WorldWideScience

Sample records for primary autonomic failure

  1. Failure Prediction for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Hecker, Simon; Dai, Dengxin; Van Gool, Luc

    2018-01-01

    The primary focus of autonomous driving research is to improve driving accuracy. While great progress has been made, state-of-the-art algorithms still fail at times. Such failures may have catastrophic consequences. It therefore is important that automated cars foresee problems ahead as early as possible. This is also of paramount importance if the driver will be asked to take over. We conjecture that failures do not occur randomly. For instance, driving models may fail more likely at places ...

  2. Brain Metabolites in Autonomic Regulatory Insular Sites in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Mary A.; Yadav, Santosh K.; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Autonomic, pain, and neuropsychologic comorbidities appear in heart failure (HF), likely resulting from brain changes, indicated as loss of structural integrity and functional deficits. Among affected brain sites, the anterior insulae are prominent in serving major regulatory roles in many of the disrupted functions commonly seen in HF. Metabolite levels, including N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), and myo-inositol (MI), could ind...

  3. Impaired cardiac uptake of meta-[123I]iodobenzylguanidine in Parkinson's disease with autonomic failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braune, S.; Luecking, C.H.; Reinhardt, M.; Bathmann, J.; Krause, T.; Lehmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective - To selectively investigate postganglionic sympathetic cardiac neurons in patients with Parkinson's disease and autonomic failure. Material and methods - Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a pharmacologically inactive analogue of noradrenaline, which is similarly metabolized in noradrenergic neurons. Therefore the uptake of radiolabelled MIBG represents not only the localization of postganglionic sympathetic neurons but also their functional integrity. Ten patients with Parkinson's disease and autonomic failure underwent standardized autonomic testing, assessment of catecholamine plasma levels and scintigraphy with [ 123 I]MIGB. Results - The cardiac uptake of MIBG, as demonstrated by the heart/mediastinum ratio, was significantly lower in patients in comparison with controls. Scintigraphy with MIBG allowed the selective in-vivo investigation of postganglionic sympathetic cardiac efferent in patients with autonomic failure, a procedure which was previously confined to post-mortem examination. Conclusion - These findings point to a relevant postganglionic pattern of involvement of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in Parkinson's disease and autonomic failure. (au)

  4. Modes of failures: primary and secondary stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1987-07-01

    The paper begins with a reminder that the purpose of stress classification is to ensure suitable margins with respect to failure modes. The distinction between primary stresses and secondary stresses is then examined and a method is given for assessing the degree of elastic follow up in the elastic plastic field. The importance of elastic follow up is then highlighted by an examination of the effect of primary and secondary stresses on crack behavior

  5. Cardiac autonomic control in adolescents with primary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlíceková Z

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment in cardiovascular autonomic regulation participates in the onset and maintenance of primary hypertension. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control using long-term heart rate variability (HRV analysis in adolescents with primary hypertension. Subjects and methods Twenty two adolescent patients with primary hypertension (5 girls/17 boys aged 14-19 years and 22 healthy subjects matched for age and gender were enrolled. Two periods from 24-hour ECG recording were evaluated by HRV analysis: awake state and sleep. HRV analysis included spectral power in low frequency band (LF, in high frequency band (HF, and LF/HF ratio. Results In awake state, adolescents with primary hypertension had lower HF and higher LF and LF/HF ratio. During sleep, HF was lower and LF/HF ratio was higher in patients with primary hypertension. Conclusions A combination of sympathetic predominance and reduced vagal activity might represent a potential link between psychosocial factors and primary hypertension, associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity.

  6. Primary testicular failure in Klinefelter's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jørgensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of androgen deficiency is based on clinical features and confirmatory low serum testosterone levels. In early primary testicular failure, a rise in serum LH levels suggests inadequate androgen action for the individual's physiological requirements despite a serum testosterone level...

  7. Autonomic Predictors of Hospitalization Due to Heart Failure Decompensation in Patients with Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmiła Daniłowicz-Szymanowicz

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system balance can be significantly deteriorated during heart failure exacerbation. However, it is still unknown whether these changes are only the consequence of heart failure decompensation or can also predict development thereof. Objectives were to verify if simple, non-invasive autonomic parameters, such as baroreflex sensitivity and short-term heart rate variability can provide independent of other well-known clinical parameters information on the risk of heart failure decompensation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.In 142 stable patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%, baroreflex sensitivity and short-term heart rate variability, as well as other well-known clinical parameters, were analyzed. During 23 ± 9 months of follow-up 19 patients were hospitalized due to the heart failure decompensation (EVENT.Pre-specified cut-off values of baroreflex sensitivity (≤2.4 ms/mmHg and low frequency power index of heart rate variability (≤19 ms2 were significantly associated with the EVENTs (hazard ratio 4.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-14.54 and 5.41, 95% CI 1.87-15.65 respectively. EVENTs were also associated with other parameters, such as left ventricular ejection fraction, NYHA class, diuretic use, renal function, brain natriuretic peptide and hemoglobin level, left atrial size, left and right ventricular heart failure signs. After adjusting baroreflex sensitivity and low frequency power index for each of the abovementioned parameters, autonomic parameters were still significant predictors of hospitalization due to the heart failure decompensation.Simple, noninvasive autonomic indices can be helpful in identifying individuals with increased risk of hospitalization due to the heart failure decompensation among clinically stable patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, even when adjusted for other well-known clinical parameters.

  8. Hormonal and cardiovascular reflex assessment in a female patient with pure autonomic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heno Ferreira Lopes

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 72-year-old female with pure autonomic failure, a rare entity, whose diagnosis of autonomic dysfunction was determined with a series of complementary tests. For approximately 2 years, the patient has been experiencing dizziness and a tendency to fall, a significant weight loss, generalized weakness, dysphagia, intestinal constipation, blurred vision, dry mouth, and changes in her voice. She underwent clinical assessment and laboratory tests (biochemical tests, chest X-ray, digestive endoscopy, colonoscopy, chest computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography, abdominal ultrasound, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Measurements of catecholamine and plasmatic renin activity were performed at rest and after physical exercise. Finally the patient underwent physiological and pharmacological autonomic tests that better diagnosed dysautonomia.

  9. Substantial effect of acute hydration on blood pressure in patients with autonomic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Boesen, F

    1987-01-01

    fraction were measured in the supine position. Measurements were repeated after rapid infusion of 11 of isotonic saline. Acute hydration resulted in increased supine mean blood pressure levels (P less than 0.01) despite normal plasma volumes in all patients. The postural reductions in mean blood pressure......The effect of acute hydration on arterial blood pressure levels was investigated in ten patients with severe postural hypotension due to autonomic failure. Blood pressure and heart rate were determined in the supine and 60-degree head-up tilted position. Plasma volume and left ventricular ejection...... were reduced from 40 mmHg before to 20 mmHg after saline (median values, P less than 0.01). The results indicate that normal plasma volumes do not ensure optimal circulatory status in patients with autonomic failure. Acute hydration with isotonic saline may be used for immediate corrections of blood...

  10. Efficacy of atomoxetine versus midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Claudia E; Okamoto, Luis E; Arnold, Amy C; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-12-01

    The clinical presentation of autonomic failure is orthostatic hypotension. Severely affected patients require pharmacological treatment to prevent presyncopal symptoms or frank syncope. We previously reported in a proof of concept study that pediatric doses of the norepinephrine transporter blockade, atomoxetine, increases blood pressure in autonomic failure patients with residual sympathetic activity compared with placebo. Given that the sympathetic nervous system is maximally activated in the upright position, we hypothesized that atomoxetine would be superior to midodrine, a direct vasoconstrictor, in improving upright blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of acute atomoxetine versus midodrine on upright systolic blood pressure and orthostatic symptom scores in 65 patients with severe autonomic failure. There were no differences in seated systolic blood pressure (means difference=0.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence [CI], -7.3 to 7.9; P=0.94). In contrast, atomoxetine produced a greater pressor response in upright systolic blood pressure (means difference=7.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, 0.6 to 15; P=0.03) compared with midodrine. Furthermore, atomoxetine (means difference=0.4; 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.8; P=0.02), but not midodrine (means difference=0.5; 95% CI, -0.1 to 1.0; P=0.08), improved orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms as compared with placebo. The results of our study suggest that atomoxetine could be a superior therapeutic option than midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Depletion of catecholaminergic neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla in multiple systems atrophy with autonomic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch, E. E.; Smithson, I. L.; Low, P. A.; Parisi, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The ventrolateral portion of the intermediate reticular formation of the medulla (ventrolateral medulla, VLM), including the C1/A1 groups of catecholaminergic neurons, is thought to be involved in control of sympathetic cardiovascular outflow, cardiorespiratory interactions, and reflex control of vasopressin release. As all these functions are affected in patients with multiple systems atrophy (MSA) with autonomic failure, we sought to test the hypothesis that catecholaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase [TH]-positive) neurons of the VLM are depleted in these patients. Medullas were obtained at autopsy from 4 patients with MSA with prominent autonomic failure and 5 patients with no neurological disease. Patients with MSA had laboratory evidence of severe adrenergic sudomotor and cardiovagal failure. Tissue was immersion fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde at 4 degrees C for 24 hours and cut into 1-cm blocks in the coronal plane from throughout the medulla. Serial 50-microm sections were collected and one section every 300 microm was stained for TH. There was a pronounced depletion of TH neurons in the rostral VLM in all cases of MSA. There was also significant reduction of TH neurons in the caudal VLM in 3 MSA patients compared with 3 control subjects. In 2 MSA cases and in 2 control subjects, the thoracic spinal cord was available for study. There was also depletion of TH fibers and sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in the 2 MSA cases examined. Thus, depletion of catecholaminergic neurons in the VLM may provide a substrate for some of the autonomic and endocrine manifestations of MSA.

  12. An autonomous recovery mechanism against optical distribution network failures in EPON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrew Tanny; Hwang, I.-Shyan; Nikoukar, AliAkbar

    2014-10-01

    Ethernet Passive Optical Network (EPON) is chosen for servicing diverse applications with higher bandwidth and Quality-of-Service (QoS), starting from Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH), FTTB (business/building) and FTTO (office). Typically, a single OLT can provide services to both residential and business customers on the same Optical Line Terminal (OLT) port; thus, any failures in the system will cause a great loss for both network operators and customers. Network operators are looking for low-cost and high service availability mechanisms that focus on the failures that occur within the drop fiber section because the majority of faults are in this particular section. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an autonomous recovery mechanism that provides protection and recovery against Drop Distribution Fiber (DDF) link faults or transceiver failure at the ONU(s) in EPON systems. In the proposed mechanism, the ONU can automatically detect any signal anomalies in the physical layer or transceiver failure, switching the working line to the protection line and sending the critical event alarm to OLT via its neighbor. Each ONU has a protection line, which is connected to the nearest neighbor ONU, and therefore, when failure occurs, the ONU can still transmit and receive data via the neighbor ONU. Lastly, the Fault Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation for recovery mechanism is presented. Simulation results show that our proposed autonomous recovery mechanism is able to maintain the overall QoS performance in terms of mean packet delay, system throughput, packet loss and EF jitter.

  13. Cardiac Organ Damage and Arterial Stiffness in Autonomic Failure: Comparison With Essential Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Valeria; Maule, Simona; Di Stefano, Cristina; Tosello, Francesco; Totaro, Silvia; Veglio, Franco; Milan, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic failure (AF) is characterized by orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, and increased blood pressure (BP) variability. AF patients develop cardiac organ damage, similarly to essential hypertension (EH), and have higher arterial stiffness than healthy controls. Determinants of cardiovascular organ damage in AF are not well known: both BP variability and mean BP values may be involved. The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac organ damage, arterial stiffness, and central hemodynamics in AF, compared with EH subjects with similar 24-hour BP and a group of healthy controls, and to evaluate determinants of target organ damage in patients with AF. Twenty-seven patients with primary AF were studied (mean age, 65.7±11.2 years) using transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, central hemodynamics, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. They were compared with 27 EH subjects matched for age, sex, and 24-hour mean BP and with 27 healthy controls. AF and EH had similar left ventricular mass (101.6±33.3 versus 97.7±28.1 g/m(2), P=0.59) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (9.3±1.8 versus 9.2±3.0 m/s, P=0.93); both parameters were significantly lower in healthy controls (Phypertensive heart disease and increased arterial stiffness, similar to EH with comparable mean BP values. Twenty-four-hour and nighttime systolic BP were determinants of cardiovascular damage, independent of BP variability. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Strain-specific patterns of autonomic nervous system activity and heart failure susceptibility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Usiene, Irmute; Harrigal, Chivonne; Lee, Joon Sup; Kubota, Toru; Feldman, Arthur M; London, Barry

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic mice are widely used to study cardiac function, but strain-dependent differences in autonomic nervous system activity (ANSA) have not been explored. We compared 1) short-term pharmacological responses of cardiac rhythm in FVB vs. C57Black6/SV129 wild-type mice and 2) long-term physiological dynamics of cardiac rhythm and survival in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha transgenic mice with heart failure (TNF-alpha mice) on defined backgrounds. Ambulatory telemetry electrocardiographic recordings and response to saline, adrenergic, and cholinergic agents were examined in FVB and C57Black6/SV129 mice. In FVB mice, baseline heart rate (HR) was higher and did not change after injection of isoproterenol or atropine but decreased with propranolol. In C57Black6/SV129 mice, HR did not change with propranolol but increased with isoproterenol or atropine. Mean HR, but not indexes of HR variability, was an excellent predictor of response to autonomic agents. The proportion of surviving animals was higher in TNF-alpha mice on an FVB background than on a mixed FVB/C57Black6 background. The homeostatic states of ANSA are strain specific, which can explain the interstrain differences in mean HR, pharmacological responses, and survival of animals with congestive heart failure. Strain-specific differences should be considered in selecting the strains of mice used for transgenic and gene targeting experiments.

  15. The effect of desmopressin on nocturnal polyuria, overnight weight loss, and morning postural hypotension in patients with autonomic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, C J; Fosbraey, P; da Costa, D F; Thornley, A; Bannister, R

    1986-01-01

    Day and night urine volume, morning and evening body weight, and supine and sitting blood pressure were measured in five patients with chronic autonomic failure who were not receiving treatment with drugs. All had nocturnal polyuria, overnight weight loss, and a pronounced postural fall in blood pressure, with lowest levels in the morning. Desmopressin (2-4 micrograms given intramuscularly at 8 pm) reduced nocturnal polyuria, diminished overnight weight loss, raised supine blood pressure, and reduced the postural fall, especially in the morning, when patients were often at their worst. Desmopressin may be a useful alternative to, or may supplement, other forms of treatment in some patients with autonomic failure. PMID:3089519

  16. High-Temperature Graphitization Failure of Primary Superheater Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Mandal, N.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Failure of boiler tubes is the main cause of unit outages of the plant, which further affects the reliability, availability and safety of the unit. So failure analysis of boiler tubes is absolutely essential to predict the root cause of the failure and the steps are taken for future remedial action to prevent the failure in near future. This paper investigates the probable cause/causes of failure of the primary superheater tube in a thermal power plant boiler. Visual inspection, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, metallographic examination and hardness measurement are conducted as the part of the investigative studies. Apart from these tests, mechanical testing and fractographic analysis are also conducted as supplements. Finally, it is concluded that the superheater tube is failed due to graphitization for prolonged exposure of the tube at higher temperature.

  17. Autonomic failure mimicing dopamine agonist induced vertigo in a patient with macroprolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, L; Braune, S; Borm, K; Magerkurth, C; Talazko, J; Peters, T; Reincke, M

    2002-10-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with general fatigue, increasing adynamia, weakness, vertigo and recurrent syncope. Six weeks earlier the diagnosis of a macroprolactinoma had been established based on a greatly elevated prolactin concentration (161 170 micro U/l) and MR-evidence of a 3.5 cm measuring pituitary mass. The patient had been started on cabergoline (1.5 mg weekly). Orthostatic hypotension due to the dopamine agonist was considered very likely and carbergoline therapy was stopped. However, there was no relief of the symptoms and further syncopes followed. Testing of blood pressure and heart rate regulation, selective testing of postganglionic cardiac neurons with [ 123 J] metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy provided evidence of grossly impaired neurogenic cardiovascular regulation due to failure of postganglionic efferent sympathetic activity. This is characteristic for pure autonomic failure. The patient was treated symptomatically with high fluid intake, compression stockings, fludrohydrocortisone (0.1 mg o.d.s.), piroxicam (20 mg o.d.s.) and etilephrin (10 mg q.d.s.), which enabled him to cope with daily activities without syncope. This case shows that vertigo in a patient with macroprolactinoma is not always related to drug therapy but may be related to other causes.

  18. Review on experiments relating to primary containment vessel failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uchida, Sunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Experiments regarding failures of primary containment vessels (PCVs) are reviewed and remained issues to be investigated in the future are discussed. Experiments are categorized as those relating to criteria of PCV failures and to FP releases through breaches on PCV boundaries. In the experiments categorized as those relating to criteria of PCV failures, experiments with full-scale, scale models, and compounds used for sealing are surveyed. Experiments relating to an amount of radioactive fission products (FPs) trapped at breaches on PCV boundaries are also reviewed. As remained issues to be investigated in the future, two items are pointed out: Evaluating degradation behavior of PCV boundaries exposed to temperature and pressure from the failure onset criteria to far above them, and evaluating an amount of FPs trapped at breaches on PCV boundaries. (author)

  19. Heart failure guidelines and prescribing in primary care across Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobbs FD Richard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major international differences in heart failure treatment have been repeatedly described, but the reasons for these differences remain unclear. National guideline recommendations might be a relevant factor. This study, therefore, explored variation of heart failure guideline recommendations in Europe. Methods Treatment recommendations of 14 national guidelines published after 1994 were analyzed in relation to the heart failure treatment guideline of the European Society of Cardiology. To test potential relations between recommendations and prescribing, national prescribing patterns as obtained by a European study in primary care (IMPROVEMENT-HF were related to selected recommendations in those countries. Results Besides the 14 national guidelines used by primary care physicians in the countries contacted, the European guideline was used in four countries, and separate guidelines for specialists and primary care were available in another four countries. Two countries indicated that no guideline was used up to 2000. Comprehensiveness of the guidelines varied with respect to length, literature included and evidence ratings. Relevant differences in treatment recommendations were seen only in drug classes where evidence had changed recently (β-blockers and spironolactone. The relation between recommendation and prescribing for selected recommendations was inconsistent among countries. Conclusion Differences in guideline recommendations are not sufficient to explain variation of prescribing among countries, thus other factors must be considered.

  20. [Primary care resources available in digital libraries in Spanish Autonomous Regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Quilis, Verónica

    2013-03-01

    The Statement by the Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (SemFYC) on access to scientific information, highlights the need for providing digital libraries with certain resources in Autonomous Regions. The primary goal is to study the evidence-based medicine (EBM) coverage that SemFYC recommends regional virtual libraries. The regional health virtual libraries were identified and the access provided to health professionals, Internet presence, remote access and resources were studied. The results suggest there is ample coverage in 8 Autonomous Regions. At the top of the list was, Health Sciences Virtual Library of Navarre, the Balearic Islands Health Sciences Virtual Library, and Virtual Library of the Andalusian Public Health System. The present study needs to be extended to the other biomedical sciences, in order to obtain more accurate results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. [Variations in antihypertensive drug utilization among primary care areas in the autonomous region of Valencia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Peiró, Salvador; Librero, Julián

    2010-01-01

    To estimate consumption of five subgroups of antihypertensive drugs by primary care areas and to analyze its variation. We performed an ecological, descriptive study of antihypertensive consumption in 239 primary care areas in the autonomous region of Valencia in 2005 followed by analysis of the variability observed. The 239 primary care areas were studied by descriptive analysis of dispensation [defined daily dose (DDD) per 1,000 inhabitants/day in pensioners (DDD/1000p/day) and in the active population (DDD/1000a/day)] and standardized consumption ratios. Small-area variation analysis was used to analyze the observed variability. Associations among dispensations of the distinct therapeutic subgroups were also analyzed. Overall antihypertensive use in the autonomous region of Valencia in 2005 was 235.6DDD/1000/day. This consumption was concentrated in pensioners (800DDD/1000p/day vs. 73DDD/1000a/day). Consumption of antihypertensive subgroups oscillated from 442DDD/1000p/day for drugs with action on the renin-angiotensin system to 32DDD/1000p/day for doxazosin. The active population showed similar patterns. Variation in consumption was moderate, with coefficients of variation from 0.20 to 0.40 (slightly greater for the active population). Associations among dispensations of the different therapeutic subgroups were strong. This study shows major variations in the overall consumption of antihypertensive drugs among primary care areas of the autonomous region of Valencia. These results suggest that variation may be associated with problems of underutilization in areas with lower consumption. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Fulminant Hepatic Failure Secondary to Primary Hepatic Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayokunle T. Abegunde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare and aggressive tumor that often presents at an advanced stage with nonspecific symptoms. Objective. To report a case of primary hepatic angiosarcoma in an otherwise healthy man with normal liver function tests two months prior to presenting with a short period of jaundice that progressed to fulminant hepatic failure. Methods. Case report and review of literature. Conclusion. This case illustrates the rapidity of progression to death after the onset of symptoms in a patient with hepatic angiosarcoma. Research on early diagnostic strategies and newer therapies are needed to improve prognosis in this rare and poorly understood malignancy with limited treatment options.

  3. 49 CFR 214.529 - In-service failure of primary braking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false In-service failure of primary braking system. 214... Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.529 In-service failure of primary braking system. (a) In the event of a total in-service failure of its primary braking system, an on-track roadway maintenance...

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in primary ovarian insufficiency: clinical and experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmeier, Silvia; De Angelis, Kátia; Rabello Casali, Karina; Vilodre, César; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Belló Klein, Adriane; Plentz, Rodrigo; Spritzer, PoliMara; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) present an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In this study we tested the hypothesis that POI in women under hormone therapy (HT) are associated with vascular vasodilatation attenuation and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and these impairments are related to changes in systemic antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, the possibility that ovarian hormone deprivation can induce such changes and that HT cannot reverse all of those impairments was examined in an experimental model of POI. Methods: Fifteen control and 17 patients with primary ovarian insufficiency receiving HT were included in the study. To test the systemic and cardiac consequences of ovarian hormone deprivation, ovariectomy was induced in young female rats that were submitted or not to HT. Spectral analysis of RR interval and blood pressure signals were performed and oxidative stress parameters were determined. Results: POI women under HT have increased mean arterial pressure (94±10 vs. 86±5 mmHg) despite normal endothelial and autonomic modulation of vasculature. Additionally, they presented impaired baroreflex sensitivity (3.9±1.38 vs. 7.15±3.62 ms/mmHg) and reduced heart rate variability (2310±1173 vs. 3754±1921 ms2). Similar results obtained in ovariectomized female rats were accompanied by an increased lipoperoxidation (7433±1010 vs. 6180±289 cps/mg protein) and decreased antioxidant enzymes in cardiac tissue. As it was observed in women, the HT in animals did not restore hemodynamic and autonomic dysfunctions. Conclusion: These data provide clinical and experimental evidence that long term HT may not restore all cardiovascular risk factors associated with ovarian hormone deprivation. PMID:24349626

  5. Factors affecting job satisfaction among primary and secondary school teachers in the autonomous province of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Nebojša Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper analyses the impact of the individual factors of mental and physical health and life satisfaction, as well as the importance of some organizational factors such as the climate in schools, the composition of classes in the case of class teachers, and certain demographic characteristics on primary and secondary school teachers' job satisfaction. The data were collected from a convenience sample of 176 teachers of primary and secondary schools in Serbia's autonomous province of Vojvodina, of different ages, genders, and years of service. The principal results indicate that job satisfaction is higher among teachers who perceive the climate in their school as positive, among teachers with higher life satisfaction, and among teachers who are in good health and, most importantly, lacking depressive reactions. When it comes to perceptions of the climate, the best predictor of job satisfaction is the degree of respondents' satisfaction with collaboration with colleagues and with decision making processes. The results also indicate that secondary school teachers report a higher level of overall job satisfaction, specifically, a higher level of satisfaction with school governance, co-workers and communication than primary school teachers. As regards demographic characteristics, the results suggest that there are no significant gender differences in job satisfaction levels and that job satisfaction declines with the number of years of service, with respondents who had between 21 and 30 years of service reporting the lowest levels of job satisfaction, which tended to rise towards the end of the teaching career.

  6. Hyponatraemia secondary to nivolumab-induced primary adrenal failure

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    Harris Trainer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Checkpoint inhibitors, such as ipilimumab and pembrolizumab, have transformed the prognosis for patients with advanced malignant melanoma and squamous non-small-cell lung cancer, and their use will only expand as experience is gained in a variety of other malignancies, for instance, renal and lymphoma. As the use of checkpoint inhibitors increases, so too will the incidence of their unique side effects, termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs, which can affect dermatological, gastrointestinal, hepatic, endocrine and other systems. Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the human programmed death receptor-1 ligand (PD-L1 found on many cancer cells and is licensed for the treatment of advanced malignant melanoma. We describe the first case of nivolumab-induced adrenalitis resulting in primary adrenal failure presenting with hyponatraemia in a 43-year-old man with malignant melanoma. The case highlights the potentially life-threatening complications of checkpoint inhibitors and the need for patient education and awareness of irAEs among the wider clinical community because such side effects require prompt recognition and treatment.

  7. Vibration based blind identification of bearing failures for autonomous wireless sensor nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Loendersloot, Richard; Tinga, Tiedo; Bregon, A.; Daigle, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite all the attention received by maintainers, undetected roller bearings failures are still a major source of concern in relation with reliability losses and high maintenance costs. Because of that, bearing condition assessment through vibration monitoring remains an intensive topic of

  8. Newly diagnosed primary hypothyroidism applicant with massive pericardial effusion and acute renal failure

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    Ates I

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. While non-symptomatic pericardial effusion is seen in primary hypothyroidism, massive pericardial effusion is a very rare finding. In the literature, newly diagnosed primary hypothyroidism cases presenting with massive pericardial effusion or acute renal failure are present, but we did not encounter any case first presenting with combination of two signs. In this case report, primary hypothyroidism case that presenting with massive pericardial effusion and acute renal failure will be discussed.

  9. Predictive value of cardiac autonomic indexes and MIBG washout in ICD recipients with mild to moderate heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutelou, M.; Katsikis, A.; Livanis, E.; Georgiadis, M.; Voudris, V.; Flevari, P.; Kremastinos, D.; Theodorakis, G.

    2009-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the combined use of heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging in the risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) of patients with mild to moderate heart failure. Twenty-five patients (17 male and 8 female, mean age 63±5 years, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 36±3%) with a recently implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and mild (NYHA I-II) heart failure due to either ischemic (n=15) or dilated (n=10) cardiomyopathy were studied. One week after ICD implantation they underwent baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) evaluation to bolus phenylephrine by the Oxford method, 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) assessment, and MIBG imaging. The mean patient follow-up was 32±10 months. Simple correlation and stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate if the number of sustained ventricular tachycardia (cycle length <330 ms) or fibrillation episodes per month is related to one or more of MIBG, BRS, and HRV indexes and if MIBG % washout is related to HRV and/or BRS. The frequency of fast ventricular arrhythmic episodes (FVAE) demonstrated an inverse relation to BRS (p<0.0001), rMSSD (p=0.001), and pNN50 (p=0.0034), while it was positively related to low frequency (LF) (p<0.0001) and MIBG % washout (p=0.001). BRS, LF, rMSSD, and MIBG washout were also independent predictors of FVAE. MIBG washout was related to only one HRV marker (SDNN-I, p<0.0001), while no correlation was observed with BRS. In ICD recipients with well-compensated heart failure, autonomic markers derived from BRS, HRV, and MIBG studies are related to FVAE. These markers have limited inter-dependency and constitute useful means for SCD risk stratification in this subgroup of patients. (author)

  10. Cardiovascular Autonomic Responses in the VCD Rat Model of Menopause: Effects of Short- and Long-Term Ovarian Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Domitila A; Bazilio, Darlan; Lorenzon, Flaviano; Sehnem, Sibele; Pacheco, Lucas; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Lima, Fernanda B

    2017-01-01

    After menopause, hypertension elevates the risk of cardiac diseases, one of the major causes of women's morbidity. The gradual depletion of ovarian follicles in rats, induced by 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), is a model for studying the physiology of menopause. 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide treatment leads to early ovarian failure (OF) and a hormonal profile comparable to menopause in humans. We have hypothesized that OF can compromise the balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic tones of the cardiovascular system, shifting toward dominance of the former. We aimed to study the autonomic modulation of heart and blood vessels and the cardiovascular reflexes in rats presenting short-term (80 days) or long-term (180 days) OF induced by VCD. Twenty-eight-day-old Wistar rats were submitted to VCD treatment (160 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or vehicle (control) for 15 consecutive days and experiments were conducted at 80 or 180 days after the onset of treatment. Long-term OF led to an increase in the sympathetic activity to blood vessels and an impairment in the baroreflex control of the heart, evoked by physiological changes in arterial pressure. Despite that, long-term OF did not cause hypertension during the 180 days of exposure. Short-term OF did not cause any deleterious effect on the cardiovascular parameters analyzed. These data indicate that long-term OF does not disrupt the maintenance of arterial pressure homeostasis in rats but worsens the autonomic cardiovascular control. In turn, this can lead to cardiovascular complications, especially when associated with the aging process seen during human menopause.

  11. [Management of heart failure in cardiology and primary care (MICCAP) program: Improving the management of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Pallares, V; Egocheaga, M I; Lobos, J M; Bover, R; Gómez Doblas, J J; Cosín, J

    2018-03-26

    Despite current treatments, morbidity and mortality of patients with heart failure remain high. The late diagnosis of heart failure, the insufficient heart failure treatment (i.e. not using the appropriate drugs, prescribing lower doses of drugs than recommended, etc.), and a poor coordination between different health care levels, may explain, at least in part, these figures. The Management of Heart Failure in Cardiology and Primary Care (MICCAP) program has been developed with the aim of optimising the integrated management of patients with heart failure between Primary Care and Cardiology, through the improvement of coordination between both health care levels. This includes continuous medical education to reinforce the diagnostic and therapeutic skills of general practitioners in the field of heart failure. The rationale and objectives of the MICCAP program are summarised in this article. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. The preserved autonomic functions may provide the asymptomatic clinical status in heart failure despite advanced left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Taçoy, Gülten; Ozdemir, Murat; Açıkgöz, Sadık Kadri; Cengel, Atiye

    2010-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is an important marker of prognosis in congestive heart failure (CHF) and may determine the symptoms and progression of CHF. The aim of our study was to investigate whether preserved autonomic function assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) analyses is related to absence of CHF symptoms despite prominently reduced systolic function. The study had a cross-sectional observational design. Fifty patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) below 40% were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups according to their CHF symptomatic status as Group 1 (NYHA functional class I, asymptomatic group) and Group 2 (NYHA functional class ≥ II, symptomatic group). Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, echocardiographic parameters and HRV indices were measured while the patients were clinically stable in each group. Possible factors associated with the development of CHF symptoms were assessed by using multiple regression analysis. Baseline clinical characteristics and left ventricular EF were similar in the two groups. Serum CRP (15 ± 21 vs 7 ± 18 mg/L, p=0.011) and NT-proBNP levels (1935 ± 1088 vs 1249 ± 1083 pg/mL, p=0.020) were significantly higher in symptomatic group. The HRV parameters (SDNN: 78 ± 57 vs 122 ± 42 ms, p=0.001; SDANN: 65 ± 55 vs 84 ± 38 ms, p=0.024; SDNNi: 36 ± 41 vs 70 ± 46 ms, pfunction were significantly associated with the asymptomatic status (SDNN, OR: 1.016, 95%CI: 1.002-1.031, p=0.028; SDNNi, OR: 1.030, 95%CI: 1.008-1.052, p=0.006; TI, OR: 1.088, 95%CI: 1.019-1.161, p=0.011). Preserved autonomic functions were shown to be associated with absence of CHF symptoms independently of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker's treatment and BNP levels and may be protective against the development of CHF symptoms despite advanced left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  13. Perceptions of seniors with heart failure regarding autonomous zero-effort monitoring of physiological parameters in the smart-home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Taherzadeh, Golnoush; Jae Chang, Isaac Sung; Boger, Jennifer; Arcelus, Amaya; Mak, Susanna; Chessex, Caroline; Mihailidis, Alex

    Technological advances are leading to the ability to autonomously monitor patient's health status in their own homes, to enable aging-in-place. To understand the perceptions of seniors with heart failure (HF) regarding smart-home systems to monitor their physiological parameters. In this qualitative study, HF outpatients were invited to a smart-home lab, where they completed a sequence of activities, during which the capacity of 5 autonomous sensing modalities was compared to gold standard measures. Afterwards, a semi-structured interview was undertaken. These were transcribed and analyzed using an interpretive-descriptive approach. Five themes emerged from the 26 interviews: (1) perceptions of technology, (2) perceived benefits of autonomous health monitoring, (3) disadvantages of autonomous monitoring, (4) lack of perceived need for continuous health monitoring, and (5) preferences for autonomous monitoring. Patient perception towards autonomous monitoring devices was positive, lending credence to zero-effort technology as a viable and promising approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Peripheral sympathetic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease without autonomic failure is heart selective and disease specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Hwang, Eui-Hyo; Matsunari, Ichiro; Tonami, Norihisa; Komai, Kiyonobu; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Sakajiri, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate by means of iodine-123-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy the peripheral sympathetic function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) without autonomic failure and in patients with related neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism. Seventy patients (33 men and 37 women, mean age 63±9.7 years) with parkinsonism and ten control subjects underwent MIBG scintigraphy. Of these 70 patients, 41 were diagnosed as having idiopathic PD, 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 6 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 2 corticobasal degeneration (CBD); the remaining 12 were diagnosed as having neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism (P-nism) that did not meet the diagnostic criteria of any specific disease. Cardiac planar and tomographic imaging studies and subsequent whole-body imaging were performed 20 min and 3 h after the injection of 111 MBq MIBG. The early MIBG heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio in PD (1.61±0.29) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.24±0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.15±0.31, P<0.01), MSA (2.08±0.31, P<0.05) and PSP (2.30±0.24, P<0.01). The delayed H/M ratio in PD (1.47±0.34) was also significantly lower than that in the control group (2.37±0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.13±0.38, P<0.01), PSP (2.36±0.36, P<0.01) and MSA (2.17±0.36, P<0.01). In patients with PD, early and delayed H/M ratios were significantly decreased in disease stages I, II and III (established using the Hoehn and Yahr criteria) as compared with control subjects, and there were no significant differences among the stages. Only PD showed a significantly higher washout rate (WR) than that in the control subjects (27%±8.0% vs 11%±4.2%, P<0.01). Early and delayed uptake ratios of the lung, parotid gland, thyroid gland, liver and femoral muscles in each of the patient groups were not significantly different from those in control subjects. Only the early and delayed uptake ratios of the lower leg muscles in MSA

  15. Peripheral sympathetic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease without autonomic failure is heart selective and disease specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Hwang, Eui-Hyo; Matsunari, Ichiro; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan); Komai, Kiyonobu; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Sakajiri, Kenichi [Department of the Neurology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate by means of iodine-123-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy the peripheral sympathetic function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) without autonomic failure and in patients with related neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism. Seventy patients (33 men and 37 women, mean age 63{+-}9.7 years) with parkinsonism and ten control subjects underwent MIBG scintigraphy. Of these 70 patients, 41 were diagnosed as having idiopathic PD, 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 6 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and 2 corticobasal degeneration (CBD); the remaining 12 were diagnosed as having neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism (P-nism) that did not meet the diagnostic criteria of any specific disease. Cardiac planar and tomographic imaging studies and subsequent whole-body imaging were performed 20 min and 3 h after the injection of 111 MBq MIBG. The early MIBG heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio in PD (1.61{+-}0.29) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.24{+-}0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.15{+-}0.31, P<0.01), MSA (2.08{+-}0.31, P<0.05) and PSP (2.30{+-}0.24, P<0.01). The delayed H/M ratio in PD (1.47{+-}0.34) was also significantly lower than that in the control group (2.37{+-}0.14, P<0.01), P-nism (2.13{+-}0.38, P<0.01), PSP (2.36{+-}0.36, P<0.01) and MSA (2.17{+-}0.36, P<0.01). In patients with PD, early and delayed H/M ratios were significantly decreased in disease stages I, II and III (established using the Hoehn and Yahr criteria) as compared with control subjects, and there were no significant differences among the stages. Only PD showed a significantly higher washout rate (WR) than that in the control subjects (27%{+-}8.0% vs 11%{+-}4.2%, P<0.01). Early and delayed uptake ratios of the lung, parotid gland, thyroid gland, liver and femoral muscles in each of the patient groups were not significantly different from those in control subjects. Only the early and delayed uptake ratios of

  16. [Description of the organizational climate in primary care teams in an autonomous community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menárguez Puche, J F; Saturno Hernández, P J

    1999-03-31

    To describe the organisational atmosphere (OA) in primary care teams (PCTs) in an autonomous community. Crossover and observational. PCTs. A questionnaire on OA was administered after prior validation to all the doctors, nurses and social workers at 29 PCTs. The OA in the different teams was described, comprehensively and by dimensions: team-work, cohesion and commitment. Multiple regression was used to find the relationship between OA (dependent variable) and the independent variables: age of the professionals, years of functioning of the PCT, teaching status, type, location (rural or urban) and profession (coordinators, doctors, nurses, clerical staff). Overall reply rate was 77.5% (402 professionals): it was higher for coordinators. Average score on the questionnaire was 3.53 (SD = 0.56): it was higher for nurses. Results by dimensions were: team-work 3.67 (SD = 0.59), cohesion 3.54 (SD = 0.71) and commitment 3.37 (SD = 0.72). OA was seen as better by teaching teams (p dimensions. Coordinators had better self-perception of the OA, both overall and by dimensions (p < 0.01). Teams who had worked together for a long time thought the atmosphere was worse. The type of job and the number of years doing it did not affect the perception of OA. 1. The evaluation of OA is generally positive, though it can certainly be improved. 2. Perception is not uniform, as coordinators and teaching teams see the OA as better. 3. Teams working together for many years see the OA as worse.

  17. Case report: Management of severe posterior open bite due to primary failure of eruption.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cafferty, J

    2010-06-01

    Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is a rare condition affecting any or all posterior quadrants. Unilateral involvement of maxillary and mandibular quadrants causes a dramatic posterior open bite that requires complex management strategies.

  18. Comparison of mode of failure between primary and revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Bae, J K; Park, C H; Kim, K I; Bae, D K; Song, S J

    2018-04-01

    Cognizance of common reasons for failure in primary and revision TKA, together with their time course, facilitates prevention. However, there have been few reports specifically comparing modes of failure for primary vs. revision TKA using a single prosthesis. The goal of the study was to compare the survival rates, modes of failure, and time periods associated with each mode of failure, of primary vs. revision TKA. The survival rates, modes of failure, time period for each mode of failure, and risk factors would differ between primary and revision TKA. Data from a consecutive cohort comprising 1606 knees (1174 patients) of primary TKA patients, and 258 knees (224 patients) of revision TKA patients, in all of whom surgery involved a P.F.C ® prosthesis (Depuy, Johnson & Johnson, Warsaw, IN), was retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up periods of primary and revision TKAs were 9.2 and 9.8 years, respectively. The average 10- and 15-year survival rates for primary TKA were 96.7% (CI 95%,±0.7%) and 85.4% (CI 95%,±2.0%), and for revision TKA 91.4% (CI 95%,±2.5%) and 80.5% (CI 95%,±4.5%). Common modes of failure included polyethylene wear, loosening, and infection. The most common mode of failure was polyethylene wear in primary TKA, and infection in revision TKA. The mean periods (i.e., latencies) of polyethylene wear and loosening did not differ between primary and revision TKAs, but the mean period of infection was significantly longer for revision TKA (1.2 vs. 4.8 years, P=0.003). Survival rates decreased with time, particularly more than 10 years post-surgery, for both primary and revision TKAs. Continuous efforts are required to prevent and detect the various modes of failure during long-term follow-up. Greater attention is necessary to detect late infection-induced failure following revision TKA. Case-control study, Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Infected primary knee arthroplasty: Risk factors for surgical treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Gabriel Duarte Paes Pradella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present epidemiological data and risk factors associated with surgical out-comes favorable or unfavorable for the treatment of infection in infected total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: We reviewed medical records of 48 patients who underwent treatment of primary total knee arthroplasty for infection between January 1994 and December 2008, in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Department of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. The variables associated with favorable outcome of surgical treatment (debridement and retention or exchange arthroplasty in two days or unfavorable (arthrodesis or death infection. RESULTS: A total of 39 cases of infection after primary total knee arthroplasty, 22 progressed to 17 for a favorable outcome and unfavorable outcome. Early infections (OR: 14.0, 95% CI 1.5-133.2, p = 0.016 and diabetes (OR: 11.3, 95% CI 1.4-89.3, p = 0.032 were associated with arthrodesis joint and death respectively. CONCLUSION: Patients with early infection had a higher risk of developing surgical procedure with unfavorable outcome (arthrodesis and diabetics had higher odds of death after infection of primary knee arthroplasties.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Primary Failure Predicts Decreased Ustekinumab Efficacy in Psoriasis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Eric P; Fanucci, Kristina A; Saraiya, Ami; Volf, Eva; Au, Shiu-chung; Argobi, Yahya; Mansfield, Ryan; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2015-08-01

    Additional studies are needed to examine the efficacy of ustekinumab in psoriasis patients who have previously been exposed to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). To examine the predictive effect of TNFi primary failure and the number of TNFi exposures on the efficacy of ustekinumab in psoriasis treatment. This retrospective study examined 44 psoriasis patients treated at the Tufts Medical Center Department of Dermatology between January 2008 and July 2014. Patients were selected if they were treated with ustekinumab and had ≥ 1 previous TNFi exposure. The following subgroups were compared: patients with vs without a previous TNFi primary failure, and patients with one vs multiple previous TNFi exposures. The efficacy measure used was the previously validated Simple Measure for Assessing Psoriasis Activity (S-MAPA), which is calculated by the product of the body surface area and physician global assessment. The primary outcome was the percentage improvement S-MAPA from course baseline at week 12 of ustekinumab treatment. Secondary outcomes were the psoriasis clearance, primary failure, and secondary failure rates with ustekinumab treatment. Patients with a previous TNFi primary failure had a significantly lower percentage improvement in S-MAPA score at week 12 of ustekinumab treatment compared with patients without TNFi primary failure (36.2% vs 61.1%, P=.027). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that this relationship was independent of patient demographics and medical comorbidities. Patients with multiple TNFi exposures had a non-statistically significant lower percentage S-MAPA improvement at week 12 (40.5% vs 52.9%, P=.294) of ustekinumab treatment compared with patients with a single TNFi exposure. Among psoriasis patients previously exposed to TNFi, a history of a previous TNFi primary failure predicts a decreased response to ustekinumab independent of patient demographics and medical comorbidities.

  1. Risk factors for treatment failure in surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Rasmussen, Lars; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) has a high cure-rate and few complications. Preoperative localization procedures have permitted a dramatic shift from routine bilateral exploration to focused, minimally invasive procedures. At Odense University Hospital, Denmark, the introduction...... University hospital, Denmark, was analyzed. A shift in strategy was made in 2006 and at the same time new surgeons started training in parathyroid surgery. Biochemical-, clinical- and follow-up data were analyzed. Overall cure-rate was 90.7 %. Complication rates were 1.1 % for hemorrhage, 1.1 % for wound...

  2. Autonomic Neuropathy and Albuminocytologic Dissociation in Cerebrospinal Fluid As the Presenting Features of Primary Amyloidosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePrimary amyloidosis is a disease with a poor prognosis and multi-organ involvement. Here, we report the clinical and pathological features of a patient with primary amyloidosis featuring autonomic neuropathy as the initial symptom and albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.MethodsThe patient was a 60-year-old Chinese male with numbness, orthostatic hypotension, and gastrointestinal symptoms. For diagnosis, we performed an electromyogram (EMG, lumbar puncture, Bence Jones protein urine test, serum electrophoresis blood test, sural nerve and rectal membrane biopsies, transthyretin (TTR gene sequencing, and bone marrow puncture.ResultsCongo red staining of sural nerve and rectal membrane biopsies showed amyloid deposition and apple-green birefringence was visualized under polarized light microscopy. TTR gene sequencing showed no causative mutation. Following lumbar puncture, normal CSF cell counts and elevated CSF protein concentration (1,680 mg/L were detected. Bone marrow puncture showed that out of the total number of whole blood cells, 0.56% were abnormal plasma cells and that 87.4% of the total number of plasma cells were abnormal. EMG results showed mixed peripheral nerve damage predominately in the sensory nerve fibers.ConclusionObvious symptoms of neuropathy, particularly autonomic neuropathy, albuminocytologic dissociation, and organ function damage suggested a diagnosis of amyloidosis. In such patients, neurologists should use caution to differentiate between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, primary amyloidosis, and familial amyloid neuropathy.

  3. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care, autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866. However, overall support for diabetes care received from friends, family members, other patients with diabetes, and health care professionals may even play a greater role.

  4. Primary LOCA in VVER-1000 by pressurizer PORV failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabotinov, L.; Lutsanych, S.; Kadenko, I.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the calculations and analysis of the design basis accident of a standard VVER-1000/V320 reactor with inadvertent opening and stuck in open position of the pressurizer pilot operated relief valve (PORV). The objective is the independent assessment of this accident applying the French best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code CATHARE 2 and verification to meet the safety criteria for such kind of the accident. The 'Inadvertent opening and stuck in open position of PORV' is a design basis accident classified as Medium Break Loss of Coolant Accident (MB LOCA) with the equivalent diameter of the break D- 68 mm. This accident is particularly interesting to be calculated and analyzed, because it took place at operating NPP with VVER-1000 reactors (Rovno NPP) in 2009. The calculations have been carried out with conservative conditions as usual for DBA analysis. The NPP model corresponds to a real VVER-1000/V320 configuration and comprises all safety systems, adopted for one of the latest CATHARE 2 versions. The results of CATHARE 2 calculations are compared with available results of RELAP5 calculations. There is similarity of the thermal-hydraulic parameters behavior, but also some differences can be observed basically due to the break flow prediction, which causes differences in primary pressure evaluation. Both calculations show that there is no boiling crisis in the reactor core and reliable cooldown is achieved. The calculations performed with CATHARE2 code demonstrate the ability of the code to predict reasonably the break flow, pressures, temperatures etc. for considered LOCA scenario and to be applied for safety studies

  5. The impact of BWR MK I primary containment failure dynamics on secondary containment integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    During the past four years, the ORNL BWRSAT Program has developed a series of increasingly sophisticated BWR secondary containment models. These models have been applied in a variety of studies to evaluate the severe accident mitigation capability of BWR secondary containments. This paper describes the results of a recent ORNL study of the impact of BWR MK I primary containment failure dynamics on secondary containment integrity. A 26-cell MELCOR Browns Ferry secondary containment model is described and the predicted thermodynamic response of the secondary containment to a variety of postulated primary containment failure modes is presented. The effects of primary containment failure location, timing, and ultimate hole size on secondary containment response is investigated, and the potential impact of hydrogen deflagrations on secondary containment integrity is explored

  6. Differention of parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure using I-123 MIBG myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Religiosol, D.; Machac, J.; Nahm, K.F.; Kaufmann, H.C.; Yahr, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical differentiation of Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and pure autonomic failure (PAF) may be difficult. 123I MIBG studies have shown significantly reduced cardiac uptake in patient with PD but not in MSA suggesting that postganglionic neurons are only affected in PD. No systematic study using 123I MIBG in patients with PAF has been reported. The Objective of this study is to investigate whether MSA, PD, and PAF can be differentiated by 1231 MIBG myocardial scintigraphy. Methods: 1231 MIBG was synthesized using Cu(I) assisted kit method (labeling efficiency 99.84±0.47%, n = 17). Five patients with a clinical diagnosis of MSA (age 63±11), 4 with PD (62±10), 4 with PAF (60±7), and 3 normal controls (50±19) were referred to NM blinded to the categories of the patients. SPECT and planar chest imaging was taken 15 min (early) and 4 hours (delayed) postinjection of 200-351 MBq 123I MIBG using a Picker triple head SPECT camera. Regions of interest were placed over the heart (H) and mediastinum (M); the average count ratios (H/M) were calculated. Each subject had a separate 201Tl perfusion imaging to exclude significant myocardial perfusion defects. Results: As shown in the Table, the H/M ratio in patients with MSA was significantly lower than that in normal subjects (P = 0.027) in early imaging, but not in the delayed imaging. Both H/M ratios in PD and PAF were significantly lower than that in MSA in early (P = 0.006, P = 0.008) and delayed (P< 0.0001, P < 0.00001) imaging. Only delayed uptake ratio showed significant difference (P = 0.013) between PD and PAF. Conclusions: 123I MIBG cardiac uptake in delayed imaging was significantly reduced in patients with PD and PAF while it was normal in MSA. Significant cardiac uptake difference was also found between PD and PAF. 123I MIBG myocardial scintigraphy appears to provide helpful information in the differential diagnosis of these disorders. (authors)

  7. Inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels ameliorates an imbalance in cardiac autonomic nerve activity and prevents lethal arrhythmias in mice with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Chinatsu; Shibata, Junko; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Cho, Kosai; Arai, Yuji; Yasuno, Shinji; Nishikimi, Toshio; Ueshima, Kenji; Kamakura, Shiro; Nishida, Motohiro; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Kimura, Takeshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2014-10-01

    Dysregulation of autonomic nervous system activity can trigger ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in patients with heart failure. N-type Ca(2+) channels (NCCs) play an important role in sympathetic nervous system activation by regulating the calcium entry that triggers release of neurotransmitters from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals. We have investigated the ability of NCC blockade to prevent lethal arrhythmias associated with heart failure. We compared the effects of cilnidipine, a dual N- and L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, with those of nitrendipine, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, in transgenic mice expressing a cardiac-specific, dominant-negative form of neuron-restrictive silencer factor (dnNRSF-Tg). In this mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy leading to sudden arrhythmic death, cardiac structure and function did not significantly differ among the control, cilnidipine, and nitrendipine groups. However, cilnidipine dramatically reduced arrhythmias in dnNRSF-Tg mice, significantly improving their survival rate and correcting the imbalance between cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity. A β-blocker, bisoprolol, showed similar effects in these mice. Genetic titration of NCCs, achieved by crossing dnNRSF-Tg mice with mice lacking CACNA1B, which encodes the α1 subunit of NCCs, improved the survival rate. With restoration of cardiac autonomic balance, dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/-) mice showed fewer malignant arrhythmias than dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/+) mice. Both pharmacological blockade of NCCs and their genetic titration improved cardiac autonomic balance and prevented lethal arrhythmias in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden arrhythmic death. Our findings suggest that NCC blockade is a potentially useful approach to preventing sudden death in patients with heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Patterns of local-regional failure after primary intensity modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Fangfang; Ying, Hongmei; Du, Chengrun; Huang, Shuang; Zhou, Junjun; Chen, Junchao; Sun, Lining; Chen, Xiaohui; Hu, Chaosu

    2014-01-01

    To analyze patterns of local-regional failure after primary intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 370 non-metastatic NPC patients consecutively treated with IMRT (with or without chemotherapy) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique at the total prescribed dose of 66-70.4Gy (2.0-2.2Gy per fraction). The location and extent of local-regional failures were transferred to the pretreatment planning computed tomography (CT) for dosimetric analysis. The dose of radiation received by V recur (volume of recurrence) was calculated and analyzed with dose-volume histogram (DVH). Failures were classified as: 'in field' if 95% of V recur was within the 95% isodose, 'marginal' if 20% to 95% of V recur was within the 95% isodose, or 'outside' if less than 20% of V recur was inside the 95% isodose. With a median follow up of 26 months, 25 local-regional failures were found in 18 patients. The 1- and 2-year actuarial local-regional control rates for all patients were 99.7% and 95.5% respectively. Among the 22 local–regional failures with available diagnostic images, 16 (64%) occurred within the 95% isodose lines and were considered in-field failures; 3 (12%) were marginal and 3 (12%) were outside-field failures. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provides excellent local-regional control for NPC. In-field failures are the main patterns for local-regional recurrence. Reducing the coverage of critical adjacent tissues in CTV purposefully for potential subclinical diseases was worth of study. Great attention in all IMRT steps is necessary to reduce potential causes of marginal failures. More studies about radioresistance are needed to reduce in-field failures

  9. Failure by void coalescence in metallic materials containing primary and secondary voids subject to intense shearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2011-01-01

    Failure under intense shearing at close to zero stress triaxiality is widely observed for ductile metallic materials, and is identified in experiments as smeared-out dimples on the fracture surface. Numerical cell-model studies of equal sized voids have revealed that the mechanism governing...... this shear failure mode boils down to the interaction between primary voids which rotate and elongate until coalescence occurs under severe plastic deformation of the internal ligaments. The objective of this paper is to analyze this failure mechanism of primary voids and to study the effect of smaller...... secondary damage that co-exists with or nucleation in the ligaments between larger voids that coalesce during intense shearing. A numerical cell-model study is carried out to gain a parametric understanding of the overall material response for different initial conditions of the two void populations...

  10. The prognostic importance of heart failure and age in patients treated with primary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriques, Jose P. S.; Zijlstra, Felix; de Boer, Menko-Jan; van 't Hof, Arnoud W. J.; Gosselink, A. T. Marcel; Dambrink, Jan-Henk E.; Suryapranata, Harry; Hoorntje, Jan C. A.

    2003-01-01

    Effective risk stratification is essential in the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Available models have not yet been studied and validated in patients treated with primary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction. The prognostic value of heart failure defined by Killip

  11. Primary testicular failure in Klinefelter's syndrome: the use of bivariate luteinizing hormone-testosterone reference charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jørgensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of androgen deficiency is based on clinical features and confirmatory low serum testosterone levels. In early primary testicular failure, a rise in serum LH levels suggests inadequate androgen action for the individual's physiological requirements despite a serum testosterone level ...

  12. Overdiagnosis of heart failure in primary care : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Mark J.; Mosterd, Arend; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Landman, Marcel A J; Hoes, Arno W.; Rutten, Frans H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to echocardiography in primary care is limited, but is necessary to accurately diagnose heart failure (HF). Aim To determine the proportion of patients with a GP's diagnosis of HF who really have HF. Design and setting A cross-sectional study of patients in 30 general practices

  13. [Health literacy in patients with heart failure treated in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesmases-Masana, Rosalia; González-de Paz, Luis; Real, Jordi; Borràs-Santos, Alicia; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni; Navarro-Rubio, Maria Dolors

    2017-01-01

    The level of health literacy is examined, as well as its conditioning factors in patients with heart failure who are seen routinely in a Primary Health Care Area. A multicentre cross-sectional study. 10 Primary care centres from the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Patients diagnosed with heart failure. to have visited the Primary Health Care centre in the last year, being able to arrive at the primary care setting independently, and voluntarily participation. Health Literacy Survey-European Union - Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q) and Spanish version of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale. An analysis was made of the relationships between health literacy, self-care practices, sociodemographic, and clinical variables using ANOVA test and a multiple linear regression model. The study included 318 patients (51.2% women) with a mean age of 77.9±8.7 years. The index of health literacy of 79.6% (n=253) of the participants indicated problems in understanding healthcare information. Health literacy level was explained by academic level (P<.001), the extent of heart failure (P=.032), self-care, and age (P<.04).The academic level explained 61.6% of the health of literacy (95% bootstrap: 44.58%; 46.75%). In patients with stable heart failure, it is important to consider all factors that help patients to understand the healthcare information. Health literacy explains patient self-care attitude in heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. MSA Mimic? Rare Occurrence of Anti-Hu Autonomic Failure and Thymoma in a Patient with Parkinsonism: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito A. G. Ricigliano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymoma is a tumor originating from thymic gland, frequently manifesting with paraneoplastic neurological disorders. Its association with paraneoplastic dysautonomia is relatively uncommon. Here, we describe the challenging case of a 71 year-old female who developed subacute autonomic failure with digestive pseudo-obstruction, dysphagia, urinary tract dysfunction and orthostatic hypotension complicating an underlying extrapyramidal syndrome that had started 3 months before hospital admission. Autonomic symptoms had 2-month course and acutely worsened just before and during hospitalization. Combination of severe dysautonomia and parkinsonism mimicked rapidly progressing multiple system atrophy. However, diagnostic exams showed thymic tumor with positive anti-Hu antibodies on both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Complete response of dysautonomia to immunoglobulins followed by thymectomy confirmed the diagnosis of anti-Hu-related paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. With regards to extrapyramidal symptoms, despite previous descriptions of paraneoplastic parkinsonism caused by other antineuronal antibodies, in our case no relation between anti-Hu and parkinsonism could be identified. A literature review of published reports describing anti-Hu positivity in thymic neoplasms highlighted that a definite autonomic disease due to anti-Hu antibodies is extremely rare in patients with thymoma but without myasthenia gravis, with only one case published so far.

  15. Primary hepatic lymphoma presenting as fulminant hepatic failure with hyperferritinemia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Fyeza S

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary hepatic lymphoma is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that usually presents with constitutional symptoms, hepatomegaly and signs of cholestatic jaundice. Diffuse hepatic infiltration is uncommon and presentation with acute hepatic failure even more rare. The presence of markedly elevated ferritin levels can complicate the evaluation process and suggest alternative diagnoses. We present the case of a middle-aged woman exhibiting pancytopenia, hyperferritinemia and rapidly deteriorating to develop acute hepatic failure. Her initial clinical picture led to a working diagnosis of adult onset Still's disease with probable hemophagocytic syndrome before her worsening liver function necessitated a percutaneous liver biopsy and establishment of the final diagnosis of primary hepatic lymphoma. Conclusion Primary hepatic lymphoma is an uncommon malignancy and its manifestation as progressive hepatitis or acute fulminant hepatic failure can be difficult to diagnose. The presence of constitutional symptoms, pancytopenia and high ferritin levels can complicate the evaluation process. A liver biopsy early in the course of liver dysfunction may establish the diagnosis without a higher risk of bleeding complications seen once liver failure sets in.

  16. Presenting hydrothorax predicts failure of needle aspiration in primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kwok Kei; Lui, Chun Tat; Ho, Chik Leung; Tsui, Kwok Leung; Fung, Hin Tat

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate if existence of hydrothorax in initial chest radiograph predicts treatment outcome in patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax who received needle thoracostomy. This is a retrospective cohort study carried out from January 2011 to August 2014 in 1 public hospital in Hong Kong. All consecutive adult patients aged 18years or above who attended the emergency department with the diagnosis of primary spontaneous pneumothorax with needle aspiration performed as primary treatment were included. Age, smoking status, size of pneumothorax, previous history of pneumothorax, aspirated gas volume and presence of hydropneumothorax in initial radiograph were included in the analysis. The outcome was success or failure of the needle aspiration. Logistic regression was used to identify the predicting factors of failure of needle aspiration. There were a total of 127 patients included. Seventy-three patients (57.5%) were successfully treated with no recurrence upon discharge. Among 54 failure cases, 13 patients (10.2%) failed immediately after procedure as evident by chest radiograph and required second treatment. Forty-one patients (32.3%) failed upon subsequent chest radiographs. Multivariate logistic regression showed factors independently associated with the failure of needle aspiration, which included hydropneumothorax in the initial radiograph (odds ratio [OR]=4.47 [1.56i12.83], P=.005), previous history of pneumothorax (OR=3.92 [1.57-9.79], P=.003), and large size of pneumothorax defined as apex-to-cupola distance ≥5cm (OR=2.75 [1.21-6.26], P=.016). Hydropneumothorax, previous history of pneumothorax, and large size were independent predictors of failure of needle aspiration in treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Consensus statement on the definition of neurogenic supine hypertension in cardiovascular autonomic failure by the American Autonomic Society (AAS) and the European Federation of Autonomic Societies (EFAS) : Endorsed by the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciulli, Alessandra; Jordan, Jens; Biaggioni, Italo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cheshire, William P; Cortelli, Pietro; Eschlboeck, Sabine; Grassi, Guido; Hilz, Max J; Kaufmann, Horacio; Lahrmann, Heinz; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mayer, Gert; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Rocha, Isabel; Struhal, Walter; Thijs, Roland; Tsioufis, Konstantinos P; van Dijk, J Gert; Wenning, Gregor K

    2018-05-15

    Patients suffering from cardiovascular autonomic failure often develop neurogenic supine hypertension (nSH), i.e., high blood pressure (BP) in the supine position, which falls in the upright position owing to impaired autonomic regulation. A committee was formed to reach consensus among experts on the definition and diagnosis of nSH in the context of cardiovascular autonomic failure. As a first and preparatory step, a systematic search of PubMed-indexed literature on nSH up to January 2017 was performed. Available evidence derived from this search was discussed in a consensus expert round table meeting in Innsbruck on February 16, 2017. Statements originating from this meeting were further discussed by representatives of the American Autonomic Society and the European Federation of Autonomic Societies and are summarized in the document presented here. The final version received the endorsement of the European Academy of Neurology and the European Society of Hypertension. In patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, nSH is defined as systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg, measured after at least 5 min of rest in the supine position. Three severity degrees are recommended: mild, moderate and severe. nSH may also be present during nocturnal sleep, with reduced-dipping, non-dipping or rising nocturnal BP profiles with respect to mean daytime BP values. Home BP monitoring and 24-h-ambulatory BP monitoring provide relevant information for a customized clinical management. The establishment of expert-based criteria to define nSH should standardize diagnosis and allow a better understanding of its epidemiology, prognosis and, ultimately, treatment.

  18. Repeated serum creatinine measurement in primary care: Not all patients have chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentille Lorente, Delicia; Gentille Lorente, Jorge; Salvadó Usach, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of kidney failure in patients from a primary care centre in a basic healthcare district with laboratory availability allowing serum creatinine measurements. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study. A basic healthcare district serving 23,807 people aged ≥ 18 years. Prevalence of kidney failure among 17,240 patients having at least one laboratory measurement available was 8.5% (mean age 77.6 ± 12.05 years). In 33.2% of such patients an occult kidney failure was found (98.8% were women). Prevalence of chronic kidney failure among 10,011 patients having at least 2 laboratory measurements available (≥ 3 months apart) was 5.5% with mean age being 80.1 ± 10.0 years (most severely affected patients were those aged 75 to 84); 59.7% were men and 76.3% of cases were in stage 3. An occult kidney failure was found in 5.3% of patients with women being 86.2% of them (a glomerular filtration rate<60 ml/min was estimated for plasma creatinine levels of 0.9 mg/dl or higher). Comparison of present findings to those previously reported demonstrates the need for further studies on the prevalence of overall (chronic and acute) kidney failure in Spain in order to estimate the real scope of the disease. Primary care physicians play a critical role in disease detection, therapy, control and recording (in medical records). MDRD equation is useful and practical to estimate glomerular filtration rate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac retransplantation is an efficacious therapy for primary cardiac allograft failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acker Michael A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although orthotopic heart transplantation has been an effective treatment for end-stage heart failure, the incidence of allograft failure has increased, necessitating treatment options. Cardiac retransplantation remains the only viable long-term solution for end-stage cardiac allograft failure. Given the limited number of available donor hearts, the long term results of this treatment option need to be evaluated. Methods 709 heart transplants were performed over a 20 year period at our institution. Repeat cardiac transplantation was performed in 15 patients (2.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed to determine the efficacy of cardiac retransplantation. Variables investigated included: 1 yr and 5 yr survival, length of hospitalization, post-operative complications, allograft failure, recipient and donor demographics, renal function, allograft ischemic time, UNOS listing status, blood group, allograft rejection, and hemodynamic function. Results Etiology of primary graft failure included transplant arteriopathy (n = 10, acute rejection (n = 3, hyperacute rejection (n = 1, and a post-transplant diagnosis of metastatic melanoma in the donor (n = 1. Mean age at retransplantation was 45.5 ± 9.7 years. 1 and 5 year survival for retransplantation were 86.6% and 71.4% respectively, as compared to 90.9% and 79.1% for primary transplantation. Mean ejection fraction was 67.3 ± 12.2% at a mean follow-up of 32.6 ± 18.5 mos post-retransplant; follow-up biopsy demonstrated either ISHLT grade 1A or 0 rejection (77.5 ± 95.7 mos post-transplant. Conclusion Cardiac retransplantation is an efficacious treatment strategy for cardiac allograft failure.

  20. [Role of outpatient heart failure clinics and primary care physicians in the tailored follow-up of heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Renata; Misuraca, Gianfranco; Milli, Massimo; Filippi, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    Continuity of care is pivotal to appropriately manage patients affected by heart failure (HF). HF is a chronic disease with frequent exacerbations that requires long-term care at different complexity levels. The lack of adequate communication between hospital cardiologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) is the main pitfall in continuity of care for HF patients. To overcome this problem, all dedicated outpatient HF clinics should organize together with PCPs in the community educational and auditing initiatives, based on locally derived performance measures to assess the appropriateness and effectiveness of integrated care pathways. The primary task of PCPs is to follow up stable HF patients and focus assessment on patient empowerment, adjustment of drug therapy, assessment of clinical stability and the early identification of worsening signs and symptoms. The progress of information technology should help in achieving adequate communication between hospital professionals and PCPs; outpatient clinical records should in any case comply with qualitative standards of discharge summaries for all patients taken in charge by PCPs. Systematic assessment of shared care between hospital cardiologists and PCPs will be a main objective of the outpatient HF clinic network in the near future.

  1. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  2. [Heart failure in primary care: Attitudes, knowledge and self-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó-Hernández, Cristina; Cosculluela-Torres, Pilar; Blanes-Monllor, Carmen; Parellada-Esquius, Neus; Méndez-Galeano, Carmen; Maroto-Villanova, Neus; García-Cerdán, Rosa Maria; Núñez-Manrique, M Pilar; Barrio-Ruiz, Carmen; Salvador-González, Betlem

    2018-04-01

    To determine the attitudes, knowledge, and self-care practices in patients with heart failure (HF) in Primary Care, as well as to identify factors associated with better self-care. Cross-sectional and multicentre study. Primary Care. Subjects over 18 years old with HF diagnosis, attended in 10 Primary Health Care Centres in the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona. Self-care was measured using the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, tests on attitudes (Self-efficacy Managing Chronic Disease Scale), knowledge (Patient Knowledge Questionnaire), level of autonomy (Barthel), and anxiety and depression screening (Goldberg Test), were also gathered in an interview. A multivariate mixed model stratified by centre was used to analyse the adjusted association of covariates with self-care. A total of 295 subjects (77.6%) agreed to participate, with a mean age of 75.6 years (SD: 11), 56.6% women, and 62% with no primary education. The mean self-care score was 28.65 (SD: 8.22), with 25% of patients scoring lower than 21 points. In the final stratified multivariate model (n=282; R 2 conditional=0.3382), better self-care was associated with higher knowledge (coefficient, 95% confidence interval: -1.37; -1.85 to -0.90), and coronary heart disease diagnosis (-2.41; -4.36: -0.46). Self-care was moderate. The correlation of better self-care with higher knowledge highlights the opportunity to implement strategies to improve self-care, which should consider the characteristics of heart failure patients attended in Primary Care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of helicobacter pylori dupA with the failure of primary eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Seiji; Nguyen, Lam Tung; Murakami, Kazunari; Kuroda, Akiko; Mizukami, Kazuhiro; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the presence of dupA Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) influences the cure rate of primary eradication therapy. Several virulence factors of H. pylori have been reported to affect the efficacy of the eradication rate. However, no study has investigated whether the presence of dupA affects eradication failure. The presence of dupA was evaluated in 142 H. pylori strains isolated from 142 patients with gastrointestinal diseases. Of these patients, 104 received primary eradication therapy for 1 week. The risk factors for eradication failure were determined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Among 142 strains, 44 (31.0%) were dupA positive. There was no association between dupA status and gastroduodenal diseases (P>0.05). The clarithromycin (CLR) resistance rate was generally lower in the dupA-positive than in the dupA-negative group (20.4% vs. 35.7%, P=0.06). However, dupA prevalence was higher in the eradication failure group than in the success group (36.3% vs. 21.9%). Among the CLR-resistant H. pylori infected group, the successful eradication rate was significantly lower in patients infected with dupA-positive H. pylori than dupA-negative H. pylori (P=0.04). In multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and type of disease, not only CLR resistance but also dupA presence was independent risk factors for eradication failure (adjusted odds ratio=3.71; 95% confidence interval,1.07-12.83). Although CLR resistant was more reliable predictor, the presence of dupA may also be an independent risk factor for eradication failure.

  4. [The Madrid autonomous community epidemiological bulletin. A survey on its dissemination and opinion thereof on among primary care physicians for the year 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Rodríguez, Silvia; Zorrilla Torras, Belén; Ramírez Fernández, Rosa; Alvarez Castillo, M Carmen; López-Gay Lucio, Dulce; Ibáñez Martín, Cosuelo; Bueno Vallejos, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    The Autonomous Community of Madrid Epidemiological Bulletin is the main communications link between epidemiological monitoring system and health care professionals. The purpose of this study is that of ascertaining the dissemination and opinion of this Autonomous Community of Madrid Epidemiological Bulletin among primary care physicians for the purpose of adapting this publication to its readers' interests. A telephone survey among primary care physicians in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, asking how often they read the Bulletin, the interest and usefulness of the information included in it. The sample size was estimated at 346 physicians. A two-stage sampling process was carried out-by cluster sampling in the first stage, randomly selecting 125 health care centers and 2.7 physicians per center, 17% being primary care team coordinators. A comparison is made of the results among physicians and coordinators by means of the Chi-square and Fisher's Exact Test method, with Epi-Info v.6. A total of 305 surveys were conducted (245 physicians and 60 coordinators). There was an awareness of the existence of the Autonomous Community of Madrid Epidemiological Bulletin on the part of 91.5% (CI 95%: 88.1-94.8), and 27.2% (CI 95%: 21.9-32.5) were familiar with more than 50% of the last issues published. A total of 92.4% (CI 95%: 89.4-95.8) considered the Bulletin to be interesting or highly interesting, grading its usefulness an average of 3.5 on a maximum scale of 5. Of the permanent sections, the most highly-valued was Epidemic Outbreaks, those reports related to meningococcal infection, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS being the most highly-valued. The Autonomous Community of Madrid Epidemiological Bulletin is a publication which, although not widely-known by the primary care physicians in the Community, is well-valued when it is read, thus being a useful feedback tool within the Epidemiological Monitoring System.

  5. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-06-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  6. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  7. The empirical intensity of PWR primary coolant pumps failure and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevicj, S.; Riznicj, J.

    1988-01-01

    The wealth of operating experience concerning PWR type and nuclear reactors that has been regularly monitored and systematically processes since 1971, enabled an analysis of the PWR primary coolant pumps operation. Failure intensity α and repair intensity μ of the pump during its working life were calculated, as these values are necessary in order to determine the reliability and availability of the pump as the basis for analyzing its effect on the safety and efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The trend of failure intensity α follows the theoretically expected changes in α over time, and this is around 10 -5 in the majority of life-time. Repair intensity μ indicates a slow rise during life-time, i.e. its faster return to operation. (author).7 refs.; 5 figs

  8. Classification and calculation of primary failure modes in bread production line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsarouhas, Panagiotis H.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe the classification methodology over a 2-year period of the primary failure modes in categories based on failure data of bread production line. We estimate the probabilities of these categories applying the chi-square goodness of fit test, and we calculate their joint probabilities of mass function at workstation and line level. Then, we present numerical examples in order to predict the causes and frequencies of breakdowns for workstations and for the entire bread production line that will occur in the future. The methodology is meant to guide bread and bakery product manufacturers, improving the operation of the production lines. It can also be a useful tool to maintenance engineers, who wish to analyze and improve the reliability and efficiency of the manufacturing systems

  9. Acute adrenal failure as the presenting feature of primary antiphospholipid syndrome in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Improda Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs. This syndrome may be associated with connective tissue disorders, or with malignancies, but it may also appear in isolated form (primary APS. We report on a pediatric patient presenting with acute adrenal failure as the first manifestation of primary APS. Case report A previously healthy 11-year-old boy developed fever, abdominal pain, and vomiting. An abdominal computed tomography scan showed nodular lesions in the adrenal glands. He was referred to our Department and a diagnosis of APS and acute adrenal failure was considered, based on positive aPLs (IgG and IgM, elevated ACTH levels and low cortisol levels. Other features were anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated inflammatory parameters, hypergammaglobulinemia, prolonged partial thromboplastin time, positive antinuclear, anticardiolipin, anti-platelet antibodies, with negative double-stranded DNA antibodies. Lupus anticoagulant and Coomb’s tests were positive. MRI revealed a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage. A treatment with intravenous metylprednisolone, followed by oral prednisone and anticoagulant, was started, resulting in a progressive improvement. After 2 months he also showed hyponatremia and elevated renine levels, indicating a mineralcocorticoid deficiency, requiring fludrocortisones therapy. Conclusion The development of acute adrenal failure from bilateral adrenal haemorrhage in the context of APS is a rare but life-threatening event that should be promptly recognized and treated. Moreover, this case emphasizes the importance of the assessment of aPLs in patients with acute adrenal failure in the context of an autoreaction.

  10. Renal failure due to primary amyloidosis: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Andrade Bezerra de Mello

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Primary amyloidosis, also known as AL amyloidosis, is commonly caused by clonal expansion of plasma cells in the bone marrow, thereby segregating light chains of clonal immunoglobulin that settle in tissues in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. The aim of this study was to report a case of primary amyloidosis with renal failure, diagnosed in Hospital São João, Porto, Portugal, focusing on the diagnostic difficulties and presenting a literature review. CASE REPORT: A 68-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Internal Medicine Department of the hospital with a condition of anasarca and nephrotic syndrome. After performing a renal biopsy that tested positive using Congo red and immunohistochemistry, lambda light chain amyloidosis was diagnosed. This evolved into terminal renal disease, which led to hemodialysis and several episodes of urinary and catheter infections. He was started on chemotherapy, consisting of bortezomib 0.7 mg/m² and dexamethasone 40 mg in six cycles. This led to clinical improvement, stabilization of the illness and good tolerance of the treatment. CONCLUSION: Amyloidosis is a rare entity that is difficult to diagnose. This is because of the unspecific early clinical manifestations of the disease. The hypothesis of amyloidosis is only considered when specific organ failure occurs. This case consisted of primary amyloidosis with involvement of the kidneys as an initial presentation of the disease and its difficulties were shown, going from the clinical approach to the final diagnosis.

  11. Acute effects of Finnish sauna and cold-water immersion on haemodynamic variables and autonomic nervous system activity in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Thomas; Poerschke, Daniel; Wilhelm, Matthias; Trachsel, Lukas D; Tschanz, Hansueli; Matter, Friederike; Jauslin, Daniel; Saner, Hugo; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    The haemodynamic response to Finnish sauna and subsequent cold-water immersion in heart failure patients is unknown. Haemodynamic response to two consecutive Finnish sauna (80℃) exposures, followed by a final head-out cold-water immersion (12℃) was measured in 37 male participants: chronic heart failure (n = 12, 61.8 ± 9.2 years), coronary artery disease (n = 13, 61.2 ± 10.6 years) and control subjects (n = 12, 60.9 ± 8.9 years). Cardiac output was measured non-invasively with an inert gas rebreathing method prior to and immediately after the first sauna exposure and after cold-water immersion, respectively. Blood pressure was measured before, twice during and after sauna. The autonomic nervous system was assessed by power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Total power, low-frequency and high-frequency components were evaluated. The low frequency/high frequency ratio was used as a marker of sympathovagal balance. Sauna and cold-water immersion were well tolerated by all subjects. Cardiac output and heart rate significantly increased in all groups after sauna and cold-water immersion (p heart failure patients. In coronary artery disease patients and controls a prolonged increase in low frequency/high frequency ratio was observed after the first sauna exposure. Acute exposure to Finnish sauna and cold-water immersion causes haemodynamic alterations in chronic heart failure patients similarly to control subjects and in particular did not provoke an excessive increase in adrenergic activity or complex arrhythmias. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Red flag in the emergency department: fracture and primary failure of a prosthetic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsarac, Murat; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Ayrik, Cuneyt; Bozkurt, Seyran; Turkcuer, Ibrahim; Gumrukcu, Serhat

    2005-07-01

    This case report concerns a patient with fracture and primary dysfunction of a prosthetic valve. A 40-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with a chief complaint of breakthrough pleuritic back pain and shortness of breath. Past surgical history was significant only for an aortic valve replacement and mitral valve replacement performed 16 years prior. The transthoracic echocardiography raised suspicion of prosthesis malposition. The patient was taken to the operating room by cardiothoracic surgeons for valve replacement. Operative findings revealed that a prosthetic valve leaflet in the mitral position had broken off. Primary prosthetic valve failure should not be overlooked in the differential diagnosis of patients with valve replacement and a rapidly deteriorating clinical course. Emergency echocardiography is a guide to convenient diagnosis and management. Early surgical consultation and early reparative surgery might prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality.

  13. The failure of suicide prevention in primary care: family and GP perspectives - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Gerard; Mallon, Sharon; Rondon-Sulbaran, Janeet; Galway, Karen; Rosato, Michael; Hughes, Lynette

    2017-11-21

    Although Primary care is crucial for suicide prevention, clinicians tend to report completed suicides in their care as non-preventable. We aimed to examine systemic inadequacies in suicide prevention from the perspectives of bereaved family members and GPs. Qualitative study of 72 relatives or close friends bereaved by suicide and 19 General Practitioners who have experienced the suicide of patients. Relatives highlight failures in detecting symptoms and behavioral changes and the inability of GPs to understand the needs of patients and their social contexts. A perceived overreliance on anti-depressant treatment is a major source of criticism by family members. GPs tend to lack confidence in the recognition and management of suicidal patients, and report structural inadequacies in service provision. Mental health and primary care services must find innovative and ethical ways to involve families in the decision-making process for patients at risk of suicide.

  14. Case report: paradoxical ventricular septal motion in the setting of primary right ventricular myocardial failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew; Schwartz, Carl; Mahmood, Feroze; Singh, Arun; Heerdt, Paul M

    2009-07-01

    In this report, a case of right ventricular (RV) failure, hemodynamic instability, and systemic organ failure is described to highlight how paradoxical ventricular systolic septal motion (PVSM), or a rightward systolic displacement of the interventricular septum, may contribute to RV ejection. Multiple inotropic medications and vasopressors were administered to treat right heart failure and systemic hypotension in a patient following combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. In the early postoperative period, echocardiographic evaluation revealed adequate left ventricular systolic function, akinesis of the RV myocardial tissues, and PVSM. In the presence of PVSM, RV fractional area of contraction was > or =35% despite akinesis of the primary RV myocardial walls. The PVSM appeared to contribute toward RV ejection. As a result, the need for multiple inotropes was re-evaluated, in considering that end-organ dysfunction was the result of systemic hypotension and prolonged vasopressor administration. After discontinuation of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, native vascular tone returned and the need for vasopressors declined. This was followed by recovery of systemic organ function. Echocardiographic re-evaluation two years later, revealed persistent akinesis of the RV myocardial tissues and PVSM, the latter appearing to contribute toward RV ejection. This case highlights the importance of left to RV interactions, and how PVSM may mediate these hemodynamic interactions.

  15. Long-term follow-up in optimally treated and stable heart failure patients : primary care vs. heart failure clinic. Results of the COACH-2 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marie Louise A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Geel, Peter Paul; Brons, Maaike; Hillege, Hans L.; Hoes, Arno W.; de Jong, Richard; Linssen, Gerard; Lok, Dirk J. A.; Berger, Marjolein; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    AimsIt has been suggested that home-based heart failure (HF) management in primary care may be an alternative to clinic-based management in HF patients. However, little is known about adherence to HF guidelines and adherence to the medication regimen in these home-based programmes. The aim of the

  16. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, B T; Barfod, T S; Kirk, O

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... copies/mL) among 293 patients randomized to two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)+ritonavir+saquinavir (RS-arm) (n=115), two NRTIs+nevirapine+nelfinavir (NN-arm) (n=118), or abacavir+stavudine+didanosine (ASD-arm) (n=60) followed up for a median of 90 weeks. Data on adherence were...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...

  17. PREDICTION AND PREVENTION OF LIVER FAILURE AFTER MAJOR LIVER PRIMARY AND METASTATIC TUMORS RESECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose of the study. Improvement of results of treatment in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer by decreasing the risk of post-resection liver failure on the basis of the evaluation of the functional reserves of the liver.Materials and Methods. The study included two independent samples of patients operated about primary or metastatic lesions of the liver at the Department of abdominal Oncology, P. A. Hertsen MORI. The first group included 53 patients who carried out 13C-breath test metallimovie and dynamic scintigraphy of the liver in the preoperative stage in addition to the standard algorithm of examination. Patients of the 2nd group (n=35 had a standard clinical and laboratory examination, the patients were not performed the preoperative evaluation of the functional reserve of the liver, the incidences of total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin time did not reveal a reduction of liver function. Post-resection liver failure have been established on the basis of the 50/50 criterion in the evaluation on day 5 after surgery.Results. Analysis of operating characteristics of the functional tests showed the absolute methacin breath test sensitivity (SE≥100%, high specificity (SP≥67% of scintigraphy of the liver and the negative predictive value of outcome (VP≥100% at complex use of two diagnostic methods. The incidence of PROPS in the study group was significantly 2 times higher in the control group –15,1% and 26.8%, respectively (p<0.001.Conclusion. The combination of preoperative dynamic scintigraphy of the liver with carrying out 13C-breath methacin test allows you to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the liver functional reserve and can significantly improve preoperative evaluation and postoperative results of anatomic resection in patients with primary and metastatic liver lesions.

  18. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  19. Autonomic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of autonomic neuropathy. Other diseases. Amyloidosis, porphyria, hypothyroidism and cancer (usually due to side effects from treatment) may also increase the risk of autonomic neuropathy. ...

  20. Prediction factors for failure to seek treatment following traumatic dental injuries to primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Targino Firmino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate prediction factors for failure to seek treatment following a traumatic dental injury (TDI to primary teeth among preschool children in the city of Campina Grande, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 277 children 3 to 5 years of age, with TDI, enrolled in public and private preschools. Parents filled out a form addressing demographic data and whether or not they had sought treatment. Clinical examinations were performed by three dentists who had undergone a calibration exercise (Kappa: 0.85 to 0.90 for the evaluation of TDI. Bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression models were constructed (α = 5%. Enamel fracture was the most prevalent type of TDI (48.7% and the upper central incisors were the most affected teeth (88.4%. The frequency of seeking dental treatment was low (9.7%. The following variables were associated with failure to seek treatment following TDI: a household income greater than one minimum wage (PR = 1.170; 95%CI 1.018-1.341, parents/caregivers’ perception of a child’s oral health as poor (PR = 1.100; 95%CI 1.026-1.176, and the non-perception of TDI by parents/caregivers (PR = 1.250; 95%CI 1.142-1.360. In the present study, the frequency of seeking treatment following TDI was low, and parents/caregivers with a higher income, a poor perception of their child’s oral health and a lack of awareness regarding the trauma were more likely to fail to seek treatment following TDI to primary teeth.

  1. Signs for early diagnosis of heart failure in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devroey D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Devroey1,2, Viviane Van Casteren11Scientific Institute of Public Health, Unit of Epidemiology, Brussels, Belgium; 2Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB, Department of Family Medicine, Brussels, BelgiumObjective: The current guidelines for the diagnosis of heart failure (HF are based on studies of hospital-based patients. The aim of this study is to describe the symptoms, clinical signs, and diagnostic procedures confirming the diagnosis of HF in primary health care.Materials/subjects and methods: Data were prospectively collected during a 2-year period by a nationwide network of sentinel practices. All adult patients without known HF, for which the diagnosis of HF was clinically suspected for the first time, were registered. When diagnosed, HF was confirmed after 1 month.Results: 754 patients with a suspicion of HF were recorded. The diagnosis of HF was confirmed for 74% of the patients. The average age of the patients with confirmed HF was 77.7 years, and for those without HF 75.6 years (P = 0.018. From a logistic regression, breathlessness on exercise (P < 0.001, limitations of physical activity (P = 0.003, and orthopnea (P = 0.040 were the symptoms most associated with HF. The clinical signs most associated with HF, were pulmonary rales (P < 0.001, peripheral edema (P < 0.001, and raised jugular venous pressure (P = 0.039. An electrocardiogram was performed in 75% of the cases, blood analyses in 68%, echocardiogram in 63%, chest X-ray in 61%, and determination of natriuretic peptides in 11% of the cases.Conclusion: Many clinical signs may occur in patients with HF. However, the occurrence of peripheral edema, breathlessness on exercise, or pulmonary rales, are highly suggestive for HF when diagnosed in primary health care, as is the case in hospital-admitted patients. The diagnosis of HF was often left unconfirmed by an echocardiogram and/or an electrocardiogram.Keywords: heart failure, primary health care, diagnostic clinical signs

  2. What causes treatment failure - the patient, primary care, secondary care or inadequate interaction in the health services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Ove

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal treatment gives complete relief of symptoms of many disorders. But even if such treatment is available, some patients have persisting complaints. One disorder, from which the patients should achieve complete relief of symptoms with medical or surgical treatment, is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Despite the fact that such treatment is cheap, safe and easily available; some patients have persistent complaints after contact with the health services. This study evaluates the causes of treatment failure. Methods Twelve patients with GERD and persistent complaints had a semi-structured interview which focused on the patients' evaluation of treatment failure. The interviews were taped, transcribed and evaluated by 18 physicians, (six general practitioners, six gastroenterologists and six gastrointestinal surgeons who completed a questionnaire for each patient. The questionnaires were scored, and the relative responsibility for the failure was attributed to the patient, primary care, secondary care and interaction in the health services. Results Failing interaction in the health services was the most important cause of treatment failure, followed by failure in primary care, secondary care and the patient himself; the relative responsibilities were 35%, 28%, 27% and 10% respectively. There was satisfactory agreement about the causes between doctors with different specialities, but significant inter-individual differences between the doctors. The causes of the failures differed between the patients. Conclusions Treatment failure is a complex problem. Inadequate interaction in the health services seems to be important. Improved communication between parts of the health services and with the patients are areas of improvement.

  3. Primary ICD-therapy in patients with advanced heart failure: selection strategies and future trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Nelles, Manfred; Schellberg, Dieter; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo

    2008-09-01

    For allocation of primary ICD-therapy, a possible lower limit of inclusion criteria--defining overly advanced heart failure--is less well investigated. Also, a multi-variable approach to stratification beyond ejection fraction (LVEF) appears warranted. We examined whether adding a selection limit of peak VO(2) primary ICD-therapy. All cause mortality was considered as end point. Median follow-up was 45 (18-86) months. ICD was not a significant predictor of outcome either for the entire population, or grouped according to aetiology of CHF. Still, 3-year mortality was 15% (ICD-patients) Vs. 28% (non-ICD-patients); P = 0.05; under combination medical therapy. Inversely, in ICD-patients medical combination therapy conveyed a significant survival benefit (P < 0.001). Consequently, the number-needed-to-treat was eight under combination therapy and the size estimate amounts to 300 patients for a prospective trial in this cohort. A cut-off of LVEF primary ICD-therapy. Our results indicate the need for a specific randomized trial in this cohort. The according mortality data and a size estimate are provided.

  4. [Spinal muscular atrophy and respiratory failure. How do primary care pediatricians act in a simulated scenario?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Tuñas, M C; Sánchez Santos, L; Busto Cuiñas, M; Rodríguez Núñez, A

    2015-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1) tends to be fatal in the first year of life if there is no ventilatory support. The decision whether to start such support is an ethical conflict for healthcare professionals. A scenario of acute respiratory failure in an infant with SMA-1 has been included in a training program using advanced simulation for Primary Care pediatricians (PCP). The performances of 34 groups of 4 pediatricians, who participated in 17 courses, were systematically analyzed. Clinical, ethical and communication aspects with parents were evaluated. The initial technical assistance (Administration of oxygen and immediate ventilatory support) was correctly performed by 94% of the teams. However, the PCP had problems in dealing with the ethical aspects of the case. Of the 85% of the teams that raised the ethical conflict with parents, 29% did so on their own initiative, 23% actively excluded them, and only 6% involved them and took their opinion into account in making decisions. Only 11.7% asked about the quality of life of children and 12% for their knowledge of the prognosis of the disease. None explained treatment alternatives, nor tried to contact the pediatrician responsible for the child. When faced with a simulated SMA-1 infant with respiratory failure, PCP have difficulties in interacting with the family, and to involve it in the decision making process. Practical training of all pediatricians should include case scenarios with an ethical clinical problem. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Supra-Acetabular Brown Tumor due to Primary Hyperparathyroidism Associated with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria M. Ruggeri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old woman presented to the Orthopedic Unit of our hospital complaining of right hip pain of 6 months'duration associated with a worsening limp. Her past medical history included chronic renal insufficiency. Physical examination revealed deep pain in the iliac region and severe restriction of the right hip's articular function in the maximum degrees of range of motion. X-rays and CT scan detected an osteolytic and expansive lesion of the right supra-acetabular region with structural reabsorption of the right iliac wing. 99mTc-MDP whole-body bone scan showed an abnormal uptake in the right iliac region. Bone biopsy revealed an osteolytic lesion with multinucleated giant cells, indicating a brown tumor. Serum intact PTH was elevated (1020 pg/ml; normal values, 12 62 pg/ml, but her serum calcium was normal (total = 9.4 mg/dl, nv 8.5–10.5; ionized = 5.0 mg/dl, nv 4.2–5.4 due to the coexistence of chronic renal failure. 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy revealed a single focus of sestamibi accumulation in the left retrosternal location, which turned out to be an intrathoracic parathyroid adenoma at surgical exploration. After surgical removal of the parathyroid adenoma, PTH levels decreased to 212 pg/ml. Three months after parathyroidectomy, the imaging studies showed complete recovery of the osteolytic lesion, thus avoiding any orthopedic surgery. This case is noteworthy because (1 primary hyperparathyroidism was not suspected due to the normocalcemia, likely attributable to the coexistence of chronic renal failure; and (2 it was associated with a brown tumor of unusual location (right supra-acetabular region.

  6. The contribution of lifestyle coaching of overweight patients in primary care to more autonomous motivation for physical activity and healthy dietary behaviour: results of a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Geert M; Meis, Jessie J M; Hendriks, Marike R C; Hamers, Femke J M; Veenhof, Cindy; Kremers, Stef P J

    2014-07-16

    Combined lifestyle interventions (CLIs) have been advocated as an effective instrument in efforts to reduce overweight and obesity. The odds of maintaining higher levels of physical activity (PA) and healthier dietary behaviour improve when people are more intrinsically motivated to change their behaviour. To promote the shift towards more autonomous types of motivation, facilitator led CLIs have been developed including lifestyle coaching as key element. The present study examined the shift in types of motivation to increase PA and healthy dieting among participants of a primary care CLI, and the contribution of lifestyle coaching to potential changes in motivational quality. This prospective cohort study included participants of 29 general practices in the Netherlands that implemented a CLI named 'BeweegKuur'. Questionnaires including items on demographics, lifestyle coaching and motivation were sent at baseline and after 4 months. Aspects of motivation were assessed with the Behavioural Regulation and Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-2) and the Regulation of Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (REBS). We performed a drop out analysis to identify selective drop-out. Changes in motivation were analysed with t-tests and effect size interpretations (Cohen's d), and multivariate regression analysis was used to identify predictors of motivational change. For physical activity, changes in motivational regulation were fully in line with the tenets of Self Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing: participants made a shift towards a more autonomous type of motivation (i.e. controlled types of motivation decreased and autonomous types increased). Moreover, an autonomy supportive coaching style was generally found to predict a larger shift in autonomous types of motivation. For healthy dietary behaviour, however, except for a small decrease in external motivation, no favourable changes in different types of motivation were observed. The relation between coaching and

  7. The contribution of lifestyle coaching of overweight patients in primary care to more autonomous motivation for physical activity and healthy dietary behaviour: results of a longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Combined lifestyle interventions (CLIs) have been advocated as an effective instrument in efforts to reduce overweight and obesity. The odds of maintaining higher levels of physical activity (PA) and healthier dietary behaviour improve when people are more intrinsically motivated to change their behaviour. To promote the shift towards more autonomous types of motivation, facilitator led CLIs have been developed including lifestyle coaching as key element. The present study examined the shift in types of motivation to increase PA and healthy dieting among participants of a primary care CLI, and the contribution of lifestyle coaching to potential changes in motivational quality. Methods This prospective cohort study included participants of 29 general practices in the Netherlands that implemented a CLI named ‘BeweegKuur’. Questionnaires including items on demographics, lifestyle coaching and motivation were sent at baseline and after 4 months. Aspects of motivation were assessed with the Behavioural Regulation and Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-2) and the Regulation of Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (REBS). We performed a drop out analysis to identify selective drop-out. Changes in motivation were analysed with t-tests and effect size interpretations (Cohen’s d), and multivariate regression analysis was used to identify predictors of motivational change. Results For physical activity, changes in motivational regulation were fully in line with the tenets of Self Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing: participants made a shift towards a more autonomous type of motivation (i.e. controlled types of motivation decreased and autonomous types increased). Moreover, an autonomy supportive coaching style was generally found to predict a larger shift in autonomous types of motivation. For healthy dietary behaviour, however, except for a small decrease in external motivation, no favourable changes in different types of motivation were observed. The

  8. Primary Gleason pattern in biopsy Gleason score 7 is predictive of adverse histopathological features and biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    +3. No difference in age, PSA, percentage of biopsies with cancer, clinical tumour stage or volume on transrectal ultrasonography was found. Primary Gleason pattern 4 was associated with worse pathological stage (p = 0.049). On multivariate analysis, primary Gleason pattern 4 (p ... (p analysis, Gleason score 3+4 had a significantly lower biochemical failure rate compared with Gleason score 4+3 (p = 0.0035). PSA (p 4 (p = 0.001) and percentage of biopsies...

  9. Rapid Progression of Metastatic Pulmonary Calcification and Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure and Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eun Joo; Kim, Dong Hun; Yoon, Seong Ho; Suk, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification (MPC) is common in patients with chronic renal failure. The authors experienced a patient with chronic renal failure and primary hyperparathyroidism by parathyroid adenoma accompanied with rapid progressions of MPC and alveolar hemorrhage. Recent chest radiographs, compared with previous chest radiographs, showed rapid accumulation of calcification in both upper lungs. Following up on the high-resolution CT scan after five years demonstrates more increased nodules in size and ground glass opacity. The patient was diagnosed with MPC and alveolar hemorrhage by transbronchial lung biopsy. We assumed rapid progression of MPC and alveolar hemorrhage in underlying chronic renal failures could be a primary hyperparathyroidism which may be caused by parathyroid adenoma detected incidentally. Therefore parathyroid adenoma was treated with ethanol injections. Herein, we have reported on CT findings of MPC with alveolar hemorrhage and reviewed our case along with other articles.

  10. Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Subsystem Thruster Fuel Valve Pilot Seal Extrusion: A Failure Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2003-01-01

    Pilot operated valves (POVs) are used to control the flow of hypergolic propellants monomethylhydrazine (fuel) and nitrogen tetroxide (oxidizer) to the Shuttle orbiter Primary Reaction Control Subsystem (PRCS) thrusters. The POV incorporates a two-stage design: a solenoid-actuated pilot stage, which in turn controls a pressure-actuated main stage. Isolation of propellant supply from the thruster chamber is accomplished in part by a captive polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) pilot seal retained inside a Custom 455.1 stainless steel cavity. Extrusion of the pilot seal restricts the flow of fuel around the pilot poppet, thus impeding or preventing the main valve stage from opening. It can also prevent the main stage from staying open with adequate force margin, particularly if there is gas in the main stage actuation cavity. During thruster operation on-orbit, fuel valve pilot seal extrusion is commonly indicated by low or erratic chamber pressure or failure of the thruster to fire upon command (Fail-Off). During ground turnaround, pilot seal extrusion is commonly indicated by slow gaseous nitrogen (GN2) main valve opening times (greater than 38 ms) or slow water main valve opening response times (greater than 33 ms). Poppet lift tests and visual inspection can also detect pilot seal extrusion during ground servicing; however, direct metrology on the pilot seat assembly provides the most quantitative and accurate means of identifying extrusion. Minimizing PRCS fuel valve pilot seal extrusion has become an important issue in the effort to improve PRCS reliability and reduce associated life cycle costs.

  11. Primary skeletal muscle myoblasts from chronic heart failure patients exhibit loss of anti-inflammatory and proliferative activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sente, T.; Berendoncks, A.M. Van; Jonckheere, A.I.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Lauwers, P.; Hoof, V. Van; Wouters, A.; Lardon, F.; Hoymans, V.Y.; Vrints, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral skeletal muscle wasting is a common finding with adverse effects in chronic heart failure (HF). Whereas its clinical relevance is beyond doubt, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated. We aimed to introduce and characterize the primary culture

  12. Long-term follow-up in optimally treated and stable heart failure patients: primary care vs. heart failure clinic. Results of the COACH-2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttik, Marie Louise A; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Geel, Peter Paul; Brons, Maaike; Hillege, Hans L; Hoes, Arno W; de Jong, Richard; Linssen, Gerard; Lok, Dirk J A; Berge, Marjolein; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2014-11-01

    It has been suggested that home-based heart failure (HF) management in primary care may be an alternative to clinic-based management in HF patients. However, little is known about adherence to HF guidelines and adherence to the medication regimen in these home-based programmes. The aim of the current study was to determine whether long-term follow-up and treatment in primary care is equally effective as follow-up at a specialized HF clinic in terms of guideline adherence and patient adherence, in HF patients initially managed and up-titrated to optimal treatment at a specialized HF clinic. We conducted a multicentre, randomized, controlled study in 189 HF patients (62% male, age 72 ± 11 years), who were assigned to follow-up either in primary care (n = 97) or in a HF clinic (n = 92). After 12 months, no differences between guideline adherence, as estimated by the Guideline Adherence Indicator (GAI-3), and patient adherence, in terms of the medication possession ratio (MPR), were found between treatment groups. There was no difference in the number of deaths (n = 12 in primary care and n = 8 in the HF clinic; P = 0.48), and hospital readmissions for cardiovascular (CV) reasons were also similar. The total number of unplanned non-CV hospital readmissions, however, tended to be higher in the primary care group (n = 22) than in the HF clinic group (n = 10; P = 0.05). Patients discharged after initial management in a specialized HF clinic can be discharged to primary care for long-term follow-up with regard to maintaining guideline adherence and patient adherence. However, the complexity of the HF syndrome and its associated co-morbidities requires continuous monitoring. Close collaboration between healthcare providers will be crucial in order to provide HF patients with optimal, integrated care. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Predicts All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in Patients With End-Stage Renal Failure: A 5-Year Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Doulgerakis

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: Age and presence of CAN are independent predictors of all-cause and CV mortality in patients with ESRF. The functionality of the cardiac autonomic nervous system activity can be used for the risk stratification in patients with ESRF.

  14. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Doubutamine Challenges in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Short-term exposure to vehicular emissions is associated with adverse cardiac events. Diesel exhaust (DE) is an ubiquitous air pollutant believed to provoke cardiac events partly through imbalance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervo...

  15. Rationale, design and baseline results of the Treatment Optimisation in Primary care of Heart failure in the Utrecht region (TOPHU) study : a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Mark J.; Hoes, Arno W.; Mosterd, Arend; Landman, Marcel A.; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Rutten, Frans H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is mainly detected and managed in primary care, but the care is considered suboptimal. We present the rationale, design and baseline results of the Treatment Optimisation in Primary care of Heart failure in the Utrecht region (TOPHU) study. In this study we assess the

  16. Autonomous houses. Autonomous house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S. (Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-09-30

    Self-sufficiency type houses are outlined. On condition that people gain a certain amount of income in relation with the society, they self-suffice under the given environment, allowing themselves to accept a minimum of industrial products with small environmental load. Ordinary supply from outside of fossil energy and materials which depend on it is minimized. Types are classified into three: energy, energy materials and perfect self-sufficiency. A study project for environment symbiotic houses is progressing which is planned by the Ministry of Construction and Institute of Building Energy Conservation and is invested by a private company. Its target is making a house for halving an environmental load by CO{sub 2}, for the purpose of creating the environment symbiotic house which is nice to and in harmony with the global environment and human beings. As a part of the studies on energy-saving and resource conservation on houses, introduced is a plan of an autonomous house at Izu-Atagawa. The passive method and high thermal-insulation are used for air conditioning, and hot spring water for hot water supply. Electric power is generated by hydroelectric power generation using mountain streams and by solar cells. Staple food is purchased, while subsidiary food is sufficed. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Practical guidance on heart failure diagnosis and management in primary care : Recent EPCCS recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Clare J; Rutten, Frans H.; Brouwer, Judith R; Hobbs, F. D.Richard

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common and costly clinical syndrome, associated with significant morbidity and reduced life expectancy, affecting around 1–2% of adults in developed countries.1 Timely diagnosis is important to optimise evidence-based treatment opportunities, which delay mortality and improve

  18. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Local Failure After Primary Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearn, Jason W.D., E-mail: hearnj@ccf.org; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Djemil, Toufik; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Local failure after definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is uncommon. We report the safety and efficacy of SBRT for salvage of local failure after previous SBRT with a biologically effective dose (BED) of ≥100 Gy{sub 10}. Methods and Materials: Using an institutional review board–approved lung SBRT registry, we identified all patients initially treated for early-stage NSCLC between August 2004 and January 2012 who received salvage SBRT for isolated local failure. Failure was defined radiographically and confirmed histologically unless contraindicated. All patients were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system using ExacTrac for image guidance, and received a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} for each SBRT course. Tumor motion control involved a Bodyfix vacuum system for immobilization along with abdominal compression. Results: Of 436 patients treated from August 2004 through January 2012, we identified 22 patients with isolated local failure, 10 of whom received SBRT for salvage. The median length of follow-up was 13.8 months from salvage SBRT (range 5.3-43.5 months). Median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range 1.7-4.8 cm). Two of the 10 lesions were “central” by proximity to the mediastinum, but were outside the zone of the proximal bronchial tree. Since completing salvage, 3 patients are alive and without evidence of disease. A fourth patient died of medical comorbidities without recurrence 13.0 months after salvage SBRT. Two patients developed distant disease only. Four patients had local failure. Toxicity included grade 1-2 fatigue (3 patients) and grade 1-2 chest wall pain (5 patients). There was no grade 3-5 toxicity. Conclusions: Repeat SBRT with a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} after local failure in patients with early-stage medically inoperable NSCLC was well tolerated in this series and may represent a viable salvage strategy in select patients with peripheral tumors ≤5 cm.

  19. Identification of Six Novel PTH1R Mutations in Families with a History of Primary Failure of Tooth Eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Lotte; Christoffersen, Line Borck; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2013-01-01

    Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE) is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R). Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients...... undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A), or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544......-26_544-23del and c.989G>T). The latter was validated by transfection of minigenes. The six novel mutations expand the mutation spectrum for PFE from eight to 14 pathogenic mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in PTH1R are also associated with recessively inherited Blomstrand chondrodysplasia. We compiled all...

  20. Predictors of the success and failure of emergency pelvic artery embolisation for primary postpartum haemorrhage: a 12-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Billy Ming Hei; Shum, John Sing Fai; Chu, Chi Yeung; Lo, Sherwin Shing Wai; Lau, Kam Ying

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to identify predictors of the outcome and clinical efficacy of emergency pelvic artery embolisation (PAE) for primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and to assess the post-embolisation fertility of PAE patients in a regional hospital setting. A 12-year retrospective study of patients undergoing emergency PAE was conducted at a regional acute general hospital. Clinical and procedural parameters, clinical outcomes and post-embolisation pregnancy success rates were analysed. There were 47,221 deliveries at the hospital during the study period, of which 33 patients required urgent PAE for primary PPH. The technical success rate of embolisation was 97.0% (n = 32). Clinically adequate haemostasis was achieved by a single embolisation procedure in 24 (72.7%) patients; the remaining eight eventually required surgery to achieve cessation of bleeding. Among the parameters studied, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that pre-embolisation platelet count (p = 0.036) and maternal age (p = 0.019) were the only significant independent predictors of embolisation failure. Only two patients successfully conceived after PAE, although one of them had an ectopic pregnancy. Emergency PAE is an effective measure to arrest life-threatening bleeding in patients with primary PPH. As low pre-embolisation platelet count and advanced maternal age are associated with higher odds of embolisation failure, careful post-embolisation monitoring may be required for such patients. Embolisation also allows subsequent pregnancy. However, further studies are required to assess the outcomes of post-embolisation pregnancies. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  1. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    function, including in possible neurotransmitter changes. Certainly, neurotrophins and cytokines regulate transcriptional factors in adult autonomic neurons that have vital differentiation roles in development. Particularly for parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons, additional examinations of developmental regulatory mechanisms will potentially aid in understanding attenuated parasympathetic function in a number of conditions, including heart failure. PMID:23872607

  2. Acute respiratory failure as primary manifestation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdokia Sourla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The systemic vasculitides are multifocal diseases characterized by the presence of blood vessel inflammation in multiple organ systems. Their clinical presentation is variable extending from self-limited illness to critical complications including diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis. Alveolar hemorrhage is a lifethreatening manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis that can rapidly progress into acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We present the case of a 74-year-old patient admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with severe hypoxic respiratory failure and diffuse alveolar infiltrates in chest imaging that was later diagnosed as antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis. The report highlights the importance of differentiate between alveolar hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome of other etiology because alveolar hemorrhage is reversible with prompt initiation of treatment.

  3. [The appropriate use of pharmacological treatment in patients with chronic heart failure. A perspective from Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveiro-Rilo, J C; Diez-Juárez, D; Flores-Zurutuza, M L; Molina Mazo, R; Alberte Pérez, C; Arias Cobos, V

    2013-01-01

    The appropriate use of pharmacological treatment according to the indications in Clinical Guidelines reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). There are numerous studies regarding this in the hospital environment, but there are few studies done in Primary Care. The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of compliance by Primary Care doctors to the Clinical Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology in patients with CHF. A descriptive, observational study on the use of indication-prescription drugs was conducted. Primary Care teams of the Leon Health Area (9 urban and 19 rural). The study population included patients with a diagnosis of New York Heart Association (NYHA) Grade II-IV chronic heart failure, from a register of 2047 with chronic heart failure patients treated by 97 Primary Care doctors. A proportional representative random sample of 474 patients from the urban and rural areas was studied. Adherence to the drugs recommended in the Clinical Guidelines was evaluated using two indicators; one overall, and another for drugs with a higher level of evidence (A1: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors-angiotensin II receptor antagonists [ACE-I/ARA-II], β-blockers [BB] and spironolactone). A total of 456 patients were studied, with a mean age of 78.4 years, and 53.1% females. Arterial hypertension (AHT) and ischaemic heart disease were present in 64.7% of patients. The mean comorbidity rate, excluding CHF, was 2.9. Around 40% were diagnosed a NYHA Grade 11-1V. The overall compliance rate (diuretics, ACE-I/ARA-II, β-blockers, spironolactone, digoxin, and oral anticoagulants) and rate of adherence to evidence-based ones was 55.2% and 44.6%, respectively. There was low compliance by 39.5%, and only 12.9% of patients showed perfect compliance with the drugs with a higher level of evidence, while to be less than 70 years-old, a history of ischaemia, AHT, and a hospital admission, were variables associated with

  4. Cost-effectiveness of primary offer of IVF vs. primary offer of IUI followed by IVF (for IUI failures) in couples with unexplained or mild male factor subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashayan, Nora; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Mathur, Raj

    2006-06-23

    In unexplained and mild male factor subfertility, both intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) are indicated as first line treatments. Because the success rate of IUI is low, many couples failing IUI subsequently require IVF treatment. In practice, it is therefore important to examine the comparative outcomes (live birth-producing pregnancy), costs, and cost-effectiveness of primary offer of IVF, compared with primary offer of IUI followed by IVF for couples failing IUI. Mathematical modelling was used to estimate comparative clinical and cost effectiveness of either primary offer of one full IVF cycle (including frozen cycles when applicable) or "IUI + IVF" (defined as primary IUI followed by IVF for IUI failures) to a hypothetical cohort of subfertile couples who are eligible for both treatment strategies. Data used in calculations were derived from the published peer-reviewed literature as well as activity data of local infertility units. Cost-effectiveness ratios for IVF, "unstimulated-IUI (U-IUI) + IVF", and "stimulated IUI (S-IUI) + IVF" were 12,600 pounds sterling, 13,100 pound sterling and 15,100 pound sterling per live birth-producing pregnancy respectively. For a hypothetical cohort of 100 couples with unexplained or mild male factor subfertility, compared with primary offer of IVF, 6 cycles of "U-IUI + IVF" or of "S-IUI + IVF" would cost an additional 174,200 pounds sterling and 438,000 pounds sterling, representing an opportunity cost of 54 and 136 additional IVF cycles and 14 to 35 live birth-producing pregnancies respectively. For couples with unexplained and mild male factor subfertility, primary offer of a full IVF cycle is less costly and more cost-effective than providing IUI (of any modality) followed by IVF.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of primary offer of IVF vs. primary offer of IUI followed by IVF (for IUI failures in couples with unexplained or mild male factor subfertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyratzopoulos Georgios

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In unexplained and mild male factor subfertility, both intrauterine insemination (IUI and in-vitro fertilisation (IVF are indicated as first line treatments. Because the success rate of IUI is low, many couples failing IUI subsequently require IVF treatment. In practice, it is therefore important to examine the comparative outcomes (live birth-producing pregnancy, costs, and cost-effectiveness of primary offer of IVF, compared with primary offer of IUI followed by IVF for couples failing IUI. Methods Mathematical modelling was used to estimate comparative clinical and cost effectiveness of either primary offer of one full IVF cycle (including frozen cycles when applicable or "IUI + IVF" (defined as primary IUI followed by IVF for IUI failures to a hypothetical cohort of subfertile couples who are eligible for both treatment strategies. Data used in calculations were derived from the published peer-reviewed literature as well as activity data of local infertility units. Results Cost-effectiveness ratios for IVF, "unstimulated-IUI (U-IUI + IVF", and "stimulated IUI (S-IUI + IVF" were £12,600, £13,100 and £15,100 per live birth-producing pregnancy respectively. For a hypothetical cohort of 100 couples with unexplained or mild male factor subfertility, compared with primary offer of IVF, 6 cycles of "U-IUI + IVF" or of "S-IUI + IVF" would cost an additional £174,200 and £438,000, representing an opportunity cost of 54 and 136 additional IVF cycles and 14 to 35 live birth-producing pregnancies respectively. Conclusion For couples with unexplained and mild male factor subfertility, primary offer of a full IVF cycle is less costly and more cost-effective than providing IUI (of any modality followed by IVF.

  6. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT, is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods. The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results. Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  7. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Censi, Federica; Gioffrè, Laura; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Strano, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Background . Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods . The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results . Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  8. [Control of anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in a primary care clinical practice setting in the different autonomous communities. PAULA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo García, J; Barrios Alonso, V; Escobar Cervantes, C; Prieto Valiente, L; Lobos Bejarano, J M; Vargas Ortega, D; Prieto Díaz, M Á; Alonso Moreno, F J; Barquilla García, A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the differences between regions in the level of control of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists, included in the PAULA study. Observational, and coss-sectional/retrospective study, including 139 Primary Care physicians from 99 Health Care centres in all autonomous communities (except La Rioja). Anticoagulation control was defined as the time in therapeutic range assessed by either the direct method (poor control <60%), or the Rosendaal method (poor control <65%). A total of 1,524 patients were included. Small differences in baseline characteristics of the patients were observed. Differences in the percentage of time in therapeutic range were observed, according to the Rosendaal method (mean 69.0±17.7%), from 78.1%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 61.5±14% (Balearic Islands), by the direct method (mean 63.2±17.9%) from 73.6%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 57.5±15.7% (Extremadura). When comparing regions, in those where the Primary Care physicians assumed full control without restrictions on prescription, the percentage of time in therapeutic range by the direct method was 63.89 vs. 60.95% in those with restrictions (p=.006), by Rosendaal method, 69.39% compared with 67.68% (p=.1036). There are significant differences in the level of control between some regions are still inadequate. Regions in which the Primary Care physicians assumed the management of anticoagulation and without restrictions, time in therapeutic range was somewhat higher, and showed a favourable trend for better control. These findings may have clinical implications, and deserve consideration and specific analysis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Total Artificial Heart as Rescue Therapy for Primary Graft Failure in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Luke A; Sainathan, Sandeep; Morell, Victor O; Sharma, Mahesh S

    2018-04-01

    An infant unable to be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass after orthotopic heart transplantation was cannulated for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. During the next 3 days, allograft failure and intracardiac thrombosis necessitated cardiectomy. To provide acute mechanical circulatory support, artificial atrial chambers were constructed with Gore-Tex conduits and PediMag centrifugal pumps were connected to each by Berlin Heart EXCOR cannulae. The PediMag pumps were subsequently exchanged for 10-mL Berlin Heart EXCOR pumps. After 60 days of support by total artificial heart, the patient was bridged successfully to a second heart transplant. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Systems analysis determining critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions on ASST magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arden, C.S.

    1993-04-01

    During the assembly process through the completion of the Accelerator Surface String Test (ASST) phase one test, Magnet Systems Division Reliability Engineering has tracked all the known discrepancies utilizing the Failure Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action System (FRACAS) and data base. This paper discusses the critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions (lessons learned) based on actual data for the ASST magnets. The ASST magnets include seven Brookhaven Lab Dipoles (DCA-207 through 213), fourteen Fermi Lab Dipoles (DCA-310 through 323) and five Lawrence Berkeley Lab Quadrupoles (QCC-402 through 406). Between all the ASST magnets built there were one hundred eighty six (186) class one discrepancies reported out of approximately eleven hundred total discrepancy reports. The class one or critical discrepancies are defined as form, fit, function, safety or reliability problem. Each and every ASST magnet is considered a success, as they all achieved the quench performance requirements and were capable of being incorporated into the string test. This paper also discuss some specific magnet discrepancies, including failure cause(s), corrective action and possible open issues

  11. Systems analysis determining critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions on ASST magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arden, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    During the assembly process through the completion of the Accelerator Surface String Test (ASST) phase one test, Magnet Systems Division Reliability Engineering has tracked all the known discrepancies utilizing the Failure Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action System (FRACAS) and data base. This paper discusses the critical items, critical assembly processes, primary failure modes and corrective actions (lessons learned) based on actual data for the ASST magnets. The ASST magnets include seven Brookhaven Lab Dipoles (DCA-207 through 213), fourteen Fermi Lab Dipoles (DCA-310 through 323) and five Lawrence Berkeley Lab Quadrupoles (QCC-402 through 406). Between all the ASST magnets built there were one hundred eighty six (186) class one discrepancies reported out of approximately eleven hundred total discrepancy reports. The class one or critical discrepancies are defined as form, fit, function, safety or reliability problem. Each and every ASST magnet is considered a success, as they all achieved the quench performance requirements and were capable of being incorporated into the string test. This paper will also discuss some specific magnet discrepancies, including failure cause(s), corrective action and possible open issues

  12. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  13. State Liability for Abuse in Primary Schools: Systemic Failure and "O'Keeffe" v. "Hickey"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Conor

    2009-01-01

    Due to the historical arrangement between Church and State, the Irish State has always discharged its duty to provide for free primary education exclusively through the provision of funding to privately owned and managed schools. Consequently, in "O'Keeffe" v. "Hickey," where a woman sued the State in respect of sex abuse she…

  14. Identification of six novel PTH1R mutations in families with a history of primary failure of tooth eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risom, Lotte; Christoffersen, Line; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette; Hove, Hanne Dahlgaard; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Kreiborg, Sven; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE) is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R). Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients with PTH1R mutations will not benefit from surgical and/or orthodontic treatment and it is therefore clinically important to establish whether a given failure of tooth eruption is caused by a PTH1R defect or not. We analyzed the PTH1R gene in six patients clinically diagnosed with PFE, all of which had undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A), or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544-26_544-23del and c.989G>T). The latter was validated by transfection of minigenes. The six novel mutations expand the mutation spectrum for PFE from eight to 14 pathogenic mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in PTH1R are also associated with recessively inherited Blomstrand chondrodysplasia. We compiled all published PTH1R mutations and identified a mutational overlap between Blomstrand chondrodysplasia and PFE. The results suggest that a genetic approach to preclinical diagnosis will have important implication for surgical and orthodontic treatment of patients with failure of tooth eruption.

  15. Identification of six novel PTH1R mutations in families with a history of primary failure of tooth eruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Risom

    Full Text Available Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R. Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients with PTH1R mutations will not benefit from surgical and/or orthodontic treatment and it is therefore clinically important to establish whether a given failure of tooth eruption is caused by a PTH1R defect or not. We analyzed the PTH1R gene in six patients clinically diagnosed with PFE, all of which had undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A, or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544-26_544-23del and c.989G>T. The latter was validated by transfection of minigenes. The six novel mutations expand the mutation spectrum for PFE from eight to 14 pathogenic mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in PTH1R are also associated with recessively inherited Blomstrand chondrodysplasia. We compiled all published PTH1R mutations and identified a mutational overlap between Blomstrand chondrodysplasia and PFE. The results suggest that a genetic approach to preclinical diagnosis will have important implication for surgical and orthodontic treatment of patients with failure of tooth eruption.

  16. Adrenal failure followed by status epilepticus and hemolytic anemia in primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bures Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 14 year old boy who presented with the symptoms abdominal pain, fever and proteinuria. A hematoma in the region of the right pararenal space was diagnosed. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were positive and serum cortisol was normal. Ten days after admission the boy suddenly suffered generalized seizures due to low serum sodium. As well, the patient developed hemolytic anemia, acute elevated liver enzymes, hematuria and increased proteinuria. At this time a second hemorrhage of the left adrenal gland was documented. Adrenal function tests revealed adrenal insufficiency. We suspected microthromboses in the adrenals and secondary bleeding and treated the boy with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and phenprocoumon. Conclusion Adrenal failure is a rare complication of APS in children with only five cases reported to date. As shown in our patient, this syndrome can manifest in a diverse set of simultaneously occurring symptoms.

  17. The Canadian approach to protection against postulated primary heat transport piping failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarman, B.L.

    1985-10-01

    In Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Act and Regulations stipulate in broad terms the requirements to be met by licensees. In addition, AECB staff have prepared licensing guides to amplify those requirements. For nuclear reactors, these include providing suitable protection against the consequences of failure of any pipe in the reactor cooling system. The suggested means of limiting the damage caused by whipping pipes or steam jets is by separation of equipment, installing barriers, or restraining piping. If, however, the designer can demonstrate that restraints are impractical or detrimental to safety, AECB staff may consider alternate arguments based on a demonstration that piping is likely to crack and then leak for a long time prior to rupture. This alternative approach would not be considered for ruptures having a high probability of defeating containment, damaging essential safety systems, or of disrupting flow to the core to the extent that fuel cooling could not be maintained

  18. How are patients with heart failure treated in primary care?
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant-Roussel, Hélène; Pereira, Bruno; Gibot-Boeuf, Sylvaine; Eschalier, Romain; Dubray, Claude; Boussageon, Rémy; Vorilhon, Philippe

    2018-05-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the adherence of general practitioners (GPs) to guidelines in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and to describe GPs' prescribing behavior regarding patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Cross-sectional study as part of the ETIC trial. Five classes of drugs were described: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs); β-blockers (BBs); mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs); diuretics (thiazide or loop diuretics); and digoxin. 178 patients were studied: their mean age was 73.5 years (± 10.6). Of the 128 patients with HFpEF, 81.3% received ACEIs or ARBs, 63.3% received BBs, 13.3% received MRAs, 75.8% received diuretics, and 12.5% received digoxin. Of the 50 patients with HFrEF, 84% received ACEIs or ARBs, 74% received BBs, 20% received MRAs, 76% received diuretics, and 2% received digoxin. 25% of the patients were given a drug in accordance with the recommendations for drug class but not a drug authorized for the HFrEF indication. Among the patients with HFrEF who were treated in accordance with the recommendations, target doses were achieved in 1/3 given ACEIs/ARBs, 1/4 given BBs, and 1/2 given MRAs. Only 6% of the patients had a perfect Global Adherence Indicator-3 (GAI-3) with all target doses achieved. Several drugs were prescribed even though they were not recommended, and few patients were treated optimally. It seems to be necessary to develop a pragmatic tool to help GPs and cardiologists in optimizing treatment.
.

  19. Elective Nodal Irradiation and Patterns of Failure in Head and Neck Cancer After Primary Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Julie; Gothelf, Anita B; Håkansson, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    on recurrence in the retropharyngeal region and level IB. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2005 to 2012, 942 patients with oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, laryngeal or oral cavity carcinomas were curatively treated with primary radiation therapy. The median follow-up period was 34 months, and 77% of the patients...... underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy. The retropharyngeal region was only routinely included in cases of involvement of the posterior pharynx wall and level IB only in cases of involvement of the oral cavity. In patients with regional recurrence, the anatomic site of the recurrence was assessed...... likely to develop recurrence in distant sites. CONCLUSIONS: Retropharyngeal or level IB recurrence after primary HNC radiation therapy is rare. Thus, inclusion of these regions in the elective treatment volumes should be limited to patients with involvement of the posterior pharyngeal wall or oral cavity....

  20. Steroid replacement in primary adrenal failure does not appear to affect circulating adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Fichna, Marta; Fichna, Piotr; Gryczy?ska, Maria; Czarnywojtek, Agata; ?urawek, Magdalena; Rucha?a, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous efforts for an optimal steroid replacement, recent observations suggest increased cardiometabolic risk and related mortality in primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI). Adipokines are peptides from the adipose tissue, markers of cardiometabolic dysfunction. This study was aimed to evaluate serum levels of adipokines: leptin, adiponectin, and resistin in PAI during conventional steroid substitution. The analysis comprised 63 patients (mean age 42.7???14.1?years) and 63 healthy c...

  1. [Status of seroepidemiology of hepatitis A, B and C in primary and middle school students in Shufu county, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z B; Xue, Z X; Han, Z G; Yang, Q Y; Zheng, X R; Zulipikaer, Tuerhong; Wang, M

    2016-12-10

    Objective: To explore the status of seroepidemiology on hepatitis A, B and C in primary and middle school students in Shufu county, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China (Xinjiang) and to evaluate the effect of related immunization. Methods: Students in four towns and villages were selected by cluster random sampling method. HAV-IgG, HBsAg, HBsAb and HCV-IgG were detected in Feb to May, 2015. Results: The overall HAV-IgG positive rate was 99.75%, among 4 830 primary and middle school students. The positive rates were seen 99.92% in boys and 99.57% in girls, with difference statistically significant ( χ 2 =5.798, P =0.016). The overall HBsAg positive rate appeared as 3.02%, with 3.55% for boys and 2.47% for girls, with difference statistically significant ( χ 2 =4.782, P =0.029). The difference between age specific HBsAg positive rates also showed statistically significant ( χ 2 =71.990, P =0.000). HBsAg positive rate in the students in rural area (3.28%) was higher than that in the students in urban area (1.61%, χ 2 =6.019, P =0.014). HBsAb positive rate was 38.84%, and the differences between the age specific HBsAb positive rates appeared statistically significant ( χ 2 =837.699, P =0.000). HBsAg positive rate in students from the urban area (42.36%) was higher than those from the rural area (38.20%, χ 2 =4.598, P =0.032). 2 815 students, accounting for 58.28% of the total students, showed negative on both HBsAg and HBsAb. The overall HCV-IgG positive rate was 0.19%, and all appeared in students from the rural areas, with ethnicity solely as Uygur. Conclusions: The effect of hepatitis A vaccine was satisfactory in primary and middle school students in Shufu county but quiet a number of the students missed the vaccination. The infection rate of hepatitis C was low. Publicity and health education on hepatitis immunization and control should be revved up. Programs regarding primary and supplementary immunization on hepatitis, should be carried out timely

  2. Fresh osteochondral allografts in the knee: comparison of primary transplantation versus transplantation after failure of previous subchondral marrow stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracitelli, Guilherme C; Meric, Gokhan; Briggs, Dustin T; Pulido, Pamela A; McCauley, Julie C; Belloti, João Carlos; Bugbee, William D

    2015-04-01

    In most treatment algorithms, osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation is regarded as an alternative salvage procedure when other, previous reparative treatments have failed. To compare the outcomes of a retrospective matched-pair cohort of (1) primary OCA transplantation and (2) OCA transplantation after failure of previous subchondral marrow stimulation. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. An OCA database was used to identify 46 knees that had OCA transplantation performed as a primary treatment (group 1) and 46 knees that underwent OCA transplantation after failure of previous subchondral marrow stimulation (group 2). All patients had a minimum of 2 years' follow-up. Patients in each group were matched for age (±5 years), diagnosis (osteochondral lesion, degenerative chondral lesion, traumatic chondral injury), and graft size (small, 10 cm2). The groups had similar body mass indexes, sex distributions, and graft locations (femoral condyle, patella, and trochlea. The number and type of further surgeries after the OCA transplantation were assessed; failure was defined as any reoperation resulting in removal of the graft. Functional outcomes were evaluated by use of the modified Merle d'Aubigné-Postel (18-point) scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS), and the Knee Society function (KS-F) scale. Patient satisfaction, according to a 5-point scale from "extremely satisfied" to "dissatisfied," was recorded at the latest follow-up. Eleven of 46 knees (24%) in group 1 had reoperations, compared with 20 of 46 knees (44%) in group 2 (P = .04). The OCA was classified as a failure in 5 knees (11%) in group 1 and 7 knees (15%) in group 2 (P = .53). At 10 years of follow-up, survivorship of the graft was 87.4% and 86% in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Both groups showed improvement in pain and function on all subjective scores from preoperatively to the latest follow

  3. Morning surge of ventricular arrhythmias in a new arrhythmogenic canine model of chronic heart failure is associated with attenuation of time-of-day dependence of heart rate and autonomic adaptation, and reduced cardiac chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yujie; Hanafy, Mohamed A; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Walcott, Gregory P; Young, Martin E; Pogwizd, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) exhibit a morning surge in ventricular arrhythmias, but the underlying cause remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate dynamics, autonomic input (assessed by heart rate variability (HRV)) and nonlinear dynamics as well as their abnormal time-of-day-dependent oscillations in a newly developed arrhythmogenic canine heart failure model are associated with a morning surge in ventricular arrhythmias. CHF was induced in dogs by aortic insufficiency & aortic constriction, and assessed by echocardiography. Holter monitoring was performed to study time-of-day-dependent variation in ventricular arrhythmias (PVCs, VT), traditional HRV measures, and nonlinear dynamics (including detrended fluctuations analysis α1 and α2 (DFAα1 & DFAα2), correlation dimension (CD), and Shannon entropy (SE)) at baseline, as well as 240 days (240 d) and 720 days (720 d) following CHF induction. LV fractional shortening was decreased at both 240 d and 720 d. Both PVCs and VT increased with CHF duration and showed a morning rise (2.5-fold & 1.8-fold increase at 6 AM-noon vs midnight-6 AM) during CHF. The morning rise in HR at baseline was significantly attenuated by 52% with development of CHF (at both 240 d & 720 d). Morning rise in the ratio of low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF) HRV at baseline was markedly attenuated with CHF. DFAα1, DFAα2, CD and SE all decreased with CHF by 31, 17, 34 and 7%, respectively. Time-of-day-dependent variations in LF/HF, CD, DFA α1 and SE, observed at baseline, were lost during CHF. Thus in this new arrhythmogenic canine CHF model, attenuated morning HR rise, blunted autonomic oscillation, decreased cardiac chaos and complexity of heart rate, as well as aberrant time-of-day-dependent variations in many of these parameters were associated with a morning surge of ventricular arrhythmias.

  4. Morning surge of ventricular arrhythmias in a new arrhythmogenic canine model of chronic heart failure is associated with attenuation of time-of-day dependence of heart rate and autonomic adaptation, and reduced cardiac chaos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhu

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF exhibit a morning surge in ventricular arrhythmias, but the underlying cause remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate dynamics, autonomic input (assessed by heart rate variability (HRV and nonlinear dynamics as well as their abnormal time-of-day-dependent oscillations in a newly developed arrhythmogenic canine heart failure model are associated with a morning surge in ventricular arrhythmias. CHF was induced in dogs by aortic insufficiency & aortic constriction, and assessed by echocardiography. Holter monitoring was performed to study time-of-day-dependent variation in ventricular arrhythmias (PVCs, VT, traditional HRV measures, and nonlinear dynamics (including detrended fluctuations analysis α1 and α2 (DFAα1 & DFAα2, correlation dimension (CD, and Shannon entropy (SE at baseline, as well as 240 days (240 d and 720 days (720 d following CHF induction. LV fractional shortening was decreased at both 240 d and 720 d. Both PVCs and VT increased with CHF duration and showed a morning rise (2.5-fold & 1.8-fold increase at 6 AM-noon vs midnight-6 AM during CHF. The morning rise in HR at baseline was significantly attenuated by 52% with development of CHF (at both 240 d & 720 d. Morning rise in the ratio of low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF HRV at baseline was markedly attenuated with CHF. DFAα1, DFAα2, CD and SE all decreased with CHF by 31, 17, 34 and 7%, respectively. Time-of-day-dependent variations in LF/HF, CD, DFA α1 and SE, observed at baseline, were lost during CHF. Thus in this new arrhythmogenic canine CHF model, attenuated morning HR rise, blunted autonomic oscillation, decreased cardiac chaos and complexity of heart rate, as well as aberrant time-of-day-dependent variations in many of these parameters were associated with a morning surge of ventricular arrhythmias.

  5. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingjing; Lin, Jialiu; Wu, Ziqiang; Xu, Hongzhi; Zuo, Chengguo; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in patients less than 7 years of age, with advanced primary congenital glaucoma who have failed previous surgeries. Consecutive patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma that failed previous operations and had undergone subsequent AGV implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Surgical success was defined as 1) intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥6 and ≤21 mmHg; 2) IOP reduction of at least 30% relative to preoperative values; and 3) without the need for additional surgical intervention for IOP control, loss of light perception, or serious complications. Fourteen eyes of eleven patients were studied. Preoperatively, the average axial length was 27.71±1.52 (25.56-30.80) mm, corneal diameter was 14.71±1.07 (13.0-16.0) mm, cup-to-disc ratio was 0.95±0.04 (0.9-1.0), and IOP was 39.5±5.7 (30-55) mmHg. The mean follow-up time was 18.29±10.96 (5-44, median 18) months. There were significant reductions in IOPs and the number of glaucoma medications (Pvalve success were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 71.4% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Severe surgical complications, including erosion of tube, endophthalmitis, retinal detachment, choroidal detachment, and delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage, occurred in 28.6% cases. AGV implantation remains a viable option for patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma unresponsive to previous surgical intervention, despite a relatively high incidence of severe surgical complications.

  6. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jingjing Huang,1 Jialiu Lin,1 Ziqiang Wu,2 Hongzhi Xu,3 Chengguo Zuo,1 Jian Ge1 1State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Department of Glaucoma, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Center for Advanced Eye Care, Carson City, NV, USA; 3Institute of Child Health Policy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV implantation in patients less than 7 years of age, with advanced primary congenital glaucoma who have failed previous surgeries.Patients and methods: Consecutive patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma that failed previous operations and had undergone subsequent AGV implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Surgical success was defined as 1 intraocular pressure (IOP ≥6 and ≤21 mmHg; 2 IOP reduction of at least 30% relative to preoperative values; and 3 without the need for additional surgical intervention for IOP control, loss of light perception, or serious complications.Results: Fourteen eyes of eleven patients were studied. Preoperatively, the average axial length was 27.71±1.52 (25.56–30.80 mm, corneal diameter was 14.71±1.07 (13.0–16.0 mm, cup-to-disc ratio was 0.95±0.04 (0.9–1.0, and IOP was 39.5±5.7 (30–55 mmHg. The mean follow-up time was 18.29±10.96 (5–44, median 18 months. There were significant reductions in IOPs and the number of glaucoma medications (P<0.001 postoperatively. The IOPs after operation were 11.3±3.4, 13.6±5.1, 16.3±2.7, and 16.1±2.6 mmHg at 1 month, 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier estimates of the cumulative probability of valve success were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 71.4% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Severe surgical complications, including erosion of tube, endophthalmitis, retinal detachment, choroidal detachment, and delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage, occurred in 28

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure: research and clinical practice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chiumeo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and comorbidities, increasing with age, is the challenge that nowadays health care systems are facing to better care treat these patients. For this reason a clinical trial was conducted in the province of Trento by a group of 30 volunteer general practitioners members of SNAMID (Scientific Society for Continuing Medical Education of General Practitioners. The objectives were to identify: i prevalence of COPD in patients (65-98 years in the province of Trento; ii presence and incidence of heart failure (HF in COPD patients; iii early detection of other chronic diseases; and iv improving electronic medical records (EMR as an innovation way of professional care management. From May 2011 to October 2013, 17 doctors completed the two-year work using the EMR. The studied patients were men and women (65-98 years, suffering from COPD; the considered data included: anthropometric information, smoking status, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 diagnosis of COPD, HF and chronic diseases, specific blood and instrumental tests. The extracted results were then linked with data of sentinel therapies, collected by the EMR. The database obtained identified patients with COPD or HF not previously recognized with ICD-9 diagnosis. The study identified the sentinel drugs chosen for COPD and HF, excluding other drugs not selective for the study or confusing for a proper statistical evaluation.

  8. Addressing the challenges of improving primary care quality in Uzbekistan: a qualitative study of chronic heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Mohir; Green, Judith; Azimov, Ravshan; Avezova, Guloyim; Inakov, Sherzod; Mamatkulov, Bahrom

    2013-08-01

    Uzbekistan has a well-developed primary care system, with universal access to care, but faces challenges in improving the quality of clinical care provided. This study aimed to identify barriers to quality improvement by focusing on one common condition, Chronic Heart Failure (CHF), for which there are evidence-based international guidelines for management. To identify the challenges to improving the quality of care for CHF in line with such guidelines we took a qualitative approach, interviewing 15 physicians and 30 patients in detail about their experiences of CHF management. Despite recent improvements to the training of primary care physicians, their access to up-to-date information was limited, and they were disproportionately reliant on information from pharmaceutical companies. The main barriers to implementing international standards of care were: reluctance of physicians (and patients) to abandon ineffective interventions; enduring, system-wide incentives for clinically unnecessary hospitalization; and the lack of structural support for evidence-based health services improvement. Patients were in general positive about adherence to medications, but faced some problems in affording drugs and hospital care. Future interventions to strengthen primary care should be implemented with evaluations of their impact on the processes and outcomes of care for chronic conditions.

  9. Outcomes of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in advanced primary congenital glaucoma with previous surgical failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingjing; Lin, Jialiu; Wu, Ziqiang; Xu, Hongzhi; Zuo, Chengguo; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate surgical results of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation in patients less than 7 years of age, with advanced primary congenital glaucoma who have failed previous surgeries. Patients and methods Consecutive patients with advanced primary congenital glaucoma that failed previous operations and had undergone subsequent AGV implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Surgical success was defined as 1) intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥6 and ≤21 mmHg; 2) IOP reduction of at least 30% relative to preoperative values; and 3) without the need for additional surgical intervention for IOP control, loss of light perception, or serious complications. Results Fourteen eyes of eleven patients were studied. Preoperatively, the average axial length was 27.71±1.52 (25.56–30.80) mm, corneal diameter was 14.71±1.07 (13.0–16.0) mm, cup-to-disc ratio was 0.95±0.04 (0.9–1.0), and IOP was 39.5±5.7 (30–55) mmHg. The mean follow-up time was 18.29±10.96 (5–44, median 18) months. There were significant reductions in IOPs and the number of glaucoma medications (Pglaucoma unresponsive to previous surgical intervention, despite a relatively high incidence of severe surgical complications. PMID:26082610

  10. The use of postoperative slit-lamp optical coherence tomography to predict primary failure in descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Carolyn Y; Ritterband, David C; Palmiero, Pat-Michael; Seedor, John A; Papachristou, George; Harizman, Noga; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2009-05-01

    To determine if central donor lenticle thickness as measured by slit-lamp optical coherence tomography (SL OCT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) is predictive of primary donor failure in patients undergoing Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Eighty-four patients who underwent DSAEK surgery by 2 surgeons (D.C.R. and J.A.S.) were enrolled. At each postoperative visit (postoperative day 1, week 1, month 1, and month 2), an SL OCT scan was obtained. Statistical differences in SL OCT measurements of successful and failed DSAEK procedures were measured using the Student t test. A successful DSAEK surgery was defined as having an anatomically attached, clear recipient corneal stroma and donor lenticle compatible with good vision 2 months after surgery. A failed DSAEK surgery was defined as an attached donor lenticle with SL evidence of corneal edema and thickening visible at 2 months or more. Ninety-three eyes of 84 consecutive patients who underwent DSAEK surgery also underwent postoperative SL OCT. After 2 months of follow-up, 82 (88%) procedures were successful and 11 (12%) procedures were failures. The average donor lenticle thickness in successful DSAEK eyes was 314 +/- 128 microm on postoperative day 1 as compared with failed DSAEK eyes, which averaged 532 +/- 259 microm (P = .0013). This was independent regardless of whether the lenticle was attached on the first postoperative visit. Seventy-nine (98%) successful DSAEK eyes had a lenticle thickness of or = 350 microm at the 1-week postoperative visit. Statistically significant differences in SL OCT thickness measurements were seen between successful and failed DSAEK cases at all examinations after postoperative week 1. Corneal thickness measurements made with SL OCT are an important predictor of DSAEK failure in both attached and detached lenticles within the first week of surgery. DSAEK lenticle thickness of 350 microm or less at 1 week

  11. On the failure probability of the primary piping of the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, G.I.; Hampl, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology for quantification of the structural reliability of the primary piping (PP) of a PWR under operational and accidental conditions is developed. Biblis B is utilized as reference plant. The PP structure is modeled utilizing finite element procedures. Based on the properties of the operational and internal accidental conditions, a static analysis suffices. However, a dynamic analysis considering non-linear effects of the soil-structure-interaction is to be used to determine load effects due to earthquake induced loading. Considering realistically the presence of initial cracks in welds and considering annual frequencies of occurrence of the various loading conditions, a crack propagation calculation utilizing the Forman model is carried out. Simultaneously leak and break probabilities using the 'Two Criteria'-Aproach are computed. A Monte Carlo simulation procedure is used as method of solution. (Author) [pt

  12. [Analysis of the influence of the process of care in primary health care on avoidable hospitalizations for heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Saz Moreno, Vicente; Alberquilla Menéndez-Asenjo, Ángel; Camacho Hernández, Ana M; Lora Pablos, David; Enríquez de Salamanca Lorente, Rafael; Magán Tapia, Purificación

    2016-02-01

    To determine if the process of care in primary health, affects the risk of avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSH) for heart failure (HF). Case-control study analyzing the risk of hospitalization for HF. The exposure factor was the process of care for HF in primary health. Health area of the region of Madrid (n=466.901). There were included all adult patients (14 years or older) with a documented diagnosis of HF in the electronic medical record of primary health (n=3.277). The cases were patients who were hospitalized for HF while the controls did not require admission, during 2007. risk of ACSH for HF related to the process of care considered both overall and for each separate standard of appropiate care. Differences in clinical complexity of the groups were measured using the Adjusted Clinical Group (ACG) classification system. 227 cases and 3.050 controls. Clinical complexity was greater in cases. The standards of appropriate care were met to a greater degree in the control group, but none of the two groups met all the standards that would define a process of care as fully appropriate. A significantly lower risk of ACSH was seen for only two standards of appropriate care. For each additional standard of appropriate care not met, the probability of admission was significantly greater (OR: 1,33, 95% CI: 1,19-1,49). Higher quality in the process of care in primary health was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization for HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Steroid replacement in primary adrenal failure does not appear to affect circulating adipokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichna, Marta; Fichna, Piotr; Gryczyńska, Maria; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Żurawek, Magdalena; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Despite continuous efforts for an optimal steroid replacement, recent observations suggest increased cardiometabolic risk and related mortality in primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI). Adipokines are peptides from the adipose tissue, markers of cardiometabolic dysfunction. This study was aimed to evaluate serum levels of adipokines: leptin, adiponectin, and resistin in PAI during conventional steroid substitution. The analysis comprised 63 patients (mean age 42.7 ± 14.1 years) and 63 healthy controls. Serum adipokines, lipid profile, and plasma glucose were assessed in both cohorts. ACTH, serum insulin, HOMA-IR, DHEA-S, cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol were determined in PAI. Body mass composition was analyzed by Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry. Mean BMI in the control group was 24.1 ± 3.9 kg/m(2) and 23.7 ± 3.9 kg/m(2) in the PAI cohort. Serum leptin and adiponectin levels were similar in both groups, whereas resistin appeared significantly lower among affected subjects (p = 0.0002). Its levels were weakly correlated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.048). Leptin was independently correlated with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, BMI, and body fat (p regression analysis only weight (p = 0.017), total and HDL cholesterol (p replacement. Serum adipokines in treated PAI follow similar correlations to those reported in healthy subjects. Further prospective studies are warranted to verify and explain plausible excess of cardiovascular mortality in PAI.

  14. Gut barrier failure biomarkers are associated with poor disease outcome in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornai, Tamas; Palyu, Eszter; Vitalis, Zsuzsanna; Tornai, Istvan; Tornai, David; Antal-Szalmas, Peter; Norman, Gary L; Shums, Zakera; Veres, Gabor; Dezsofi, Antal; Par, Gabriella; Par, Alajos; Orosz, Peter; Szalay, Ferenc; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Papp, Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the prevalence of a panel of serologic markers that reflect gut barrier dysfunction in a mixed cohort of pediatric and adult primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients. METHODS Sera of 67 PSC patients [median age (range): 32 (5-79) years, concomitant IBD: 67% and cirrhosis: 20%] were assayed for the presence of antibodies against to F-actin (AAA IgA/IgG) and gliadin (AGA IgA/IgG)] and for serum level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) by ELISA. Markers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure [LPS binding protein (LBP)] and various anti-microbial antibodies [anti-OMP Plus IgA and endotoxin core IgA antibody (EndoCAb)] were also determined. Poor disease outcome was defined as orthotopic liver transplantation and/or liver-related death during the follow-up [median: 99 (14-106) mo]. One hundred and fifty-three healthy subjects (HCONT) and 172 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were the controls. RESULTS A total of 28.4%, 28.0%, 9% and 20.9% of PSC patients were positive for AAA IgA, AAA IgG, AGA IgA and AGA IgG, respectively. Frequencies of AAA IgA and AAA IgG (P < 0.001, for both) and AGA IgG (P = 0.01, for both) but not AGA IgA were significantly higher compared to both of the HCONT and the UC groups. In survival analysis, AAA IgA-positivity was revealed as an independent predictor of poor disease outcome after adjusting either for the presence of cirrhosis [HR = 5.15 (1.27-20.86), P = 0.022 or for the Mayo risk score (HR = 4.24 (0.99-18.21), P = 0.052]. AAA IgA-positivity was significantly associated with higher frequency of anti-microbial antibodies (P < 0.001 for EndoCab IgA and P = 0.012 for anti-OMP Plus IgA) and higher level of the enterocyte damage marker (median I-FABPAAA IgA pos vs neg: 365 vs 166 pg/mL, P = 0.011), but not with serum LBP level. CONCLUSION Presence of IgA type AAA identified PSC patients with progressive disease. Moreover, it is associated with enhanced mucosal immune response to various microbial antigens and

  15. Does the Presence of Primary Circulating Prostate Cells Imply the Presence of Agressive Prostate Cancer with Early Biochemical Failure: a Comparison with the Walz Nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Nigel P; Reyes, Eduardo; Orellana, Nelson; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Orellana, Sebastian; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    To determine the utility of primary circulating prostate cells (CPC) for predicting early biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and compare the results with the Walz nomogram. A single centre prospective study of men with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy was conducted between 2004 and 2014. Clinicalpathological details were registered, along with total serum PSA presurgery, Gleason score, extracapsular extension, positive surgical margins, infiltration of lymph nodes, seminal vesicles and pathological stage. Primary circulating prostate cells were obtained using differential gel centrifugation and detected using standard immunocytochemistry with antiPSA. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA >0.2ng/ml, predictive values were calculated using the Walz nomagram and CPC detection. A total of 285 men participated, of whom 103/285 (36.1%) suffered biochemcial failure; 32/103 (31.1%) within two years of radical prostatectomy. Men with higher Gleason scores, higher pathological stage, infiltration of the surgical margin or prostate capsule and infiltration of seminal vesicles were more likely to undergo biochemical failure. There was a significant increase in the frequency of biochemical failure with increasing number of CPCs detected (p<0.0004 Chi squared for trend) and increasing percent prediction for the Walz nomogram (p<0.0001 Chi squared for trends). The positive predictive value of primary CPC detection, even using a cutoff point of ≥ 4 cells/sample was very low. The detection of primary CPCs in men as a prognostic factor pretreatment fails to identify those at high risk of biochemical failure within two years of curative therapy. This is in keeping with their biological significance, that the majority of them will be eliminated by the primary therapy and thus have no influence on the subsequent clinical history of the patient.

  16. Insights into the background of autonomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Geraldes, Vera; Oliveira, Mário; Rocha, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the physiology underlying the autonomic nervous system is pivotal for understanding autonomic dysfunction in clinical practice. Autonomic dysfunction may result from primary modifications of the autonomic nervous system or be secondary to a wide range of diseases that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Together with a detailed history and physical examination, laboratory assessment of autonomic function is essential for the analysis of various clinical conditions and the establishment of effective, personalized and precise therapeutic schemes. This review summarizes the main aspects of autonomic medicine that constitute the background of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. MICE or NICE? An economic evaluation of clinical decision rules in the diagnosis of heart failure in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Mark; Barton, Pelham; Taylor, Clare J; Roalfe, Andrea K; Hobbs, F D Richard; Cowie, Martin; Davis, Russell; Deeks, Jon; Mant, Jonathan; McCahon, Deborah; McDonagh, Theresa; Sutton, George; Tait, Lynda

    2017-08-15

    Detection and treatment of heart failure (HF) can improve quality of life and reduce premature mortality. However, symptoms such as breathlessness are common in primary care, have a variety of causes and not all patients require cardiac imaging. In systems where healthcare resources are limited, ensuring those patients who are likely to have HF undergo appropriate and timely investigation is vital. A decision tree was developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of using the MICE (Male, Infarction, Crepitations, Edema) decision rule compared to other diagnostic strategies to identify HF patients presenting to primary care. Data from REFER (REFer for EchocaRdiogram), a HF diagnostic accuracy study, was used to determine which patients received the correct diagnosis decision. The model adopted a UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective. The current recommended National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for identifying patients with HF was the most cost-effective option with a cost of £4400 per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained compared to a "do nothing" strategy. That is, patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of HF should be referred straight for echocardiography if they had a history of myocardial infarction or if their NT-proBNP level was ≥400pg/ml. The MICE rule was more expensive and less effective than the other comparators. Base-case results were robust to sensitivity analyses. This represents the first cost-utility analysis comparing HF diagnostic strategies for symptomatic patients. Current guidelines in England were the most cost-effective option for identifying patients for confirmatory HF diagnosis. The low number of HF with Reduced Ejection Fraction patients (12%) in the REFER patient population limited the benefits of early detection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Political accountability and autonomous weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Igoe Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous weapons would have the capacity to select and attack targets without direct human input. One important objection to the introduction of such weapons is that they will make it more difficult to identify and hold accountable those responsible for undesirable outcomes such as mission failures and civilian casualties. I hypothesize that individuals can modify their attribution of responsibility in predicable ways to accommodate this new technology. The results of a survey experiment are consistent with this; subjects continue to find responsible and hold accountable political and military leaders when autonomous weapons are used, but also attribute responsibility to the designers and programmers of such weapons.

  19. Acute renal failure due to mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in a pregnant woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Fatma Ulku; Torun, Dilek; Bolat, Filiz; Zumrutdal, Aysegul; Sezer, Siren; Ozdemir, Fatma Nurhan

    2006-02-01

    The most common form of renal involvement in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is tubulointerstitial nephritis. Renal dysfunction is usually mild and subclinical. Glomerulonephritis (GMN) is rare in patients with SS. We report a 28-year-old multigravida patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and associated manifestations, who presented with acute renal failure in the 20th week of her fifth pregnancy. The complaints and clinical findings, positive Schirmer's test, findings of dry eye on ophthalmologic examination, and the salivary gland biopsy were compatible with SS. The patient exhibited no other clinical or laboratory findings indicative of other collagenous disease and/or rheumatoid arthritis. She refused renal biopsy, hesitating for fear of fetal loss; thus, based on the clinical and laboratory findings indicating rapidly progressive GMN and vasculitis, prednisolone, plasmapheresis, and one dose of cyclophosphamide were administered during the pregnancy. Hemodialysis five times weekly was performed. At the 28th week of gestation, she underwent a cesarean section due to early rupture of membranes and fetal distress. A healthy male boy was delivered. The renal biopsy performed 2 weeks after labor revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. After the fourth cyclophosphamide treatment, her urinary output increased and she was discharged from the hemodialysis program. She remains in follow-up at our outpatient clinic free of hemodialysis for 4 months. This is the first report of mesangial proliferative GMN requiring dialysis in a pregnant pSS patient that has featured good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  20. Hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure: the impact of hospital and primary care organizational factors in Northern Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria Avaldi

    Full Text Available Primary health care is essential for an appropriate management of heart failure (HF, a disease which is a major clinical and public health issue and a leading cause of hospitalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different organizational factors on readmissions of patients with HF.The study population included elderly resident in the Local Health Authority of Bologna (Northern Italy and discharged with a diagnosis of HF from January to December 2010. Unplanned hospital readmissions were measured in four timeframes: 30 (short-term, 90 (medium-term, 180 (mid-long-term, and 365 days (long-term. Using multivariable multilevel Poisson regression analyses, we investigated the association between readmissions and organizational factors (discharge from a cardiology department, general practitioners' monodisciplinary organizational arrangement, and implementation of a specific HF care pathway.The 1873 study patients had a median age of 83 years (interquartile range 77-87 and 55.5% were females; 52.0% were readmitted to the hospital for any reason after a year, while 20.1% were readmitted for HF. The presence of a HF care pathway was the only factor significantly associated with a lower risk of readmission for HF in the short-, medium-, mid-long- and long-term period (short-term: IRR [incidence rate ratio]=0.57, 95%CI [confidence interval]=0.35-0.92; medium-term: IRR=0.70, 95%CI=0.51-0.96; mid-long-term: IRR=0.79, 95%CI=0.64-0.98; long-term: IRR=0.82, 95%CI=0.67-0.99, and with a lower risk of all-cause readmission in the short-term period (IRR=0.73, 95%CI=0.57-0.94.Our study shows that the HF care specific pathway implemented at the primary care level was associated with lower readmission rate for HF in each timeframe, and also with lower readmission rate for all causes in the short-term period. Our results suggest that the engagement of primary care professionals starting from the early post-discharge period may be relevant in the

  1. Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Nishikawa, Kei; Honda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

  2. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  3. Failure to thrive as primary feature in two patients with subtle chromosomal aneuploidy: Interstitial deletion 2q33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, K.; Mulla, W.; Stump, T. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelpha, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It is well known that patients with chromosomal aneuploidy present with multiple congenital anomalies and dysmorphia, and that they may have associated failure to thrive. However, rarely is failure to thrive the predominant presenting feature. We report two such patients. Patient 1 had a marked history of failure to thrive, (weight 50% for 5 1/2 months at 20 months, length 50% for 15 months at 20 months). Patient 2 was noted to be growth retarded at 2 months upon presenting to the hospital with respiratory symptoms (weight 50% for a newborn, length 50% for 36 weeks gestation). There was relative head sparing in both patients. Chromosome analysis in patient 1, prompted by a negative work-up for the failure to thrive, and emerging evidence of developmental delay, revealed a 46,XY,del(2)(q32.2q33) karyotype. Chromosome analysis in patient 2, done as part of a complete workup for the failure to thrive, revealed a 46,XX,del(2)(q33.2q33.2 or q33.2q33.3) karyotype. On careful examination, subtle dysmorphic features were seen. In both patients these included a long flat philtrum, thin upper lip and high arched palate. Patient 1 also had a small posterior cleft of the palate. These patients have the smallest interstitial deletions of chromosome 2 so far reported. Their deletions overlap within 2q33 although they are not identical. Review of the literature reveals 15 patients with interstitial deletions which include 2q33. Marked growth retardation is reported in 14 of these cases. Cleft palate/abnormal uvula were frequently associated. These cases illustrate the need to include high resolution chromosomal studies as part of a complete work-up for unexplained failure to thrive.

  4. Primary care-based multifaceted, interdisciplinary medical educational intervention for patients with systolic heart failure: lessons learned from a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellberg Dieter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic (systolic heart failure (CHF is a common and disabling condition. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines in primary care has been shown to improve health outcomes. The aim was to explore the impact of a multidisciplinary educational intervention for general practitioners (GPs (Train the trainer = TTT on patient and performance outcomes. Methods This paper presents the key findings from the trial and discusses the lessons learned during the implementation of the TTT trial. Primary care practices were randomly assigned to the TTT intervention or to the control group. 37 GPs (18 TTT, 19 control were randomised and 168 patients diagnosed with ascertained CHF (91 TTT, 77 control were enrolled. GPs in the intervention group attended four meetings addressing clinical practice guidelines and pharmacotherapy feedback. The primary outcome was patient self-reported quality of life at seven months, using the SF-36 Physical Functioning scale. Secondary outcomes included other SF-36 scales, the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ, total mortality, heart failure hospital admissions, prescribing, depressive disorders (PHQ-9, behavioural change (European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale, patient-perceived quality of care (EUROPEP and improvement of heart failure using NT-proBNP-levels. Because recruitment targets were not achieved an exploratory analysis was conducted. Results There was high baseline achievement in both groups for many outcomes. At seven months, there were no significant mean difference between groups for the primary outcome measure (-3.3, 95%CI -9.7 to 3.1, p = 0.30. The only difference in secondary outcomes related to the prescribing of aldosterone antagonists by GPs in the intervention group, with significant between group differences at follow-up (42 vs. 24%, adjusted OR = 4.0, 95%CI 1.2–13; p = 0.02. Conclusion The intervention did not change the primary outcome or most secondary outcomes

  5. Primary care-based multifaceted, interdisciplinary medical educational intervention for patients with systolic heart failure: lessons learned from a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Klimm, Frank; Campbell, Stephen; Müller-Tasch, Thomas; Schellberg, Dieter; Gelbrich, Goetz; Herzog, Wolfgang; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2009-08-13

    Chronic (systolic) heart failure (CHF) is a common and disabling condition. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines in primary care has been shown to improve health outcomes. The aim was to explore the impact of a multidisciplinary educational intervention for general practitioners (GPs) (Train the trainer = TTT) on patient and performance outcomes. This paper presents the key findings from the trial and discusses the lessons learned during the implementation of the TTT trial. Primary care practices were randomly assigned to the TTT intervention or to the control group. 37 GPs (18 TTT, 19 control) were randomised and 168 patients diagnosed with ascertained CHF (91 TTT, 77 control) were enrolled. GPs in the intervention group attended four meetings addressing clinical practice guidelines and pharmacotherapy feedback. The primary outcome was patient self-reported quality of life at seven months, using the SF-36 Physical Functioning scale. Secondary outcomes included other SF-36 scales, the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ), total mortality, heart failure hospital admissions, prescribing, depressive disorders (PHQ-9), behavioural change (European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale), patient-perceived quality of care (EUROPEP) and improvement of heart failure using NT-proBNP-levels. Because recruitment targets were not achieved an exploratory analysis was conducted. There was high baseline achievement in both groups for many outcomes. At seven months, there were no significant mean difference between groups for the primary outcome measure (-3.3, 95%CI -9.7 to 3.1, p = 0.30). The only difference in secondary outcomes related to the prescribing of aldosterone antagonists by GPs in the intervention group, with significant between group differences at follow-up (42 vs. 24%, adjusted OR = 4.0, 95%CI 1.2-13; p = 0.02). The intervention did not change the primary outcome or most secondary outcomes. Recruitment targets were not achieved and the under

  6. Selective plasticity of primary afferent innervation to the dorsal horn and autonomic nuclei following lumbosacral ventral root avulsion and reimplantation in long term studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lisa; Wu, Jun; Chang, Huiyi H; Havton, Leif A

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies involving injuries to the nerves of the cauda equina and the conus medullaris have shown that lumbosacral ventral root avulsion in rat models results in denervation and dysfunction of the lower urinary tract, retrograde and progressive cell death of the axotomized motor and parasympathetic neurons, as well as the emergence of neuropathic pain. Root reimplantation has also been shown to ameliorate several of these responses, but experiments thus far have been limited to studying the effects of lesion and reimplantation local to the lumbosacral region. Here, we have expanded the region of investigation after lumbosacral ventral root avulsion and reimplantation to include the thoracolumbar sympathetic region of the spinal cord. Using a retrograde tracer injected into the major pelvic ganglion, we were able to define the levels of the spinal cord that contain sympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the lower urinary tract. We have conducted studies on the effects of the lumbosacral ventral root avulsion and reimplantation models on the afferent innervation of the dorsal horn and autonomic nuclei at both thoracolumbar and lumbosacral levels through immunohistochemistry for the markers calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). Surprisingly, our experiments reveal a selective and significant decrease of CGRP-positive innervation in the dorsal horn at thoracolumbar levels that is partially restored with root reimplantation. However, no similar changes were detected at the lumbosacral levels despite the injury and repair targeting efferent neurons, and being performed at the lumbosacral levels. Despite the changes evident in the thoracolumbar dorsal horn, we find no changes in afferent innervation of the autonomic nuclei at either sympathetic or parasympathetic segmental levels by CGRP or VGLUT1. We conclude that even remote, efferent root injuries and repair procedures can have an effect on remote and non

  7. Patient-related predictors of implant failure after primary total hip replacement in the initial, short- and long-terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, S.P.; Sørensen, H.T.; Lucht, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    replacement, an age of 80 years or more and hip replacement undertaken as a sequela of trauma, for avascular necrosis or paediatric conditions, were associated with an increased risk of failure. However, during six months to 8.6 years after surgery, being less than 60 years old was associated...

  8. Impact of primary para-aortic lymphadenectomy on distant failure in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated in the era of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Mazeron, Renaud; Dunant, Ariane; Gouy, Sébastien; Petit, Claire; Maroun, Pierre; Uzan, Catherine; Annede, Pierre; Bentivegna, Enrica; Balleyguier, Corinne; Genestie, Catherine; Pautier, Patricia; Leary, Alexandra; Lhomme, Catherine; Deutsch, Eric; Morice, Philippe; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of a primary para-aortic lymphadenectomy (PAL) in locally advanced cervical cancer patients receiving definitive chemoradiation, we reviewed the clinical records of consecutive patients treated in our Institution and receiving an external beam irradiation followed with an image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for a locally advanced cervical cancer. We examined the impact of performing a primary PAL as part of primary staging for guiding irradiation fields in patients without extra-pelvic PET uptake. The outcome of patients presenting para-aortic lymph node uptake (PALNU) was also examined. 186 patients were identified. Median follow-up was 44.4 months. Patients receiving a primary PAL (PAL group) and those who received upfront pelvic chemoradiation (no-PAL group) did not significantly differ for loco-regional failures. Survival without distant failure (DFFS), including para-aortic relapses, was at 3 years 87 % (95 % CI 84-90 %) in PAL group, 67 % (95 % CI 59-85 %) in the no-PAL group and 44 % (95 % CI 32-66 %) in the PALNU group (p = 0.04 for comparison between PAL and no-PAL groups). In a multivariate model including para-aortic lymphadenectomy, pelvic nodal uptake and high-risk clinical target volume as adjustment variables, a para-aortic lymphadenectomy was significant for DFS (HR = 0.47, 95 % CI 0.26-0.84, p = 0.01). Although confounding factors could account for these retrospective results, a primary PAL with tailored irradiation fields based on para-aortic histological findings seems to be associated with a better control for distant metastases. A randomized trial is testing the benefit of this strategy.

  9. Efficacy of an integrated hospital-primary care program for heart failure: a population-based analysis of 56,742 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Verdú-Rotellar, José María; Vela, Emili; Clèries, Montse; Bustins, Montserrat; Mendoza, Lola; Badosa, Neus; Cladellas, Mercè; Ferré, Sofía; Bruguera, Jordi

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of heart failure programs has been demonstrated in clinical trials but their applicability in the real world practice setting is more controversial. This study evaluates the feasibility and efficacy of an integrated hospital-primary care program for the management of patients with heart failure in an integrated health area covering a population of 309,345. For the analysis, we included all patients consecutively admitted with heart failure as the principal diagnosis who had been discharged alive from all of the hospitals in Catalonia, Spain, from 2005 to 2011, the period when the program was implemented, and compared mortality and readmissions among patients exposed to the program with the rates in the patients of all the remaining integrated health areas of the Servei Català de la Salut (Catalan Health Service). We included 56,742 patients in the study. There were 181,204 hospital admissions and 30,712 deaths during the study period. In the adjusted analyses, when compared to the 54,659 patients from the other health areas, the 2083 patients exposed to the program had a lower risk of death (hazard ratio=0.92 [95% confidence interval, 0.86-0.97]; P=.005), a lower risk of clinically-related readmission (hazard ratio=0.71 [95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.76]; P<.001), and a lower risk of readmission for heart failure (hazard ratio=0.86 [95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.94]; P<.001). The positive impact on the morbidity and mortality rates was more marked once the program had become well established. The implementation of multidisciplinary heart failure management programs that integrate the hospital and the community is feasible and is associated with a significant reduction in patient morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  11. Outcome of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) experiencing primary induction failure in the AIEOP AML 2002/01 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarello, Paola; Fagioli, Franca; Basso, Giuseppe; Putti, Maria C; Berger, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Menna, Giuseppe; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who fail induction due to primary resistance to chemotherapy account for a significant proportion of cases and have a particularly dismal prognosis. We report the clinical and biological data, and final outcome of 48 paediatric patients with primary-resistant AML enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 clinical trial. These patients had a significantly higher white blood cell count at diagnosis compared to other AML patients. Cytogenetic and molecular features did not differ between patients with primary induction failure and patients allocated to the high-risk group. For the whole patient population, the probability of overall survival, event-free survival (EFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was 21·8% ± 6·2, 20·4% ± 5·9, and 49·5% ± 11·3, respectively. Twenty-eight (58%) patients received haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); 3 were autologous and 25 were allogeneic. Patients who underwent HSCT had improved EFS (31·2% vs. 5%, P < 0·0001). Only one of the 20 patients who did not receive HSCT is alive and disease free. The 19 patients in complete remission at time of HSCT showed significantly better DFS than the 9 with active disease (46% vs. 0%, P = 0·02). This study represents one of the largest series with long-term follow up of paediatric AML patients with primary refractory disease. Children who underwent transplantation had an encouraging long-term outcome. Disease recurrence remains the major cause of treatment failure; a better understanding of the disease biology is desirable to develop more effective treatment strategies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparative study of the Quality Control of x-ray tubes and generators in hospital assistance and primary assistance in Galician autonomous community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombar Camean, M.; Lobato Busto, R.

    1992-01-01

    The quality guarantee in Diagnostic Radiology is defined as the organized effort of surgical staff to guarantee sufficient quality images, which provide the correct diagnostic information, as cheaply as possible and with the least exposure to radiation for the patient. In this paper a comparative study about the quality control of x-ray tube and generators in hospital assistance and primary assistance is present. In the conclusions, it is confirmed that the antiquity and poor conservation of the primary attendance x-ray equipment, have influence on the studied constants and therefore, influence the doses received by the patients. (author)

  13. Clinically relevant diagnostic research in primary care: the example of B-type natriuretic peptides in the detection of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelder, Johannes C; Rutten, Frans H; Hoes, Arno W

    2009-02-01

    With the emergence of novel diagnostic tests, e.g. point-of-care tests, clinically relevant empirical evidence is needed to assess whether such a test should be used in daily practice. With the example of the value of B-type natriuretic peptides (BNP) in the diagnostic assessment of suspected heart failure, we will discuss the major methodological issues crucial in diagnostic research; most notably the choice of the study population and the data analysis with a multivariable approach. BNP have been studied extensively in the emergency care setting, and also several studies in the primary care are available. The usefulness of this test when applied in combination with other readily available tests is still not adequately addressed in the relevant patient domain, i.e. those who are clinically suspected of heart failure by their GP. Future diagnostic research in primary care should be targeted much more at answering the clinically relevant question 'Is it useful to add this (new) test to the other tests I usually perform, including history taking and physical examination, in patients I suspect of having a certain disease'.

  14. Validation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Diagnosis as the Primary Cause of Renal Failure in the US Renal Data System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, Anna; Mowrey, Wenzhu B; Izmirly, Peter; Costenbader, Karen H

    2017-04-01

    Using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification as gold standards, we determined sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of having SLE denoted as the primary cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the US Renal Data System (USRDS). ESRD patients were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes in electronic medical records of 1 large tertiary care center, Montefiore Hospital, from 2006 to 2012. Clinical data were extracted and reviewed to establish SLE diagnosis. Data were linked by social security number, name, and date of birth to the USRDS, where primary causes of ESRD were ascertained. Of 7,396 ESRD patients at Montefiore, 97 met ACR/SLICC SLE criteria, and 86 had SLE by record only. Among the 97 SLE patients, the attributed causes of ESRD in the USRDS were 77 SLE and 12 with other causes (unspecified glomerulonephritis, hypertension, scleroderma), and 8 missing. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for SLE in the USRDS were 79%, 99.9%, 93%, and 99.7%, respectively. Of the 60 patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, 44 (73%) had SLE as primary ESRD cause in the USRDS. Attribution of the primary ESRD causes among SLE patients with ACR/SLICC criteria differed by race, ethnicity, and transplant status. The diagnosis of SLE as the primary cause of ESRD in the USRDS has good sensitivity, and excellent specificity, PPV, and NPV. Nationwide access to medical records and biopsy reports may significantly improve sensitivity of SLE diagnosis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Structural analysis and incipient failure detection of primary circuit components based on correlation-analysis and finite-element models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olma, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented to compute vibrational power spectral densities (VPSD's) of primary circuit components based on a finite-element representation of the primary circuit. First this method has been applied to the sodium cooled reactor KNK, Karlsruhe. Now a further application is being developed for a BWR-nuclear power plant. The experimentally determined VPSD's can be considered as the output of a multiple input-output system. They have to be explained as the frequency response of a multidimensional mechanical system, which is excited by stochastic and deterministic mechanical driving forces. The stochastic mechanical forces are generated by the dynamic pressure fluctuations of the fluid. The deterministic mechanical forces are caused by the pressure fluctuations, which are induced by the main coolant pumps or by standing waves. The excitation matrix can be obtained from measured pressure fluctuations. The vibration transfer function matrix can be computed from the mass matrix, damping matrix and stiffness matrix of a theoretical finite-element model or mass-spring model. Based on this theory the computer code 'STAMPO' has been established. This program has been applied to the KNK reactor. The excitation matrix was created from measured jet-noise pressure fluctuations. The mass-, stiffness- and damping matrix has been extracted from a SAP-IV-model of the primary system. Sequentially for each frequency point the complete VPSD matrix has been computed. The diagonal elements of this matrix represent the vibrational auto-power spectral densities, the off-diagonal elements represent the vibrational cross-power spectral densities. The calculations give good agreement with measured VPSD's. The comparison shows that the measured jet-noise pressure fluctuations act nearly uncorrelated on the structure, whereas the output VPSD's are well correlated

  16. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  17. Primary management of esophageal carcinoma with radiation therapy and surgery and correlation of failure pattern based on autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.M.; Goertz, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a study of forty-seven patients with esophageal carcinoma who were treated definitively with radiation therapy (n = 18) and radical surgery (n = 18) or received palliative treatment (n = 11) at the Medical College of Virginia between 1967 and 1982. The average intervals between diagnosis and death were 5, 7, and 4 months, respectively. Autopsy revealed that 80% with radiation therapy and 50% in the surgery group had persistent local-regional disease. Eleven of 36 had adrenal metastasis and eight of 36 had a second primary in the head, neck, lung or prostate. The data show a significant incidence of persistent disease in spite of negative surgical margins. Additional treatment with chemotherapy or postoperative radiation therapy should be considered

  18. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course of the di......Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course...

  19. Analysis of failure modes in multislice computed tomography during primary trauma survey; Analyse von Verzoegerungen der Schockraumdiagnostik bei Einsatz der Mehrschicht-Spiral-Computertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, C.; Stegmaier, J.; Kirchhoff, C.; Kanz, K.G. [Chirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Wirth, S.; Koerner, M.; Pfeifer, K.J. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kay, M.V. [Plansafe GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: in the case of major trauma, immediate recognition and treatment of life-threatening conditions are essential. An increasing number of European trauma centers use MSCT during the primary trauma survey due to its high diagnostic precision and speed. However, there is currently little empirical data about failures in this process to practice quality assurance. The aim of this study was to evaluate this process under operating resuscitation conditions and to identify failure modes that caused delays in completion. Materials and methods: an independent study monitor documented the course of trauma room treatment during a 10-month period. The inclusion criteria were patients who were admitted directly from the accident scene and the study monitor was present at the time of admission. Results: according to our ATLS-based trauma algorithm whole-body CT (WBCT) consists of non-contrast head CT (CCT) and contrast-enhanced trunk CT (TCT). 57 trauma patients receiving 45 WBCT. 5 single CCT and 4 single TCT studies were evaluated. After initial resuscitation, CCT was obtained within 17 min of trauma room admission (IQR 13.0 - 20.0). In 20% (95%CI 9 - 31%) of the cases, a CCT delay of median 5.0 min (IQR 3.8 - 8.0) was observed caused by e.g. earings, piercings and ECG cables in the scan field or intoxicated patients. Contrast-enhanced TCT was performed after 23.0 min (IQR 19.0 - 27.0). Due to preventable errors 12 of the 49 TCT studies were delayed (25%95%CI 12 - 37%) for 5 min (IQR 3.0 - 8.0). Conclusion: under ''front line'' conditions every fifth CCT and every fourth TCT study was completed with a median delay of 5 min. An independent process analysis revealed that unpreventable delays were due to uncooperative patients or system failure. Preventable delays were due to errors such as short intravenous lines or deviation from trauma room algorithms. Preventable delays could be avoided by addressing human and technical aspects such as revising

  20. Rethinking Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    F?rstenwerth, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    An increasing body of clinical observations and experimental evidence suggests that cardiac dysfunction results from autonomic dysregulation of the contractile output of the heart. Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system and a decrease in parasympathetic tone are associated with increased mortality. Elevated levels of circulating catecholamines closely correlate with the severity and poor prognosis in heart failure. Sympathetic over-stimulation causes increased levels of catech...

  1. Failure of Chemotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Due to Impaired and Dysregulated Primary Liver Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Drug Transport Proteins: What to Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Islam, Salman; Ahmed, Muhammad Bilal; Shehzad, Adeeb; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2018-05-28

    Most of the drugs are metabolized in the liver by the action of drug metabolizing enzymes. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), primary drug metabolizing enzymes are severely dysregulated, leading to failure of chemotherapy. Sorafenib is the only standard systemic drug available, but it still presents certain limitations, and much effort is required to understand who is responsive and who is refractory to the drug. Preventive and therapeutic approaches other than systemic chemotherapy include vaccination, chemoprevention, liver transplantation, surgical resection, and locoregional therapies. This review details the dysregulation of primary drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transport proteins of the liver in HCC and their influence on chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, it emphasizes the adoption of safe alternative therapeutic strategies to chemotherapy. The future of HCC treatment should emphasize the understanding of resistance mechanisms and the finding of novel, safe, and efficacious therapeutic strategies, which will surely benefit patients affected by advanced HCC. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — VisionThe Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  3. Improvement of primary care for patients with chronic heart failure: a study protocol for a cluster randomised trial comparing two strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Jan; Steenkamer, Betty; Knippenberg, Marjan; Wensing, Michel

    2011-03-25

    Many patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), a common condition with high morbidity and mortality rates, receive treatment in primary care. To improve the management of CHF in primary care, we developed an implementation programme comprised of educational and organisational components, with support by a practice visitor and focus both on drug treatment and lifestyle advice, and on organisation of care within the practice and collaboration with other healthcare providers. Tailoring has been shown to improve the success of implementation programmes, but little is known about what would be best methods for tailoring, specifically with respect to CHF in primary care. We describe the study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of tailoring a CHF implementation programme to general practices compared to a standardised way of delivering a programme. The study population will consist of 60 general practitioners (GPs) and the CHF patients they include. GPs are randomised in blocks of four, stratified according to practice size. With a tailored implementation programme GPs prioritise the issues that will form the bases of the support for the practice visits. These may comprise several issues, both educational and organizational.The primary outcome measures are patient's experience of receiving structured primary care for CHF (PACIC, a questionnaire related to the Chronic Care Model), patients' health-related utilities (EQ-5D), and drugs prescriptions using the guideline adherence index. Patients being clustered in practices, multilevel regression analyses will be used to explore the effect of practice size and type of intervention programme. In addition we will examine both changes within groups and differences at follow-up between groups with respect to drug dosages and advice on lifestyle issues. Furthermore, in interviews the feasibility of the programme and goal attainment, organisational changes in CHF care, and formalised

  4. Improvement of primary care for patients with chronic heart failure: A study protocol for a cluster randomised trial comparing two strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, a common condition with high morbidity and mortality rates, receive treatment in primary care. To improve the management of CHF in primary care, we developed an implementation programme comprised of educational and organisational components, with support by a practice visitor and focus both on drug treatment and lifestyle advice, and on organisation of care within the practice and collaboration with other healthcare providers. Tailoring has been shown to improve the success of implementation programmes, but little is known about what would be best methods for tailoring, specifically with respect to CHF in primary care. Methods/design We describe the study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of tailoring a CHF implementation programme to general practices compared to a standardised way of delivering a programme. The study population will consist of 60 general practitioners (GPs and the CHF patients they include. GPs are randomised in blocks of four, stratified according to practice size. With a tailored implementation programme GPs prioritise the issues that will form the bases of the support for the practice visits. These may comprise several issues, both educational and organizational. The primary outcome measures are patient's experience of receiving structured primary care for CHF (PACIC, a questionnaire related to the Chronic Care Model, patients' health-related utilities (EQ-5D, and drugs prescriptions using the guideline adherence index. Patients being clustered in practices, multilevel regression analyses will be used to explore the effect of practice size and type of intervention programme. In addition we will examine both changes within groups and differences at follow-up between groups with respect to drug dosages and advice on lifestyle issues. Furthermore, in interviews the feasibility of the programme and goal attainment

  5. Genetic autonomic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B

    2013-03-01

    Genetic disorders affecting the autonomic nervous system can result in abnormal development of the nervous system or they can be caused by neurotransmitter imbalance, an ion-channel disturbance or by storage of deleterious material. The symptoms indicating autonomic dysfunction, however, will depend upon whether the genetic lesion has disrupted peripheral or central autonomic centers or both. Because the autonomic nervous system is pervasive and affects every organ system in the body, autonomic dysfunction will result in impaired homeostasis and symptoms will vary. The possibility of genetic confirmation by molecular testing for specific diagnosis is increasing but treatments tend to remain only supportive and directed toward particular symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients With Fibromyalgia Have Significant Autonomic Symptoms But Modest Autonomic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Low, Phillip A; Joyner, Michael; Hoskin, Tanya L

    2016-05-01

    function have only modest objective measures of autonomic dysfunction. We recommend that the primary treatment goal should be focused on restoration of function, which may also ameliorate symptoms. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comorbidities, risk factors and outcomes in patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction of more than or equal to 40% in primary care- and hospital care-based outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, B; Wändell, P; Dahlström, U; Näsman, P; Lund, L H; Edner, M

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%, managed in both Primary- and Hospital based outpatient clinics separately with their prognosis, comorbidities and risk factors. Further to compare the heart failure medication in the two groups. We used the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry to include 9654 out-patients who had HF and EF ≥40%, 1802 patients were registered in primary care and 7852 in hospital care. Descriptive statistical tests were used to analyze base line characteristics in the two groups and multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess mortality rate in the groups separately. The prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%. Comorbidities, risk factors and mortality. Mean-age was 77.5 (primary care) and 70.3 years (hospital care) p care group having more atrial fibrillation, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and COPD. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis smoking, COPD and diabetes were the most important independent risk factors in the primary care group and valvular disease in the hospital care group. All-cause mortality during mean follow-up of almost 4 years was 31.5% in primary care and 27.8% in hospital care. One year-mortality rates were 7.8%, and 7.0% respectively. Any co-morbidity was noted in 97% of the HF-patients with an EF of more than or equal to 40% managed at primary care based out-patient clinics and these patients had partly other independent risk factors than those patients managed in hospital care based outpatients clinics. Our results indicate that more attention should be payed to manage COPD in the primary care group. KEY POINTS 97% of heart failure patients with an ejection fraction of more than or equal to 40% managed at primary care based out-patient clinics had any comorbidity. Patients in primary care had partly other

  8. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  9. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  10. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Mola, Ernesto; Rollo, Rodolfo; Caldarola, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco; Pomo, Vincenzo; Bux, Francesco

    2010-05-06

    Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM) model and of the introduction of "care manager" nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative "team" consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk) to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization. Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services as well as treatment paths helped promote confidence and enhance safety of chronic patient management at home. Physicians, care managers, and patients showed unanimous agreement regarding the positive impact on patient health and self-management, and attributed the outcomes to the strong "partnership" between the care manager and the patient and the collaboration between the physician and the care manager. Future studies should consider the possibility of incorporating a patient empowerment model which considers the patient as the most important member of the health team and care managers as key health care collaborators able to enhance and support services to patients provided by physicians in

  11. Importance of beta-blocker dose in prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, heart failure hospitalizations, and death in primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, A C; Gislason, G H; Vinther, M

    2018-01-01

    Aims: There is a paucity of studies investigating a dose-dependent association between beta-blocker therapy and risk of outcome. In a nationwide cohort of primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients, we aimed to investigate the dose-dependent association between beta-blocker...... therapy and risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT/VF), heart failure (HF) hospitalizations, and death. Methods and results: Information on ICD implantation, endpoints, comorbidities, beta-blocker usage, type, and dose were obtained through Danish nationwide registers. The two major beta-blockers...... carvedilol and metoprolol were examined in three dose levels; low (metoprolol ≤ 25 mg; carvedilol ≤ 12.5 mg), intermediate (metoprolol 26-199 mg; carvedilol 12.6-49.9 mg), and high (metoprolol ≥ 200 mg; carvedilol ≥ 50 mg). Time to events was investigated utilizing multivariate Cox models with beta-blocker...

  12. Type D personality is a predictor of poor emotional quality of life in primary care heart failure patients independent of depressive symptoms and New York Heart Association functional class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; de Jonge, Peter; Scherer, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Quality of life is an important patient-centered outcome and predictor of mortality in heart failure, but little is known about the role of personality as a determinant of quality of life in this patient group. We examined the influence of Type D personality (i.e., increased negative emotions paired with emotional non-expression) on quality of life in primary care heart failure patients, using a prospective study design. Heart failure patients (n = 251) recruited from 44 primary care practices in Germany completed standardized questionnaires at baseline and 9 months. The prevalence of Type D was 31.9%. Type D patients experienced poorer emotional (P emotional (P = .78) nor physical quality of life (P = .74) over time; neither the interaction for time by Type D for emotional (P = .31) nor physical quality of life (P = .91) was significant, indicating that Type D exerted a stable effect on quality of life over time. Adjusting for demographics, New York Heart Association functional class, and depressive symptoms, Type D remained an independent determinant of emotional (P = .03) but not physical quality of life (P = .29). Primary care heart failure patients with a Type D personality experienced poorer emotional but not physical quality of life compared to non-Type D patients. Patients with this personality profile should be identified in primary care to see if their treatment is optimal, as both Type D and poor quality of life have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality.

  13. Autonomous Propellant Loading Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) project consists of three activities. The first is to develop software that will automatically control loading of...

  14. Autonomous Systems and Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Systems and Operations (ASO) project will develop an understanding of the impacts of increasing communication time delays on mission operations,...

  15. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  16. Hiperoxalúria primária com insuficiência renal crônica terminal em lactente Primary hyperoxaluria with endstage renal failure in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia S. Macedo

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: descrever caso clínico de um lactente com insuficiência renal crônica terminal, causada por hiperoxalúria primária.Método: após revisão da literatura, verifica-se a raridade da doença; na França, a prevalência é de 1,05/milhão, com taxa de incidência de 0,12/milhão/ano. Pesquisa abordando centros especializados mundiais detectou, em 1999, 78 casos em lactentes; destes, em 14% o quadro inicial foi de uremia. A gravidade e a raridade da doença sugerem o relato deste caso.Resultados: criança de sexo feminino, com quadro de vômitos e baixo ganho de peso desde os primeiros meses de vida, desenvolveu insuficiência renal terminal aos 6 meses de idade, sendo mantida em tratamento dialítico desde então. Aos 8 meses, foi encaminhada para esclarecimento diagnóstico, apresentando déficit pôndero-estatural grave e os seguintes exames laboratoriais: uréia= 69 mg/dl, creatinina=2,2 mg/dl e clearance de creatinina= 12,5 ml/min/1.73m²SC. O exame de urina foi normal, a ultra-sonografia renal revelou tamanho normal e hiperecogenicidade de ambos os rins. A dosagem de oxalato urinário foi de 9,2mg/kg/dia ou 0,55 mmol/1.73m²SC, e a relação oxalato:creatinina, de 0,42. A biópsia renal diagnosticou presença de grande quantidade de depósitos de cristais de oxalato de cálcio no parênquima renal. A radiografia de ossos longos evidenciou sinais sugestivos de osteopatia oxalótica, e a fundoscopia indireta, sinais de retinopatia por oxalato. A criança foi mantida em diálise peritoneal ambulatorial contínua, tendo sido iniciado tratamento com piridoxina.Conclusões: a hiperoxalúria primária deve ser considerada como um dos diagnósticos diferenciais de insuficiência renal crônica em lactentes, especialmente na ausência de história sugestiva de outras patologias.Objective: to report a case of an infant with endstage renal failure caused by primary hyperoxaluria. Methods: the review of the literature showed the rarity of

  17. Association of time to reperfusion with left ventricular function and heart failure in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Kashish; Pinto, Duane S; Gibson, C Michael

    2013-04-01

    Shorter time to reperfusion is associated with a significant reduction in mortality; however, its association with heart failure (HF) is not clearly documented. We conducted a systematic review to examine the association between time to reperfusion and incident HF and/or left ventricular dysfunction. MEDLINE/OVID, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases were searched from January 1974 to May 2012 for studies that reported the association between time to reperfusion and incident HF or left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Of 362 nonduplicate abstracts, 71 studies were selected for full-text review. Thirty-three studies were included in the final review, of which 16 were single-center studies, 7 were population-based studies, 7 were subanalyses from randomized controlled trials, and 3 were based on national samples. The pooled data demonstrate that every 1-hour delay in time to reperfusion is associated with a 4% to 12% increased risk of new-onset HF and a 4% relative increase in the risk of incident HF during follow-up. Early reperfusion was associated with a 2% to 8% greater LVEF before discharge and a 3% to 12% larger improvement in absolute LVEF at follow-up compared with the index admission. This systematic review presents evidence that longer time to reperfusion is not only associated with worsened left ventricular systolic function and new-onset HF at the time of index admission, but also with increased risk of HF and reduced improvement in left ventricular systolic function during follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microarray Meta-Analysis Identifies Acute Lung Injury Biomarkers in Donor Lungs That Predict Development of Primary Graft Failure in Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitsma, Jack J.; Furmli, Suleiman; Masoom, Hussain; Liu, Mingyao; Imai, Yumiko; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Beyene, Joseph; Greenwood, Celia M. T.; dos Santos, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To perform a meta-analysis of gene expression microarray data from animal studies of lung injury, and to identify an injury-specific gene expression signature capable of predicting the development of lung injury in humans. Methods We performed a microarray meta-analysis using 77 microarray chips across six platforms, two species and different animal lung injury models exposed to lung injury with or/and without mechanical ventilation. Individual gene chips were classified and grouped based on the strategy used to induce lung injury. Effect size (change in gene expression) was calculated between non-injurious and injurious conditions comparing two main strategies to pool chips: (1) one-hit and (2) two-hit lung injury models. A random effects model was used to integrate individual effect sizes calculated from each experiment. Classification models were built using the gene expression signatures generated by the meta-analysis to predict the development of lung injury in human lung transplant recipients. Results Two injury-specific lists of differentially expressed genes generated from our meta-analysis of lung injury models were validated using external data sets and prospective data from animal models of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Pathway analysis of gene sets revealed that both new and previously implicated VILI-related pathways are enriched with differentially regulated genes. Classification model based on gene expression signatures identified in animal models of lung injury predicted development of primary graft failure (PGF) in lung transplant recipients with larger than 80% accuracy based upon injury profiles from transplant donors. We also found that better classifier performance can be achieved by using meta-analysis to identify differentially-expressed genes than using single study-based differential analysis. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggests that microarray analysis of gene expression data allows for the detection of

  19. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteo Ciccone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Matteo Ciccone1, Ambrogio Aquilino2, Francesca Cortese1, Pietro Scicchitano1, Marco Sassara1, Ernesto Mola3, Rodolfo Rollo4,Pasquale Caldarola5, Francesco Giorgino6, Vincenzo Pomo2, Francesco Bux21Section of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, Italy; 2Agenzia Regionale Sanitaria – Regione Puglia (ARES, Apulia, Italy; 3ASL, Lecce, Italy; 4ASL, Brindisi, Italy; 5Cardiologia, Ospedale “Sarcone”, Terlizzi, Italy; 6Section of Endocrinology, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, ItalyPurpose: Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM model and of the introduction of “care manager” nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Patients and methods: Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative “team” consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization.Results: Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services

  20. Knowledge-based and integrated monitoring and diagnosis in autonomous power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, J. A.; Zhang, Z. Z.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique of knowledge-based and integrated monitoring and diagnosis (KBIMD) to deal with abnormalities and incipient or potential failures in autonomous power systems is presented. The KBIMD conception is discussed as a new function of autonomous power system automation. Available diagnostic modelling, system structure, principles and strategies are suggested. In order to verify the feasibility of the KBIMD, a preliminary prototype expert system is designed to simulate the KBIMD function in a main electric network of the autonomous power system.

  1. Pro–A-Type Natriuretic Peptide, Proadrenomedullin, and N-Terminal Pro–B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Used in a Multimarker Strategy in Primary Health Care in Risk Assessment of Patients With Symptoms of Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2013-01-01

    Use of new biomarkers in the handling of heart failure patients has been advocated in the literature, but most often in hospital-based populations. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate whether plasma measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), midregional pro-A-type...... natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM), individually or combined, gives prognostic information regarding cardiovascular and all-cause mortality that could motivate use in elderly patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of heart failure in primary health care....

  2. The REFER (REFer for EchocaRdiogram protocol: a prospective validation of a clinical decision rule, NT-proBNP, or their combination, in the diagnosis of heart failure in primary care. Rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tait Lynda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. As mortality rates are high, it is important that patients seen by general practitioners with symptoms suggestive of heart failure are identified quickly and treated appropriately. Identifying patients with heart failure or deciding which patients need further tests is a challenge. All patients with suspected heart failure should be diagnosed using objective tests such as echocardiography, but it is expensive, often delayed, and limited by the significant skill shortage of trained echocardiographers. Alternative approaches for diagnosing heart failure are currently limited. Clinical decision tools that combine clinical signs, symptoms or patient characteristics are designed to be used to support clinical decision-making and validated according to strict methodological procedures. The REFER Study aims to determine the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of our previously derived novel, simple clinical decision rule, a natriuretic peptide assay, or their combination, in the triage for referral for echocardiography of symptomatic adult patients who present in general practice with symptoms suggestive of heart failure. Methods/design This is a prospective, Phase II observational, diagnostic validation study of a clinical decision rule, natriuretic peptides or their combination, for diagnosing heart failure in primary care. Consecutive adult primary care patients 55 years of age or over presenting to their general practitioner with a chief complaint of recent new onset shortness of breath, lethargy or peripheral ankle oedema of over 48 hours duration, with no obvious recurrent, acute or self-limiting cause will be enrolled. Our reference standard is based upon a three step expert specialist consensus using echocardiography and clinical variables and tests. Discussion Our clinical decision rule offers a potential solution to the diagnostic challenge of providing a timely and

  3. An efficient phased mission reliability analysis for autonomous vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remenyte-Prescott, R., E-mail: R.Remenyte-Prescott@nottingham.ac.u [Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Andrews, J.D. [Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Chung, P.W.H. [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Autonomous systems are becoming more commonly used, especially in hazardous situations. Such systems are expected to make their own decisions about future actions when some capabilities degrade due to failures of their subsystems. Such decisions are made without human input, therefore they need to be well-informed in a short time when the situation is analysed and future consequences of the failure are estimated. The future planning of the mission should take account of the likelihood of mission failure. The reliability analysis for autonomous systems can be performed using the methodologies developed for phased mission analysis, where the causes of failure for each phase in the mission can be expressed by fault trees. Unmanned autonomous vehicles (UAVs) are of a particular interest in the aeronautical industry, where it is a long term ambition to operate them routinely in civil airspace. Safety is the main requirement for the UAV operation and the calculation of failure probability of each phase and the overall mission is the topic of this paper. When components or subsystems fail or environmental conditions throughout the mission change, these changes can affect the future mission. The new proposed methodology takes into account the available diagnostics data and is used to predict future capabilities of the UAV in real time. Since this methodology is based on the efficient BDD method, the quickly provided advice can be used in making decisions. When failures occur appropriate actions are required in order to preserve safety of the autonomous vehicle. The overall decision making strategy for autonomous vehicles is explained in this paper. Some limitations of the methodology are discussed and further improvements are presented based on experimental results.

  4. An efficient phased mission reliability analysis for autonomous vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remenyte-Prescott, R.; Andrews, J.D.; Chung, P.W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous systems are becoming more commonly used, especially in hazardous situations. Such systems are expected to make their own decisions about future actions when some capabilities degrade due to failures of their subsystems. Such decisions are made without human input, therefore they need to be well-informed in a short time when the situation is analysed and future consequences of the failure are estimated. The future planning of the mission should take account of the likelihood of mission failure. The reliability analysis for autonomous systems can be performed using the methodologies developed for phased mission analysis, where the causes of failure for each phase in the mission can be expressed by fault trees. Unmanned autonomous vehicles (UAVs) are of a particular interest in the aeronautical industry, where it is a long term ambition to operate them routinely in civil airspace. Safety is the main requirement for the UAV operation and the calculation of failure probability of each phase and the overall mission is the topic of this paper. When components or subsystems fail or environmental conditions throughout the mission change, these changes can affect the future mission. The new proposed methodology takes into account the available diagnostics data and is used to predict future capabilities of the UAV in real time. Since this methodology is based on the efficient BDD method, the quickly provided advice can be used in making decisions. When failures occur appropriate actions are required in order to preserve safety of the autonomous vehicle. The overall decision making strategy for autonomous vehicles is explained in this paper. Some limitations of the methodology are discussed and further improvements are presented based on experimental results.

  5. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco; Milan, Elisa; Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio; Metra, Marco; Rodella, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Milan, Elisa [Ospedale Di Castelfranco Veneto, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Metra, Marco [University of Brescia, Department of Cardiology, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Carlo [Health Physics Department, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  7. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... organs they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  8. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  9. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple...

  10. Towards autonomous vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We are moving towards an age of autonomous vehicles. Cycles of innovation initiated in the public and private sectors : have led one into another since the 1990s; and out of these efforts have sprung a variety of Advanced Driver Assistance : Systems ...

  11. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André; Vervoort, Wiek

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is

  12. Experimental Autonomous Road Vehicle with Logical Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey Sergeevich Shadrin; Oleg Olegovich Varlamov; Andrey Mikhailovich Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    This article describes some technical issues regarding the adaptation of a production car to a platform for the development and testing of autonomous driving technologies. A universal approach to performing the reverse engineering of electric power steering (EPS) for the purpose of external control is also presented. The primary objective of the related study was to solve the problem associated with the precise prediction of the dynamic trajectory of an autonomous vehicle. This was accomplish...

  13. Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics in diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J

    1986-01-01

    Noradrenaline and isoproterenol kinetics using intravenous infusion of L-3H-NA and of 3H-isoproterenol were investigated in eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients without neuropathy and in eight Type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy matched for age, sex and duration...... with autonomic failure (p less than 0.01). The disappearance of L-3H-noradrenaline from plasma after the infusion of L-3H-noradrenaline had been stopped was not different in patients with and without neuropathy. The metabolic clearance of isoproterenol was not influenced by the presence of autonomic failure...

  14. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......) are not altered in circulating blood cells in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Thus, a generalized up-regulation of adrenoceptors does not occur in diabetic autonomic neuropathy....

  15. Monitoring aquatic environments with autonomous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Philip Aagaard

    High frequency measurements from autonomous sensors have become a widely used tool among aquatic scientists. This report focus primarily on the use of ecosystem metabolism based on high frequency oxygen measurements and relates the calculations to spatial variation, biomass of the primary producers...... and in shallow systems the macrophytes can completely dominate primary production. This was despite the fact that the plants in the studied system were light-saturated most of the light hours and occasionally carbon limited. It was also shown that the GPP and the total phytoplankton biomass in a nutrient...

  16. Autonomous Intersection Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    detects that the driver is not slowing sufficiently fast. Jaguar, Honda, and BMW offer similar systems. Nissan and Toyota have recently begun offering...that the driver is not braking hard enough. Both Toyota and BMW are currently selling vehicles that can parallel park completely autonomously, even...other vehicles. The system was tested both in simulation and with a robotic vehicle. This work is sponsored by Toyota , who have also currently have an

  17. Autonomía

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Muñoz, Juan Antonio

    2007-01-01

    En este ensayo la noción de autonomía es estudiada de un modo diferente al sentido habitual; sus implicaciones y las contradicciones que encierra, específicamente como sucedáneo de la genuina libertad. El artículo describe el modelo de hombre presupuesto en su uso. Concluye con su inviabilidad para resolver problemas morales y sociales.

  18. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jitendra R. Raol; Ajith Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS) is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i) perception and reasoning, (ii) mobility and navigation,(iii) haptics and teleoperation, (iv) image fusion/computervision, (v) modelling of manipulators, (vi) hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii) ve...

  19. Highly Skilled Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Acosta Reche; Stratis Kanarachos; Mike V Blundell

    2017-01-01

    Recent research suggests that collision mitigation on low grip surfaces might require autonomous vehicles to execute maneuvers such as drift, trail braking or Scandinavian flick. In order to achieve this it is necessary to perceive the vehicle states and their interaction with the environment, and use this information to determine the chassis limits. A first look at the virtual automotive sensing problem is provided, followed by a description of Rally driving modeling approaches. Finally, a c...

  20. Autonomous Underwater Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Wood,; Stephen,

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles are only now being marketed as robust commercial vehicles for many industries, and of these vehicles underwater gliders are becoming the new tool for oceanographers. Satellites have provided scientists and marine specialists with measurements of the sea surface such as temperature since the late 1970s, and data via subsurface oceanographic moorings since the 1950's. As stated by David Smeed of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, England, that "gliders...

  1. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  2. Heart failure programmes in countries with a primary care-based health care system. Are additional trials necessary? Design of the DEAL-HF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Porte, PWFBA; Lok, DJA; van Wijngaarden, J; Cornel, JH; Pruijsers-Lamers, D; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Hoes, AW

    Background: Several randomised studies of heart failure (HF) management programmes in the United States, Australia and Europe have shown a considerable reduction in hospitalisation rates for HE In this article, a comprehensive review of these studies will be provided and their applicability to

  3. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  4. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  5. Experimental Autonomous Road Vehicle with Logical Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Sergeevich Shadrin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes some technical issues regarding the adaptation of a production car to a platform for the development and testing of autonomous driving technologies. A universal approach to performing the reverse engineering of electric power steering (EPS for the purpose of external control is also presented. The primary objective of the related study was to solve the problem associated with the precise prediction of the dynamic trajectory of an autonomous vehicle. This was accomplished by deriving a new equation for determining the lateral tire forces and adjusting some of the vehicle parameters under road test conductions. A Mivar expert system was also integrated into the control system of the experimental autonomous vehicle. The expert system was made more flexible and effective for the present application by the introduction of hybrid artificial intelligence with logical reasoning. The innovation offers a solution to the major problem of liability in the event of an autonomous transport vehicle being involved in a collision.

  6. MAXimising Involvement in MUltiMorbidity (MAXIMUM) in primary care: protocol for an observation and interview study of patients, GPs and other care providers to identify ways of reducing patient safety failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daker-White, Gavin; Hays, Rebecca; Esmail, Aneez; Minor, Brian; Barlow, Wendy; Brown, Benjamin; Blakeman, Thomas; Bower, Peter

    2014-08-18

    Increasing numbers of older people are living with multiple long-term health conditions but global healthcare systems and clinical guidelines have traditionally focused on the management of single conditions. Having two or more long-term conditions, or 'multimorbidity', is associated with a range of adverse consequences and poor outcomes and could put patients at increased risk of safety failures. Traditionally, most research into patient safety failures has explored hospital or inpatient settings. Much less is known about patient safety failures in primary care. Our core aims are to understand the mechanisms by which multimorbidity leads to safety failures, to explore the different ways in which patients and services respond (or fail to respond), and to identify opportunities for intervention. We plan to undertake an applied ethnographic study of patients with multimorbidity. Patients' interactions and environments, relevant to their healthcare, will be studied through observations, diary methods and semistructured interviews. A framework, based on previous studies, will be used to organise the collection and analysis of field notes, observations and other qualitative data. This framework includes the domains: access breakdowns, communication breakdowns, continuity of care errors, relationship breakdowns and technical errors. Ethical approval was received from the National Health Service Research Ethics Committee for Wales. An individual case study approach is likely to be most fruitful for exploring the mechanisms by which multimorbidity leads to safety failures. A longitudinal and multiperspective approach will allow for the constant comparison of patient, carer and healthcare worker expectations and experiences related to the provision, integration and management of complex care. This data will be used to explore ways of engaging patients and carers more in their own care using shared decision-making, patient empowerment or other relevant models. Published by

  7. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent ...

  8. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  9. Autonomic Fuselet Specification and Composition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mills, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    A framework for autonomic fuselet business logic development was developed, using semantic web services and workflow technologies to specify fuselet information needs, to define an executable workflow...

  10. Clinical Outcome in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from the Primary Breast Cancer : Prognostic Factors in Local Treatment Failure and Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases in primary breast cancer patients are considerable sources of morbidity and mortality. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has gained popularity as an up-front therapy in treating such metastases over traditional radiation therapy due to better neurocognitive function preservation. The aim of this study was to clarify the prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival in radiosurgery for brain metastases from primary breast cancer. Methods From March 2001 to Ma...

  11. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    management and efficient system operation. Due to the expected large number of user-deployed cells, centralized network planning becomes unpractical and new scalable alternatives must be sought. In this article, we propose a fully distributed and scalable solution to the interference management problem...... in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...... the experience of all users and not just the few best ones; while overall cell capacity is not compromised....

  12. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  13. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  14. Contraceptive failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Most studies focusing on contraceptive failure in relation to pregnancy have focused on contraceptive failure among women having induced abortions, thereby neglecting those women who, despite contraceptive failure, accept the pregnancy and intend to carry the fetus to term. To get a more complete...... picture of the problem of contraceptive failure, this study focuses on contraceptive failure among women with diverse pregnancy outcomes. In all, 3520 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital were included: 373 had induced abortions, 435 had spontaneous abortions, 97 had ectopic pregnancies......, and 2614 received antenatal care. The variables studied comprise age, partner relationship, number of births, occupational and economical situation, and contraceptive use.Contraceptive failure, defined as contraceptive use (condom, diaphragm, IUD, oral contraception, or another modern method...

  15. Autonomic headache with autonomic seizures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Yalçin Tasmertek, Fazilet

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the report is to present a case of an autonomic headache associated with autonomic seizures. A 19-year-old male who had had complex partial seizures for 15 years was admitted with autonomic complaints and left hemicranial headache, independent from seizures, that he had had for 2 years and were provoked by watching television. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right hippocampal sclerosis and electroencephalography revealed epileptic activity in right hemispheric areas. Treatment with valproic acid decreased the complaints. The headache did not fulfil the criteria for the diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, and was different from epileptic headache, which was defined as a pressing type pain felt over the forehead for several minutes to a few hours. Although epileptic headache responds to anti-epileptics and the complaints of the present case decreased with antiepileptics, it has been suggested that the headache could be a non-trigeminal autonomic headache instead of an epileptic headache.

  16. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  17. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  18. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  19. First-line endoscopic treatment with over-the-scope clips significantly improves the primary failure and rebleeding rates in high-risk gastrointestinal bleeding: A single-center experience with 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Glatz, Torben; Walker, Christine; Fischer, Andreas; Thimme, Robert

    2016-11-07

    To evaluate rebleeding, primary failure (PF) and mortality of patients in whom over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) were used as first-line and second-line endoscopic treatment (FLET, SLET) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB, LGIB). A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database identified all patients with UGIB and LGIB in a tertiary endoscopic referral center of the University of Freiburg, Germany, from 04-2012 to 05-2016 ( n = 93) who underwent FLET and SLET with OTSCs. The complete Rockall risk scores were calculated from patients with UGIB. The scores were categorized as < or ≥ 7 and were compared with the original Rockall data. Differences between FLET and SLET were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the factors that influenced rebleeding after OTSC placement. Primary hemostasis and clinical success of bleeding lesions (without rebleeding) was achieved in 88/100 (88%) and 78/100 (78%), respectively. PF was significantly lower when OTSCs were applied as FLET compared to SLET (4.9% vs 23%, P = 0.008). In multivariate analysis, patients who had OTSC placement as SLET had a significantly higher rebleeding risk compared to those who had FLET (OR 5.3; P = 0.008). Patients with Rockall risk scores ≥ 7 had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those with scores < 7 (35% vs 10%, P = 0.034). No significant differences were observed in patients with scores < or ≥ 7 in rebleeding and rebleeding-associated mortality. Our data show for the first time that FLET with OTSC might be the best predictor to successfully prevent rebleeding of gastrointestinal bleeding compared to SLET. The type of treatment determines the success of primary hemostasis or primary failure.

  20. Behavioural domain knowledge transfer for autonomous agents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available , and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series, 13-15 November 2014 Behavioural Domain Knowledge Transfer for Autonomous Agents Benjamin Rosman Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems Modelling and Digital Science Council...

  1. From cooperative to autonomous vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sande, T.P.J.; Nijmeijer, H.; Fossen, T.I.; Pettersen, K.Y.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2017-01-01

    What defines an autonomous vehicle? In this chapter the authors will try to answer this question and formulate the limitations of driver assistance systems as well as for—conditionally—autonomous vehicles . First a short summary of the levels of automation as provided by the society of automotive

  2. Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, George T.; Carey, Robin J.; Kapushion, Blanche M.

    2016-01-01

    "Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book" includes activities and strategies to support the development of autonomous learners. More than 40 activities are included, all geared to the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development of students. Teachers may use these activities and strategies with the entire class, small groups, or…

  3. Semi-Autonomous Vehicle Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective this summer is "evaluating standards for wireless architecture for the internet of things". The Internet of Things is the network of physical objects or "things" embedded with electronics, software, sensors and network connectivity which enables these objects to collect and exchange data and make decisions based on said data. This was accomplished by creating a semi-autonomous vehicle that takes advantage of multiple sensors, cameras, and onboard computers and combined them with a mesh network which enabled communication across large distances with little to no interruption. The mesh network took advantage of what is known as DTN - Disruption Tolerant Networking which according to NASA is the new communications protocol that is "the first step towards interplanetary internet." The use of DTN comes from the fact that it will store information if an interruption in communications is detected and even forward that information via other relays within range so that the data is not lost. This translates well into the project because as the car moves further away from whatever is sending it commands (in this case a joystick), the information can still be forwarded to the car with little to no loss of information thanks to the mesh nodes around the driving area.

  4. PET imaging of the autonomic nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THACKERAY, James T.; BENGEL, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system is the primary extrinsic control of heart rate and contractility, and is subject to adaptive and maladaptive changes in cardiovascular disease. Consequently, noninvasive assessment of neuronal activity and function is an attractive target for molecular imaging. A myriad of targeted radiotracers have been developed over the last 25 years for imaging various components of the sympathetic and parasympathetic signal cascades. While routine clinical use remains somewhat limited, a number of larger scale studies in recent years have supplied momentum to molecular imaging of autonomic signaling. Specifically, the findings of the ADMIRE HF trial directly led to United States Food and Drug Administration approval of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) assessment of sympathetic neuronal innervation, and comparable results have been reported using the analogous PET agent 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED). Due to the inherent capacity for dynamic quantification and higher spatial resolution, regional analysis may be better served by PET. In addition, preliminary clinical and extensive preclinical experience has provided a broad foundation of cardiovascular applications for PET imaging of the autonomic nervous system. Recent years have witnessed the growth of novel quantification techniques, expansion of multiple tracer studies, and improved understanding of the uptake of different radiotracers, such that the transitional biology of dysfunctional subcellular catecholamine handling can be distinguished from complete denervation. As a result, sympathetic neuronal molecular imaging is poised to play a role in individualized patient care, by stratifying cardiovascular risk, visualizing underlying biology, and guiding and monitoring therapy.

  5. Monitoring aquatic environments with autonomous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Philip Aagaard

    High frequency measurements from autonomous sensors have become a widely used tool among aquatic scientists. This report focus primarily on the use of ecosystem metabolism based on high frequency oxygen measurements and relates the calculations to spatial variation, biomass of the primary producers...... and environmental variables. The results can be formulated in three main conclusions. 1) Primary production and respiration in stratified lakes are not evenly distributed in the water column. Generally you can expect the net production to decreases with depth as gross primary production (GPP) decreases with depth......, unless it is a very clear lake, while respiration is relatively stable. Metabolism estimates based on data from the epilimnion will only represent a minor proportion of the whole lake metabolism under conditions of strong stratification and high water transparency. At a low depth of the upper mixed layer...

  6. Research Institute for Autonomous Precision Guided Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogacki, John R

    2007-01-01

    ... vehicles, cooperative flight of autonomous aerial vehicles using GPS and vision information, cooperative and sharing of information in search missions involving multiple autonomous agents, multi-scale...

  7. Circulatory autonomic failure 50 years after acute poliomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, A. D.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Wieling, W.

    1991-01-01

    A 59-year old woman who presented with postural dizziness 50 years after an acute episode of poliomyelitis is described. There were no new neurological signs and no evidence of motor neuron disease. She had postural hypotension with an abnormal Valsalva. Investigations led to a diagnosis of

  8. Premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persani Luca

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Premature ovarian failure (POF is a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years (secondary amenorrhea. It is a heterogeneous disorder affecting approximately 1% of women e.g. Turner syndrome represent the major cause of primary amenorrhea associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Despite the description of several candidate genes, the cause of POF remains undetermined in the vast majority of the cases. Management includes substitution of the hormone defect by estrogen/progestin preparations. The only solution presently available for the fertility defect in women with absent follicular reserve is ovum donation.

  9. Mobile Autonomous Reconfigurable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavliuk N.A.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is a multifunctional modular robot able to assemble independently in a given configuration and responsively change it in the process of operation depending on the current task. In this work we aim at developing and examining unified modules for a modular robot, which can both perform autonomous movement and form a complex structure by connecting to other modules. The existing solutions in the field of modular robotics were reviewed and classified by power supply, the ways of interconnection, the ways of movement and the possibility of independent movement of separate modules. Basing on the analysis of the shortcomings of existing analogues, we have developed a module of mobile autonomous reconfigurable system, including a base unit, a set of magneto-mechanical connectors and two motor wheels. The basic kinematic scheme of the modular robot, the features of a single module, as well as the modular structure formed by an array of similar modules were described. Two schemes for placing sets of magneto-mechanical connectors in the basic module have been proposed. We described the principle of operation of a magneto-mechanical connector based on redirection of the magnetic flux of a permanent magnet. This solution simplifies the system for controlling a mechanism of connection with other modules, increases energy efficiency and a battery life of the module. Since the energy is required only at the moment of switching the operating modes of the connector, there is no need to power constantly the connector mechanism to maintain the coupling mode.

  10. A case report and literature review of primary resistant Hodgkin lymphoma: a response to anti-PD-1 after failure of autologous stem cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu PP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Peipei Xu, Fan Wang, Chaoyang Guan, Jian Ouyang, Xiaoyan Shao, Bing Chen Department of Hematology, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL is a highly curable hematologic malignancy, and ~70% of cases can be cured with combination chemotherapy with or without radiation. However, patients with primary resistant disease have a cure rate of <30%. For such patients, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT is considered to be the standard treatment. If patients fail to respond to ASCT or relapse soon thereafter, they usually receive another ASCT, allogeneic stem cell transplantation or treatment with novel agents. This case report presents the case of a 54-year-old patient with primary resistant HL who received single-agent treatment, brentuximab vedotin, after ASCT relapse. Despite treatment with brentuximab vedotin, the disease continued to progress. In patients with such highly resistant disease, the treatment options are limited. Depending on the physical condition and the willingness of the patient, pembrolizumab, a programmed cell death protein-1 inhibitor, can be given as salvage therapy. But, out of our expectation, the patient achieved a very good partial response after four cycles of pembrolizumab. No serious adverse events were observed with pembrolizumab treatment. This case provides support for a new and effective strategy for treating primary resistant Hodgkin lymphoma. Keywords: Hodgkin lymphoma, autologous stem cell transplant, brentuximab vedotin, pembrolizumab, PD-1, good response

  11. Central nervous system involvement in the autonomic responses to psychological distress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Morree, H.M.; Szabó, B.M.; Rutten, G.J.; Kop, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological distress can trigger acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death in vulnerable patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism that plays a role in stress-induced cardiac events involves the autonomic nervous system, particularly disproportional sympathetic activation and

  12. Prognostic burden of heart failure recorded in primary care, acute hospital admissions, or both: a population-based linked electronic health record cohort study in 2.1 million people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudstaal, Stefan; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Denaxas, Spiros; Gho, Johannes M I H; Shah, Anoop D; Yu, Ning; Patel, Riyaz S; Gale, Chris P; Hoes, Arno W; Cleland, John G; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Hemingway, Harry

    2017-09-01

    The prognosis of patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure (HF) is well described, but not that of patients managed solely in non-acute settings such as primary care or secondary outpatient care. We assessed the distribution of HF across levels of healthcare, and assessed the prognostic differences for patients with HF either recorded in primary care (including secondary outpatient care) (PC), hospital admissions alone, or known in both contexts. This study was part of the CALIBER programme, which comprises linked data from primary care, hospital admissions, and death certificates for 2.1 million inhabitants of England. We identified 89 554 patients with newly recorded HF, of whom 23 547 (26%) were recorded in PC but never hospitalized, 30 629 (34%) in hospital admissions but not known in PC, 23 681 (27%) in both, and 11 697 (13%) in death certificates only. The highest prescription rates of ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists was found in patients known in both contexts. The respective 5-year survival in the first three groups was 43.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 43.2-44.6%], 21.7% (95% CI 21.1-22.2%), and 39.8% (95% CI 39.2-40.5%), compared with 88.1% (95% CI 87.9-88.3%) in the age- and sex-matched general population. In the general population, one in four patients with HF will not be hospitalized for worsening HF within a median follow-up of 1.7 years, yet they still have a poor 5-year prognosis. Patients admitted to hospital with worsening HF but not known with HF in primary care have the worst prognosis and management. Mitigating the prognostic burden of HF requires greater consistency across primary and secondary care in the identification, profiling, and treatment of patients. NCT02551016. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  14. Decentralized Control of Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Autonomous Vehicles by John S. Baras, Xiaobo Tan, Pedram Hovareshti CSHCN TR 2003-8 (ISR TR 2003-14) Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...AND SUBTITLE Decentralized Control of Autonomous Vehicles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Decentralized Control of Autonomous Vehicles ∗ John S. Baras, Xiaobo Tan, and Pedram

  15. Mediterranean Diet and Other Dietary Patterns in Primary Prevention of Heart Failure and Changes in Cardiac Function Markers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sanches Machado d’Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure (HF is a complex syndrome and is recognized as the ultimate pathway of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Studies using nutritional strategies based on dietary patterns have proved to be effective for the prevention and treatment of CVD. Although there are studies that support the protective effect of these diets, their effects on the prevention of HF are not clear yet. Methods: We searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies that examined dietary patterns, such as dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH diet, paleolithic, vegetarian, low-carb and low-fat diets and prevention of HF. No limitations were used during the search in the databases. Results: A total of 1119 studies were identified, 14 met the inclusion criteria. Studies regarding the Mediterranean, DASH, vegetarian, and Paleolithic diets were found. The Mediterranean and DASH diets showed a protective effect on the incidence of HF and/or worsening of cardiac function parameters, with a significant difference in relation to patients who did not adhere to these dietary patterns. Conclusions: It is observed that the adoption of Mediterranean or DASH-type dietary patterns may contribute to the prevention of HF, but these results need to be analyzed with caution due to the low quality of evidence.

  16. Clinical Significance of the Presence of Autonomic and Vestibular Dysfunction in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Kyoung Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN and vestibular dysfunction (VD in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.MethodsThirty-five diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy were enrolled from August 2008 to July 2009. All subjects underwent autonomic function tests. Nineteen of the patients (54.3% underwent videonystagmography.ResultsDiabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 28 patients (80%. A mild degree of autonomic failure was observed in 18 patients (64.3%, and a moderate degree of autonomic failure was observed in ten patients (35.7%. Factors related to DAN included diabetic nephropathy (P=0.032, degree of chronic kidney disease (P=0.003, and duration of diabetes (P=0.044. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in 11 of 19 patients (57.9%. There was no significant association between DAN and VD.ConclusionDiabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 28 diabetic patients (80% with peripheral neuropathy. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in nearly 60% of diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy who complained of dizziness but showed no significant association with DAN. Diabetic patients who complained of dizziness need to examine both autonomic function and vestibular function.

  17. Profile of mecasermin for the long-term treatment of growth failure in children and adolescents with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Fintini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Danilo Fintini, Claudia Brufani, Marco CappaEndocrinology Unit, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHI or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 deficiency (IGFD is characterized by deficit of IGF-1 production due to alteration of response of growth hormone (GH receptor to GH. This syndrome is due to mutation of GH receptor or IGF-1 gene and patients affected showed no response to GH therapy. The only treatment is recombinant IGF-1 (mecasermin, which has been available since 1986, but approved in the United States by the US Food and Drug Administration only in 2005 and in Europe by the European Medicines Agency in 2007. To date, few studies are available on long-term treatment with mecasermin in IGFD patients and some of them have a very small number of subjects. In this review we discuss briefly clinical features of severe primary IGFD, laboratory findings, and indications for treatment. Results of long-term therapy with rhIGF1 (mecasermin in patients affected by severe primary IGFD and possible side effects are explained.Keywords: mecasermin, therapy, Laron syndrome, IGF-1

  18. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  19. Planning of Autonomous Multi-agent Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viksnin Ilya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a traffic management system with agents acting on behalf autonomous vehicle at the crossroads. Alternatively to existing solutions based on usage of semiautonomous control systems with the control unit, proposed in this paper algorithm apply the principles of decentralized multi-agent control. Agents during their collaboration generate intersection plan and determinate the optimal order of road intersection for a given criterion based on the exchange of information about them and their environment. The paper contains optimization criteria for possible routes selection and experiments that perform in order to estimate the proposed model. Experiment results show that this model can significantly reduce traffic density compared to the traditional traffic management systems. Moreover, the proposed algorithm efficiency increases with road traffic density. Furthermore, the availability of control unit in the system significantly reduces the negative impact of possible failures and hacker attacks.

  20. The Autonomous Student: A Footnote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jancis

    1987-01-01

    An argument that rationality is a learned behavior, rather than a natural facility, is developed vis-a-vis certain educational theories. The difficulties students face in maintaining a rational stance in an autonomous classroom are also discussed. (JL)

  1. Structural Discrimination and Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the potential for structural discrimination to be woven into the fabric of autonomous vehicle developments, which remain underexplored and undiscussed. The prospect for structural discrimination arises as a result of the coordinated modes of autonomous vehicle behaviour...... individual identity, and potentially relative worth, to autonomous vehicles engaging in a crash damage calculus. At the risk of introducing these ideas into the development of autonomous vehicles, this paper hopes to spark a debate to foreclose these eventualities....... that is prescribed by its code. This leads to the potential for individuated outcomes to be networked and thereby multiplied consistently to any number of vehicles implementing such a code. The aggregated effects of such algorithmic policy preferences will thus cumulate in the reallocation of benefits and burdens...

  2. Simple autonomous Mars walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    Under a contract with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Martin Marietta has developed several alternative rover concepts for unmanned exploration of the planet Mars. One of those concepts, the 'Walking Beam', is the subject of this paper. This concept was developed with the goal of achieving many of the capabilities of more sophisticated articulated-leg walkers with a much simpler, more robust, less computationally demanding and more power efficient design. It consists of two large-base tripods nested one within the other which alternately translate with respect to each other along a 5-meter beam to propel the vehicle. The semiautonomous navigation system relies on terrain geometry sensors and tacticle feedback from each foot to autonomously select a path which avoids hazards along a route designated from earth. Both mobility and navigation features of this concept are discussed including a top-level description of the vehicle's physical characteristics, deployment strategy, mobility elements, sensor suite, theory of operation, navigation and control processes, and estimated performance.

  3. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  4. Autonomous Energy Grids: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bernstein, Andrey [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, Brian S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    With much higher levels of distributed energy resources - variable generation, energy storage, and controllable loads just to mention a few - being deployed into power systems, the data deluge from pervasive metering of energy grids, and the shaping of multi-level ancillary-service markets, current frameworks to monitoring, controlling, and optimizing large-scale energy systems are becoming increasingly inadequate. This position paper outlines the concept of 'Autonomous Energy Grids' (AEGs) - systems that are supported by a scalable, reconfigurable, and self-organizing information and control infrastructure, can be extremely secure and resilient (self-healing), and self-optimize themselves in real-time for economic and reliable performance while systematically integrating energy in all forms. AEGs rely on scalable, self-configuring cellular building blocks that ensure that each 'cell' can self-optimize when isolated from a larger grid as well as partaking in the optimal operation of a larger grid when interconnected. To realize this vision, this paper describes the concepts and key research directions in the broad domains of optimization theory, control theory, big-data analytics, and complex system modeling that will be necessary to realize the AEG vision.

  5. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  6. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes

  7. How academic psychiatry can better prepare students for their future patients. Part I: the failure to recognize depression and risk for suicide in primary care; problem identification, responsibility, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, C Raymond

    2008-01-01

    The author, after a review of the relevant literature, found that depression and the risk for suicide remain unacceptably underrecognized in primary care (PC). The negative consequences are substantial for patients and their physicians. Suicide prevention in PC begins with the recognition of depression because suicide occurs largely during depression. In this article (Part I), the author suggests causes, responsibilities, and solutions for that failure. He also addresses the role of academic psychiatry's traditional curriculum. The comprehensive, initial diagnostic interview that is typically taught to medical students in psychiatry may decrease recognition in PC care because of the time required to complete it. In Part II, the author offers guidelines to develop a weekly interview course with an instrument targeting abbreviated diagnostic screening for only the most critical psychiatric problems such as depression and the risk for suicide.

  8. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  9. The Concept of Autonomous Power Supply System Fed with Renewable Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Fedak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable economic development requires the use of renewable energy sources in a rational and thoughtful way. In Polish conditions the use of several types of renewable energy sources on a single setup is a new issue. In particular, hybrid devices in conjunction with intelligent energy systems, such as lighting systems are generally not used. Therefore, the Polish energy production still relies on the burning of coal. Despite their advantages, renewable energy sources are characterized by seasonality and considerable instability. Access to renewable energy varies daily and seasonally, hence activities promoting the use of autonomous, hybrid power systems must be intensified. The presented research aims at the development of the Autonomous Power Supply (APS system based on the so-called energy mix. Such a system works in an isolated arrangement and serves to reliably supply electricity from renewable sources for small residential or public utility devices in an urban area. Systems with up to 3 kW power consist of modules, whose modular design allows the combination of various power configurations and types of renewable energy used. The basic system consists of a primary power source, additional power source, emergency power source, energy storage device, weather station and controller. The energy mix depends on the geographical location of the system. The emergency source can be implemented as an on-grid connector or fuel power generator with the participation of 100% until the primary or accessory power source failure is removed. The energy storage system consists of batteries or supercapacitors. The proposed system can be combined to create a local network that automatically responds to energy shortages in various network nodes by adjusting the supply of electricity within the network depending on its needs. For Poland realistic solutions in this article are the new and modern answer to these requirements.

  10. Expansion of donor-reactive host T cells in primary graft failure after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT following reduced-intensity conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, M; Hashimoto, D; Nagafuji, K; Eto, T; Ohno, Y; Aoyama, K; Iwasaki, H; Miyamoto, T; Hill, G R; Akashi, K; Teshima, T

    2014-01-01

    Graft rejection remains a major obstacle in allogeneic hematopoietic SCT following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC-SCT), particularly after cord blood transplantation (CBT). In a murine MHC-mismatched model of RIC-SCT, primary graft rejection was associated with activation and expansion of donor-reactive host T cells in peripheral blood and BM early after SCT. Donor-derived dendritic cells are at least partly involved in host T-cell activation. We then evaluated if such an expansion of host T cells could be associated with graft rejection after RIC-CBT. Expansion of residual host lymphocytes was observed in 4/7 patients with graft rejection at 3 weeks after CBT, but in none of the 17 patients who achieved engraftment. These results suggest the crucial role of residual host T cells after RIC-SCT in graft rejection and expansion of host T cells could be a marker of graft rejection. Development of more efficient T cell-suppressive conditioning regimens may be necessary in the context of RIC-SCT.

  11. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  12. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  13. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo; Azumi, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22–85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  14. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Naoki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei, E-mail: rsasaki@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Azumi, Atsushi [Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Matsui, Toshimitsu [Division of Hematology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22-85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  15. Diastolic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wake, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Primary diastolic failure is typically seen in patients with hypertensive or valvular heart disease as well as in hypertrophic or restrictive cardiomyopathy but can also occur in a variety of clinical disorders, especially tachycardia and ischemia. Diastolic dysfunction has a particularly high prevalence in elderly patients and is generally associated, with low mortality but high morbidity. The pathophysiology of diastolic dysfunction includes delayed relaxation, impaired LV filling and/or in...

  16. Compact autonomous navigation system (CANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. C.; Ying, L.; Xiong, K.; Cheng, H. Y.; Qiao, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous navigation of Satellite and constellation has series of benefits, such as to reduce operation cost and ground station workload, to avoid the event of crises of war and natural disaster, to increase spacecraft autonomy, and so on. Autonomous navigation satellite is independent of ground station support. Many systems are developed for autonomous navigation of satellite in the past 20 years. Along them American MANS (Microcosm Autonomous Navigation System) [1] of Microcosm Inc. and ERADS [2] [3] (Earth Reference Attitude Determination System) of Honeywell Inc. are well known. The systems anticipate a series of good features of autonomous navigation and aim low cost, integrated structure, low power consumption and compact layout. The ERADS is an integrated small 3-axis attitude sensor system with low cost and small volume. It has the Earth center measurement accuracy higher than the common IR sensor because the detected ultraviolet radiation zone of the atmosphere has a brightness gradient larger than that of the IR zone. But the ERADS is still a complex system because it has to eliminate many problems such as making of the sapphire sphere lens, birefringence effect of sapphire, high precision image transfer optical fiber flattener, ultraviolet intensifier noise, and so on. The marginal sphere FOV of the sphere lens of the ERADS is used to star imaging that may be bring some disadvantages., i.e. , the image energy and attitude measurements accuracy may be reduced due to the tilt image acceptance end of the fiber flattener in the FOV. Besides Japan, Germany and Russia developed visible earth sensor for GEO [4] [5]. Do we have a way to develop a cheaper/easier and more accurate autonomous navigation system that can be used to all LEO spacecraft, especially, to LEO small and micro satellites? To return this problem we provide a new type of the system—CANS (Compact Autonomous Navigation System) [6].

  17. Biofeedback in the treatment of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael G; Moravec, Christine S

    2010-07-01

    Biofeedback training can be used to reduce activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and increase activation of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). It is well established that hyperactivation of the SNS contributes to disease progression in chronic heart failure. It has been postulated that underactivation of the PNS may also play a role in heart failure pathophysiology. In addition to autonomic imbalance, a chronic inflammatory process is now recognized as being involved in heart failure progression, and recent work has established that activation of the inflammatory process may be attenuated by vagal nerve stimulation. By interfering with both autonomic imbalance and the inflammatory process, biofeedback-assisted stress management may be an effective treatment for patients with heart failure by improving clinical status and quality of life. Recent studies have suggested that biofeedback and stress management have a positive impact in patients with chronic heart failure, and patients with higher perceived control over their disease have been shown to have better quality of life. Our ongoing study of biofeedback-assisted stress management in the treatment of end-stage heart failure will also examine biologic end points in treated patients at the time of heart transplant, in order to assess the effects of biofeedback training on the cellular and molecular components of the failing heart. We hypothesize that the effects of biofeedback training will extend to remodeling the failing human heart, in addition to improving quality of life.

  18. Estimation and Control for Autonomous Coring from a Rover Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Nicolas; Backes, Paul; DiCicco, Matt; Bajracharya, Max

    2010-01-01

    A system consisting of a set of estimators and autonomous behaviors has been developed which allows robust coring from a low-mass rover platform, while accommodating for moderate rover slip. A redundant set of sensors, including a force-torque sensor, visual odometry, and accelerometers are used to monitor discrete critical and operational modes, as well as to estimate continuous drill parameters during the coring process. A set of critical failure modes pertinent to shallow coring from a mobile platform is defined, and autonomous behaviors associated with each critical mode are used to maintain nominal coring conditions. Autonomous shallow coring is demonstrated from a low-mass rover using a rotary-percussive coring tool mounted on a 5 degree-of-freedom (DOF) arm. A new architecture of using an arm-stabilized, rotary percussive tool with the robotic arm used to provide the drill z-axis linear feed is validated. Particular attention to hole start using this architecture is addressed. An end-to-end coring sequence is demonstrated, where the rover autonomously detects and then recovers from a series of slip events that exceeded 9 cm total displacement.

  19. Treatment of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2018-03-01

    Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system afflicts most patients with Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, and pure autonomic failure, reducing quality of life and increasing mortality. For example, gastrointestinal dysfunction can lead to impaired drug pharmacodynamics causing a worsening in motor symptoms, and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension can cause syncope, falls, and fractures. When recognized, autonomic problems can be treated, sometimes successfully. Discontinuation of potentially causative/aggravating drugs, patient education, and nonpharmacological approaches are useful and should be tried first. Pathophysiology-based pharmacological treatments that have shown efficacy in controlled trials of patients with synucleinopathies have been approved in many countries and are key to an effective management. Here, we review the treatment of autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies, summarize the nonpharmacological and current pharmacological therapeutic strategies including recently approved drugs, and provide practical advice and management algorithms for clinicians, with focus on neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, dysphagia, sialorrhea, gastroparesis, constipation, neurogenic overactive bladder, underactive bladder, and sexual dysfunction. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  1. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori; Sugi, Toshihiko; Mikami, Tadashi; Shouda, Sakae

    1999-01-01

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  2. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained s...

  3. Routine failures in the process for blood testing and the communication of results to patients in primary care in the UK: a qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Hill, Ann; McManus, Richard J; Lilford, Richard; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-11-01

    The testing and result communication process in primary care is complex. Its successful completion relies on the coordinated efforts of a range of staff in primary care and external settings working together with patients. Despite the importance of diagnostic testing in provision of care, this complexity renders the process vulnerable in the face of increasing demand, stretched resources and a lack of supporting guidance. We conducted a series of focus groups with patients and staff across four primary care practices using process-improvement strategies to identify and understand areas where either unnecessary delay is introduced, or the process may fail entirely. We then worked with both patients and staff to arrive at practical strategies to improve the current system. A total of six areas across the process were identified where improvements could be introduced. These were: (1) delay in phlebotomy, (2) lack of a fail-safe to ensure blood tests are returned to practices and patients, (3) difficulties in accessing results by telephone, (4) role of non-clinical staff in communicating results, (5) routine communication of normal results and (6) lack of a protocol for result communication. A number of potential failures in testing and communicating results to patients were identified, and some specific ideas for improving existing systems emerged. These included same-day phlebotomy sessions, use of modern technology methods to proactively communicate routine results and targeted training for receptionists handling sensitive data. There remains an urgent need for further work to test these and other potential solutions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. B-type natriuretic peptide measurement in primary care; magnitude of associations with cardiovascular risk factors and their therapies. Observations from the STOP-HF (St. Vincent's Screening TO Prevent Heart Failure) study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conlon, Carmel M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: An effective prevention strategy for heart failure in primary care requires a reliable screening tool for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction. Preliminary data indicate that B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) may be suitable for this task. However, for the most effective use of this peptide, the interrelationships between associated risk factors and their therapies on BNP, and in particular their magnitude of effect, needs to be established in a large primary care population. Therefore, the objective of the study was to establish the extent of the association between BNP, cardiovascular risk factors and their therapies. METHODS: BNP measurement and clinical review was preformed on 1122 primary care patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Multivariate analyses identified significant associates of BNP concentrations which were further explored to establish the magnitude of their association. RESULTS: Associates of BNP were age (1.36-fold increase in BNP\\/decade), female (1.28), beta-blockers (1.90), myocardial infarction (1.36), arrhythmia (1.98), diastolic blood pressure; all p<0.01. A novel method was devised that plotted median BNP per sliding decade of age for the various combinations of these principal associates. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented underline the importance of considering several clinical and therapeutic factors when interpreting BNP concentrations. Most of these variables were associated with increased concentrations, which may in part explain the observed false-positive rates for detecting ventricular dysfunction using this peptide. Furthermore, the design of studies or protocols using BNP as an endpoint or a clinical tool should take particular account of these associations. This analysis provides the foundation for age, risk factor and therapy adjusted reference ranges for BNP in this setting.

  5. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  6. Toward Intelligent Autonomous Agents for Cyber Defense: Report of the 2017 Workshop by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Research Group IST-152 RTG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-18

    simple example? 15. SUBJECT TERMS cybersecurity , cyber defense, autonomous agents, resilience, adversarial intelligence 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...explained” based on other attack sequences (e.g., Kullback–Leibler [K-L] divergence). For example, the DARPA Explainable Artificial Intelligence ...a failure of humanity, not artificial intelligence . The notion of self-guidance approaches the field of robot ethics. How can autonomous agents be

  7. Toward Intelligent Autonomous Agents for Cyber Defense: Report of the 2017 Workshop by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Research Group IST-152-RTG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    simple example? 15. SUBJECT TERMS cybersecurity , cyber defense, autonomous agents, resilience, adversarial intelligence 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...explained” based on other attack sequences (e.g., Kullback–Leibler [K-L] divergence). For example, the DARPA Explainable Artificial Intelligence ...a failure of humanity, not artificial intelligence . The notion of self-guidance approaches the field of robot ethics. How can autonomous agents be

  8. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  9. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and Advanced HF • Tools and Resources • Personal Stories Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  10. Pathophysiological relationships between heart failure and depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Deborah W; Akintade, Bimbola; Son, Heesook; Woltz, Patricia; Hunt, Dennis; Friedmann, Erika; Hartung, Mary Kay; Thomas, Sue Ann

    2014-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common comorbid conditions in patients with heart failure. Patients with heart failure and depression have increased mortality. The association of anxiety with increased mortality in patients with heart failure is not established. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the similarities of the underlying pathophysiology of heart failure, depression, and anxiety by using the Biopsychosocial Holistic Model of Cardiovascular Health. Depression and anxiety affect biological processes of cardiovascular function in patients with heart failure by altering neurohormonal function via activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic dysregulation, and activation of cytokine cascades and platelets. Patients with heart failure and depression or anxiety may exhibit a continued cycle of heart failure progression, increased depression, and increased anxiety. Understanding the underlying pathophysiological relationships in patients with heart failure who experience comorbid depression and/or anxiety is critical in order to implement appropriate treatments, educate patients and caregivers, and educate other health professionals.

  11. Cascading failure in the wireless sensor scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Ran; Dong, Ming-Ru; Yin, Rong-Rong; Han, Li

    2015-05-01

    In the practical wireless sensor networks (WSNs), the cascading failure caused by a failure node has serious impact on the network performance. In this paper, we deeply research the cascading failure of scale-free topology in WSNs. Firstly, a cascading failure model for scale-free topology in WSNs is studied. Through analyzing the influence of the node load on cascading failure, the critical load triggering large-scale cascading failure is obtained. Then based on the critical load, a control method for cascading failure is presented. In addition, the simulation experiments are performed to validate the effectiveness of the control method. The results show that the control method can effectively prevent cascading failure. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. F2014203239), the Autonomous Research Fund of Young Teacher in Yanshan University (Grant No. 14LGB017) and Yanshan University Doctoral Foundation, China (Grant No. B867).

  12. The Bering Autonomous Target Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    An autonomous asteroid target detection and tracking method has been developed. The method features near omnidirectionality and focus on high speed operations and completeness of search of the near space rather than the traditional faint object search methods, employed presently at the larger...... telescopes. The method has proven robust in operation and is well suited for use onboard spacecraft. As development target for the method and the associated instrumentation the asteroid research mission Bering has been used. Onboard a spacecraft, the autonomous detection is centered around the fully...... autonomous star tracker the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC). One feature of this instrument is that potential targets are registered directly in terms of date, right ascension, declination, and intensity, which greatly facilitates both tracking search and registering. Results from ground and inflight tests...

  13. Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Nielsen, Oluf Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investiga......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper......; sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot-robot interaction, human-robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties. Findings - The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry......) with a quick and gentle overview of AIMM. Furthermore, the paper identifies key open issues and promising research directions to realize real-world integration and maturation of the AIMM technology. Originality/value - This paper reviews the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile...

  14. Enriching the hierarchical model of achievement motivation: autonomous and controlling reasons underlying achievement goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-12-01

    The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between achievement motives and outcomes. We tested whether mastery approach, performance approach, and performance avoidance goals and their underlying autonomous and controlling reasons would jointly explain the relation between achievement motives (i.e., fear of failure and need for achievement) and learning strategies (Study 1). Additionally, we examined whether the autonomous and controlling reasons underlying learners' dominant achievement goal would account for the link between achievement motives and the educational outcomes of learning strategies and cheating (Study 2). Six hundred and six Greek adolescent students (Mage = 15.05, SD = 1.43) and 435 university students (Mage M = 20.51, SD = 2.80) participated in studies 1 and 2, respectively. In both studies, a correlational design was used and the hypotheses were tested via path modelling. Autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals mediated, respectively, the relation of need for achievement and fear of failure to aspects of learning outcomes. Autonomous and controlling reasons underlying achievement goals could further explain learners' functioning in achievement settings. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta, E-mail: aneta@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-09-30

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  16. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  17. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  18. Failure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    After ten years of operation at the Atucha I Nuclear Power Station a gear belonging to a pressurized heavy water reactor refuelling machine, failed. The gear box was used to operate the inlet-outlet heavy-water valve of the machine. Visual examination of the gear device showed an absence of lubricant and that several gear teeth were broken at the root. Motion was transmitted with a speed-reducing device with controlled adjustable times in order to produce a proper fitness of the valve closure. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results of the gear failure analysis in order to recommend the proper solution to prevent further failures. (Author)

  19. Autonomous vertical autorotation for unmanned helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamagkidis, Konstantinos

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) are considered the stepping stone for the integration of civil unmanned vehicles in the National Airspace System (NAS) because of their low cost and risk. Such systems are aimed at a variety of applications including search and rescue, surveillance, communications, traffic monitoring and inspection of buildings, power lines and bridges. Amidst these systems, small helicopters play an important role because of their capability to hold a position, to maneuver in tight spaces and to take off and land from virtually anywhere. Nevertheless civil adoption of such systems is minimal, mostly because of regulatory problems that in turn are due to safety concerns. This dissertation examines the risk to safety imposed by UAS in general and small helicopters in particular, focusing on accidents resulting in a ground impact. To improve the performance of small helicopters in this area, the use of autonomous autorotation is proposed. This research goes beyond previous work in the area of autonomous autorotation by developing an on-line, model-based, real-time controller that is capable of handling constraints and different cost functions. The approach selected is based on a non-linear model-predictive controller, that is augmented by a neural network to improve the speed of the non-linear optimization. The immediate benefit of this controller is that a class of failures that would otherwise result in an uncontrolled crash and possible injuries or fatalities can now be accommodated. Furthermore besides simply landing the helicopter, the controller is also capable of minimizing the risk of serious injury to people in the area. This is accomplished by minimizing the kinetic energy during the last phase of the descent. The presented research is designed to benefit the entire UAS community as well as the public, by allowing for safer UAS operations, which in turn also allow faster and less expensive integration of UAS in the NAS.

  20. Diagnosis of Fault Modes Masked by Control Loops with an Application to Autonomous Hovercraft Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis A. Raptis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a methodology for the design, testing and assessment of incipient failure detection techniques for failing components/systems of an autonomous vehicle masked or hidden by feedback control loops. It is recognized that the optimum operation of critical assets (aircraft, autonomous systems, etc. may be compromised by feedback control loops by masking severe fault modes while compensating for typical disturbances. Detrimental consequences of such occurrences include the inability to detect expeditiously and accurately incipient failures, loss of control and inefficient operation of assets in the form of fuel overconsumption and adverse environmental impact. We pursue a systems engineering process to design, construct and test an autonomous hovercraft instrumented appropriately for improved autonomy. Hidden fault modes are detected with performance guarantees by invoking a Bayesian estimation approach called particle filtering. Simulation and experimental studies are employed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methods.

  1. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases...

  2. Energy homeostasis, autonomic activity and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Balkan, B; Nyakas, C; vanDijk, G; Steffens, AB; Bohus, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The present paper summarizes the results of a number of studies designed to investigate autonomic functioning in normal, genetically, and experimentally obese rats, Particular emphasis is given

  3. Connected and autonomous vehicles 2040 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) commissioned a one-year project, Connected and Autonomous : Vehicles 2040 Vision, with researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to assess the implications of connected and : autonomous ve...

  4. Mining in the Future: Autonomous Robotics for Safer Mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shahdi, A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ? Require less support infrastructure ? Advanced sensors ? CSIR 2012 Slide 4 Degree of Autonomy ? Teleoperation ? Semi-autonomous ? Autonomous ? CSIR 2012 Slide 5 Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group ? The Mobile Intelligent Autonomous...

  5. Formal Verification of Autonomous Vehicle Platooning

    OpenAIRE

    Kamali, Maryam; Dennis, Louise A.; McAree, Owen; Fisher, Michael; Veres, Sandor M.

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of multiple autonomous vehicles into convoys or platoons is expected on our highways in the near future. However, before such platoons can be deployed, the new autonomous behaviors of the vehicles in these platoons must be certified. An appropriate representation for vehicle platooning is as a multi-agent system in which each agent captures the "autonomous decisions" carried out by each vehicle. In order to ensure that these autonomous decision-making agents in vehicle platoo...

  6. Autonomic nervous system mediated effects of food intake. Interaction between gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Orshoven, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis focused on the autonomic nervous system mediated interactions between the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems in response to food intake and on potential consequences of failure of these interactions. The effects of food intake on cardiovascular

  7. Powering Autonomous Sensors An Integral Approach with Focus on Solar and RF Energy Harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Penella-López, María Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous sensors transmit data and power their electronics without using cables. They can be found in e.g. wireless sensor networks (WSNs) or remote acquisition systems. Although primary batteries provide a simple design for powering autonomous sensors, they present several limitations such as limited capacity and power density, and difficulty in predicting their condition and state of charge. An alternative is to extract energy from the ambient (energy harvesting). However, the reduced dimensions of most autonomous sensors lead to a low level of available power from the energy transducer. Thus, efficient methods and circuits to manage and gather the energy are a must. An integral approach for powering autonomous sensors by considering both primary batteries and energy harvesters is presented. Two rather different forms of energy harvesting are also dealt with: optical (or solar) and radiofrequency (RF). Optical energy provides high energy density, especially outdoors, whereas RF remote powering is possibly...

  8. Hazard Map for Autonomous Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels

    This dissertation describes the work performed in the area of using image analysis in the process of landing a spacecraft autonomously and safely on the surface of the Moon. This is suggested to be done using a Hazard Map. The correspondence problem between several Hazard Maps are investigated...

  9. Designing Assessment for Autonomous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Marie; Mathers, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to disseminate and evaluate an autonomous learning framework developed through collaborative research with first- and second-year undergraduate students at De Montfort University. Central to the framework is the involvement of students in the assessment of their peers and themselves using dialogue about the assessment and feedback…

  10. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  11. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    -deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures

  12. Simulation of Aircraft Sortie Generation Under an Autonomic Logistics System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Lockheed Martin and the Joint Program Office are developing a new autonomic logistics system for the multibillion F-35 Lightning Joint Strike Fighter...partners (United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark, and Norway). Lockheed Martin is the primary aircraft contractor...Accountability Office, 2014). Lockheed Martin , the prime contractor of the F-35 project, describes ALIS in its official website as: “ALIS serves as

  13. Fuzzy Behavior Modulation with Threshold Activation for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstel, Edward

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes fuzzy logic techniques used in a hierarchical behavior-based architecture for robot navigation. An architectural feature for threshold activation of fuzzy-behaviors is emphasized, which is potentially useful for tuning navigation performance in real world applications. The target application is autonomous local navigation of a small planetary rover. Threshold activation of low-level navigation behaviors is the primary focus. A preliminary assessment of its impact on local navigation performance is provided based on computer simulations.

  14. Reliability of EUCLIDIAN: An autonomous robotic system for image-guided prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, Tarun K.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Huang Ke; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, several robotic systems have been developed to perform accurate and consistent image-guided brachytherapy. Before introducing a new device into clinical operations, it is important to assess the reliability and mean time before failure (MTBF) of the system. In this article, the authors present the preclinical evaluation and analysis of the reliability and MTBF of an autonomous robotic system, which is developed for prostate seed implantation. Methods: The authors have considered three steps that are important in reliability growth analysis. These steps are: Identification and isolation of failures, classification of failures, and trend analysis. For any one-of-a-kind product, the reliability enhancement is accomplished through test-fix-test. The authors have used failure mode and effect analysis for collection and analysis of reliability data by identifying and categorizing the failure modes. Failures were classified according to severity. Failures that occurred during the operation of this robotic system were considered as nonhomogenous Poisson process. The failure occurrence trend was analyzed using Laplace test. For analyzing and predicting reliability growth, commonly used and widely accepted models, Duane's model and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, i.e., Crow's model, were applied. The MTBF was used as an important measure for assessing the system's reliability. Results: During preclinical testing, 3196 seeds (in 53 test cases) were deposited autonomously by the robot and 14 critical failures were encountered. The majority of the failures occurred during the first few cases. The distribution of failures followed Duane's postulation as well as Crow's postulation of reliability growth. The Laplace test index was -3.82 (<0), indicating a significant trend in failure data, and the failure intervals lengthened gradually. The continuous increase in the failure occurrence interval suggested a trend toward improved reliability. The MTBF

  15. Reliability of EUCLIDIAN: An autonomous robotic system for image-guided prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Huang Ke; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center (NCI-designated), Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, several robotic systems have been developed to perform accurate and consistent image-guided brachytherapy. Before introducing a new device into clinical operations, it is important to assess the reliability and mean time before failure (MTBF) of the system. In this article, the authors present the preclinical evaluation and analysis of the reliability and MTBF of an autonomous robotic system, which is developed for prostate seed implantation. Methods: The authors have considered three steps that are important in reliability growth analysis. These steps are: Identification and isolation of failures, classification of failures, and trend analysis. For any one-of-a-kind product, the reliability enhancement is accomplished through test-fix-test. The authors have used failure mode and effect analysis for collection and analysis of reliability data by identifying and categorizing the failure modes. Failures were classified according to severity. Failures that occurred during the operation of this robotic system were considered as nonhomogenous Poisson process. The failure occurrence trend was analyzed using Laplace test. For analyzing and predicting reliability growth, commonly used and widely accepted models, Duane's model and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, i.e., Crow's model, were applied. The MTBF was used as an important measure for assessing the system's reliability. Results: During preclinical testing, 3196 seeds (in 53 test cases) were deposited autonomously by the robot and 14 critical failures were encountered. The majority of the failures occurred during the first few cases. The distribution of failures followed Duane's postulation as well as Crow's postulation of reliability growth. The Laplace test index was -3.82 (<0), indicating a significant trend in failure data, and the failure intervals lengthened gradually. The continuous increase in the failure occurrence interval suggested a trend toward

  16. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  17. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  18. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  19. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  20. The clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic autonomic auras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Revditovna Kremenchugskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to refine the pattern of clinical manifestations of epileptic autonomic auras (EAA and to reveal clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroimaging ratios. Patients and methods. Eighteen patients (8, 41% men and 10, 59% women aged 9 to 27years (mean 18±5years were examined. The examination encompassed analysis of history data, clinical and neurological studies, long-term video-assisted electroencephalographic monitoring, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. Results. In most patients (n = 12, 67%, the symptoms of EAA corresponded to the criteria for abdominal one. In the other patients, the clinical manifestations resembled autonomic paroxysms as attacks of panic. Interictal pathological changes on an electroencephalogram (EEG were present in the frontal, temporal, and frontotemporal regions in 4 (22%, 6 (33%, and 7 (39% patients, respectively, as well as in both the left and right hemispheres without significant differences. Pathological EEG changes were not found in one case. MRI detected that 13 (72% patients had structural changes that were potentially eliptogenic. Conclusion. The clinical symptoms of EAA give information on the site of a primary pathological focus. It is necessary to differentiate EAA from non-epileptic paroxysmal states. The autonomic phenomena of epileptic genesis help study the functional organizations of the autonomic nervous system.

  1. Comparison of three filters in asteroid-based autonomous navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wen; Zhu Kai-Jian

    2014-01-01

    At present, optical autonomous navigation has become a key technology in deep space exploration programs. Recent studies focus on the problem of orbit determination using autonomous navigation, and the choice of filter is one of the main issues. To prepare for a possible exploration mission to Mars, the primary emphasis of this paper is to evaluate the capability of three filters, the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and weighted least-squares (WLS) algorithm, which have different initial states during the cruise phase. One initial state is assumed to have high accuracy with the support of ground tracking when autonomous navigation is operating; for the other state, errors are set to be large without this support. In addition, the method of selecting asteroids that can be used for navigation from known lists of asteroids to form a sequence is also presented in this study. The simulation results show that WLS and UKF should be the first choice for optical autonomous navigation during the cruise phase to Mars

  2. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  3. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of serum B-type natriuretic peptide testing and monitoring in patients with heart failure in primary and secondary care: an evidence synthesis, cohort study and cost-effectiveness model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pufulete, Maria; Maishman, Rachel; Dabner, Lucy; Mohiuddin, Syed; Hollingworth, William; Rogers, Chris A; Higgins, Julian; Dayer, Mark; Macleod, John; Purdy, Sarah; McDonagh, Theresa; Nightingale, Angus; Williams, Rachael; Reeves, Barnaby C

    2017-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) affects around 500,000 people in the UK. HF medications are frequently underprescribed and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)-guided therapy may help to optimise treatment. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of BNP-guided therapy compared with symptom-guided therapy in HF patients. Systematic review, cohort study and cost-effectiveness model. A literature review and usual care in the NHS. (a) HF patients in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of BNP-guided therapy; and (b) patients having usual care for HF in the NHS. Systematic review : BNP-guided therapy or symptom-guided therapy in primary or secondary care. Cohort study : BNP monitored (≥ 6 months' follow-up and three or more BNP tests and two or more tests per year), BNP tested (≥ 1 tests but not BNP monitored) or never tested. Cost-effectiveness model : BNP-guided therapy in specialist clinics. Mortality, hospital admission (all cause and HF related) and adverse events; and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for the cost-effectiveness model. Systematic review : Individual participant or aggregate data from eligible RCTs. Cohort study : The Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episode Statistics and National Heart Failure Audit (NHFA). A systematic literature search (five databases, trial registries, grey literature and reference lists of publications) for published and unpublished RCTs. Five RCTs contributed individual participant data (IPD) and eight RCTs contributed aggregate data (1536 participants were randomised to BNP-guided therapy and 1538 participants were randomised to symptom-guided therapy). For all-cause mortality, the hazard ratio (HR) for BNP-guided therapy was 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 1.04]. Patients who were aged Chris A Rogers' and Maria Pufulete's time contributing to the study. Syed Mohiuddin's time is supported by the NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West at University

  4. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  5. The clinical value of cardiac sympathetic imaging in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Emil; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the pathology of heart failure. The single-photon emission computed tomography tracer iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) can be used to investigate the activity of the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous...

  6. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control...... in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: 1. one abnormal cardio-vagal test identifies possible or early CAN; 2. at least two abnormal cardio-vagal tests....... diagnosis of CAN clinical forms, 2. detection and tailored treatment of CAN clinical correlates (e.g. tachycardia, OH, nondipping, QT interval prolongation), 3. risk stratification for diabetic complications and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and 4. modulation of targets of diabetes therapy...

  7. Autonomous Laser-Powered Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An autonomous laser-powered vehicle designed to autonomously penetrate through ice caps of substantial (e.g., kilometers) thickness by melting a path ahead of the vehicle as it descends. A high powered laser beam is transmitted to the vehicle via an onboard bare fiber spooler. After the beam enters through the dispersion optics, the beam expands into a cavity. A radiation shield limits backscatter radiation from heating the optics. The expanded beam enters the heat exchanger and is reflected by a dispersion mirror. Forward-facing beveled circular grooves absorb the reflected radiant energy preventing the energy from being reflected back towards the optics. Microchannels along the inner circumference of the beam dump heat exchanger maximize heat transfer. Sufficient amount of fiber is wound on the fiber spooler to permit not only a descent but also to permit a sample return mission by inverting the vehicle and melting its way back to the surface.

  8. Health, autonomic financing and transferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cantarero Prieto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper has as objective to study the whole relative problem to the autonomous communities and regional heath care expenditure financing in Spain. This article has a dual purpose. First, the financing of the current health care attendance is approached in the Spanish regions passing magazine to its possible variants and we observe that the balance of our system is clearly inclined towards the side of the integration in the general pattern of financing («Fiscal Room» with specific conditions («Mixed System». Secondly, we examine the new situation in the mark of health care and its corresponding financing in the new model approved in 2001, in terms of the effects of tax assignment on autonomous communities.

  9. Autonomously managed high power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, D.J.; Bechtel, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The need for autonomous power management capabilities will increase as the power levels of spacecraft increase into the multi-100 kW range. The quantity of labor intensive ground and crew support consumed by the 9 kW Skylab cannot be afforded in support of a 75-300 kW Space Station or high power earth orbital and interplanetary spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center is managing a program to develop necessary technologies for high power system autonomous management. To date a reference electrical power system and automation approaches have been defined. A test facility for evaluation and verification of management algorithms and hardware has been designed with the first of the three power channel capability nearing completion

  10. Development of autonomous operation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endou, Akira; Watanabe, Kenshiu; Miki, Tetsushi

    1992-01-01

    To enhance operation reliability of nuclear plants by removing human factors, study on an autonomous operation system has been carried out to substitute artificial intelligence (AI) for plant operators and, in addition, traditional controllers used in existing plants. For construction of the AI system, structurization of knowledge on the basis of the principles such as physical laws, function and structure of relevant objects and generalization of problem solving process are intended. A hierarchical distributed cooperative system configuration in employed because it is superior from the viewpoint of dynamical reorganization of system functions. This configuration is realized by an object-oriented multi-agent system. Construction of a prototype system was planned and the conceptual design was made for FBR plant in order to evaluate applicability of AI to the autonomous operation and to have a prospect for the realization of the system. The prototype system executes diagnosis, state evaluation, operation and control for the main plant subsystems. (author)

  11. Autonomous Agents as Artistic Collaborators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadish, David

    In this paper, I ask whether it is possible to exert creative direction on the emergence of large scale patterns from the actions of autonomous or semi-autonomous actors. As an artist and an engineer, I undertake installations and projects with an intent to create, to make art or innovative...... structures. At the same time, one of my artistic interests is in ceding a great deal of creative control to a cluster of robotic actors, in the process interrogating the lack of control that we, as a species, exert over the world. Here, I explore this idea in the context of an ongoing project called...... that navigate the space as well. My work has implications for how we as a species address planetary-scale challenges and whether we can organize societies to find emergent solutions to complex problems. Behind my artistic interest is the idea that "creation" has no teleological impulse. The creative force from...

  12. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  13. Biology-Inspired Autonomous Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    insect brain, allow these animals to fly with damaged wings, order of body mass payloads (e.g., foraging bees with a load of pollen , blood satiated...The research focus addressed two broad, complementary research areas : autonomous systems concepts inspired by the behavior and neurobiology...UL 46 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 850 883-1887 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Table of

  14. Autonomous Electrical Vehicles’ Charging Station

    OpenAIRE

    Józef Paska; Mariusz Kłos; Łukasz Rosłaniec; Rafał Bielas; Magdalena Błędzińska

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a model of an autonomous electrical vehicles’ charging station. It consists of renewable energy sources: wind turbine system, photovoltaic cells, as well as an energy storage, load, and EV charging station. In order to optimise the operating conditions, power electronic converters were added to the system. The model was implemented in the Homer Energy programme. The first part of the paper presents the design assumptions and technological solutions. Further in the paper...

  15. Fleet management for autonomous vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Bsaybes, Sahar; Quilliot, Alain; Wagler, Annegret K.

    2016-01-01

    The VIPAFLEET project consists in developing models and algorithms for man- aging a fleet of Individual Public Autonomous Vehicles (VIPA). Hereby, we consider a fleet of cars distributed at specified stations in an industrial area to supply internal transportation, where the cars can be used in different modes of circulation (tram mode, elevator mode, taxi mode). One goal is to develop and implement suitable algorithms for each mode in order to satisfy all the requests under an economic point...

  16. Urban planning for autonomous vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Fourie, Pieter J.; Ordoñez Medina, Sergio A.; Maheshwari, Tanvi; Wang, Biyu; Erath, Alexander; Cairns, Stephen; Axhausen, Kay W.

    2018-01-01

    In land-scarce Singapore, population growth and increasingly dense development are running up against limited remaining space for mobility infrastructure expansion. Autonomous Vehicles (AV) promise to relieve some of this pressure, through more efficient use of road space through platooning and intersection coordination, reducing the need for parking space, and reducing overall reliance on privately owned cars, realising Singapore’s vision of a “car-lite” future. In a collaborative resear...

  17. Autonomic computing meets SCADA security

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, S; Patel, S; Patel, D

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 IEEE. National assets such as transportation networks, large manufacturing, business and health facilities, power generation, and distribution networks are critical infrastructures. The cyber threats to these infrastructures have increasingly become more sophisticated, extensive and numerous. Cyber security conventional measures have proved useful in the past but increasing sophistication of attacks dictates the need for newer measures. The autonomic computing paradigm mimics the auton...

  18. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  19. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  20. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H.; Tio, Rene A.; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  1. Rationale, design and conduct of a randomised controlled trial evaluating a primary care-based complex intervention to improve the quality of life of heart failure patients: HICMan (Heidelberg Integrated Case Management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Klimm, Frank; Müller-Tasch, Thomas; Schellberg, Dieter; Gensichen, Jochen; Muth, Christiane; Herzog, Wolfgang; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2007-08-23

    Chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) is a complex disease with rising prevalence, compromised quality of life (QoL), unplanned hospital admissions, high mortality and therefore high burden of illness. The delivery of care for these patients has been criticized and new strategies addressing crucial domains of care have been shown to be effective on patients' health outcomes, although these trials were conducted in secondary care or in highly organised Health Maintenance Organisations. It remains unclear whether a comprehensive primary care-based case management for the treating general practitioner (GP) can improve patients' QoL. HICMan is a randomised controlled trial with patients as the unit of randomisation. Aim is to evaluate a structured, standardized and comprehensive complex intervention for patients with CHF in a 12-months follow-up trial. Patients from intervention group receive specific patient leaflets and documentation booklets as well as regular monitoring and screening by a prior trained practice nurse, who gives feedback to the GP upon urgency. Monitoring and screening address aspects of disease-specific self-management, (non)pharmacological adherence and psychosomatic and geriatric comorbidity. GPs are invited to provide a tailored structured counselling 4 times during the trial and receive an additional feedback on pharmacotherapy relevant to prognosis (data of baseline documentation). Patients from control group receive usual care by their GPs, who were introduced to guideline-oriented management and a tailored health counselling concept. Main outcome measurement for patients' QoL is the scale physical functioning of the SF-36 health questionnaire in a 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes are the disease specific QoL measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy questionnaire (KCCQ), depression and anxiety disorders (PHQ-9, GAD-7), adherence (EHFScBS and SANA), quality of care measured by an adapted version of the Patient Chronic Illness

  2. Rationale, design and conduct of a randomised controlled trial evaluating a primary care-based complex intervention to improve the quality of life of heart failure patients: HICMan (Heidelberg Integrated Case Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muth Christiane

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic congestive heart failure (CHF is a complex disease with rising prevalence, compromised quality of life (QoL, unplanned hospital admissions, high mortality and therefore high burden of illness. The delivery of care for these patients has been criticized and new strategies addressing crucial domains of care have been shown to be effective on patients' health outcomes, although these trials were conducted in secondary care or in highly organised Health Maintenance Organisations. It remains unclear whether a comprehensive primary care-based case management for the treating general practitioner (GP can improve patients' QoL. Methods/Design HICMan is a randomised controlled trial with patients as the unit of randomisation. Aim is to evaluate a structured, standardized and comprehensive complex intervention for patients with CHF in a 12-months follow-up trial. Patients from intervention group receive specific patient leaflets and documentation booklets as well as regular monitoring and screening by a prior trained practice nurse, who gives feedback to the GP upon urgency. Monitoring and screening address aspects of disease-specific self-management, (nonpharmacological adherence and psychosomatic and geriatric comorbidity. GPs are invited to provide a tailored structured counselling 4 times during the trial and receive an additional feedback on pharmacotherapy relevant to prognosis (data of baseline documentation. Patients from control group receive usual care by their GPs, who were introduced to guideline-oriented management and a tailored health counselling concept. Main outcome measurement for patients' QoL is the scale physical functioning of the SF-36 health questionnaire in a 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes are the disease specific QoL measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy questionnaire (KCCQ, depression and anxiety disorders (PHQ-9, GAD-7, adherence (EHFScBS and SANA, quality of care measured by an adapted

  3. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Offspring of Hypertensive Parents During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Leonardo Barbosa de; Peçanha, Tiago; Mira, Pedro Augusto de Carvalho; Souza, Livia Victorino de; da Silva, Lílian Pinto; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães Guedes; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2017-12-01

    Offspring of hypertensive parents present autonomic dysfunction at rest and during physiological maneuvers. However, the cardiac autonomic modulation during exercise remains unknown. This study tested whether the cardiac autonomic modulation would be reduced in offspring of hypertensive parents during exercise. Fourteen offspring of hypertensive and 14 offspring of normotensive individuals were evaluated. The groups were matched by age (24.5±1.0 vs. 26.6±1.5 years; p=0.25) and BMI (22.8±0.6 vs. 24.2±1.0 kg/m 2 ; p=0.30). Blood pressure and heart rate were assessed simultaneously during 3 min at baseline followed by 3-min isometric handgrip at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction. Cardiac autonomic modulation was evaluated using heart rate variability. Primary variables were subjected to two-way ANOVA (group vs. time). P valueexercise protocol. In contrast, offspring of hypertensive subjects showed a reduction of SDNN (Basal=34.8±3.5 vs. 45.2±3.7 ms; Exercise=30.8±3.3 vs. 41.5±3.9 ms; p group=0.01), RMSSD (Basal=37.1±3.7 vs. 52.0±6.0 ms; Exercise=28.6±3.4 vs. 41.9±5.3 ms; p group=0.02) and pNN50 (Basal=15.7±4.0 vs. 29.5±5.5%; Exercise=7.7±2.4 vs. 18.0±4.3%; p group=0.03) during the exercise protocol in comparison with offspring of normotensive parents. We concluded that normotensive offspring of hypertensive parents exhibit impaired cardiac autonomic modulation during exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Vagal stimulation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ferrari, Gaetano M

    2014-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by an autonomic imbalance that is almost always characterized by both increased sympathetic activity and withdrawal of vagal activity. Experimentally, vagal stimulation has been shown to exert profound antiarrhythmic activity and to improve cardiac function and survival in HF models. A open-label pilot clinical study in 32 patients with chronic HF has shown safety and tolerability of chronic vagal stimulation associated with subjective (improved quality of life and 6-min walk test) and objective improvements (reduced left ventricular systolic volumes and improved left ventricular ejection fraction). Three larger clinical studies, including a phase III trial are currently ongoing and will evaluate the clinical role of this new approach.

  6. Total autonomic blockage and primary sinus node dysfunction in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history confirmed the episodic headaches but there was no record of a similar incident. A Caesarean section done in 1996 had been uneventful. She apparently had ... dysfunction, the machine did not have a memory store for subsequent study, and moreover we were unable to confirm this diagnosis, as the hospital had no ...

  7. Conceptual design of autonomous operation system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endou, A.; Saiki, A.; Miki, T.; Himeno, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Conceptual design of an autonomous operation system for nuclear power plants has been carried out. Prime objective is to grade up operation reliability by eliminating human factors and enhancing control capabilities. For this objective, operators' role and traditional controllers are replaced with artificial intelligence (AI). Norms of autonomy are defined as (a) to maintain its own basic functions, (b) to protect oneself from catastrophic events, (c) to reorganize oneself in case of its partial failure, (d) to harmonize with the environment, and (e) to improve its performance by itself. For the present, a great emphasis is put on realizing humanlike knowledge-based decision-making process by AI in accordance with the norms (a) and (c). To do this, the authors take a model-based approach and it is intended to make modeling of a problem-solving process from multiple viewpoints and structurization of knowledge used in the process. A hierarchical distributed cooperative system configuration is adopted to allow to dynamically reorganize system functions and it is realized by an object-oriented multi-agent system. Plural agents based on different methodology from each other are applied to individual function or methodology diversity is assured to prevent loss of system functions by common cause failure and to reorganize integrant agents. A prototype autonomous operation system is now under development. (orig.)

  8. Preliminary failure mode and effect analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, J.V.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) was made on the overall 5 Kwe system. A general discussion of the system and failure effect is given in addition to the tabulated FMEA and a primary block diagram of the system. (U.S.)

  9. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  10. Pilot In Command: A Feasibility Assessment of Autonomous Flight Management Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David J.; Ballin, Mark G.; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    Several years of NASA research have produced the air traffic management operational concept of Autonomous Flight Management with high potential for operational feasibility, significant system and user benefits, and safety. Among the chief potential benefits are demand-adaptive or scalable capacity, user flexibility and autonomy that may finally enable truly successful business strategies, and compatibility with current-day operations such that the implementation rate can be driven from within the user community. A concept summary of Autonomous Flight Management is provided, including a description of how these operations would integrate in shared airspace with existing ground-controlled flight operations. The mechanisms enabling the primary benefits are discussed, and key findings of a feasibility assessment of airborne autonomous operations are summarized. Concept characteristics that impact safety are presented, and the potential for initially implementing Autonomous Flight Management is discussed.

  11. Feasibility of Turing-Style Tests for Autonomous Aerial Vehicle "Intelligence"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    A new approach is suggested to define and evaluate key metrics as to autonomous aerial vehicle performance. This approach entails the conceptual definition of a "Turing Test" for UAVs. Such a "UAV Turing test" would be conducted by means of mission simulations and/or tailored flight demonstrations of vehicles under the guidance of their autonomous system software. These autonomous vehicle mission simulations and flight demonstrations would also have to be benchmarked against missions "flown" with pilots/human-operators in the loop. In turn, scoring criteria for such testing could be based upon both quantitative mission success metrics (unique to each mission) and by turning to analog "handling quality" metrics similar to the well-known Cooper-Harper pilot ratings used for manned aircraft. Autonomous aerial vehicles would be considered to have successfully passed this "UAV Turing Test" if the aggregate mission success metrics and handling qualities for the autonomous aerial vehicle matched or exceeded the equivalent metrics for missions conducted with pilots/human-operators in the loop. Alternatively, an independent, knowledgeable observer could provide the "UAV Turing Test" ratings of whether a vehicle is autonomous or "piloted." This observer ideally would, in the more sophisticated mission simulations, also have the enhanced capability of being able to override the scripted mission scenario and instigate failure modes and change of flight profile/plans. If a majority of mission tasks are rated as "piloted" by the observer, when in reality the vehicle/simulation is fully- or semi- autonomously controlled, then the vehicle/simulation "passes" the "UAV Turing Test." In this regards, this second "UAV Turing Test" approach is more consistent with Turing s original "imitation game" proposal. The overall feasibility, and important considerations and limitations, of such an approach for judging/evaluating autonomous aerial vehicle "intelligence" will be discussed from a

  12. Human Supervision of Multiple Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2013-0143 HUMAN SUPERVISION OF MULTIPLE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Heath A. Ruff Ball...REPORT TYPE Interim 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 09-16-08 – 03-22-13 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HUMAN SUPERVISION OF MULTIPLE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES 5a...Supervision of Multiple Autonomous Vehicles To support the vision of a system that enables a single operator to control multiple next-generation

  13. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T van den Heever

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 50-year-old female patient after sustaining a wound to her right lower leg. She developed autonomic dysfunction, which included labile hypertension alternating with hypotension and sweating. The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine sulphate infusion, magnesium sulphate, and clonidine. She also received adrenaline and phenylephrine infusions as needed for hypotension. We then discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features and treatment options of autonomic dysfunction.

  14. Public Health, Ethics, and Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Janet

    2017-04-01

    With the potential to save nearly 30 000 lives per year in the United States, autonomous vehicles portend the most significant advance in auto safety history by shifting the focus from minimization of postcrash injury to collision prevention. I have delineated the important public health implications of autonomous vehicles and provided a brief analysis of a critically important ethical issue inherent in autonomous vehicle design. The broad expertise, ethical principles, and values of public health should be brought to bear on a wide range of issues pertaining to autonomous vehicles.

  15. A Generic Architecture for Autonomous Uninhabited Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbier, Magali; Gabard, Jean-Francois; Ayreault, Herve

    2007-01-01

    ...; few solutions propose architecture adaptive to several types of platform. Autonomous vehicles that move in partially known and dynamic environments have to deal with asynchronous disruptive events...

  16. Research Institute for Autonomous Precision Guided Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogacki, John R

    2007-01-01

    ... actuators, development of a visualization lab for modeling vision based guidance algorithms, concept development of a rapid prototyping and aero characterization lab, vision based control of autonomous...

  17. Physical training in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Fletcher, RN, MN, FAAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a primary health concern in North and South America, with hospitalizations for heart failure as the primary diagnosis continuing to rise. There is a positive relationship between the prevalence of heart failure and age. However, mortality from heart failure is on the decline due to medical advancements, pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacological interventions. One of these nonpharmacological interventions is physical training or exercise. Physical training or exercise is becoming widely accepted by the medical community as a viable option in the medical management of stable heart failure patients. Both aerobic and resistance type exercise have been shown to be efficacious in stable heart failure patients. Evidence now exists not only supporting exercise to improve or maintain physical function in heart failure patients, but also quality of life. Many studies have shown that utilizing exercise in this population improves mood and overall self-reported well being. While the myocardial benefits from exercise may be minimal in heart failure patients, the peripheral benefits leading to improved physical function and preservation of independence are indispensible. Based on the research that has been conducted in the area of exercise and heart failure to this point, clinicians working with this population have the data necessary to prescribe evidence-based exercise prescriptions that can be utilized as part of a comprehensive medical management approach. Currently, several medical position statements endorse exercise as a safe and effective modality in heart failure patients.

  18. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  19. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  20. Autonomously managed electrical power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callis, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    The electric power systems for future spacecraft such as the Space Station will necessarily be more sophisticated and will exhibit more nearly autonomous operation than earlier spacecraft. These new power systems will be more reliable and flexible than their predecessors offering greater utility to the users. Automation approaches implemented on various power system breadboards are investigated. These breadboards include the Hubble Space Telescope power system test bed, the Common Module Power Management and Distribution system breadboard, the Autonomusly Managed Power System (AMPS) breadboard, and the 20 kilohertz power system breadboard. Particular attention is given to the AMPS breadboard. Future plans for these breadboards including the employment of artificial intelligence techniques are addressed.

  1. Autonomous quality assurance and troubleshooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPlain, Ronald F.; Radziwill, Nicole M.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2006-06-01

    To improve operational availability (the proportion of time that a telescope is able to accomplish what a visiting observer wants at the time the observation is scheduled), response time to faults must be minimized. One way this can be accomplished is by characterizing the relationships and interdependencies between components in a control system, developing algorithms to identify the root cause of a problem, and capturing expert knowledge of a system to simplify the process of troubleshooting. Results from a prototype development are explained, along with deployment issues. Implications for the future, such as effective knowledge representation and management, and learning processes which integrate autonomous and interactive components, are discussed.

  2. Artificial Intelligence in Autonomous Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, William; Thanjavur, Karun

    2011-03-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is key to the natural evolution of today's automated telescopes to fully autonomous systems. Based on its rapid development over the past five decades, AI offers numerous, well-tested techniques for knowledge based decision making essential for real-time telescope monitoring and control, with minimal - and eventually no - human intervention. We present three applications of AI developed at CFHT for monitoring instantaneous sky conditions, assessing quality of imaging data, and a prototype for scheduling observations in real-time. Closely complementing the current remote operations at CFHT, we foresee further development of these methods and full integration in the near future.

  3. Topological entropy of autonomous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    When studying fluid dynamics, especially in a turbulent regime, it is crucial to estimate the number of active degrees of freedom or of localized structures in the system. The topological entropy quantifies the exponential growth of the number of `distinct` orbits in a dynamical system as a function of their length, in the infinite spatial resolution limit. Here, I illustrate a novel method for its evaluation, which extends beyond maps and is applicable to any system, including autonomous flows: these are characterized by lack of a definite absolute time scale for the orbit lengths. (author) 8 refs.

  4. BART: The Czech Autonomous Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Štrobl, Jan; Polášek, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, Spec. Is. (2010), 103986/1-103986/5 ISSN 1687-7969. [Workshop on Robotic Autonomous Observatories. Málaga, 18.05.2009-21.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : robotic telescope * BART * gamma ray bursts Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics http://www.hindawi.com/journals/aa/2010/103986.html

  5. Analysis of emergency operating procedures effectiveness for core damage prevention using computer code RELAP for nuclear power plants with VVER-1000/B-320 in reference to primary to secondary circuit leak with external power loss and BRU-A stuck open failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangelski, L.; Sheveliov, D. V.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents analysis of development emergency operating procedures effectiveness for possible accident on nuclear power plant with WWER-1000 reactor type. Accident initiating event is the primary to secondary circuit leak caused by steam generator primary cover lift-up. In according to conservative assumptions the following additional failures were considered: dump valve BRU-A stuck open failure; loss of external power. The results of this work are represented as a comparative analysis of two possible ways of accident evolution: according to functioning automatic safety systems responses; according to accident management based on development emergency operating procedures with operator intervention. Developed emergency operating procedures assure the following significant goals to mitigate accident sequences: optimal use of ECCS water inventory; severe core damage prevention; mitigation of environment radioactive contamination. (authors)

  6. Autonomous Lawnmower using FPGA implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabihah; Lokman, Nabill bin; Helmy Abd Wahab, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, there are various types of robot have been invented for multiple purposes. The robots have the special characteristic that surpass the human ability and could operate in extreme environment which human cannot endure. In this paper, an autonomous robot is built to imitate the characteristic of a human cutting grass. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the movements where all data and information would be processed. Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is used to describe the hardware using Quartus II software. This robot has the ability of avoiding obstacle using ultrasonic sensor. This robot used two DC motors for its movement. It could include moving forward, backward, and turning left and right. The movement or the path of the automatic lawn mower is based on a path planning technique. Four Global Positioning System (GPS) plot are set to create a boundary. This to ensure that the lawn mower operates within the area given by user. Every action of the lawn mower is controlled by the FPGA DE' Board Cyclone II with the help of the sensor. Furthermore, Sketch Up software was used to design the structure of the lawn mower. The autonomous lawn mower was able to operate efficiently and smoothly return to coordinated paths after passing the obstacle. It uses 25% of total pins available on the board and 31% of total Digital Signal Processing (DSP) blocks.

  7. Structured control for autonomous robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and occupational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive behaviors onto deliberative components. In this structured control approach, the deliberative components handle normal situations and the reactive behaviors, which are explicitly constrained as to when and how they are activated, handle exceptional situations. The Task Control Architecture (TCA) has been developed to support this approach. TCA provides an integrated set of control constructs useful for implementing deliberative and reactive behaviors. The control constructs facilitate modular and evolutionary system development: they are used to integrate and coordinate planning, perception, and execution, and to incrementally improve the efficiency and robustness of the robot systems. To date, TCA has been used in implementing a half-dozen mobile robot systems, including an autonomous six-legged rover and indoor mobile manipulator

  8. Hypogonadism and renal failure: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumavalavan, Nannan; Wilken, Nathan A; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both hypogonadism and renal failure is increasing. Hypogonadism in men with renal failure carries with it significant morbidity, including anemia and premature cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether testosterone therapy can affect the morbidity and mortality associated with renal failure. As such, in this review, we sought to evaluate the current literature addressing hypogonadism and testosterone replacement, specifically in men with renal failure. The articles chosen for this review were selected by performing a broad search using Pubmed, Embase and Scopus including the terms hypogonadism and renal failure from 1990 to the present. This review is based on both primary sources as well as review articles. Hypogonadism in renal failure has a multifactorial etiology, including co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, old age and obesity. Renal failure can lead to decreased luteinizing hormone production and decreased prolactin clearance that could impair testosterone production. Given the increasing prevalence of hypogonadism and the potential morbidity associated with hypogonadism in men with renal failure, careful evaluation of serum testosterone would be valuable. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men with symptomatic hypogonadism and renal failure, and may ameliorate some of the morbidity associated with renal failure. Patients with all stages of renal disease are at an increased risk of hypogonadism that could be associated with significant morbidity. Testosterone replacement therapy may reduce some of the morbidity of renal failure, although it carries risk.

  9. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  10. An autonomous weeding robot for organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at ¯eld level. The autonomous weeding robot was designed using a structured design approach, giving a good overview of the total design. A vehicle was developed with a diesel engine,

  11. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are available to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions

  12. Overfeeding, autonomic regulation and metabolic consequences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, A.J.W.; Balkan, B; Strubbe, J.H.; van Dijk, G.; Steffens, A.B

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of body processes in health and disease. Overfeeding and obesity (a disproportional increase of the fat mass of the body) are often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The

  13. Technologies for highly miniaturized autonomous sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, K.; Gyselinckx, B.; Torfs, T.; Leonov, V.; Yazicioglu, F.; Brebels, S.; Donnay, S.; Vanfleteren, J.; Beyne, E.; Hoof, C. van

    2006-01-01

    Recent results of the autonomous sensor research program HUMAN++ will be summarized in this paper. The research program aims to achieve highly miniaturized and (nearly) autonomous sensor systems that assist our health and comfort. Although the application examples are dedicated to human

  14. Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-03

    I I Final Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles F49620-01-1-0337 6. AUTHOR(S... Autonomous Vehicles Final Report Kendall E. Nygard Department of Computer Science and Operations Research North Dakota State University Fargo, ND 58105-5164

  15. 3-D Vision Techniques for Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    TITLE (Include Security Classification) W 3-D Vision Techniques for Autonomous Vehicles 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Martial Hebert, Takeo Kanade, inso Kweoni... Autonomous Vehicles Martial Hebert, Takeo Kanade, Inso Kweon CMU-RI-TR-88-12 The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Acession For Pittsburgh

  16. Autonomy Level Specification for Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Autonomy Level Specification for Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles : Interim Progress Report Hui-Min Huang, Elena Messina, James Albus...Level Specification for Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles : Interim Progress Report 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  17. Intelligent autonomous systems 12. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukhan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of). College of Information and Communication Engineering; Yoon, Kwang-Joon [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyungsuck [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jangmyung (eds.) [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electronics Engineering

    2013-02-01

    Recent research in Intelligent and Autonomous Systems. Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 12th International Conference IAS-12, held June 26-29, 2012, jeju Island, Korea. Written by leading experts in the field. Intelligent autonomous systems are emerged as a key enabler for the creation of a new paradigm of services to humankind, as seen by the recent advancement of autonomous cars licensed for driving in our streets, of unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles carrying out hazardous tasks on-site, and of space robots engaged in scientific as well as operational missions, to list only a few. This book aims at serving the researchers and practitioners in related fields with a timely dissemination of the recent progress on intelligent autonomous systems, based on a collection of papers presented at the 12th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems, held in Jeju, Korea, June 26-29, 2012. With the theme of ''Intelligence and Autonomy for the Service to Humankind, the conference has covered such diverse areas as autonomous ground, aerial, and underwater vehicles, intelligent transportation systems, personal/domestic service robots, professional service robots for surgery/rehabilitation, rescue/security and space applications, and intelligent autonomous systems for manufacturing and healthcare. This volume 2 includes contributions devoted to Service Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction and Autonomous Multi-Agent Systems and Life Engineering.

  18. Safe and Autonomous Drones for Urban Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are no longer futuristic technology; in fact, there are already cars with self-driving features on the road. Over the next five years, the connected vehicles will disrupt the entire automotive and UAS ecosystems. The industry will undergo fundamental change as semi-autonomous driving and flying emerges, followed by an eventual shift to full autonomy.

  19. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  20. Autonomic composite hydrogels by reactive printing: materials and oscillatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramb, R C; Buskohl, P R; Slone, C; Smith, M L; Vaia, R A

    2014-03-07

    Autonomic materials are those that automatically respond to a change in environmental conditions, such as temperature or chemical composition. While such materials hold incredible potential for a wide range of uses, their implementation is limited by the small number of fully-developed material systems. To broaden the number of available systems, we have developed a post-functionalization technique where a reactive Ru catalyst ink is printed onto a non-responsive polymer substrate. Using a succinimide-amine coupling reaction, patterns are printed onto co-polymer or biomacromolecular films containing primary amine functionality, such as polyacrylamide (PAAm) or poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAAm) copolymerized with poly-N-(3-Aminopropyl)methacrylamide (PAPMAAm). When the films are placed in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) solution medium, the reaction takes place only inside the printed nodes. In comparison to alternative BZ systems, where Ru-containing monomers are copolymerized with base monomers, reactive printing provides facile tuning of a range of hydrogel compositions, as well as enabling the formation of mechanically robust composite monoliths. The autonomic response of the printed nodes is similar for all matrices in the BZ solution concentrations examined, where the period of oscillation decreases in response to increasing sodium bromate or nitric acid concentration. A temperature increase reduces the period of oscillations and temperature gradients are shown to function as pace-makers, dictating the direction of the autonomic response (chemical waves).

  1. AUTONOMOUS LEARNING STRATEGY OF THE SUCCESSFUL NONTRADITIONAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zulaihah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most students of English Education Program in STKIP PGRI Ponorogo can be considered as nontraditional students with family, work, and other life responsibilities which have many influences on their educational goals. Autonomous learning is a customized way of learning applied by individual to find out his own learning needs and learning goals, decide the most appropriate way for his own learning, as well as to monitor and evaluate the learning progress. This research used qualitative descriptive method. The primary techniques in data collection were questionnaire, and interview. In general, the most influential motivation for the students was internal motivation. Advisor’s availability, text book, internet, supportive atmosphere, self discipline, cozy and quiet place, and early morning were among the students’ choices for their autonomous learning. They frequently used music, film, video, essay, and smart phone application in their study. In general, the nontraditional students with high achievement were often felt easy to understand the material especially when it was delivered in relatively “easy” language, expressed their opinion bravely, and patient in doing their tasks. They considered friends, best friends, and lecturer as people who were capable to help them in doing autonomous learning

  2. Cardiac autonomic modulation impairments in advanced breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Claudia; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; da Silva Paiva, Laércio; Fulghum, Kyle Levi; Fristachi, Carlos Elias; Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto; Elias, Simone; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; Ferreira Filho, Celso; Gidron, Yori; Ferreira, Celso

    2018-05-02

    To compare cardiac autonomic modulation in early- versus advanced-stage breast cancer patients before any type of cancer treatment and investigate associated factors. This cross-sectional study included women (30-69 years old) with primary diagnosis of breast cancer and women with benign breast tumors. We evaluated cardiac modulation by heart rate variability and assessed factors of anxiety, depression, physical activity, and other relevant medical variables. Patients were divided into three groups based on TNM staging of cancer severity: early-stage cancer (n = 42), advanced-stage cancer (n = 37), or benign breast tumors to serve as a control (n = 37). We analyzed heart rate variability in time and frequency domains. The advanced-stage cancer group had lower vagal modulation than early-stage and benign groups; also, the advance-stage group had lower overall heart rate variability when compared to benign conditions. Heart rate variability was influenced by age, menopausal status, and BMI. Heart rate variability seems to be a promising, non-invasive tool for early diagnosis of autonomic dysfunction in breast cancer and detection of cardiovascular impairments at cancer diagnosis. Cardiac autonomic modulation is inversely associated with breast cancer staging.

  3. ROV90 - A prototype autonomous inspection vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedseth, Oe.J.; Hallset, J.O.

    1991-04-01

    Simple autonomous inspection vehicles are suitable for operations where the cost, danger to humans, or area of operation prohibits the use of conventional underwater technology. Autonomous vehicles are, however, in their infancy and few such vehicles are available. There are still some problems to be overcome before this technology becomes useful in commercial applications. We have built ROV90 to investigate these problems. It is a test bed for experimenting with the different parts of an autonomous underwater vehicle. ROV90 will be able to autonomously follow prominent features in the real world, man made or natural. Examples are pipelines or walls in tunnels. ROV90 is tethered, but we are planning to use experience and results from ROV90 to develop av ''real'' autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) called PISCIS. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Enabling autonomous control for space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    The application of nuclear reactors for space power and/or propulsion presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a space reactor power system (SRPS) employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. Thus, a SRPS control system must provide for operational autonomy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted an investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control to determine the experience base in the nuclear power application domain, both for space and terrestrial use. It was found that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and basic control for a SRPS is clearly feasible under optimum circumstances. However, autonomous control is primarily intended to account for the non optimum circumstances when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor and near-term human intervention is not possible. Thus, the development and demonstration of autonomous control capabilities for the specific domain of space nuclear power operations is needed. This paper will discuss the findings of the ORNL study and provide a description of the concept of autonomy, its key characteristics, and a prospective

  5. Current challenges in autonomous driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, I.; Todoruţ, A.; Cordoş, N.; Molea, A.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays the automotive industry makes a quantum shift to a future, where the driver will have smaller and smaller role in driving his or her vehicle ending up being totally excluded. In this paper, we have investigated the different levels of driving automatization, the prospective effects of these new technologies on the environment and traffic safety, the importance of regulations and their current state, the moral aspects of introducing these technologies and the possible scenarios of deploying the autonomous vehicles. We have found that the self-driving technologies are facing many challenges: a) They must make decisions faster in very diverse conditions which can include many moral dilemmas as well; b) They have an important potential in reducing the environmental pollution by optimizing their routes, driving styles by communicating with other vehicles, infrastructures and their environment; c) There is a considerable gap between the self-drive technology level and the current regulations; fortunately, this gap shows a continuously decreasing trend; d) In case of many types of imminent accidents management there are many concerns about the ability of making the right decision. Considering that this field has an extraordinary speed of development, our study is up to date at the submission deadline. Self-driving technologies become increasingly sophisticated and technically accessible, and in some cases, they can be deployed for commercial vehicles as well. According to the current stage of research and development, it is still unclear how the self-driving technologies will be able to handle extreme and unexpected events including their moral aspects. Since most of the traffic accidents are caused by human error or omission, it is expected that the emergence of the autonomous technologies will reduce these accidents in their number and gravity, but the very few currently available test results have not been able to scientifically underpin this issue yet. The

  6. Premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is the occurrence of hypergonadotropic hypoestrogenic amenorrhea in women under the age of forty years. It is idiopathic in 74-90% patients. Known cases can be divided into primary and secondary POF. In primary POF genetic aberrations can involve the X chromosome (monosomy, trisomy, translocations, deletions or autosomes. Genetic mechanisms include reduced gene dosage and non-specific chromosome effects impairing meiosis, decreasing the pool of primordial follicles and increasing atresia due to apoptosis or failure of follicle maturation. Autoimmune ovarian damage is caused by alteration of T-cell subsets and T-cell mediated injury, increase of autoantibody producing B-cells, a low number of effector/cytotoxic lymphocyte, which decreases the number and activity of natural killer cells. Bilateral oophorectomy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and infections cause the secondary POF. Symptoms of POF include irritability, nervousness, loss of libido, depression, lack of concentration, hot flushes, weight gaining, dry skin, vaginal dryness, frequent infections etc. The diagnosis is confirmed by the level of FSH of over 40 IU/L and estradiol below 50 pmol/L in women aged below 40 years. Biochemical and other hormonal analysis (free thyroxin, TSH, prolactin, testosterone, karyotype (<30 years of age, ultrasound of the breasts and pelvis are advisable. Optimal therapy is combined estrogen progestagen therapy given in a sequential rhythm, after excluding absolute contraindications. Testosterone can be added to adnexectomized women and those with a low libido. Sequential estrogen progestagen replacement therapy is the first line therapy for ovulation induction in those looking for pregnancy and after that oocyte donation will be advised. Appropriate estro-progestagen therapy improves the quality of life and prevents complications such as cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, stroke etc.

  7. Distributed Algorithm for Collision Avoidance at Road Intersections in the Presence of Communication Failures

    OpenAIRE

    Savic, Vladimir; Schiller, Elad M.; Papatriantafilou, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication is a crucial component of the future autonomous driving systems since it enables improved awareness of the surrounding environment, even without extensive processing of sensory information. However, V2V communication is prone to failures and delays, so a distributed fault-tolerant approach is required for safe and efficient transportation. In this paper, we focus on the intersection crossing (IC) problem with autonomous vehicles that cooperate via V2V co...

  8. Autonomous Flight Rules Concept: User Implementation Costs and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, William B.; Hilb, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The costs to implement Autonomous Flight Rules (AFR) were examined for estimates in acquisition, installation, training and operations. The user categories were airlines, fractional operators, general aviation and unmanned aircraft systems. Transition strategies to minimize costs while maximizing operational benefits were also analyzed. The primary cost category was found to be the avionics acquisition. Cost ranges for AFR equipment were given to reflect the uncertainty of the certification level for the equipment and the extent of existing compatible avionics in the aircraft to be modified.

  9. Primary headaches in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is a widespread clinical problem; the prevalence is high in all age groups, from which children and teenagers are not spared. It has been reported that, as many as 75% of school-age children may experience headache infrequently, among them 10% have recurrent headaches. [1],[2] The vast majority of headaches are primary and classified as migraine, tension-type headache (TTH, cluster headache, and other trigeminal autonomic cephalgias. The type of primary headaches could usually be diagnosed by a thorough and careful history taking, and physical examination. Once the diagnosis of migraine is established and appropriate reassurance provided, a balanced and individually tailored treatment plan can be instituted. The goal of treatment includes abortive or acute pain treatment, preventive long-term treatment, and biobehavioral therapy. Knowledge of precise impact of primary headaches on child′s quality of life helps to design a proper comprehensive treatment plan.

  10. Predicting Subsequent Task Performance From Goal Motivation and Goal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catherine Healy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated that the cognitive processes associated with goal pursuit can continue to interfere with unrelated tasks when a goal is unfulfilled. Drawing from the self-regulation and goal-striving literatures, the present study explored the impact of goal failure on subsequent cognitive and physical task performance. Furthermore, we examined if the autonomous or controlled motivation underpinning goal striving moderates the responses to goal failure. Athletes (75 male, 59 female, Mage = 19.90 years, SDage = 3.50 completed a cycling trial with the goal of covering a given distance in 8 minutes. Prior to the trial, their motivation was primed using a video. During the trial they were provided with manipulated performance feedback, thus creating conditions of goal success or failure. No differences emerged in the responses to goal failure between the primed motivation or performance feedback conditions. We make recommendations for future research into how individuals can deal with failure in goal striving.

  11. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    areas, which is consistent with the Braak hypothesis. In the narcolepsy patients, it was shown that a reduced HRR to arousals was primarily predicted by hypocretin deficiency in both rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep, independent of cataplexy and other factors. The results confirm...... that hypocretin deficiency affects the autonomic nervous system of patients with narcolepsy and that the hypocretin system is important for proper heart rate modulation at rest.Furthermore, it was shown that hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake and REM sleep...... control, indicating that the disorder may serve as a human model for the sleep-wake and REM sleep flip-flop switches. The increased frequency of transitions may cause increased sympathetic activity during sleep and thereby increased heart rate, or the increased heart rate could be caused by decreased...

  12. Autonomous navigation system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  13. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  14. Wireless autonomous device data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, Jr., David W. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Mi, Minhong (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of communicating information from a wireless autonomous device (WAD) to a base station. The WAD has a data element having a predetermined profile having a total number of sequenced possible data element combinations. The method includes receiving at the WAD an RF profile transmitted by the base station that includes a triggering portion having a number of pulses, wherein the number is at least equal to the total number of possible data element combinations. The method further includes keeping a count of received pulses and wirelessly transmitting a piece of data, preferably one bit, to the base station when the count reaches a value equal to the stored data element's particular number in the sequence. Finally, the method includes receiving the piece of data at the base station and using the receipt thereof to determine which of the possible data element combinations the stored data element is.

  15. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  16. Digital autonomous terminal access communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A significant problem for the Bus Monitor Unit is to identify the source of a given transmission. This problem arises from the fact that the label which identifies the source of the transmission as it is put into the bus is intercepted by the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communications (DATAC) terminal and removed from the transmission. Thus, a given subsystem will see only data associated with a label and never the identifying label itself. The Bus Monitor must identify the source of the transmission so as to be able to provide some type of error identification/location in the event that some problem with the data transmission occurs. Steps taken to alleviate this problem by modifications to the DATAC terminal are discussed.

  17. Full autonomous microline trace robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Deer; Lu, Si; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan

    2000-10-01

    Optoelectric inspection may find applications in robotic system. In micro robotic system, smaller optoelectric inspection system is preferred. However, as miniaturizing the size of the robot, the number of the optoelectric detector becomes lack. And lack of the information makes the micro robot difficult to acquire its status. In our lab, a micro line trace robot has been designed, which autonomous acts based on its optoelectric detection. It has been programmed to follow a black line printed on the white colored ground. Besides the optoelectric inspection, logical algorithm in the microprocessor is also important. In this paper, we propose a simply logical algorithm to realize robot's intelligence. The robot's intelligence is based on a AT89C2051 microcontroller which controls its movement. The technical details of the micro robot are as follow: dimension: 30mm*25mm*35*mm; velocity: 60mm/s.

  18. Knowledge representation methods for early failure detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, K.P.; Stiller, P.

    1990-01-01

    To supervise technical processes like nuclear power plants, it is very important to detect failure modes in an early stage. In the nuclear research center at Karlsruhe an expert system is developed, embedded in a computer network of autonomous computers, which are used for intelligent prepocessing. Events, process data and actual parameter values are stored in slots of special frames in the knowledge base of the expert system. Both rule based and fact based knowledge representations are employed to generate cause consequence chains of failure states. By on-line surveillance of the reactor process, the slots of the frames are dynamically actualized. Immediately after the evaluation, the inference engine starts in the special domain experts (triggered by metarules from a manager) and detects the correspondend failures or anomaly state. Matching the members of the chain and regarding a catalogue of instructions and messages, what is to do by the operator, future failure states can be estimated and propagation can be prohibited. That means qualitative failure prediction based on cause consequence in the static part of the knowledge base. Also, a time series of physical data can be used to predict on analytical way future process state and to continue such a theoretical propagation with matching the cause consuquence chain

  19. Reforma da Atenção Primária em Portugal em duplo movimento: unidades assistenciais autónomas de saúde familiar e gestão em agrupamentos de Centros de Saúde Primary Healthcare Reform in Portugal on two fronts: autonomous family healthcare units and management of groupings of Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pisco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Analisa-se o processo de reforma da atenção primária à saúde (APS em Portugal de 2005 a abril de 2010, período em que a Missão para os Cuidados de Saúde Primários teve a responsabilidade de conduzir essa profunda reconfiguração da APS Portuguesa. Os principais objectivos da reforma foram: melhorar a acessibilidade, eficiência, qualidade e continuidade dos cuidados e aumentar a satisfação dos profissionais e cidadãos. Suas principais características são a adesão voluntária, trabalho em equipa, existência obrigatória de sistema de informação, pagamento por desempenho, contratualização e avaliação. A reconfiguração dos centros de saúde obedeceu a um duplo movimento: por um lado, formação de pequenas unidades funcionais autónomas, as Unidades de Saúde Familiar (USF, prestando serviços com proximidade e qualidade; por outro lado, a agregação de recursos e estruturas de gestão, os agrupamentos de Centros de Saúde (ACES visando a eficiência e economia de escala. As USF conseguiram simultaneamente mais eficiência, acessibilidade, melhor clima laboral, maior satisfação dos cidadãos, numa palavra, mais qualidade. Salienta-se a importância de um forte apoio político, da criação de uma estrutura responsável pelo desenho e implementação da reforma e de uma boa comunicação social.In 2005, Portugal began a reform of Primary Health Care. This reform process through to April 2010 is described and analyzed. During this period the Mission for Primary Health Care was responsible for conducting a profound reconfiguration. The main objectives for this reform were to improve accessibility, efficiency, quality and continuity of care and increase the satisfaction of professionals and citizens. The main features are voluntary adhesion, teamwork, mandatory information system, performance-sensitive payment, contracting and evaluation. The reconfiguration of health centers was two pronged. First, there was the formation

  20. Autonomous and professional maintenance in metallurgical enterprise as activities within total productive maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The content of this publication consists of notions connected with Total Productive Maintenance (TPM in metallurgical enterprise. The basic areas of devices condition management through Autonomous and Professional Maintenance are described here. Mentioned areas of activities are performed in metallurgical enterprise ArcelorMittal Poland within pillars of World Class Manufacturing (WCM. The aims of UR programs are to maintain the basic functionality of the devices and decrease the number of failures in order to reach improvement of production efficiency.

  1. A Role for the Autonomic Nervous System in Modulating the Immune Response during Mild Emotional Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croiset, Gerda; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Wal, Wim E. van der; Boer, Sietse F. de; Wied, David de

    1990-01-01

    The role of the autonomic nervous system in the modulation of the immune response to emotional stimuli, was established in rats subjected to the passive avoidance test. An increase in splenic primary antibody response directed against SRBC was found after exposure of rats to the passive avoidance

  2. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  3. Stress, autonomic imbalance, and the prediction of metabolic risk: A model and a proposal for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulsin, Lawson; Herman, James; Thayer, Julian F

    2018-03-01

    Devising novel prevention strategies for metabolic disorders will depend in part on the careful elucidation of the common pathways for developing metabolic risks. The neurovisceral integration model has proposed that autonomic imbalance plays an important role in the pathway from acute and chronic stress to cardiovascular disease. Though generally overlooked by clinicians, autonomic imbalance (sympathetic overactivity and/or parasympathetic underactivity) can be measured and modified by methods that are available in primary care. This review applies the neurovisceral integration concept to the clinical setting by proposing that autonomic imbalance plays a primary role in the development of metabolic risks. We present a testable model, a systematic review of the evidence in support of autonomic imbalance as a predictor for metabolic risks, and specific approaches to test this model as a guide to future research on the role of stress in metabolic disorders. We propose that autonomic imbalance deserves consideration by researchers, clinicians, and policymakers as a target for early interventions to prevent metabolic disorders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Failure to thrive: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sarah Z; Lanham, Jason S

    2011-04-01

    Failure to thrive in childhood is a state of undernutrition due to inadequate caloric intake, inadequate caloric absorption, or excessive caloric expenditure. In the United States, it is seen in 5 to 10 percent of children in primary care settings. Although failure to thrive is often defined as a weight for age that falls below the 5th percentile on multiple occasions or weight deceleration that crosses two major percentile lines on a growth chart, use of any single indicator has a low positive predictive value. Most cases of failure to thrive involve inadequate caloric intake caused by behavioral or psychosocial issues. The most important part of the outpatient evaluation is obtaining an accurate account of a child's eating habits and caloric intake. Routine laboratory testing rarely identifies a cause and is not generally recommended. Reasons to hospitalize a child for further evaluation include failure of outpatient management, suspicion of abuse or neglect, or severe psychosocial impairment of the caregiver. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment, including home nursing visits and nutritional counseling, has been shown to improve weight gain, parent-child relationships, and cognitive development. The long-term effects of failure to thrive on cognitive development and future academic performance are unclear.

  5. An Autonomous Distributed Fault-Tolerant Local Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a fault-tolerant, GPS-independent (Global Positioning System) distributed autonomous positioning system for static/mobile objects and present solutions for providing highly-accurate geo-location data for the static/mobile objects in dynamic environments. The reliability and accuracy of a positioning system fundamentally depends on two factors; its timeliness in broadcasting signals and the knowledge of its geometry, i.e., locations and distances of the beacons. Existing distributed positioning systems either synchronize to a common external source like GPS or establish their own time synchrony using a scheme similar to a master-slave by designating a particular beacon as the master and other beacons synchronize to it, resulting in a single point of failure. Another drawback of existing positioning systems is their lack of addressing various fault manifestations, in particular, communication link failures, which, as in wireless networks, are increasingly dominating the process failures and are typically transient and mobile, in the sense that they typically affect different messages to/from different processes over time.

  6. Current challenges in autonomous vehicle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J.; Hong, W. S.; Mahoney, R. B., Jr.; Sparrow, D. A.

    2006-05-01

    The field of autonomous vehicles is a rapidly growing one, with significant interest from both government and industry sectors. Autonomous vehicles represent the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, combining decision-making with real-time control. Autonomous vehicles are desired for use in search and rescue, urban reconnaissance, mine detonation, supply convoys, and more. The general adage is to use robots for anything dull, dirty, dangerous or dumb. While a great deal of research has been done on autonomous systems, there are only a handful of fielded examples incorporating machine autonomy beyond the level of teleoperation, especially in outdoor/complex environments. In an attempt to assess and understand the current state of the art in autonomous vehicle development, a few areas where unsolved problems remain became clear. This paper outlines those areas and provides suggestions for the focus of science and technology research. The first step in evaluating the current state of autonomous vehicle development was to develop a definition of autonomy. A number of autonomy level classification systems were reviewed. The resulting working definitions and classification schemes used by the authors are summarized in the opening sections of the paper. The remainder of the report discusses current approaches and challenges in decision-making and real-time control for autonomous vehicles. Suggested research focus areas for near-, mid-, and long-term development are also presented.

  7. Immune mediated liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capac...

  8. Chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Ingrid; Easton, Kellie

    2017-01-01

    1. The common symptoms and signs of chronic heart failure are dyspnoea, ankle swelling, raised jugular venous pressure and basal crepitations. Other conditions may be confused with chronic heart failure, including dependent oedema or oedema due to renal or hepatic disease. Shortness of breath may be due to respiratory disease or severe anaemia. Heart failure secondary to lung disease (cor pulmonale) should be distinguished from congestive cardiac failure. Heart failure may also present with l...

  9. Type D personality is a predictor of poor emotional quality of life in primary care heart failure patients independent of depressive symptoms and New York Heart Association functional class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; de Jonge, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Quality of life is an important patient-centered outcome and predictor of mortality in heart failure, but little is known about the role of personality as a determinant of quality of life in this patient group. We examined the influence of Type D personality (i.e., increased negative emotions...

  10. Health care system delay and heart failure in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention: follow-up of population-based medical registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Hansen, Hans-Henrik Tilsted

    2011-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), delay between contact with the health care system and initiation of reperfusion therapy (system delay) is associated with mortality, but data on the associated risk for congestive heart failure (CHF) among survivors are limited....

  11. PHM Enabled Autonomous Propellant Loading Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The utility of Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) software capability applied to Autonomous Operations (AO) remains an active research area within aerospace applications. The ability to gain insight into which assets and subsystems are functioning properly, along with the derivation of confident predictions concerning future ability, reliability, and availability, are important enablers for making sound mission planning decisions. When coupled with software that fully supports mission planning and execution, an integrated solution can be developed that leverages state assessment and estimation for the purposes of delivering autonomous operations. The authors have been applying this integrated, model-based approach to the autonomous loading of cryogenic spacecraft propellants at Kennedy Space Center.

  12. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic...... symptoms has never been systematically performed. Patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD (318 cases) and controls (137 healthy volunteers and 181 sleep center controls with sleep diagnoses other than RBD) were recruited from 13 neurological centers in 10 countries from 2008 to 2011. A validated scale...

  13. Cognitive Deficit in Heart Failure and the Benefits of Aerobic Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luíza de Medeiros Rêgo

    Full Text Available Abstract Heart Failure is a clinical syndrome prevalent throughout the world and a major contribution to mortality of cardiac patients in Brazil. In addition, this pathology is strongly related to cerebral dysfunction, with a high prevalence of cognitive impairment. Many mechanisms may be related to cognitive loss, such as cerebral hypoperfusion, atrophy and loss of gray matter of the brain, and dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. The literature is clear regarding the benefits of aerobic physical activity in healthy populations in the modulation of the autonomic nervous system and in brain functions. Studies have shown that in the population of patients with heart failure, exercise is associated with an improvement in cognitive function, as well as in cardiac autonomic regulation. However, little emphasis has been given to the mechanisms by which aerobic physical activity can benefit brain functioning, the autonomic nervous system and result in better cognitive performance, particularly in patients with heart failure. Therefore, the present work presents the ways in which brain areas responsible for cognition also act in the modulation of the autonomic nervous system, and emphasizes its importance for the understanding of cognitive impairment in relation to the pathophysiology of heart failure. It is also described the way in which aerobic physical activity can promote benefits when it is integrated into the therapy, associated to a better prognosis of the clinical picture of these patients.

  14. Autonomous vehicles' disengagements: Trends, triggers, and regulatory limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favarò, Francesca; Eurich, Sky; Nader, Nazanin

    2018-01-01

    Autonomous Vehicle (AV) technology is quickly becoming a reality on US roads. Testing on public roads is currently undergoing, with many AV makers located and testing in Silicon Valley, California. The California Department of Motor Vehicles (CA DMV) currently mandates that any vehicle tested on California public roads be retrofitted to account for a back-up human driver, and that data related to disengagements of the AV technology be publicly available. Disengagements data is analyzed in this work, given the safety-critical role of AV disengagements, which require the control of the vehicle to be handed back to the human driver in a safe and timely manner. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the fragmented data obtained from AV manufacturers testing on California public roads from 2014 to 2017. Trends of disengagement reporting, associated frequencies, average mileage driven before failure, and an analysis of triggers and contributory factors are here presented. The analysis of the disengagements data also highlights several shortcomings of the current regulations. The results presented thus constitute an important starting point for improvements on the current drafts of the testing and deployment regulations for autonomous vehicles on public roads. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MULTIAGENT PLANNING OF INTERSECTION PASSAGE BY AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Zikratov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a traffic management system for autonomous vehicles that are agents at the intersection. In contrast to the known solutions based on the usage of semiautonomous control systems in assembly with the control unit, this algorithm is based on the principles of decentralized multiagent control. The best travel plan for intersection passage is produced by means of optimization methods jointly by all agents belonging to a dynamic collaboration of autonomous vehicles. The order of road intersection optimal for a given criterion is determined by the agents in the process of information exchange about themselves and environment. Our experiments show that this protocol can reduce significantly the traffic density as compared to the traditional systems of traffic management. Moreover, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm increases with increasing density of road traffic. In addition, the absence of the critical object, that is the control unit, in the control system, reduces significantly the effectiveness of possible failures and hacker attacks on the intersection control system.

  16. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  17. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  18. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  19. Autonomous Operations Design Guidelines for Flight Hardware

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSC experimentally modified an autonomous operations flexible system suite developed for a ground application for a flight system under development by JSC. The...

  20. Interpersonal communication and issues for autonomous vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Interpersonal roadway communication is a vital component of the transportation system. Road users communicate to coordinate movement and increase roadway safety. Future autonomous vehicle research needs to account for the role of interpersonal roadwa...

  1. Autonomous Task Primitives for Complex Manipulation Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this research effort is to enable robots to autonomously perform the complex manipulation tasks that are necessary to maintain a spacecraft. Robots, like...

  2. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang; Germain, Cé cile; Sebag, Michè le

    2010-01-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting

  3. Autonomous Operations System: Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.; Wilkins, Kim N.; Walker, Mark; Stahl, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous control systems provides the ability of self-governance beyond the conventional control system. As the complexity of mechanical and electrical systems increases, there develops a natural drive for developing robust control systems to manage complicated operations. By closing the bridge between conventional automated systems to knowledge based self-awareness systems, nominal control of operations can evolve into relying on safe critical mitigation processes to support any off-nominal behavior. Current research and development efforts lead by the Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) group at NASA Kennedy Space Center aims to improve cryogenic propellant transfer operations by developing an automated control and health monitoring system. As an integrated systems, the center aims to produce an Autonomous Operations System (AOS) capable of integrating health management operations with automated control to produce a fully autonomous system.

  4. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, Hugo H G; Myburgh, Herman C

    2015-12-02

    There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV), such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  5. Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System (CAPS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent efforts led by the PI of this proposal have studied the benefits of a satellite navigation technique known as Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit...

  6. Computer vision for an autonomous mobile robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Withey, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer vision systems are essential for practical, autonomous, mobile robots – machines that employ artificial intelligence and control their own motion within an environment. As with biological systems, computer vision systems include the vision...

  7. Eye Accommodation, Personality, and Autonomic Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    associated with central nervous system action, "transient catecnolamine ( dopamine and norepinephrine) action followed by a cholinergic rebound together with...parallels of psycnopatny: A psychophysiological model relating autonomic imbalance to hyperactivity, psychopathy, and autism . Advnces in Cild

  8. Data Provisioning Systems for Autonomous Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varaiya, Pravin

    1999-01-01

    This project is part of a portfolio comprising four other projects to investigate the possibility of operating a collection of intelligent autonomous agents so that the collection can undertakes complex missions...

  9. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo H. G. Coppejans

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV, such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  10. Layered Safe Motion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The major problem addressed by this research is how to plan a safe motion for autonomous vehicles in a two dimensional, rectilinear world. With given start and goal configurations, the planner performs motion planning which

  11. Tracked robot controllers for climbing obstacles autonomously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    Research in mobile robot navigation has demonstrated some success in navigating flat indoor environments while avoiding obstacles. However, the challenge of analyzing complex environments to climb obstacles autonomously has had very little success due to the complexity of the task. Unmanned ground vehicles currently exhibit simple autonomous behaviours compared to the human ability to move in the world. This paper presents the control algorithms designed for a tracked mobile robot to autonomously climb obstacles by varying its tracks configuration. Two control algorithms are proposed to solve the autonomous locomotion problem for climbing obstacles. First, a reactive controller evaluates the appropriate geometric configuration based on terrain and vehicle geometric considerations. Then, a reinforcement learning algorithm finds alternative solutions when the reactive controller gets stuck while climbing an obstacle. The methodology combines reactivity to learning. The controllers have been demonstrated in box and stair climbing simulations. The experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for crossing obstacles.

  12. Framework for Autonomous Optimization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phoenix Integration and MIT propose to create a novel autonomous optimization tool and application programming interface (API). The API will demonstrate the ability...

  13. Advisory and autonomous cooperative driving systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T.H.A. van den; Ploeg, J.; Netten, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the traffic efficiency of an advisory cooperative driving system, Advisory Acceleration Control is examined and compared to the efficiency of an autonomous cooperative driving system, Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control. The algorithms and implementation thereof are explained. The

  14. The Cardiovascular Autonomic Nervous System and Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    system that continues to sustain and control our vital organ systems. .... vagal tone and increased sympathetic outflow to the sinus node due to the fall in blood pressure) ... intraoperative autonomic balance of a particular patient population.

  15. Adaptive Sampling in Autonomous Marine Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eickstedt, Donald P

    2006-01-01

    ... oceanographic network scenario. This architecture has three major components, an intelligent, logical sensor that provides high-level environmental state information to a behavior-based autonomous vehicle control system, a new...

  16. Future Autonomous and Automated Systems Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trust is the greatest obstacle to implementing greater autonomy and automation (A&A) in the human spaceflight program. The Future Autonomous and Automated...

  17. Autonomous Training for Long-Term Spaceflight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop the autonomous capability to intelligently select/generate practice scenarios in order to provide individually targeted crew training when...

  18. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Li-Yan; Xu Lu-Ping; Zhang Hua; Sun Jing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The log–polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. (paper)

  19. Imposing limits on autonomous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P A

    2017-02-01

    Our present era is witnessing the genesis of a sea-change in the way that advanced technologies operate. Amongst this burgeoning wave of untrammelled automation there is now beginning to arise a cadre of ever-more independent, autonomous systems. The degree of interaction between these latter systems with any form of human controller is becoming progressively more diminished and remote; and this perhaps necessarily so. Here, I advocate for human-centred and human favouring constraints to be designed, programmed, promulgated and imposed upon these nascent forms of independent entity. I am not sanguine about the collective response of modern society to this call. Nevertheless, the warning must be voiced and the issue debated, especially among those who most look to mediate between people and technology. Practitioner Summary: Practitioners are witnessing the penetration of progressively more independent technical orthotics into virtually all systems' operations. This work enjoins them to advocate for sentient, rational and mindful human-centred approaches towards such innovations. Practitioners need to place user-centred concerns above either the technical or the financial imperatives which motivate this line of progress.

  20. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  1. Models Supporting Trajectory Planning in Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to drastically improve the safety, efficiency and cost of transportation. Instead of a driver, an autonomous vehicle is controlled by an algorithm, offering improved consistency and the potential to eliminate human error from driving: by far the most common cause of accidents. Data collected from different types of sensors, along with prior information such as maps, are used to build models of the surrounding traffic scene, encoding relevant aspects of t...

  2. Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton; He, Ruijie; Roy, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are already commodities on ground vehicles, air vehicles seeking the same performance face unique challenges. In this paper, we describe the difficulties in achieving fully autonomous helicopter flight, highlighting the differences between ground and helicopter robots that make it ...

  3. Autonomous nutrient detection for water quality monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Damien; Cleary, John; Cogan, Deirdre; Diamond, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    The ever increasing demand for real time environmental monitoring is currently being driven by strong legislative and societal drivers. Low cost autonomous environmental monitoring systems are required to meet this demand as current monitoring solutions are insufficient. This poster presents an autonomous nutrient analyser platform for water quality monitoring. Results from a field trial of the nutrient analyser are reported along with current work to expand the range of water quality targ...

  4. When do the symptoms of autonomic nervous system malfunction appear in patients with Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luka, Silvio R; Svetel, Marina; Pekmezović, Tatjana; Milovanović, Branislav; Kostić, Vladimir S

    2014-04-01

    Dysautonomia appears in almost all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a certain stage of their condition. The aim of our study was to detect the development and type of autonomic disorders, find out the factors affecting their manifestation by analyzing the potential association with demographic variables related to clinical presentation, as well as the symptoms of the disease in a PD patient cohort. The patients with PD treated at the Clinic of Neurology in Belgrade during a 2-year period, divided into 3 groups were studied: 25 de novo patients, 25 patients already treated and had no long-term levodopa therapy-related complications and 22 patients treated with levodopa who manifested levodopa-induced motor complications. Simultaneously, 35 healthy control subjects, matched by age and sex, were also analyzed. Autonomic nervous system malfunction was defined by Ewing diagnostic criteria. The tests, indicators of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, were significantly different in the PD patients as compared with the controls, suggesting the failure of both systems. However, it was shown, in the selected groups of patients, that the malfunction of both systems was present in two treated groups of PD patients, while de novo group manifested only sympathetic dysfunction. For this reason, the complete autonomic neuropathy was diagnosed only in the treated PD patients, while de novo patients were defined as those with the isolated sympathetic dysfunction. The patients with the complete autonomic neuropathy differed from the subjects without such neuropathy in higher cumulative and motor unified Parkinson's disease rating score (UPDRS) (p nervous system disturbances among PD patients from the near onset of disease, with a predominant sympathetic nervous system involvement. The patients who developed complete autonomic neuropathy (both sympathetic and parasympathetic) were individuals with considerable level of functional failure, more severe clinical

  5. When the heart kills the liver: acute liver failure in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saner FH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congestive heart failure as a cause of acute liver failure is rarely documented with only a few cases. Although the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there is rising evidence, that low cardiac output with consecutive reduction in hepatic blood flow is a main causing factor, rather than hypotension. In the setting of acute liver failure due to congestive heart failure, clinical signs of the latter can be absent, which requires an appropriate diagnostic approach. As a reference center for acute liver failure and liver transplantation we recorded from May 2003 to December 2007 202 admissions with the primary diagnoses acute liver failure. 13/202 was due to congestive heart failure, which was associated with a mortality rate of 54%. Leading cause of death was the underlying heart failure. Asparagine transaminase (AST, bilirubin, and international normalized ratio (INR did not differ significantly in surviving and deceased patients at admission. Despite both groups had signs of cardiogenic shock, the cardiac index (CI was significantly higher in the survival group on admission as compared with non-survivors (2.1 L/min/m2 vs. 1.6 L/min/m2, p = 0.04. Central venous - and pulmonary wedge pressure did not differ significantly. Remarkable improvement of liver function was recorded in the group, who recovered from cardiogenic shock. In conclusion, patients with acute liver failure require an appropriate diagnostic approach. Congestive heart failure should always be considered as a possible cause of acute liver failure.

  6. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  7. The Human Element and Autonomous Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauli Ahvenjärvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomous ship technology has become a “hot” topic in the discussion about more efficient, environmentally friendly and safer sea transportation solutions. The time is becoming mature for the introduction of commercially sensible solutions for unmanned and fully autonomous cargo and passenger ships. Safety will be the most interesting and important aspect in this development. The utilization of the autonomous ship technology will have many effects on the safety, both positive and negative. It has been announced that the goal is to make the safety of an unmanned ship better that the safety of a manned ship. However, it must be understood that the human element will still be present when fully unmanned ships are being used. The shore-based control of a ship contains new safety aspects and an interesting question will be the interaction of manned and unmanned ships in the same traffic area. The autonomous ship technology should therefore be taken into account on the training of seafarers. Also it should not be forgotten that every single control algorithm and rule of the internal decision making logic of the autonomously navigating ship has been designed and coded by a human software engineer. Thus the human element is present also in this point of the lifetime navigation system of the autonomous ship.

  8. Autonomous power networks based power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokic, A.; Van den Bosch, P.P.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presented the concept of autonomous networks to cope with this increased complexity in power systems while enhancing market-based operation. The operation of future power systems will be more challenging and demanding than present systems because of increased uncertainties, less inertia in the system, replacement of centralized coordinating activities by decentralized parties and the reliance on dynamic markets for both power balancing and system reliability. An autonomous network includes the aggregation of networked producers and consumers in a relatively small area with respect to the overall system. The operation of an autonomous network is coordinated and controlled with one central unit acting as an interface between internal producers/consumers and the rest of the power system. In this study, the power balance problem and system reliability through provision of ancillary services was formulated as an optimization problem for the overall autonomous networks based power system. This paper described the simulation of an optimal autonomous network dispatching in day ahead markets, based on predicted spot prices for real power, and two ancillary services. It was concluded that large changes occur in a power systems structure and operation, most of them adding to the uncertainty and complexity of the system. The introduced concept of an autonomous power network-based power system was shown to be a realistic and consistent approach to formulate and operate a market-based dispatch of both power and ancillary services. 9 refs., 4 figs

  9. Oxidative stress in primary glomerular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markan, Suchita; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Sud, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure.......To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure....

  10. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  11. Autonomous renewable energy conversion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtchev, V. [Technical University of Varna (Bulgaria). Dept. of Electronics; Bossche, A. van den; Ghijselen, J.; Melkebeek, J. [University of Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Electrical Power Engineering

    2000-02-01

    This paper briefly reviews the need for renewable power generation and describes a medium-power Autonomous Renewable Energy Conversion System (ARECS), integrating conversion of wind and solar energy sources. The objectives of the paper are to extract maximum power from the proposed wind energy conversion scheme and to transfer this power and the power derived by the photovoltaic system in a high efficiency way to a local isolated load. The wind energy conversion operates at variable shaft speed yielding an improved annual energy production over constant speed systems. An induction generator (IG) has been used because of its reduced cost, robustness, absence of separate DC source for excitation, easier dismounting and maintenance. The maximum energy transfer of the wind energy is assured by a simple and reliable control strategy adjusting the stator frequency of the IG so that the power drawn is equal to the peak power production of the wind turbine at any wind speed. The presented control strategy also provides an optimal efficiency operation of the IG by applying a quadratic dependence between the IG terminal voltage and frequency V {approx} f{sup 2}. For improving the total system efficiency, high efficiency converters have been designed and implemented. The modular principle of the proposed DC/DC conversion provides the possibility for modifying the system structure depending on different conditions. The configuration of the presented ARECS and the implementation of the proposed control algorithm for optimal power transfer are fully discussed. The stability and dynamic performance as well as the different operation modes of the proposed control and the operation of the converters are illustrated and verified on an experimental prototype. (author)

  12. In Support of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Allison

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, I propose a concerted effort to begin devising a theory and pedagogy of failure. I review the discourse of failure in Western culture as well as in composition pedagogy, ultimately suggesting that failure is not simply a judgement or indication of rank but is a relational, affect-bearing concept with tremendous relevance to…

  13. Autonomous sensors 2010. Microsensors without external power supply and with remote signal processing. Proceedings; Energieautarke Sensorik 2010. Mikrosensorik mit autarker Energieversorgung und drahtloser Signaluebertragung. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Within the meeting 'Energy autonomous sensor technology 2010' at 26th to 27th October, 2010 in Hamburg (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were held: (1) Application of thermoelectrics in energy autonomous sensors (K. Bartholoma); (2) Optimisation of micro fuel cells for power generation of energy autonomous sensors (M. Weiland); (3) Thin, flexible primary and secondary batteries produced by the screen printing process (M. Wendler); (4) Energy transformation in the surface area by means of piezoelectric PVDF converter modules (E. Bischur); (5) Energy sources of the human body (P. Husar); (6) Binary Zero Power Sensor - An alternative solution for energy autonomous sensor systems (T. Frank); (7) Energy autonomous Tilger sensor modules (T. Bein); (8) Energy autonomous pressure sensor for automobiles by vibration (M. Kurth); (9) Passive microwaves RFID with integrated and external sensor technology (N. Gay); (10) Energy autonomous Microsystems as an enabling technology (J. Rittner); (11) Energy supply of microelectronic sensor modules via radio communication (G. v. Boegle); (12) System design of a MST based piezoelectric power supply module for energy autonomous applications (A. Frey); (13) Miniaturized energy autonomous components with reliable wireless communication for the automation (MIKOA) (H. Haase); (14) Mobile tagging in logistics, automation and sensor technology (R. Assfalg); (15) Energy autonomous sensor systems for the condition-oriented maintenance and logistics (R. Thomasius); (16) Energy autonomous systems for aeronautic applications (M. Kluge); (17) Energy autonomous sensor technology in automobiles (I. Kuehne); (18) The wireless Retina implantate in clinical test (A. Harscher); (19) Sensoric protective clothing for the forestry work with chainsaws (M. Rupp); (20) A systematic selection of concepts for energy transformation for the use in machine tools (B. Denkena); (21) Monitoring of risk patients by means of a portable

  14. Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy: A Theoretical Framework for Muscle Reflex Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Alan Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders whose most prominent clinical feature is progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. In several forms of the disease, the function of cardiac muscle is likewise affected. The primary defect in this group of diseases is caused by mutations in myocyte proteins important to cellular structure and/or performance. That being stated, a growing body of evidence suggests that the development of autonomic dysfunction may secondarily contribute to the generation of skeletal and cardio-myopathy in muscular dystrophy. Indeed, abnormalities in the regulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity have been reported in a number of muscular dystrophy variants. However, the mechanisms mediating this autonomic dysfunction remain relatively unknown. An autonomic reflex originating in skeletal muscle, the exercise pressor reflex, is known to contribute significantly to the control of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity when stimulated. Given the skeletal myopathy that develops with muscular dystrophy, it is logical to suggest that the function of this reflex might also be abnormal with the pathogenesis of disease. As such, it may contribute to or exacerbate the autonomic dysfunction that manifests. This possibility along with a basic description of exercise pressor reflex function in health and disease are reviewed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that possibly underlie autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy may not only facilitate further research but could also lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  15. Promoting autonomous learning in English through the implementation of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL in science and maths subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriani Putu Fika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous learning is a concept in which the learner has the ability to take charge of their own learning. It becomes a notable aspect that should be perceived by students. The aim of this research is for finding out the strategies used by grade two teachers in Bali Kiddy Primary School to promote autonomous learning in English through the implementation of Content and Language Integrated Learning in science and maths subjects. This study was designed in the form of descriptive qualitative study. The data were collected through observation, interview, and document study. The result of the study shows that there are some strategies of promoting autonomous learning in English through the implementation of CLIL in Science and Maths subjects. Those strategies are table of content training, questioning & presenting, journal writing, choosing activities, and using online activity. Those strategies can be adopted or even adapted as the way to promote autonomous learning in English subject.

  16. An Autonomous Self-Aware and Adaptive Fault Tolerant Routing Technique for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Sani; Lee, Jeong-A

    2015-08-18

    We propose an autonomous self-aware and adaptive fault-tolerant routing technique (ASAART) for wireless sensor networks. We address the limitations of self-healing routing (SHR) and self-selective routing (SSR) techniques for routing sensor data. We also examine the integration of autonomic self-aware and adaptive fault detection and resiliency techniques for route formation and route repair to provide resilience to errors and failures. We achieved this by using a combined continuous and slotted prioritized transmission back-off delay to obtain local and global network state information, as well as multiple random functions for attaining faster routing convergence and reliable route repair despite transient and permanent node failure rates and efficient adaptation to instantaneous network topology changes. The results of simulations based on a comparison of the ASAART with the SHR and SSR protocols for five different simulated scenarios in the presence of transient and permanent node failure rates exhibit a greater resiliency to errors and failure and better routing performance in terms of the number of successfully delivered network packets, end-to-end delay, delivered MAC layer packets, packet error rate, as well as efficient energy conservation in a highly congested, faulty, and scalable sensor network.

  17. An Autonomous Self-Aware and Adaptive Fault Tolerant Routing Technique for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Sani; Lee, Jeong-A

    2015-01-01

    We propose an autonomous self-aware and adaptive fault-tolerant routing technique (ASAART) for wireless sensor networks. We address the limitations of self-healing routing (SHR) and self-selective routing (SSR) techniques for routing sensor data. We also examine the integration of autonomic self-aware and adaptive fault detection and resiliency techniques for route formation and route repair to provide resilience to errors and failures. We achieved this by using a combined continuous and slotted prioritized transmission back-off delay to obtain local and global network state information, as well as multiple random functions for attaining faster routing convergence and reliable route repair despite transient and permanent node failure rates and efficient adaptation to instantaneous network topology changes. The results of simulations based on a comparison of the ASAART with the SHR and SSR protocols for five different simulated scenarios in the presence of transient and permanent node failure rates exhibit a greater resiliency to errors and failure and better routing performance in terms of the number of successfully delivered network packets, end-to-end delay, delivered MAC layer packets, packet error rate, as well as efficient energy conservation in a highly congested, faulty, and scalable sensor network. PMID:26295236

  18. Hypertrophy of Neurons Within Cardiac Ganglia in Human, Canine, and Rat Heart Failure: The Potential Role of Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S.; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S.; Nee, Lisa M.; Wurster, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hyper...

  19. The failure of earthquake failure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  20. TPM and autonomous maintenance: case study in a metal mechanic company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Carvalho Biehl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to describe a case of autonomous maintenance implementation in a pilot area of a metal mechanical industry company. The TPM – Total Productive Maintenance is a managerial technology that can help companies to reduce failures and breakages of machines. One of the most important issues of TPM is autonomous maintenance. The method of research was the case study. A program of twelve points was structured and adopted as stand-alone maintenance deployment guide. The program began in a pilot area, including three machining centers. The main results of the pilot program were: increasing by more than 700% the Mean Time between Failure, reducing by more than 40% in the Mean Time to Repair, as well as the consequent increase of more than five percentage points on the availability of the three machines and almost 60% reduction in the cost of maintenance materials. The main conclusion was that the TPM, and in particular the autonomous maintenance, can increase the efficiency of maintenance as strategic factor, which enhances the competitiveness of manufacturing in industrial companies.

  1. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  2. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V.; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J.

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems. PMID:27997566

  3. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak V Dixit

    Full Text Available Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  4. How Academic Psychiatry Can Better Prepare Students for Their Future Patients: Part I--The Failure to Recognize Depression and Risk for Suicide in Primary Care; Problem Identification, Responsibility, and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, C. Raymond

    2008-01-01

    The author, after a review of the relevant literature, found that depression and the risk for suicide remain unacceptably underrecognized in primary care (PC). The negative consequences are substantial for patients and their physicians. Suicide prevention in PC begins with the recognition of depression because suicide occurs largely during…

  5. Cardiorespiratory and autonomic interactions during snoring related resistive breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateika, J H; Mitru, G

    2001-03-15

    We hypothesized that blood pressure (BP) is less during snoring as compared to periods of non-snoring in non-apneic individuals. Furthermore, we hypothesized that this reduction may be accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in sympathetic (SNSA) and parasympathetic (PNSA) nervous system activity and an increase in heart rate (HR). N/A. N/A. N/A. The variables mentioned above in addition to breathing frequency were measured in 9 subjects during NREM sleep. In addition, the lowest systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) during inspiration and the highest SBP and DBP during expiration was determined breath-by-breath from segments selected from each NREM cycle. Heart rate variability was used as a marker of autonomic nervous system activity. Our results showed that BP during snoring decreased compared to non-snoring and the breath-by-breath BP analysis suggested that this difference may have been mediated by changes in intrathoracic pressure. In conjunction with the decrease in BP, SNSA decreased and HR increased however PNSA remained constant. Thus, a decrease in PNSA was likely not the primary mechanism responsible for the HR response. We conclude that BP responses and SNSA during snoring are similar to that reported previously in non-snoring individuals. However, the causal mechanisms maybe different and manifested in other measures such as HR. Thus, nocturnal cardiovascular and autonomic function maybe uniquely different in non-apneic snoring individuals.

  6. Cumulative stress and autonomic dysregulation in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Rachel; Tuit, Keri; Hong, Kwang-Ik; Donovan, Theresa; Lee, Forrester; Sinha, Rajita

    2016-05-01

    Whether cumulative stress, including both chronic stress and adverse life events, is associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV), a non-invasive measure of autonomic status which predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes, is unknown. Healthy community dwelling volunteers (N = 157, mean age 29 years) participated in the Cumulative Stress/Adversity Interview (CAI), a 140-item event interview measuring cumulative adversity including major life events, life trauma, recent life events and chronic stressors, and underwent 24-h ambulatory ECG monitoring. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain and standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN) calculated. Initial simple regression analyses revealed that total cumulative stress score, chronic stressors and cumulative adverse life events (CALE) were all inversely associated with ultra low-frequency (ULF), very low-frequency (VLF) and low-frequency (LF) power and SDNN (all p accounting for additional appreciable variance. For VLF and LF, both total cumulative stress and chronic stress significantly contributed to the variance alone but were not longer significant after adjusting for race and health behaviors. In summary, total cumulative stress, and its components of adverse life events and chronic stress were associated with decreased cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV. Findings suggest one potential mechanism by which stress may exert adverse effects on mortality in healthy individuals. Primary preventive strategies including stress management may prove beneficial.

  7. Autonomous calibration of single spin qubit operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Florian; Unden, Thomas; Zoller, Jonathan; Said, Ressa S.; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-12-01

    Fully autonomous precise control of qubits is crucial for quantum information processing, quantum communication, and quantum sensing applications. It requires minimal human intervention on the ability to model, to predict, and to anticipate the quantum dynamics, as well as to precisely control and calibrate single qubit operations. Here, we demonstrate single qubit autonomous calibrations via closed-loop optimisations of electron spin quantum operations in diamond. The operations are examined by quantum state and process tomographic measurements at room temperature, and their performances against systematic errors are iteratively rectified by an optimal pulse engineering algorithm. We achieve an autonomous calibrated fidelity up to 1.00 on a time scale of minutes for a spin population inversion and up to 0.98 on a time scale of hours for a single qubit π/2 -rotation within the experimental error of 2%. These results manifest a full potential for versatile quantum technologies.

  8. A Collaborative Knowledge Plane for Autonomic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Maïssa; Krief, Francine

    Autonomic networking aims to give network components self-managing capabilities. Several autonomic architectures have been proposed. Each of these architectures includes sort of a knowledge plane which is very important to mimic an autonomic behavior. Knowledge plane has a central role for self-functions by providing suitable knowledge to equipment and needs to learn new strategies for more accuracy.However, defining knowledge plane's architecture is still a challenge for researchers. Specially, defining the way cognitive supports interact each other in knowledge plane and implementing them. Decision making process depends on these interactions between reasoning and learning parts of knowledge plane. In this paper we propose a knowledge plane's architecture based on machine learning (inductive logic programming) paradigm and situated view to deal with distributed environment. This architecture is focused on two self-functions that include all other self-functions: self-adaptation and self-organization. Study cases are given and implemented.

  9. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  10. An Expert System for Autonomous Spacecraft Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Rob; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Rabideau, Gregg

    2005-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE), part of the New Millennium Space Technology 6 Project, is flying onboard the Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1) mission. The ASE software enables EO-1 to autonomously detect and respond to science events such as: volcanic activity, flooding, and water freeze/thaw. ASE uses classification algorithms to analyze imagery onboard to detect chang-e and science events. Detection of these events is then used to trigger follow-up imagery. Onboard mission planning software then develops a response plan that accounts for target visibility and operations constraints. This plan is then executed using a task execution system that can deal with run-time anomalies. In this paper we describe the autonomy flight software and how it enables a new paradigm of autonomous science and mission operations. We will also describe the current experiment status and future plans.

  11. Elements of Autonomous Self-Reconfigurable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David Johan

    In this thesis, we study several central elements of autonomous self-reconfigurable modular robots. Unlike conventional robots such robots are: i) Modular, since robots are assembled from numerous robotic modules. ii) Reconfigurable, since the modules can be combined in a variety of ways. iii) Self......-reconfigurable, since the modules themselves are able to change how they are combined. iv) Autonomous, since robots control themselves without human guidance. Such robots are attractive to study since they in theory have several desirable characteristics, such as versatility, reliability and cheapness. In practice...... however, it is challenging to realize such characteristics since state-of-the-art systems and solutions suffer from several inherent technical and theoretical problems and limitations. In this thesis, we address these challenges by exploring four central elements of autonomous self-reconfigurable modular...

  12. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Mahboob; Das, Pinaki; Ghosh, Parasar; Zaman, Md Salim Uz; Boro, Madhusmita; Sadhu, Manika; Mazumdar, Ardhendu

    2015-01-01

    Objective is to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function in SLE by simple non-invasive tests. A case control study was carried out involving 18-50 yrs old previously diagnosed SLE patients and same number of age and sex-matched controls. Parasympathetic function was assessed by heart rate (HR) response to Valsalva maneuver, deep breathing and standing. Sympathetic function was evaluated by blood pressure response to standing and sustained hand-grip test (HGT). There were 50 female SLE patients. They had significantly higher minimum resting HR and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). HR variation with deep breathing, expiratory inspiratory ratio, 30:15 ratio and DBP change in response to HGT were significantly lower inpatients compared to controls. Thirty patients (60%) had at least one abnormal or two borderline test results indicating autonomic impairment of which 27 had parasympathetic dysfunction and 7 had sympathetic dysfunction. Autonomic dysfunction is common in SLE with higher prevalence of parasympathetic impairment.

  13. Development of an autonomous power system testbed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.R.; Adams, T.; Liffring, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A power system testbed has been assembled to advance the development of large autonomous electrical power systems required for the space station, spacecraft, and aircraft. The power system for this effort was designed to simulate single- or dual-bus autonomous power systems, or autonomous systems that reconfigure from a single bus to a dual bus following a severe fault. The approach taken was to provide a flexible power system design with two computer systems for control and management. One computer operates as the control system and performs basic control functions, data and command processing, charge control, and provides status to the second computer. The second computer contains expert system software for mission planning, load management, fault identification and recovery, and sends load and configuration commands to the control system

  14. Autonomous driving technical, legal and social aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Gerdes, J; Lenz, Barbara; Winner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    This book takes a look at fully automated, autonomous vehicles and discusses many open questions: How can autonomous vehicles be integrated into the current transportation system with diverse users and human drivers? Where do automated vehicles fall under current legal frameworks? What risks are associated with automation and how will society respond to these risks? How will the marketplace react to automated vehicles and what changes may be necessary for companies? Experts from Germany and the United States define key societal, engineering, and mobility issues related to the automation of vehicles. They discuss the decisions programmers of automated vehicles must make to enable vehicles to perceive their environment, interact with other road users, and choose actions that may have ethical consequences. The authors further identify expectations and concerns that will form the basis for individual and societal acceptance of autonomous driving. While the safety benefits of such vehicles are tremendous, the auth...

  15. Control of autonomous robot using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Adam; Volna, Eva

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the article is to design a method of control of an autonomous robot using artificial neural networks. The introductory part describes control issues from the perspective of autonomous robot navigation and the current mobile robots controlled by neural networks. The core of the article is the design of the controlling neural network, and generation and filtration of the training set using ART1 (Adaptive Resonance Theory). The outcome of the practical part is an assembled Lego Mindstorms EV3 robot solving the problem of avoiding obstacles in space. To verify models of an autonomous robot behavior, a set of experiments was created as well as evaluation criteria. The speed of each motor was adjusted by the controlling neural network with respect to the situation in which the robot was found.

  16. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  17. Stochastic Quantitative Reasoning for Autonomous Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-09

    data streams generated from sen- sors can be erroneous and could lead to serious problems. For example, pitot tubes icing which occurred to Air France...are simulated: pitot tube failure, GPS failure, and simultaneous pitot tube and GPS failures. The error detection accuracy is approximately 93% and...the response time to correct data is at most 5 seconds. For the AF447 flight, 162 seconds of available flight data including the pitot tubes failure is

  18. Are Turkish University Students Autonomous or Not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Kırtık

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tried to determine Turkish learners’ attitudes, and the Turkish education system’s approach towards learner autonomy with regard to three main points: 1 whether Turkish university students are aware of learner autonomy or not 2 whether Turkish university students have the characteristics of autonomous learners (whether they are autonomous learners or not, and 3 if the Turkish education system is suitable for fostering learner autonomy or not from the viewpoint of the participants. Participants were 50 second grade learners in the English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe University (N=10, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University (N=10, and Uludag University (N=30 who had already taken courses about learner autonomy.  The data were collected by means of a questionnaire which had two Likert-scale sections and an open-ended questions section. The first Likert-scale section contained 15 characteristics of autonomous learners each of which was rated by the participants in a scale from strongly disagree to agree, from 1 to 5. In the second Likert-scale section, the participants were asked to rate the Turkish education system’s five basic elements such as school curriculums, course materials, approaches used by the teachers in classrooms, learning activities, and classroom settings. Additionally, learners’ opinions about their awareness and understanding of learner autonomy were gathered by five open ended questions. The results proposed that the participants were aware of learner autonomy, and had the characteristics of autonomous learners. On the other hand, results showed that the Turkish education system was not suitable for autonomous learners and did not foster learner autonomy. The findings suggested that the Turkish education system should be designed again in such a way to support the autonomous learners and to foster learner autonomy in all sections of the education.

  19. Cheap electricity with autonomous solar cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouwens, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the costs of an autonomous solar cell system and a centralized electricity supply system. In both cases investment costs are the main issue. It is shown that for households in densely populated sunny areas, the use of autonomous solar cell systems is - even with today's market prices - only as expensive or even cheaper than a grid connection, as long as efficient electric appliances are used. The modular nature of solar cell systems makes it possible to start with any number of appliances, depending on the amount of money available to be spent. (author)

  20. Autonomous scheduling technology for Earth orbital missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a dynamic autonomous system (DYASS) of resources for the mission support of near-Earth NASA spacecraft is discussed and the current NASA space data system is described from a functional perspective. The future (late 80's and early 90's) NASA space data system is discussed. The DYASS concept, the autonomous process control, and the NASA space data system are introduced. Scheduling and related disciplines are surveyed. DYASS as a scheduling problem is also discussed. Artificial intelligence and knowledge representation is considered as well as the NUDGE system and the I-Space system.

  1. Multiculturalismo, interculturalismo y autonomía

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Cruz Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Este artículo examina dos enfoques teóri- cos sobre la autonomía: el multiculturalis- mo liberal y el interculturalismo latinoa- mericano. El argumento principal es que el enfoque intercultural es idóneo para fun- damentar la autonomía que el multicultu- ralismo porque tiene un mayor alcance metodológico y sus horizontes normativos son más amplios. En primer lugar, se exa- minan las críticas del interculturalismo al multiculturalismo liberal de Kymlicka. Se- guidamente, se estudian sus concep...

  2. Autonomous control of distributed storages in microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2011-01-01

    Operation of distributed generators in microgrids has widely been discussed, but would not be fully autonomous, if distributed storages are not considered. Storages in general are important, since they provide energy buffering to load changes, energy leveling to source variations and ride......-through enhancement to the overall microgrids. Recognizing their importance, this paper presents a scheme for sharing power among multiple distributed storages, in coordination with the distributed sources and loads. The scheme prompts the storages to autonomously sense for system conditions, requesting for maximum...

  3. Autonomous execution of the Precision Immobilization Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascareñas, David D. L.; Stull, Christopher J.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2017-03-01

    Over the course of the last decade great advances have been made in autonomously driving cars. The technology has advanced to the point that driverless car technology is currently being tested on publicly accessed roadways. The introduction of these technologies onto publicly accessed roadways not only raises questions of safety, but also security. Autonomously driving cars are inherently cyber-physical systems and as such will have novel security vulnerabilities that couple both the cyber aspects of the vehicle including the on-board computing and any network data it makes use of, with the physical nature of the vehicle including its sensors, actuators, and the vehicle chassis. Widespread implementation of driverless car technology will require that both the cyber, as well as physical security concerns surrounding these vehicles are addressed. In this work, we specifically developed a control policy to autonomously execute the Precision Immobilization Technique, a.k.a. the PIT maneuver. The PIT maneuver was originally developed by law enforcement to end high-speed vehicular pursuits in a quasi-safe manner. However, there is still a risk of damage/roll-over to both the vehicle executing the PIT maneuver as well as to the vehicle subject to the PIT maneuver. In law enforcement applications, it would be preferable to execute the PIT maneuver using an autonomous vehicle, thus removing the danger to law-enforcement officers. Furthermore, it is entirely possible that unscrupulous individuals could inject code into an autonomously-driving car to use the PIT maneuver to immobilize other vehicles while maintaining anonymity. For these reasons it is useful to know how the PIT maneuver can be implemented on an autonomous car. In this work a simple control policy based on velocity pursuit was developed to autonomously execute the PIT maneuver using only a vision and range measurements that are both commonly collected by contemporary driverless cars. The ability of this

  4. Autonomous system for launch vehicle range safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Bob; Haley, Sam

    2001-02-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is a launch vehicle subsystem whose ultimate goal is an autonomous capability to assure range safety (people and valuable resources), flight personnel safety, flight assets safety (recovery of valuable vehicles and cargo), and global coverage with a dramatic simplification of range infrastructure. The AFSS is capable of determining current vehicle position and predicting the impact point with respect to flight restriction zones. Additionally, it is able to discern whether or not the launch vehicle is an immediate threat to public safety, and initiate the appropriate range safety response. These features provide for a dramatic cost reduction in range operations and improved reliability of mission success. .

  5. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  6. Emerging Technologies for Autonomous Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Warschauer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a lengthier review completed for the US National Institute for Literacy, this paper examines emerging technologies that are applicable to self-access and autonomous learning in the areas of listening and speaking, collaborative writing, reading and language structure, and online interaction. Digital media reviewed include podcasts, blogs, wikis, online writing sites, text-scaffolding software, concordancers, multiuser virtual environments, multiplayer games, and chatbots. For each of these technologies, we summarize recent research and discuss possible uses for autonomous language learning.

  7. Automatic stimulation of experiments and learning based on prediction failure recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juarez Cordova, A.G.; Kahl, B.; Henne, T.; Prassler, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the task of automatically and autonomously initiating experimentation and learning based on the recognition of prediction failure. We present a mechanism that utilizes conceptual knowledge to predict the outcome of robot actions, observes their execution and indicates when

  8. Effect of mibefradil on heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J; de Kam, PJ; Haaksma, J; Crijns, HJGM; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2000-01-01

    Background: Mibefradil was recently withdrawn from the market because of an unfavorable clinical profile in patients with chronic heart failure. Although drug interactions appear to play a role, other mechanisms such as proarrhythmia and autonomic deterioration could also be relevant. Chronic heart

  9. Other primary headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Bahra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ′Other Primary Headaches′ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ′alarm clock headache′, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review.

  10. A Japanese case of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) and a review of AAG cases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Michiyuki; Ishii, Yuko

    2009-03-12

    A 29-year-old woman presented with acute, pure autonomic (both sympathetic and parasympathetic) failure and positive antibody to ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; the diagnosis was autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). She had typical symptoms of AAG, although the patient also had coughing episodes and psychiatric symptoms, which are not typical of AAG in Western countries but are common in AAG cases in Japan. In a review of the Japanese literature, 29 cases of AAG had been reported. AAG patients in Japan were younger and more male predominant than in Western countries. Of the patients in these 29 cases, 10 (34.5%) had coughing episodes and 12 (41.4%) had psychiatric symptoms.

  11. Research on key technology of prognostic and health management for autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are non-cable and autonomous motional underwater robotics. With a wide range of activities, it can reach thousands of kilometers. Because it has the advantages of wide range, good maneuverability, safety and intellectualization, it becomes an important tool for various underwater tasks. How to improve diagnosis accuracy of the AUVs electrical system faults, and how to repair AUVs by the information are the focus of navy in the world. In turn, ensuring safe and reliable operation of the system has very important significance to improve AUVs sailing performance. To solve these problems, in the paper the prognostic and health management(PHM) technology is researched and used to AUV, and the overall framework and key technology are proposed, such as data acquisition, feature extraction, fault diagnosis, failure prediction and so on.

  12. A Conceptual Framework for Design of Embedded Systems and Data Communication for Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard

    2005-01-01

    systems in a set of time rings each demanding actions equal in time magnitude. The safety analysis can in an equal way structure the system in safety rings, each demanding fault and failure handling at the same level. The concept deals with the widely differing time demands at different control levels on......This paper describes a conceptual framework for the development of a hierarchal control architecture for an autonomous vehicle. The concept is based on time/frequency and safety analysis on board the vehicle. The time/frequency analysis is used to structure the guidance, navigation and control......-board the vehicle, the integration of sensors and actuators using different communication protocols, integration of wireless communication to a base and payload data handling as well as control, reliability and safety issues. The system is implemented on an autonomous platform mapping spatial density of weed...

  13. Olfactory bulb dysgenesis, mirror neuron system dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation as the neural basis for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brang, David; Ramachandran, V S

    2010-05-01

    Autism is a disorder characterized by social withdrawal, impoverished language and empathy, and a profound inability to adopt another's viewpoint - a failure to construct a "theory of mind" for interpreting another person's thoughts and intentions. We previously showed that these symptoms might be explained, in part, by a paucity of mirror neurons. Prompted by an MRI report of an individual with autism, we now suggest that there may be, in addition, a congenital aplasia/dysplasia of the olfactory bulbs with consequent reduction of vasopressin and oxytocin receptor binding. There may also be sub-clinical temporal lobe epilepsy affecting the recently discovered third visual system that is rich in "empathy" related mirror neurons (MNS) and projects (via the TOP junction - just below the inferior parietal lobule) to limbic structures that regulate autonomic outflow. This causes deranged autonomic feedback, resulting in additional deficiencies in MNS with loss of emotional empathy and introspection.

  14. Automated multiple failure FMEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.J.; Taylor, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is typically performed by a team of engineers working together. In general, they will only consider single point failures in a system. Consideration of all possible combinations of failures is impractical for all but the simplest example systems. Even if the task of producing the FMEA report for the full multiple failure scenario were automated, it would still be impractical for the engineers to read, understand and act on all of the results. This paper shows how approximate failure rates for components can be used to select the most likely combinations of failures for automated investigation using simulation. The important information can be automatically identified from the resulting report, making it practical for engineers to study and act on the results. The strategy described in the paper has been applied to a range of electrical subsystems, and the results have confirmed that the strategy described here works well for realistically complex systems

  15. Heart Failure in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Biykem; Khalaf, Shaden

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in women, and they tend to develop it at an older age compared to men. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is more common in women than in men and accounts for at least half the cases of heart failure in women. When comparing men and women who have heart failure and a low left ventricular ejection fraction, the women are more symptomatic and have a similarly poor outcome. Overall recommendations for guideline-directed medical therapies show no differences in treatment approaches between men and women. Overall, women are generally underrepresented in clinical trials for heart failure. Further studies are needed to shed light into different mechanisms, causes, and targeted therapies of heart failure in women. PMID:29744014

  16. Definition of containment failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulskis, P.

    1982-01-01

    Core meltdown accidents of the types considered in probabilistic risk assessments (PRA's) have been predicted to lead to pressures that will challenge the integrity of containment structures. Review of a number of PRA's indicates considerable variation in the predicted probability of containment failure as a function of pressure. Since the results of PRA's are sensitive to the prediction of the occurrence and the timing of containment failure, better understanding of realistic containment capabilities and a more consistent approach to the definition of containment failure pressures are required. Additionally, since the size and location of the failure can also significantly influence the prediction of reactor accident risk, further understanding of likely failure modes is required. The thresholds and modes of containment failure may not be independent

  17. A Priori User Acceptance and the Perceived Driving Pleasure in Semi-autonomous and Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas

    The aim of this minor pilot study is, from a sociological user perspective, to explore a priori user acceptance and the perceived driving pleasure in semi- autonomous and autonomous vehicles. The methods used were 13 in-depth interviews while having participants watch video examples within four...... different scenarios. After each scenario, two different numerical rating scales were used. There was a tendency toward positive attitudes regarding semi- autonomous driving systems, especially the use of a parking assistant and while driving in city traffic congestion. However, there were also major...

  18. Biologically inspired autonomous structural materials with controlled toughening and healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michael E.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2010-04-01

    The field of structural health monitoring (SHM) has made significant contributions in the field of prognosis and damage detection in the past decade. The advantageous use of this technology has not been integrated into operational structures to prevent damage from propagating or to heal injured regions under real time loading conditions. Rather, current systems relay this information to a central processor or human operator, who then determines a course of action such as altering the mission or scheduling repair maintenance. Biological systems exhibit advanced sensory and healing traits that can be applied to the design of material systems. For instance, bone is the major structural component in vertebrates; however, unlike modern structural materials, bone has many properties that make it effective for arresting the propagation of cracks and subsequent healing of the fractured area. The foremost goal for the development of future adaptive structures is to mimic biological systems, similar to bone, such that the material system can detect damage and deploy defensive traits to impede damage from propagating, thus preventing catastrophic failure while in operation. After sensing and stalling the propagation of damage, the structure must then be repaired autonomously using self healing mechanisms motivated by biological systems. Here a novel autonomous system is developed using shape memory polymers (SMPs), that employs an optical fiber network as both a damage detection sensor and a network to deliver stimulus to the damage site initiating adaptation and healing. In the presence of damage the fiber optic fractures allowing a high power laser diode to deposit a controlled level of thermal energy at the fractured sight locally reducing the modulus and blunting the crack tip, which significantly slows the crack growth rate. By applying a pre-induced strain field and utilizing the shape memory recovery effect, thermal energy can be deployed to close the crack and return

  19. GPM GROUND VALIDATION AUTONOMOUS PARSIVEL UNIT (APU) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Autonomous Parsivel Unit (APU) GCPEx dataset was collected by the Autonomous Parsivel Unit (APU), which is an optical disdrometer that...

  20. Autonomous Vehicle Survey of Bicyclists and Pedestrians in Pittsburgh, 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — In Pittsburgh, Autonomous Vehicle (AV) companies have been testing autonomous vehicles since September 2016. However, the tech is new, and there have been some...

  1. Bidirectional Prospective Associations between Cardiac Autonomic Activity and Inflammatory Markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Mandy X; Lamers, Femke; Neijts, Melanie; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been cross-sectionally associated with inflammatory processes. Longitudinal studies are needed to shed light on the nature of this relationship. We examined cross-sectional and bidirectional prospective associations between cardiac autonomic

  2. Hard-real-time resource management for autonomous spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tickets, a computational mechanism for hard-real-time autonomous resource management. Autonomous spacecraftcontrol can be considered abstractly as a computational process whose outputs are spacecraft commands.

  3. CSIR eNews: Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available autonomous systems Distinguished scientist from India to share knowledge with CSIR An esteemed scientist from India, Dr Jitendra Raol, will spend the next 14 months at the CSIR, specifically in the mobile intelligence autonomous systems (MIAS) emerging...

  4. GPM GROUND VALIDATION AUTONOMOUS PARSIVEL UNIT (APU) NSSTC V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Autonomous Parsivel Unit (APU) NSSTC dataset was collected by the Autonomous Parsivel Unit (APU), which is an optical disdrometer based on...

  5. The concept of leak before failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellissier-Tanon, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to demonstrate the state of leak before failure introduce a new tangible element in the estimation of safety from which it becomes possible to estimate more rationnally the risks associated to crack formation. This paper presents the international positions on the full section break suppression of steam and primary pipes (Federal Republic of Germany, USA, France) [fr

  6. A Secure, Scalable and Elastic Autonomic Computing Systems Paradigm: Supporting Dynamic Adaptation of Self-* Services from an Autonomic Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Jaleel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic computing embeds self-management features in software systems using external feedback control loops, i.e., autonomic managers. In existing models of autonomic computing, adaptive behaviors are defined at the design time, autonomic managers are statically configured, and the running system has a fixed set of self-* capabilities. An autonomic computing design should accommodate autonomic capability growth by allowing the dynamic configuration of self-* services, but this causes security and integrity issues. A secure, scalable and elastic autonomic computing system (SSE-ACS paradigm is proposed to address the runtime inclusion of autonomic managers, ensuring secure communication between autonomic managers and managed resources. Applying the SSE-ACS concept, a layered approach for the dynamic adaptation of self-* services is presented with an online ‘Autonomic_Cloud’ working as the middleware between Autonomic Managers (offering the self-* services and Autonomic Computing System (requiring the self-* services. A stock trading and forecasting system is used for simulation purposes. The security impact of the SSE-ACS paradigm is verified by testing possible attack cases over the autonomic computing system with single and multiple autonomic managers running on the same and different machines. The common vulnerability scoring system (CVSS metric shows a decrease in the vulnerability severity score from high (8.8 for existing ACS to low (3.9 for SSE-ACS. Autonomic managers are introduced into the system at runtime from the Autonomic_Cloud to test the scalability and elasticity. With elastic AMs, the system optimizes the Central Processing Unit (CPU share resulting in an improved execution time for business logic. For computing systems requiring the continuous support of self-management services, the proposed system achieves a significant improvement in security, scalability, elasticity, autonomic efficiency, and issue resolving time

  7. Amenorrhea - primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of periods - primary Images Primary amenorrhea Normal uterine anatomy (cut section) Absence of menstruation (amenorrhea) References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  8. Canine primary hyperparathyroidism and its association with urolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, J.S.; Fernandez, F.R.; O'Leary, T.P.; Johnston, S.D.; Osborne, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism results from autonomous secretion of parathyroid hormone by a single or multiple parathyroid glands. Clinical signs result from various combinations of hypercalcemia, hypercalcemic nephropathy, urolithiasis, or mobilization of calcium and phosphorus from bone. Following parathyroidectomy, the prognosis for dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism is good if the disorder is diagnosed before renal disease is advanced

  9. Valvular Heart Disease in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe MC Rosano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural valvular heart disease may be the cause of heart failure or may worsen the clinical status of patients with heart failure. Heart failure may also develop in patients treated with valve surgery. Patients with heart failure with valvular heart disease are at increased risk of events including sudden cardiac death. Before considering intervention (surgical or percutaneous all patients should receive appropriate medical and device therapy taking into account that vasodilators must be used with caution in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Numerous percutaneous and/or hybrid procedures have been introduced in the past few years and they are changing the management of valvular heart disease. In patients with heart failure and valvular heart disease, either primary or functional, the whole process of decision-making should be staged through a comprehensive evaluation of the risk– benefit ratio of different treatment strategies and should be made by a multidisciplinary ‘heart team’ with a particular expertise in valvular heart disease. The heart team should include heart failure cardiologists, cardiac surgeons/structural valve interventionists, imaging specialists, anaesthetists, geriatricians and intensive care specialists. This article will review recent developments and distill practical guidance in the management of this important heart failure co-morbidity.

  10. College English Students’ Autonomous Learning Motivation and Cultivation Model Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳荣; 李娥

    2015-01-01

    Studying the autonomous learning motivation and excitation model can stimulate intrinsic motivation of foreign language learners,develop students self-management strategy evaluation are very necessary.The purpose of this paper is to give students the skills of listening and speaking for their autonomous learning.Then study the cultivation and motivation of college English students autonomous learning,hoping to make students to learn autonomous learning and stimulate their motivation fully.

  11. Adaptive Control Allocation for Fault Tolerant Overactuated Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Tolerant Overactuated Autonomous Vehicles Casavola, A.; Garone, E. (2007) Adaptive Control Allocation for Fault Tolerant Overactuated Autonomous ...Adaptive Control Allocation for Fault Tolerant Overactuated Autonomous Vehicles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Tolerant Overactuated Autonomous Vehicles 3.2 - 2 RTO-MP-AVT-145 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Control allocation problem (CAP) - Given a virtual input v(t

  12. A polling model with an autonomous server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Roland; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers polling systems with an autonomous server that remain at a queue for an exponential amount of time before moving to a next queue incurring a generally distributed switch-over time. The server remains at a queue until the exponential visit time expires, also when the queue

  13. Autonomic regulation of hepatic glucose production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, Peter H.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Glucose produced by the liver is a major energy source for the brain. Considering its critical dependence on glucose, it seems only natural that the brain is capable of monitoring and controlling glucose homeostasis. In addition to neuroendocrine pathways, the brain uses the autonomic nervous system

  14. Enhancing agent safety through autonomous environment adaptation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available limit their ability to interact with and explore their environments. In this work we address this risk through the incorporation of a caregiver robot, and present a model allowing it to autonomously adapt its environment to minimize danger for other...

  15. An autonomous control framework for advanced reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Wood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery through phased introduction of multiple units on a common site with shared facilities and/or reconfigurable energy conversion systems. Additionally, small modular reactors are suitable for remote deployment to support highly localized microgrids in isolated, underdeveloped regions. The long-term economic viability of these advanced reactor plants depends on significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance costs. To accomplish these goals, intelligent control and diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. A nearly autonomous control system should enable automatic operation of a nuclear power plant while adapting to equipment faults and other upsets. It needs to have many intelligent capabilities, such as diagnosis, simulation, analysis, planning, reconfigurability, self-validation, and decision. These capabilities have been the subject of research for many years, but an autonomous control system for nuclear power generation remains as-yet an unrealized goal. This article describes a functional framework for intelligent, autonomous control that can facilitate the integration of control, diagnostic, and decision-making capabilities to satisfy the operational and performance goals of power plants based on multimodular advanced reactors.

  16. Autonomous biomorphic robots as platforms for sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilden, M.; Hasslacher, B.; Mainieri, R.; Moses, J.

    1996-10-01

    The idea of building autonomous robots that can carry out complex and nonrepetitive tasks is an old one, so far unrealized in any meaningful hardware. Tilden has shown recently that there are simple, processor-free solutions to building autonomous mobile machines that continuously adapt to unknown and hostile environments, are designed primarily to survive, and are extremely resistant to damage. These devices use smart mechanics and simple (low component count) electronic neuron control structures having the functionality of biological organisms from simple invertebrates to sophisticated members of the insect and crab family. These devices are paradigms for the development of autonomous machines that can carry out directed goals. The machine then becomes a robust survivalist platform that can carry sensors or instruments. These autonomous roving machines, now in an early stage of development (several proof-of-concept prototype walkers have been built), can be developed so that they are inexpensive, robust, and versatile carriers for a variety of instrument packages. Applications are immediate and many, in areas as diverse as prosthetics, medicine, space, construction, nanoscience, defense, remote sensing, environmental cleanup, and biotechnology.

  17. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced

  18. An autonomous control framework for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Richard T.; Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Floyd, Dan C.

    2017-01-01

    Several Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery through phased introduction of multiple units on a common site with shared facilities and/or reconfigurable energy conversion systems. Additionally, small modular reactors are suitable for remote deployment to support highly localized microgrids in isolated, underdeveloped regions. The long-term economic viability of these advanced reactor plants depends on significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance costs. To accomplish these goals, intelligent control and diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. A nearly autonomous control system should enable automatic operation of a nuclear power plant while adapting to equipment faults and other upsets. It needs to have many intelligent capabilities, such as diagnosis, simulation, analysis, planning, reconfigurability, self-validation, and decision. These capabilities have been the subject of research for many years, but an autonomous control system for nuclear power generation remains as-yet an unrealized goal. This article describes a functional framework for intelligent, autonomous control that can facilitate the integration of control, diagnostic, and decision-making capabilities to satisfy the operational and performance goals of power plants based on multimodular advanced reactors

  19. An autonomous control framework for advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard T.; Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Floyd, Dan C. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Several Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery through phased introduction of multiple units on a common site with shared facilities and/or reconfigurable energy conversion systems. Additionally, small modular reactors are suitable for remote deployment to support highly localized microgrids in isolated, underdeveloped regions. The long-term economic viability of these advanced reactor plants depends on significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance costs. To accomplish these goals, intelligent control and diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. A nearly autonomous control system should enable automatic operation of a nuclear power plant while adapting to equipment faults and other upsets. It needs to have many intelligent capabilities, such as diagnosis, simulation, analysis, planning, reconfigurability, self-validation, and decision. These capabilities have been the subject of research for many years, but an autonomous control system for nuclear power generation remains as-yet an unrealized goal. This article describes a functional framework for intelligent, autonomous control that can facilitate the integration of control, diagnostic, and decision-making capabilities to satisfy the operational and performance goals of power plants based on multimodular advanced reactors.

  20. Autonomous Robot Navigation In Public Nature Park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2005-01-01

    This extended abstract describes a project to make a robot travel autonomously across a public nature park. The challenge is to detect and follow the right path across junctions and open squares avoiding people and obstacles. The robot is equipped with a laser scanner, a (low accuracy) GPS, wheel...