiments was generally lower in patients than in volunteers. The quantitative results showed a trend towards increased ipsilateral activation in volunteers during left hand compared to right hand motion and in patients during motion of the affected compared to the non-affected hand. Considering quantitative and qualitative results, significantly increased ipsilateral activation was found in patients compared to healthy volunteers. In conclusion, functional MR imaging quality was significantly reduced in patient studies compared to healthy volunteers, even if influences of age, sex, and handedness were excluded. Increased ipsilateral activation was found in patients with brain tumours which can be interpreted by an improved connectivity between both hemispheres. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war ein Vergleich der funktionellen MR-Bildgebung (fMRI: Functional magnetic resonance imaging) des Motorkortex bei gesunden Probanden und Patienten mit Hirntumor. Die funktionelle MR-Bildgebung wurde bei 14 gesunden Probanden und bei 14 Patienten mit einem Tumor im oder nahe des primaeren Motorkortex durchgefuehrt, wobei beide Kollektive

  6. Fetal antigen 2 in primary and secondary brain tumors

    Rasmussen, H Boje; Teisner, B; Schrøder, H D

    1991-01-01

    Immunohistochemical deposition and distribution of fetal antigen 2 (FA2) was examined in normal brain tissue and in primary and metastatic tumors of the brain. In normal brain tissue FA2 was exclusively found linearly around the vessels, along pia and in arachnoidea. A similar localization was seen...

  7. Preoperative mapping of cortical language areas in adult brain tumour patients using PET and individual non-normalised SPM analyses

    Meyer, Philipp T.; Sturz, Laszlo; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Setani, Keyvan S.; Buell, Udalrich; Spetzger, Uwe; Meyer, Georg F.; Sabri, Osama

    2003-01-01

    In patients scheduled for the resection of perisylvian brain tumours, knowledge of the cortical topography of language functions is crucial in order to avoid neurological deficits. We investigated the applicability of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) without stereotactic normalisation for individual preoperative language function brain mapping using positron emission tomography (PET). Seven right-handed adult patients with left-sided brain tumours (six frontal and one temporal) underwent 12 oxygen-15 labelled water PET scans during overt verb generation and rest. Individual activation maps were calculated for P<0.005 and P<0.001 without anatomical normalisation and overlaid onto the individuals' magnetic resonance images for preoperative planning. Activations corresponding to Broca's and Wernicke's areas were found in five and six cases, respectively, for P<0.005 and in three and six cases, respectively, for P<0.001. One patient with a glioma located in the classical Broca's area without aphasic symptoms presented an activation of the adjacent inferior frontal cortex and of a right-sided area homologous to Broca's area. Four additional patients with left frontal tumours also presented activations of the right-sided Broca's homologue; two of these showed aphasic symptoms and two only a weak or no activation of Broca's area. Other frequently observed activations included bilaterally the superior temporal gyri, prefrontal cortices, anterior insulae, motor areas and the cerebellum. The middle and inferior temporal gyri were activated predominantly on the left. An SPM group analysis (P<0.05, corrected) in patients with left frontal tumours confirmed the activation pattern shown by the individual analyses. We conclude that SPM analyses without stereotactic normalisation offer a promising alternative for analysing individual preoperative language function brain mapping studies. The observed right frontal activations agree with proposed reorganisation processes, but

  8. Crystals in brain and meninges in primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis.

    Haqqani, M T

    1977-01-01

    A case of primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis with chronic renal failure, crystalline myocarditis, and disseminated calcium oxalate crystal deposition in various tissues including the brain and meninges is described. Deposition of crystals in brain and meninges is exceptionally rare in primary oxalosis. Images PMID:838867

  9. A multinational case-control study on childhood brain tumours, anthropogenic factors, birth characteristics and prenatal exposures: A validation of interview data.

    Vienneau Danielle; Infanger Denis; Feychting Maria; Schüz Joachim; Schmidt Lisbeth Samsø; Poulsen Aslak Harbo; Tettamanti Giorgio; Klæboe Lars; Kuehni Claudia E; Tynes Tore; Von der Weid Nicolas; Lannering Birgitta; Röösli Martin

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the aetiology of childhood brain tumours. We investigated anthropometric factors (birth weight length maternal age) birth characteristics (e.g. vacuum extraction preterm delivery birth order) and exposures during pregnancy (e.g. maternal: smoking working dietary supplement intake) in relation to risk of brain tumour diagnosis among 7 19 year olds. The multinational case control study in Denmark Sweden Norway and Switzerland (CEFALO) included interviews with 352 (particip...

  10. Comparison of a gene expression profiling strategy to standard clinical work-up for determination of tumour origin in cancer of unknown primary (CUP)

    Ades, Felipe; de Azambuja, Evandro; Daugaard, Gedske

    2013-01-01

    CupPrint® is a genomic signature able to identify 47 different cancer types. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracy of this genomic signature to that of a full clinical work-up in diagnosing the primary tumour site. Patients with newly diagnosed, untreated metastatic tumours were eligible...

  11. operative treatment of primary bone tumours of the femur and the tibia

    can cause infection, pseudoarthrosis and pathological fracture. Objective: The purpose of ... after several re-surgeries. Key words: Bone tumour, Femur, Tibia, Resection, Allograft .... stress, the length of the graft, the realization of an arthrodesis ...

  12. Contribution of sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate brain scintigraphy in the diagnosis of tumours of posterior fossa

    Sergent, Aline.

    1976-01-01

    The present work concerns 38 posterior cranial fossa tumour cases subjected to sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate brain scintigraphy between May 1974 and June 1976. 33 of these patients have undergone an anatomical check while for the remaining 5, the existence of a posterior fossa tumour is established from the conjunction of clinical signs and other paraclinical examinations. The procedure was the same for all these 38 patients: after a 300 μC/kg injection of tracer, an immediate angioscintigraphic period, an early set of pictures (half an hour after the tracer injection) then delayed set (4 to 5 hours later) taken from 4 angles: front, back and two profiles. The examination was performed with an OHIO NUCLEAR SIEMENS gamma camera and sometimes a conventional scanner as well (the latter giving no better a diagnosis than the former). In 75% of the cases a hyperfixation of the injected tracer was observed and its site located quite accurately in the posterior fossa tumour. The etiology of the lesion could be diagnosed in 'most probable' or 'least probable' terms. Examination of work by other authors, who obtained similar results, leads to the conclusion that this method is very helpful in the diagnosis of posterior fossa tumours when used as a means of early detection, before the undertaking of more complex neuroradiological explorations [fr

  13. Accuracy and Feasibility of Estimated Tumour Volumetry in Primary Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: Validation Using Semi-automated Technique in 127 Patients

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shinagare, Atul B.; O’Neill, Ailbhe C.; Nishino, Mizuki; Rosenthal, Michael H.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) using semi-automated volumetry. Materials and Methods In this IRB-approved retrospective study, we measured the three longest diameters in x, y, z axes on CTs of primary gastric GISTs in 127 consecutive patients (52 women, 75 men, mean age: 61 years) at our institute between 2000 and 2013. Segmented volumes (Vsegmented) were obtained using commercial software by two radiologists. Estimate volumes (V1–V6) were obtained using formulae for spheres and ellipsoids. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of Vsegmented and agreement of V1–6 with Vsegmented were analysed with concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and Bland-Altman plots. Results Median Vsegmented and V1–V6 were 75.9 cm3, 124.9 cm3, 111.6 cm3, 94.0 cm3, 94.4cm3, 61.7 cm3 and 80.3 cm3 respectively. There was strong intra- and inter-observer agreement for Vsegmented. Agreement with Vsegmented was highest for V6 (scalene ellipsoid, x≠y≠z), with CCC of 0.96 [95%CI: 0.95–0.97]. Mean relative difference was smallest for V6 (0.6%), while it was −19.1% for V5, +14.5% for V4, +17.9% for V3, +32.6 % for V2 and +47% for V1. Conclusion Ellipsoidal approximations of volume using three measured axes may be used to closely estimate Vsegmented when semi-automated techniques are unavailable. PMID:25991487

  14. DMBT1, a new member of the SRCR superfamily, on chromosome 10q25.3-26.1 is deleted in malignant brain tumours

    Mollenhauer, J; Wiemann, S; Scheurlen, W

    1997-01-01

    Loss of sequences from human chromosome 10q has been associated with the progression of human cancer. Medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme are the most common malignant brain tumours in children and adults, respectively. In glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form, 80% of the tumo......Loss of sequences from human chromosome 10q has been associated with the progression of human cancer. Medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme are the most common malignant brain tumours in children and adults, respectively. In glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form, 80....... Intragenic homozygous deletions has been detected in 2/20 medulloblastomas and in 9/39 glioblastomas multiformes. Lack of DMBT1 expression has been demonstrated in 4/5 brain-tumour cell lines. We suggest that DMBT1 is a putative tumour-suppressor gene implicated in the carcinogenesis of medulloblastoma...

  15. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET/CT, Bad Berka (Germany); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Hoersch, Dieter [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 {+-} 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were calculated and compared with SUV{sub max} in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV{sub max} of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 {+-} 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 {+-} 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV{sub max} in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 {+-} 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 {+-} 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV{sub max} of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p < 0.05) as compared to the ones with known primary tumour sites; 19% of the patients had high-grade and 81% low-grade NET. Based on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is

  16. Constrained customization of non-coplanar beam orientations in radiotherapy of brain tumours

    Rowbottom, C.G.; Oldham, M.; Webb, S.

    1999-01-01

    A methodology for the constrained customization of non-coplanar beam orientations in radiotherapy treatment planning has been developed and tested on a cohort of five patients with tumours of the brain. The methodology employed a combination of single and multibeam cost functions to produce customized beam orientations. The single-beam cost function was used to reduce the search space for the multibeam cost function, which was minimized using a fast simulated annealing algorithm. The scheme aims to produce well-spaced, customized beam orientations for each patient that produce low dose to organs at risk (OARs). The customized plans were compared with standard plans containing the number and orientation of beams chosen by a human planner. The beam orientation constraint-customized plans employed the same number of treatment beams as the standard plan but with beam orientations chosen by the constrained-customization scheme. Improvements from beam orientation constraint-customization were studied in isolation by customizing the beam weights of both plans using a dose-based downhill simplex algorithm. The results show that beam orientation constraint-customization reduced the maximum dose to the orbits by an average of 18.8 (±3.8, 1SD)% and to the optic nerves by 11.4 (±4.8, 1SD)% with no degradation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution. The mean doses, averaged over the patient cohort, were reduced by 4.2 (±1.1, 1SD)% and 12.4 (±3.1 1SD)% for the orbits and optic nerves respectively. In conclusion, the beam orientation constraint-customization can reduce the dose to OARs, for few-beam treatment plans, when compared with standard treatment plans developed by a human planner. (author)

  17. Classification of brain tumours using short echo time 1H MR spectra

    Devos, A.; Lukas, L.; Suykens, J. A. K.; Vanhamme, L.; Tate, A. R.; Howe, F. A.; Majós, C.; Moreno-Torres, A.; van der Graaf, M.; Arús, C.; Van Huffel, S.

    2004-09-01

    The purpose was to objectively compare the application of several techniques and the use of several input features for brain tumour classification using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time 1H MRS signals from patients with glioblastomas ( n = 87), meningiomas ( n = 57), metastases ( n = 39), and astrocytomas grade II ( n = 22) were provided by six centres in the European Union funded INTERPRET project. Linear discriminant analysis, least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) with a linear kernel and LS-SVM with radial basis function kernel were applied and evaluated over 100 stratified random splittings of the dataset into training and test sets. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to measure the performance of binary classifiers, while the percentage of correct classifications was used to evaluate the multiclass classifiers. The influence of several factors on the classification performance has been tested: L2- vs. water normalization, magnitude vs. real spectra and baseline correction. The effect of input feature reduction was also investigated by using only the selected frequency regions containing the most discriminatory information, and peak integrated values. Using L2-normalized complete spectra the automated binary classifiers reached a mean test AUC of more than 0.95, except for glioblastomas vs. metastases. Similar results were obtained for all classification techniques and input features except for water normalized spectra, where classification performance was lower. This indicates that data acquisition and processing can be simplified for classification purposes, excluding the need for separate water signal acquisition, baseline correction or phasing.

  18. Misdiagnosis of Child Abuse Related to Delay in Diagnosing a Paediatric Brain Tumour

    Lynne Wrennall Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflicting opinion regarding the relative weight that should be allocated to the investigation of organic causes of child illness, compared to the pursuit of suspicions of child abuse, has generated considerable public debate. The discourse of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy/Fabricated and Induced Illness is at the centre of contention. In particular, concern has arisen that children's medical needs are being neglected when their conditions are misdiagnosed as child abuse. This paper documents a case study in which the use of Child Protection procedures was linked to the belief that the child's illness had “no organic cause.” The case study is contextualised in a review of literature relevant to the diagnostic process. The deployment of the Child Protection perspective resulted in significant delay in the diagnosis of the child's brain tumour. The child was ultimately found to be suffering from an optic chasm mass lesion involving the hypothalamus and the medial temporal regions, resulting in Diencephalic Syndrome. The evidence in this case is that erring on the side of suspecting Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy/Fabricated and Induced Illness, was not “erring on the side of the child.” Several lessons need to be learned from the case. The importance of ensuring that the Child Protection perspective does not displace adequate assessment of alternative explanations for the child's condition is emphasised, as is the need for good communication in medical relationships. Strategies involving empathy, mediation, negotiation and conflict resolution may provide a more appropriate and therapeutic alternative to the use of Child Protection procedures in cases where the diagnosis is contentious. The need to re-write relevant policy, protocols and guidance is imperative.

  19. A case series discussing the anaesthetic management of pregnant patients with brain tumours [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/y7

    Alaa A Abd-Elsayed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy may aggravate the natural history of an intracranial tumour, and may even unmask a previously unknown diagnosis. Here we present a series of seven patients who had brain tumours during pregnancy. The aim of this case series is to characterize the current perioperative management and to suggest evidence based guidelines for the anaesthetic management of pregnant females with brain tumours. This is a retrospective study. Information on pregnant patients diagnosed with brain tumours that underwent caesarean section (CS and/or brain tumour resection from May 2003 through June 2008 was obtained from the Department of General Anaesthesia and the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumour & Neuro-Oncology Centre (BBTC at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA. The mean age was 34.5 years (range 29-40 years old. Six patients had glioma, two of whom had concomitant craniotomy and CS. Six cases had the tumour in the frontal lobe. Four cases were operated on under general anaesthesia and three underwent awake craniotomy. The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores. Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient. In conclusion, management of brain tumours in pregnant women is mainly reliant on case reports and the doctor’s personal experience. Therefore, close communication between the neurosurgeon, neuroanaesthetist, obstetrician and the patient is crucial. General anaesthesia, propofol, dexmedetomidine and remifentanil were used in our study and were safe. Although this may not agree with previous studies, desflurane and isoflurane were used in our patients with no detectable complications.

  20. Menopausal status dependence of the timing of breast cancer recurrence after surgical removal of the primary tumour

    Demicheli, Romano; Bonadonna, Gianni; Hrushesky, William JM; Retsky, Michael W; Valagussa, Pinuccia

    2004-01-01

    Information on the metastasis process in breast cancer patients undergoing primary tumour removal may be extracted from an analysis of the timing of clinical recurrence. The hazard rate for local-regional and/or distant recurrence as the first event during the first 4 years after surgery was studied in 1173 patients undergoing mastectomy alone as primary treatment for operable breast cancer. Subset analyses were performed according to tumour size, axillary nodal status and menopausal status. A sharp two-peaked hazard function was observed for node-positive pre-menopausal patients, whereas results from node-positive post-menopausal women always displayed a single broad peak. The first narrow peak among pre-menopausal women showed a very steep rise to a maximum about 8–10 months after mastectomy. The second peak was considerably broader, reaching its maximum at 28–30 months. Post-menopausal patients displayed a wide, nearly symmetrical peak with maximum risk at about 18–20 months. Peaks displayed increasing height with increasing axillary lymph node involvement. No multi-peaked pattern was evident for either pre-menopausal or post-menopausal node-negative patients; however, this finding should be considered cautiously because of the limited number of events. Tumour size influenced recurrence risk but not its timing. Findings resulting from the different subsets of patients were remarkably coherent and each observed peak maintained the same position on the time axis in all analysed subsets. The risk of early recurrence for node positive patients is dependent on menopausal status. The amount of axillary nodal involvement and the tumour size modulate the risk value at any given time. For pre-menopausal node-positive patients, the abrupt increase of the first narrow peak of the recurrence risk suggests a triggering event that synchronises early risk. We suggest that this event is the surgical removal of the primary tumour. The later, broader, more symmetrical risk

  1. Pinhole SPECT: high resolution imaging of brain tumours in small laboratory animals

    Franceschim, M.; Bokulic, T.; Kusic, Z.; Strand, S.E.; Erlandsson, K.

    1994-01-01

    The performance properties of pinhole SPECT and the application of this technology to evaluate radionuclide uptake in brain in small laboratory animals were investigated. System sensitivity and spatial resolution measurements of a rotating scintillation camera system were made for a low energy pinhole collimator equipped with 2.0 mm aperture pinhole insert. Projection data were acquired at 4 degree increments over 360 degrees in the step and shoot mode using a 4.5 cm radius of rotation. Pinhole planar and SPECT imaging were obtained to evaluate regional uptake of Tl-201, Tc-99m-MIBI, Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-DTPA in tumor and control regions of the brain in a primary brain tumor model in Fisher 344 rats. Pinhole SPECT images were reconstructed using a modified cone- beam algorithm developed from a two dimensional fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm. The reconstructed transaxial resolution of 2.8 FWHM and system sensitivity of 0.086 c/s/kBq with the 2.0 mm pinhole collimator aperture were measured. Tumor to non-tumor uptake ratios at 19-28 days post tumor cell inoculation varied by a factor > 20:1 on SPECT images. Pinhole SPECT provides an important new approach for performing high resolution imaging: the resolution properties of pinhole SPECT are superior to those which have been achieved with conventional SPECT or PET imaging technologies. (author)

  2. Dosimetry comparison of irradiation with conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions and robotic stereotactic radiotherapy for benign brain tumours

    Spasic, E.; Noel, A.; Buchheit, I.; Bernier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To compare several techniques in order to determine the best treatment for benign brain tumours. Methods and patients. - A retrospective study was performed for five patients who received 3D-conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or CyberKnife R . These patients had a meningioma, a pituitary tumour, a cranio-pharyngioma or a neurinoma. In each case, these treatment plans were optimised and compared with the three other dosimetries. Radiobiological or positioning parameters were evaluated, as well as dosimetric parameters, in order to compare treatments with different characteristics. Results. - The dosimetric parameters showed that the choice of treatment seemed to be determined mostly by tumour size, shape and proximity with organs at risk (not tumour localisation). Whereas the results showed no significant deviations with regards to the radiobiological parameters. Therefore, with these parameters, it was difficult to give priority to a treatment. Conclusions. - With regards to benign brain tumours of medium or large size, intensity modulated radiotherapy seemed the recommended treatment. It enabled to obtain a good ratio between efficacy and toxicity for tumours that are really close to organs at risk. Concerning small benign brain tumours, the CyberKnife R was probably the best treatment. (authors)

  3. Self-perception and quality of life in adolescents during treatment for a primary malignant bone tumour.

    van Riel, Christel A H P; Meijer-van den Bergh, Esther E M; Kemps, Hennie L M; Feuth, Ton; Schreuder, Hendrik W B; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; De Groot, Imelda J M; Mavinkurve-Groothuis, Annelies M C

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents experience physical and psychosocial changes as part of their normal development. It can be hypothesized that they have lower scores on Quality of Life (QoL) and self-perception when additional changes occur due to cancer treatment. The purpose of our study was to assess self-perception and QoL of adolescents during or up to three months after adjuvant treatment for a primary malignant bone tumour. Ten adolescent patients (median age of 15 years) were included. Every patient was matched with two healthy peers. Participants completed the dutch version of the Self Perception Profile of Adolescents (SPPA) to measure self-perception and the KIDSCREEN-52 questionnaire for QoL. For both instruments, normative data were available. Adolescents with a bone tumour had consistently lower scores on QoL as compared to healthy peers. Significantly on domains: physical well-being (P self-perception in this group were similar in both the study and control group. Adolescents with a primary malignant bone tumour during or up to three months after adjuvant treatment had lower scores on QoL (KIDSCREEN-52), significantly on domains of physical well-being and social functioning. Unlike most other quality of life instruments, the KIDSCREEN-52 contains different areas of social functioning and has shown to be a useful instrument in our patient group. Scores on self-perception in this group were similar in both study and control group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperthermia improves the antitumour effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide in a rat transplantable brain tumour

    Dahl Borkamo, Erling; Fluge, Oystein; Mella, Olav; Akslen, Lars A.; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: As low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide (CTX) and hyperthermia (HT) both exert antitumour effects in part through antiangiogenic mechanisms, interactive effects of the two modalities were explored. Materials and methods: Subcutaneously implanted rat tumours (BT4An) were treated with CTX 35 mg/kg i.p. three doses a week for two weeks, local water-bath HT yielding mean tumour temperature of 43 o C for one hour at day 0, both modalities combined (CTX-HT 0 ), or saline. TUNEL assays, immunohistochemical staining of thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and real time RT-PCR of TSP-1 mRNA were analysed the first three hours after completed treatment day 0. Results: Metronomic dosed CTX (p = 0.006) and HT (p 0 (41%) treated rats. TSP-1 protein was specifically upregulated in the vascular matrix of tumours receiving CTX (weak), HT (moderate) and CTX-HT 0 (strong). In contrast, reduced expression of TSP-1 protein was observed in tumour cells after HT alone and CTX-HT 0 . TUNEL assays indicated induction of apoptosis by HT and CTX-HT 0 90 minutes after end of the first treatment. Conclusion: A single session of local HT enhances the effects of low-dose metronomic CTX, possibly in part mediated through a differential effect on TSP-1 protein levels in tumour cells and tumour vasculature

  5. Whole brain irradiation with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Local tumour control and survival

    Oehlke, Oliver; Wucherpfennig, David; Prokic, Vesna [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Fels, Franziska [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); St. Josefs Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenburg (Germany); Frings, Lars [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Freiburg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Egger, Karl [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Weyerbrock, Astrid [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-01-16

    Hippocampal-avoidance whole brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) for multiple brain metastases may prevent treatment-related cognitive decline, compared to standard WBRT. Additionally, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) on individual metastases may further improve the outcome. Here, we present initial data concerning local tumour control (LTC), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity and safety for this new irradiation technique. Twenty patients, enrolled between 2011 and 2013, were treated with HA-WBRT (30 Gy in 12 fractions, D{sub 98} {sub %} to hippocampus ≤ 9 Gy) and a SIB (51 Gy) on multiple (2-13) metastases using a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) approach based on 2-4 arcs. Metastases were evaluated bidimensionally along the two largest diameters in contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighed MRI. Median follow-up was 40 weeks. The median time to progression of boosted metastases has not been reached yet, corresponding to a LTC rate of 73 %. Median intracranial PFS was 40 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year PFS of 45.3 %. Median OS was 71.5 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year OS of 60 %. No obvious acute or late toxicities grade > 2 (NCI CTCAE v4.03) were observed. D{sub mean} to the bilateral hippocampi was 6.585 Gy ± 0.847 (α/β = 2 Gy). Two patients developed a new metastasis in the area of hippocampal avoidance. HA-WBRT (simultaneous integrated protection, SIP) with SIB to metastases is a safe and tolerable regime that shows favorable LTC for patients with multiple brain metastases, while it has the potential to minimize the side-effect of cognitive deterioration. (orig.) [German] Die Hippocampus-schonende Ganzhirnbestrahlung (HS-GHB) kann im Vergleich zur Standard-GHB die Verschlechterung der neurokognitiven Funktion verhindern. Zusaetzlich vermag ein simultan integrierter Boost (SIB) auf die Metastasen die Prognose der betroffenen Patienten weiter zu verbessern. In dieser Studie praesentieren wir erste Ergebnisse

  6. Improving fMRI reliability in presurgical mapping for brain tumours.

    Stevens, M Tynan R; Clarke, David B; Stroink, Gerhard; Beyea, Steven D; D'Arcy, Ryan Cn

    2016-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is becoming increasingly integrated into clinical practice for presurgical mapping. Current efforts are focused on validating data quality, with reliability being a major factor. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of a recently developed approach that uses receiver operating characteristic-reliability (ROC-r) to: (1) identify reliable versus unreliable data sets; (2) automatically select processing options to enhance data quality; and (3) automatically select individualised thresholds for activation maps. Presurgical fMRI was conducted in 16 patients undergoing surgical treatment for brain tumours. Within-session test-retest fMRI was conducted, and ROC-reliability of the patient group was compared to a previous healthy control cohort. Individually optimised preprocessing pipelines were determined to improve reliability. Spatial correspondence was assessed by comparing the fMRI results to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping, in terms of the distance to the nearest active fMRI voxel. The average ROC-r reliability for the patients was 0.58±0.03, as compared to 0.72±0.02 in healthy controls. For the patient group, this increased significantly to 0.65±0.02 by adopting optimised preprocessing pipelines. Co-localisation of the fMRI maps with cortical stimulation was significantly better for more reliable versus less reliable data sets (8.3±0.9 vs 29±3 mm, respectively). We demonstrated ROC-r analysis for identifying reliable fMRI data sets, choosing optimal postprocessing pipelines, and selecting patient-specific thresholds. Data sets with higher reliability also showed closer spatial correspondence to cortical stimulation. ROC-r can thus identify poor fMRI data at time of scanning, allowing for repeat scans when necessary. ROC-r analysis provides optimised and automated fMRI processing for improved presurgical mapping. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  7. Primary Tumour Resection Could Improve the Survival of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving Bevacizumab-Containing Chemotherapy

    Zhiming Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of primary tumour resection (PTR among metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients remains controversial. Combination chemotherapy with bevacizumab could improve the clinical outcomes of these patients, which might change the importance of PTR in the multi-disciplinary treatment pattern. Methods: We performed a non-randomized prospective controlled study of mCRC pts whose performance status (PS scored ≤2 and who received bevacizumab combination chemotherapy (FOLFOX/XELOX/FOLFIRI as a first-line therapy. These patients were classified into the PTR group and the IPT (intact primary tumour group according to whether they underwent PTR before receiving the systemic therapy. The progression free survival (PFS time and overall survival (OS time, which were recorded from the start of the primary diagnosis until disease progression and death or last follow-up, were analysed. We also compared severe clinical events (such as emergency surgery, radiation therapy, and stent plantation between the two groups. Results: One hundred and nighty-one mCRC pts (108 male patients and 93 female patients were entered in this prospective observational study. The median age was 57.5 years old. The clinical characteristics (age, gender, performance status, primary tumour site, RAS status, and the number of metastatic organs did not significantly differ between the two groups. The median PFS and OS times of the PTR group were superior than those of the IPT group (10.0 vs 7.8 months, p Conclusions: The mCRC patients who received PTR and bevacizumab combination chemotherapy had better clinical outcomes than patients who did not receive PTR. PTR also decreased the incidence of severe clinical events and improved quality of life.

  8. 2D VS 3D imaging of brain tumours with 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and positron emission tomography (PET)

    Pathmaraj, K.; Scott, A.M.; Egan, G.F.; Hannah, A.; Tauro, A.; Tochon-Danguy, A.; Sachinidis, J.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Fabinyi, G.; McKay, W.J.; Cher, L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: 18 F-FMISO accumulates in hypoxic cells and can be used in the PET imaging of brain tumours containing viable but hypoxic cells. The limited activity (typically 130 MBq) of injected 18 F-FMISO yield poor statistics, requiring prolonged imaging in the conventional 2D mode of PET scanning. 3D (septa retracted) imaging allows for more counts to be collected over a shorter time period making it a more practical alternative. This study investigates the contrast resolution that can be obtained from 3D PET scans compared to the corresponding 2D scan. A patient recently diagnosed with brain tumour was injected with 18 -FMISO 2 hours prior to scanning and imaged supine on a 951/31R PET scanner with the head secured firmly in a head holder. The imaging protocol consisted of a 3 min emission rectilinear scan to position the brain in the FOV, a 10 min post-emission transmission scan, a 20 min 2D emission scan and a 5X10 min frames 3D emission scan. Both the 2D and 3D scans were reconstructed with filtered backprojection algorithm. The first 10 min frame of the 3D acquisition was reconstructed. The total true counts were 3 million and 6.06 million in the 2D image and 3D images respectively. The random events were 0.24 million and 0.96 million in the 2D and 3D images respectively. The Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC) were 2.2 million and 2.02 million for the 2D and 3D images respectively indicating that the 2D and 3D scans (in spite of the nominal true events being vastly different in the 2 scans) had similar Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Circular ROI's were defined in the tumour and the contralateral cortex in comparable transaxial slices of the 2D and 3D images. Contrast resolution of the tumour to the background was calculated as 1.4 and 1.38 in the 2D and 3D images respectively. Thus comparable contrast resolution is obtained in the brain with both 3D and 2D images, making 3D imaging a viable alternative to 2D imaging and greatly reducing imaging time. Optimum time

  9. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    McRoy

    Results: 2,041 of 4,546 reports were malignant. 1342 were ... Conclusion: We observed a rising incidence of head and neck .... head and neck cancer rose from 44 cases in ... Carcinosarcoma. 1. Clear cell tumour. 0. 1. Cutaneous lymphoma. 1.

  10. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  11. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Neuner, Irene; Kaffanke, Joachim B.; Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N. Jon

    2012-01-01

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as 18 F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or 11 C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  12. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  13. A multinational case-control study on childhood brain tumours, anthropogenic factors, birth characteristics and prenatal exposures: A validation of interview data.

    Vienneau, Danielle; Infanger, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Tettamanti, Giorgio; Klæboe, Lars; Kuehni, Claudia E; Tynes, Tore; Von der Weid, Nicolas; Lannering, Birgitta; Röösli, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the aetiology of childhood brain tumours. We investigated anthropometric factors (birth weight, length, maternal age), birth characteristics (e.g. vacuum extraction, preterm delivery, birth order) and exposures during pregnancy (e.g. maternal: smoking, working, dietary supplement intake) in relation to risk of brain tumour diagnosis among 7-19 year olds. The multinational case-control study in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Switzerland (CEFALO) included interviews with 352 (participation rate=83.2%) eligible cases and 646 (71.1%) population-based controls. Interview data were complemented with data from birth registries and validated by assessing agreement (Cohen's Kappa). We used conditional logistic regression models matched on age, sex and geographical region (adjusted for maternal age and parental education) to explore associations between birth factors and childhood brain tumour risk. Agreement between interview and birth registry data ranged from moderate (Kappa=0.54; worked during pregnancy) to almost perfect (Kappa=0.98; birth weight). Neither anthropogenic factors nor birth characteristics were associated with childhood brain tumour risk. Maternal vitamin intake during pregnancy was indicative of a protective effect (OR 0.75, 95%-CI: 0.56-1.01). No association was seen for maternal smoking during pregnancy or working during pregnancy. We found little evidence that the considered birth factors were related to brain tumour risk among children and adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P.; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Hommann, Merten; Hoersch, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 ± 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV max ) were calculated and compared with SUV max in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV max of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 ± 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 ± 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV max in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 ± 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 ± 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV max of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is highly superior to 111 In-OctreoScan (39% detection rate for CUP according to the literature) and can play a major role in the management of patients with CUP-NET. (orig.)

  15. Primary brain lymphoma in a patient after renal transplantation

    Arteaga, Carlos; Duarte, Monica; Bayona, Hernan

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) has increased during the past 40 years. This has been associated with immunodeficiency, mainly in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and in transplant patients. Tumor genesis is related with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The most frequent PCNSL immuno phenotype is B-cell lymphoma. Clinical manifestations depend on tumor localization, and are usually behavior dysfunctions and intracranial hypertension syndrome. Differential diagnosis must take into consideration infectious processes, stroke, primary brain tumors, and metastases. The diagnosis of PCNSL requires brain MRI and brain biopsy. It is important to assess HIV infection when diagnosing PCNSL. This review reports a case of primary brain lymphoma in a patient who underwent renal transplantation due to polycystic kidney disease 8 years before.

  16. FDG PET/CT in pediatric primary bone tumours: comparison with conventional imaging (CI) and management impact assesment

    Stege, Claudia; London, Kevin; Cross, Siobhan; Howman-Giles, Robert; Onikul, Ella; Graf, Nicole; Pozza, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate PET/CT in pediatric primary bone tumours (PBT), the accuracy, clinical impact, prognostic indicators in predicting tumour response to therapy and determining epiphyseal involvement were compared to Cl. Methods: A retrospective review of PET/CT scans with CI was performed. Lesions were compared to a reference standard: histopathology or follow up >6 mths. Pt based analysis was performed for clinical impact. Prognostic indicators (SUYmax, tumour size) were compared to histopathology response post chemotherapy. Results: 43 pts (average 12.9 yrs) with osteosarcoma (I 8), Ewing's sarcoma (21), PNE (4) were analysed. 109 PET/CT scans with CI scans were evaluated (371 lesions). 33 lesions were discordant. Accuracy of PET/CT was higher for all lesions than CI (95% vs92%) but sensitivity was lower (79% vs 83%). Excluding lung lesions, sensitivities increased for PET/CT and CI (92% vs 89%). 9pts had PET/CT staging and follow up with histopathological evaluation post chemotherapy: 2pts poor responders, 7 good responders. Good responders had a higher SUYmax at diagnosis compared to poor responders (av 13.84 vs 7.95) but reduced more [10.5(70%) vs 3.5( 45%)]following chemotherapy. There were no false negatives for epiphyseal involvement for PET/CT and CI but one PET/CT was false positive. Conclusion: PET/CT is less sensitive in small lung lesions, but more sensitive in other areas compared to Cl. SUYmax at diagnosis is a poor predictor of response, but percent decrease post therapy was associated with therapeutic response. Change in tumour size on MR is a poor predictor of response. There is improved clinical impact with PET/CT in patient management.

  17. The blood-brain barrier in vitro using primary culture

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart

    The brain is protected from the entry of unwanted substances by means of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by the brain microvasculature. This BBB is composed of non-fenestrated brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) with their intermingling tight junctions. The presence of the BBB is a huge...... obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, as many potentially CNS active drugs are unable to reach their site of action within the brain. In vitro BBB models are, therefore, being developed to investigate the BBB permeability of a drug early in its development. The first part...... of the thesis involves the establishment and characterization of an in vitro BBB models based on primary cells isolated from the rat brain. Co-culture and triple culture models with astrocytes and pericytes were found to be the superior to mono cultured BCECs with respect to many important BBB characteristics...

  18. Mir-34a mimics are potential therapeutic agents for p53-mutated and chemo-resistant brain tumour cells.

    Yuen Ngan Fan

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic drug resistance and relapse remains a major challenge for paediatric (medulloblastoma and adult (glioblastoma brain tumour treatment. Medulloblastoma tumours and cell lines with mutations in the p53 signalling pathway have been shown to be specifically insensitive to DNA damaging agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of triggering cell death in p53 mutated medulloblastoma cells by a direct activation of pro-death signalling downstream of p53 activation. Since non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs have the ability to fine tune the expression of a variety of target genes, orchestrating multiple downstream effects, we hypothesised that triggering the expression of a p53 target miRNA could induce cell death in chemo-resistant cells. Treatment with etoposide, increased miR-34a levels in a p53-dependent fashion and the level of miR-34a transcription was correlated with the cell sensitivity to etoposide. miR-34a activity was validated by measuring the expression levels of one of its well described target: the NADH dependent sirtuin1 (SIRT1. Whilst drugs directly targeting SIRT1, were potent to trigger cell death at high concentrations only, introduction of synthetic miR-34a mimics was able to induce cell death in p53 mutated medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines. Our results show that the need of a functional p53 signaling pathway can be bypassed by direct activation of miR-34a in brain tumour cells.

  19. Quality of Life in Survivors of a Primary Bone Tumour: A Systematic Review

    Eiser, Christine; Grimer, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. We conducted a systematic search of published literature, to assess (i) quality of life (QoL) for survivors of a bone tumour compared with the normal population; (ii) QoL implications following amputation, successful or failed limb salvage; (iii) adaptation of young children to amputation compared with older children or adolescents. Methods. Electronic databases were searched including Medline, PsycLIT and Cinahl covering the years 1982– 1998. Results. We identified 11 studies. Regar...

  20. Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours -- a case-control gene association study.

    Melin, Beatrice; Dahlin, Anna M; Andersson, Ulrika; Wang, Zhaoming; Henriksson, Roger; Hallmans, Göran; Bondy, Melissa L; Johansen, Christoffer; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Kitahara, Cari M; Wang, Sophia S; Ruder, Avima M; Carreón, Tania; Butler, Mary Ann; Inskip, Peter D; Purdue, Mark; Hsing, Ann W; Mechanic, Leah; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Chanock, Stephen J; Hartge, Patricia; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2013-05-15

    Familial cancer can be used to leverage genetic association studies. Recent genome-wide association studies have reported independent associations between seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether glioma cases with a positive family history of brain tumours, defined as having at least one first- or second-degree relative with a history of brain tumour, are associated with known glioma risk loci. One thousand four hundred and thirty-one glioma cases and 2,868 cancer-free controls were identified from four case-control studies and two prospective cohorts from USA, Sweden and Denmark and genotyped for seven SNPs previously reported to be associated with glioma risk in case-control designed studies. Odds ratios were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. In analyses including glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours (n = 104) and control subjects free of glioma at baseline, three of seven SNPs were associated with glioma risk: rs2736100 (5p15.33, TERT), rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2A-CDKN2B) and rs6010620 (20q13.33, RTEL1). After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, only one marker was statistically significantly associated with glioma risk, rs6010620 (ORtrend for the minor (A) allele, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.61; Bonferroni adjusted ptrend , 1.7 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, as previously shown for glioma regardless of family history of brain tumours, rs6010620 (RTEL1) was associated with an increased risk of glioma when restricting to cases with family history of brain tumours. These findings require confirmation in further studies with a larger number of glioma cases with a family history of brain tumours. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  1. Feasibility study of FDG PET/CT-derived primary tumour glycolysis as a prognostic indicator of survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Mehta, G.; Chander, A.; Huang, C.; Kelly, M.; Fielding, P.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility and prognostic value of measuring total lesion glycolysis of the primary tumour (TLG primary ) using combined 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with proven or suspected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the routine diagnostic setting. Materials and methods: At the All wales Research and Diagnostic Positron Emission Tomography Centre in Cardiff (PETIC), in the calendar year 2011, 288 consecutive patients were identified with a single pulmonary mass in whom NSCLC was confirmed or clinically diagnosed following multidisciplinary team review. In a retrospective analysis, for each patient the PET-derived volume of the primary tumour and SUV MEAN was calculated using adaptive thresholds of 40% and 50% of the SUV MAX of the primary tumour. The TLG primary (calculated by volume x SUV MEAN ) was calculated at these two thresholds and was used to predict survival in a multivariate analysis with TNM (tumour, node, metastasis) stage, age, sex, and SUV MAX . The primary endpoint was overall survival over a minimum follow-up of at least 7 months. Results: In virtually every case, the primary tumour could be measured using the automated software with minimal use of manual adjustments. In multivariate analysis, TNM clinical stage, log(TLG primary ) and sex were independent predictors of overall survival. Conclusion: Measurements of primary tumour total lesion glycolysis are simple to perform and provide additional prognostic information over and above that provided by TNM staging

  2. MRI fused with prone FDG PET/CT improves the primary tumour staging of patients with breast cancer

    Garcia-Velloso, Maria J.; Ribelles, Maria J.; Rodriguez, Macarena; Sancho, Lidia; Prieto, Elena [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pamplona (Spain); Fernandez-Montero, Alejandro [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Occupational Medicine, Pamplona (Spain); Santisteban, Marta [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Oncology, Pamplona (Spain); Rodriguez-Spiteri, Natalia; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Surgery, Pamplona (Spain); Idoate, Miguel A. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Pathology, Pamplona (Spain); Elizalde, Arlette; Pina, Luis J. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain)

    2017-08-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fused with prone 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in primary tumour staging of patients with breast cancer. This retrospective study evaluated 45 women with 49 pathologically proven breast carcinomas. MRI and prone PET-CT scans with time-of-flight and point-spread-function reconstruction were performed with the same dedicated breast coil. The studies were assessed by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, and evaluation of fused images was made by consensus. The final diagnosis was based on pathology (90 lesions) or follow-up ≥ 24 months (17 lesions). The study assessed 72 malignant and 35 benign lesions with a median size of 1.8 cm (range 0.3-8.4 cm): 31 focal, nine multifocal and nine multicentric cases. In lesion-by-lesion analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 97%, 80%, 91% and 93% for MRI, 96%, 71%, 87%, and 89% for prone PET, and 97%. 94%, 97% and 94% for MRI fused with PET. Areas under the curve (AUC) were 0.953, 0.850, and 0.983, respectively (p < 0.01). MRI fused with FDG-PET is more accurate than FDG-PET in primary tumour staging of breast cancer patients and increases the specificity of MRI. (orig.)

  3. Primary pancreatic lymphoma – pancreatic tumours that are potentially curable without resection, a retrospective review of four cases

    Grimison, Peter S; Chin, Melvin T; Harrison, Michelle L; Goldstein, David

    2006-01-01

    Primary pancreatic lymphomas (PPL) are rare tumours of the pancreas. Symptoms, imaging and tumour markers can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but they are much more amenable to treatment. Treatment for PPL remains controversial, particularly the role of surgical resection. Four cases of primary pancreatic lymphoma were identified at Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. A literature review of cases of PPL reported between 1985 and 2005 was conducted, and outcomes were contrasted. All four patients presented with upper abdominal symptoms associated with weight loss. One case was diagnosed without surgery. No patients underwent pancreatectomy. All patients were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and two of four patients received rituximab. One patient died at 32 months. Three patients are disease free at 15, 25 and 64 months, one after successful retreatment. Literature review identified a further 103 patients in 11 case series. Outcomes in our series and other series of chemotherapy and radiotherapy compared favourably to surgical series. Biopsy of all pancreatic masses is essential, to exclude potentially curable conditions such as PPL, and can be performed without laparotomy. Combined multimodality treatment, utilising chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without surgical resection is advocated but a cooperative prospective study would lead to further improvement in treatment outcomes

  4. Colon cancer with unresectable synchronous metastases: the AAAP scoring system for predicting the outcome after primary tumour resection.

    Li, Z M; Peng, Y F; Du, C Z; Gu, J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic scoring system to predict the outcome of patients with unresectable metastatic colon cancer who received primary colon tumour resection. Patients with confirmed metastatic colon cancer treated at the Peking University Cancer Hospital between 2003 and 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation of clinicopathological factors with overall survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Independent prognostic factors were identified using a Cox proportional hazards regression model and were then combined to form a prognostic scoring system. A total of 110 eligible patients were included in the study. The median survival time was 10.4 months and the 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 21.8%. Age over 70 years, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level over 160 IU/l, ascites, a platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) above 162 and no postoperative therapy were independently associated with a shorter OS in multivariate analysis. Age, ALP, ascites and PLR were subsequently combined to form the so-called AAAP scoring system. Patients were classified into high, medium and low risk groups according to the score obtained. There were significant differences in OS between each group (P colonic cancer who underwent primary tumour resection. The AAAP scoring system may be a useful tool for surgical decision making. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Clinical relevance of the apparent diffusion coefficient value of metastatic bone tumours on diffusion-weighted MRI images: differences according to the types of primary tumour, the affected bones, and clinical factors.

    Cha, M J; Yoon, Y C

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of metastatic bone tumours on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images differs according to the type of primary cancer, the affected bone, and clinical factors. For this retrospective study, two radiologists reviewed MRI images, including ADC maps, of 67 patients (M:F=38:29; median age, 48 years) who were diagnosed with bone metastasis by means of histological or clinical confirmation. The primary tumours included 29 lung adenocarcinomas, 15 invasive ductal adenocarcinomas of the breast, 13 hepatocellular carcinomas, six prostatic carcinomas, and four renal cell carcinomas. ADC values of the metastatic tumour were compared according to the type of primary malignancy, the affected bone, and the age and sex of the patient using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni correction. In addition, pre-contrast CT images were available in 38 of 67 patients; a subanalysis of the CT radiodensity and ADC values were performed with Spearman correlation. The mean, standard deviation, and minimum and maximum values of the ADC of metastatic bone tumours did not differ significantly according to type of primary malignancy, the affected bone, or clinical variables (p>0.1). The ADC value was not significantly correlated with CT radiodensity (p=0.24). Intra- and interobserver agreements for the mean ADC values were excellent (intra-observer: p=0.98; interobserver: p=0.98). Assessment of the ADC value of metastatic bone tumours is not reliable for differentiation of the type of primary cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hyaluronan and hyaluronectin in the extracellular matrix of human brain tumour stroma.

    Delpech, B; Maingonnat, C; Girard, N; Chauzy, C; Maunoury, R; Olivier, A; Tayot, J; Creissard, P

    1993-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and the hyaluronan-binding glycoprotein hyaluronectin (HN) were measured in 23 gliomas and 8 meningiomas and their location was revisited in 35 tumours. A clear-cut difference was found in the HN/HA ratio values of glioblastomas (below 0.5) and that of astrocytomas (above 0.5 P edification of the extracellular matrix. In meningiomas only the stroma would be responsible for HA and HN production.

  7. Cerebellar mutism syndrome in children with brain tumours of the posterior fossa

    Wibroe, Morten; Cappelen, Johan; Castor, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    , the clinical course and strategies for prevention and treatment are yet to be determined.Methods: This observational, prospective, multicentre study will include 500 children with posterior fossa tumours. It opened late 2014 with participation from 20 Nordic and Baltic centres. From 2016, five British centres...... for and the clinical course of CMS - with the ultimate goal of defining strategies for prevention and treatment of this severely disabling condition....

  8. A parameter study to determine the optimal source neutron energy in boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    Nievaart, V A [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Moss, R L [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kloosterman, J L [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Hagen, T H J J van der [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Dam, H van [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-09-21

    The values of the parameters used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to calculate a given dose to human tissue vary with patients due to different physical, biological and/or medical circumstances. Parameters include the tissue dimensions, the {sup 10}B concentration and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors for the different dose components associated with BNCT. Because there is still no worldwide agreement on RBE values, more often than not, average values for these parameters are used. It turns out that the RBE-problem can be circumvented by taking into account all imaginable parameter values. Approaching this quest from another angle: the outcome will also provide the parameters (and values) which influence the optimal source neutron energy. For brain tumours it turns out that the {sup 10}B concentration, the RBE factors for {sup 10}B as well as fast neutrons, together with the dose limit set for healthy tissue, affect the optimal BNCT source neutron energy. By using source neutrons of a few keV together with neutrons of a few eV, it ensures that, under all imaginable circumstances, a maximum of alpha (and lithium) particles can be delivered in the tumour.

  9. MDCT of primary, locally recurrent, and metastatic duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A single institution study of 25 patients with review of literature

    Cheng, J.M.; Tirumani, S.H.; Shinagare, A.B.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Raut, C.P.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of primary, locally recurrent, and metastatic duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). Materials and methods: In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)-compliant, retrospective study, 25 patients [13 men, 12 women; mean age 56 years (34–74 years)] with histopathologically confirmed duodenal GISTs seen at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital from December 1999 to October 2009 were identified. The MDCT of primary tumours in six patients and follow-up imaging in all the 25 patients was reviewed by two radiologists in consensus. Electronic medical records were reviewed to document the clinical characteristics and management. Results: The mean size of the primary tumour was 3.7 cm (range 2.5–5.6 cm). Three of six primary tumours were in the second and third portions of the duodenum, one in the third portion, one in the third and fourth portions, and one in the fourth portion. Three of six of the tumours were exophytic, two were both exophytic and intraluminal, and one was intramural. The tumours were well-circumscribed, round or oval masses, with few lobulations, and were either homogeneously hyper-enhancing or heterogeneously isodense at MDCT. None of the tumours had necrosis, haemorrhage, calcification, or loco regional lymphadenopathy on imaging. Sixteen of 25 (64%) patients developed metastatic disease, the most common sites being liver (14/16; 87.5%) and peritoneum (5/16; 31%). Conclusion: Duodenal GISTs are well-circumscribed, round or oval masses, and occur in the second through fourth portions of the duodenum, without lymphadenopathy or duodenal obstruction. Duodenal GISTS metastasize frequently to the liver and peritoneum

  10. Analysis of the interaction between two nitrosourea compounds and X-irradiation in rat brain tumour cells

    Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H [Association Euratom-ITAL, Wageningen (Netherlands); Deen, D F [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology

    1980-02-01

    Experimental measurements have shown that both BCNU (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea) and CCNU (1-(2-choroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea) are toxic in rat 9L brain tumour cells and also sensitize these cells to the action of ionizing radiation. The interaction of BCNU and CCNU with radiation has been interpreted using a recently developed extension of the molecular theory of cell survival. The experimental results are shown to be compatible with the mathematical equations predicted by the model and the analysis indicates that the sensitizing effect is caused by a synergistic interaction between sublethal damage caused by the nitrosourea compound and the radiation at the molecular level. The analysis of the dependence of the interaction on the time between nitrosourea treatment and radiation indicates that the optimal interaction occurs with a 5 hour interval.

  11. An analysis of the interaction between two nitrosourea compounds and X-irradiation in rat brain tumour cells

    Leenhouts, H.P.; Chadwick, K.H.; Deen, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental measurements have shown that both BCNU [1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] and CCNU [1-(2-choroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea] are toxic in rat 9L brain tumour cells and also sensitize these cells to the action of ionizing radiation. The interaction of BCNU and CCNU with radiation has been interpreted using a recently developed extension of the molecular theory of cell survival. The experimental results are shown to be compatible with the mathematical equations predicted by the model and the analysis indicates that the sensitizing effect is caused by a synergistic interaction between sublethal damage caused by the nitrosourea compound and the radiation at the molecular level. The analysis of the dependence of the interaction on the time between nitrosourea treatment and radiation indicates that the optimal interaction occurs with a 5 hour interval. (Author)

  12. Tumours associated with medical X-ray therapy exposure in childhood

    Colman, M.; Kirsch, M.; Creditor, M.

    1978-01-01

    A total of 5166 persons who were exposed to limited field (80-100 cm 2 ) X-ray irradiation to the head, neck and upper chest region during childhood and adolescence have provided an outstanding opportunity for the study of tumour incidence following medical X-ray therapy. More than 3254 subjects have been traced, 3108 have completed questionnaires eliciting information on tumour incidence, and 1539 of these were subjected to a thorough clinical screening procedure that included a thyroid scintigram. The prevalence of thyroid tumours in the 1539 clinically screened subjects and the prevalence of all other tumours in the 3254 subjects traced can therefore be assumed to reflect the risks in the group of irradiated subjects as a whole. Median age at irradiation was 3.5 years, and median radiation dose 790 rads (7.9 Gy). Thyroid tumour was diagnosed in 413 subjects. Of those undergoing surgery (273) 30.3% were found to have thyroid cancer. A total of 366 surgical pathology specimens of the thyroid, including 93 from subjects who were diagnosed at other hospitals, were examined revealing 73 papillary carcinomas, 12 follicular carcinomas and 26 microscopic papillary carcinomas. One hundred and eighty-seven other (non-thyroid) neoplasmas identified included 27 benign and 10 malignant salivary gland tumours, 16 benign and seven malignant tumours of neural origin (brain, spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves), 37 skin tumours, 9 lymphomas, 8 gonadal tumours, 45 breast tumours and 28 tumours of miscellaneous sites. The incidence of thyroid tumours, salivary gland tumours and primary brain tumours was considerably in excess of the expected incidence (p values<0.0001), and a radiation dose-effect correlation was observed for thyroid and brain tumours. Gonadal tumours and lymphomas did not occur in excess of the expected incidence

  13. A combined MRI and MRSI based multiclass system for brain tumour recognition using LS-SVMs with class probabilities and feature selection.

    Luts, J.; Heerschap, A.; Suykens, J.A.; Huffel, S. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the use of automated pattern recognition methods on magnetic resonance data with the ultimate goal to assist clinicians in the diagnosis of brain tumours. Recently, the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

  14. Glioblastoma and ABO blood groups: further evidence of an association between the distribution of blood group antigens and brain tumours.

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Al Barbarawi, Mohammed M; Hiasat, Mohammad Y; Al-Qaralleh, Mohammed A; Ababneh, Emad I

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumour that usually leads to death. Several studies have reported a link between the distribution of ABO blood group antigens and a risk of developing specific types of cancer, although no consensus has been reached. This study aims to investigate the relationship between the distribution of ABO blood group antigens and the incidence of glioblastoma. The study cohort consisted of 115 glioblastoma patients who were diagnosed at King Abdullah University Hospital, Jordan, between 2004 and 2015. Three different patient populations made up three control groups and these were selected from among patients at the same institution between 2014 and 2015 as follows: 3,847 healthy blood donors, 654 accidental trauma patients admitted to the Departments of Neurosurgery and Orthopaedics, and 230 age- and sex-matched control subjects recruited blindly from the Departments of Paediatrics and Internal Medicine. There was a significant association between the distribution of ABO blood group antigens and the incidence of glioblastoma. Post hoc residual analysis revealed that individuals with group A had a higher than expected chance of developing glioblastoma, while individuals with group O had a lower than expected chance. Furthermore, individuals with group A were found to be at a 1.62- to 2.28-fold increased risk of developing glioblastoma compared to individuals with group O. In the present study, we demonstrate that, in Jordan, individuals with group A have an increased risk of developing glioblastoma, while individuals with group O have a reduced risk. These findings suggest that the distribution of ABO blood group antigens is associated with a risk of brain tumours and may play an important role in their development. However, further clinical and experimental investigations are required to confirm this association.

  15. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model.

    Habib Baghirov

    Full Text Available The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma.

  16. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model

    Baghirov, Habib; Snipstad, Sofie; Sulheim, Einar; Berg, Sigrid; Hansen, Rune; Thorsen, Frits; Mørch, Yrr; Åslund, Andreas K. O.

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma. PMID:29338016

  17. Is it safe to preserve the deltoid when resecting the proximal humerus for a primary malignant bone tumour? A comparative study.

    Cladière-Nassif, V; Bourdet, C; Audard, V; Babinet, A; Anract, P; Biau, D

    2017-09-01

    Resection of the proximal humerus for the primary malignant bone tumour sometimes requires en bloc resection of the deltoid. However, there is no information in the literature which helps a surgeon decide whether to preserve the deltoid or not. The aim of this study was to determine whether retaining the deltoid at the time of resection would increase the rate of local recurrence. We also sought to identify the variables that persuade expert surgeons to choose a deltoid sparing rather than deltoid resecting procedure. We reviewed 45 patients who had undergone resection of a primary malignant tumour of the proximal humerus. There were 29 in the deltoid sparing group and 16 in the deltoid resecting group. Imaging studies were reviewed to assess tumour extension and soft-tissue involvement. The presence of a fat rim separating the tumour from the deltoid on MRI was particularly noted. The cumulative probability of local recurrence was calculated in a competing risk scenario. There was no significant difference (adjusted p = 0.89) in the cumulative probability of local recurrence between the deltoid sparing (7%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1 to 20) and the deltoid resecting group (26%, 95% CI 8 to 50). Patients were more likely to be selected for a deltoid sparing procedure if they presented with a small tumour (p = 0.0064) with less bone involvement (p = 0.032) and a continuous fat rim on MRI (p = 0.002) and if the axillary nerve could be identified (p = 0.037). A deltoid sparing procedure can provide good local control after resection of the proximal humerus for a primary malignant bone tumour. A smaller tumour, the presence of a continuous fat rim and the identification of the axillary nerve on pre-operative MRI will persuade surgeons to opt for a deltoid resecting procedure. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1244-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  18. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    Aim: To determine the incidence of primary head and neck cancers seen at Korle Bu Teaching hospital, Ghana. Methods: A retrospective study of histopathological records of diagnosed head and neck cancers from 1989-2008. Results: 2,041 of 4,546 reports were malignant. 1342 were primary cancers. These were studied ...

  19. Brain imaging before primary lung cancer resection: a controversial topic.

    Hudson, Zoe; Internullo, Eveline; Edey, Anthony; Laurence, Isabel; Bianchi, Davide; Addeo, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    International and national recommendations for brain imaging in patients planned to undergo potentially curative resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are variably implemented throughout the United Kingdom [Hudson BJ, Crawford MB, and Curtin J et al (2015) Brain imaging in lung cancer patients without symptoms of brain metastases: a national survey of current practice in England Clin Radiol https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crad.2015.02.007]. However, the recommendations are not based on high-quality evidence and do not take into account cost implications and local resources. Our aim was to determine local practice based on historic outcomes in this patient cohort. This retrospective study took place in a regional thoracic surgical centre in the United Kingdom. Pathology records for all patients who had undergone lung resection with curative intent during the time period January 2012-December 2014 were analysed in October 2015. Electronic pathology and radiology reports were accessed for each patient and data collected about their histological findings, TNM stage, resection margins, and the presence of brain metastases on either pre-operative or post-operative imaging. From the dates given on imaging, we calculated the number of days post-resection that the brain metastases were detected. 585 patients were identified who had undergone resection of their lung cancer. Of these, 471 had accessible electronic radiology records to assess for the radiological evidence of brain metastases. When their electronic records were evaluated, 25/471 (5.3%) patients had radiological evidence of brain metastasis. Of these, five patients had been diagnosed with a brain metastasis at initial presentation and had undergone primary resection of the brain metastasis followed by resection of the lung primary. One patient had been diagnosed with both a primary lung and a primary bowel adenocarcinoma; on review of the case, it was felt that the brain metastasis was more likely to have

  20. Intra-operative cerebrospinal fluid sampling versus post-operative lumbar puncture for detection of leptomeningeal disease in malignant paediatric brain tumours.

    Sharon Y Y Low

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal disease is a feared sequelae of malignant paediatric brain tumours. Current methods for its detection is the combined use of cranio-spinal MRI, and CSF cytology from a post-operative lumbar puncture. In this study, the authors hypothesize that CSF taken at the start of surgery, either from an external ventricular drain or neuroendoscope will have equal sensitivity for positive tumour cells, in comparison to lumbar puncture. Secondary hypotheses include positive correlation between CSF cytology and MRI findings of LMD. From a clinical perspective, the key aim of the study was for affected paediatric patients to avoid an additional procedure of a lumbar puncture, often performed under anaesthesia after neurosurgical intervention.This is single-institution, retrospective study of paediatric patients diagnosed with malignant brain tumours. Its main aim was to compare cytological data from CSF collected at the time of surgery versus data from an interval lumbar puncture. In addition, MRI imaging of the same cohort of patients was examined for leptomeningeal disease and corroborated against CSF tumour cytology findings.Thirty patients are recruited for this study. Data analysis demonstrates a statistically significant association between our intra-operative CSF and LP sampling. Furthermore, our results also show for significant correlation between evidence of leptomeningeal disease on MRI findings versus intra-operative CSF positivity for tumour cells.Although this is a retrospective study with a limited population, our data concurs with potential to avoid an additional procedure for the paediatric patient diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour.

  1. Treatment of brain metastases from primary lung cancer

    Ryan, Gail F.; Ball, David L.; Smith, Jennifer G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study of patients treated at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute for brain metastases from primary carcinoma of the lung is presented. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients with the diagnosis of primary carcinoma of the lung who presented with, or subsequently developed, brain metastases during the period January 1984 to December 1987 were reviewed. Information on a number of factors of potential prognostic significance (sex, age, histology, performance status and interval between diagnosis of the primary and brain metastases) was collected. Details of surgery, radiation and steroid usage were recorded, and any steroid side effects documented. Survival was calculated from the date of diagnosis of brain metastases. Stepwise regression based on Cox's proportional hazards model was used to determine significant prognostic factors affecting survival. Patients with and without steroid side effects were compared using Yate's corrected chi-square test. Results: The overall estimated median survival was only 3.3 months (95% confidence interval 2.9-3.7 months). Only two factors were found to be associated with a significantly improved survival--surgical intervention and good performance status. After taking these two factors into account, the dose of radiation used (< 30 Gy or ≥ 30 Gy) did not influence survival. There was a 3% incidence of gastric bleeding or perforation in patients taking steroids, with a 40% fatality rate. Predisposing factors to gastric side effects were a prior history of peptic ulcer and/or aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug consumption. Conclusion: Radiation of brain metastases from primary lung cancer results in modest survival benefit. Radiation dose (< 30 Gy or ≥ 30 Gy) is not a significant determinant of survival. Other treatment modifications, such as concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, should be explored. Steroids should be used with caution as fatal side effects can occur

  2. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger

  3. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  4. Role of surgery in brain metastases.

    Laghari, Altaf Ali; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    Brain metastases remain the commonest type of brain tumour, being four times more common than primary brain tumours. Although surgical intervention may be recommended for one of various reasons in the management of these tumours, including but not limited to conformation of diagnosis, relief of mass effect, improvement of neurological status and prolongation of survival, the guidelines for management of brain metastases remain largely subjective and therefore controversial. Herein the authors have attempted to review some of the existing evidence on role of surgery in the management of brain metastases and have presented their selected guidelines for the readers.

  5. Identification of imaging predictors discriminating different primary liver tumours in patients with chronic liver disease on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI: a classification tree analysis

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Young Kon; Cha, Dong Ik; Kim, Joungyoun; Goo, Juna

    2016-01-01

    To identify predictors for the discrimination of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IMCC) and combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma (CHC) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for primary liver cancers on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI among high-risk chronic liver disease (CLD) patients using classification tree analysis (CTA). A total of 152 patients with histopathologically proven IMCC (n = 40), CHC (n = 24) and HCC (n = 91) were enrolled. Tumour marker and MRI variables including morphologic features, signal intensity, and enhancement pattern were used to identify tumours suspicious for IMCC and CHC using CTA. On CTA, arterial rim enhancement (ARE) was the initial splitting predictor for assessing the probability of tumours being IMCC or CHC. Of 43 tumours that were classified in a subgroup on CTA based on the presence of ARE, non-intralesional fat, and non-globular shape, 41 (95.3 %) were IMCCs (n = 29) or CHCs (n = 12). All 24 tumours showing fat on MRI were HCCs. The CTA model demonstrated sensitivity of 84.4 %, specificity of 97.8 %, and accuracy of 92.3 % for discriminating IMCCs and CHCs from HCCs. We established a simple CTA model for classifying a high-risk group of CLD patients with IMCC and CHC. This model may be useful for guiding diagnosis for primary liver cancers in patients with CLD. (orig.)

  6. Prognostic value of primary tumour resection in synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer: Individual patient data analysis of first-line randomised trials from the ARCAD database

    van Rooijen, K. L.; Shi, Q.; Goey, K. K. H.; Meyers, J.; Heinemann, V.; Diaz-Rubio, E.; Aranda, E.; Falcone, A.; Green, E.; de Gramont, A.; Sargent, D. J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.

    2018-01-01

    Indication for primary tumour resection (PTR) in asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients is unclear. Previous retrospective analyses suggest a survival benefit for patients who underwent PTR. The aim was to evaluate the prognostic value of PTR in patients with synchronous mCRC by

  7. Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing tumour resectability in advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube and/or primary peritoneal cancer

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Roze, Joline F.; van de Wetering, Fleur T.; Spijker, René; Verleye, Leen; Vlayen, Joan; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; Scholten, Rob J P M; Zweemer, RP

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Diagnostic test accuracy). The objectives are as follows: To assess the diagnostic test accuracy of PET(-CT), conventional and diffusion-weighted MRI as an replacement or an add-on to abdominal CT, for predicting tumour resectability at primary debulking

  8. Investigations of primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Sawyer, T. W.; Josey, T.; Wang, Y.; Villanueva, M.; Ritzel, D. V.; Nelson, P.; Lee, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    The development of an advanced blast simulator (ABS) has enabled the reproducible generation of single-pulse shock waves that simulate free-field blast with high fidelity. Studies with rodents in the ABS demonstrated the necessity of head restraint during head-only exposures. When the head was not restrained, violent global head motion was induced by pressures that would not produce similar movement of a target the size and mass of a human head. This scaling artefact produced changes in brain function that were reminiscent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to impact-acceleration effects. Restraint of the rodent head eliminated these, but still produced subtle changes in brain biochemistry, showing that blast-induced pressure waves do cause brain deficits. Further experiments were carried out with rat brain cell aggregate cultures that enabled the conduct of studies without the gross movement encountered when using rodents. The suspension nature of this model was also exploited to minimize the boundary effects that complicate the interpretation of primary blast studies using surface cultures. Using this system, brain tissue was found not only to be sensitive to pressure changes, but also able to discriminate between the highly defined single-pulse shock waves produced by underwater blast and the complex pressure history exposures experienced by aggregates encased within a sphere and subjected to simulated air blast. The nature of blast-induced primary TBI requires a multidisciplinary research approach that addresses the fidelity of the blast insult, its accurate measurement and characterization, as well as the limitations of the biological models used.

  9. The value of intratumoral heterogeneity of (18)F-FDG uptake to differentiate between primary benign and malignant musculoskeletal tumours on PET/CT.

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Nakajo, Masayuki; Jinguji, Megumi; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Tani, Atsushi; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cumulative standardized uptake value (SUV)-volume histogram (CSH) was reported to be a novel way to characterize heterogeneity in intratumoral tracer uptake. This study investigated the value of fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) intratumoral heterogeneity in comparison with SUV to discriminate between primary benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MS) tumours. The subjects comprised 85 pathologically proven MS tumours. The area under the curve of CSH (AUC-CSH) was used as a heterogeneity index, with lower values corresponding with increased heterogeneity. As 22 tumours were indiscernible on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) and AUC-CSH were obtained in 63 positive tumours. The Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were used for analyses. The difference between benign (n = 35) and malignant tumours (n = 28) was significant in AUC-CSH (p = 0.004), but not in SUVmax (p = 0.168) and SUVmean (p = 0.879). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing malignancy were 61%, 66% and 64% for SUVmax (optical threshold value, >6.9), 54%, 60% and 57% for SUVmean (optical threshold value, >3) and 61%, 86% and 75% for AUC-CSH (optical threshold value, ≤0.42), respectively. The area under the ROC curve was significantly higher in AUC-CSH (0.71) than SUVmax (0.60) (p = 0.018) and SUVmean (0.51) (p = 0.005). The heterogeneity index, AUC-CSH, has a higher diagnostic accuracy than SUV analysis in differentiating between primary benign and malignant MS tumours, although it is not sufficiently high enough to obviate histological analysis. AUC-CSH can assess the heterogeneity of (18)F-FDG uptake in primary benign and malignant MS tumours, with significantly greater heterogeneity associated with malignant MS tumours. AUC-CSH is more diagnostically accurate than SUV analysis in differentiating between benign and

  10. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  11. Application of independent component analysis to H-1 MR spectroscopic imaging exams of brain tumours

    Szabo de Edelenyi, F.; Simonetti, A.W.; Postma, G.; Huo, R.; Buydens, L.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The low spatial resolution of clinical H-1 MRSI leads to partial volume effects. To overcome this problem, we applied independent component analysis (ICA) on a set of H-1 MRSI exams of brain turnours. With this method, tissue types that yield statistically independent spectra can be separated. Up to

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of cognitive deficits caused by radiation in patients with brain tumours

    Ishiuchi, Shogo

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses about the diagnosis and evaluation of brain higher functions, feature of their impairment induced by radiotherapy for brain tumor, and association of the impairment and neurogenesis in hippocampus (H). Radiation is one of important causes of cognitive impairment in patients with brain tumor: exempli gratia (e.g.) single irradiation of 2 Gy increases its risk. The impairment is usually diagnosed and evaluated with neuropsychological tests like mini-mental state examination (MMSE), authors' Ryudai version of the brief neuropsychological test battery, etc. The neurotoxicity of radiation is classified in acute effect caused by destruction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) appearing within 2 weeks after irradiation, early-late one of demyelination as a result of BBB rupture within 1-6 months after radiotherapy and late-late effect accompanying serious symptoms like necrosis of irradiated region at later than a few months to several years. Lowered neurogenic function in H and invasion of microglia cells are observed in autopsy specimen of the irradiated brain, and single X-irradiation at 5 or 10 Gy is known to result in the arrest of neurogenesis in the mouse H dentate gyrus. Lowered cognition by irradiation of H in clinical cases is particularly reported in children. Inflammatory biomarkers like cytokines are detected in the serum of irradiated patients as well as of animals. Although fMRI alone is not satisfactory to diagnose and evaluate the radiation-induced impairment, the imaging reveals the association of anatomically different regions in cognition through neural network. It has been recently shown that the impairment can be partially protected by planning the irradiation field so as to avoid H, by medication with donepezil, memantine, erythropoietin and indomethacin, and by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. (T.T.)

  13. Localization of aldosterone-producing tumours in primary aldosteronism by adrenal and renal vein catheterization

    Lund, J O; Nielsen, M D; Giese, Jacob

    1980-01-01

    Regional venous plasma aldosterone concentrations were determined and assessed against concurrent arterial levels in 16 patients with primary aldosteronism. The results obtained by sampling from the left adrenal vein or the left renal vein allowed correct side prediction of the presupposed adenoma...

  14. Plasmacytoma Mimicking Mediastinal Parathyroid Tumour in a Patient with Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Jubbin Jagan Jacob

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of monoclonal gammopathies with primary hyperparathyroidism is well documented. Many case reports have documented the coexistence of primary hyperparathyroidism and multiple myeloma. The cause of this relationship is not known. We report the case of a 49-year-old gentleman who was treated for primary hyperparathyroidism. His initial preoperative nuclear scan had shown persistent activity and retention of tracer in the retrosternal region in addition to the discrete hot spot in the region of the lower pole of the left lobe of the thyroid. During surgery, the enlarged left inferior parathyroid gland was removed. In addition, the retrosternal area was also explored and found to be normal. Ten months later, he developed a mass in the region of the manubrium sternii which was proven to be a plasmacytoma. We review the literature for similar cases and suggest hypotheses for a possible association. In conclusion, coexisting plasma cell dyscrasias including plasmacytoma should be considered in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

  15. Germline PMS2 and somatic POLE exonuclease mutations cause hypermutability of the leading DNA strand in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome brain tumours.

    Andrianova, Maria A; Chetan, Ghati Kasturirangan; Sibin, Madathan Kandi; Mckee, Thomas; Merkler, Doron; Narasinga, Rao Kvl; Ribaux, Pascale; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Nikolaev, Sergey I

    2017-11-01

    Biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) in tumours is frequently associated with somatic mutations in the exonuclease domains of DNA polymerases POLE or POLD1, and results in a characteristic mutational profile. In this article, we describe the genetic basis of ultramutated high-grade brain tumours in the context of bMMRD. We performed exome sequencing of two second-cousin patients from a large consanguineous family of Indian origin with early onset of high-grade glioblastoma and astrocytoma. We identified a germline homozygous nonsense variant, p.R802*, in the PMS2 gene. Additionally, by genome sequencing of these tumours, we found extremely high somatic mutation rates (237/Mb and 123/Mb), as well as somatic mutations in the proofreading domain of POLE polymerase (p.P436H and p.L424V), which replicates the leading DNA strand. Most interestingly, we found, in both cancers, that the vast majority of mutations were consistent with the signature of POLE exo - , i.e. an abundance of C>A and C>T mutations, particularly in special contexts, on the leading strand. We showed that the fraction of mutations under positive selection among mutations in tumour suppressor genes is more than two-fold lower in ultramutated tumours than in other glioblastomas. Genetic analyses enabled the diagnosis of the two consanguineous childhood brain tumours as being due to a combination of PMS2 germline and POLE somatic variants, and confirmed them as bMMRD/POLE exo - disorders. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Solitary phalangeal brown tumour in primary hyperparathyroidism: Report of a rare presentation

    Nagaraj, Chandana; Oommen, Regi; Jacob, Paul M; Irodi, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid adenoma is the most common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism. Severe cases of primary hyperparathyroidism manifest as osteitis fibrosa cystica generalisata, characterized by generalized bone loss with increased bone resorption, including both subperiosteal and endosteal surfaces. The most common sites for formation of fibrotic cystic lesions (brown tumors) are in the long bones and jaw which present as swelling, pathological fracture, and/or bone pain, usually involving multiple sites. Here, we describe an unusual presentation of a solitary brown tumor in a young male who initially presented to the hand surgeon with a history of right thumb swelling following trivial trauma. Further detailed clinical, biochemical, scintigraphic (Tc 99m methylene diphosphonate scintigraphy and Tc 99m Sestamibi scintigraphy), and radiological investigations aided definitive diagnosis and treatment. The causative parathyroid adenoma was excised curing hyperparathyroidism and the lesion regressed substantially

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography in the functional detection and differential diagnosis of brain tumours

    Dierckx, R.A. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Martin, J.J. (Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium) Lab. of Neuropathology, Born-Bunge Foundation, Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)); Dobbeleir, A. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Crols, R. (Dept. of Neurology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Neetens, I. (Dept. of Pathology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Deyn, P.P. de (Lab. of Neuropathology, Born-Bunge Foundation, Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium) Lab. of Neurochemistry and Behaviour, Born-Bunge Foundation, Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1994-07-01

    Histologically tumours consisted of astrocytoma stage I or II, astrocytoma stage III, glioblastoma multiforme and oligodendroglioma, brain metastasis, lymphoma, meningioma, pituitary adenoma, pineal tumour, colloid cyst and craniopharyngioma. False-negative studies included pineal tumour, colloid cyst, craniopharyngioma, astrocytomas stage I or II and stage III, oligodendroglioma and metastasis in the brain stem. Additional metastases approximately < 1.5 cm were not detected in two patients and [sup 201]Tl SPET underestimated tumoral extent in one patient suffering from glioblastoma multiforme. A false-positive study was obtained in a patient with skull metastasis. All 15 patients who were finally shown to suffer from ischaemic infarction had a normal SPET study 9-28 days after the onset of symptomatology. Of five patients with haemorrhagic infarction, studied within 2 weeks, four were false-positive. Of six patients with intracranial haemorrhage, studied 9-39 days later, one showed focal [sup 201]Tl accumulation. Two further false-positive studies consisted of angioma and epidural haematoma. Finally, SPET studies were normal in six patients with definite diagnosis of (reactive) gliosis, Binswanger's encephalopathy, postinfectious encephalopathy and multiple sclerosis. In the patient population presented, sensitivity of [sup 201]Tl SPET for supratentorial brain tumours was 71.7% and specificity was 80.9%. Clinical information and control SPET studies in combination with early, 30-min and 3- to 4-h delayed imaging may be expected to improve on these figures. On the other hand it seems that, in addition to tumoral histology, the presence of tumours in the fossa posterior and small volumes contribute to the occurrence of false-negative [sup 201]Tl SPET studies. (orig.)

  18. Seizure characteristics and the use of anti-epileptic drugs in children and young people with brain tumours and epileptic seizures: Analysis of regional paediatric cancer service population.

    Pilotto, Chiara; Liu, Jo-Fen; Walker, David A; Whitehouse, William P

    2018-03-21

    Epileptic seizures complicate the management of childhood brain tumours. There are no published standards for clinical practice concerning risk factors, treatment selection or strategies to withdraw treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED). we undertook a case note review of 120 patients with newly diagnosed brain tumours, referred to a regional paediatric cancer service. data was available on 117/120 (98%) children seizures. A cortical tumour location was associated with the highest risk of seizures (OR: 7.1; CI 95% 2.9-17.3). At a median follow up of 24 months (IQR 25°-75° : 15-48), 22/35 (63%) with seizures, had a single seizure episode, 15/35 (43%) were seizure free (SF) on AEDs, 13/35 (37%) were SF off AEDs, and 7/35 (20%) experienced continuing epileptic seizures. Overall 34/35 (97%) were treated with AEDs after a seizure, of whom 12/35 (35%) withdrew from AED medication, and although 4/35 (12%) had seizure relapse, all were after further acute events. The median duration of AED before withdrawal was 11 months (IQR 25°-75° 5-14 months), and the median follow up after withdrawal was 15 months (IQR 25°-75° 5-34 months). Seizures affect about 1/3rd of children and young people presenting with and being treated for brain tumours particularly when the tumour is in the cerebral cortex. The low risk of recurrent seizures after AED treatment justifies consideration of early withdrawal of AED after seizure control. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A retrospective study of the role of intracavitary brachytherapy and prognotic factors determining local tumour control after primary radical radiotherapy in 903 non-disseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    Teo, P.M.L.; Kwan, W.H.; Yu, P.; Lee, W.Y.; Leung, S.F.; Choi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were to determine the role of intracavitary brachytherapy given shortly after external beam radiotherapy in the primary radical treatment of non-metastatic nasopharyngeal (NPC) cancer patients, and the prognostic factors governing local tumour control. From 1984 to 1989, 903 patients with non-disseminated NPC who had no previous treatment were managed at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, where investigation and treatment methods had been standardized according to a departmental protocol. In the 903 non-disseminated NPCs, the patient's age and tumour involvement of the skull base and cranial nerves were significant independent prognostic factors governing local tumour control. In the 358 patients with Ho T 3 disease, tumour involvement of the orbits and the laryngopharynx significantly worsened local tumour control. The presence of local persistence at 4 weeks after external radiotherapy, for which therapeutic brachytherapy was given, was marginally significant as a prognostic factor in addition to the presence of cranial nerve palsy. (author)

  20. Asymptomatic primary tumour in incurable metastatic colorectal cancer: is there a role for surgical resection prior to systematic therapy or not?

    Samalavicius, Narimantas E; Dulskas, Audrius; Baltruskeviciene, Edita; Smailyte, Giedre; Skuciene, Marija; Mikelenaite, Rasa; Venslovaite, Rasa; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Samalavicius, Almantas; Lunevicius, Raimundas

    2016-01-01

    The role of the resection of asymptomatic primary colorectal cancer in patients with incurable disease is questionable. To evaluate the impact of the resection of asymptomatic primary tumour on overall survival in patients with unresectable distant metastases. Patients treated in the National Cancer Institute, Lithuania, in the period 2008-2012, were selected retrospectively. The main inclusion criteria were: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), endoscopically and histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, without any symptoms for urgent operation, and at least one cycle of palliative chemotherapy administered. Information on patients' age, gender, tumour histology, localization of the tumour, regional lymph node involvement, number of metastatic sites, surgery and systemic treatment was collected prospectively. Eligible patients for the study were divided into two groups according to the initial treatment - surgery (patients who underwent primary tumour resection) and chemotherapy (patients who received chemotherapy without surgery). The impact of initial treatment strategy, tumour size and site, regional lymph nodes, grade of differentiation of adenocarcinoma and application of biotherapy on overall cumulative survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. To compare survival between groups the log-rank test was used. Cox regression analysis was employed to assess the effects of variables on patient survival. The study group consisted of 183 patients: 103 men and 80 women. The median age was 66 years (range: 37-91). There were no notable imbalances with regard to age, gender, number of metastatic sites, metastases (such as pulmonary, peritoneal, liver, metastases into non-regional lymph nodes and other metastases), the number of received cycles of chemotherapy, first line chemotherapy type or biological therapy. Only 27 (14.8%) patients received biological therapy and the majority of them (n = 25, 92.6%) were treated with bevacizumab. For surgically treated

  1. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein expression by immunohistochemistry in brain and non-brain systemic tumours: systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Brell, Marta; Ibáñez, Javier; Tortosa, Avelina

    2011-01-01

    The DNA repair protein O 6 -Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) confers resistance to alkylating agents. Several methods have been applied to its analysis, with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) the most commonly used for promoter methylation study, while immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become the most frequently used for the detection of MGMT protein expression. Agreement on the best and most reliable technique for evaluating MGMT status remains unsettled. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between IHC and MSP. A computer-aided search of MEDLINE (1950-October 2009), EBSCO (1966-October 2009) and EMBASE (1974-October 2009) was performed for relevant publications. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were those comparing MGMT protein expression by IHC with MGMT promoter methylation by MSP in the same cohort of patients. Methodological quality was assessed by using the QUADAS and STARD instruments. Previously published guidelines were followed for meta-analysis performance. Of 254 studies identified as eligible for full-text review, 52 (20.5%) met the inclusion criteria. The review showed that results of MGMT protein expression by IHC are not in close agreement with those obtained with MSP. Moreover, type of tumour (primary brain tumour vs others) was an independent covariate of accuracy estimates in the meta-regression analysis beyond the cut-off value. Protein expression assessed by IHC alone fails to reflect the promoter methylation status of MGMT. Thus, in attempts at clinical diagnosis the two methods seem to select different groups of patients and should not be used interchangeably

  2. O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein expression by immunohistochemistry in brain and non-brain systemic tumours: systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    Ibáñez Javier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA repair protein O6-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT confers resistance to alkylating agents. Several methods have been applied to its analysis, with methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP the most commonly used for promoter methylation study, while immunohistochemistry (IHC has become the most frequently used for the detection of MGMT protein expression. Agreement on the best and most reliable technique for evaluating MGMT status remains unsettled. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between IHC and MSP. Methods A computer-aided search of MEDLINE (1950-October 2009, EBSCO (1966-October 2009 and EMBASE (1974-October 2009 was performed for relevant publications. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were those comparing MGMT protein expression by IHC with MGMT promoter methylation by MSP in the same cohort of patients. Methodological quality was assessed by using the QUADAS and STARD instruments. Previously published guidelines were followed for meta-analysis performance. Results Of 254 studies identified as eligible for full-text review, 52 (20.5% met the inclusion criteria. The review showed that results of MGMT protein expression by IHC are not in close agreement with those obtained with MSP. Moreover, type of tumour (primary brain tumour vs others was an independent covariate of accuracy estimates in the meta-regression analysis beyond the cut-off value. Conclusions Protein expression assessed by IHC alone fails to reflect the promoter methylation status of MGMT. Thus, in attempts at clinical diagnosis the two methods seem to select different groups of patients and should not be used interchangeably.

  3. Brain MRI findings in infants with primary congenital glaucoma

    Dai, A. Ibrahym; Saygili, O.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma appears in the first months of life, eventually at birth. Isolated congenital glaucoma is characterized by minor malformations of the irido-corneal angle of the anterior chamber of the eye. Clinical manifestations include tearing, photophobia and enlargement of the globe appearing in the first months of life. Imaging technology such as optical coherence tomography and measurement of central corneal thickness may play an important role in the assessment of children with suspected or known glaucoma. However, no MRI findings of the CNS in patients with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) were reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate MRI findings of the brain in infants with PCG. We reviewed the radiological and histopathological and clinical characteristics of infants with primary congenital glaucoma. The records of 17 patients with PCG were reviewed and the MRIs of the brain and associated manifestations were analyzed. Three patients with PCG had abnormal MRI findings suggesting agenesis of the corpus callosum. Two infants had delayed myelinization of the brain. Significant abnormal optic nerve excavation and increased corneal diameters in 2 patients with delayed myelinization may suggest that intraocular pressure can be more striking and more severe, revealing a close relationship with PCG and abnormal myelinization in white matter. Studies with more patients are needed to confirm these results. (author)

  4. Modelling DW-MRI data from primary and metastatic ovarian tumours

    Winfield, Jessica M. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Surrey (United Kingdom); DeSouza, Nandita M.; Collins, David J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Priest, Andrew N.; Hodgkin, Charlotte; Freeman, Susan [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wakefield, Jennifer C.; Orton, Matthew R. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    To assess goodness-of-fit and repeatability of mono-exponential, stretched exponential and bi-exponential models of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) data in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. Thirty-nine primary and metastatic lesions from thirty-one patients with stage III or IV ovarian cancer were examined before and after chemotherapy using DW-MRI with ten diffusion-weightings. The data were fitted with (a) a mono-exponential model to give the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), (b) a stretched exponential model to give the distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) and stretching parameter (α), and (c) a bi-exponential model to give the diffusion coefficient (D), perfusion fraction (f) and pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*). Coefficients of variation, established from repeated baseline measurements, were: ADC 3.1 %, DDC 4.3 %, α 7.0 %, D 13.2 %, f 44.0 %, D* 165.1 %. The bi-exponential model was unsuitable in these data owing to poor repeatability. After excluding the bi-exponential model, analysis using Akaike Information Criteria showed that the stretched exponential model provided the better fit to the majority of pixels in 64 % of lesions. The stretched exponential model provides the optimal fit to DW-MRI data from ovarian, omental and peritoneal lesions and lymph nodes in pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements with good repeatability. (orig.)

  5. CT findings of traumatic primary brain-stem injury

    Hosaka, Yasuaki; Hatashita, Shizuo; Bandou, Kuniaki; Ueki, Yasuyuki; Abe, Kouzou; Koga, Nobunori; Sugimura, Jun; Sakakibara, Tokiwa; Takagi, Suguru

    1984-01-01

    A series of 27 consecutive patients with traumatic primary brain stem injuries was studied. They were diagnosed by means of clinical signs, neurological examination, and computerized tomography (CT). The CT findings of the brain-stem lesions were classified into 4 types: Type H, spotty, high-density; Type H and L, high- and low-densities; Type L, low-density; Type I, isodensity. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS), neurological findings on admission, CT findings (findings in the brain stem, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern (PMC), and other findings), and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) were examined. In the 9 cases of Type H, there was a correlation between the GCS and the GOS, and the spotty, high-density lesions were localized mainly in the dorsal and/or ventral midbrain parenchyma, but these lesions did not show focal signs and symptoms. Without an obliteration of the PMC, Type-H patients did not always have a bad outcome. In the 4 cases of Type H and L, the 2 cases of Type L, and the 12 cases of Type I, there was an obliteration of the PMC. All of the these cases had a bad outcome (1 case of moderate disability, 3 cases of severe disability, and 14 cases of death). The mechanism producing a spotty, high-density area was discussed. The weaker impact (than the other types) and individual anatomical differences weresupposed to make for a spotty, high-density are in the brain stem. (author)

  6. Accumulation of silver nanoparticles by cultured primary brain astrocytes

    Luther, Eva M; Koehler, Yvonne; Dringen, Ralf [Center for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, PO Box 330440, D-28334 Bremen (Germany); Diendorf, Joerg; Epple, Matthias, E-mail: ralf.dringen@uni-bremen.de [Inorganic Chemistry and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 5-7, D-45117 Essen (Germany)

    2011-09-16

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are components of various food industry products and are frequently used for medical equipment and materials. Although such particles enter the vertebrate brain, little is known on their biocompatibility for brain cells. To study the consequences of an AgNP exposure of brain cells we have treated astrocyte-rich primary cultures with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgNP. The incubation of cultured astrocytes with micromolar concentrations of AgNP for up to 24 h resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of silver, but did not compromise the cell viability nor lower the cellular glutathione content. In contrast, the incubation of astrocytes for 4 h with identical amounts of silver as AgNO{sub 3} already severely compromised the cell viability and completely deprived the cells of glutathione. The accumulation of AgNP by astrocytes was proportional to the concentration of AgNP applied and significantly lowered by about 30% in the presence of the endocytosis inhibitors chloroquine or amiloride. Incubation at 4 {sup 0}C reduced the accumulation of AgNP by 80% compared to the values obtained for cells that had been exposed to AgNP at 37 {sup 0}C. These data demonstrate that viable cultured brain astrocytes efficiently accumulate PVP-coated AgNP in a temperature-dependent process that most likely involves endocytotic pathways.

  7. Assessing occupational and domestic ELF magnetic field exposure in the UK Adult Brain Tumour Study: Results of a feasibility study

    Van Tongeren, M.; Mee, T.; Whatmough, P.; Broad, L.; Mashlanyj, M.; Allen, S.; Muir, K.; McKinney, P.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF MF) in the UK Adult Brain Tumour Study (UKABTS) was examined. During the study, 81 individuals and 30 companies were approached with 79 individuals and 25 companies agreeing to participate. Exposure data were collected using EMDEX II dosemeters worn by the participants for 3-4 consecutive days. Data were collected over a total of 321 d, including non-occupational periods. The results showed occupational exposure to be the main determinant of overall exposure. Moderate to strong correlations were found between arithmetic mean exposure and all other metrics with the possible exception of maximum exposure. Significant differences in exposure were found between job categories with large variability in certain categories. Highest average exposures were found for security officers (arithmetic mean, AM: 0.78 μT), secretaries (AM: 0.48 μT) and dentists (AM: 0.42 μT). Welding and working near high-voltage power lines were associated with elevated exposure. In summary, acceptably precise measures of ELF MF exposure are feasible at relatively moderate cost. The results were used to develop a protocol for data collection from subjects in the UKABTS. (authors)

  8. The frequency and cause of anxiety and depression amongst patients with malignant brain tumours between surgery and radiotherapy.

    Kilbride, Lynn; Smith, Graeme; Grant, Robin

    2007-09-01

    Between surgery and radiotherapy patients with a malignant glioma may encounter a number of psychosocial issues that could invoke an anxious or depressive response. This study explored the frequency, severity and cause of anxiety and depression in patients with presumed malignant brain tumours in the period between their surgery and radiotherapy. A prospective study of 51 patients used mixed methods to measure anxiety and depression at three time points; post surgery, three weeks post surgery and pre radiotherapy. Analysis was undertaken using statistical and content analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scores and unstructured interviews respectively. Analysis of HAD scores indicated a heightened level of anxiety in patients pre radiotherapy. This anxiety is more prevalent in younger patients and is not related to the patients change in functional state. Five patients had a significant depression at one or more time points between surgery and radiotherapy. Four of the five patients who reported scores consistent with depression had past histories of depression. Content analysis of unstructured interviews indicated that the HAD scores underestimated the presence of anxiety and depression amongst this group of patients. Anxiety was more common in younger patients. Anxiety was slightly more frequent pre-radiotherapy. A past medical history of depression is a predictor of significant depression in the post-operative period. The HAD scale although useful is not an adequate measurement tool for detecting anxiety and depression amongst all patients and health care professionals should adopt other means to monitor for these signs and symptoms.

  9. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S.; Leclere, J.; Vanel, D.; Missenard, G.; Pinieux, G. de

    2008-01-01

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  11. Primary adrenal insufficiency in adult population: a Portuguese Multicentre Study by the Adrenal Tumours Study Group.

    Ferreira, Lia; Silva, João; Garrido, Susana; Bello, Carlos; Oliveira, Diana; Simões, Hélder; Paiva, Isabel; Guimarães, Joana; Ferreira, Marta; Pereira, Teresa; Bettencourt-Silva, Rita; Martins, Ana Filipa; Silva, Tiago; Fernandes, Vera; Pereira, Maria Lopes

    2017-11-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is a rare but severe and potentially life-threatening condition. No previous studies have characterized Portuguese patients with PAI. To characterize the clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, treatment and follow-up of Portuguese patients with confirmed PAI. This multicentre retrospective study examined PAI patients in 12 Portuguese hospitals. We investigated 278 patients with PAI (55.8% were females), with a mean age of 33.6 ± 19.3 years at diagnosis. The most frequent presenting clinical features were asthenia (60.1%), mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation (55.0%) and weight loss (43.2%); 29.1% of the patients presented with adrenal crisis. Diagnosis was established by high plasma ACTH and low serum cortisol in most patients (43.9%). The most common aetiology of PAI was autoimmune adrenalitis (61.0%). There were 38 idiopathic cases. Autoimmune comorbidities were found in 70% of the patients, the most frequent being autoimmune thyroiditis (60.7%) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (17.3%). Seventy-nine percent were treated with hydrocortisone (mean dose 26.3 ± 8.3 mg/day) mostly in three (57.5%) or two (37.4%) daily doses. The remaining patients were treated with prednisolone (10.1%), dexamethasone (6.2%) and methylprednisolone (0.7%); 66.2% were also on fludrocortisone (median dose of 100 µg/day). Since diagnosis, 33.5% of patients were hospitalized for disease decompensation. In the last appointment, 17.2% of patients had complaints (7.6% asthenia and 6.5% depression) and 9.7% had electrolyte disturbances. This is the first multicentre Portuguese study regarding PAI. The results emphasize the need for standardization in diagnostic tests and etiological investigation and provide a framework for improving treatment. © 2017 The authors.

  12. (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in cervix cancer: Lymph node assessment and prognostic/predictive value of primary tumour analysis

    Leseur, J.; Williaume, D.; Le Prise, E.; De Crevoisier, R.; Devillers, A.; Garin, E.; Fougerou, C.; Bouriel, C.; Leveque, J.; Monpetit, E.; Blanchot, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - In cervix carcinoma: (a) to evaluate the ability of ( 18 F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the lymph node detection; (b) to investigate the prognostic and predictive value of the primary cervical PET parameters. Patients and methods. - Ninety patients treated for cervix carcinoma and evaluated initially by MRI and FDG PET were included. The performances of FDG-PET for lymph node detection (relatively to the lymph node dissection) have been described (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value). PET tumour parameters analyzed were: maximum standard uptake value (SUV max ), the volume and the maximum diameter. The prognostic and predictive values of these parameters were investigated. The tumour response was evaluated on surgical specimens. Results. - PET detected the cervical tumour with a sensitivity of 97% (mean values: SUV max = 15.8, volume = 27 mm 3 , maximum diameter = 47). For the detection of the lymph nodes, the values of sensibility, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were: 86, 56, 69 and 78% in the pelvic, and 90, 67, 50 and 95% for the para-aortic area, respectively. The SUV max was correlated with histologic response (P = 0.04). The frequency of partial histological response was significantly higher for tumour SUV max > 10.9 (P = 0.017). The maximum PET diameter and pathologic response had an impact on disease-free survival and overall survival in multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). Conclusion. - PET has high sensitivity in detecting pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes. Some primary cervical tumour PET parameters are useful as prognostic and predictive factors. (authors)

  13. Is primary care access to CT brain examinations effective?

    Benamore, R.E.; Wright, D.; Britton, I.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Primary care access to CT head examinations could enable common neurological conditions to be managed within primary care. Outcome data from the first 8 years of a local service were used to identify effective referral criteria. METHODS: Primary care head CT results from 1 March 1995 to 31 October 2003 were categorized as normal, incidental or significant findings. Normal reports were cross-referenced for referral to secondary care. Case notes with incidental or significant CT findings were reviewed for secondary care attendance and outcome. RESULTS: Records of 1403/1645 CT head examinations (85%) were available for review. Of these 1403, 951 (67.8%) returned normal findings, 317 (22.6%) incidental findings and 135 (9.6%) significant findings. The commonest indication for referral was investigation of headaches (46.6%). Of the total 533 patients under 50 years of age, 13 (2.4%) yielded significant findings and all 13 showed other features in addition to headache. Of 314 cases presenting with focal neurology, 83 (26.4%) showed significant findings. 314 patients were referred from primary to secondary care. 189 had normal scans and 74 had findings described as incidental. 60% of secondary care referrals were for normal CT scans. In patients with focal neurology, 90 of 314 were referred, allowing 71% to be managed in primary care. Yield was also 0% for headaches, dizziness, visual disturbance or nausea and vomiting. CONCLUSION: Primary care access to CT brain examinations is effective for patients with focal neurology, neurological symptoms or a known malignancy, but not for patients aged less than 50 years, or with uncomplicated headaches, dizziness or diplopia

  14. Is primary care access to CT brain examinations effective?

    Benamore, R.E. [Department of Radiology, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rachelbenamore@doctors.org.uk; Wright, D. [Department of Radiology, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston (United Kingdom); Britton, I. [Department of Radiology, Pilgrim Hospital, Boston (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    AIM: Primary care access to CT head examinations could enable common neurological conditions to be managed within primary care. Outcome data from the first 8 years of a local service were used to identify effective referral criteria. METHODS: Primary care head CT results from 1 March 1995 to 31 October 2003 were categorized as normal, incidental or significant findings. Normal reports were cross-referenced for referral to secondary care. Case notes with incidental or significant CT findings were reviewed for secondary care attendance and outcome. RESULTS: Records of 1403/1645 CT head examinations (85%) were available for review. Of these 1403, 951 (67.8%) returned normal findings, 317 (22.6%) incidental findings and 135 (9.6%) significant findings. The commonest indication for referral was investigation of headaches (46.6%). Of the total 533 patients under 50 years of age, 13 (2.4%) yielded significant findings and all 13 showed other features in addition to headache. Of 314 cases presenting with focal neurology, 83 (26.4%) showed significant findings. 314 patients were referred from primary to secondary care. 189 had normal scans and 74 had findings described as incidental. 60% of secondary care referrals were for normal CT scans. In patients with focal neurology, 90 of 314 were referred, allowing 71% to be managed in primary care. Yield was also 0% for headaches, dizziness, visual disturbance or nausea and vomiting. CONCLUSION: Primary care access to CT brain examinations is effective for patients with focal neurology, neurological symptoms or a known malignancy, but not for patients aged less than 50 years, or with uncomplicated headaches, dizziness or diplopia.

  15. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [{sup 18}F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI: feasibility, agreement and initial experience

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Hansen, Adam E.; Law, Ian [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Vibeke A. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans S. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Functional Imaging Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2016-01-15

    imaging of brain tumour metabolism and perfusion using hybrid PET/MR systems may provide complementary information on tumour biology, but the potential clinical value remains to be determined in future trials. (orig.)

  16. The INTERPRET Decision-Support System version 3.0 for evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy data from human brain tumours and other abnormal brain masses

    Mercadal Guillem

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proton Magnetic Resonance (MR Spectroscopy (MRS is a widely available technique for those clinical centres equipped with MR scanners. Unlike the rest of MR-based techniques, MRS yields not images but spectra of metabolites in the tissues. In pathological situations, the MRS profile changes and this has been particularly described for brain tumours. However, radiologists are frequently not familiar to the interpretation of MRS data and for this reason, the usefulness of decision-support systems (DSS in MRS data analysis has been explored. Results This work presents the INTERPRET DSS version 3.0, analysing the improvements made from its first release in 2002. Version 3.0 is aimed to be a program that 1st, can be easily used with any new case from any MR scanner manufacturer and 2nd, improves the initial analysis capabilities of the first version. The main improvements are an embedded database, user accounts, more diagnostic discrimination capabilities and the possibility to analyse data acquired under additional data acquisition conditions. Other improvements include a customisable graphical user interface (GUI. Most diagnostic problems included have been addressed through a pattern-recognition based approach, in which classifiers based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA were trained and tested. Conclusions The INTERPRET DSS 3.0 allows radiologists, medical physicists, biochemists or, generally speaking, any person with a minimum knowledge of what an MR spectrum is, to enter their own SV raw data, acquired at 1.5 T, and to analyse them. The system is expected to help in the categorisation of MR Spectra from abnormal brain masses.

  17. Generation of primary cultures of bovine brain endothelial cells and setup of cocultures with rat astrocytes

    Helms, Hans C; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    -brain barrier. The present protocol describes the setup of an in vitro coculture model based on primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. The model displays a high electrical tightness and expresses blood-brain barrier marker proteins....

  18. The predictive value of preoperative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for postoperative recurrence in patients with localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    Miyake, Kanae Kawai; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mikami, Yoshiki [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kyoto (Japan); Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kumamoto (Japan); Tanaka, Shiro [Kyoto University, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [Shiga Medical Center Research Institute, Shiga (Japan); Tadamura, Eiji [Sakazaki Clinic, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Dianostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Minami, Shunsuke [Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Department of Radiology, Shiga (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To assess the potential value of preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET to predict postoperative recurrence of solitary localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) after radical resection. A total of 46 patients with primary GIST who received preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET and underwent complete resection without neoadjuvant therapy were retrospectively studied. PET findings, including ring-shaped uptake and intense uptake, were compared with Joensuu risk grades using Fisher's exact test. The prognostic value of the preoperative clinico-imaging variables - age ≥60 years, male, ring-shaped uptake, intense uptake, tumour size >5 cm, heterogeneous CT attenuation and lower gastrointestinal origin - and Joensuu high risk for recurrence-free survival was evaluated using log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Ring-shaped uptake and intense uptake were significantly associated with Joensuu high risk. Univariate analysis showed that ring-shaped uptake, intense uptake, size >5 cm and Joensuu high risk were significantly associated with inferior recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that ring-shaped uptake (P = 0.004) and Joensuu high risk (P = 0.021) were independent adverse prognostic factors of postoperative recurrence. Ring-shaped uptake on preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET may be a potential predictor of postoperative tumour recurrence of localized primary GISTs. (orig.)

  19. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury: lessons from lithotripsy

    Nakagawa, A.; Ohtani, K.; Armonda, R.; Tomita, H.; Sakuma, A.; Mugikura, S.; Takayama, K.; Kushimoto, S.; Tominaga, T.

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic injury caused by explosive or blast events is traditionally divided into four mechanisms: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. The mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) are biomechanically distinct and can be modeled in both in vivo and in vitro systems. The primary bTBI injury mechanism is associated with the response of brain tissue to the initial blast wave. Among the four mechanisms of bTBI, there is a remarkable lack of information regarding the mechanism of primary bTBI. On the other hand, 30 years of research on the medical application of shock waves (SWs) has given us insight into the mechanisms of tissue and cellular damage in bTBI, including both air-mediated and underwater SW sources. From a basic physics perspective, the typical blast wave consists of a lead SW followed by shock-accelerated flow. The resultant tissue injury includes several features observed in primary bTBI, such as hemorrhage, edema, pseudo-aneurysm formation, vasoconstriction, and induction of apoptosis. These are well-described pathological findings within the SW literature. Acoustic impedance mismatch, penetration of tissue by shock/bubble interaction, geometry of the skull, shear stress, tensile stress, and subsequent cavitation formation are all important factors in determining the extent of SW-induced tissue and cellular injury. In addition, neuropsychiatric aspects of blast events need to be taken into account, as evidenced by reports of comorbidity and of some similar symptoms between physical injury resulting in bTBI and the psychiatric sequelae of post-traumatic stress. Research into blast injury biophysics is important to elucidate specific pathophysiologic mechanisms of blast injury, which enable accurate differential diagnosis, as well as development of effective treatments. Herein we describe the requirements for an adequate experimental setup when investigating blast-induced tissue and cellular injury; review SW physics

  20. Correlation between [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and volume perfusion CT in primary tumours and mediastinal lymph nodes of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Sauter, Alexander W.; Spira, Daniel; Schulze, Maximilian; Pfannenberg, Christina; Claussen, Claus D.; Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Hetzel, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Oncology, Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Pulmonology, Tuebingen (Germany); Reimold, Matthias [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Klotz, Ernst [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between glucose metabolism as determined by [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and tumour perfusion as quantified by volume perfusion CT in primary tumours and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Enrolled in the study were 17 patients with NSCLC. [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was quantified in terms of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and flow extraction product (K{sup trans}) were determined as perfusion parameters. The correlations between the perfusion parameters and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake values were subsequently evaluated. For the primary tumours, no correlations were found between perfusion parameters and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. In MLN, there were negative correlations between BF and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.383), BV and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.406), and BV and SUV{sub max} (r = -0.377), but not between BF and SUV{sub max}, K{sup trans} and SUV{sub avg}, or K{sup trans} and SUV{sub max}. Additionally, in MLN with SUV{sub max} >2.5 there were negative correlations between BF and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.510), BV and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.390), BF and SUV{sub max} (r = -0.536), as well as BV and SUV{sub max} (r = -0.346). Perfusion and glucose metabolism seemed to be uncoupled in large primary tumours, but an inverse correlation was observed in MLN. This information may help improve therapy planning and response evaluation. (orig.)

  1. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yong; Li, Xin; Sun, Peng; Wang, Muwen; Wang, Ridong; Jin, Xunbo

    2012-01-01

    As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer

  2. Altered brain network measures in patients with primary writing tremor

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Panda, Rajanikant; Saini, Jitender; Bharath, Rose Dawn [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2017-10-15

    Primary writing tremor (PWT) is a rare task-specific tremor, which occurs only while writing or while adopting the hand in the writing position. The basic pathophysiology of PWT has not been fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the alterations in the resting state functional brain connectivity, if any, in patients with PWT using graph theory-based analysis. This prospective case-control study included 10 patients with PWT and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI in a 3-Tesla scanner. Several parameters of small-world functional connectivity were compared between patients and healthy controls by using graph theory-based analysis. There were no significant differences in age, handedness (all right handed), gender distribution (all were males), and MMSE scores between the patients and controls. The mean age at presentation of tremor in the patient group was 51.7 ± 8.6 years, and the mean duration of tremor was 3.5 ± 1.9 years. Graph theory-based analysis revealed that patients with PWT had significantly lower clustering coefficient and higher path length compared to healthy controls suggesting alterations in small-world architecture of the brain. The clustering coefficients were lower in PWT patients in left and right medial cerebellum, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Patients with PWT have significantly altered small-world brain connectivity in bilateral medial cerebellum, right DLPFC, and left PPC. Further studies with larger sample size are required to confirm our results. (orig.)

  3. Altered brain network measures in patients with primary writing tremor

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Panda, Rajanikant; Saini, Jitender; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Primary writing tremor (PWT) is a rare task-specific tremor, which occurs only while writing or while adopting the hand in the writing position. The basic pathophysiology of PWT has not been fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the alterations in the resting state functional brain connectivity, if any, in patients with PWT using graph theory-based analysis. This prospective case-control study included 10 patients with PWT and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI in a 3-Tesla scanner. Several parameters of small-world functional connectivity were compared between patients and healthy controls by using graph theory-based analysis. There were no significant differences in age, handedness (all right handed), gender distribution (all were males), and MMSE scores between the patients and controls. The mean age at presentation of tremor in the patient group was 51.7 ± 8.6 years, and the mean duration of tremor was 3.5 ± 1.9 years. Graph theory-based analysis revealed that patients with PWT had significantly lower clustering coefficient and higher path length compared to healthy controls suggesting alterations in small-world architecture of the brain. The clustering coefficients were lower in PWT patients in left and right medial cerebellum, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Patients with PWT have significantly altered small-world brain connectivity in bilateral medial cerebellum, right DLPFC, and left PPC. Further studies with larger sample size are required to confirm our results. (orig.)

  4. Altered brain network measures in patients with primary writing tremor.

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Panda, Rajanikant; Saini, Jitender; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Primary writing tremor (PWT) is a rare task-specific tremor, which occurs only while writing or while adopting the hand in the writing position. The basic pathophysiology of PWT has not been fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the alterations in the resting state functional brain connectivity, if any, in patients with PWT using graph theory-based analysis. This prospective case-control study included 10 patients with PWT and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI in a 3-Tesla scanner. Several parameters of small-world functional connectivity were compared between patients and healthy controls by using graph theory-based analysis. There were no significant differences in age, handedness (all right handed), gender distribution (all were males), and MMSE scores between the patients and controls. The mean age at presentation of tremor in the patient group was 51.7 ± 8.6 years, and the mean duration of tremor was 3.5 ± 1.9 years. Graph theory-based analysis revealed that patients with PWT had significantly lower clustering coefficient and higher path length compared to healthy controls suggesting alterations in small-world architecture of the brain. The clustering coefficients were lower in PWT patients in left and right medial cerebellum, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Patients with PWT have significantly altered small-world brain connectivity in bilateral medial cerebellum, right DLPFC, and left PPC. Further studies with larger sample size are required to confirm our results.

  5. Transfection of brain capillary endothelial cells in primary culture with defined blood-brain barrier properties.

    Burkhart, Annette; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Lichota, Jacek; Fazakas, Csilla; Krizbai, István; Moos, Torben

    2015-08-07

    Primary brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are a promising tool to study the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro, as they maintain many important characteristics of the BBB in vivo, especially when co-cultured with pericytes and/or astrocytes. A novel strategy for drug delivery to the brain is to transform BCECs into protein factories by genetic modifications leading to secretion of otherwise BBB impermeable proteins into the central nervous system. However, a huge challenge underlying this strategy is to enable transfection of non-mitotic BCECs, taking a non-viral approach. We therefore aimed to study transfection in primary, non-mitotic BCECs cultured with defined BBB properties without disrupting the cells' integrity. Primary cultures of BCECs, pericytes and astrocytes were generated from rat brains and used in three different in vitro BBB experimental arrangements, which were characterised based on a their expression of tight junction proteins and other BBB specific proteins, high trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), and low passive permeability to radiolabeled mannitol. Recombinant gene expression and protein synthesis were examined in primary BCECs. The BCECs were transfected using a commercially available transfection agent Turbofect™ to express the red fluorescent protein HcRed1-C1. The BCECs were transfected at different time points to monitor transfection in relation to mitotic or non-mitotic cells, as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis after 5-and 6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinidyl ester incorporation. The cell cultures exhibited important BBB characteristics judged from their expression of BBB specific proteins, high TEER values, and low passive permeability. Among the three in vitro BBB models, co-culturing with BCECs and astrocytes was well suited for the transfection studies. Transfection was independent of cell division and with equal efficacy between the mitotic and non-mitotic BCECs. Importantly

  6. Functional outcome after endoprosthetic limb-salvage therapy of primary bone tumours--a comparative analysis using the MSTS score, the TESS and the RNL index.

    Tunn, P U; Pomraenke, D; Goerling, U; Hohenberger, P

    2008-10-01

    Limb-saving therapy for primary bone tumours is the treatment of choice. We aimed at analysing the quality of life of this group of patients by combining three different tools. Eighty-seven patients (46 females, 41 males) with a primary bone tumour of the extremity who had undergone endoprosthetic reconstruction between 1982 and 2000 were included in this retrospective study. The median age at the time of evaluation was 30 (12-73) years. The Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) and the Reintegration to Normal Living index (RNL) were recorded an average of 5.8 years after reconstruction and the Musculoskeletal Tumour Society Score (MSTS) after an average of 6.5 years. The mean MSTS score was 77% (13-93%). The mean TESS was 82% (22-99%), and the mean RNL index was 87% (32-98%). The subjective satisfaction and acceptance of physical impairment were significantly higher than the objective score (p TESS was 88% in patients aged 12-25 years, 81% in those aged 26-40 years and 57% in those aged 41-73 years. Parallel recording of the MSTS score, TESS and RNL index provides a better measure reflecting the complex situation of the patients by combining objective and subjective parameters.

  7. N-hydroxyurea, mitomycin C and actinomycin D activity in the process of tumour formation on the primary leaves of the 'Pinto' bean

    Aldona Rennert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitomycin C (MC, N-hydroxyurea (HU and actinomycin D (AD inhibit tumour formation on the primary leaves of Pinto beans. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was inoculated into bean leaves with application of the above named inhibitors at various times. It was found that MC action is strongest during inoculation and immediately after it, the maximal effect of HU take place within 12 h after inoculation, whereas the antitumour action of AD starts as late as 12 h after leaf inoculation. In view of the different degree of susceptibility of bacteria and plant cells to the inhibitors applied, the above described results allowed to distinguish three critical periods in the process of tumour formation in the tested host-pathogen system.

  8. TUMOUR VACCINE

    Wagner, Ernst; Kircheis, Ralf; Crommelin, D.; Van Slooten, Maaike; Storm, Gert

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a tumour vaccine with a tumour antigen base. In addition to a source of tumour antigens, the vaccine contains a release system for the delayed release of the active agent IFN- gamma , the active dose of IFN- gamma being 50 ng to 5 mu g. The IFN- gamma is released over a

  9. Assessment of DNA methylation profiling and copy number variation as indications of clonal relationship in ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancers to distinguish recurrent breast cancer from a second primary tumour

    Huang, Katie T.; Mikeska, Thomas; Li, Jason; Takano, Elena A.; Millar, Ewan K A; Graham, Peter H.; Boyle, Samantha E.; Campbell, Ian G.; Speed, Terence P.; Dobrovic, Alexander; Fox, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer have an increased risk of developing subsequent breast cancers. It is important to distinguish whether these tumours are de novo or recurrences of the primary tumour in order to guide the appropriate therapy. Our aim was to investigate the use of DNA methylation profiling and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to determine whether the second tumour is clonally related to the first tumour. Methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting was used to screen promoter methylation in a panel of 13 genes reported as methylated in breast cancer (RASSF1A, TWIST1, APC, WIF1, MGMT, MAL, CDH13, RARβ, BRCA1, CDH1, CDKN2A, TP73, and GSTP1) in 29 tumour pairs (16 ipsilateral and 13 contralateral). Using the methylation profile of these genes, we employed a Bayesian and an empirical statistical approach to estimate clonal relationship. Copy number alterations were analysed using aCGH on the same set of tumour pairs. There is a higher probability of the second tumour being recurrent in ipsilateral tumours compared with contralateral tumours (38 % versus 8 %; p <0.05) based on the methylation profile. Using previously reported recurrence rates as Bayesian prior probabilities, we classified 69 % of ipsilateral and 15 % of contralateral tumours as recurrent. The inferred clonal relationship results of the tumour pairs were generally concordant between methylation profiling and aCGH. Our results show that DNA methylation profiling as well as aCGH have potential as diagnostic tools in improving the clinical decisions to differentiate recurrences from a second de novo tumour. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1676-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  10. Mismatch repair deficiency: a temozolomide resistance factor in medulloblastoma cell lines that is uncommon in primary medulloblastoma tumours

    von Bueren, A. O.; Bacolod, M. D.; Hagel, C.; Heinimann, K.; Fedier, A.; Kordes, U.; Pietsch, T.; Koster, J.; Grotzer, M. A.; Friedman, H. S.; Marra, G.; Kool, M.; Rutkowski, S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumours are responsive to temozolomide (TMZ) if they are deficient in O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mismatch repair (MMR) proficient. METHODS: The effect of TMZ on medulloblastoma (MB) cell killing was analysed with clonogenic survival assays. Expression of DNA

  11. Disrupted modular organization of primary sensory brain areas in schizophrenia

    Cécile Bordier

    Full Text Available Abnormal brain resting-state functional connectivity has been consistently observed in patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ using functional MRI and other neuroimaging techniques. Graph theoretical methods provide a framework to investigate these defective functional interactions and their effects on the organization of brain connectivity networks. A few studies have shown altered distribution of connectivity within and between functional modules in SCZ patients, an indication of imbalanced functional segregation ad integration. However, no major alterations of modular organization have been reported in patients, and unambiguous identification of the neural substrates affected remains elusive. Recently, it has been demonstrated that current modularity analysis methods suffer from a fundamental and severe resolution limit, as they fail to detect features that are smaller than a scale determined by the size of the entire connectivity network. This resolution limit is likely to have hampered the ability to resolve differences between patients and controls in previous studies. Here, we apply Surprise, a novel resolution limit-free approach, to study the modular organization of resting state functional connectivity networks in a large cohort of SCZ patients and in matched healthy controls. Leveraging these important methodological advances we find new evidence of substantial fragmentation and reorganization involving primary sensory, auditory and visual areas in SCZ patients. Conversely, frontal and prefrontal areas, typically associated with higher cognitive functions, appear to be largely unaffected, with changes selectively involving language and speech processing areas. Our findings support the hypothesis that cognitive dysfunction in SCZ may involve deficits occurring already at early stages of sensory processing. Keywords: Schizophrenia, Surprise, Asymptotical surprise, Functional connectivity, Community detection, Modularity, Graph theory

  12. Intensity-modulated arc therapy with cisplatin as neo-adjuvant treatment for primary irresectable cervical cancer. Toxicity, tumour response and outcome

    Vandecasteele, K.; Eijkeren, M. van; Meerleer, G. de [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Makar, A.; Broecke, R. van den; Tummers, P. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Gynecology; Delrue, L. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Denys, H. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Lambein, K. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Pathology; Lambert, B. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of intensity-modulated arc therapy {+-} cisplatin (IMAT {+-} C) followed by hysterectomy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Patients and methods: A total of 30 patients were included in the study. The primary tumour and PET-positive lymph node(s) received a simultaneous integrated boost. Four weeks after IMAT {+-} C treatment, response was evaluated. Resection consisted of hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy. Tumour response, acute and late radiation toxicity, postoperative morbidity and outcome were evaluated. Results: All hysterectomy specimens were macroscopically tumour-free with negative resection margins; pathological complete response was 40%. In 2 patients, one resected lymph node was positive. There was no excess in postoperative morbidity. Apart from two grade 3 hematologic toxicities, no grade 3 or 4 acute radiation toxicity was observed. No grade 3, 1 grade 4 (4%) intestinal, and 4 grade 3 (14%) urinary late toxicities were observed. The 2-year local and regional control rates were 96% and 100%, respectively. The 2-year distant control rate was 92%. Actuarial 2-year progression free survival rate was 89%. Actuarial 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 96% and 91%, while 3-year overall survival was 84%. Conclusion: Surgery after IMAT {+-} C is feasible with low postoperative morbidity and radiation toxicity. Local, regional, distant control and survival rates are promising. (orig.)

  13. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in primary staging of prostate cancer: PSA and Gleason score predict the intensity of tracer accumulation in the primary tumour

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Kendler, Dorota; Scarpa, Lorenza; Di Santo, Gianpaolo; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer (PC) cells typically show increased expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which can be visualized by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in the primary tumour and metastases in patients with biopsy-proven PC prior to therapy, and to determine whether a correlation exists between the primary tumour-related {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation and the Gleason score (GS) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Ninety patients with transrectal ultrasound biopsy-proven PC (GS 6-10; median PSA: 9.7 ng/ml) referred for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. PET images were analysed visually and semiquantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour and pathologic lesions suspicious for lymphatic or distant metastases were then compared to the physiologic background activity of normal prostate tissue and gluteal muscle. The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour was assessed in relation to both PSA level and GS. Eighty-two patients (91.1%) demonstrated pathologic tracer accumulation in the primary tumour that exceeded physiologic tracer uptake in normal prostate tissue (median SUV{sub max}: 12.5 vs. 3.9). Tumours with GS of 6, 7a (3+4) and 7b (4+3) showed significantly lower {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake, with median SUV{sub max} of 5.9, 8.3 and 8.2, respectively, compared to patients with GS >7 (median SUV{sub max}: 21.2; p < 0.001). PC patients with PSA ≥10.0 ng/ml exhibited significantly higher uptake than those with PSA levels <10.0 ng/ml (median SUV{sub max}: 17.6 versus 7.7; p < 0.001). In 24 patients (26.7%), 82 lymph nodes with pathologic tracer accumulation consistent with metastases were detected (median SUV{sub max}: 10.6). Eleven patients (12.2%) revealed 55 pathologic osseous lesions suspicious for bone metastases (median SUV{sub max}: 11.6). The GS and PSA level correlated with

  14. Are dual-phase 18F-FDG PET scans necessary in nasopharyngeal carcinoma to assess the primary tumour and loco-regional nodes?

    Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Yu-Chen; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Hsu, Ching-Han; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Fu, Ying-Kai; Ng, Shu-Hang

    2005-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the efficacy of dual-phase positron emission tomography (PET) in evaluating the loco-regional status of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Eighty-four patients with newly diagnosed NPC and a fasting serum glucose level of 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET studies (at 40 min and 3 h after injection of 370 MBq 18 F-FDG) and head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed within 1 week. Diagnostic criteria for NPC comprised the histopathological findings, the joint judgments of the research team and the post-treatment outcome. Each lesion's maximum standardised uptake value (SUV) and retention index were obtained. SUV data were evaluated using a paired test. Receiver operating characteristic curves and calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) determined the discriminative power. 18 F-FDG PET was significantly superior to MRI in identifying lower neck NPC nodal metastasis (AUC: 1 vs 0. 972, P=0.046) and overall loco-regional metastases (AUC: 0.985 vs 0.958, P=0.036). However, 18 F-FDG PET was similar to MRI in detecting primary tumour, as well as retropharyngeal, upper neck and supraclavicular nodal metastases. There was no significant difference between early phase (40 min) and delayed phase (3 h) 18 F-FDG PET in the detection of primary tumours (accuracy: 100% vs 100%) or loco-regional nodal metastasis (AUC: 0.984 vs 0.985, P=0.834). 18 F-FDG PET is superior to MRI in identifying lower neck nodal metastasis of NPC. Additional 3-h 18 F-FDG PET contributes no further information in the detection of primary tumours or loco-regional metastatic nodes in untreated NPC patients. (orig.)

  15. Noninvasive quantification of 18F-FLT human brain PET for the assessment of tumour proliferation in patients with high-grade glioma

    Backes, Heiko; Ullrich, Roland; Neumaier, Bernd; Kracht, Lutz; Wienhard, Klaus; Jacobs, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    Compartmental modelling of 3 ' -deoxy-3 ' -[ 18 F]-fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT) PET-derived kinetics provides a method for noninvasive assessment of the proliferation rate of gliomas. Such analyses, however, require an input function generally derived by serial blood sampling and counting. In the current study, 18 F-FLT kinetic parameters obtained from image-derived input functions were compared with those from input functions derived from arterialized blood samples. Based on the analysis of 11 patients with glioma (WHO grade II-IV) a procedure for the automated extraction of an input function from 18 F-FLT brain PET data was derived. The time-activity curve of the volume of interest with the maximum difference in 18 F-FLT uptake during the first 5 min after injection and the period from 60 to 90 min was corrected for partial-volume effects and in vivo metabolism of 18 F-FLT. For each patient a two-compartment kinetic model was applied to the tumour tissue using the image-derived input function. The resulting kinetic rate constants K 1 (transport across the blood-brain barrier) and K i (metabolic rate constant or net influx constant) were compared with those obtained from the same data using the input function derived from blood samples. Additionally, the metabolic rate constant was correlated with the frequency of tumour cells stained with Ki-67, a widely used immunohistochemical marker of cell proliferation. The rate constants from kinetic modelling were comparable when the blood sample-derived input functions were replaced by the image-derived functions (K 1,img and K 1,sample , r = 0.95, p -5 ; K i,img and K i,sample , r = 0.86, p 1,img and K 1,sample , p = 0.20; K i,img and K i,sample , p = 0.92). Furthermore, a significant correlation between K i,img and the percentage of Ki-67-positive cells was observed (r = 0.73, p = 0.01). Kinetic modelling of 18 F-FLT brain PET data using image-derived input functions extracted from human brain PET data with the practical

  16. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/Computed Tomography for Primary Brain Tumors

    Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind; Hess, Søren; Grupe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Structural imaging with computed tomography (CT) and MR imaging is the mainstay in primary diagnosis of primary brain tumors, but these modalities depend on morphologic appearance and an intact blood-brain barrier, and important aspects of tumor biology are not addressed. Such issues may...

  17. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen.

    Benedykcinska, Anna; Ferreira, Andreia; Lau, Joanne; Broni, Jessica; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Henriquez, Nico V; Brandner, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS) can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP) is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER) allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen

    Anna Benedykcinska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours.

  19. Decrease of deleted in malignant brain tumour-1 (DMBT-1) expression is a crucial late event in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Sasaki, M; Huang, S-F; Chen, M-F

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the participation of DMBT-1, a candidate tumour suppressor gene, in the development of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma via intraductal papillary neoplasm of the liver (IPN-L) arising in hepatolithiasis. DMBT-1 plays a role in mucosal immune defence. METHODS AND RESULTS: The e...

  20. Application of the Moving Strip Technique of Fletcher in the radiation treatment of primary malignant tumours of the ovary

    Dana, M.; Louppe, C.; Koskas, Y.; Chotin, G.; Briot, E.

    1977-01-01

    The Moving Strip Technique for irradiation of the abdomen perfected by Fletcher and Delclos represents considerable progress in terms of radiotherapy for carcinomas of the ovary by virtue of its simplicity, good tolerance, the homogeneous dose delivered to the entire abdominal cavity and the absence of sequelae. It is possible to deliver a dose of the order of 2,500 rads in 10 days to each abdominal segment, this being equivalent to 3,500 rads in 3,5 weeks. This moderate dose is aimed only at dealing with micromodular invasion and the superimposition of added local doses is required for residual tumour, marked using clips. From a histological standpoint, the worst group seems to be adenocarcinomas. Systematic sequential surgery for excision or reduction, chemotherapy to dry out ascites, moving strip irradiation with superimposed doses locally and long term chemotherapy should make it possible to improve the prognostic results of this tumour, for which the outlook remains poor [fr

  1. The effects of X-irradiation, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea or combined treatment on O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity in fetal rat brain and liver and the induction of CNS tumours

    Stammberger, I.; Nice, L.; Schmahl, W.

    1990-01-01

    Wistar rats were treated in utero on day 16 of gestation either by X-irradiation, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), or both in combination. The O 6 -alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AT) activity of the fetal brain and liver was analyzed and long-term observations were made to reveal any relationship between the O 6 -ethylguanine repair capability and tumour incidence in the organs of the offspring. The AT activity in the brain was affected to the same extent in the fetuses as in the dams. There was a 60.9% decrease in AT activity in fetuses 24 h after ENU treatment. This correlates with a significant increase in the incidence of brain tumours in the treated offspring (44.1%) compared to control animals. The inductive effect of X-irradiation on AT activity corresponded in turn with a reduction of the incidence of tumours after the combined treatment. In the liver of the rat fetuses, there was generally no effect of treatment on AT activity in contrast to the results obtained for the dams, where an increased AT activity was observed. There were no tumours of the liver observed in the offspring after either treatment alone or after combined treatment. It is suggested that the combined treatment of rat fetuses could significantly reduce the incidence of brain tumours in adult life. (author)

  2. The effects of X-irradiation, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea or combined treatment on O sup 6 -alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity in fetal rat brain and liver and the induction of CNS tumours

    Stammberger, I.; Nice, L. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Walter-Straub-Institut fuer Pharmakologie und Toxikologie); Schmahl, W. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Pathologie)

    1990-02-01

    Wistar rats were treated in utero on day 16 of gestation either by X-irradiation, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), or both in combination. The O{sup 6}-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AT) activity of the fetal brain and liver was analyzed and long-term observations were made to reveal any relationship between the O{sup 6}-ethylguanine repair capability and tumour incidence in the organs of the offspring. The AT activity in the brain was affected to the same extent in the fetuses as in the dams. There was a 60.9% decrease in AT activity in fetuses 24 h after ENU treatment. This correlates with a significant increase in the incidence of brain tumours in the treated offspring (44.1%) compared to control animals. The inductive effect of X-irradiation on AT activity corresponded in turn with a reduction of the incidence of tumours after the combined treatment. In the liver of the rat fetuses, there was generally no effect of treatment on AT activity in contrast to the results obtained for the dams, where an increased AT activity was observed. There were no tumours of the liver observed in the offspring after either treatment alone or after combined treatment. It is suggested that the combined treatment of rat fetuses could significantly reduce the incidence of brain tumours in adult life. (author).

  3. Case-control study of the association between malignant brain tumours diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 and mobile and cordless phone use.

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Söderqvist, Fredrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown a consistent association between long-term use of mobile and cordless phones and glioma and acoustic neuroma, but not for meningioma. When used these phones emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) and the brain is the main target organ for the handheld phone. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified in May, 2011 RF-EMF as a group 2B, i.e. a 'possible' human carcinogen. The aim of this study was to further explore the relationship between especially long-term (>10 years) use of wireless phones and the development of malignant brain tumours. We conducted a new case-control study of brain tumour cases of both genders aged 18-75 years and diagnosed during 2007-2009. One population-based control matched on gender and age (within 5 years) was used to each case. Here, we report on malignant cases including all available controls. Exposures on e.g. use of mobile phones and cordless phones were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index using the whole control sample. Of the cases with a malignant brain tumour, 87% (n=593) participated, and 85% (n=1,368) of controls in the whole study answered the questionnaire. The odds ratio (OR) for mobile phone use of the analogue type was 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04‑3.3, increasing with >25 years of latency (time since first exposure) to an OR=3.3, 95% CI=1.6-6.9. Digital 2G mobile phone use rendered an OR=1.6, 95% CI=0.996-2.7, increasing with latency >15-20 years to an OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2-3.6. The results for cordless phone use were OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.1-2.9, and, for latency of 15-20 years, the OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2-3.8. Few participants had used a cordless phone for >20-25 years. Digital type of wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones, cordless phones) gave increased risk with latency >1-5 years, then a lower risk in the following

  4. Electrochemotherapy of tumours

    Sersa, G.; Cemazar, M.; Rudolf, Z.; Miklavcic, D.

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy consists of chemotherapy followed by local application of electric pulses to the tumour to increase drug delivery into cells. Drug uptake can be increased by electroporation for only those drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, only bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical trials. In vitro studies demonstrated several fold increase of their cytotoxicity after electroporation of cells. In vivo, electroporation of tumours after local or systemic administration of either of the drugs, i.e. electrochemotherapy, proved to be an effective antitumour treatment. In preclinical studies on several tumour models, electrochemotherapy either with bleomycin or cisplatin was elaborated and parameters for effective local tumour control were determined. In veterinary medicine, electrochemotherapy also proved to be effective in the treatment of primary tumours in cats, dogs and horses. In human clinical studies, electrochemotherapy was performed on the patients with progressive disease and accessible tumour nodules of different malignancies. All clinical studies demonstrated that electrochemotherapy is an effective treatment for local tumour control in cancer patients. (author)

  5. Familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism/hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome caused by germline gross deletion or point mutations of CDC73 gene in Chinese.

    Kong, Jing; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Shi, Jie; Hu, Yingying; Jiang, Yan; Li, Mei; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Xing, Xiaoping

    2014-08-01

    Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT) and familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) are two subtypes of familial primary hyperparathyroidism, which are rarely reported in Chinese population. Here, we reported three FIHP families and one HPT-JT family with long-term follow-up and genetic analysis. A total of 22 patients, from four FIHP/HPT-JT families of Chinese descent, were recruited and genomic DNA was extracted from their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Direct sequencing for MEN1, CDC73, CASR gene was conducted. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study the effect of splice site mutations and gross deletion mutations. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse parafibromin expression in parathyroid tumours. Genotype-phenotype correlations were assessed through clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up data. Genetic analysis revealed four CDC73 germline mutations that were responsible for the four kindreds, including two novel point mutation (c.157 G>T and IVS3+1 G>A), one recurrent point mutation (c.664 C>T) and one deletion mutation (c.307+?_513-?del exons 4, 5, 6). RT-PCR confirmed that IVS3+1 G>A generated an aberrant transcript with exon3 deletion. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated reduced nuclear parafibromin expression in tumours supporting the pathogenic effects of these mutations. This study supplies information on mutations and phenotypes of HPT-JT/FIHP syndrome in Chinese. Screening for gross deletion and point mutations of the CDC73 gene is necessary in susceptible subjects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  7. Unsuspected Active Sarcoidosis Diagnosed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT During the Search for a Primary Tumour in a Patient with Bone Lesions

    Caobelli, Federico; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Soffientini, Alberto; Guerra, Ugo Paolo [Fondazion Poliambulanza, Brescia (Italy); Gabanelli, Sara Vincenzina; Brucato, Antonio [Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo (Italy); Giubbini, Raffaele [Univ. of Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology, characterised by granulomatous lesions with heterogeneous clinical manifestations affecting multiple organs and tissues. Although the respiratory system is most commonly affected, the disease may also present with bone lesions. We report the case of a 31-year old woman who presented with low back pain and no history of cancer and who was found to have suspicious lesions involving the entire spine on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The patient underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to search for a primary tumour and for staging purposes. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT revealed a pattern of hypermetabolic activity in widespread skeletal lesions and in a single left cervical lymph node. The primary tumour was not found, thus suggesting a haematologic disorder. Subsequent biopsies of a cervical lymph node and of bone tissue from L4 revealed active sarcoidosis with no evidence of cancer. This underlines the importance of considering all alternatives when hypermetabolic lesions are found on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Furthermore, {sup 18}F-FDG PET can be very useful to indicate accessible sites for guiding fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC)

  8. Unsuspected Active Sarcoidosis Diagnosed by 18F-FDG PET/CT During the Search for a Primary Tumour in a Patient with Bone Lesions

    Caobelli, Federico; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Soffientini, Alberto; Guerra, Ugo Paolo; Gabanelli, Sara Vincenzina; Brucato, Antonio; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology, characterised by granulomatous lesions with heterogeneous clinical manifestations affecting multiple organs and tissues. Although the respiratory system is most commonly affected, the disease may also present with bone lesions. We report the case of a 31-year old woman who presented with low back pain and no history of cancer and who was found to have suspicious lesions involving the entire spine on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The patient underwent 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to search for a primary tumour and for staging purposes. 18 F-FDG PET/CT revealed a pattern of hypermetabolic activity in widespread skeletal lesions and in a single left cervical lymph node. The primary tumour was not found, thus suggesting a haematologic disorder. Subsequent biopsies of a cervical lymph node and of bone tissue from L4 revealed active sarcoidosis with no evidence of cancer. This underlines the importance of considering all alternatives when hypermetabolic lesions are found on 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Furthermore, 18 F-FDG PET can be very useful to indicate accessible sites for guiding fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC)

  9. Role of magnetic resonance tractography in the preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment of patients with intra-axial brain tumours.

    Romano, A; Ferrante, M; Cipriani, V; Fasoli, F; Ferrante, L; D'Andrea, G; Fantozzi, L M; Bozzao, A

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the possibility of identifying precise white matter tracts situated in proximity to intracranial tumours, to define the anatomical and topographical relations between the same white matter tracts and the tumour, to verify the possibility of integrating tractographic images in the context of a package of three-dimensional anatomical images to send to the neuronavigation system, to assess the impact of this information on surgical planning, and to analyse, both pre-and postoperatively, the patient's clinical conditions as an index of the functional integrity of the fibres themselves. Twenty-five patients underwent diffusion tensor study prior to neurosurgery. With the use of dedicated software, relative colour maps were obtained and the trajectories of the white matter tracts adjacent to the tumour were reconstructed in three dimensions. These were then processed for preoperative planning. Planning, which was performed with the neuronavigator, was based on analysis of the location of the course of the main white matter tracts adjacent to the lesion (pyramidal tract, optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus). Two neurosurgeons were asked whether the tractography images had modified the access and/or intraoperative approach to the tumour. All patients were clinically assessed both pre-and postoperatively 1 month after the procedure to define the presence of symptoms related to the involvement of the white matter tracts studied and therefore to assess the integrity of the fibres after the operation. In one patient, the tumour was situated away from all the tracts studied and did not compress them in any way. Overall, 40/75 tracts studied had no anatomical relation with the tumour, were not displaced by the tumour or could not be visualised in their entire course. Analysis of the remaining 35 white matter tracts led to an a priori change in the surgical approach for corticotomy in four patients (16%), with no disagreement between the two

  10. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Larsen, Vibeke A; Muhic, Aida

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Both [(18)F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility...... of simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. METHODS: A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens m......MR system 20 min after injection of 200 MBq FET. The MRI protocol included standard structural MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging for BV measurements. Maximal relative tumour FET uptake (TBRmax) and BV (rBVmax), and Dice coefficients were calculated to assess the quantitative and spatial...

  11. Resection of the primary tumour versus no resection prior to systemic therapy in patients with colon cancer and synchronous unresectable metastases (UICC stage IV): SYNCHRONOUS - a randomised controlled multicentre trial (ISRCTN30964555)

    Rahbari, Nuh N; Koch, Moritz; Büchler, Markus W; Kieser, Meinhard; Weitz, Jürgen; Lordick, Florian; Fink, Christine; Bork, Ulrich; Stange, Annika; Jäger, Dirk; Luntz, Steffen P; Englert, Stefan; Rossion, Inga

    2012-01-01

    Currently, it remains unclear, if patients with colon cancer and synchronous unresectable metastases who present without severe symptoms should undergo resection of the primary tumour prior to systemic chemotherapy. Resection of the primary tumour may be associated with significant morbidity and delays the beginning of chemotherapy. However, it may prevent local symptoms and may, moreover, prolong survival as has been demonstrated in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. It is the aim of the present randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of primary tumour resection prior to systemic chemotherapy to prolong survival in patients with newly diagnosed colon cancer who are not amenable to curative therapy. The SYNCHRONOUS trial is a multicentre, randomised, controlled, superiority trial with a two-group parallel design. Colon cancer patients with synchronous unresectable metastases are eligible for inclusion. Exclusion criteria are primary tumour-related symptoms, inability to tolerate surgery and/or systemic chemotherapy and history of another primary cancer. Resection of the primary tumour as well as systemic chemotherapy is provided according to the standards of the participating institution. The primary endpoint is overall survival that is assessed with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. Furthermore, it is the objective of the trial to assess the safety of both treatment strategies as well as quality of life. The SYNCHRONOUS trial is a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of primary tumour resection before beginning of systemic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colon cancer not amenable to curative therapy. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN30964555

  12. Impact of brain tumour location on emotion and personality: a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping study on mentalization processes.

    Campanella, Fabio; Shallice, Tim; Ius, Tamara; Fabbro, Franco; Skrap, Miran

    2014-09-01

    Patients affected by brain tumours may show behavioural and emotional regulation deficits, sometimes showing flattened affect and sometimes experiencing a true 'change' in personality. However, little evidence is available to the surgeon as to what changes are likely to occur with damage at specific sites, as previous studies have either relied on single cases or provided only limited anatomical specificity, mostly reporting associations rather than dissociations of symptoms. We investigated these aspects in patients undergoing surgery for the removal of cerebral tumours. We argued that many of the problems described can be ascribed to the onset of difficulties in one or more of the different levels of the process of mentalizing (i.e. abstracting and reflecting upon) emotion and intentions, which impacts on everyday behaviour. These were investigated in terms of (i) emotion recognition; (ii) Theory of Mind; (iii) alexithymia; and (iv) self-maturity (personality disorder). We hypothesized that temporo/limbic areas would be critical for processing emotion and intentions at a more perceptual level, while frontal lobe structures would be more critical when higher levels of mentalization/abstraction are required. We administered four different tasks, Task 1: emotion recognition of Ekman faces; Task 2: the Eyes Test (Theory of Mind); Task 3: Toronto Alexithymia Scale; and Task 4: Temperament and Character Inventory (a personality inventory), both immediately before and few days after the operation for the removal of brain tumours in a series of 71 patients (age range: 18-75 years; 33 female) with lesions located in the left or right frontal, temporal and parietal lobes. Lobe-based and voxel-based analysis confirmed that tasks requiring interpretation of emotions and intentions at more basic (less mentalized) levels (Tasks 1 and 2) were more affected by temporo/insular lesions, with emotion recognition (Task 1) being maximally impaired by anterior temporal and amygdala

  13. Specific diagnosis of brain disease with double isotope brain scanning

    Ell, P J; Lotritsch, K H; Hilbrand, E; Meixner, M; Barolin, G; Scholz, H [Landesunfallkrankenhaus, Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Landesnervenkrankenhaus, Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Neurology)

    1976-02-01

    25 patients with known cerebral disease (either CVA's or primary or secondary tumours) diagnosed by clinical and angiographic criteria were submitted to a double siotope imaging technique using sup(99m)TcO/sub 4/- and sup(99m)Tc-EHDP. The different biological behaviour of these radiopharmaceuticals has provided specific and differential diagnosis between vascular and neoplastic disease of the brain. sup(99m)Tc-EHDP is shown to be the tracer of choice for the imaging of CVA's and sup(99m)TcO/sub 4/- is confirmed as the tracer of choice for the imaging of primary or secondary tumours in the brain.

  14. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair enhances initiation and growth of neuroblastoma and brain tumour multicellular spheroids.

    Samuel L Collins

    Full Text Available Multicellular tumour spheroid (MCTS cultures are excellent model systems for simulating the development and microenvironmental conditions of in vivo tumour growth. Many documented cell lines can generate differentiated MCTS when cultured in suspension or in a non-adhesive environment. While physiological and biochemical properties of MCTS have been extensively characterized, insight into the events and conditions responsible for initiation of these structures is lacking. MCTS are formed by only a small subpopulation of cells during surface-associated growth but the processes responsible for this differentiation are poorly understood and have not been previously studied experimentally. Analysis of gene expression within spheroids has provided clues but to date it is not known if the observed differences are a cause or consequence of MCTS growth. One mechanism linked to tumourigenesis in a number of cancers is genetic instability arising from impaired DNA mismatch repair (MMR. This study aimed to determine the role of MMR in MCTS initiation and development. Using surface-associated N2a and CHLA-02-ATRT culture systems we have investigated the impact of impaired MMR on MCTS growth. Analysis of the DNA MMR genes MLH1 and PMS2 revealed both to be significantly down-regulated at the mRNA level compared with non-spheroid-forming cells. By using small interfering RNA (siRNA against these genes we show that silencing of MLH1 and PMS2 enhances both MCTS initiation and subsequent expansion. This effect was prolonged over several passages following siRNA transfection. Down-regulation of DNA MMR can contribute to tumour initiation and progression in N2a and CHLA-02-ATRT MCTS models. Studies of surface-associated MCTS differentiation may have broader applications in studying events in the initiation of cancer foci.

  15. Deleted in malignant brain tumour 1 (DMBT1) is secreted in the oviduct and involved in the mechanism of fertilization in equine and porcine species

    Ambruosi, Barbara; Accogli, Gianluca; Douet, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    fertilization rate, and that this effect is cancelled by the addition of antibodies, in both porcine and equine species. Moreover, pre-incubation of oocytes with recombinant DMBT1 induces an increase of the monospermic fertilization rate in the pig, confirming an involvement of DMBT1 in the fertilization...... allowed us to identify the DMBT1 protein as well as a DMBT1-like protein in several mammals. Our results strongly suggest an important role of DMBT1 in the process of fertilization.......Oviductal environment affects preparation of gametes for fertilization, fertilization itself, and the subsequent embryo development. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of oviductal fluid and the possible involvement of Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 (DMBT1) on in vitro...

  16. Theoretical and experimental studies on three-dimensional irradiation planning in the telecobalt therapy of primary tumours of the epipharynx

    Klose, G.

    1975-01-01

    A few examples of the numerous conceivable and measured irradiation methods for the radiotherapeutical treatment of epipharynx tumours are given and are documented by means of their advantages and disadvantages. As a result, a special standard technique is obtained. Two counterfields are combined with a nasal field. By using lead wedge filters it is possible to sufficiently protect the critical organs and to relatively homogeneously detect the whole standardized target volume. The combination is supplemented by two longitudinal fields along the cervical lymphatic node chains in order to detect existing or latent lymphatic node metastasis. For therapy purposes, only γ-rays having an energy above 1 MeV come into question. (ORU/LH) [de

  17. Effects of an alveolar recruitment maneuver on subdural pressure, brain swelling, and mean arterial pressure in patients undergoing supratentorial tumour resection: a randomized crossover study.

    Flexman, Alana M; Gooderham, Peter A; Griesdale, Donald E; Argue, Ruth; Toyota, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Although recruitment maneuvers have been advocated as part of a lung protective ventilation strategy, their effects on cerebral physiology during elective neurosurgery are unknown. Our objectives were to determine the effects of an alveolar recruitment maneuver on subdural pressure (SDP), brain relaxation score (BRS), and cerebral perfusion pressure among patients undergoing supratentorial tumour resection. In this prospective crossover study, patients scheduled for resection of a supratentorial brain tumour were randomized to undergo either a recruitment maneuver (30 cm of water for 30 sec) or a "sham" maneuver (5 cm of water for 30 sec), followed by the alternative intervention after a 90-sec equilibration period. Subdural pressure was measured through a dural perforation following opening of the cranium. Subdural pressure and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded continuously. The blinded neurosurgeon provided a BRS at baseline and at the end of each intervention. During each treatment, the changes in SDP, BRS, and MAP were compared. Twenty-one patients underwent the study procedure. The increase in SDP was higher during the recruitment maneuver than during the sham maneuver (difference, 3.9 mmHg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2 to 5.6; P < 0.001). Mean arterial pressure decreased further in the recruitment maneuver than in the sham maneuver (difference, -9.0 mmHg; 95% CI, -12.5 to -5.6; P < 0.001). Cerebral perfusion pressure decreased 14 mmHg (95% CI, 4 to 24) during the recruitment maneuver. The BRS did not change with either maneuver. Our results suggest that recruitment maneuvers increase subdural pressure and reduce cerebral perfusion pressure, although the clinical importance of these findings is thus far unknown. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02093117.

  18. New Zealand adolescents’ cellphone and cordless phone user-habits: are they at increased risk of brain tumours already? A cross-sectional study

    2013-01-01

    Background Cellphone and cordless phone use is very prevalent among early adolescents, but the extent and types of use is not well documented. This paper explores how, and to what extent, New Zealand adolescents are typically using and exposed to active cellphones and cordless phones, and considers implications of this in relation to brain tumour risk, with reference to current research findings. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 373 Year 7 and 8 school students with a mean age of 12.3 years (range 10.3-13.7 years) from the Wellington region of New Zealand. Participants completed a questionnaire and measured their normal body-to-phone texting distances. Main exposure-metrics included self-reported time spent with an active cellphone close to the body, estimated time and number of calls on both phone types, estimated and actual extent of SMS text-messaging, cellphone functions used and people texted. Statistical analyses used Pearson Chi2 tests and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r). Analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 19.0. Results Both cellphones and cordless phones were used by approximately 90% of students. A third of participants had already used a cordless phone for ≥ 7 years. In 4 years from the survey to mid-2013, the cordless phone use of 6% of participants would equal that of the highest Interphone decile (≥ 1640 hours), at the surveyed rate of use. High cellphone use was related to cellphone location at night, being woken regularly, and being tired at school. More than a third of parents thought cellphones carried a moderate-to-high health risk for their child. Conclusions While cellphones were very popular for entertainment and social interaction via texting, cordless phones were most popular for calls. If their use continued at the reported rate, many would be at increased risk of specific brain tumours by their mid-teens, based on findings of the Interphone and Hardell-group studies. PMID:23302218

  19. New Zealand adolescents' cellphone and cordless phone user-habits: are they at increased risk of brain tumours already? A cross-sectional study.

    Redmayne, Mary

    2013-01-10

    Cellphone and cordless phone use is very prevalent among early adolescents, but the extent and types of use is not well documented. This paper explores how, and to what extent, New Zealand adolescents are typically using and exposed to active cellphones and cordless phones, and considers implications of this in relation to brain tumour risk, with reference to current research findings. This cross-sectional study recruited 373 Year 7 and 8 school students with a mean age of 12.3 years (range 10.3-13.7 years) from the Wellington region of New Zealand. Participants completed a questionnaire and measured their normal body-to-phone texting distances. Main exposure-metrics included self-reported time spent with an active cellphone close to the body, estimated time and number of calls on both phone types, estimated and actual extent of SMS text-messaging, cellphone functions used and people texted. Statistical analyses used Pearson Chi2 tests and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). Analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 19.0. Both cellphones and cordless phones were used by approximately 90% of students. A third of participants had already used a cordless phone for ≥ 7 years. In 4 years from the survey to mid-2013, the cordless phone use of 6% of participants would equal that of the highest Interphone decile (≥ 1640 hours), at the surveyed rate of use. High cellphone use was related to cellphone location at night, being woken regularly, and being tired at school. More than a third of parents thought cellphones carried a moderate-to-high health risk for their child. While cellphones were very popular for entertainment and social interaction via texting, cordless phones were most popular for calls. If their use continued at the reported rate, many would be at increased risk of specific brain tumours by their mid-teens, based on findings of the Interphone and Hardell-group studies.

  20. Intercalary defects reconstruction of the femur and tibia after primary malignant bone tumour resection. A series of 13 cases.

    Brunet, O; Anract, P; Bouabid, S; Babinet, A; Dumaine, V; Toméno, B; Biau, D

    2011-09-01

    Performing intercalary segment reconstruction after malignant bone tumour resection results in both mechanical and biological challenges. Fixation must be solid enough to avoid short-term or mid-term mechanical failure. The use of an allograft or autograft must ensure long-term survival of the reconstruction. The goal of this study was to analyse the clinical and radiological outcomes of these reconstructions. Thirteen patients were operated on eight femurs and five tibias. The median age was 20 years old (range 14-50). The most common diagnosis was osteosarcoma. The median resection length was 15cm (Q1-Q3: 6-26). A plate was used for fixation in nine cases and an intramedullary locked nail in four cases. An isolated bone autograft was used in two cases, an isolated bone allograft in one case, a dual autograft-allograft composite in six cases, and vascularised fibula and allograft combination in four cases. The cumulative probability of union was 46% (95% CI: 0-99%) at 1 year; at the final follow-up, union was achieved in 12 patients (92%). Because of non-unions, 13 iterative procedures were needed to obtain these results. A non-displaced fracture of a cuboid-shaped tibial graft occurred in one patient, which was treated conservatively. Three infections occurred. The results of intercalary segmental defects reconstruction after bone tumour resection were good, both from an oncologic and radiological point-of-view. One or more iterative procedures are sometimes needed to finally obtain bone union. We prefer to use a free rectangular cuboidal tibial graft since reconstruction with a vascularised autograft is technically more difficult. The choice of fixation methods is still controversial and no approach was found to be superior. Level IV. Retrospective study. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Brain scintigraphy (SPECT) using 201thallium in patients with primary tumors of the brain

    Barzen, G.; Schubert, C.; Richter, W.; Calder, D.; Eichstaedt, H.; Felix, R.; Baerwald, M.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the role of thallium 201 Single-Photon-Emission-Computed-Tomography (SPECT) in diagnosis, differential diagnosis and follow-up of 33 patients with primary brain tumors. 27 of 33 lesions were detectable by Tl-201-SPECT because only two of eight low-grade (grade 1 and 2) astrocytomas showed Tl-201 accumulation up to a tumor to nontumor ratio of 2.6. High grade (grade 3 and 4) astrocytomas showed Tl-201 accumulation in the range of 2.2 up to 13.0 and were different from low-grade astrocytomas. Noninvasive grading of astrocytomas is therefore possible, whereas differential diagnosis of oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas or meningeomas was not possible with Tl-201. In the follow-up of six patients, we could demonstrate, that tumor progression is correlated with increasing and tumor regression with decreasing Tl-201 accumulations. This functional changings proceed morphological findings in CT. But vanishing of Tl-201 accumulation during therapy does not mean vanishing of tumor as could be demonstrated by follow-up. (orig.) [de

  2. Mutations in XPR1 cause primary familial brain calcification associated with altered phosphate export

    A. Legati (Andrea); D. Giovannini (Donatella); G. Nicolas (Gaël); U. López-Sánchez (Uriel); B. Quintáns (Beatriz); J.R. Oliveira (Joao); R.L. Sears (Renee L); E.M. Ramos (Eliana Marisa); E. Spiteri (Elizabeth); M.J. Sobrido (Maria); A. Carracedo (Angel); C. Castro-Fernández (Cristina); S. Cubizolle (Stéphanie); B.L. Fogel (Brent L); C. Goizet (Cyril); J.C. Jen (Joanna C); S. Kirdlarp (Suppachok); A.E. Lang (Anthony E); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); W. Mitarnun (Witoon); M. Paucar (Martin); H.L. Paulson (Henry); J. Pariente (Jérémie); A.-C. Richard (Anne-Claire); N.S. Salins (Naomi S); S.A. Simpson (Sheila A); P. Striano (Pasquale); P. Svenningsson (Per); F. Tison (François); V.K. Unni (Vivek K); O. Vanakker (Olivier); M.W. Wessels (Marja); S. Wetchaphanphesat (Suppachok); M. Yang (Michele); F. Boller (Francois); D. Campion (Dominique); D. Hannequin (Didier); M. Sitbon (Marc); H. Geschwind; J.-L. Battini (Jean-Luc); D. Coppola (Domenico)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPrimary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurological disease characterized by calcium phosphate deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions and has thus far been associated with SLC20A2, PDGFB or PDGFRB mutations. We identified in multiple families with PFBC mutations

  3. Newly-derived neuroblastoma cell lines propagated in serum-free media recapitulate the genotype and phenotype of primary neuroblastoma tumours

    Bate-Eya, Laurel T.; Ebus, Marli E.; Koster, Jan; den Hartog, Ilona J. M.; Zwijnenburg, Danny A.; Schild, Linda; van der Ploeg, Ida; Dolman, M. Emmy M.; Caron, Huib N.; Versteeg, Rogier; Molenaar, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently protocols have been devised for the culturing of cell lines from fresh tumours under serum-free conditions in defined neural stem cell medium. These cells, frequently called tumour initiating cells (TICs) closely retained characteristics of the tumours of origin. We report the isolation of

  4. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. ..... rangement of the EGF receptor gene in primary human brain tumors ... the INK4A gene in superficial bladder tumors.

  5. Prognosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: difference between primary and progressive tumours and implications for therapy.

    Schrier, B.P.; Hollander, M.P.; Rhijn, B.W. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the difference in prognosis between progressive and primary muscle-invasive bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1986 to 2000, 74 patients with progressive muscle-invasive bladder cancer were identified. Eighty-nine patients with primary muscle-invasive bladder cancer

  6. Impaired cholesterol esterification in primary brain cultures of the lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutant

    Patel, S.C.; Suresh, S.; Weintroub, H.; Brady, R.O.; Pentchev, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Esterification of cholesterol was investigated in primary neuroglial cultures obtained from newborn lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutants. An impairment in 3 H-oleic acid incorporation into cholesteryl esters was demonstrated in cultures of homozygous LCSD brain. Primary cultures derived from other phenotypically normal pups of the carrier breeders esterified cholesterol at normal levels or at levels which were intermediary between normal and deficient indicating a phenotypic expression of the LCSD heterozygote genotype. These observations on LCSD mutant brain cells indicate that the defect in cholesterol esterification is closely related to the primary genetic defect and is expressed in neuroglial cells in culture

  7. Melanoma Patients with Unknown Primary Site or Nodal Recurrence after Initial Diagnosis Have a Favourable Survival Compared to Those with Synchronous Lymph Node Metastasis and Primary Tumour

    Weide, Benjamin; Faller, Christine; Els?sser, Margrit; B?ttner, Petra; Pflugfelder, Annette; Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Bauer, J?rgen; Meier, Friedegund; Garbe, Claus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A direct comparison of prognosis between patients with regional lymph node metastases (LNM) detected synchronously with the primary melanoma (primary LNM), patients who developed their first LNM subsequently (secondary LNM) and those with initial LNM in melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP) is missing thus far. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival of 498 patients was calculated from the time point of the first macroscopic LNM using Kaplan Meier and multivariate Cox hazard regression ...

  8. Prognostic and predictive value of primary tumour side in patients with RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy and EGFR directed antibodies in six randomized trials.

    Arnold, D; Lueza, B; Douillard, J-Y; Peeters, M; Lenz, H-J; Venook, A; Heinemann, V; Van Cutsem, E; Pignon, J-P; Tabernero, J; Cervantes, A; Ciardiello, F

    2017-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a genetically heterogeneous disease and that tumours arising from different sides of the colon (left versus right) have different clinical outcomes. Furthermore, previous analyses comparing the activity of different classes of targeted agents in patients with KRAS wild-type (wt) or RAS wt mCRC suggest that primary tumour location (side), might be both prognostic and predictive for clinical outcome. This retrospective analysis investigated the prognostic and predictive influence of the localization of the primary tumour in patients with unresectable RAS wt mCRC included in six randomized trials (CRYSTAL, FIRE-3, CALGB 80405, PRIME, PEAK and 20050181), comparing chemotherapy plus EGFR antibody therapy (experimental arm) with chemotherapy or chemotherapy and bevacizumab (control arms). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumours, and odds ratios (ORs) for objective response rate (ORR) were estimated by pooling individual study HRs/ORs. The predictive value was evaluated by pooling study interaction between treatment effect and tumour side. Primary tumour location and RAS mutation status were available for 2159 of the 5760 patients (37.5%) randomized across the 6 trials, 515 right-sided and 1644 left-sided. A significantly worse prognosis was observed for patients with right-sided tumours compared with those with left-sided tumours in both the pooled control and experimental arms for OS [HRs = 2.03 (95% CI: 1.69-2.42) and 1.38 (1.17-1.63), respectively], PFS [HRs = 1.59 (1.34-1.88) and 1.25 (1.06-1.47)], and ORR [ORs = 0.38 (0.28-0.50) and 0.56 (0.43-0.73)]. In terms of a predictive effect, a significant benefit for chemotherapy plus EGFR antibody therapy was observed in patients with left-sided tumours [HRs = 0.75 (0.67-0.84) and 0.78 (0.70-0.87) for OS

  9. Calorie restriction as an anti-invasive therapy for malignant brain cancer in the VM mouse.

    Shelton, Laura M; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Mukherjee, Purna; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2010-07-23

    GBM (glioblastoma multiforme) is the most aggressive and invasive form of primary human brain cancer. We recently developed a novel brain cancer model in the inbred VM mouse strain that shares several characteristics with human GBM. Using bioluminescence imaging, we tested the efficacy of CR (calorie restriction) for its ability to reduce tumour size and invasion. CR targets glycolysis and rapid tumour cell growth in part by lowering circulating glucose levels. The VM-M3 tumour cells were implanted intracerebrally in the syngeneic VM mouse host. Approx. 12-15 days post-implantation, brains were removed and both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres were imaged to measure bioluminescence of invading tumour cells. CR significantly reduced the invasion of tumour cells from the implanted ipsilateral hemisphere into the contralateral hemisphere. The total percentage of Ki-67-stained cells within the primary tumour and the total number of blood vessels was also significantly lower in the CR-treated mice than in the mice fed ad libitum, suggesting that CR is anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic. Our findings indicate that the VM-M3 GBM model is a valuable tool for studying brain tumour cell invasion and for evaluating potential therapeutic approaches for managing invasive brain cancer. In addition, we show that CR can be effective in reducing malignant brain tumour growth and invasion.

  10. Calorie Restriction as an Anti-Invasive Therapy for Malignant Brain Cancer in the VM Mouse

    Laura M Shelton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available GBM (glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive and invasive form of primary human brain cancer. We recently developed a novel brain cancer model in the inbred VM mouse strain that shares several characteristics with human GBM. Using bioluminescence imaging, we tested the efficacy of CR (calorie restriction for its ability to reduce tumour size and invasion. CR targets glycolysis and rapid tumour cell growth in part by lowering circulating glucose levels. The VM-M3 tumour cells were implanted intracerebrally in the syngeneic VM mouse host. Approx. 12-15 days post-implantation, brains were removed and both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres were imaged to measure bioluminescence of invading tumour cells. CR significantly reduced the invasion of tumour cells from the implanted ipsilateral hemisphere into the contralateral hemisphere. The total percentage of Ki-67-stained cells within the primary tumour and the total number of blood vessels was also significantly lower in the CR-treated mice than in the mice fed ad libitum, suggesting that CR is anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic. Our findings indicate that the VM-M3 GBM model is a valuable tool for studying brain tumour cell invasion and for evaluating potential therapeutic approaches for managing invasive brain cancer. In addition, we show that CR can be effective in reducing malignant brain tumour growth and invasion.

  11. Primary thyroid cancer after a first tumour in childhood (the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study): a nested case-control study

    Sigurdson, Alice J.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Mertens, Ann C.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Liu, Yan; Berkow, Roger L.; Hammond, Sue; Neglia, Joseph P.; Meadows, Anna T.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Survivors of malignant disease in childhood who have had radiotherapy to the head, neck, or upper thorax have an increased risk of subsequent primary thyroid cancer, but the magnitude of risk over the therapeutic dose range has not been well established. We aimed to quantify the long-term risk of

  12. New Zealand adolescents’ cellphone and cordless phone user-habits: are they at increased risk of brain tumours already? A cross-sectional study

    Redmayne Mary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellphone and cordless phone use is very prevalent among early adolescents, but the extent and types of use is not well documented. This paper explores how, and to what extent, New Zealand adolescents are typically using and exposed to active cellphones and cordless phones, and considers implications of this in relation to brain tumour risk, with reference to current research findings. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 373 Year 7 and 8 school students with a mean age of 12.3 years (range 10.3-13.7 years from the Wellington region of New Zealand. Participants completed a questionnaire and measured their normal body-to-phone texting distances. Main exposure-metrics included self-reported time spent with an active cellphone close to the body, estimated time and number of calls on both phone types, estimated and actual extent of SMS text-messaging, cellphone functions used and people texted. Statistical analyses used Pearson Chi2 tests and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r. Analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 19.0. Results Both cellphones and cordless phones were used by approximately 90% of students. A third of participants had already used a cordless phone for ≥ 7 years. In 4 years from the survey to mid-2013, the cordless phone use of 6% of participants would equal that of the highest Interphone decile (≥ 1640 hours, at the surveyed rate of use. High cellphone use was related to cellphone location at night, being woken regularly, and being tired at school. More than a third of parents thought cellphones carried a moderate-to-high health risk for their child. Conclusions While cellphones were very popular for entertainment and social interaction via texting, cordless phones were most popular for calls. If their use continued at the reported rate, many would be at increased risk of specific brain tumours by their mid-teens, based on findings of the Interphone and Hardell-group studies.

  13. Effectiveness of different treatment modalities for the management of adult-onset granulosa cell tumours of the ovary (primary and recurrent).

    Gurumurthy, Mahalakshmi; Bryant, Andrew; Shanbhag, Smruta

    2014-04-21

    Granulosa cell tumour is a rare gynaecological tumour of the ovary with recurrences many years after initial diagnosis and treatment. Evidence-based management of granulosa cell tumour of the ovary is limited, and treatment has not been standardised. Surgery, including fertility-sparing procedures for young women, has traditionally been the standard treatment. Adjuvant treatments following surgery have been based on non-randomised trials. A combination of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP) has traditionally been used for treatment of advanced and/or recurrent disease that cannot be optimally managed surgically. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatment modalities offered in current practice for the management of primary, residual and recurrent adult-onset granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) of the ovary. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to December 2013. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and observational studies that examined women with adult-onset granulosa cell tumours of the ovary (primary and recurrent). For non-randomised studies, we included studies that used multivariate analysis to adjust for baseline characteristics. Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Studies were heterogeneous with respect to treatment comparisons, so data were not synthesised in meta-analyses, and methods for assessing heterogeneity were not needed. Risk of bias in included studies was assessed by using the six core items used to assess RCTs and by evaluating four additional criteria specifically addressing risk of bias in non-randomised studies. Five retrospective cohort studies (535 women with a diagnosis of GCT) that used appropriate statistical methods

  14. Melanoma patients with unknown primary site or nodal recurrence after initial diagnosis have a favourable survival compared to those with synchronous lymph node metastasis and primary tumour.

    Benjamin Weide

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A direct comparison of prognosis between patients with regional lymph node metastases (LNM detected synchronously with the primary melanoma (primary LNM, patients who developed their first LNM subsequently (secondary LNM and those with initial LNM in melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP is missing thus far. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival of 498 patients was calculated from the time point of the first macroscopic LNM using Kaplan Meier and multivariate Cox hazard regression analysis. RESULTS: Patients with secondary LNM (HR = 0.67; p = 0.009 and those with initial LNM in MUP (HR = 0.45; p = 0.008 had a better prognosis compared to patients with primary LNM (median survival time 52 and 65 vs. 24 months, respectively. A high number of involved nodes, the presence of in-transit/satellite metastases and male gender had an additional independent unfavourable effect. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of patients with LNM in MUP and with secondary LNM is similar and considerably more favourable compared to those with primary LNM. This difference needs to be considered during patient counselling and for stratification purposes in clinical trials. The assumption of an immune privilege of patients with MUP which is responsible for rejection of the primary melanoma, and results in a favourable prognosis is not supported by our data.

  15. Therapeutical effect on blood-flow in three-phase scanning in primary malignant tumours and acute osteomyelitis

    Kovacic, K; Kusic, Z [Clinical Hospital Sestre Milosrdnice, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Cepulic, M [Children` s Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1994-10-01

    In the studies where the bone scan was limited only to the late static image, the main disadvantage was its nonspecifity. With three-phase bone scan the number of false positive findings was reduced by some peculiar diseases; for instance, acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. It is well known that various diseases, such as nonunion of the fracture, some surgical interventions, avascular necrosis... can imitate acute osteomyelitis on the static image. These diseases can only be differentiated from inflammation by blood-flow. Therefore, in all patients with the diagnosis of primary bone disease tumor, inflammation, trauma, aseptic necrosis... three-phase bone scintigraphy is performed. Here, only the patients with acute osteomyelitis and primary malignant bone tumors will be presented: the basic scintigram was done before the therapy started, and the second one as a part of the follow-up - in some patients during the therapy and in some after its ending. We noticed that the most reliable part of three-phase bone scan responding to the therapy is angioscintigraphy (blood-flow) and in some cases early static (blood-pool) image. These two phases, especially the first one, are in good correlation with the clinic, in contrast to the third phase which is delayed. From the presented cases it could be concluded that in acute osteomyelitis and primary malignant tumors, blood-flow and blood-pool images are unavoidable phases of the bone scanning when we want to correctly evaluate the effects of the therapy. (author).

  16. Digit ratio (2D:4D) in primary brain tumor patients: A case-control study.

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Tamasauskas, Sarunas; Deltuva, Vytenis Pranas; Tamasauskas, Arimantas; Sliauzys, Albertas; Bunevicius, Robertas

    2016-12-01

    The second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) reflects prenatal estrogen and testosterone exposure, and is established in utero. Sex steroids are implicated in development and progression of primary brain tumors. To investigate whether there is a link between 2D:4D ratio and primary brain tumors, and age at presentation. Digital images of the right and left palms of 85 primary brain tumor patients (age 56.96±13.68years; 71% women) and 106 (age 54.31±13.68years; 68% women) gender and age matched controls were obtained. The most common brain tumor diagnoses were meningioma (41%), glioblastoma (20%) and pituitary adenoma (16%). Right and left 2D:4D ratios, and right minus left 2D:4D (D r-l ) were compared between patients and controls, and were correlated with age. Right and left 2D:4D ratios were significantly lower in primary brain tumor patients relative to controls (t=-4.28, pbrain tumor patients and controls (p=0.27). In meningioma and glioma patients, age at presentation correlated negatively with left 2D:4D ratio (rho=-0.42, p=0.01 and rho=-0.36, p=0.02, respectively) and positively with D r-l (rho=0.45, p=0.009 and rho=0.65, p=0.04, respectively). Right and left hand 2D:4D ratios are lower in primary brain tumor patients relative to healthy individuals suggesting greater prenatal testosterone and lower prenatal estrogen exposure in brain tumor patients. Greater age at presentation is associated with greater D r-l and with lower left 2D:4D ratio of meningioma and glioma patients. Due to small sample size our results should be considered preliminary and interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synchronous and Metachronous Malignant Tumours expect the un-expected

    Mehdi, I.; Shah, A.H.; Moona, M.S.; Verma, K.; Abussa, A.; Elramih, R.; El-Hashmi, H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate occurrence of synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours, to find tumour types, age group, and relationship to treatment received. Methods: Previously diagnosed first primary tumour cases experiencing a synchronous or metachronous tumour, seen at AOI from February 2003 to August 2009 (78 months) were included. The cases were analyzed for morphology/histology of first primary tumour, age and gender of patient, treatment received for first tumour, time interval between the first and second primary tumour, morphology/histology of second tumour, and the treatment conferred for second tumour. Results: The second synchronous and metachronous tumours were 46/4025 (1.14%), in 18 males and 28 females (M:F 1:1.6). The age range was 16-75 years (median 43 years). The follow up time was 24-150 months. The time to second primary tumour was 2-132 months. The first primary tumours were breast, ovary, GIT and urinary bladder. The patients received surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy alone or as multi-modality treatment for the first tumours. The frequent second tumours were breast, ovary and Gastro Intestinal tumours. Conclusion: It is imperative that patients with a primary malignant tumour should be thoroughly, closely, and regularly followed. Genetic counseling, risk estimation, cancer screening and hemo prevention must be emphasized. Every subsequent occurring tumour should be biopsied. The effect of first tumour on the second or vice versa are still not fully understood and need exploration. The second primary tumour is usually more aggressive, treatment resistant, and metastasizes early requiring a more aggressive treatment strategy. (author)

  18. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    Jieqiong Wang; Ting Li; Bernhard A. Sabel; Zhiqiang Chen; Hongwei Wen; Jianhong Li; Xiaobin Xie; Diya Yang; Weiwei Chen; Ningli Wang; Junfang Xian; Huiguang He

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/...

  19. Gamma-knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from primary lung cancer

    Uchiyama, Bine; Satoh, Ken; Saijo, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    Forty patients with metastatic brain tumors from primary lung cancer underwent radiosurgery (γ-knife). We retrospectively compared their prior treatment history, number of metastatic foci, and performance status, to evaluate the effects of, and indications for, γ-knife therapy. After both the primary and the metastatic tumors were controlled, performance status could be used as an index in the choice of γ-knife therapy. Our results demonstrate that repeated γ-knife radiosurgeries prolonged survival time. Gamma-knife radiosurgery improves quality of life and prognosis of patients with metastatic brain tumors. (author)

  20. Malignant primary germ-cell tumor of the brain

    Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Sato, Shinichi; Nakao, Satoshi; Ban, Sadahiko; Namba, Koh

    1983-01-01

    The unusual case of a 15 year old boy with three discrete paraventricular germ-cell tumors is reported.FThe first tumor was located just lateral to the left thalamus and included a massive cystic part around it, the second tumor in the paraventricular region above the head of the left caudate nucleus and the third tumor in the medial part of the left parietal lobe.FTotal removal of all tumors was successfully accomplished in stages at four separate operations, namely, the first tumor was removed through the left transsylvian approach, the second tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and the third tumor via left superior frontal gyrus and left superior parietal lobule.FHistological examination revealed that the first tumor was teratoma, the second was choriocarcinoma and the third was germinoma.FPrimary germ-cell tumors of the brain can be divided into 5 groups: 1) germinoma; 2) embryonal carcinoma; 3) choriocarcinoma; 4) yolk-sac tumor; or 5) teratoma.FIn this case, a combination of three different histological patterns was seen. If malignant germ-cell tumor is supected on CT, aggressive extirpation should be done, not only to determine the exact diagnosis, but also to provide the basis for subsequent adjunctive therapy. (author)

  1. Clinical thermometry, using the 27 MHz multi-electrode current-source interstitial hyperthermia system in brain tumours

    Kaatee, Robert S.J.P.; Nowak, Peter C.J.M.; Zee, Jacoba van der; Bree, Jacob de; Kanis, Bart P.; Crezee, Hans; Levendag, Peter C.; Visser, Andries G.

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: In interstitial hyperthermia, temperature measurements are mainly performed inside heating applicators, and therefore, give the maximum temperatures of a rather heterogeneous temperature distribution. The problem of how to estimate lesion temperatures using the multi-electrode current-source interstitial hyperthermia (MECS-IHT) system in the brain was studied. Materials and methods: Temperatures were measured within the electrodes and in an extra catheter at the edge of a 4x4x4.5 cm 3 glioblastoma multiforme resection cavity. From the temperature decays during a power-off period, information was obtained about local maximum and minimum tissue temperatures. The significance of these data was examined through model calculations. Results: Maximum tissue temperatures could be estimated roughly by switching off all electrodes for about 5 s. Model calculations showed that the minimum tissue temperatures near a certain afterloading catheter correspond well with the temperature of the applicator inside, about 1 min after this applicator was switched off. Conclusions: Although the electrode temperatures read during heating are not suitable to assess the temperature distribution, it is feasible to heat the brain adequately using the MECS-IHT system with extra sensors outside the electrodes and/or application of decay methods

  2. Intra-tumoural vessel area estimated by expression of epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 and microRNA-126 in primary tumours and metastases of patients with colorectal cancer

    Hansen, T. F.; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background: Understanding the biological properties of potential drug targets are important. This is especially true for anti-angiogenic therapies in the search for potential biomarkers. The aim of the present descriptive study was to analyse the intra-tumoural expressions of epidermal growth...

  3. 99mTc-GHA: A promising agent for assessing tumour viability

    Choudhury, P.S.; Gupta, A.; Sharma, P.K.; Bhatia, S.; Nambiar, U.; Jena, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Biochemical investigations have a major role to play in the management of primary malignancies. Major biochemical changes occur during cancerous transformation including changes in the energy metabolism of the cell. Changes can take place in terms of utilization of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis and expression of antigens and receptors. Changes also take place in disruption of transport mechanism across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries like blood brain barrier. Anatomical imaging is aimed at the diagnosis of tumours whereas biochemical imaging is better suited for tissue characterization. We report here the utility of 99mTc GHA as a radiopharmaceutical for assessing tumour viability. Evaluation was done for 44 patients who had undergone 72 studies based on objective parameters like histopathological correlation and serial clinical and other radiological evaluation in long-term follow-up. All the evaluated patients had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the local site within one week of 99m GHA study and had some sort of morphological abnormality and suspicious contrast behaviour. 41 patients had cerebral lesions (37 primary brain tumours during initial diagnosis, evaluation of residual or recurrent disease and 4 patients of brain metastasis) and 3 patients had Ewing's Sarcoma evaluated during the course of treatment. 29 patients of suspected brain tumour (21 primary and 8 residual / recurrence) had surgical decompression along with 2/4 in metastatic brain lesions. Out of the 29 patients who underwent surgery, 28 patients had histopathology positive for malignancy. 27 patients showed abnormal GHA concentration corresponding to the morphological abnormality (1 false negative). One patient of pseudo-tumour also showed avid tracer concentration (false positive). 2/4 patients of solitary metastatic foci in brain, with positive GHA scan, underwent surgery and showed positive histopathology. 2/4 patients treated by

  4. Low tumour cell content in a lung tumour bank: implications for molecular characterisation.

    Goh, Felicia; Duhig, Edwina E; Clarke, Belinda E; McCaul, Elizabeth; Passmore, Linda; Courtney, Deborah; Windsor, Morgan; Naidoo, Rishendren; Franz, Louise; Parsonson, Kylie; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer encompasses multiple malignant epithelial tumour types, each with specific targetable, potentially actionable mutations, such that precision management mandates accurate tumour typing. Molecular characterisation studies require high tumour cell content and low necrosis content, yet lung cancers are frequently a heterogeneous mixture of tumour and stromal cells. We hypothesised that there may be systematic differences in tumour cell content according to histological subtype, and that this may have implications for tumour banks as a resource for comprehensive molecular characterisation studies in lung cancer. To investigate this, we estimated tumour cell and necrosis content of 4267 samples resected from 752 primary lung tumour specimens contributed to a lung tissue bank. We found that banked lung cancer samples had low tumour cell content (33%) generally, although it was higher in carcinoids (77.5%) than other lung cancer subtypes. Tumour cells comprise a variable and often small component of banked resected tumour samples, and are accompanied by stromal reaction, inflammation, fibrosis, and normal structures. This has implications for the adequacy of unselected tumour bank samples for diagnostic and molecular investigations, and further research is needed to determine whether tumour cell content has a significant impact on analytical results in studies using tissue from tumour bank resources. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Is palliative resection of the primary tumour, in the presence of advanced rectal cancer, a safe and useful technique for symptom control?

    Al-Sanea, N.; Isbister, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Over an 8-year period 22 patients (average age 54 years) underwent rectal resectional surgery in the presence of metastatic disease. There were 13 men and nine women. The commonest complaint was rectal bleeding. All patients had chest radiographs. Pulmonary metastases were identified in four patients. Nineteen abdominal and pelvic computed tomography scans were performed and eight showed evidence of metastases. Skeletal radiographs in two patients showed evidence of bone metastasis. At operation, intraperitoneal metastases were found in 18 patients. Nine of these were not identified preoperatively. Six patients underwent abdomino-perineal resection, nine anterior resection and seven a Hartmann's procedure. Eight patients developed a significant postoperative complication and one died 42 days after surgery. The mean length of hospital stay was 18.6 days. Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy. Four patients had palliative radiotherapy, two for bony, one for liver and one for peritoneal metastases. Patients were followed up for a mean of 1.1 years. During follow up, 11 returned to the emergency room on 24 occasions. Two patients required readmission. No patient had further rectal bleeding. The mean survival was 1.3 years. It is concluded that patients with rectal cancer and unresectable distant metastases can be successfully palliated by resection of the primary tumour with low morbidity and mortality. The early involvement of a palliative care team facilitates patient management and helps patients enjoy what remains of the rest of their lives at home, in comfort and with good symptom control. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing

  6. Diagnostic challenges in primary brain stem glioblastoma multiform; a case report

    Muhammad Taimur Malik, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem gliomas are rare form of primary brain tumors in adult and represent <2% of gliomas. Glioblastomas (GBM are much less common in pediatric patients; adult GBM vary in presentation and response to therapy, and generally have a very poor prognosis. GBM is less common in the brainstem, comprising <2% gliomas and there is therefore limited data available to provide a standard of care. Here we present a case report of a patient who presented with aggressive primary pontine GBM.

  7. Correlations of {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine uptake with pathological tumour size, Ki-67 and thymidine kinase 1 expressions in primary and metastatic lymph node colorectal cancer foci

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Nakajo, Masayuki [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Kajiya, Yoriko; Tani, Atsushi [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Goto, Yuko; Higashi, Michiyo [Kagoshima University, Department of Human Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, 890-8544 (Japan); Jinguji, Megumi; Fukukura, Yoshihiko [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Tanaka, Sadao [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Pathology, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    To examine correlations of {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) uptake with pathological tumour size and immunohistochemical Ki-67, and thymidine kinase 1 (TK-1) expressions in primary and metastatic node colorectal cancer foci. Thirty primary cancers (PCs) and 37 metastatic nodes (MNs) were included. FLT uptake was assessed by visual scores (non-visible: 0-1 and visible: 2-4), standardized uptake value (SUV), and correlated with size, Ki-67, and TK-1. SUV was measured in visible lesions. FLT heterogeneity was assessed by visual scores (no heterogeneous uptake: 0 and heterogeneous uptake: 1-4). Forty-two lesions were visible. The visible group showed significantly higher values than the non-visible group in size, Ki-67, and TK-1 (each p < 0.05). Size correlated significantly with visual score (PC; ρ = 0.74 and MN; ρ = 0.63), SUVmax (PC; ρ = 0.49, and MN; ρ = 0.76), and SUVmean (PC; ρ = 0.40 and MN; ρ = 0.76) (each p < 0.05). Visual score correlated significantly with size (ρ = 0.86), Ki-67max (ρ = 0.35), Ki-67mean (ρ = 0.38), TK-1max (ρ = 0.35) and TK-1mean (ρ = 0.25) (each p < 0.05). No significant correlations were found between FLT uptake and Ki-67 or TK-1 in 42 visible lesions (each p > 0.05). Heterogeneous FLT uptake was noted in 73 % (22/30) of PCs. FLT uptake correlated with size. Heterogeneous FLT distribution in colorectal cancers may be one of the causes of weak or lack of FLT uptake/Ki-67 or TK-1 correlation. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative Folding Pattern Analysis of Early Primary Sulci in Human Fetuses with Brain Abnormalities.

    Im, K; Guimaraes, A; Kim, Y; Cottrill, E; Gagoski, B; Rollins, C; Ortinau, C; Yang, E; Grant, P E

    2017-07-01

    Aberrant gyral folding is a key feature in the diagnosis of many cerebral malformations. However, in fetal life, it is particularly challenging to confidently diagnose aberrant folding because of the rapid spatiotemporal changes of gyral development. Currently, there is no resource to measure how an individual fetal brain compares with normal spatiotemporal variations. In this study, we assessed the potential for automatic analysis of early sulcal patterns to detect individual fetal brains with cerebral abnormalities. Triplane MR images were aligned to create a motion-corrected volume for each individual fetal brain, and cortical plate surfaces were extracted. Sulcal basins were automatically identified on the cortical plate surface and compared with a combined set generated from 9 normal fetal brain templates. Sulcal pattern similarities to the templates were quantified by using multivariate geometric features and intersulcal relationships for 14 normal fetal brains and 5 fetal brains that were proved to be abnormal on postnatal MR imaging. Results were compared with the gyrification index. Significantly reduced sulcal pattern similarities to normal templates were found in all abnormal individual fetuses compared with normal fetuses (mean similarity [normal, abnormal], left: 0.818, 0.752; P the primary distinguishing features. The gyrification index was not significantly different between the normal and abnormal groups. Automated analysis of interrelated patterning of early primary sulci could outperform the traditional gyrification index and has the potential to quantitatively detect individual fetuses with emerging abnormal sulcal patterns. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of using a gene expression profiling test to aid in identifying the primary tumour in patients with cancer of unknown primary.

    Hannouf, M B; Winquist, E; Mahmud, S M; Brackstone, M; Sarma, S; Rodrigues, G; Rogan, P; Hoch, J S; Zaric, G S

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of a 2000-gene-expression profiling (GEP) test to help identify the primary tumor site when clinicopathological diagnostic evaluation was inconclusive in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). We built a decision-analytic-model to project the lifetime clinical and economic consequences of different clinical management strategies for CUP. The model was parameterized using follow-up data from the Manitoba Cancer Registry, cost data from Manitoba Health administrative databases and secondary sources. The 2000-GEP-based strategy compared to current clinical practice resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $44,151 per quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained. The total annual-budget impact was $36.2 million per year. A value-of-information analysis revealed that the expected value of perfect information about the test's clinical impact was $4.2 million per year. The 2000-GEP test should be considered for adoption in CUP. Field evaluations of the test are associated with a large societal benefit.

  10. Tumours of the pineal region in childhood

    Herrmann, H.D.; Schulte, F.J.; Winkler, D.; Mueller, D.

    1988-01-01

    36 patients with tumours in the pineal region were treated between 1980 and 1986, 19 of whom were under 20 years of age. Diagnosis was based on cranial CT, supplemented to by MRI as from 1986. Preoperative angiography was peformed on all patients to demonstrate tumour vascularization and type of vascular supply. Stereotactic biopsies were complemented by intraoperative ventriculography. Stereotactic biopsy only was performed in 13 patients out of the total group to verify tumour histology. 23 patients were directly operated on primarily. 3 of these died postoperative. In cases of germ-cell tumours and pineal blastomas the total brain and the vertebral canal were irradiated. (orig./MG) [de

  11. High-resolution 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging at 1.5 and 3 Tesla of the human brain: development of techniques and applications for patients with primary brain tumors and multiple sclerosis

    Stadlbauer, A.

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop several strategies and software-packages for the evaluation of in-vivo-data of the human brain, which were acquired with high-resolution 1H-MRSI at 1.5 and 3 T. Several studies involving phantoms, volunteers and patients were performed. Quality assurance studies were conducted in order to evaluate the reproducibility of the applied MR-techniques at both field strengths. A qualitative comparison-study between MRSI-data from a 1.5 T clinical MR-scanner and a 3 T research MR-scanner showed the advantages of the more advanced MRSI sequences and higher field strength (3 T). A study involving patients with primary brain tumours (gliomas) was performed in cooperation with the Department of Neurosurgery (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg). The methods developed in the course of this study, such as the integration of MRS-data into a stereotactic-system, the segmentation of metabolic maps and the correlation with histopathological findings represent a package of vital information for diagnostics and therapy of primary brain tumors, neurodegenerative disorders or epilepsy. In the course of two pilot-studies in cooperation with the MR-Centre of Excellence (Medical University of Vienna) the advantages of high-resolution 3D in-vivo-1H-MRSI at 3T were qualitatively evaluated via measurements on patients with brain tumors and multiple sclerosis (MS). It was demonstrated that 1H-MRSI may be valuable for the diagnosis, follow-up and prediction of 'seizures' with MS-patients. In conclusion, this work contains an overview of potential and advantages of in-vivo-1H-MRS-methods at 1.5 and 3 T for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients with gliomas and MS. (author)

  12. Podoplanin expression in primary brain tumors induces platelet aggregation and increases risk of venous thromboembolism.

    Riedl, Julia; Preusser, Matthias; Nazari, Pegah Mir Seyed; Posch, Florian; Panzer, Simon; Marosi, Christine; Birner, Peter; Thaler, Johannes; Brostjan, Christine; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2017-03-30

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in patients with brain tumors, and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that podoplanin, a sialomucin-like glycoprotein, increases the risk of VTE in primary brain tumors via its ability to induce platelet aggregation. Immunohistochemical staining against podoplanin and intratumoral platelet aggregates was performed in brain tumor specimens of 213 patients (mostly high-grade gliomas [89%]) included in the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study, a prospective observational cohort study of patients with newly diagnosed cancer or progressive disease aimed at identifying patients at risk of VTE. Platelet aggregation in response to primary human glioblastoma cells was investigated in vitro. During 2-year follow-up, 29 (13.6%) patients developed VTE. One-hundred fifty-one tumor specimens stained positive for podoplanin (33 high expression, 47 medium expression, 71 low expression). Patients with podoplanin-positive tumors had lower peripheral blood platelet counts ( P < .001) and higher D-dimer levels ( P < .001). Podoplanin staining intensity was associated with increasing levels of intravascular platelet aggregates in tumor specimens ( P < .001). High podoplanin expression was associated with an increased risk of VTE (hazard ratio for high vs no podoplanin expression: 5.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-21.26; P = 010), independent of age, sex, and tumor type. Podoplanin-positive primary glioblastoma cells induced aggregation of human platelets in vitro, which could be abrogated by an antipodoplanin antibody. In conclusion, high podoplanin expression in primary brain tumors induces platelet aggregation, correlates with hypercoagulability, and is associated with increased risk of VTE. Our data indicate novel insights into the pathogenesis of VTE in primary brain tumors. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    Miyoshi, Ko, E-mail: miyoshi@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Brain Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato [Department of Brain Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  14. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li 2 CO 3 were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  15. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  16. MRI versus {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for gross tumour volume delineation in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Kirste, Simon; Fechter, Tobias; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Hennies, Steffen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Rempel, Irene; Soschynski, Martin; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, Hans Christian [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Jilg, Cordula A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Bock, Michael [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is widely used in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer (PCA). Focal dose escalation to the dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIPL) may lead to improved PCA control. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCAs. {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA inhibitors have demonstrated promising results in detection of PCA with PET/CT. The aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT with MRI for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition in primary PCA. This retrospective study included 22 patients with primary PCA analysed after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI. GTVs were delineated on MR images by two radiologists (GTV-MRIrad) and two radiation oncologists separately. Both volumes were merged leading to GTV-MRIint. GTVs based on PET/CT were delineated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus (GTV-PET). Laterality (left, right, and left and right prostate lobes) on mpMRI, PET/CT and pathological analysis after biopsy were assessed. Mean GTV-MRIrad, GTV-MRIint and GTV-PET were 5.92, 3.83 and 11.41 cm{sup 3}, respectively. GTV-PET was significant larger then GTV-MRIint (p = 0.003). The MRI GTVs GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint showed, respectively, 40 % and 57 % overlap with GTV-PET. GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint included the SUVmax of GTV-PET in 12 and 11 patients (54.6 % and 50 %), respectively. In nine patients (47 %), laterality on mpMRI, PET/CT and histopathology after biopsy was similar. Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI provided concordant results for delineation of the DIPL in 47 % of patients (40 % - 54 % of lesions). GTV-PET was significantly larger than GTV-MRIint. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT may have a role in radiation treatment planning for focal radiation to the DIPL. Exact correlation of PET and MRI images with histopathology is needed. (orig.)

  17. Imaging oxygenation of human tumours

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia represents a significant challenge to the curability of human tumours leading to treatment resistance and enhanced tumour progression. Tumour hypoxia can be detected by non-invasive and invasive techniques but the inter-relationships between these remains largely undefined. 18 F-MISO and Cu-ATSM-PET, and BOLD-MRI are the lead contenders for human application based on their non-invasive nature, ease of use and robustness, measurement of hypoxia status, validity, ability to demonstrate heterogeneity and general availability, these techniques are the primary focus of this review. We discuss where developments are required for hypoxia imaging to become clinically useful and explore potential new uses for hypoxia imaging techniques including biological conformal radiotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Primary lymphoma of brain: results of management of a modern cohort with radiation therapy

    Laperriere, Normand J.; Cerezo, Laura; Milosevic, Michael F.; Wong, C. Shun; Patterson, Bruce; Panzarella, Tony

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcome and prognostic factors for patients with primary lymphoma of brain managed with radiation therapy between 1979 and 1988. Methods and materials: A retrospective review was undertaken of 49 patients referred to Princess Margaret Hospital. There were 25 males and 24 females. Median age was 60 years, with a range of 17-80 years. Tumors were located supratentorially in 35, infratentorially in 10, and both in 4 patients. Single masses were demonstrated on CT brain in 36, and multiple lesions in 13 patients. Cranial irradiation was given in 48, and 11 patients received chemotherapy. All patients in this series were immunocompetent. Results: Over a follow-up range of 3-11 years of surviving patients, with a median of 6 years, (40(49)) patients have died. Overall median survival was 1.4 years (17 months) and 5-year actuarial survival was 26%. Statistical analysis revealed the following significant factors: Karnofsky performance status (KPS), age, and distribution pattern of disease on presenting CT brain. Five-year actuarial survival for patients with a KPS > 60 or 60, 5-year actuarial survival was 42% and 9%, respectively (P = 0.03); for patients with solitary or multiple lesions, 5-year actuarial survival was 30% and 15%, respectively (P = 0.04). Conclusions: We conclude that Karnofsky performance status, age, and distribution pattern on pretreatment CT of brain are significant prognostic factors in primary lymphoma of brain, and that new approaches need to be developed for these patients

  19. Hypotonic hyponatremia by primary polydipsia caused brain death in a 10-year-old boy

    A Ra Ko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypotonic hyponatremia by primary polydipsia can cause severe neurologic complications due to cerebral edema. A 10-year-and-4-month-old boy with a psychiatric history of intellectual disability and behavioral disorders who presented with chief complaints of seizure and mental change showed severe hypotonic hyponatremia with low urine osmolality (serum sodium, 101 mmol/L; serum osmolality, 215 mOsm/kg; urine osmolality, 108 mOsm/kg. The patient had been polydipsic for a few months prior, and this had been worse in the previous few days. A diagnosis of hypotonic hyponatremia caused by primary polydipsia was made. The patient was in a coma, and developed respiratory arrest and became brain death shortly after admission, despite the treatment. The initial brain magnetic resonance imaging showed severe brain swelling with tonsillar and uncal herniation, and the patient was declared as brain death. It has been reported that antidiuretic hormone suppression is inadequate in patients with chronic polydipsia, and that this inadequate suppression of antidiuretic hormone is aggravated in patients with acute psychosis. Therefore, hyponatremia by primary polydipsia, although it is rare, can cause serious and life-threatening neurologic complications.

  20. Computed tomographic brain scanning in the diagnosis of metastatic neoplasms

    Ringelstein, E.B.; Zeumer, H.; Hacke, W.; Keulers, P.

    1981-01-01

    Clinical investigations and computed brain scanning were done in 305 patients with primary extracerebral malignant tumours. One third of the patients had cerebral metastases. In most patients with brain metastases extracerebral secondary tumours were known already. Silent brain metastases were present in only 0.6% of all investigated tumour patients. All other patients had either objective neurologic-psychiatric defects or at least symptoms (headache, vomiting). Use of cranial computed tomography in all tumour patients as a pure screening method is thus not justified. The indication for the investigation is dependent on the clinical symptomatology. However, not only objective neurologic-psychiatric defects must be taken into account, but also occurrence of new symptoms. (orig.) [de

  1. Brain metastases of solid tumour. Treatment distribution and analysis of survival in the period 1/01/2004 to 31/12/2008

    Xavier, F.; Rodriguez, R.; Lima, R.; Rios, A.; Mara, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the characteristics, treatments and survival analysis in patients with solid tumors with brain metastases (E IV) assisted in Unit Neuro-Oncology over a period of five years. Patients and methods: The records of patients (pts) with diagnosis of brain metastases from solid tumors assisted in Neuro-Oncology Unit, from 1/01/2004 and 31/12/2008. Results: 51 new patients carriers of brain metastases were treated with solid tumors. The median age at diagnosis was 57 years, ranging from 30 to 75. They corresponded to the male 37 and female 14 ratio 2.5 / 1. The majority was presented as metastases 31/51. The location was in the supratentorial region in 27 cases, posterior fossa in 11 and 13 were supra and infratentorial. In only 5 patients cranial MRI was performed in only one case and it changed the therapeutical strategy. In 35 patients he corresponded to the lung primary tumor (CBP), following cancer renal (5/51). Within the CBP, the most common histologic subtypes were to large cells and adenocarcinomas, 11 and 10, respectively. In 32 patients were not found dissemination elsewhere. Surgery + RT was performed in 30 cases, in 11 exclusive RT, exclusive surgery in 4 and 3 patients symptomatic treatment. In 39 cases did not Systemic treatment diagnosis. When a progression was only diagnosed It could make systemic treatment 5 pts. The median survival was 15.4 weeks (1-301 weeks). Conclusions: Lung cancer is the most common source of metastases brain, with a poor survival. The results of other characteristics patients, systemic treatments performed and survival according to the treatments performed will be presented during the congresss

  2. Tumores pediátricos primários do sistema nervoso central: estudo anatomopatológico de 623 casos Primary paediatric tumours of the central nervous system: pathological study of 623 cases

    Luiz Fernando Bleggi Torres

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumores primários do sistema nervoso central (SNC representam a segunda mais freqüente forma de neoplasia em crianças abaixo dos 15 anos, entretanto são as principais neoplasias responsáveis pelo óbito. Os autores relatam a análise epidemiológica e histopatológica de 623 tumores primários do SNC que acometeram pacientes pediátricos no período de 1990 a 1996 na cidade de Curitiba- PR. Neste período foram analisadas 3318 biópsias de SNC. Do total, 623 eram provenientes de neoplasias acometendo pacientes pediátricos (18,7%. As idades dos pacientes variaram de S meses a 15 anos, sendo que 325 tumores ocorreram no sexo masculino e 298 no sexo feminino. Grande parte dos tumores localizava-se na fossa posterior. Dos 623 tumores, 277 eram de origem glial. As mais freqüentes foram: astrocitoma (27,9%, meduloblastoma (9,95%, craniofaringioma (5,93%, ependimoma (4,97% e glioblastoma (3,37%.Tumours of central nervous system (CNS represent the second most frequent malignancy in children under 15 years of age but are the commonest cause of death. The authors present the epidemiologic and histopathologic analysis of 623 primary tumours of CNS occurring during the period 1990 to 1996 in paediatric patients. In this period 3318 biopsies of CNS were analyzed. In this total were included 623 paediatric tumours (18.7%. The age of patients ranged from 5 months to 15 years, 325 tumours occurred in males and 298 in females. The majority affected the posterior fossa. The majority of paediatric neoplasias were of glial origin (n=277. The most frequent tumours were: astrocytoma (27.9%, medulloblastoma (9.95%, craniopharyngioma (5.93%, ependymoma (4.97% and glioblastoma (3.37%.

  3. Mohs micrographic surgery in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans allows tumour clearance with smaller margins and greater preservation of healthy tissue compared with conventional surgery: a study of 74 primary cases.

    Serra-Guillén, C; Llombart, B; Nagore, E; Guillén, C; Requena, C; Traves, V; Kindem, S; Alcalá, R; Rivas, N; Sanmartín, O

    2015-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an uncommon skin tumour with aggressive local growth. Whether DFSP should be treated with conventional surgery (CS) or Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has long been a topic of debate. To calculate, in a large series of DFSP treated by MMS, the minimum margin that would have been needed to achieve complete clearance by CS. Secondly, to calculate the percentage of healthy tissue that was preserved by MMS rather than CS with 2- and 3-cm margins. The minimum margin was calculated by measuring the largest distance from the visible edge of the tumour to the edge of the definitive surgical defect. Tumour and surgical defect areas for hypothetical CS with 2- and 3-cm margins were calculated using AutoCAD for Windows. A mean minimum margin of 1·34 cm was required to achieve complete clearance for the 74 tumours analysed. The mean percentages of skin spared using MMS rather than CS with 2- and 3-cm margins were 49·4% and 67·9%, respectively. MMS can achieve tumour clearance with smaller margins and greater preservation of healthy tissue than CS. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  5. Hydrophobically Modified siRNAs Silence Huntingtin mRNA in Primary Neurons and Mouse Brain

    Julia F Alterman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of RNA interference for neuroscience research have been limited by a lack of simple and efficient methods to deliver oligonucleotides to primary neurons in culture and to the brain. Here, we show that primary neurons rapidly internalize hydrophobically modified siRNAs (hsiRNAs added directly to the culture medium without lipid formulation. We identify functional hsiRNAs targeting the mRNA of huntingtin, the mutation of which is responsible for Huntington's disease, and show that direct uptake in neurons induces potent and specific silencing in vitro. Moreover, a single injection of unformulated hsiRNA into mouse brain silences Htt mRNA with minimal neuronal toxicity. Thus, hsiRNAs embody a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that enable simple and straightforward functional studies of genes involved in neuronal biology and neurodegenerative disorders in a native biological context.

  6. Regional differences in actomyosin contraction shape the primary vesicles in the embryonic chicken brain

    Filas, Benjamen A; Oltean, Alina; Majidi, Shabnam; Bayly, Philip V; Taber, Larry A; Beebe, David C

    2012-01-01

    In the early embryo, the brain initially forms as a relatively straight, cylindrical epithelial tube composed of neural stem cells. The brain tube then divides into three primary vesicles (forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain), as well as a series of bulges (rhombomeres) in the hindbrain. The boundaries between these subdivisions have been well studied as regions of differential gene expression, but the morphogenetic mechanisms that generate these constrictions are not well understood. Here, we show that regional variations in actomyosin-based contractility play a major role in vesicle formation in the embryonic chicken brain. In particular, boundaries did not form in brains exposed to the nonmuscle myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin, whereas increasing contractile force using calyculin or ATP deepened boundaries considerably. Tissue staining showed that contraction likely occurs at the inner part of the wall, as F-actin and phosphorylated myosin are concentrated at the apical side. However, relatively little actin and myosin was found in rhombomere boundaries. To determine the specific physical mechanisms that drive vesicle formation, we developed a finite-element model for the brain tube. Regional apical contraction was simulated in the model, with contractile anisotropy and strength estimated from contractile protein distributions and measurements of cell shapes. The model shows that a combination of circumferential contraction in the boundary regions and relatively isotropic contraction between boundaries can generate realistic morphologies for the primary vesicles. In contrast, rhombomere formation likely involves longitudinal contraction between boundaries. Further simulations suggest that these different mechanisms are dictated by regional differences in initial morphology and the need to withstand cerebrospinal fluid pressure. This study provides a new understanding of early brain morphogenesis. (paper)

  7. Diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with intracranial tumours

    Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Scheidhauer, K.; Kirsch, B.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the SR binding sites in intracranial tumours and to evaluate the benefit of SRS in pre- and postoperative diagnostics. 86 patients with 94 intracranial tumours (39 meningiomas, 18 pituitary adenomas, 11 gliomas grade 3 or 4, 8 gliomas grade 2, 5 neurinomas, 5 intracranial metastases, 4 tumours of the orbit, 2 neurofibromas, 1 brain abscess and 1 cystic lesion) were examined. 111 In-octreotide was injected i.v. as 10 μg or 20 μg bolus, corresponding to 110 or 220 MBq (3 or 6 mCi). Gamma-camera images and SPECT were obtained 3-6 h and 24 h post injection. The scintigraphic evaluation was performed without knowledge of CT and MRI results. The histological classification corresponded to the WHO grading system. Somatostatin binding sites were detected in vito using somatostatin-gold conjugates. All patients with meningiomas showed a high focal tracer uptake corresponding to SR binding sites in vitro, whereas only in 50% of the pituitary adenomas SRS was positive. Neurinomas did not show any tracer uptake. In patients with gliomas with disturbed blood-brain-barrier positive tracer uptake was detected, while none of the gliomas with intact blood-brain-barrier could be visualized by SRS but showed somatostatin binding sites in vitro. In intracranial metastases a local tracer uptake was detected in vivo. In vitro 3 of 4 cases showed somatostatin binding sites. In 2 cases extracranial tracer uptake showed the primary tumour and metastases of the lymphnodes. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can help to detect or to exclude meningiomas especially in the cerebellopontine angle or in the orbit. In intracranial metastases SRS may point to the primary tumour or other metastases. In all other intracranial tumours receptor scintigraphy provides no clinical relevant information. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM, UMR 1101 LaTIM, Brest (France); Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [Miletrie Hospital, DACTIM, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Poitiers (France); Espie, Marc [Saint-Louis Hospital, Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Roquancourt, Anne de [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and {sup 18}F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}. Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV{sub max} values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV{sub max} and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and TLG significantly differed among the three

  9. Do clinical, histological or immunohistochemical primary tumour characteristics translate into different 18F-FDG PET/CT volumetric and heterogeneity features in stage II/III breast cancer?

    Groheux, David; Martineau, Antoine; Merlet, Pascal; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris; Tixier, Florent; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Espie, Marc; Roquancourt, Anne de; Hindie, Elif

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if some features of baseline 18 F-FDG PET images, including volume and heterogeneity, reflect clinical, histological or immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with stage II or III breast cancer (BC). Included in the present retrospective analysis were 171 prospectively recruited patients with stage II/III BC treated consecutively at Saint-Louis hospital. Primary tumour volumes were semiautomatically delineated on pretreatment 18 F-FDG PET images. The parameters extracted included SUV max , SUV mean , metabolically active tumour volume (MATV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and heterogeneity quantified using the area under the curve of the cumulative histogram and textural features. Associations between clinical/histopathological characteristics and 18 F-FDG PET features were assessed using one-way analysis of variance. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were used to quantify the discriminative power of the features significantly associated with clinical/histopathological characteristics. T3 tumours (>5 cm) exhibited higher textural heterogeneity in 18 F-FDG uptake than T2 tumours (AUC <0.75), whereas there were no significant differences in SUV max and SUV mean . Invasive ductal carcinoma showed higher SUV max values than invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.008) but MATV, TLG and textural features were not discriminative. Grade 3 tumours had higher FDG uptake (AUC 0.779 for SUV max and 0.694 for TLG), and exhibited slightly higher regional heterogeneity (AUC 0.624). Hormone receptor-negative tumours had higher SUV values than oestrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours, while heterogeneity patterns showed only low-level variation according to hormone receptor expression. HER-2 status was not associated with any of the image features. Finally, SUV max , SUV mean and TLG significantly differed among the three phenotype subgroups (HER2-positive, triple-negative and ER

  10. Distinct angiotensin II receptor in primary cultures of glial cells from rat brain

    Raizada, M.K.; Phillips, M.I.; Crews, F.T.; Sumners, C.

    1987-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang-II) has profound effects on the brain. Receptors for Ang-II have been demonstrated on neurons, but no relationship between glial cells and Agn-II has been established. Glial cells (from the hypothalamus and brain stem of 1-day-old rat brains) in primary culture have been used to demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors. Binding of 125 I-Ang-II to glial cultures was rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific for Ang-II. The rank order of potency of 125 I-Ang-II binding was determined. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogeneous population of high-affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 110 fmol/mg of protein. Light-microscopic autoradiography of 125 I-Ang-II binding supported the kinetic data, documenting specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells. Ang-II stimulated a dose-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols in glial cells, an effect mediated by Ang-II receptors. However, Ang-II failed to influence [ 3 H] norepinephrine uptake, and catecholamines failed to regulate Ang-II receptors, effects that occur in neurons. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells in primary cultures derived from normotensive rat brain. The receptors are kinetically similar to, but functionally distinct from, the neuronal Ang-II receptors

  11. Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) in intracranial tumours: comparison with surgical findings

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Yukawa, O.; Migita, K.; Hada, H.; Katada, K.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of surface anatomy scanning (SAS) in intracranial tumours, comparing it with surgical findings. We examined 31 patients with brain tumours preoperatively. The tumours included 16 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, 4 metastases and 3 others. SAS clearly demonstrated the tumours, allowing them to be distinguished from the structures of the brain surface, including oedema, except in cases of metastasis. SAS clearly demonstrated large cortical veins. SAS is useful for three-dimensional delineation of the brain surface before surgery. (orig.)

  12. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours

    Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are considered relatively rare tumours that have the characteristic property of secreting bioactive substances, such as amines and hormones. They constitute a heterogeneous group, characterized by good prognosis, but important disparities of the evolutionary potential. In the aggressive forms, the therapeutic strategies are limited. The metabolic or internal radiotherapy, using radiolabelled peptides, which can act at the same time on the primary tumour and its metastases, constitutes a tempting therapeutic alternative, currently in evolution. The prospects are related to the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, with the use of other peptide analogues whose applications will overflow the framework of the neuro-endocrine tumours. (authors)

  13. Primary Dystonia: Conceptualizing the Disorder through a Structural Brain Imaging Lens

    Kristina Simonyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder of involuntary, twisting repetitive movements. The anatomical structures and pathways implicated in its pathogenesis as well as their relationship to the neurophysiological paradigm of abnormal surround inhibition, maladaptive plasticity and impaired sensorimotor integration remain not well delineated. Objective: We review the use of high-resolution structural brain imaging using voxel-based morphometry (VBM and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques for evaluation of brain changes in primary torsion dystonia and their relationships to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Methods: A search in PubMed was conducted to identify the relevant literature. Discussion: Structural imaging has enhanced our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of dystonia. In particular, VBM and DTI data have revealed microstructural disturbances in the basal ganglia, sensorimotor cortices and cerebellum along with aberrations in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic and cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways.  When combined with functional brain imaging and neurophysiological modalities, a structure-function relationship can be established in the dystonia brain network at the sensorimotor, plasticity, cortical disinhibition and cerebellar outflow connectivity levels. Structural imaging highlighted new anatomical substrates and, with a combined structural-functional approach, has offered new opportunities for investigation of the neurodevelopmental, environmental and/or genetic interplay in the brain networks of dystonia patients. 

  14. Noninvasive imaging of brain oxygen metabolism in children with primary nocturnal enuresis during natural sleep.

    Yu, Bing; Huang, Mingzhu; Zhang, Xu; Ma, Hongwei; Peng, Miao; Guo, Qiyong

    2017-05-01

    A series of studies have revealed that nocturnal enuresis is closely related to hypoxia in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE). However, brain oxygen metabolism of PNE children has not been investigated before. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in children suffering from PNE. We used the newly developed T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) magnetic resonance imaging technique. Neurological evaluation, structural imaging, phase-contrast, and the TRUST imaging method were applied in children with PNE (n = 37) and healthy age- and sex-matched control volunteers (n = 39) during natural sleep to assess whole-brain CMRO 2 , CBF, OEF, and arousal from sleep scores. Results showed that whole-brain CMRO 2 and OEF values of PNE children were higher in controls, while there was no significant difference in CBF. Consequently, OEF levels of PNE children were increased to maintain oxygen supply. The elevation of OEF was positively correlated with the difficulty of arousal. Our results provide the first evidence that high oxygen consumption and high OEF values could make PNE children more susceptible to hypoxia, which may induce cumulative arousal deficits and make them more prone to nocturnal enuresis. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2532-2539, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Depletion of intracellular polyamine content does not alter the survival of 9L rat brain tumour cells after X-irradiation

    Seidenfeld, J.; Deen, D.F.; Marton, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    A 24-hour preincubation of 9L rat brain tumour cells with 10 mM DL-α methylornithine (αMO) reduced 9L putrescine content by more than 97%, spermidine content by 67% and total polyamine content by 50%. This did not increase the sensitivity of 9L cells to killing by X-rays. Polyamine content of treated and untreated cells did not vary with X-ray dose. A similar experiment was performed with 9L cells incubated for 48 hours in the presence and absence of 25 mM DL-α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). X-ray dose again did not affect polyamine contents of either DFMO treated or untreated cells. The reduction of total polyamine content by 75% produced by this treatment did not affect the X-ray dose-response curve of 9L cells. Incubation of 9L cells with 40 μM methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) for 48 hours also did not increase the sensitivity of the treated cells to killing by X-rays. Measurement of intracellular polyamine contents for MGBG-treated and untreated cell showed that Sd was reduced by 70% and Sp by 66%. The increase in Pu content resulted in equal total polyamine contents on a molar basis for both groups of cells. Cultures of 9L cells were incubated for 48 hours in the presence or absence of 40 μM MGBG + 25 mM DFMO, producing an 87% reduction in total polyamine content of treated cells. The Sd content of cells treated with DFMO alone was lower than that of cells treated with DFMO + MGBG, and the combination of the two inhibitors had no effect on the X-ray dose-response. 0.1 mM DFMO did not affect the CFE of untreated unirradiated 9L cells. Addition of 1 mM DFMO caused a greater reduction in the CFE of 9L cells when added at the same time as seeding the cells than when added 24 hours later. There was no difference between the effects of 10 and 25 mM DFMO on the CFE of 9L cells. (U.K.)

  16. The role of rehabilitation measures in reintegration of children with brain tumours or leukaemia and their families after completion of cancer treatment: a study protocol.

    Peikert, Mona Leandra; Inhestern, Laura; Bergelt, Corinna

    2017-08-11

    For ill children as well as for their parents and siblings, childhood cancer poses a major challenge. Little is known about the reintegration into daily life of childhood cancer survivors and their families. The aim of this prospective observational study is to further the understanding of the role of rehabilitation measures in the reintegration process of childhood leukaemia or brain tumour survivors and their family members after the end of cancer treatment. This prospective observational study consists of three study arms: a quantitative study in cooperation with three German paediatric oncological study registries (study arm 1), a quantitative study in cooperation with a rehabilitation clinic that offers a family-oriented paediatric oncological rehabilitation programme (study arm 2) and a qualitative study at 12-month follow-up including families from the study arms 1 and 2 (study arm 3). In study arm 1, children, parents and siblings are surveyed after treatment (baseline), 4-6 months after baseline measurement and at 12-month follow-up. In study arm 2, data are collected at the beginning and at the end of the rehabilitation measure and at 12-month follow-up. Families are assessed with standardised questionnaires on quality of life, emotional and behavioural symptoms, depression, anxiety, fear of progression, coping and family functioning. Furthermore, self-developed items on rehabilitation aims and reintegration into daily life are used. Where applicable, users and non-users of rehabilitation measures will be compared regarding the outcome parameters. Longitudinal data will be analysed by means of multivariate analysis strategies. Reference values will be used for comparisons if applicable. Qualitative data will be analysed using thematic analysis. This study has been approved by the medical ethics committee of the Medical Chamber of Hamburg. Data will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences. © Article author(s) (or their

  17. Coping and adaptive strategies of traumatic brain injury survivors and primary caregivers.

    Adams, Deana; Dahdah, Marie

    2016-06-27

    Qualitative research methods allowed the investigator to contribute to the development of new theories and to examine change in processes over time, which added rich detail to existing knowledge of the use of coping and adaptive strategies by traumatic brain injury survivors and their primary caregivers (Ponsford, Sloan, & Snow, 2013). The advantages of phenomenological study were that it allows flexibility to explore and understand meanings attached by people to well-studied concepts such as coping, resiliency, and adaptation or compensation. Phenomenological study was sensitive to contextual factors. It also permitted the study of in-depth dynamics of coping and adaptive strategies of TBI survivors and primary caregivers, while understanding the social and psychological implications of the phenomenon. To explore the needs and deficits of adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors and primary caregivers; and to identify their self-initiated coping and adaptive strategies. Significant to this study was the development of coping and adaptive strategies by the participants after their discharge from inpatient and rehabilitation treatment. The compensatory skills taught in treatment settings did not transfer to the home environment. Therefore, these strategies developed independently from previous treatment recommendations contributed to the development of theory related to rehabilitation and counseling. Distinctive to this study was the similarity of coping and adaptive strategies developed from both mild and severe traumatic brain injury survivors. This study consisted of eleven with TBI and six primary caregivers (N = 17), who participated in a series of semi-structured interviews aimed at discovering the coping and adaptive strategies utilized in dealing with the effects of brain injury. A Qualitative Phenomenological design was employed. Patience and understanding, support, and professional help were identified by TBI survivors and caregivers as being their

  18. Primary microglia isolation from mixed glial cell cultures of neonatal rat brain tissue.

    Tamashiro, Tami T; Dalgard, Clifton Lee; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2012-08-15

    Microglia account for approximately 12% of the total cellular population in the mammalian brain. While neurons and astrocytes are considered the major cell types of the nervous system, microglia play a significant role in normal brain physiology by monitoring tissue for debris and pathogens and maintaining homeostasis in the parenchyma via phagocytic activity. Microglia are activated during a number of injury and disease conditions, including neurodegenerative disease, traumatic brain injury, and nervous system infection. Under these activating conditions, microglia increase their phagocytic activity, undergo morpohological and proliferative change, and actively secrete reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, often activating a paracrine or autocrine loop. As these microglial responses contribute to disease pathogenesis in neurological conditions, research focused on microglia is warranted. Due to the cellular heterogeneity of the brain, it is technically difficult to obtain sufficient microglial sample material with high purity during in vivo experiments. Current research on the neuroprotective and neurotoxic functions of microglia require a routine technical method to consistently generate pure and healthy microglia with sufficient yield for study. We present, in text and video, a protocol to isolate pure primary microglia from mixed glia cultures for a variety of downstream applications. Briefly, this technique utilizes dissociated brain tissue from neonatal rat pups to produce mixed glial cell cultures. After the mixed glial cultures reach confluency, primary microglia are mechanically isolated from the culture by a brief duration of shaking. The microglia are then plated at high purity for experimental study. The principle and protocol of this methodology have been described in the literature. Additionally, alternate methodologies to isolate primary microglia are well described. Homogenized brain tissue may be separated

  19. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in primary brain lymphoma.

    de-Bonilla-Damiá, Á; Fernández-López, R; Capote-Huelva, F J; de la Cruz-Vicente, F; Egea-Guerrero, J J; Borrego-Dorado, I

    To study the usefulness of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the initial evaluation and in the response assessment in primary brain lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was carried out on 18 patients diagnosed with primary brain lymphoma, a histological subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, on whom an initial 18 F-FDG PET/CT and MRI was performed, with 7 of the cases being analysed after the completion of treatment in order to assess response and clinical follow up. Initial 18 F-FDG PET/CT showed 26 hypermetabolic foci, whereas 46 lesions were detected by MRI. The average SUV maximum of the lesions was 17.56 with T/N 3.55. The concordance of both tests for identifying the same number of lesions was moderate, obtaining a kappa index of 0.395 (P<.001). In the evaluation of treatment, MRI identified 16 lesions compared to 7 pathological accumulations observed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The concordance of both tests to assess type of response to treatment was moderate (kappa index 0.41) (P=.04). In both the initial evaluation and the assessment of the response to treatment, PET/CT led to a change strategy in 22% of patients who had lesions outside the cerebral parenchyma. MRI appears to be the method of choice for detecting brain disease in patients with primary brain lymphoma, whereas 18 F-FDG PET/CT seems to play a relevant role in the assessment of extra-cerebral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  20. Discrimination of different brain metastases and primary CNS lymphomas using morphologic criteria and diffusion tensor imaging

    Bette, S.; Wiestler, B.; Huber, T.; Boeckh-Behrens, T.; Zimmer, C.; Kirschke, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Delbridge, C. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Meyer, B.; Gempt, J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2016-12-15

    Brain metastases are a common complication of cancer and occur in about 15-40% of patients with malignancies. The aim of this retrospective study was to differentiate between metastases from different primary tumors/CNS lymphyomas using morphologic criteria, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage, cysts, pattern of contrast enhancement and location were reported in 200 consecutive patients with brain metastases/primary CNS lymphomas. FA and ADC values were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part, the necrosis and the non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Differences between histopathological subtypes of metastases were analyzed using non-parametric tests, decision trees and hierarchical clustering analysis. Significant differences were found in morphologic criteria such as hemorrhage or pattern of contrast enhancement. In diffusion measurements, significant differences between the different tumor entities were only found in ADC analyzed in the contrast-enhancing tumor part. Among single tumor entities, primary CNS lymphomas showed significantly lower median ADC values in the contrast-enhancing tumor part (ADC{sub lymphoma} 0.92 [0.83-1.07] vs. ADC{sub no} {sub lymphoma} 1.35 [1.10-1.64] P=0.001). Further differentiation between types of metastases was not possible using FA and ADC. There were morphologic differences among the main subtypes of brain metastases/CNS lymphomas. However, due to a high variability of common types of metastases and low specificity, prospective differentiation remained challenging. DTI including FA and ADC was not a reliable tool for differentiation between different histopathological subtypes of brain metastases except for CNS lymphomas showing lower ADC values. Biopsy, surgery and staging remain essential for diagnosis.

  1. Results of postoperative radiotherapy and radiation of recurrent tumours, observed in adenomas of the pituitary gland operated at a primary stage

    Oettle, E.

    1987-01-01

    This retrospective study included 134 patients showing adenomas of the pituitary gland. It was found that radiotherapy carried out immediately after surgery was superior to radiation commencing only after tumour recidivation. Treatment was predominantly based an 'ultrahard' X-rays (betatron), to a lesser extent on cobalt-60 gamma rays. (MBC) [de

  2. Lack of TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity predicts effect of adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy in patients (n=647) with primary breast cancer

    Willemoe, Gro L.; Hertel, Pernille Bræmer; Bartels, Annette

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: A number of prospective studies have shown that adjuvant CEF significantly improves disease-free and overall survival as compared to CMF in breast cancer patients. Our aim was to determine whether the benefit of epirubicin versus methotrexate differs according to TIMP-1 tumour cell...

  3. NcoI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) region in primary biliary cirrhosis and in healthy Danes

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1989-01-01

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism of the human tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) region was investigated by means of 20 different restriction enzymes and a human TNF alpha cDNA probe. Only one of the enzymes, NcoI, revealed a polymorphic pattern consisting of fragments of 10.5 and 5.5...

  4. Tumour sleuths

    Beyers, M.; Springolo, E.; Conradie, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common disease in South Africa and its identification difficult. Methods for the diagnosis of this disease includes the production of hybridoma cell lines by inoculating laboratory mice with a purified human tumour-associated antigen or the antigen-containing surface membranes or the intact cells. In the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, high concentrations of serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) can be measured by means of radioimmunoassay techniques. The need for specific methods of diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma led to the investigation by the Isotope Production Centre at Pelindaba into the possibility of using radiolabelled monoclonal anti-AFP for diagnosis, and later, therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies can also be labelled with 131 I. Recently the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the University of the Witwatersrand is conducting diagnostic trials on patients who have given their informed consent, to assess the specificity of 131 I radiolabelled anti-AFP monoclonal antibodies to hepatocellular carcinoma cells in humans. Although the investigation is still in its infancy, monoclonal antibodies may prove to be successful non-invasive agents for detecting tumors in early stages

  5. Expression and activity of the urokinase plasminogen activator system in canine primary brain tumors

    Rossmeisl JH

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available John H Rossmeisl,1–3 Kelli Hall-Manning,4 John L Robertson,1,3,5 Jamie N King,1,2 Rafael V Davalos,3,5 Waldemar Debinski,3 Subbiah Elankumaran6,† 1Veterinary and Comparative Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, 2Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, 3The Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston-Salem, NC, 4Virginia Tech Animal Laboratory Services, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, 5Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, 6Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, USA†The authors regret to advise of the passing of Dr Subbiah Elankumaran prior to publicationBackground: The expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein family member, and the activity of its ligand, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, have been associated with the invasive and metastatic potentials of a variety of human brain tumors through their regulation of extracellular matrix degradation. Domesticated dogs develop naturally occurring brain tumors that share many clinical, phenotypic, molecular, and genetic features with their human counterparts, which has prompted the use of the dogs with spontaneous brain tumors as models to expedite the translation of novel brain tumor therapeutics to humans. There is currently little known regarding the role of the uPA system in canine brain tumorigenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression of uPAR and the activity of uPA in canine brain tumors as justification for the development of uPAR-targeted brain tumor therapeutics in dogs.Methods: We investigated the expression of uPAR in 37 primary canine brain tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, real

  6. The research of morphological variations and sexual dimorphism of primary grooves on the medial side of brain hemispheres in humans

    Spasojević Goran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological studies of the various parts of the brain show certain morphological and morphometric differences in correlation with sex, so-called sexual dimorphism of the brain. Our research has been done on the cerebral hemispheres, taken from cadavers of both sexes and different age without pathological processes in the brain. The sample comprised 26 male brains and 16 female brains. We studied three primary grooves (sulcus cinguli, sulcus parietooccipitalis and sulcus calcarinus of the medial surface of the human cerebral hemispheres. We conducted morphological typology of grooves and morphometric measurements of primary brain grooves length in relation to sex and side of hemisphere. The results showed a statistically significant sex difference in the cingulate sulcus length (p0,05. Determined morphometric sexual dimorphism in cingulate sulcus length is significant because it implies the correlation between morphology and function of the explored areas of the cerebral cortex.

  7. Use of primary cultures of Kenyon cells from bumblebee brains to assess pesticide side effects.

    Wilson, Daniel E; Velarde, Rodrigo A; Fahrbach, Susan E; Mommaerts, Veerle; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Bumblebees are important pollinators in natural and agricultural ecosystems. The latter results in the frequent exposure of bumblebees to pesticides. We report here on a new bioassay that uses primary cultures of neurons derived from adult bumblebee workers to evaluate possible side-effects of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid. Mushroom bodies (MBs) from the brains of bumblebee workers were dissected and dissociated to produce cultures of Kenyon cells (KCs). Cultured KCs typically extend branched, dendrite-like processes called neurites, with substantial growth evident 24-48 h after culture initiation. Exposure of cultured KCs obtained from newly eclosed adult workers to 2.5 parts per billion (ppb) imidacloprid, an environmentally relevant concentration of pesticide, did not have a detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. By contrast, in cultures prepared from newly eclosed adult bumblebees, inhibitory effects of imidacloprid were evident when the medium contained 25 ppb imidacloprid, and no growth was observed at 2,500 ppb. The KCs of older workers (13-day-old nurses and foragers) appeared to be more sensitive to imidacloprid than newly eclosed adults, as strong effects on KCs obtained from older nurses and foragers were also evident at 2.5 ppb imidacloprid. In conclusion, primary cultures using KCs of bumblebee worker brains offer a tool to assess sublethal effects of neurotoxic pesticides in vitro. Such studies also have the potential to contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of plasticity in the adult bumblebee brain. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Adnexal Tumours Of Skin

    Parate Sanjay N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total 120 cases of epidermal appendage tumours of skin were analysed and classified according to the classification provided by WHO’. Epidermal appendage tumours accounted for 12.87% of all skin tumours, of which 29.17% were benign and 70.83% were malignant. Most of the tumours (75.83% were in the head and face region. The most common tumour was basal cell epithelioma (55%.

  9. Feasibility of the evidence-based cognitive telerehabilitation program ReMind for patients with primary brain tumors

    van der Linden, S.D.; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Rutten, G.J.M.; Gehring, K.

    2018-01-01

    Many patients with primary brain tumors experience cognitive deficits. Cognitive rehabilitation programs focus on alleviating these deficits, but availability of such programs is limited. Our large randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated positive effects of the cognitive rehabilitation

  10. Computed tomographic aspects of primary brain tumors in dogs and cats

    Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Zardo, Karen Maciel; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Silva, Luciana Carandina da; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, the Veterinary Medicine has made great advances, enabling thus the diagnosis of many diseases. As a result of this new situation, there was an increased expectation of life of animals resulting in an increase in the number of clinical care of older animals. Thus, diseases considered unusual in the past, begin to be diagnosed more frequently, as is the case of brain damage. Recently, computed tomography has been widely used in Brazil as a tool to aid in the diagnosis of several diseases. This noninvasive imaging technique allows the identification and evaluation of lesions of central nervous tissue such as brain tumors. This provides information about the size, shape and location of the lesion, in addition to the magnitude of compression and invasion of adjacent structures by the tumor and its side effects (such as the peritumoral edema and hydrocephalus). The image obtained from computed tomography may suggest the presence of a certain type brain tumor, data of great importance for the prognosis and treatment of the animal. This review covers the computed tomography aspects of primary brain tumors such as meningiomas, astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, choroid plexus tumors and ependymomas. However, despite the computed tomography provide much information about the changes inside the skull; no way replace histopathological examination in determining the definitive diagnosis. (author)

  11. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  12. The blood-brain barrier and oncology : new insights into function and modulation

    Bart, J; Groen, HJM; Hendrikse, NH; van der Graaf, WTA; Vaalburg, W; de Vries, EGE

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapy for malignant primary or metastatic brain tumours is still poor. This is at least partly due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The functionality of the BBB can be explained by physicochemical features and efflux pump mechanisms. An overview of the

  13. The toxicity of uranyl nitrate on primary brain cell culture of L. Hoevenii

    Ismail Bahari; Fauziah Mohd Noor

    1995-01-01

    In Malaysia, uranium is indirectly being concentrated by mining and petroleum industries that have no relevance to its use. Concentration of uranium and the production of TENORM may give rise to radiological risk to workers and the environment. A study was conducted to determine the toxicity of a uranium compound, uranyl nitrate. For this purpose a primary brain cell culture derived from L. hoevenii was used. The nature of uranil nitrate toxicity was determined by comparing with the effects induced by mitomycin C and gamma radiation. The toxicity of these agents were measured by observing changes in Unschedule DNA Synthesis (UDS) and the induction of micronucleus. Result from the study showed that UO sub 2 sup 2+ is UDS positive and is toxic to the primary brain cells of L. hoevenii. It gives a response profile that is almost similar to that induced by gamma radiation and mitomycin C. We believed that a low concentration, UO sub 2 sup 2+ acts as a chemo toxic agent rather than as an ionising radiation. At higher concentration the toxicity of UO sub 2 sup 2+ comes from both its chemo toxic and radiation effects. Results of this study also show the ability of the primary culture to carry out repair on its DNA damaged by the UDS positive agents

  14. Occupational and environmental risk factors of adult primary brain cancers: a systematic review.

    Gomes, J; Al Zayadi, A; Guzman, A

    2011-04-01

    The incidence of brain neoplasm has been progressively increasing in recent years in the industrialized countries. One of the reasons for this increased incidence could be better access to health care and improved diagnosis in the industrialized countries. It also appears that Caucasians have a higher incidence than blacks or Hispanics or Asians. A number of risk factors have been identified and described including the genetic, ethnic and age-based factors. Certain occupational and environmental factors are also believed to influence the risk of primary adult brain tumors. Potential occupational and environmental factors include exposure to diagnostic and therapeutic radiations, electromagnetic radiation from cellular phones and other wireless devices, infectious agents, air pollution and residence near landfills and high-voltage power lines and jobs as firefighters, farmers, physician, chemists and jobs in industries such as petrochemical, power generation, synthetic rubber manufacturing, agricultural chemicals manufacturing. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine occupational and environmental risk factors of brain neoplasm. A range of occupational and environmental exposures are evaluated for significance of their relationship with adult primary brain tumors. On the basis of this review we suggest a concurrent evaluation of multiple risk factors both within and beyond occupational and environmental domains. The concurrent approach needs to consider better exposure assessment techniques, lifetime occupational exposures, genotypic and phenotypic characteristics and lifestyle and dietary habits. This approach needs to be interdisciplinary with contributions from neurologists, oncologists, epidemiologists and molecular biologists. Conclusive evidence that has eluded multitude of studies with single focus and single exposure needs to multifaceted and multidisciplinary.

  15. Feasibility of the evidence-based cognitive telerehabilitation program Remind for patients with primary brain tumors.

    van der Linden, Sophie D; Sitskoorn, Margriet M; Rutten, Geert-Jan M; Gehring, Karin

    2018-05-01

    Many patients with primary brain tumors experience cognitive deficits. Cognitive rehabilitation programs focus on alleviating these deficits, but availability of such programs is limited. Our large randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated positive effects of the cognitive rehabilitation program developed by our group. We converted the program into the iPad-based cognitive rehabilitation program ReMind, to increase its accessibility. The app incorporates psychoeducation, strategy training and retraining. This pilot study in patients with primary brain tumors evaluates the feasibility of the use of the ReMind-app in a clinical (research) setting in terms of accrual, attrition, adherence and patient satisfaction. The intervention commenced 3 months after resective surgery and patients were advised to spend 3 h per week on the program for 10 weeks. Of 28 eligible patients, 15 patients with presumed low-grade glioma or meningioma provided informed consent. Most important reason for decline was that patients (7) experienced no cognitive complaints. Participants completed on average 71% of the strategy training and 76% of the retraining. Some patients evaluated the retraining as too easy. Overall, 85% of the patients evaluated the intervention as "good" or "excellent". All patients indicated that they would recommend the program to other patients with brain tumors. The ReMind-app is the first evidence-based cognitive telerehabilitation program for adult patients with brain tumors and this pilot study suggests that postoperative cognitive rehabilitation via this app is feasible. Based on patients' feedback, we have expanded the retraining with more difficult exercises. We will evaluate the efficacy of ReMind in an RCT.

  16. Significance of Primary Tumor Location and Histology for Brain Metastasis Development and Peritumoral Brain Edema in Lung Cancer

    Fabian, Katalin; Gyulai, Marton; Furak, Jozsef

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain metastasis of lung cancer adversely affects overall survival (OS) and quality of life, while peritumoral brain edema is responsible for life-threatening complications. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological and cerebral radiological data of 575 consecutive...... lung cancer patients with brain metastases. Results: In adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, peritumoral brain edema was more pronounced than in small-cell lung cancer (p ... of peritumoral brain edema (p

  17. Elevated tumour marker: an indication for imaging?

    McMahon, Colm J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of imaging examinations in patients with elevated tumour markers when (a) the tumour marker is not validated for as a primary diagnostic test; (b) the patient had no personal history of cancer and (c) the patient had no other imaging indication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients without known cancer who had abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA125 and\\/or CA15-3 serology over a one-year period were included. A retrospective medical record review was performed to assess the number of these cases who underwent imaging because of \\'elevated tumour marker\\' in the absence of a clinical indication for imaging. The number and result of these imaging studies were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight hundred and nineteen patients were included. Of those, 25 patients (mean age: 67.8 [range 41-91] y), were imaged to evaluate: \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. They underwent 29 imaging studies (mean [+\\/-standard deviation (SD)] per patient = 1.2 [+\\/-0.4]), and had 42 elevated tumour marker serology tests (mean [+\\/-SD] per patient = 1.7 [+\\/-0.7]). Four patients had >1 imaging test. No patient had an imaging study which diagnosed a malignancy or explained the elevated tumour marker. CONCLUSION: The non-judicious use of tumour markers can prompt further unnecessary investigations including imaging. In this study, there was no positive diagnostic yield for imaging performed for investigation of \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. \\'Elevated tumour marker\\

  18. Enhanced Network Efficiency of Functional Brain Networks in Primary Insomnia Patients

    Xiaofen Ma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests that primary insomnia (PI affects interregional neural coordination of multiple interacting functional brain networks. However, a complete understanding of the whole-brain network organization from a system-level perspective in PI is still lacking. To this end, we investigated in topological organization changes in brain functional networks in PI. 36 PI patients and 38 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were recruited. All participants underwent a series of neuropsychological assessments and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Individual whole-brain functional network were constructed and analyzed using graph theory-based network approaches. There were no significant differences with respect to age, sex, or education between groups (P > 0.05. Graph-based analyses revealed that participants with PI had a significantly higher total number of edges (P = 0.022, global efficiency (P = 0.014, and normalized global efficiency (P = 0.002, and a significantly lower normalized local efficiency (P = 0.042 compared with controls. Locally, several prefrontal and parietal regions, the superior temporal gyrus, and the thalamus exhibited higher nodal efficiency in participants with PI (P < 0.05, false discovery rate corrected. In addition, most of these regions showed increased functional connectivity in PI patients (P < 0.05, corrected. Finally, altered network efficiency was correlated with neuropsychological variables of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Insomnia Severity Index in patients with PI. PI is associated with abnormal organization of large-scale functional brain networks, which may account for memory and emotional dysfunction in people with PI. These findings provide novel implications for neural substrates associated with PI.

  19. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nunez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G.

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs

  20. High predictive value of brain MRI imaging in primary mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency.

    de Beaurepaire, Isaure; Grévent, David; Rio, Marlène; Desguerre, Isabelle; de Lonlay, Pascale; Levy, Raphaël; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Barcia, Giulia; Funalot, Benoit; Besmond, Claude; Metodiev, Metodi D; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Assouline, Zahra; Munnich, Arnold; Rötig, Agnès; Boddaert, Nathalie

    2018-06-01

    Because the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) is ubiquitous, its deficiency can theoretically give rise to any symptom in any organ or tissue at any age with any mode of inheritance, owing to the twofold genetic origin of respiratory enzyme machinery, that is, nuclear and mitochondrial. Not all respiratory enzyme deficiencies are primary and secondary or artefactual deficiency is frequently observed, leading to a number of misleading conclusions and inappropriate investigations in clinical practice. This study is aimed at investigating the potential role of brain MRI in distinguishing primary RC deficiency from phenocopies and other aetiologies. Starting from a large series of 189 patients (median age: 3.5 years (8 days-56 years), 58% males) showing signs of RC enzyme deficiency, for whom both brain MRIs and disease-causing mutations were available, we retrospectively studied the positive predictive value (PPV) and the positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of brain MRI imaging and its ability to discriminate between two groups: primary deficiency of the mitochondrial RC machinery and phenocopies. Detection of (1) brainstem hyperintensity with basal ganglia involvement (P≤0.001) and (2) lactate peak with either brainstem or basal ganglia hyperintensity was highly suggestive of primary RC deficiency (P≤0.01). Fourteen items had a PPV>95% and LR+ was greater than 9 for seven signs. Biallelic SLC19A3 mutations represented the main differential diagnosis. Non-significant differences between the two groups were found for cortical/subcortical atrophy, leucoencephalopathy and involvement of caudate nuclei, spinothalamic tract and corpus callosum. Based on these results and owing to invasiveness of skeletal muscle biopsies and cost of high-throughput DNA sequencing, we suggest giving consideration to brain MRI imaging as a diagnostic marker and an informative investigation to be performed in patients showing signs of RC enzyme deficiency. © Article author(s) (or their

  1. Energy and glucose pathways in thiamine deficient primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Ham, D; Karska-Wysocki, B

    2005-12-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) results in lactate acidosis, which is associated with neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate this alteration in primary rat brain endothelia. Spectrophotometric analysis of culture media revealed that only a higher concentration of pyrithiamine, which accelerates the intracellular blocking of thiamine, significantly elevated the lactate level and lactate dehydrogenase activity within 7 days. The medium without pyrithiamine and with a thiamine concentration comparable to pathophysiological plasma levels mildly reduced only the activity of transketolase. This suggests that significant metabolic changes may not occur at the early phase of TD in cerebral capillary cells, while anaerobic glycolysis in capillaries may be mediated during late stage/chronic TD.

  2. Comparison of primary tumour volumes delineated on four-dimensional computed tomography maximum intensity projection and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography images of non-small cell lung cancer

    Duan, Yili; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Wei; Fan, Tingyong; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Guo, Yanluan; Sun, Xiaorong; Shang, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to compare the positional and volumetric differences of tumour volumes based on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) of four-dimensional CT (4DCT) and 18 F-fluorodexyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography CT (PET/CT) images for the primary tumour of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ten patients with NSCLC underwent 4DCT and 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans of the thorax on the same day. Internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) of the primary tumours were contoured on the MIP images of 4DCT to generate IGTV MIP . Gross target volumes (GTVs) based on PET (GTV PET ) were determined with nine different threshold methods using the auto-contouring function. The differences in the volume, position, matching index (MI) and degree of inclusion (DI) of the GTV PET and IGTV MIP were investigated. In volume terms, GTV PET2.0 and GTV PET20% approximated closely to IGTV MIP with mean volume ratio of 0.93 ± 0.45 and 1.06 ± 0.43, respectively. The best MI was between IGTV MIP and GTV PET20% (0.45 ± 0.23). The best DI of IGTV MIP in GTV PET was IGTV MIP in GTV PET20% (0.61 ± 0.26). In 3D PET images, the GTVPET contoured by standardised uptake value (SUV) 2.0 or 20% of maximal SUV (SUV max ) approximate closely to the IGTV MIP in target size, while the spatial mismatch is apparent between them. Therefore, neither of them could replace IGTV MIP in spatial position and form. The advent of 4D PET/CT may improve the accuracy of contouring the perimeter for moving targets.

  3. Hypothalamus-Related Resting Brain Network Underlying Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Primary Hypertension

    Hongyan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempted to explore modulated hypothalamus-seeded resting brain network underlying the cardiovascular system in primary hypertensive patients after short-term acupuncture treatment. Thirty right-handed patients (14 male were divided randomly into acupuncture and control groups. The acupuncture group received a continuous five-day acupuncture treatment and undertook three resting-state fMRI scans and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM as well as SF-36 questionnaires before, after, and one month after acupuncture treatment. The control group undertook fMRI scans and 24-hour ABPM. For verum acupuncture, average blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR decreased after treatment but showed no statistical differences. There were no significant differences in BP and HR between the acupuncture and control groups. Notably, SF-36 indicated that bodily pain (P = 0.005 decreased and vitality (P = 0.036 increased after acupuncture compared to the baseline. The hypothalamus-related brain network showed increased functional connectivity with the medulla, brainstem, cerebellum, limbic system, thalamus, and frontal lobes. In conclusion, short-term acupuncture did not decrease BP significantly but appeared to improve body pain and vitality. Acupuncture may regulate the cardiovascular system through a complicated brain network from the cortical level, the hypothalamus, and the brainstem.

  4. Brief descriptive epidemiology of primary malignant brain tumors from North-East India.

    Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Bhattacharyya, Mouchumee; Nandy, Pintu; Hazarika, Munlima

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumors are a mixed group of neoplasms that originate from the intracranial tissues and the meninges with degrees of malignancy varying greatly from benign to aggressive. Not much is known about the epidemiology of primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) in our population in North-East India. In this analysis, an attempt was made to identify the age groups, gender distribution, topography and different histological types of PMBT with data from a hospital cancer registry. A total of 231 cases of PMBT were identified and included for the present analysis. Our analysis has shown that most of PMBT occur at 20-60 years of age, with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Some 70.5% of cases occurred in cerebral lobes except for the occipital lobe, and astrocytic tumors were the most common broad histological type. In our population the prevalence of PMBT is 1% of all cancers, mostly affecting young and middle aged patients. As brain tumors are rare, so case-control analytic epidemiological studies will be required to establish the risk factors prevalent in our population.

  5. A Case of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Located at Brain Stem in a Child.

    Kim, Jinho; Kim, Young Zoon

    2016-10-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an extranodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is confined to the brain, eyes, and/or leptomeninges without evidence of a systemic primary tumor. Although the tumor can affect all age groups, it is rare in childhood; thus, its incidence and prognosis in children have not been well defined and the best treatment strategy remains unclear. A nine-year old presented at our department with complaints of diplopia, dizziness, dysarthria, and right side hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance image suggested a diffuse brain stem glioma with infiltration into the right cerebellar peduncle. The patient was surgically treated by craniotomy and frameless stereotactic-guided biopsy, and unexpectedly, the histopathology of the mass was consistent with diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for CD20 and CD79a. Accordingly, we performed a staging work-up for systemic lymphoma, but no evidence of lymphoma elsewhere in the body was obtained. In addition, she had a negative serologic finding for human immunodeficient virus, which confirmed the histopathological diagnosis of PCNSL. She was treated by radiosurgery at 12 Gy and subsequent adjuvant combination chemotherapy based on high dose methotrexate. Unfortunately, 10 months after the tissue-based diagnosis, she succumbed due to an acute hydrocephalic crisis.

  6. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  7. Calculation of primary and secondary dose in proton therapy of brain tumors using Monte Carlo method

    Moghbel Esfahani, F.; Alamatsaz, M.; Karimian, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy beams of protons offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum - Bragg peak - near the end of range with a sharp falloff at the distal edge. Therefore, research must be done to investigate the possible negative and positive effects of using proton therapy as a treatment modality. In proton therapy, protons do account for the vast majority of dose. However, when protons travel through matter, secondary particles are created by the interactions of protons and matter en route to and within the patient. It is believed that secondary dose can lead to secondary cancer, especially in pediatric cases. Therefore, the focus of this work is determining both primary and secondary dose. Dose calculations were performed by MCNPX in tumoral and healthy parts of brain. The brain tumor has a 10 mm diameter and is located 16 cm under the skin surface. The brain was simulated by a cylindrical water phantom with the dimensions of 19 x 19cm 2 (length x diameter), with 0.5 cm thickness of plexiglass (C 4 H 6 O 2 ). Then beam characteristics were investigated to ensure the accuracy of the model. Simulations were initially validated with against packages such as SRIM/TRIM. Dose calculations were performed using different configurations to evaluate depth-dose profiles and dose 2D distributions.The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the brain tumor, is from 152 to 154 MeV. (authors)

  8. Imaging of primary central nervous system lymphoma

    Tang, Y.Z., E-mail: yenzhitang@doctors.net.uk [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Booth, T.C.; Bhogal, P.; Malhotra, A.; Wilhelm, T. [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) comprises 5% of all primary brain tumours. PCNSL demonstrates a variety of well-documented imaging findings, which can vary depending on immune status and histological type. Imaging features of PCNSL may overlap with other tumours and infection making definitive diagnosis challenging. In addition, several rare variants of PCNSL have been described, each with their own imaging characteristics. Advanced imaging techniques including 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and {sup 11}C positron-emission tomography (PET), {sup 201}Tl single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and MR perfusion, have been used to aid differentiation of PCNSL from other tumours. Ultimately, no imaging method can definitively diagnose PCNSL, and histology is required.

  9. Perinatal tumours: the contribution of radiology to management

    Donoghue, Veronica; Ryan, Stephanie; Twomey, Eilish [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-06-15

    A formal classification does not exist and they are probably best classified by their location. Overall the most common neoplasms are - Extracranial teratoma - Neuroblastoma - Soft-tissue tumours - Brain tumours - Leukaemia - Renal tumours - Liver tumours - Retinoblastoma. The prognosis is generally poor, although there are some exceptions such as congenital neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma. These tumours have a tendency to regress and have a benign clinical course despite a clear malignant histological picture. Other tumours, though histologically benign, may be fatal because of their size and location. Large benign masses may cause airway or cardiovascular compromise and death. Others may cause significant mass effect preventing normal organ development. As normal embryonic cells have a high mitotic rate it is not surprising that perinatal tumours may have a rapid growth rate and become enormous in size. (orig.)

  10. Cancer and tumour markers

    Osifo, B.

    1999-02-01

    Cancer has been a major cause of death world wide and in Nigeria there are six commonest forms of manifestation of cancer known. Of these prostrate cancer is the highest with 16% occurrence of all known cancers according to a study by the Histopathology Department of the UCH. Many factors, amongst them dietary, environmental, lifestyle, age and sedentary work are possible causes. With the global rise in incidents, the IAEA initiated the Tumour Marker Project as a means of screening cancers in 15 African countries including Nigeria. In Nigeria, 4 groups of the commonest cancers have been chosen for screening. These are prostrate cancer, primary liver cancer, cancer of the GI tract and trophoblastic cancer

  11. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...... adhesion in quiescent tumour endothelial cells with intact insulin receptors and partly prevented increases in VCAM-1 and leukocyte adhesion after treatment with tumour necrosis factor-α. Knockout of insulin receptors in endothelial cells also increased leukocyte adhesion in mesenteric venules...

  12. Expression and deposition of basement membrane proteins by brain capillary endothelial cells in a primary murine model of the blood-brain barrier

    Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Birkelund, Svend; Larsen, Annette Burkhart

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the interface between the blood and the brain parenchyma and consists of endothelial cells which are tightly sealed together by tight junction proteins. The endothelial cells are in addition supported by pericytes, which are embedded in the vascular basement...... of the present study was to create four different in vitro constructs of the murine BBB to characterise if the expression and secretion of basement membrane proteins by the murine brain capillary endothelial cells (mBCECs) was affected by co-culturing with pericytes, mixed glial cells, or both. Primary m......BCECs and pericytes were isolated from brains of adult mice. Mixed glial cells were prepared from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. The mBCECs were grown as mono-culture, or co-cultured with pericytes, mixed glial cells, or both. To study the expression of basement membrane proteins RT-qPCR, mass spectrometry...

  13. Assessment of the long-term effects of primary radiation therapy for brain tumors in children

    Danoff, B.F.; Cowchock, F.S.; Marquette, C.; Mulgrew, L.; Kramer, S.

    1982-01-01

    One-hundred-twelve children with primary brain tumors received definitive radiotherapy between the years 1958-1979. Sixty-nine patients were alive at intervals of 1-21 years. Thirty-eight patients underwent neurologic and endocrine evaluation, psychologic and intelligence testing, and assessment for second malignancy post-treatment. A second intracranial malgnancy developed in one child, for an incidence of 1.6%. Performance status was good to excellent in 89% of the patients studied. Seventeen percent of the group were mentally retarded. Behavioral disorders were identified in 39% of the patients, 59% of the mothers, and 43% of the fathers. Of the 23 patients with nonparasellar tumors, six were found to have growth hormone deficiency, including two patients with panhypopituitarism. Disability was related to age under 3 years at the time of treatment and tumor extension to the hypothalamus

  14. Regional Susceptibility to Domoic Acid in Primary Astrocyte Cells Cultured from the Brain Stem and Hippocampus

    Olga M. Pulido

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid is a marine biotoxin associated with harmful algal blooms and is the causative agent of amnesic shellfish poisoning in marine animals and humans. It is also an excitatory amino acid analog to glutamate and kainic acid which acts through glutamate receptors eliciting a very rapid and potent neurotoxic response. The hippocampus, among other brain regions, has been identified as a specific target site having high sensitivity to DOM toxicity. Histopathology evidence indicates that in addition to neurons, the astrocytes were also injured. Electron microscopy data reported in this study further supports the light microscopy findings. Furthermore, the effect of DOM was confirmed by culturing primary astrocytes from the hippocampus and the brain stem and subsequently exposing them to domoic acid. The RNA was extracted and used for biomarker analysis. The biomarker analysis was done for the early response genes including c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, Hsp-72; specific marker for the astrocytes- GFAP and the glutamate receptors including GluR 2, NMDAR 1, NMDAR 2A and B. Although, the astrocyte-GFAP and c-fos were not affected, c-jun and GluR 2 were down-regulated. The microarray analysis revealed that the chemokines / cytokines, tyrosine kinases (Trk, and apoptotic genes were altered. The chemokines that were up-regulated included - IL1-a, IL-1B, IL-6, the small inducible cytokine, interferon protein IP-10, CXC chemokine LIX, and IGF binding proteins. The Bax, Bcl-2, Trk A and Trk B were all downregulated. Interestingly, only the hippocampal astrocytes were affected. Our findings suggest that astrocytes may present a possible target for pharmacological interventions for the prevention and treatment of amnesic shellfish poisoning and for other brain pathologies involving excitotoxicity

  15. "Unusual brain stone": heavily calcified primary neoplasm with some features suggestive of angiocentric glioma.

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Bermingham, Niamh; Marks, Charles; Keohane, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    This 40-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of progressive right-sided headache associated with visual blurring. He also had a history of epilepsy but had been seizure free with medication for the past 10 years. An initial CT scan of his brain performed 16 years previously had revealed a small area of calcification in the right parietal region. In the current presentation, he had a left-sided homonymous hemianopia but no other neurological deficits. A CT scan of his brain showed a much larger calcified, partly cystic lesion in the right parietal region. Because he was symptomatic, the lesion was excised and the cyst was drained. Histological examination of the excised tissue showed an unusual primary tumor that was difficult to classify but had some features of angiocentric glioma. The heavy calcification, mixed-density cell population, and regions with features of angiocentric glioma were most unusual. The patient remained asymptomatic 5 years after surgery, and follow-up scans did not show recurrence.

  16. Factors affecting 18 F FDOPA standardized uptake value in patients with primary brain tumors after treatment

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Fiorentini, Alessandro; Villani, Veronica; Carapella, Carmine; Pace, Andrea; Di Pietro, Barbara; Di Russo, Carmen; Palumbo, Barbara; Floris, Roberto; Schillaci, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the factors affecting 18 F FDOPA uptake in patients with primary brain tumors (PBT) after treatment. Materials and methods: 97 patients with PBT (6 were grade I, 40 were grade II, 29 were grade III and 22 were grade IV) underwent 18 F FDOPA positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after treatment. Intervals from surgery, chemotherapy (CHT) and radiotherapy (RT) were 41.48 (± 42.27), 16.04 (± 29.08) and 28.62 (± 34.49) months respectively. Results: 18 F FDOPA uptake in the site of recurrence was not related to the interval from surgery and CHT while a significant relationship has been found with the interval from RT and tumor grade. Conclusions: The results of our study show that the interval from RT and the grade of PBT should be considered carefully when evaluating brain PET/CT scans since these factors could directly affect 18 F FDOPA uptake

  17. Clinical outcomes from maximum-safe resection of primary and metastatic brain tumors using awake craniotomy.

    Groshev, Anastasia; Padalia, Devang; Patel, Sephalie; Garcia-Getting, Rosemarie; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Forsyth, Peter A; Vrionis, Frank D; Etame, Arnold B

    2017-06-01

    To retrospectively analyze outcomes in patients undergoing awake craniotomies for tumor resection at our institution in terms of extent of resection, functional preservation and length of hospital stay. All cases of adults undergoing awake-craniotomy from September 2012-February 2015 were retrospectively reviewed based on an IRB approved protocol. Information regarding patient age, sex, cancer type, procedure type, location, hospital stay, extent of resection, and postoperative complications was extracted. 76 patient charts were analyzed. Resected cancer types included metastasis to the brain (41%), glioblastoma (34%), WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytoma (18%), WHO grade II glioma (4%), WHO grade I glioma (1%), and meningioma (1%). Over a half of procedures were performed in the frontal lobes, followed by temporal, and occipital locations. The most common indication was for motor cortex and primary somatosensory area lesions followed by speech. Extent of resection was gross total for 59% patients, near-gross total for 34%, and subtotal for 7%. Average hospital stay for the cohort was 1.7days with 75% of patients staying at the hospital for only 24h or less post surgery. In the postoperative period, 67% of patients experienced improvement in neurological status, 21% of patients experienced no change, 7% experienced transient neurological deficits, which resolved within two months post op, 1% experienced transient speech deficit, and 3% experienced permanent weakness. In a consecutive series of 76 patients undergoing maximum-safe resection for primary and metastatic brain tumors, awake-craniotomy was associated with a short hospital stay and low postoperative complications rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of diffuse brain injury with primary brainstem lesion on MRI

    Shibata, Masayoshi; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Shimoda, Masami; Ishizaka, Hideo; Shiramizu, Hideki; Morita, Seiji; Tsugane, Ryuichi

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that diffuse brain injury patients with primary brainstem lesions have a poor prognosis. Predicting the existence of brainstem injury at hospital arrival is problematic in actual clinical practice. We conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to visualize brainstem lesions clearly, and retrospectively analyzed predictive factors of brainstem lesions by stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis of patient characteristics, neurological findings, laboratory data, and CT findings at arrival in each case. We compared 24 patients with brainstem lesion and 60 without using MRI obtained less than 3 weeks after admission. Items investigated were blood pressure immediately after hospital arrival, arterial blood gas analysis, existence of abnormal respiration, blow direction, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), light reflex, oculocephalic reflex, corneal reflex, intracranial pressure, jugular venous oxygen saturation, and CT findings such as existence of subarachnoid hemorrhage at the suprasellar cistern, perimesencephalic cistern and convexity, lesions on the thalamus and basal ganglia, gliding contusion, intraventricular hemorrhage and Traumatic Coma Data Bank classification. Independent predictive factors of primary brainstem lesion included impaired light reflex (odds ratio: 2.269), subarachnoid hemorrhage at convexity (odds ratio: 3.592) and suprasellar cistern (odds ratio: 2.458), and Traumatic Coma Data Bank group III (odds ratio: 11.062). (author)

  19. Epidemiology of childhood cancer and the SACCSG tumour regis try

    (biochemistry, cell biology, immunology and genetics); (ii) the tissular or organ level ... geographical distribution, sex and ethnicity. It provides .... developed countries, in South Africa brain tumours ... substantial underreporting, the difference.

  20. Role of hormonal factor in development of primary and secondary tumorous process in the brain

    O. I. Kit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Causes of the development onset of primary malignant cerebral neoplasms have not yet been determined. Not excluded is a possibility of unfavorable effect of the environment, genetic abnormalities, changes alterations in the hormonal background as well as metabolism, ionizing radiation: possible is also the role of viral infections and injuries. One of the main most severest complications of malignant tumors remain are metastatic lesions of the central nervous system whose proportion increases as with the patients’ longlivity. Cerebral metastases of malignant tumors are encountered more often than primary neoplasms of the central nervous system. The brain is not only a hormone-dependent organ the effect of sex hormones as early the embryonic state conditions normal development of the body as a whole and controls the sex related differentiation. It is known that neurons and glyocites like gonads and adrenal glands are able to produce steroid hormones. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of neurosteroids were detected in the brain tissue in the embryonic period of the development. The human brain is not only a hormone-dependent organ effect influence of sex hormones as early as in the embrional state conditiones normal development of the body as a whole and controls sexual gender differentiation. It is known that neurons and glyocytes like gonads and adrenal glands are able to produce steroid hormones. Enzymes responsible for synthesis of neurosteroids were revealed in cerebral tissue both in during the embryonic period of the development and in adult condition. Besides there are have been obtained large amount of data on the presence in the cerebral cells of receptors to steroidal hormones. In various periods of life the influence effect exerted by steroids on nervous cells can change the morphofunctional state of the brain and manifests as altering myelinization, neuronal growth, and differentiation of nerve cells

  1. Allograft in bone tumour surgery

    Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    In the last twenty years, there has been a vast improvement in the prognosis of primary malignant tumours of bone. This is due to many factors including early detection, staging and classification of tumours as a result of better staining and imaging techniques, better surgical technology, e.g. endoprosthesis and most importantly adjuvant treatment with cytotoxic drugs. As a result of long term survival, amputation of limb has more or less been replaced by limb salvage surgery. This procedure consists of two parts. Primary objective is of course complete removal of the tumour by adequate soft tissue cover and secondarily by reconstruction of the locomotor system, If possible with retention of the function of the limb. These procedures include endo-prosthetic replacement or arthroplasty and arthrodesis using autologus grafts, allograft or combination. With the development of bone banks and assured safety of preserved bones, reconstructive limb salvage surgery using massive allograft is gradually replacing prosthetic implants. The advantages include replacement of articular surfaces, incorporation of the graft to the host bone, attachment of bone tissue and increased probably permanent survival. Allograft can be used for intercalary replacement, osteo-articular arthroplasty arthrodesis or filling large cavities. Inherent complication of massive allograft are disease transmission, infection, delayed and non-union, pathological fractures, mechanical failure and joint destruction. Several limb salvage procedures using allografts have been carried out in our institution with one failure due to infection. Paucity of available allograft has restricted more such procedures to be carried out

  2. A phase II trial with bevacizumab and irinotecan for patients with primary brain tumors and progression after standard therapy

    Møller, Søren; Grunnet, Kirsten; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2012-01-01

    The combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab has shown efficacy in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A prospective, phase II study of 85 patients with various recurrent brain tumors was carried out. Primary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and response rate....

  3. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Megan C. Mladinich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59 persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs, without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7, IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread.

  4. Long-term memory shapes the primary olfactory center of an insect brain.

    Hourcade, Benoît; Perisse, Emmanuel; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2009-10-01

    The storage of stable memories is generally considered to rely on changes in the functional properties and/or the synaptic connectivity of neural networks. However, these changes are not easily tractable given the complexity of the learning procedures and brain circuits studied. Such a search can be narrowed down by studying memories of specific stimuli in a given sensory modality and by working on networks with a modular and relatively simple organization. We have therefore focused on associative memories of individual odors and the possible related changes in the honeybee primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL). As this brain structure is organized in well-identified morpho-functional units, the glomeruli, we looked for evidence of structural and functional plasticity in these units in relation with the bees' ability to store long-term memories (LTMs) of specific odors. Restrained bees were trained to form an odor-specific LTM in an appetitive Pavlovian conditioning protocol. The stability and specificity of this memory was tested behaviorally 3 d after conditioning. At that time, we performed both a structural and a functional analysis on a subset of 17 identified glomeruli by measuring glomerular volume under confocal microscopy, and odor-evoked activity, using in vivo calcium imaging. We show that long-term olfactory memory for a given odor is associated with volume increases in a subset of glomeruli. Independent of these structural changes, odor-evoked activity was not modified. Lastly, we show that structural glomerular plasticity can be predicted based on a putative model of interglomerular connections.

  5. Phosphorylated AKT and MAPK expression in primary tumours and in corresponding metastases and clinical outcome in colorectal cancer patients receiving irinotecan-cetuximab

    Scartozzi Mario

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical observations suggested that a non negligible proportion of patients, ranging from 40% to 70%, does not seem to benefit from the use of anti-EGFR targeted antibodies even in the absence of a mutation of the K- RAS gene. The EGFR pathway activation via the Ras-Raf-MAP-kinase and the protein-serine/threonine kinase AKT could determine resistance to anti-EGFR treatment. Methods We tested the interaction between phosphorylated AKT and MAPK expression in colorectal tumours and corresponding metastases and global outcome in K-RAS wild type patients receiving irinotecan-cetuximab. Results Seventy-two patients with histologically proven metastatic colorectal cancer, treated with Irinotecan and Cetuximab based chemotherapy, were eligible for our analysis. In metastases pAKT correlated with RR (9% vs. 58%, p = 0.004, PFS (2.3 months vs.9.2 months p  Discussion pAKT and pMAPK expression in metastases may modulate the activity of EGFR-targeted antibodies. We could speculate that in patients with pAKT and pMAPK metastases expression targeting these factors may be crucial.

  6. Higher frequency of brain abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Gu, Li-Na; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2016-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder often co-exists with primary Sjögren's syndrome. We compared the clinical features of 16 neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients with ( n = 6) or without primary Sjögren's syndrome ( n = 10). All patients underwent extensive clinical, laboratory, and MRI evaluations. There were no statistical differences in demographics or first neurological involvement at onset between neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients with and without primary Sjögren's syndrome. The laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal banding, serum C-reactive protein, antinuclear autoantibody, anti-Sjögren's-syndrome-related antigen A antibodies, anti-Sjögren's-syndrome-related antigen B antibodies, and anti-Sm antibodies were significantly higher in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome than those without. Anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies were detectable in 67% (4/6) of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and in 60% (6/10) of patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome. More brain abnormalities were observed in patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome than in those with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Segments lesions (> 3 centrum) were noted in 50% (5/10) of patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome and in 67% (4/6) of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. These findings indicate that the clinical characteristics of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients with and without primary Sjögren's syndrome are similar. However, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients without primary Sjögren's syndrome have a high frequency of brain abnormalities.

  7. Treatment options for Primary CNS Lymphoma.

    Laghari, Altaf Ali; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Jabbar, Adnan; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2018-03-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare and aggressive brain tumour that is uniformly fatal. The rarity of the disease and the poor response to treatment makes it difficult to reach a consensus with regards to treatment options. In this review, the authors have discussed different treatment modalities used in the management of PCNSL including chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, as well as the results of recent clinical trials on treatment options for PCNSL.

  8. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight.

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nu